The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 iSteve BlogTeasers
Retiring to Latin America?
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments

The concept of Americans retiring to Latin America due to the lower cost of living has been around for a long time. When I was seven, I went with my parents to check out the American retirement colony at Lake Chapala in Mexico (where Fred Reed now lives) in 1966. But the idea has never really taken off.

There’s no accurate way to measure the phenomenon, but the Social Security Administration was sending payments to 380,000 retired U.S. workers living abroad in 2014 — up 50 percent from a decade ago.

That has to be under 1% of all American retirees. Presumably a large fraction of people receiving Social Security checks in foreign countries were sojourner workers who went home for retirement.

A new hotspot for American retirees is the old colonial city of Cuenca in Ecuador’s Andes.

The city of Cuenca recently conducted a census that found its municipality alone was home to almost 10,000 foreign retirees, most of them Americans from Texas and Florida. …

In Cuenca, a city of about 350,000 people, they’ve found robust public transportation, an extensive museum network, solid healthcare and markets bursting with fresh fruits and produce. It’s a place where their two-bedroom, two-and-a-half bath apartment costs less than $400 a month. They’ve found that for about $1,500 a month, they can live a solidly upper-class lifestyle, dining out frequently and traveling.

“In the United States, we couldn’t afford to go anywhere,” Susan explained. “We were having to stay home.” …

The city is trying to combat local fears that the retirees are both driving up land prices and bleeding the public healthcare system, she said. And the language barrier has become a source of local irritation. Some restaurants and even neighborhoods seem like English-only spaces.

“Cuencanos are feeling like strangers in their own city,” she said.

The climate is delightful, but that’s because of the extreme elevation: 8,200 feet. Whether to retire to high altitude is a tough decision. You might not mind it at 65, but will you feel the same at 75?

I think Ecuador is in the same time zone as the Eastern U.S. (although, being on the Equator, it doesn’t have daylight savings time). It’s convenient to be in the same time zone as most of your contacts so having a second home at a different latitude but not longitude (e.g., Donald Trump’s main homes are in New York and Florida, while Bill Gates’ summer home is in Redmond, WA and winter home is in Ranch Santa Fe, CA). That’s much more convenient than moving across longitudes (which might be why Hawaii hasn’t ever really taken off as a place for the wealthy to live while still conducting their business).

 
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
    []
  1. Kirt says:

    I know guys who have retired to Brazil. They are socially adventurous experienced world travelers, who are not deterred by the high crime. I’ve heard that Chile and New Zealand are also increasingly popular ex-pat destinations for Americans. I’ve also heard that Phuket, Thailand, is host to significant ex-pat communities of both Americans and Russians. Maybe a good location for a Trump/Putin summit.

    Read More
    • Replies: @fitzGetty
    ... an abode in old Siam surrounded by shouting Russkies ?
    Another sort of hell ...
    , @AndrewR
    Brazil is a very large country and simply cannot be easily generalized. Some parts of Brazil have less crime than the US average, and obviously most of Brazil has less crime than the worst cities in the US.
    , @anonymous
    It's not difficult to live outside crime in Brazil. All these "experienced world travelers" must do to live in big cities, if they have money, is to buy expensive apartments or gated communities in the big cities that risks are really diminished. Since risk is still there, just learn to drive in your armoured car (if you don't have, don't worry) straight from home to work or wherever you go without taking detours and you are okay.
    .
    Or you can just go the countryside or the southern region into the more homogeneous european immigrant towns. It's all about money in all these cases. But then, many if not most of people who immigrate to Brazil in order to retire or live there thinking about their "educated white privileges" end up ashamed of their choice, since they won't be able to escape from being permeated with all the socioecomical problems and even cultural chaos there.
    .
    .
    In relation to the article, this tendency to move to Latin America sounds a real big hypocrisy. All these Baby Boomers or even people from recent generations wanting to retire or make career in South America clearly because everything will be easier, an cheap and easy-going like which they will be well received because they're "moneyed, educated americans" or "europeans". I mean, it doesn't lack good places to live in the US or Europe, where they are well among their equals. It's even bad when nationalists complain about migrants in their countries, but decide to "run away" or retire to these countries if things doesn't end well for them, believing they can hang in any closed group of people in some "peaceful" South American country and better it by themselves, no matter how much untapped potential might have.
    , @Truth

    I’ve also heard that Phuket, Thailand, is host to significant ex-pat communities of both Americans and Russians.
     
    If there weren't too many SWiPpLes there, I'd retire there, Phuk it.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    /isteve/retiring-to-latin-america/#comment-1895485
    More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. Polynikes says:

    Why so many from Florida and Texas? Maybe because they are Latin Americans to begin with. How long until Democrats vote illegal immigrants who worked here their entire lives Social security benefits? We’ll really see some outflows of SS money then.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP

    Why so many from Florida and Texas? Maybe because they are Latin Americans to begin with
     
    The excerpts from the article suggests they are Anglos.

    Parts of those states are so heavily Latin American already that moving to Latin America itself isn't much of a difference culturally.
    , @Kyle McKenna

    How long until Democrats vote illegal immigrants who worked here their entire lives Social security benefits?
     
    The Democrats I know certainly won't be limiting it to illegals who worked here, entire lives or not. What are you, racist?

    Meanwhile, I wonder how many American ex-pats consider the cost of medical care. You could live in Mexico near the border to cut expenses, and visit clinics in the nearby USA for Medicare coverage, but you'd have to love really hot weather, slums, and questionable quality of care (except maybe San Diego).

    , @Nico

    Why so many from Florida and Texas? Maybe because they are Latin Americans to begin with.
     
    I'm from Florida (Miami, in fact) and my mother is from Texas. My anecdotal experience suggests the bulk of the retirees in question are either Anglos or wealthy (and white) Latin Americans - mostly Cubans - who have been in the States for decades and have their lives pretty much set Stateside. The real culprit is 1. the spike in coastal real estate prices and 2. the major setback for a large number of pension funds in 2008-09: snowbirding it in Florida or Texas suddenly became out of the reach of a large number of middle-class boomer retirees, in contrast to the lot of their Greatest/Silent generation forebearers.

    How long until Democrats vote illegal immigrants who worked here their entire lives Social security benefits?

     

    In France medical care requires a copayment for most people, but illegal aliens get 100% coverage from the moment they set foot on French soil. And that is official policy.
  3. Take a look at

    and you will see that Quito and Cuenca, Ecuador, which are on the Pacific coast of South America, are at very nearly the same longitude as Buffalo, NY:
    Buffalo: 42 deg 54 min N, 78 deg 51 min W
    Quito: 0 deg 14 min S, 78 deg 31 min W
    Cuenca: 2 deg 54 min S, 79 deg 01 min W
    That is, Buffalo is farther west than Quito. People tend to forget that South America is not south of North America, but southeast of North America.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It's a really, really long way from Los Angeles to Rio de Janeiro.
    , @dr kill
    All of SA is east of Miami.
    , @Hapalong Cassidy
    "People tend to forget that South America is not south of North America, but southeast of North America."

    Back in the 1500s, the Spanish and the Pope didn't realize that fact either, when they drew that longitude line dividing the world between Spain and Portugal. The original idea was Spain would get all of the New World, while Portugal would have claim to Africa and all the islands of its coast. Imagine the pleasant surprise to the Portuguese (and the shock to the Spanish), when it was discovered that a big chunk of South America extended east of that longitude line.
  4. @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    Take a look at
    https://jungleblogtom.files.wordpress.com/2014/06/north-and-south-america.jpg
    and you will see that Quito and Cuenca, Ecuador, which are on the Pacific coast of South America, are at very nearly the same longitude as Buffalo, NY:
    Buffalo: 42 deg 54 min N, 78 deg 51 min W
    Quito: 0 deg 14 min S, 78 deg 31 min W
    Cuenca: 2 deg 54 min S, 79 deg 01 min W
    That is, Buffalo is farther west than Quito. People tend to forget that South America is not south of North America, but southeast of North America.

    It’s a really, really long way from Los Angeles to Rio de Janeiro.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    So Europe's taking 84 years to win a World Cup in South America can't be blamed on jet lag.

    Note that Europe's first extracontinental Cup win was in South Africa, which is in the same time zone as Greece.
    , @The Last Real Calvinist

    It’s a really, really long way from Los Angeles to Rio de Janeiro.

     

    Using Google Maps' 'Measure distance' feature, it looks as if it's roughly 6,300 miles from LA to Rio. That same distance gets you from LA to Rome or Beijing, or even to within a couple hundred miles of Auckland, New Zealand.

    Yes, it's a long way.
    , @James Richard
    My fave bookmark for these instances is Great Circle Mapper:

    http://www.gcmap.com/mapui?P=lax-rio&MS=wls&DU=mi
    , @Father O'Hara
    From LA to Tipperary?
    , @AnotherDad

    It’s a really, really long way from Los Angeles to Rio de Janeiro.
     
    Steve, I think you're hitting on a big big reason--beyond the biggies of language/culture/legal/medical--as to why this hasn't taken off as much: flight time.

    I'd say flight time is more the reason that Trump has a place in Florida and Gates in California than compatible longitude. I'm back down in Florida now. But it a tedious all day trip from Seattle that burns a day--six hours flying time, 2 hours before, 1 hour after, connection time and then you lose three hours. (Even though retired we don't like doing that and mostly have come down on the--fairly cheap--Frontier evening flight to Denver, then red-eye to Orlando.) But this is a place my wife likes and that we can afford.

    Air travel's become routine during my life. Most retired folks want to have their comfortable (warmer) weather, but be able to hop on a plane and comfortably zoom up to see their kids and grandkids whenever invited/motivated. Quick aiport access and maybe three or four hours of flying is pretty tractable. Distrance and/or tedious drives to/from airports, longer flights, connections, customs+immigration just pile on top. Also a lot of people look forward to driving around and seeing America in retirement--including stopping and seeing friends/family along the way.

    I'm guessing there's a notable statistical skew in who goes expat--more likely people divorced on 2nd marriages, people who have fewer children or more tenuous relationships with their children. I'm guessing the one marriage, passel of kids and grandkids types are much more likely to stay in the USA. Just because it's way easier, faster (more comfortable) and cheaper to shoot around and see their families.

  5. I wonder if any American senior citizens live in El Alto, which is a million person suburb of La Paz, Bolivia?

    Elevation 13,615 feet.

    Read More
    • Replies: @(((Owen)))
    You'll go a long, long time before you find a white person in El Alto. It's apparently pretty nice, but white people just aren't biologically suited to it. HBD and all that.

    Here, have a tour:

    https://goo.gl/maps/rHaH5Z2wDvt
  6. I read the article about US retirees in Cuenca Ecuador that Drudge links to at the Charlotte Observer.

    http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/nation-world/world/article154209369.html

    My BS detector pegged about half way through:

    -Better healthcare in a small turd world town of Concha Ecuardor than in the US.
    -Ecuador’s Socialist President poured the country’s oil wealth into healthcare and infrastructure.
    -The irony of Capitalist gringos flocking to Ecuador to take advantage of Socialized medicine
    -Unlike the US where that Devil Trump wants to undo Obamacare
    -Unlike the US where seniors are uncertain about their future because of looming cuts in social services

    The author of this piece needs to be sentenced to a few decades in the Gulag where he can get remedial education in writing believable Marxist propaganda.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave
    Instead of relying on your broken BS detector you could try crawling out of your cave and travel the world, including the dreaded Third World, and then you might realize that many parts of South America are quite safe, quite inexpensive and populated with easy going, hospitable people.
    Cuenca is actually a beautiful city, and certainly not as dangerous as Baltimore or Chicago.
    In fact, the worst that would probably happen to you in many parts of South America is pickpocketing .
    Some of you guys need to get out of the house a bit more.
  7. FKA Max says:

    NASA Astronaut Brian O’Leary https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_O%27Leary retired to and died in Vilcabamba, Ecuador https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vilcabamba,_Ecuador :

    Located in a historical and scenic valley, it is a common destination for tourists, in part because it is widely believed that its inhabitants grow to a very old age. Locals assert that it is not uncommon to see a person reach 100 years of age and it is claimed that many have gotten to 120, even up to 135, which would make it an area with the oldest inhabitants in the world. It is often called the Valley of Longevity.
    [...]
    The researchers speculated that the villagers had originally exaggerated their ages in order to gain prestige in the community. This practice appeared to have been occurring for generations, long before academic researchers had arrived in the village. Additionally Dr. Leaf speculated that the international publicity, and subsequent rise in tourism, may have encouraged the villagers’ exaggerations to grow more prolific.
    [...]
    Although the Vilcabambans did not enjoy greater longevity than the rest of the world, researchers noted that the Vilcabamban lifestyle, which included hard work in a high altitude combined with a low-calorie, low-animal-fat diet, did seem to keep the villagers healthy and vigorous in their old age.

    Read More
    • Replies: @mobi

    Although the Vilcabambans did not enjoy greater longevity than the rest of the world, researchers noted that the Vilcabamban lifestyle, which included hard work in a high altitude combined with a low-calorie, low-animal-fat diet, did seem to keep the villagers healthy and vigorous in their old age.
     
    There is, or was, a hypothesis kicking around the ageing-research community that chronic, low-level exposure to stressors like heat or radiation might actually prolong lifespan.

    The idea was that it triggers a very ancient stress-response mechanism at the cellular level, analogous to very hardy, extraordinarily long-lived states of spores, or virtually ageless, defensive 'dauer' states in roundworms, etc.

    The suggestion was that living long-term at very high altitudes, by exposing one to chronically somewhat higher (though not high) radiation levels (eg cosmic rays) might be triggering such a state, and might even be tied to the widespread anecdotes about exceptionally long-lived mountain peoples.

    There's some evidence medical workers chronically exposed to higher levels of radiation live longer, for example, and get less, not more, cancer.

    Calorie restriction appears similarly promising (and might be working via similar pathways).

  8. AP says:
    @Polynikes
    Why so many from Florida and Texas? Maybe because they are Latin Americans to begin with. How long until Democrats vote illegal immigrants who worked here their entire lives Social security benefits? We'll really see some outflows of SS money then.

    Why so many from Florida and Texas? Maybe because they are Latin Americans to begin with

    The excerpts from the article suggests they are Anglos.

    Parts of those states are so heavily Latin American already that moving to Latin America itself isn’t much of a difference culturally.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jimi
    If you're going to spend your old age being taken cared by latino workers in a latino city, might as well do it for half the price in Latin America.
    , @27 year old
    >Parts of those states are so heavily Latin American already that moving to Latin America itself isn’t much of a difference


    This exactly. If you're going to be a foreigner in the country you grew up in, surrounded by people unlike you speaking a strange different language then why not go be a foreigner in a country you didn't grow up in that's cheaper and has a better climate?
  9. @Steve Sailer
    It's a really, really long way from Los Angeles to Rio de Janeiro.

    So Europe’s taking 84 years to win a World Cup in South America can’t be blamed on jet lag.

    Note that Europe’s first extracontinental Cup win was in South Africa, which is in the same time zone as Greece.

    Read More
  10. Ballerino Leaps Onto Subway Tracks and Lifts Man to Safety

    Most remarkable thing about this story– the dancer has a wife.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    The creator of Sex and the City, Candace Bushnell, married a Ballerino. And Baryshnikov is famously straight. I wouldn't be surprised if most were straight, but I don't know.

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2002/07/07/style/weddings-vows-candace-bushnell-charles-askegard.html?referer=
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Reg, they are both nimble and strong. Doesn't matter that the ballerina weighs a hundred pounds, they still lift her and prance about the stage. Whoa, prance, bad choice of words. Rahm Emanuel was a ballerino
    , @Anon
    Funny. I was in and around the dance world for a while. Lots of gays of course but lots of gays in all the arts. However there is a certain percent of male dancers who are alpha. Often these guys learned as kids and are soloist or higher. So they are both high status in the ballet world and have lots of young girls to hit on. Essentially they are foxes in the hen house. Btw I had to google ballerino to see if it was real as I had never heard it used. I guess I never met many Italian dancers.
  11. @Steve Sailer
    It's a really, really long way from Los Angeles to Rio de Janeiro.

    It’s a really, really long way from Los Angeles to Rio de Janeiro.

    Using Google Maps’ ‘Measure distance’ feature, it looks as if it’s roughly 6,300 miles from LA to Rio. That same distance gets you from LA to Rome or Beijing, or even to within a couple hundred miles of Auckland, New Zealand.

    Yes, it’s a long way.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Sweeney
    And strangely, it is 7,300 miles to Manila from LA, a miserable, 15 hour flight I've made several times. Seems counter-intuitive that Auckland is closer though but I checked and the posters are right.
  12. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Reg Cæsar

    Ballerino Leaps Onto Subway Tracks and Lifts Man to Safety
     
    Most remarkable thing about this story-- the dancer has a wife.

    The creator of Sex and the City, Candace Bushnell, married a Ballerino. And Baryshnikov is famously straight. I wouldn’t be surprised if most were straight, but I don’t know.

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2002/07/07/style/weddings-vows-candace-bushnell-charles-askegard.html?referer=

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    Steve once pointed out that in Eastern Europe, a ballet career is as much or more about class aspirations than about letting one's butterflies flutter free.

    Nureyev was bi-- he was introduced to "the art of male love" by his girlfriend's other boyfriend. Speaking of class, few celebrities were willing to appear on The Muppet Show at first, but after Nureyev agreed to, suddenly every other A-lister wanted to as well.

    Baryshnikov sired a pony-- okay, a Pony. His daughter with Jessica Lange went to Stillwater Area High School while living with Jessica and Sam Shepard. Misha has three other kids elsewhere.

    http://wikivisually.com/wiki/Shura_Baryshnikov
    http://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/jessica-lange-article-032006
    , @Formerly CARealist
    I've already shared this, but my husband was a ballet/broadway dancer who took classes with Baryshnikov in the 80's. He claims women paid Baryshnikov money to try to get pregnant by him.

    He also said about 2/3 of the male ballet dancers were queers.

    In our teen/child ballet world the males all claim to be straight and the few who are likely not wind up leaving ballet. You have to be really, really confident of your masculinity to be a straight male ballet dancer.
    , @Anonymous
    Movie star Natalie Portman is married to a French ballerino.
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    Straight male ballet dancers? Well, they do get to dance with pretty women and lift them up by their nether regions...

    Think of all the rehearsals! "I think we need to practice that lift again."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANcPnhuAj_g
    , @NOTA
    I bet straight ballerinos have a really entertaining life, surrounded by super girly, super fit women and with like 3/4 of the natural competition gay.
    , @Mark F.
    No, most professional dancers are gay. But not all.
  13. @Steve Sailer
    It's a really, really long way from Los Angeles to Rio de Janeiro.

    My fave bookmark for these instances is Great Circle Mapper:

    http://www.gcmap.com/mapui?P=lax-rio&MS=wls&DU=mi

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Thanks.

    It's further from Los Angeles to Rio than from Los Angeles to Moscow.

    , @PiltdownMan
    Huh.

    Tehran is closer to New York City than Rio is to Los Angeles.
  14. Lot says:

    Most of Florida is not very expensive either.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Karl
    14 Lot > Most of Florida is not very expensive either



    but not too many SocialSecurity retirees in FL are shacking up with 19 year old Latinas. Whose overall maintenance runs, say, $200-300/month

    Quite easy to do, in Central America.

    Most expat American retirees continue to receive their money through American banks.
    , @dr kill
    And for most of Steve's readers, rural FL will be just as foreign as any place in SA. Except we do speak English.
    , @AnotherDad

    Most of Florida is not very expensive either.
     
    Yeah but the problem is ... you're living in Florida.

    (The ocean waves felt terrific this morning. Saw several pretty bikini clad girls--without tats! There are some pluses. But man the geography is deathly boring.)
  15. @James Richard
    My fave bookmark for these instances is Great Circle Mapper:

    http://www.gcmap.com/mapui?P=lax-rio&MS=wls&DU=mi

    Thanks.

    It’s further from Los Angeles to Rio than from Los Angeles to Moscow.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Are there even any direct flights? Last time I went there from New York it was via Houston then São Paulo. Maybe 12-14 hours all together.
  16. A lot of expats get their social security checks deposited to an American bank and then just download cash at an ATM. That wouldn’t be included in the above statistics.

    Read More
  17. cthulhu says:

    My degree-of-separation number from Bill Gates is 3, in two ways: first, Gates’ wife is the daughter of one of my former co-workers; second, and relevant to this story, the daughter of another former co-worker took care of the saltwater aquarium at Gates’ Rancho Santa Fe home?

    Just a curious coincidence…

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Highlands

    Co-worker took care of the saltwater aquarium at Gates’ Rancho Santa Fe home
     
    OK, that's not quite up there with the guy who spent his apocryphal working life carrying ice to the polar bear at Hearst Castle, but it's close. I thought Gates stood for something much nobler in the history of American capitalism: increasing the population of Africa to 5 billion by 2100.
  18. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer
    Thanks.

    It's further from Los Angeles to Rio than from Los Angeles to Moscow.

    Are there even any direct flights? Last time I went there from New York it was via Houston then São Paulo. Maybe 12-14 hours all together.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    My longest flight ever was direct from Dubai to Toronto. At least 12 hours.

    I chugged a bottle of Nyquil after boarding and woke up at my destination. The elderly Jewish couple I sat beside marvelled at my ability to not go to the bathroom.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    Just checked Wolfram Alpha, and if there were a direct flight from Los Angeles it Rio, it would be 11.5 hours. A direct flight from New York would be about 8.5 hours.
  19. @James Richard
    My fave bookmark for these instances is Great Circle Mapper:

    http://www.gcmap.com/mapui?P=lax-rio&MS=wls&DU=mi

    Huh.

    Tehran is closer to New York City than Rio is to Los Angeles.

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Richard
    There are some real doozies on this list

    https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/nonstop-flights-20-longest-flights-in-the-world-ranked-by-mileage

    but the longest current regularly scheduled non-stop flight is from Doha,Qatar to Auckland. 9032 miles. I was just reading that United has ordered some specially built 787s (fewer seats, more fuel) for a proposed flight from the US to Singapore that is even longer. Singapore is becoming a popular hub for long distance flights to the Orient that were previously routed to Hong Kong.

    The manufacturers are increasing the air pressure to simulate a lower altitude of 6000 feet on these long flights too. I guess they don't want elderly tourists to expire before they arrive at their destination. I hear tell that Emirates is the best airline but their first class fares cost as much as a good car.

  20. BenKenobi says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Are there even any direct flights? Last time I went there from New York it was via Houston then São Paulo. Maybe 12-14 hours all together.

    My longest flight ever was direct from Dubai to Toronto. At least 12 hours.

    I chugged a bottle of Nyquil after boarding and woke up at my destination. The elderly Jewish couple I sat beside marvelled at my ability to not go to the bathroom.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    Did you check to make sure you still had your kidneys?
    , @prosa123
    Why would Jewish people go to Dubai?
  21. Kyle McKenna [AKA "Mika-Non"] says:
    @Polynikes
    Why so many from Florida and Texas? Maybe because they are Latin Americans to begin with. How long until Democrats vote illegal immigrants who worked here their entire lives Social security benefits? We'll really see some outflows of SS money then.

    How long until Democrats vote illegal immigrants who worked here their entire lives Social security benefits?

    The Democrats I know certainly won’t be limiting it to illegals who worked here, entire lives or not. What are you, racist?

    Meanwhile, I wonder how many American ex-pats consider the cost of medical care. You could live in Mexico near the border to cut expenses, and visit clinics in the nearby USA for Medicare coverage, but you’d have to love really hot weather, slums, and questionable quality of care (except maybe San Diego).

    Read More
  22. @PiltdownMan
    Huh.

    Tehran is closer to New York City than Rio is to Los Angeles.

    There are some real doozies on this list

    https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/nonstop-flights-20-longest-flights-in-the-world-ranked-by-mileage

    but the longest current regularly scheduled non-stop flight is from Doha,Qatar to Auckland. 9032 miles. I was just reading that United has ordered some specially built 787s (fewer seats, more fuel) for a proposed flight from the US to Singapore that is even longer. Singapore is becoming a popular hub for long distance flights to the Orient that were previously routed to Hong Kong.

    The manufacturers are increasing the air pressure to simulate a lower altitude of 6000 feet on these long flights too. I guess they don’t want elderly tourists to expire before they arrive at their destination. I hear tell that Emirates is the best airline but their first class fares cost as much as a good car.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    There are some real doozies on this list

    https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/nonstop-flights-20-longest-flights-in-the-world-ranked-by-mileage

     

    I've done the Newark-Hong Kong flight (and also Chicago-HK, which isn't much shorter, i.e. 15 hours+), and many many flights in the 12-14 hour range.

    I find that after about eight hours, the length of the flight becomes less and less relevant; one enters a psychological state akin to Homer's in that Simpson's episode when he's eaten the super-spicy peppers and Johnny Cash is his spirit guide.

    , @Whoever
    I've flown UAL155 several times: GUM to HNL via TKK, PNI, KSA, KWA and MAJ, close to 12 hours flight time on a 737-800.
    Not non-stop, with down time on each island, and kind of fun, with an eclectic assortment of passengers -- some of whom seem as if they came straight out of a Somerset Maugham short story.
    It's a long, long haul and you get to know your fellow passengers pretty well. The longest leg is from MAJ to HNL, about five hours. Everybody sleeps, except for those leaning their heads together, whispering secrets to strangers.
    , @PiltdownMan
    I once did the Newark to Singapore 18+ hour flight, now discontinued, that used to be operated by Singapore Airlines.

    While the inflight service was superb, and the flight itself very comfortable, I experienced a certain degree of cabin fever and impatience after the 15 hour point. These ultra-long flights have become easier, especially with the improved in-flight entertainment options, but your personality really has to be suited to it. Mine isn't. I'm the annoying guy who paces up and down the aisle during the night portion of the flight!
    , @fitzGetty
    ... avoid all those Mid East carriers for heaven's sake ... especially Qatar after today's long delayed diplomatic severances ... these predatory airlines are funded by bottomless government funds and using them, arguably, helps fund terror across the West...
    , @Reg Cæsar
    Back in the '90s, the Minneapolis/St Paul-to-Hong Kong route on Northwest was the longest route in the world, but it didn't last long. The service, that is, not the flight. Two years, I think.

    Don't know about the onboard service, but since Northwest's flight attendants were Teamsters, you didn't want to cross them. One of them gave a toddler Xanax in her juice. On a short flight, no less.
    , @Karl
    22 James Richard > I was just reading that United has ordered some specially built 787s (fewer seats, more fuel) for a proposed flight from the US to Singapore that is even longer.


    be super careful if/when you book a Singsapore Airlines First Class seat from SG to California.

    some of the flights are codeshares with United. You pay the ridiculously high price, but you don't get the ridiculously high level of outfitment & service-rendered on Sing Air aircrafts by S-A crews

    It is always best to buy the ticket at a real S-Air office. However, evem they will not mention the fact of codeshare unless you ask....
  23. My wife is Lithuanian, and I have visited Lithuania with her many times.

    I am 64 years old, and I have felt for many years that retiring to Lithuania would be a good idea. I know Lithuanian Americans who have retired there and live well on their Social Security benefits.

    There is no way, however, that my wife would agree to go back and live in Lithuania. She likes it here.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Because of the victory of feminism here?
    , @Jack D
    I have visited Lithuania and it's a great country to visit... in the summer. Clean, relatively low crime, part of the EU, cost of living low but modern conveniences are available, etc. In the winter (approx. 10 months of the year - I only exaggerate slightly) not so much. Usually people like to retire to places with less snow and ice and more sunlight in the winter.

    The other problem is the language which resembles nothing else (except Latvian) and is devilishly hard to learn (it's one of those languages with a million different tenses and in which you have to inflect EVERYTHING, not just verbs.
    , @Father O'Hara
    So? What do you need her for? Find some clog dancing Lithuanian THOT and get busy y'all!
  24. unit472 says:

    Medicare doesn’t pay if you are outside the US which is a deterrent to retiring abroad.

    Read More
    • Replies: @james wilson
    Government cannot even see clearly when an issue is in it's own interest. When I signed up for Medicare I asked what the taxpayer bill was for my freebie (which I've not used after four years) and the reply was 10k. Some of these expats are paying a few hundred, if that, for full services, and Medicare doesn't pay. If government were privately run we would be paying citizens to vacation in the places they were to receive otherwise expensive services.
  25. anon says: • Disclaimer

    I spent part of a winter in Argentina. I liked it. Its a classic and chronic underachiever, and it’s development is referred to as the Argentinan Paradox. It’s also not cheap. In the 1920′s, it’s standard of living was roughly that of Canada. They were able to profiteer from two world wars and failed to make much out of it. And can’t believe that they are no longer the leading economic power in Latin America.

    In fact, if someone wants to live like an American, the cheapest place to do it is America. On the other hand, to the extent that a person is interested in living a more native lifestyle, there are tradeoffs. In general, stuff costs more and services are cheaper. If you want to own a car, its hard to beat the US.

    As far as health care? A lot of places have free health care that no American would be interested in using. Argentina isn’t a place to run a profitable business. When I was there, they had stringent currency controls and I exchanged $US on the black (blue) market. The Herald used to publish the daily official and ‘Blue Dollar’ exchange rates.

    I liked the people.

    Read More
  26. @Steve Sailer
    It's a really, really long way from Los Angeles to Rio de Janeiro.

    From LA to Tipperary?

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Richard
    There are no direct flights from LAX to Shannon but both Aer Lingus and Ethiopian Airlines(!) do fly non-stop to Dublin several times a week. 10 hours and 5200 miles.
  27. @BenKenobi
    My longest flight ever was direct from Dubai to Toronto. At least 12 hours.

    I chugged a bottle of Nyquil after boarding and woke up at my destination. The elderly Jewish couple I sat beside marvelled at my ability to not go to the bathroom.

    Did you check to make sure you still had your kidneys?

    Read More
  28. @James Richard
    There are some real doozies on this list

    https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/nonstop-flights-20-longest-flights-in-the-world-ranked-by-mileage

    but the longest current regularly scheduled non-stop flight is from Doha,Qatar to Auckland. 9032 miles. I was just reading that United has ordered some specially built 787s (fewer seats, more fuel) for a proposed flight from the US to Singapore that is even longer. Singapore is becoming a popular hub for long distance flights to the Orient that were previously routed to Hong Kong.

    The manufacturers are increasing the air pressure to simulate a lower altitude of 6000 feet on these long flights too. I guess they don't want elderly tourists to expire before they arrive at their destination. I hear tell that Emirates is the best airline but their first class fares cost as much as a good car.

    There are some real doozies on this list

    https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/nonstop-flights-20-longest-flights-in-the-world-ranked-by-mileage

    I’ve done the Newark-Hong Kong flight (and also Chicago-HK, which isn’t much shorter, i.e. 15 hours+), and many many flights in the 12-14 hour range.

    I find that after about eight hours, the length of the flight becomes less and less relevant; one enters a psychological state akin to Homer’s in that Simpson’s episode when he’s eaten the super-spicy peppers and Johnny Cash is his spirit guide.

    Read More
    • LOL: James Richard
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt

    I find that after about eight hours, the length of the flight becomes less and less relevant; one enters a psychological state akin to Homer’s in that Simpson’s episode when he’s eaten the super-spicy peppers and Johnny Cash is his spirit guide.
     
    You feel like the plane crashed on takeoff, and you're now a ghost circling the planet forever, like a modern Flying Dutchman.
    , @Jack D
    I did UAL Chicago-HK on an ancient 747 - the "in flight entertainment" was a CRT hanging from the ceiling every 10th row.

    Luckily I had brought some books (don't have to worry about the batteries dying on those - needless to say there were no power outlets). As far as I could tell, the Chinese all took massive doses of Ambien and slept the whole way. This is probably because they work 23 hours/day when they are not traveling and are badly sleep deprived.

    Speaking of ancient, the "stewardesses" were all surly old ladies (flights get assigned by seniority due to union rules and I guess this flight is considered desirable) who had been flying longer than the plane. For one of them it was her last flight before retirement and the rest of the crew kept parading her around with balloons and songs and such, as if I gave a damn.

    My next flight after that was Dragon Air HK to Shanghai - the stewardesses were all attractive 20 something females, the plane was brand new, they kept coming around with booze and hot towels. I felt like I was in an Asian version of Mad Men - the only thing missing (which I did not miss) were the clouds of cigarette smoke.

  29. Whoever says: • Website
    @James Richard
    There are some real doozies on this list

    https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/nonstop-flights-20-longest-flights-in-the-world-ranked-by-mileage

    but the longest current regularly scheduled non-stop flight is from Doha,Qatar to Auckland. 9032 miles. I was just reading that United has ordered some specially built 787s (fewer seats, more fuel) for a proposed flight from the US to Singapore that is even longer. Singapore is becoming a popular hub for long distance flights to the Orient that were previously routed to Hong Kong.

    The manufacturers are increasing the air pressure to simulate a lower altitude of 6000 feet on these long flights too. I guess they don't want elderly tourists to expire before they arrive at their destination. I hear tell that Emirates is the best airline but their first class fares cost as much as a good car.

    I’ve flown UAL155 several times: GUM to HNL via TKK, PNI, KSA, KWA and MAJ, close to 12 hours flight time on a 737-800.
    Not non-stop, with down time on each island, and kind of fun, with an eclectic assortment of passengers — some of whom seem as if they came straight out of a Somerset Maugham short story.
    It’s a long, long haul and you get to know your fellow passengers pretty well. The longest leg is from MAJ to HNL, about five hours. Everybody sleeps, except for those leaning their heads together, whispering secrets to strangers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Everybody sleeps, except for those leaning their heads together, whispering secrets to strangers.
     
    That’s Beautiful: Jenner Ickham Errican
  30. I am semi retired to South Africa, alternating a Cape Town southern suburb six months of the year and Canada’s Laurentian Mountains for the Boreal summer. The 18 hours in the air twice a year is a bit of a trial, though a Kindle and an iPad preloaded with movies make it easier.

    They speak English in Cape Town. There’s a symphony orchestra, huge public library, often plays at the university, and surfing daily is something one can do over 60. There are modern shopping malls and cinemas, food is much cheaper, and one can always get away to the Knysna Oyster Festival, or camping at Up the Creek (a sort of annual Woodstock), or camping in Namibia or the Okavango Delta (if you don’t mind being around lions).

    There is less to worry about when it comes to crime than I found living in Chicago, where just riding the L after dark was nerve wracking.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mark Caplan
    Yours and AmRen's descriptions of the life of white people in South Africa are in total disagreement. You're saying whites are not targeted for extinction?
  31. @James Richard
    There are some real doozies on this list

    https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/nonstop-flights-20-longest-flights-in-the-world-ranked-by-mileage

    but the longest current regularly scheduled non-stop flight is from Doha,Qatar to Auckland. 9032 miles. I was just reading that United has ordered some specially built 787s (fewer seats, more fuel) for a proposed flight from the US to Singapore that is even longer. Singapore is becoming a popular hub for long distance flights to the Orient that were previously routed to Hong Kong.

    The manufacturers are increasing the air pressure to simulate a lower altitude of 6000 feet on these long flights too. I guess they don't want elderly tourists to expire before they arrive at their destination. I hear tell that Emirates is the best airline but their first class fares cost as much as a good car.

    I once did the Newark to Singapore 18+ hour flight, now discontinued, that used to be operated by Singapore Airlines.

    While the inflight service was superb, and the flight itself very comfortable, I experienced a certain degree of cabin fever and impatience after the 15 hour point. These ultra-long flights have become easier, especially with the improved in-flight entertainment options, but your personality really has to be suited to it. Mine isn’t. I’m the annoying guy who paces up and down the aisle during the night portion of the flight!

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    I once did the Newark to Singapore 18+ hour flight, now discontinued, that used to be operated by Singapore Airlines.

     

    That is an epic flight! But if I had to pick one airline to make it bearable, SA would be it. Cathay Pacific, Hong Kong's flagship carrier, used to rival Singapore Air, but no more.

    I've been doing regular long-haul flights since the early 1990s, and I agree that advances in personal entertainment options have made these flights a whole lot easier. Individual movie systems, phones with podcasts, Kindles instead of carrying several books -- all help.

    Veering back toward our topic: coincidentally, in the past couple of days, i.e. before Steve posted this article, my FB feed was full of expat retirement ads, including some for Latin American destinations. Odd.

  32. @PiltdownMan
    I once did the Newark to Singapore 18+ hour flight, now discontinued, that used to be operated by Singapore Airlines.

    While the inflight service was superb, and the flight itself very comfortable, I experienced a certain degree of cabin fever and impatience after the 15 hour point. These ultra-long flights have become easier, especially with the improved in-flight entertainment options, but your personality really has to be suited to it. Mine isn't. I'm the annoying guy who paces up and down the aisle during the night portion of the flight!

    I once did the Newark to Singapore 18+ hour flight, now discontinued, that used to be operated by Singapore Airlines.

    That is an epic flight! But if I had to pick one airline to make it bearable, SA would be it. Cathay Pacific, Hong Kong’s flagship carrier, used to rival Singapore Air, but no more.

    I’ve been doing regular long-haul flights since the early 1990s, and I agree that advances in personal entertainment options have made these flights a whole lot easier. Individual movie systems, phones with podcasts, Kindles instead of carrying several books — all help.

    Veering back toward our topic: coincidentally, in the past couple of days, i.e. before Steve posted this article, my FB feed was full of expat retirement ads, including some for Latin American destinations. Odd.

    Read More
    • Replies: @fitzGetty
    ... and soon, Quantas nonstop from LHR to Perth - with no distasteful stop in any distasteful Mid East hell hole...
    , @bored identity
    bored identity is reading snowflaking passengers whining & bragging about Fake Phileas Fogg experiences during their white collar priviliged flights to Dubai, Singapore, Hong-Kong....

    Bwaaaaa,...


    Why don't Y'all try Ft. Polk-Indianapolis....on a Greyhound fare, with 3 transfers,1 book, 1 crossword puzzles, and 0 gadgets , as a foolishly inexperienced bored did it in 2000 AD ?

    https://www.rome2rio.com/s/Fort-Polk-South/Indianapolis
  33. “The city is trying to combat local fears that the retirees are both driving up land prices and bleeding the public healthcare system, she said. And the language barrier has become a source of local irritation. Some restaurants and even neighborhoods seem like English-only spaces.”

    For me, that’s the money quote. I’ve lived in a few places around the world, and many will be tolerant of Americans in low doses when permanent residents, and larger transient doses for the money. Ecuadore is a rather pleasant place, but I wonder how tolerant the locals will be if this feeling that they are being overrun starts to really bubble.

    Don’t knock the value of longitude … its somtimes very convenient to be a half-day away from the home crowd.

    Read More
  34. High elevations are good for life expectancy, though. If anything might be worth favoring such places.

    Downshifting to Latin America or some other cheap place is for most American retirees a no brainer, I would imagine. The reason most don’t consider it, I imagine, is for the same reason that they go to the nearest MacDonald’s upon landing in Paris or Shanghai: cultural conservatism. A preference for the way things are.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    One possible downside that occurs to me is the possibility that the people there'll kill you.
    , @dcthrowback
    even simpler than "cultural conservatism": seeing your kids/grandkids on the reg
    , @Sunbeam
    "High elevations are good for life expectancy, though. If anything might be worth favoring such places. "

    Interesting contention. Intuitively I believe it, but what are the reasons exactly?
    , @AndrewR
    I am fond of many foreign cuisines and of cultural novelty and experimentation, but when in foreign lands I do enjoy going to American chain restaurants. They are always different than what one would find in the US, both in ambiance and in gastronomy, generally for the better. One "MacDonald's" I visited in Buenos Aires was on par with the nicest cafés one could find in NYC or Chicago.
    , @Art Deco
    We had a co-worker who retired to the Yucatan for a while. It's the most tranquil part of Mexico. They came back after a while. You're old, you benefit more from 1st world medicine. Two elements of their decision to go there were (1) the wife's nonagenarian mother died and (2) their children (2 sons) were in the Navy and not in any fixed location. I think most people when they're out to grass want to be near the younger generation in their families and face a certain ambivalence when considering whether to remain near friends or settle near children. (And it stings when you discover the younger set find you a nuisance or an item on a to-do list).
    , @Jack D
    High elevations are good to grow up in - you end up with extra lung capacity due to your body compensating for the thin air. Plus it's usually unpolluted air, you have a simple plant based diet (maybe supplemented with some goat and goat's milk) and since there are usually few roads you run from village to village (BTW, why are marathoners from Ethiopia and Kenya and not from Peru and Ecuador?). BTW, some of the longevity reports are exaggerated - even before researchers took an interest, a lot of older SA Indians had a tradition of exaggerating their ages. When people report that they are 140 years old, you can assume that it is false.

    But if you are a fat ass Westerner with pre-existing CPD, high elevation is the last place you would want to retire to. OTOH, I could see fit retirees from Colorado selling their condos and switching to a place where their retirement checks would go a lot farther.
    , @Jimbo in OPKS
    I'm 60, retired fed, working for a private university because I want to. Considered moving to South America until this Easter when my daughter told me she was pregnant. Now, no way. That's more powerful than McDonald's.

    Having said that, does anyone think that Puerto Rico's financial troubles present an opportunity to buy a nice vacation place?

  35. KM32 says:

    I’ve spent several months in Cuenca. It’s really a very nice place and extremely cheap, unless you’re a local and have to compete with Americans for apartments and the like. Some of the foreigners aren’t happy. They’re there because a spouse dragged them down to South America or because it’s the only place they can really afford to live. A lot of others seem to be loving it, but I did note that very few people had been there more than four or five years. Eventually, I guess they need to go back home.

    During the election, the local Gringo coffee shop had a big banner put up by Lasso, the non-socialist candidate, that read in English “Give Gringos a Voice.” I can only think they were targeting the Ecuadorian wives of Gringo expats. You see a fair number of 55-65 year old foreign guys with 30-40 y.o. locals women.

    Read More
  36. @Anatoly Karlin
    High elevations are good for life expectancy, though. If anything might be worth favoring such places.

    Downshifting to Latin America or some other cheap place is for most American retirees a no brainer, I would imagine. The reason most don't consider it, I imagine, is for the same reason that they go to the nearest MacDonald's upon landing in Paris or Shanghai: cultural conservatism. A preference for the way things are.

    One possible downside that occurs to me is the possibility that the people there’ll kill you.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ATX Hipster
    I don't know, there are plenty of people here that have no qualms about violence against the elderly.

    http://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/elderly-woman-burned-beaten-in-her-home-dies-weeks-after-attack/430968502
  37. I am surprised that nobody mentioned Uruguay yet as a Latin American bug-out or ex-pat destination. It’s not just that John Derbyshire has mentioned it multiple times, which could be read here on unz. I was reading on it a couple of years back after I noticed that it is 90% white. That’s greater than the US of A by a long shot. Now, these white people are not all Englishmen and Americans, but many of German, Italian, and Spanish ancestry.

    I came upon Uruguay when I was looking for out-of-the-way places, starting with the Guianas. Those are a big no-go demographically, and the climate would be tough on some. All most people know about them is British Guiana from Jim Jones of that Kool-Aid crowd (not OUR Jim Jones), and French Guiana from Euro rockets and Papillon. Surinam, or Dutch Guiana, hardly ever pops up in any story about anything. That sounds really good sometimes. However, again, look at the demographics. It’s cool to look at these places via google-earth and just imagine who the hell is living down there. Cayenne, capital of French Guiana looks to be a town of no more than 10,000 people from the map.

    Anyway, I had hoped it could be my secret, but between Derb and me, now it’s not. No, I’ve not been there yet.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kirt
    I've visited Uruguay as a tourist and it's nice. Very American looking and feeling, so you don't have to be an adventurous ex-pat.
    , @dcthrowback
    no chance

    https://youtu.be/NNIYob8nC7o
  38. Karl says:
    @Lot
    Most of Florida is not very expensive either.

    14 Lot > Most of Florida is not very expensive either

    but not too many SocialSecurity retirees in FL are shacking up with 19 year old Latinas. Whose overall maintenance runs, say, $200-300/month

    Quite easy to do, in Central America.

    Most expat American retirees continue to receive their money through American banks.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    My anecdotal knowledge of this is they are not hot 19 year olds. More typical is mid-50s American man with early 30's foreign woman who is average looking and argues.
  39. Here’s what I really wanted to write about first on this expatriate thing, and have already. First, it is a much better idea for single guys. The family will have a hard time adjusting, and the wife will be forever complaining about what’s missing and you can’t get this here, etc…. Single men are much more adaptable and undemanding, and may want places with foreign women who not only treat them very nicely, but are cheap to support.

    That being said, this life on the SS check or small pension or decent savings from the world back home is a GREAT deal for now. It will ABSOLUTELY NOT BE when the US dollar falls in the coming, inevitable financial crash. Americans in these countries love it because the almighty reserve-currency almighty dollar make them rich men down there. They will not like living in Ecuador as and Ecuadoran* Keep in mind, during hard times, you will be looked at harshly in any country in which you could be picked out by face as a foreigner (think Uruguay).

    I would hope “DC Sunsets”, as another guy in-tune to the financial situation, could back me up where there any questions.

    Jimmy Buffet sang about this expatriate life the best (though it’s a Steve Goodman song):

    Some of them are running from lovers
    leaving no forward address.
    Some of them are running guns in.
    Some are running from the IRS.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anQ2t8UgeMx

    Down to the banana republics
    things aren’t as warm as they seem.
    None of the natives are buying
    any second-hand American dreams.

    * Maybe an engineer or other technical guy could find a place in the economy even when things get rough.

    Read More
  40. I don’t know why the 1st video of the thread didn’t show up embedded. Do it for the Parrotheads! However, this Steve Goodman was such a great songwriter (as is Jimmy Buffett) that I gotta put all the lyrics in:

    Down to the Banana Republics,
    down to the tropical sun,
    go the expatriated Americans
    hopin’ to find some fun.

    Some of them go for the sailing,
    called by the lure of the sea,
    tryin’ to find what is ailing
    living in the land of the free.
    Some of them are running to lovers,
    leaving no forward address.
    Some of them are running tons of ganja <— Oh, I did get this wrong.
    Some are running from the IRS

    Late at night you will find them
    in the cheap hotels and bar,s
    hustling the senoritas
    while they dance beneath the star.s
    Spending those renegade pesos
    on a bottle of rum and a lime,
    singin’ give me some words I can dance to
    or a melody that rhymes.

    First you learn the native custom
    soon a word of Spanish or two.
    You know that you cannot trust them.
    They know they can’t trust you.

    Expatriated Americans, feelin’ so all alone,
    telling themselves the same lies
    that they told themselves back home.

    Down to the Banana Republics,
    things aren’t as warm as they seem.
    None of the natives are buying
    any second hand American dreams.

    Late at night you will find them
    in the cheap hotels and bars.
    Hustling the senoritas
    while they dance beneath the stars.
    Spending those renegade pesos
    on a bottle of rum and a lime,
    singing give me some words I can dance to
    or a melody that rhymes

    Down to the Banana Republics,
    down to the tropical sun,
    go the expatriated Americans
    hopin’ to find some fun

    From Buffett’s 1977 album “Changes in Lattitudes, Changes in Attitudes

    Read More
    • Replies: @(((Owen)))
    This is Steve Goodman's year, three decades on from his youthful death. His Cubs are finally the World Series champions (for five more months). It's a small comfort to know that he passed away in 1984 just before the collapse when they went up 2-0 against the Padres and lost the series 3-2.

    And yes, he was a darn good songwriter. City of New Orleans is still a favorite.
  41. OK, now I gotta do this:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I didn't want to screw up the video embedment, which is very, very sensitive, apparently, so last comment here for the time being.

    How appropos are these lyrics still!

    "I went home with Ann Coulter (in my dreams)
    the way I always do.
    How was I to know
    she was with the Russians too"

    Then comes that great guitar riff! I never knew this guy's music much when he was alive - only "Werewolves of London" of course. RIP Warren.
  42. fitzGetty says:

    … London was a superb relocation spot and many parents of friends went to live there … now though, as the mohammadan population has risen above the red line of 3%, the situation is untenable …

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    I've joked elsewhere in these pages, but it is a true observation: I see more hijabs, naquibs and headscarves in London nowadays than I saw in Beirut in 1983.
  43. @Achmed E. Newman
    OK, now I gotta do this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lP5Xv7QqXiM

    I didn’t want to screw up the video embedment, which is very, very sensitive, apparently, so last comment here for the time being.

    How appropos are these lyrics still!

    “I went home with Ann Coulter (in my dreams)
    the way I always do.
    How was I to know
    she was with the Russians too”

    Then comes that great guitar riff! I never knew this guy’s music much when he was alive – only “Werewolves of London” of course. RIP Warren.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ganderson
    Warren is very underrated- his first , self titled album is a gem, as is Excitable Boy. He has a lot of great later stuff- "Mr Bad Example", "Transverse City" just to name a couple. The Dead used to do ""Werewolves" as an encore, with the Wolf guitar!

  44. fitzGetty says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I once did the Newark to Singapore 18+ hour flight, now discontinued, that used to be operated by Singapore Airlines.

     

    That is an epic flight! But if I had to pick one airline to make it bearable, SA would be it. Cathay Pacific, Hong Kong's flagship carrier, used to rival Singapore Air, but no more.

    I've been doing regular long-haul flights since the early 1990s, and I agree that advances in personal entertainment options have made these flights a whole lot easier. Individual movie systems, phones with podcasts, Kindles instead of carrying several books -- all help.

    Veering back toward our topic: coincidentally, in the past couple of days, i.e. before Steve posted this article, my FB feed was full of expat retirement ads, including some for Latin American destinations. Odd.

    … and soon, Quantas nonstop from LHR to Perth – with no distasteful stop in any distasteful Mid East hell hole…

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    … and soon, Quantas nonstop from LHR to Perth – with no distasteful stop in any distasteful Mid East hell hole…
     
    ... except for that one stop in London. Maybe it should just take off and keep getting refueled in-flight until the business class passengers' credit cards get maxed out. It'd keep em out of the 3rd world for a while, anyway.

    Of course, you've got to come down for blue juice, ice, and the hot-section overhauls.
    , @James Richard
    Wow, 9,000 miles! It does have the disadvantage of traversing the entire length of Iran though.
  45. dcthrowback says: • Website
    @Anatoly Karlin
    High elevations are good for life expectancy, though. If anything might be worth favoring such places.

    Downshifting to Latin America or some other cheap place is for most American retirees a no brainer, I would imagine. The reason most don't consider it, I imagine, is for the same reason that they go to the nearest MacDonald's upon landing in Paris or Shanghai: cultural conservatism. A preference for the way things are.

    even simpler than “cultural conservatism”: seeing your kids/grandkids on the reg

    Read More
    • Replies: @Discordiax
    Don't underestimate the profit motive and competition. REtirement communities in Florida are a lot like summer camp for grownups--there is a full menu of activities, excursions, etc to keep you as busy as you want to be. My father bought a place for about $70,000 (roughly $50,000 for the land, $20,000 for the double-wide trailer*, plus about $5,000 for the realtor to furnish it) in a community, and signed up for (and narrowly escaped being made officers in) the IRish, Italian, German clubs, VFW, Legion (Friday clam bake, I think). Day trips to activities in Orlando, Miami, Tampa (each a 2 hour drive or so.)

    There is an extensive choice of things to do, and a bunch of people to do it with. He was advised to lock his doors at night, or wake up to find a widow in his bed.

    I don't think retiring to a foreign country has the same package.

    * Yes, it is technically a trailer park. But as I learned as an adolescent watching Boyz N The Hood, and seeing the same houses and yard plots that you'd see in nice 1940's built white neighborhoods in the northeast, it's not the architecture, it's the population.

  46. fitzGetty says:
    @James Richard
    There are some real doozies on this list

    https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/nonstop-flights-20-longest-flights-in-the-world-ranked-by-mileage

    but the longest current regularly scheduled non-stop flight is from Doha,Qatar to Auckland. 9032 miles. I was just reading that United has ordered some specially built 787s (fewer seats, more fuel) for a proposed flight from the US to Singapore that is even longer. Singapore is becoming a popular hub for long distance flights to the Orient that were previously routed to Hong Kong.

    The manufacturers are increasing the air pressure to simulate a lower altitude of 6000 feet on these long flights too. I guess they don't want elderly tourists to expire before they arrive at their destination. I hear tell that Emirates is the best airline but their first class fares cost as much as a good car.

    … avoid all those Mid East carriers for heaven’s sake … especially Qatar after today’s long delayed diplomatic severances … these predatory airlines are funded by bottomless government funds and using them, arguably, helps fund terror across the West…

    Read More
  47. Yak-15 says:

    One can see a lot of the retirement choices of expats on House Hunters International. It seems like everyone’s favorite retirement destination is Costa Rica. In my opinion, Panama wouldn’t be a bad place to retire until the very end when you are immobile.

    These retirement choices seem like great ideas until major social upheaval occurs. At that point you are probably going to lose your property and possibly your life.

    Read More
  48. fitzGetty says:
    @Kirt
    I know guys who have retired to Brazil. They are socially adventurous experienced world travelers, who are not deterred by the high crime. I've heard that Chile and New Zealand are also increasingly popular ex-pat destinations for Americans. I've also heard that Phuket, Thailand, is host to significant ex-pat communities of both Americans and Russians. Maybe a good location for a Trump/Putin summit.

    … an abode in old Siam surrounded by shouting Russkies ?
    Another sort of hell …

    Read More
  49. Hodag says:

    Left unsaid is: how is the golf? If I was retiring at altitude it would be Lookout Mountain Georgia or Roaring Gap North Carolina. Seth Raynor or Donald Ross?

    Read More
  50. All my retirement research was done by a DINK couple we know. Lake Chapala, Puerto Vallarta, San Miguel de Allende, Queretaro, places in Ecuador, Costa Rica and Panama add onto that Bermuda, Grand Cayman and Turks and Caicos. Final decision: Bonita Springs, Florida.

    There you go.

    Read More
  51. dr kill says:
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    Take a look at
    https://jungleblogtom.files.wordpress.com/2014/06/north-and-south-america.jpg
    and you will see that Quito and Cuenca, Ecuador, which are on the Pacific coast of South America, are at very nearly the same longitude as Buffalo, NY:
    Buffalo: 42 deg 54 min N, 78 deg 51 min W
    Quito: 0 deg 14 min S, 78 deg 31 min W
    Cuenca: 2 deg 54 min S, 79 deg 01 min W
    That is, Buffalo is farther west than Quito. People tend to forget that South America is not south of North America, but southeast of North America.

    All of SA is east of Miami.

    Read More
  52. dr kill says:
    @Lot
    Most of Florida is not very expensive either.

    And for most of Steve’s readers, rural FL will be just as foreign as any place in SA. Except we do speak English.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Karl
    53 Dr Kill > Except we do speak English


    Ostensibly, so do blacks in deep-rural Parishes of Louisiana.
  53. AndrewR says:

    When the US sends its people they’re not sending their best people. They’re old. They’re monolingual. They’re wealthy. Some, I assume, are good people.

    Read More
  54. Sunbeam says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    High elevations are good for life expectancy, though. If anything might be worth favoring such places.

    Downshifting to Latin America or some other cheap place is for most American retirees a no brainer, I would imagine. The reason most don't consider it, I imagine, is for the same reason that they go to the nearest MacDonald's upon landing in Paris or Shanghai: cultural conservatism. A preference for the way things are.

    “High elevations are good for life expectancy, though. If anything might be worth favoring such places. ”

    Interesting contention. Intuitively I believe it, but what are the reasons exactly?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Flip
    http://roguehealthandfitness.com/higher-altitude-means-much-lower-death-rates/
  55. AndrewR says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    High elevations are good for life expectancy, though. If anything might be worth favoring such places.

    Downshifting to Latin America or some other cheap place is for most American retirees a no brainer, I would imagine. The reason most don't consider it, I imagine, is for the same reason that they go to the nearest MacDonald's upon landing in Paris or Shanghai: cultural conservatism. A preference for the way things are.

    I am fond of many foreign cuisines and of cultural novelty and experimentation, but when in foreign lands I do enjoy going to American chain restaurants. They are always different than what one would find in the US, both in ambiance and in gastronomy, generally for the better. One “MacDonald’s” I visited in Buenos Aires was on par with the nicest cafés one could find in NYC or Chicago.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jimi
    McDonald's in India is definitely worth a visit. They have a created a totally new menu based on local cuisine and ingredients. Food is great.

    The McDonald's in India are also cleaner than the average restaurants there.
  56. AndrewR says:
    @Kirt
    I know guys who have retired to Brazil. They are socially adventurous experienced world travelers, who are not deterred by the high crime. I've heard that Chile and New Zealand are also increasingly popular ex-pat destinations for Americans. I've also heard that Phuket, Thailand, is host to significant ex-pat communities of both Americans and Russians. Maybe a good location for a Trump/Putin summit.

    Brazil is a very large country and simply cannot be easily generalized. Some parts of Brazil have less crime than the US average, and obviously most of Brazil has less crime than the worst cities in the US.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cornbeef
    I can easily generalize. The South is predominantly white and white pleasant. The rest of the country is less pleasant and more stabby.
  57. @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    Take a look at
    https://jungleblogtom.files.wordpress.com/2014/06/north-and-south-america.jpg
    and you will see that Quito and Cuenca, Ecuador, which are on the Pacific coast of South America, are at very nearly the same longitude as Buffalo, NY:
    Buffalo: 42 deg 54 min N, 78 deg 51 min W
    Quito: 0 deg 14 min S, 78 deg 31 min W
    Cuenca: 2 deg 54 min S, 79 deg 01 min W
    That is, Buffalo is farther west than Quito. People tend to forget that South America is not south of North America, but southeast of North America.

    “People tend to forget that South America is not south of North America, but southeast of North America.”

    Back in the 1500s, the Spanish and the Pope didn’t realize that fact either, when they drew that longitude line dividing the world between Spain and Portugal. The original idea was Spain would get all of the New World, while Portugal would have claim to Africa and all the islands of its coast. Imagine the pleasant surprise to the Portuguese (and the shock to the Spanish), when it was discovered that a big chunk of South America extended east of that longitude line.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Back in the 1500s, the Spanish and the Pope didn’t realize that fact either, when they drew that longitude line dividing the world between Spain and Portugal.
     
    This is great stuff to learn here on unz, Cassidy. Thanks.

    Here's the problem these explorers had in determining longitude. a) To get good numbers you need accurate clocks OR b) something to measure that happened at the same time everywhere in the world.

    Yeah, the sun and stars are fine for latitude, as you just need the angle of the pole star (gives you 1 deg error max, even if you had no idea of your longitude) at night, or just the highest angle of sun-above-horizon in the daytime - cloudy nights and days, tough shit. For longitude, you may use any star, including ours, planet whatever you want (well, a decent ways from the pole), but you need the time of day too. The development of a long-term-accurate clock was the big key to getting accurate position (as described in a well-readable book called "Longitude").

    except.... the astronomers came through with some workarounds based on celestial events like eclipses, positions of the moons of Jupiter (you can see these even with 7x binos) such as an occulation of a certain moon by the big planet or a entrance of exit of a transit by one of them, stuff like that. You had to have something that you could predict accurately, unless you wanted to back-calculate position info after the fact (i.e. when the ship got back, the info from the logs could be compared to that in Greenwich, the capital of all astronomy). Real time on-the-spot knowledge of a celestial event's coming was much better though. The main thing was you had see something happening that, of course happened, but could be seen at the same time in Greenwich. The time it happened (or was predicted to happen) in Greenwich WAS the clock. Cool stuff, and it explains why the early explorers knew a lot about astronomy - it wasn't just a scientific part of the mission.

    We had some smart people in those days. Is it any comparison between these astronomers and explorers of these Royal Societies vs. guys like Gates and Zuckerberg?
    , @Kirt
    There are those who don't think the Portuguese were surprised. There is a theory that Portuguese mariners had already made landfall in Brazil, but it was kept a closely guarded state secret pending the treaty for dividing the world and the subsequent adjustment of the treaty to push the dividing line hundreds of miles west. After that Brazil was conveniently "discovered" by the Portuguese.
  58. Tiny Duck says:

    Reading the comments it has become quite evident that the people here are old as dirt

    This explains the retrograde opinions and ignorance

    Read More
    • Troll: Forbes
    • Replies: @BB753
    You are probably right on this one. I'm in my late forties and I'm probably one of the youngests regulars here.
    , @Stan Adams
    At least we're younger than the rocks inside your head.

    Show some respect for your elders, boy. Children should be seen and not heard.
    , @ken
    If only your daddy had suffered from retrograde ejaculation.
  59. Baby boomer darlings have dreams about retiring in Latin America and living like a king? British baby boomers have the same desires, except they move to Spain. We all know that the asset bubbles in stocks, bonds and real estate have been re-inflated to benefit the baby boomer generation. The pensions that the baby boomers are receiving and expect to get would have been vaporized if not for the extraordinary exertions of global central bankers.

    Once more unto the monetary policy. Baby boomers have been kept financially afloat by the use of monetary extremism and other debt tricks. Kevin Phillips calls it financialization. The monetary policy party that the baby boomers have enjoyed is about to end.

    White Americans born after the year 1965 will soon call bullshit on all this baby boomer globaloney horseshit. They will say BASTA to the baby boomers.

    President Trump has been the one baby boomer, on the national level, who has called bullshit on globalization and mass immigration. President Trump has attacked baby boomer politicians for their immorality and irresponsibility in regards to their immigration, trade and foreign policies.

    The baby boomers should expect a dramatic diminution in their pensions and assets coming soon. The baby boomers will not escape the curses of those who come after.

    Read More
  60. @The Last Real Calvinist

    I once did the Newark to Singapore 18+ hour flight, now discontinued, that used to be operated by Singapore Airlines.

     

    That is an epic flight! But if I had to pick one airline to make it bearable, SA would be it. Cathay Pacific, Hong Kong's flagship carrier, used to rival Singapore Air, but no more.

    I've been doing regular long-haul flights since the early 1990s, and I agree that advances in personal entertainment options have made these flights a whole lot easier. Individual movie systems, phones with podcasts, Kindles instead of carrying several books -- all help.

    Veering back toward our topic: coincidentally, in the past couple of days, i.e. before Steve posted this article, my FB feed was full of expat retirement ads, including some for Latin American destinations. Odd.

    bored identity is reading snowflaking passengers whining & bragging about Fake Phileas Fogg experiences during their white collar priviliged flights to Dubai, Singapore, Hong-Kong….

    Bwaaaaa,…

    Why don’t Y’all try Ft. Polk-Indianapolis….on a Greyhound fare, with 3 transfers,1 book, 1 crossword puzzles, and 0 gadgets , as a foolishly inexperienced bored did it in 2000 AD ?

    https://www.rome2rio.com/s/Fort-Polk-South/Indianapolis

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Why did you do that? I did something like that once when I was really poor and struggling. I ended up making it where I was going to, but it wasn't a pleasant time in my life - though a memorable one.
    , @James Richard
    Because we all grew up and got real jobs?
  61. @The Last Real Calvinist

    There are some real doozies on this list

    https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/nonstop-flights-20-longest-flights-in-the-world-ranked-by-mileage

     

    I've done the Newark-Hong Kong flight (and also Chicago-HK, which isn't much shorter, i.e. 15 hours+), and many many flights in the 12-14 hour range.

    I find that after about eight hours, the length of the flight becomes less and less relevant; one enters a psychological state akin to Homer's in that Simpson's episode when he's eaten the super-spicy peppers and Johnny Cash is his spirit guide.

    I find that after about eight hours, the length of the flight becomes less and less relevant; one enters a psychological state akin to Homer’s in that Simpson’s episode when he’s eaten the super-spicy peppers and Johnny Cash is his spirit guide.

    You feel like the plane crashed on takeoff, and you’re now a ghost circling the planet forever, like a modern Flying Dutchman.

    Read More
  62. Jimi says:
    @AP

    Why so many from Florida and Texas? Maybe because they are Latin Americans to begin with
     
    The excerpts from the article suggests they are Anglos.

    Parts of those states are so heavily Latin American already that moving to Latin America itself isn't much of a difference culturally.

    If you’re going to spend your old age being taken cared by latino workers in a latino city, might as well do it for half the price in Latin America.

    Read More
  63. @dcthrowback
    even simpler than "cultural conservatism": seeing your kids/grandkids on the reg

    Don’t underestimate the profit motive and competition. REtirement communities in Florida are a lot like summer camp for grownups–there is a full menu of activities, excursions, etc to keep you as busy as you want to be. My father bought a place for about $70,000 (roughly $50,000 for the land, $20,000 for the double-wide trailer*, plus about $5,000 for the realtor to furnish it) in a community, and signed up for (and narrowly escaped being made officers in) the IRish, Italian, German clubs, VFW, Legion (Friday clam bake, I think). Day trips to activities in Orlando, Miami, Tampa (each a 2 hour drive or so.)

    There is an extensive choice of things to do, and a bunch of people to do it with. He was advised to lock his doors at night, or wake up to find a widow in his bed.

    I don’t think retiring to a foreign country has the same package.

    * Yes, it is technically a trailer park. But as I learned as an adolescent watching Boyz N The Hood, and seeing the same houses and yard plots that you’d see in nice 1940′s built white neighborhoods in the northeast, it’s not the architecture, it’s the population.

    Read More
    • Agree: prole
    • Replies: @Jack D
    When you see trailer parks blasted to splinters by a tornado (which you often do) it's not because tornadoes are magically attracted to trailers, it's because trailers are shoddily built. I am familiar with construction costs and there's no way you can build a 1,500 sq. ft house (about the size of a double wide trailer) for $20,000 or even close to it. The only way they are doing this is by taking severe short cuts in the construction. Anyway, I assume that $20,000 buys you a used trailer - trailers are more like cars that depreciate rapidly than they are to normal houses which tend to retain their value.
    , @Anon
    I'd never buy a trailer in a hurricane-prone state, no matter what the amenities. I'd rather not get blown to smithereens.
  64. Art Deco says:

    (which might be why Hawaii hasn’t ever really taken off as a place for the wealthy to live while still conducting their business).

    About 30% of Hawaii’s population is (1) small town and rural and (2) in loci where the one city in the islands is inaccessible except by cumbersome and expensive means. That’s not for everyone.

    One of the oddities about Honolulu is that it’s a city of middling size with big city housing costs. I had a relation who lived in Honolulu for a decade. He never bought any property because it was too expensive. The condominium he rented from an absentee owner was in a high rise constructed in 1968 which has since been torn down. The one he rented was their cheapest floor plan (a modest two bedroom unit: kitchenette, living room, lanai, utility room / wc, master bedroom with bath, small auxilliary bedroom). The asking price for those units was > $400,000 ca. 2006. You could get a handsome old 3-story home in a smart neighborhood in Rochester for that price at that time. Detached housing is atypical in Honolulu. Madelyn Dunham, once a vice president at the Bank of Hawaii, lived in detached housing only briefly during her 48 years there and never owned such a place.

    In any city, you’ve got value added from the trade the residents have with each other and you have value-added from export trade. The thing is, the opportunities for agriculture are quite circumscribed due to physiography and soil quality, shipping costs put a damper on manufacturing, and there isn’t much to mine. The export trade would be in services: tourism, finance, and transit. Honolulu is not Brisbane. It does not have an ample hinterland endowed with agricultural land and skilled labor. It has about 500,000 people in its hinterland and not a lot of margin to add more at non-metropolitan densities. What’s interesting about Honolulu is not that that its growth is stunted. What’s interesting is that it has as many people as it does.

    One other thing about Honolulu that would put a damper on its appeal to many among the wealthy as a retirement destination: it’s tacky. If you don’t mind tacky, why not Florida?

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Richard

    If you don’t mind tacky, why not Florida?
     
    Hawaii has waaay better surf!
    , @E. Rekshun
    Re Honolulu - a couple of acquaintances that travel every other year from the east coast advise of huge numbers of vagrants milling around the public spaces and beaches. The City of Honolulu even offers full-paid one-way tickets to mainland US for any vagrant. The NYT has covered this quite a bit.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/04/us/hawaii-homeless-criminal-law-sitting-ban.html?_r=0

    https://www.google.com/#q=%22new+york+times%22+AND+%22honolulu%22+AND+%22homeless%22
    , @Captain Tripps
    For some strange reason, my wife is obsessed with Hawaii. We went there for a second honeymoon in 2013 and she was hooked. Keeps talking about retiring there. I told her only the Big Island, because its relatively less expensive than Oahu (but still way pricey compared to CONUS).

    She will have to come to grips with the fact that I was born in the US of A (in the heartland, Missouri); I served and fought in the Legions of the US of A; so, for better or worse, I will die in the US of A (notwithstanding my kin go as far back as the early 1700s in this country). Besides, that is what our affordable retirement scenario is looking like, sans a lottery jackpot win. There are plenty of decent places to retire in the US, fairly cheap and pleasant, though for how long is anyone's guess. I'm good with my hands and IT so I could make a good living in a post crash scenario if needed, and wife is a superb gardener, which could be her occupation if necessary.

    Deep South Gulf Coast has some underappreciated good places (i.e. Pensacola, Fort Walton Beach, east of Mobile), but I'd relocate maybe 100-200 miles inland to escape the worst effects of a bad storm, which have been known to pass through there.
  65. Art Deco says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    High elevations are good for life expectancy, though. If anything might be worth favoring such places.

    Downshifting to Latin America or some other cheap place is for most American retirees a no brainer, I would imagine. The reason most don't consider it, I imagine, is for the same reason that they go to the nearest MacDonald's upon landing in Paris or Shanghai: cultural conservatism. A preference for the way things are.

    We had a co-worker who retired to the Yucatan for a while. It’s the most tranquil part of Mexico. They came back after a while. You’re old, you benefit more from 1st world medicine. Two elements of their decision to go there were (1) the wife’s nonagenarian mother died and (2) their children (2 sons) were in the Navy and not in any fixed location. I think most people when they’re out to grass want to be near the younger generation in their families and face a certain ambivalence when considering whether to remain near friends or settle near children. (And it stings when you discover the younger set find you a nuisance or an item on a to-do list).

    Read More
  66. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Kirt
    I know guys who have retired to Brazil. They are socially adventurous experienced world travelers, who are not deterred by the high crime. I've heard that Chile and New Zealand are also increasingly popular ex-pat destinations for Americans. I've also heard that Phuket, Thailand, is host to significant ex-pat communities of both Americans and Russians. Maybe a good location for a Trump/Putin summit.

    It’s not difficult to live outside crime in Brazil. All these “experienced world travelers” must do to live in big cities, if they have money, is to buy expensive apartments or gated communities in the big cities that risks are really diminished. Since risk is still there, just learn to drive in your armoured car (if you don’t have, don’t worry) straight from home to work or wherever you go without taking detours and you are okay.
    .
    Or you can just go the countryside or the southern region into the more homogeneous european immigrant towns. It’s all about money in all these cases. But then, many if not most of people who immigrate to Brazil in order to retire or live there thinking about their “educated white privileges” end up ashamed of their choice, since they won’t be able to escape from being permeated with all the socioecomical problems and even cultural chaos there.
    .
    .
    In relation to the article, this tendency to move to Latin America sounds a real big hypocrisy. All these Baby Boomers or even people from recent generations wanting to retire or make career in South America clearly because everything will be easier, an cheap and easy-going like which they will be well received because they’re “moneyed, educated americans” or “europeans”. I mean, it doesn’t lack good places to live in the US or Europe, where they are well among their equals. It’s even bad when nationalists complain about migrants in their countries, but decide to “run away” or retire to these countries if things doesn’t end well for them, believing they can hang in any closed group of people in some “peaceful” South American country and better it by themselves, no matter how much untapped potential might have.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kirt
    The guys I know are not wealthy, just middle class and they gravitate toward Rio, Salvador de Bahia, Recife, etc.; not the much more European extreme south. Some have been victims of robbery but to them it's just another adventure to be recounted. They don't live in anything like fortress gated communities or ride in armored cars. They usually travel by bus or taxi. They are all single guys with a taste for Brazilian women, music and culture.
  67. @AP

    Why so many from Florida and Texas? Maybe because they are Latin Americans to begin with
     
    The excerpts from the article suggests they are Anglos.

    Parts of those states are so heavily Latin American already that moving to Latin America itself isn't much of a difference culturally.

    >Parts of those states are so heavily Latin American already that moving to Latin America itself isn’t much of a difference

    This exactly. If you’re going to be a foreigner in the country you grew up in, surrounded by people unlike you speaking a strange different language then why not go be a foreigner in a country you didn’t grow up in that’s cheaper and has a better climate?

    Read More
  68. Buddy Ray says:

    Hawaii was a retirement destination for F. M. Davis, who, during his adventurous time in Hawaii, wrote an autobiographical novella called “Sex Rebel.” You should read it, Mr. Sailer. I started reading you because you were a truth seeker. Read it.

    Read More
  69. @Art Deco
    (which might be why Hawaii hasn’t ever really taken off as a place for the wealthy to live while still conducting their business).

    About 30% of Hawaii's population is (1) small town and rural and (2) in loci where the one city in the islands is inaccessible except by cumbersome and expensive means. That's not for everyone.

    One of the oddities about Honolulu is that it's a city of middling size with big city housing costs. I had a relation who lived in Honolulu for a decade. He never bought any property because it was too expensive. The condominium he rented from an absentee owner was in a high rise constructed in 1968 which has since been torn down. The one he rented was their cheapest floor plan (a modest two bedroom unit: kitchenette, living room, lanai, utility room / wc, master bedroom with bath, small auxilliary bedroom). The asking price for those units was > $400,000 ca. 2006. You could get a handsome old 3-story home in a smart neighborhood in Rochester for that price at that time. Detached housing is atypical in Honolulu. Madelyn Dunham, once a vice president at the Bank of Hawaii, lived in detached housing only briefly during her 48 years there and never owned such a place.

    In any city, you've got value added from the trade the residents have with each other and you have value-added from export trade. The thing is, the opportunities for agriculture are quite circumscribed due to physiography and soil quality, shipping costs put a damper on manufacturing, and there isn't much to mine. The export trade would be in services: tourism, finance, and transit. Honolulu is not Brisbane. It does not have an ample hinterland endowed with agricultural land and skilled labor. It has about 500,000 people in its hinterland and not a lot of margin to add more at non-metropolitan densities. What's interesting about Honolulu is not that that its growth is stunted. What's interesting is that it has as many people as it does.

    One other thing about Honolulu that would put a damper on its appeal to many among the wealthy as a retirement destination: it's tacky. If you don't mind tacky, why not Florida?

    If you don’t mind tacky, why not Florida?

    Hawaii has waaay better surf!

    Read More
    • Replies: @E. Rekshun
    Hawaii has waaay better surf!

    Yes, but the water is cold year-round.
  70. $1500/month sounds like a pitch to the non-early Boomer demographic. Born after 1950, they are the Dudders. Look at the Presidents and Vice Presidents who were Boomers and you won’t find Dudders until Mike Pence. I don’t count Obama for reasons that should be obvious. Many Dudders lost their retirement to the financial crisis if they hadn’t already lost their retirement to the influx of cheap labor, divorces, outflow of manufacturing, etc. They’re on Social Security and that’s pretty much it. Well, OK, a lot of Dudders are on opooids, dead or rapidly heading there….

    So — what happens when the US loses its reserve currency status and the Dudders are living in a ‘developing country”? Well, the Dudders will be Deadders.

    Read More
  71. peterike says:

    The city is trying to combat local fears that the retirees are both driving up land prices and bleeding the public healthcare system, she said. And the language barrier has become a source of local irritation. Some restaurants and even neighborhoods seem like English-only spaces.

    Am I the only one that notices the rather extreme irony here?

    Read More
  72. Dave says:
    @jesse helms think-alike
    I read the article about US retirees in Cuenca Ecuador that Drudge links to at the Charlotte Observer.

    http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/nation-world/world/article154209369.html

    My BS detector pegged about half way through:

    -Better healthcare in a small turd world town of Concha Ecuardor than in the US.
    -Ecuador's Socialist President poured the country's oil wealth into healthcare and infrastructure.
    -The irony of Capitalist gringos flocking to Ecuador to take advantage of Socialized medicine
    -Unlike the US where that Devil Trump wants to undo Obamacare
    -Unlike the US where seniors are uncertain about their future because of looming cuts in social services

    The author of this piece needs to be sentenced to a few decades in the Gulag where he can get remedial education in writing believable Marxist propaganda.

    Instead of relying on your broken BS detector you could try crawling out of your cave and travel the world, including the dreaded Third World, and then you might realize that many parts of South America are quite safe, quite inexpensive and populated with easy going, hospitable people.
    Cuenca is actually a beautiful city, and certainly not as dangerous as Baltimore or Chicago.
    In fact, the worst that would probably happen to you in many parts of South America is pickpocketing .
    Some of you guys need to get out of the house a bit more.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Not to argue with your point, but you responded to a comment about socialized medicine with a comment about crime.
  73. Jack D says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    High elevations are good for life expectancy, though. If anything might be worth favoring such places.

    Downshifting to Latin America or some other cheap place is for most American retirees a no brainer, I would imagine. The reason most don't consider it, I imagine, is for the same reason that they go to the nearest MacDonald's upon landing in Paris or Shanghai: cultural conservatism. A preference for the way things are.

    High elevations are good to grow up in – you end up with extra lung capacity due to your body compensating for the thin air. Plus it’s usually unpolluted air, you have a simple plant based diet (maybe supplemented with some goat and goat’s milk) and since there are usually few roads you run from village to village (BTW, why are marathoners from Ethiopia and Kenya and not from Peru and Ecuador?). BTW, some of the longevity reports are exaggerated – even before researchers took an interest, a lot of older SA Indians had a tradition of exaggerating their ages. When people report that they are 140 years old, you can assume that it is false.

    But if you are a fat ass Westerner with pre-existing CPD, high elevation is the last place you would want to retire to. OTOH, I could see fit retirees from Colorado selling their condos and switching to a place where their retirement checks would go a lot farther.

    Read More
  74. Pat Boyle says:

    All important phenomena are best understood by those with a good understanding of Italian Opera.

    Why would anyone want to live abroad? Don Magnifico explains it in his first act aria in Cenerentola (Rossini’s Cinderella opera). As he explains in song “Servo, servo, servo”. He wants lots of servants.

    I have three Latin American maids who are due to come to my house tomorrow (and God knows with a new puppy I really need them). They will however only be here for about an hour or two. I would prefer one maid on a full time basis. I also need someone to pull the weeds in my yard. But local maids are well organized and expensive.

    I have a little Roomba like device that sweeps the floor but at the present state of technology there is no substitute for a human servant.

    Read More
  75. Jack D says:
    @Discordiax
    Don't underestimate the profit motive and competition. REtirement communities in Florida are a lot like summer camp for grownups--there is a full menu of activities, excursions, etc to keep you as busy as you want to be. My father bought a place for about $70,000 (roughly $50,000 for the land, $20,000 for the double-wide trailer*, plus about $5,000 for the realtor to furnish it) in a community, and signed up for (and narrowly escaped being made officers in) the IRish, Italian, German clubs, VFW, Legion (Friday clam bake, I think). Day trips to activities in Orlando, Miami, Tampa (each a 2 hour drive or so.)

    There is an extensive choice of things to do, and a bunch of people to do it with. He was advised to lock his doors at night, or wake up to find a widow in his bed.

    I don't think retiring to a foreign country has the same package.

    * Yes, it is technically a trailer park. But as I learned as an adolescent watching Boyz N The Hood, and seeing the same houses and yard plots that you'd see in nice 1940's built white neighborhoods in the northeast, it's not the architecture, it's the population.

    When you see trailer parks blasted to splinters by a tornado (which you often do) it’s not because tornadoes are magically attracted to trailers, it’s because trailers are shoddily built. I am familiar with construction costs and there’s no way you can build a 1,500 sq. ft house (about the size of a double wide trailer) for $20,000 or even close to it. The only way they are doing this is by taking severe short cuts in the construction. Anyway, I assume that $20,000 buys you a used trailer – trailers are more like cars that depreciate rapidly than they are to normal houses which tend to retain their value.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Discordiax
    They're in a flood area, so the expectation is that you're going to be rebuilding every 10-25 years.
  76. Lake Chapala used to sound interesting, but I’m not sure I could stomach Fred Reed holding forth in the local diner about how Mexicans are god’s gift to humanity and to not want 30 million of them in your local emergency rooms is just so gringo privilegist.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Corvinus
    I would imagine that the locals are also sick and tired of the invading Gringos inviting themselves. First a trickle, then a torrent, of blue hairs lamenting why the townies are at siesta when they should be opening up their restaurants to serve up the early bird specials of the day.
    , @Lurker

    I’m not sure I could stomach Fred Reed holding forth in the local diner about how Mexicans are god’s gift to humanity
     
    It's OK, eventually he'd have to go and serve another table.
  77. @Jack D
    When you see trailer parks blasted to splinters by a tornado (which you often do) it's not because tornadoes are magically attracted to trailers, it's because trailers are shoddily built. I am familiar with construction costs and there's no way you can build a 1,500 sq. ft house (about the size of a double wide trailer) for $20,000 or even close to it. The only way they are doing this is by taking severe short cuts in the construction. Anyway, I assume that $20,000 buys you a used trailer - trailers are more like cars that depreciate rapidly than they are to normal houses which tend to retain their value.

    They’re in a flood area, so the expectation is that you’re going to be rebuilding every 10-25 years.

    Read More
  78. dsgntd_plyr says: • Website

    There’s no accurate way to measure the phenomenon, but the Social Security Administration was sending payments to 380,000 retired U.S. workers living abroad in 2014 — up 50 percent from a decade ago.

    no one who lives outside the country should be able to get welfare. if you can afford international travel you’re not poor.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Flip
    Social Security is not welfare, at least not until it is means tested in the future (which I personally would be ok with).
    , @James Richard
    I found a single Icelandair Economy Class Special roundtrip ticket from PDX to MAN on Expedia for $301.08 a couple of weeks ago.
    , @Curle
    I understand it is very common for college students to use student loans for travel, including overseas vacations.
  79. Corvinus says:
    @Bragadocious
    Lake Chapala used to sound interesting, but I'm not sure I could stomach Fred Reed holding forth in the local diner about how Mexicans are god's gift to humanity and to not want 30 million of them in your local emergency rooms is just so gringo privilegist.

    I would imagine that the locals are also sick and tired of the invading Gringos inviting themselves. First a trickle, then a torrent, of blue hairs lamenting why the townies are at siesta when they should be opening up their restaurants to serve up the early bird specials of the day.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bel Riose
    "I would imagine that the locals are also sick and tired of the invading Gringos inviting themselves."

    The "Gringos" aren't invading anyone. They are merely taking advantage of their host country's immigration / tourist / foreign retiree laws -- just like immigrants who move to America take advantage of OUR laws.

    If the citizens of the country to which the "Gringos" have moved don't like the fact that the "Gringos" "invite themselves" into their land, they are free to change their laws accordingly.

    Until then, the citizens of said country don't have any right to complain

    After all, if a country has laws which permits Gringo retirees to move to and live in said country, those laws are really an "invitation" for such Gringos to arrive and take up residence, no?

    You've made this argument so often yourself (only if favor of unlimited Muslim immigration into the U.S.) that it's an integral part of your shtick when it comes to immigration.

    So, Corvinus old boy, consider yourself -- hoist by your own petard.

    And feel free to consider yourself a hypocrite as well.

    , @Karl
    80 Corvinus > I would imagine that the locals are also sick and tired of the invading Gringos inviting themselves

    and here I was, thinking that countries COMPETE LIKE CRAZY to get western retirees with their steady monthly income of hard currencies.

    No need to "imagine", sir,.... you can just google on "retirement visa", or (e.g.) "Malaysia My Second Home"

    Now I understand why Mr Trump didn't appoint you to be Secretary of the Treasury
  80. @bored identity
    bored identity is reading snowflaking passengers whining & bragging about Fake Phileas Fogg experiences during their white collar priviliged flights to Dubai, Singapore, Hong-Kong....

    Bwaaaaa,...


    Why don't Y'all try Ft. Polk-Indianapolis....on a Greyhound fare, with 3 transfers,1 book, 1 crossword puzzles, and 0 gadgets , as a foolishly inexperienced bored did it in 2000 AD ?

    https://www.rome2rio.com/s/Fort-Polk-South/Indianapolis

    Why did you do that? I did something like that once when I was really poor and struggling. I ended up making it where I was going to, but it wasn’t a pleasant time in my life – though a memorable one.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bored identity
    Oh, I was poor and a strugglingas well ( military subcontractor's subcontractor ) ; but, fortunately, that's all an ancient history, as for nowadays bored identity is mostly... poor.


    Too poor to afford any cheap Greyhounding experience.
  81. George says:

    Who are these low income retirees? My guess is public school teachers and other government/military retirees. My speculation is based on the fact that private sector wage surfs can’t affort to retire, military healthcare aka Tricare seems to be international, ect.

    Observations:

    Government workers are probably less loyal to the US as they fully expect to retire abroad and don’t want any problems. Increasingly the US military retirees and even works abroad. You can sense that from reading mainstream media where talk is of letting various parts of traditional America die. See: Kevin Williamson

    http://www.focusonmexico.com/TRICARE-The-Military-Health-Plan.html

    This could mean that Mexico is undervalued or the US is overvalued.

    Although the implication is that Americans are using medical care that would be available to Mexicans, the reality is medical care in Mexico is probably expanding due to the presence of foreign retirees.

    BTW, the joker in the deck is the pension crisis. See pensiontsunami.com for details. It is my understanding that federal pensions, including SS, are 0% reserved, 100% ‘pay as you go’.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Germany is full of American military retirees and their German wives.
  82. @Dave Pinsen
    The creator of Sex and the City, Candace Bushnell, married a Ballerino. And Baryshnikov is famously straight. I wouldn't be surprised if most were straight, but I don't know.

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2002/07/07/style/weddings-vows-candace-bushnell-charles-askegard.html?referer=

    Steve once pointed out that in Eastern Europe, a ballet career is as much or more about class aspirations than about letting one’s butterflies flutter free.

    Nureyev was bi– he was introduced to “the art of male love” by his girlfriend’s other boyfriend. Speaking of class, few celebrities were willing to appear on The Muppet Show at first, but after Nureyev agreed to, suddenly every other A-lister wanted to as well.

    Baryshnikov sired a pony– okay, a Pony. His daughter with Jessica Lange went to Stillwater Area High School while living with Jessica and Sam Shepard. Misha has three other kids elsewhere.

    http://wikivisually.com/wiki/Shura_Baryshnikov

    http://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/jessica-lange-article-032006

    Read More
    • Replies: @Truth

    His daughter with Jessica Lange
     
    I guess science has scarily advanced over the past 40 years...
  83. @Father O'Hara
    From LA to Tipperary?

    There are no direct flights from LAX to Shannon but both Aer Lingus and Ethiopian Airlines(!) do fly non-stop to Dublin several times a week. 10 hours and 5200 miles.

    Read More
  84. @James Richard
    There are some real doozies on this list

    https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/nonstop-flights-20-longest-flights-in-the-world-ranked-by-mileage

    but the longest current regularly scheduled non-stop flight is from Doha,Qatar to Auckland. 9032 miles. I was just reading that United has ordered some specially built 787s (fewer seats, more fuel) for a proposed flight from the US to Singapore that is even longer. Singapore is becoming a popular hub for long distance flights to the Orient that were previously routed to Hong Kong.

    The manufacturers are increasing the air pressure to simulate a lower altitude of 6000 feet on these long flights too. I guess they don't want elderly tourists to expire before they arrive at their destination. I hear tell that Emirates is the best airline but their first class fares cost as much as a good car.

    Back in the ’90s, the Minneapolis/St Paul-to-Hong Kong route on Northwest was the longest route in the world, but it didn’t last long. The service, that is, not the flight. Two years, I think.

    Don’t know about the onboard service, but since Northwest’s flight attendants were Teamsters, you didn’t want to cross them. One of them gave a toddler Xanax in her juice. On a short flight, no less.

    Read More
  85. prosa123 says: • Website
    @BenKenobi
    My longest flight ever was direct from Dubai to Toronto. At least 12 hours.

    I chugged a bottle of Nyquil after boarding and woke up at my destination. The elderly Jewish couple I sat beside marvelled at my ability to not go to the bathroom.

    Why would Jewish people go to Dubai?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Drugs, clubs, porn and beautiful Russian girl and boy prostitutes.
    , @biz
    I doubt they were going to Dubai. It is a major transfer airport. If you are flying to or back from South Asia, Thailand, or many places in Africa, you are likely going through Dubai.
  86. Flip says:
    @dsgntd_plyr

    There’s no accurate way to measure the phenomenon, but the Social Security Administration was sending payments to 380,000 retired U.S. workers living abroad in 2014 — up 50 percent from a decade ago.
     
    no one who lives outside the country should be able to get welfare. if you can afford international travel you're not poor.

    Social Security is not welfare, at least not until it is means tested in the future (which I personally would be ok with).

    Read More
  87. Deckin says:

    I actually know someone who retired to Cuenca. Here are some observations he told me:
    1. The food is bland–I would have thought it would be hot and spicy, but that’s not part of the native diet there, for whatever reason.
    2. The retirees there really try to sell it to others.
    3. It’s super cheap.
    4. There’s a sort of benign lawlessness to the place. People, if they get in car wrecks, will just walk away and leave the car on the side of the road. He said it’s not uncommon to see this everywhere.
    5. It’s never super hot or super cold–so they do have a nice climate.

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Richard

    There’s a sort of benign lawlessness to the place. People, if they get in car wrecks, will just walk away and leave the car on the side of the road. He said it’s not uncommon to see this everywhere.
     
    Sounds like the San Joaquin Valley!
    , @Jack D
    It's funny that because Mexican cuisine uses a lot of chili peppers (though even Mexican food is not as relentlessly hot as some people imagine it to be) somehow people assume that this carries over to the rest of Latin America and even Spain. The climate of Ecuador is not really suited to growing chili peppers, especially at high altitudes. Potatoes are more like it.

    As for climate, it's a good idea to look at places where you can grow high quality Arabica coffee beans. Coffee thrives in mild rather than hot temperatures but cannot tolerate any frost so it grows mostly on mountains in the tropics.

  88. @Mike Sylwester
    My wife is Lithuanian, and I have visited Lithuania with her many times.

    I am 64 years old, and I have felt for many years that retiring to Lithuania would be a good idea. I know Lithuanian Americans who have retired there and live well on their Social Security benefits.

    There is no way, however, that my wife would agree to go back and live in Lithuania. She likes it here.

    Because of the victory of feminism here?

    Read More
  89. Flip says:
    @Sunbeam
    "High elevations are good for life expectancy, though. If anything might be worth favoring such places. "

    Interesting contention. Intuitively I believe it, but what are the reasons exactly?
    Read More
    • Replies: @CapitalistRoader
    People's bodies acclimate to altitude within a few days or a week at most, regardless of age.
  90. @dsgntd_plyr

    There’s no accurate way to measure the phenomenon, but the Social Security Administration was sending payments to 380,000 retired U.S. workers living abroad in 2014 — up 50 percent from a decade ago.
     
    no one who lives outside the country should be able to get welfare. if you can afford international travel you're not poor.

    I found a single Icelandair Economy Class Special roundtrip ticket from PDX to MAN on Expedia for $301.08 a couple of weeks ago.

    Read More
  91. @bored identity
    bored identity is reading snowflaking passengers whining & bragging about Fake Phileas Fogg experiences during their white collar priviliged flights to Dubai, Singapore, Hong-Kong....

    Bwaaaaa,...


    Why don't Y'all try Ft. Polk-Indianapolis....on a Greyhound fare, with 3 transfers,1 book, 1 crossword puzzles, and 0 gadgets , as a foolishly inexperienced bored did it in 2000 AD ?

    https://www.rome2rio.com/s/Fort-Polk-South/Indianapolis

    Because we all grew up and got real jobs?

    Read More
    • Replies: @bored identity
    Continue, please...

    bored identity is dying of curiosity to hear what grown-up-make-a-diference important function you mantain on this planet.


    Something tells me that with your ass and nose being constantly Way Up In The Air, your frequent flyer douchebagery is fully inflated by the same sense of self-importance as is the case with this fictional Airport Dweller:


    https://youtu.be/ZDgFAFQGZbI


    Don't you think it's time for you to renew your Condé Nast Package subscription?





    ?

    S
    , @bored identity
    Continue, please...

    bored identity is dying of curiosity to hear what grown-up-make-a-diference important function you maintain on this planet.


    Something tells me that with your ass and nose being constantly Way Up In The Air, your frequent flyer douchebaggery is fully inflated by the same sense of self-importance as is the case with this fictional Airport Dweller:


    https://youtu.be/ZDgFAFQGZbI


    Don't you think it's time for you to renew your Condé Nast Package subscription?
  92. @Dave Pinsen
    The creator of Sex and the City, Candace Bushnell, married a Ballerino. And Baryshnikov is famously straight. I wouldn't be surprised if most were straight, but I don't know.

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2002/07/07/style/weddings-vows-candace-bushnell-charles-askegard.html?referer=

    I’ve already shared this, but my husband was a ballet/broadway dancer who took classes with Baryshnikov in the 80′s. He claims women paid Baryshnikov money to try to get pregnant by him.

    He also said about 2/3 of the male ballet dancers were queers.

    In our teen/child ballet world the males all claim to be straight and the few who are likely not wind up leaving ballet. You have to be really, really confident of your masculinity to be a straight male ballet dancer.

    Read More
  93. Still about five years to go to early retirement for me, but I’m thinking June – August in a rental on the NH coast and Sep. – May on the FL east coast.

    Read More
  94. @Whoever
    I've flown UAL155 several times: GUM to HNL via TKK, PNI, KSA, KWA and MAJ, close to 12 hours flight time on a 737-800.
    Not non-stop, with down time on each island, and kind of fun, with an eclectic assortment of passengers -- some of whom seem as if they came straight out of a Somerset Maugham short story.
    It's a long, long haul and you get to know your fellow passengers pretty well. The longest leg is from MAJ to HNL, about five hours. Everybody sleeps, except for those leaning their heads together, whispering secrets to strangers.

    Everybody sleeps, except for those leaning their heads together, whispering secrets to strangers.

    That’s Beautiful: Jenner Ickham Errican

    Read More
  95. jim jones says:

    Spain is the standard retirement spot for Brits, I am surprised more Yanks don`t consider it – only a short hop across the Pond.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    Portugal is popular with French retirees. Morocco was once, and may still be, but I think more people are nervous about the political situation there.
    , @Another Canadian
    I know a couple who retired there from Canada about a year ago. They can see the Rock of Gibraltar from their patio. It's still quite inexpensive despite a real estate recovery, however anything with an engine costs an arm and a leg.
  96. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Dave Pinsen
    The creator of Sex and the City, Candace Bushnell, married a Ballerino. And Baryshnikov is famously straight. I wouldn't be surprised if most were straight, but I don't know.

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2002/07/07/style/weddings-vows-candace-bushnell-charles-askegard.html?referer=

    Movie star Natalie Portman is married to a French ballerino.

    Read More
  97. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @prosa123
    Why would Jewish people go to Dubai?

    Drugs, clubs, porn and beautiful Russian girl and boy prostitutes.

    Read More
  98. @Art Deco
    (which might be why Hawaii hasn’t ever really taken off as a place for the wealthy to live while still conducting their business).

    About 30% of Hawaii's population is (1) small town and rural and (2) in loci where the one city in the islands is inaccessible except by cumbersome and expensive means. That's not for everyone.

    One of the oddities about Honolulu is that it's a city of middling size with big city housing costs. I had a relation who lived in Honolulu for a decade. He never bought any property because it was too expensive. The condominium he rented from an absentee owner was in a high rise constructed in 1968 which has since been torn down. The one he rented was their cheapest floor plan (a modest two bedroom unit: kitchenette, living room, lanai, utility room / wc, master bedroom with bath, small auxilliary bedroom). The asking price for those units was > $400,000 ca. 2006. You could get a handsome old 3-story home in a smart neighborhood in Rochester for that price at that time. Detached housing is atypical in Honolulu. Madelyn Dunham, once a vice president at the Bank of Hawaii, lived in detached housing only briefly during her 48 years there and never owned such a place.

    In any city, you've got value added from the trade the residents have with each other and you have value-added from export trade. The thing is, the opportunities for agriculture are quite circumscribed due to physiography and soil quality, shipping costs put a damper on manufacturing, and there isn't much to mine. The export trade would be in services: tourism, finance, and transit. Honolulu is not Brisbane. It does not have an ample hinterland endowed with agricultural land and skilled labor. It has about 500,000 people in its hinterland and not a lot of margin to add more at non-metropolitan densities. What's interesting about Honolulu is not that that its growth is stunted. What's interesting is that it has as many people as it does.

    One other thing about Honolulu that would put a damper on its appeal to many among the wealthy as a retirement destination: it's tacky. If you don't mind tacky, why not Florida?

    Re Honolulu – a couple of acquaintances that travel every other year from the east coast advise of huge numbers of vagrants milling around the public spaces and beaches. The City of Honolulu even offers full-paid one-way tickets to mainland US for any vagrant. The NYT has covered this quite a bit.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/04/us/hawaii-homeless-criminal-law-sitting-ban.html?_r=0

    https://www.google.com/#q=%22new+york+times%22+AND+%22honolulu%22+AND+%22homeless%22

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Wasn't like that ca. 1975.

    Since their export trade is crucially dependent on their amenities, they need to be very vigorous about reducing the number of vagrants to a feasible minimum.
    , @Captain Tripps

    Re Honolulu – a couple of acquaintances that travel every other year from the east coast advise of huge numbers of vagrants milling around the public spaces and beaches.
     
    True. However, they are pretty harmless and keep to themselves. Anyone who becomes loud and/or appearing to act crazily/aggressively is quickly removed by HPD. Lots of aggressive panhandlers or crazy homeless would depress the primary industry (tourism). Its a balancing act; too many homeless, even harmless ones, will negatively impact the State's bottom line.
  99. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @George
    Who are these low income retirees? My guess is public school teachers and other government/military retirees. My speculation is based on the fact that private sector wage surfs can't affort to retire, military healthcare aka Tricare seems to be international, ect.

    Observations:

    Government workers are probably less loyal to the US as they fully expect to retire abroad and don't want any problems. Increasingly the US military retirees and even works abroad. You can sense that from reading mainstream media where talk is of letting various parts of traditional America die. See: Kevin Williamson

    http://www.focusonmexico.com/TRICARE-The-Military-Health-Plan.html

    This could mean that Mexico is undervalued or the US is overvalued.

    Although the implication is that Americans are using medical care that would be available to Mexicans, the reality is medical care in Mexico is probably expanding due to the presence of foreign retirees.

    BTW, the joker in the deck is the pension crisis. See pensiontsunami.com for details. It is my understanding that federal pensions, including SS, are 0% reserved, 100% 'pay as you go'.

    Germany is full of American military retirees and their German wives.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    Several thousand ... you don't trip over military retirees in Germany unless you are near a still extant base. What you do find a lot of is accountants and lawyers.
  100. @James Richard

    If you don’t mind tacky, why not Florida?
     
    Hawaii has waaay better surf!

    Hawaii has waaay better surf!

    Yes, but the water is cold year-round.

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Richard
    Not as cold as the Pacific Ocean north of Point Conception! It does keep the crowds down to a minimum though.
  101. whorefinder says: • Website

    That TV show NCIS had two characters retire to Mexico: Gibbs (temporarily) and Gibbs’s predecessor (whom Gibbs went to live with).

    Of course, even when retired both of them came back to the U.S. a lot to do stuff. The underlying theme was that retirement to a foreign land sounds nice, but there’s a reason why it’s so cheap to live in a villa in a sleepy Mexican village: it’s friggin’ boring. No one’s around, the local TV is crap, there’s nothing to do.

    I’ve never really understood people who work and live and raise a family their entire adult lives in one state only to move to another on retirement. Leave everything you’ve built and known just for warmer weather? What’s wrong with you? Why didn’t you just move there in the first place, if you thought it so wonderful?

    Then I realized most people who permanently do it are either Jews or the kind of “rootless cosmopolitans” who hang out with Jews (e.g. Joe Kennedy, Sr.). So, really, if you don’t give a crap where you lived but used it to make money and don’t have any deep human connections, yeah, it makes sense. But most goyim ain’t like that.

    Personally, I like where I live. That’s why I live here.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Milo Minderbinder
    My dad grew up in Alabama and my mom in Louisiana. They met in Philadelphia when my dad was in medical school. He joined a practice in South Jersey and lived there for the 35 years. When my dad retired, my mom wanted to move as "Gloucester County has been ruined".


    The population doubled from 1970 to 1980 alone. In the full year they were in NJ the property taxes on their house were $15,000.

    And this was before the opiod epidemic. The county has one of the higher OD rates in the country. I biked through there 2 weeks ago and saw two women in their 50's dazed and stumbling down the sidewalk. My Mom was right to get out.

    So they returned to the South and retired to the Shenandoah Valley where they play lots of bridge. My mother figures by the time they ruin The Valley she'll be dead.

    , @Barnard
    I have wondered that about Latin American retirees as well. What do they do all day and who do they see on a regular basis? The Florida or Arizona retirement community makes a lot more sense.
    , @Anonymous
    Retiring away from family and living (or at least trying to live) independently into advanced age is more of a WASP thing. Elderly Jews might retire to Florida but they're known for constantly pestering their families.
    , @Captain Tripps

    I’ve never really understood people who work and live and raise a family their entire adult lives in one state only to move to another on retirement. Leave everything you’ve built and known just for warmer weather? What’s wrong with you? Why didn’t you just move there in the first place, if you thought it so wonderful?
     
    I understand and am a bit sympathetic to your sentiment. However, health has a lot to do with these decisions. Many elderly can't function well in temperate (but with a robust winter)/cold climates. I know this will drive our retirement location decision; my wife suffers from a condition called Reynaud's syndrome, where her extremities lose blood circulation in colder weather:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raynaud_syndrome

    Her family evolved for tropical living, so temperate/cold weather is an anomaly for her. I have no problems with the cold, but ultimately I want to live somewhere where she will be comfortable and not have to worry about that; health problems tend to worsen with age, but if you can ameliorate the effects, then do so.
    , @Anonymous
    When you've got a prostate and hemorrhoid the size of grapefruits, you'll understand why retirees decamp away from their families to places like Florida and the relief they afford. The climate does wonders for swollen tissue and blood vessels. The climate down there is like a giant Sitz bath:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sitz_bath

    A sitz bath or hip bath is a bath in which a person sits in water up to the hips.[1] It is used to relieve discomfort and pain in the lower part of the body, for example, due to hemorrhoids (piles), anal fissures, rectal surgery, an episiotomy, uterine cramps, inflammatory bowel disease, and infections of the bladder, prostate or vagina. It works by keeping the affected area clean and increasing the flow of blood to it.
     
  102. @Daniel Chieh
    Why did you do that? I did something like that once when I was really poor and struggling. I ended up making it where I was going to, but it wasn't a pleasant time in my life - though a memorable one.

    Oh, I was poor and a strugglingas well ( military subcontractor’s subcontractor ) ; but, fortunately, that’s all an ancient history, as for nowadays bored identity is mostly… poor.

    Too poor to afford any cheap Greyhounding experience.

    Read More
  103. res says:

    https://internationalliving.com/ has an interesting look at living as an American abroad from a practitioner/advocate POV.

    Read More
  104. Rancho Santa Fe, or has Gates created some Hank Scorpio Cypress Creek-type place in the desert somewhere with a similar name to throw the rubes off the trail … ?

    Read More
  105. @fitzGetty
    ... and soon, Quantas nonstop from LHR to Perth - with no distasteful stop in any distasteful Mid East hell hole...

    … and soon, Quantas nonstop from LHR to Perth – with no distasteful stop in any distasteful Mid East hell hole…

    … except for that one stop in London. Maybe it should just take off and keep getting refueled in-flight until the business class passengers’ credit cards get maxed out. It’d keep em out of the 3rd world for a while, anyway.

    Of course, you’ve got to come down for blue juice, ice, and the hot-section overhauls.

    Read More
  106. @cthulhu
    My degree-of-separation number from Bill Gates is 3, in two ways: first, Gates' wife is the daughter of one of my former co-workers; second, and relevant to this story, the daughter of another former co-worker took care of the saltwater aquarium at Gates' Rancho Santa Fe home?

    Just a curious coincidence...

    Co-worker took care of the saltwater aquarium at Gates’ Rancho Santa Fe home

    OK, that’s not quite up there with the guy who spent his apocryphal working life carrying ice to the polar bear at Hearst Castle, but it’s close. I thought Gates stood for something much nobler in the history of American capitalism: increasing the population of Africa to 5 billion by 2100.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Triumph104
    No one in the Gates family wants poor people to have more children. Bill and Melinda Gates are pro-contraception and pro-abortion. Bill Gates Sr. served on the board of Planned Parenthood. LINK

    After Trump cut funding to international organizations that provide abortion information, an international group called She Decides was formed to replace the loss funding. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation promised $20 million. "The money will go to five agencies to pay for contraception supplies, counselling, safe abortion services in countries where abortion is legal and other family planning programs, primarily in Africa and other regions of the developing world." LINK

    In response to the abortion-related cuts, Melinda Gates wrote a strange opinion piece for CNN.

    Less than 1% of the US federal budget goes to aid, and the dollars spent abroad reap dividends for our country, too. ...

    The money we spend on foreign aid is a long-term investment in Americans themselves. ...

    When the United States invests in strengthening health systems abroad, it also makes deadly epidemics less likely to land on our shores. ...

    Investing in global health and development also helps keep Americans safe. When people in the world's poorest places have the chance to support their families and contribute to their communities, they are less likely to resort to violence. ...

    What's more, by helping countries lift themselves out of poverty, we also create markets for US products. ...

    Another US investment that yields enormous returns for the global economy is contraceptives. ...

    Smaller families mean women are better able to work outside the home...

    For all these reasons, I will spend my time in D.C. this week making the case that if we care about keeping America healthy, safe and prosperous, then we must prioritize foreign aid. The cost of these cuts is far too great for our country — or our conscience — to bear.

    http://edition.cnn.com/2017/04/20/opinions/melinda-gates-the-best-investment-america-can-make/index.html
     

    , @Medvedev

    I thought Gates stood for something much nobler in the history of American capitalism: increasing the population of Africa to 5 billion by 2100.
     
    The problem with liberal intellectuals, they assume that people in Africa have the same IQ and think the same way as they think:
    "Let's give them aid and vaccines and food, so they don't starve. Sure, they don't want their children to starve and suffer, so they won't have any more children after that." Turns out they don't care and have as many children as they can. That's why population of Africa skyrocketed from ~220 mln in 1950 to ~1200 mln today and is set to reach 4.3 bln by the end of the century.
    As Haiti and Jamaica demonstrate it's better to let them destroy country's ecosystem and learn the importance of family planning the hard way. Faster and more effective.
  107. countenance says: • Website

    And then you’ll always have to look behind your back, worrying about some banana republic Chavez type confiscating and expropriating everything the gringo-invaders have, because power to the people.

    Read More
  108. @Dave Pinsen
    The creator of Sex and the City, Candace Bushnell, married a Ballerino. And Baryshnikov is famously straight. I wouldn't be surprised if most were straight, but I don't know.

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2002/07/07/style/weddings-vows-candace-bushnell-charles-askegard.html?referer=

    Straight male ballet dancers? Well, they do get to dance with pretty women and lift them up by their nether regions…

    Think of all the rehearsals! “I think we need to practice that lift again.”

    Read More
  109. NOTA says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    The creator of Sex and the City, Candace Bushnell, married a Ballerino. And Baryshnikov is famously straight. I wouldn't be surprised if most were straight, but I don't know.

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2002/07/07/style/weddings-vows-candace-bushnell-charles-askegard.html?referer=

    I bet straight ballerinos have a really entertaining life, surrounded by super girly, super fit women and with like 3/4 of the natural competition gay.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    But then very few men think that overcoming their aversion to dancing is worth it. I bet 95% of straight males hate dancing
    It's a girly thing.
  110. @Hapalong Cassidy
    "People tend to forget that South America is not south of North America, but southeast of North America."

    Back in the 1500s, the Spanish and the Pope didn't realize that fact either, when they drew that longitude line dividing the world between Spain and Portugal. The original idea was Spain would get all of the New World, while Portugal would have claim to Africa and all the islands of its coast. Imagine the pleasant surprise to the Portuguese (and the shock to the Spanish), when it was discovered that a big chunk of South America extended east of that longitude line.

    Back in the 1500s, the Spanish and the Pope didn’t realize that fact either, when they drew that longitude line dividing the world between Spain and Portugal.

    This is great stuff to learn here on unz, Cassidy. Thanks.

    Here’s the problem these explorers had in determining longitude. a) To get good numbers you need accurate clocks OR b) something to measure that happened at the same time everywhere in the world.

    Yeah, the sun and stars are fine for latitude, as you just need the angle of the pole star (gives you 1 deg error max, even if you had no idea of your longitude) at night, or just the highest angle of sun-above-horizon in the daytime – cloudy nights and days, tough shit. For longitude, you may use any star, including ours, planet whatever you want (well, a decent ways from the pole), but you need the time of day too. The development of a long-term-accurate clock was the big key to getting accurate position (as described in a well-readable book called “Longitude”).

    except…. the astronomers came through with some workarounds based on celestial events like eclipses, positions of the moons of Jupiter (you can see these even with 7x binos) such as an occulation of a certain moon by the big planet or a entrance of exit of a transit by one of them, stuff like that. You had to have something that you could predict accurately, unless you wanted to back-calculate position info after the fact (i.e. when the ship got back, the info from the logs could be compared to that in Greenwich, the capital of all astronomy). Real time on-the-spot knowledge of a celestial event’s coming was much better though. The main thing was you had see something happening that, of course happened, but could be seen at the same time in Greenwich. The time it happened (or was predicted to happen) in Greenwich WAS the clock. Cool stuff, and it explains why the early explorers knew a lot about astronomy – it wasn’t just a scientific part of the mission.

    We had some smart people in those days. Is it any comparison between these astronomers and explorers of these Royal Societies vs. guys like Gates and Zuckerberg?

    Read More
  111. OT: Sorry if this has been mentioned already, but Eric Turkheimer has written a new piece over at his Genetics and Human Agency blog (sort of) responding to Steve and others. He even links to Steve.

    In the post, he lays down the gauntlet to Steve and others.

    http://www.geneticshumanagency.org/gha/origin-of-race-differences-in-intelligence-is-not-a-scientific-question/

    It is the hereditarians who are trying to reach a strong and potentially destructive conclusion, and the burden is absolutely on them to demonstrate that they have a well-grounded empirical and quantitative theory to work with. So, if you are out there and think that group differences t are at least partially genetic, please explain exactly what you mean, in empirical terms. Do you mean that some portion of the IQ gap will never go away, no matter what we do environmentally? Do you mean we will discover genes with hard-wired biological consequences for IQ, and their frequencies will differ across groups? Are polygenic risk scores going to do it somehow? But don’t let me mischaracterize your position: explain it yourself.

    Ironically (or not), you can’t leave a comment. :)

    Turkheimer seems to be saying that the hereditarians and anti-hereditarians can’t prove their case scientifically so it’s all just an argument about how many angels you fit on the head of a pin. (Not sure what that means for his own research.)

    The third reason why this argument never gets anywhere is the most important: there is no valid scientific basis for answering the question in the first place.

    I predict that in a relatively short period of time, contemporary race science will seem just as transparently unscientific and empirically untrue as the race science of the early 20th Century now appears from our modern perspective.

    Mind you, Turkheimer doesn’t explain why, but promises to do so in the future.

    Frankly, the entire post was odd, confusing and somewhat cryptic. He kept promising to explain himself in later posts.

    Anyway, Steve, you have been challenged.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    Worth noting that Turkheimer linked to both Steve and Razib in that post.
    , @candid_observer
    The thing to keep in mind about people like Turkheimer is that they aren't, at heart, scientists. They are, instead, lawyers-- lawyers arguing for a position dictated by ideology.

    When the facts are against you, pound the table. Turkheimer is pounding that table with every ad hominem he can think of.

    , @Bill

    I predict that in a relatively short period of time, contemporary race science will seem just as transparently unscientific and empirically untrue as the race science of the early 20th Century now appears from our modern perspective.
     
    Uh, does the race science of the early 20th Century now appear transparently unscientific and empirically untrue? Do the hereditarians generally concede a point like this?
    , @Bill
    I'm also curious about this bit:

    Now have a look at the Rushton and Jensen paper making the case for the partial genetic determination of racial differences, or listen to Murray and Harris, or read any of the replies to our piece in Vox. Where are the percentages? Where is the equivalent of the ACE model?
     
    Regardless of what one thinks of the ACE model, is it true that racial hereditarians (or whatever you are supposed to call them) do not have an "empirical theory" which is the rough equivalent of the ACE model?
  112. Lot says:
    @Karl
    14 Lot > Most of Florida is not very expensive either



    but not too many SocialSecurity retirees in FL are shacking up with 19 year old Latinas. Whose overall maintenance runs, say, $200-300/month

    Quite easy to do, in Central America.

    Most expat American retirees continue to receive their money through American banks.

    My anecdotal knowledge of this is they are not hot 19 year olds. More typical is mid-50s American man with early 30′s foreign woman who is average looking and argues.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Karl
    Lot > My anecdotal knowledge of this

    quoted without comment. Next you'll be quoting CNN documentaries.

    > is they are not hot 19 year olds. More typical is mid-50s American man

    If they are mid-50's it's not very likely that they are actually retired

    > with early 30′s foreign woman who is average looking and argues

    In this world, you get the kind of government you deserve, and the kind of pussy you deserve..

  113. Roger says:

    Do those countries have good internet connections? Phone service? English language TV?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan Adams

    English language TV?
     
    English-language TV is the greatest force for evil the world has ever known. It is the wellspring of multiculti worship, Trump-bashing, and all such unholy bullshit.

    Smash your television and free your mind.
    , @Triumph104
    Speaking of technology, Ecuador has restrictions on the number of electronic goods that a traveler can bring into the country duty-free. There may be a tax on items over the limit.

    1 new and 1 unit used the following portable items: photographic cameras; imagesetter; PDA or PC tablet (tablet); Portable global positioning system (GPS) ;. Laptop and peripherals (mouse, headphones, cameras, keyboard, and the like); Video games console (portable or not); Electronic calculator ;

    1 new or used unit, of the following goods: Player image / video or portable sound; TV (up to 24 “); Desktop computer and its peripherals (mouse, headphones, cameras, keyboard, scanner and the like); Binoculars; Projection apparatus and screen; Computer monitor up to 22 “; Printer; and, telephone or fax.

    If found two or more units of the items in the above list regardless of the second unit is new or used, it shall be deemed taxable goods.

    http://ecuadorresources.com/what-can-you-bring-with-you-to-ecuador/
     

    , @res
    A good internet connection goes a long way towards covering the other two. Well, not cell phone coverage I guess, but the landline aspect.
    , @Pepe

    Do those countries have good internet connections? Phone service? English language TV?
     
    In central Mexico, I pay about $45.00 US a month to a cable company that provides internet, cable and phone service.

    The internet is 20 mbps, which allows me to work online. I get around 200 cable channels, about half of which are HD including 20 pay movie channels. All English language entertainment and sports channels are available in English. The phone service is unlimited calls for Mexico, the US and Canada, including cell phones.

    I could get Netflix and stuff like that, but I really would rather watch less tv. Most big US and European films will play down here with Spanish subtitles. I do miss some of the smaller independent or foreign films, but I sense fewer of these are being made. At any rate, I check movie review sites weekly and make notes on any films I might want to see and order them from Amazon or look for them when I go up to the US once or twice a year for weekly trips. Pirated dvd's cost about 75 US cents and will pretty much cover all films released in Mexico.
    , @Jack D
    I can't speak to Ecuador specifically, but because the US was the earliest adopter of cell phone technology and because of our tendency toward unregulated oligopoly carriers, the US in general has among the worst and highest cost cell phone service in the world. Ditto for internet service. We think of the US being ahead on this kind of stuff but sadly when you go abroad you realize that we have fallen behind on a lot of things. Most 3rd world countries would be ashamed to have an airport like La Guardia. We have spent all of our treasure on wars, on welfare, on security theater, on unnecessary college degrees, on all sorts of BS and have badly neglected our infrastructure

    English TV - this can be satisfied with streaming services if you have good enough internet or cell service, which you probably will. You can also get a satellite dish of some kind.

    Phone - most 3rd worldish places never had good wireline service to begin with (usually run, badly, by the local post office) so most people switched to cell long ago. Wireline phone service is a relic - I know a lot of seniors are used to having it and it is not without its advantages, but it's somewhere up there with carburetors and tube TVs on the list of obsolete technologies.
  114. BB753 says:
    @NOTA
    I bet straight ballerinos have a really entertaining life, surrounded by super girly, super fit women and with like 3/4 of the natural competition gay.

    But then very few men think that overcoming their aversion to dancing is worth it. I bet 95% of straight males hate dancing
    It’s a girly thing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    I assume you are talking about ballet dancing. When it comes to social dancing, this has traditionally been a pair activity so there has to be a 1:1 sex ratio of partners. Perhaps this is like the # of sexual partners where men report having more than women. One of the genders has to be lying.

    In the past, dancing was considered an essential part of the matching process but I guess people now just swipe on Tinder and go right at it like dogs so that men can skip the dancing.
  115. @Art Deco
    (which might be why Hawaii hasn’t ever really taken off as a place for the wealthy to live while still conducting their business).

    About 30% of Hawaii's population is (1) small town and rural and (2) in loci where the one city in the islands is inaccessible except by cumbersome and expensive means. That's not for everyone.

    One of the oddities about Honolulu is that it's a city of middling size with big city housing costs. I had a relation who lived in Honolulu for a decade. He never bought any property because it was too expensive. The condominium he rented from an absentee owner was in a high rise constructed in 1968 which has since been torn down. The one he rented was their cheapest floor plan (a modest two bedroom unit: kitchenette, living room, lanai, utility room / wc, master bedroom with bath, small auxilliary bedroom). The asking price for those units was > $400,000 ca. 2006. You could get a handsome old 3-story home in a smart neighborhood in Rochester for that price at that time. Detached housing is atypical in Honolulu. Madelyn Dunham, once a vice president at the Bank of Hawaii, lived in detached housing only briefly during her 48 years there and never owned such a place.

    In any city, you've got value added from the trade the residents have with each other and you have value-added from export trade. The thing is, the opportunities for agriculture are quite circumscribed due to physiography and soil quality, shipping costs put a damper on manufacturing, and there isn't much to mine. The export trade would be in services: tourism, finance, and transit. Honolulu is not Brisbane. It does not have an ample hinterland endowed with agricultural land and skilled labor. It has about 500,000 people in its hinterland and not a lot of margin to add more at non-metropolitan densities. What's interesting about Honolulu is not that that its growth is stunted. What's interesting is that it has as many people as it does.

    One other thing about Honolulu that would put a damper on its appeal to many among the wealthy as a retirement destination: it's tacky. If you don't mind tacky, why not Florida?

    For some strange reason, my wife is obsessed with Hawaii. We went there for a second honeymoon in 2013 and she was hooked. Keeps talking about retiring there. I told her only the Big Island, because its relatively less expensive than Oahu (but still way pricey compared to CONUS).

    She will have to come to grips with the fact that I was born in the US of A (in the heartland, Missouri); I served and fought in the Legions of the US of A; so, for better or worse, I will die in the US of A (notwithstanding my kin go as far back as the early 1700s in this country). Besides, that is what our affordable retirement scenario is looking like, sans a lottery jackpot win. There are plenty of decent places to retire in the US, fairly cheap and pleasant, though for how long is anyone’s guess. I’m good with my hands and IT so I could make a good living in a post crash scenario if needed, and wife is a superb gardener, which could be her occupation if necessary.

    Deep South Gulf Coast has some underappreciated good places (i.e. Pensacola, Fort Walton Beach, east of Mobile), but I’d relocate maybe 100-200 miles inland to escape the worst effects of a bad storm, which have been known to pass through there.

    Read More
  116. @unit472
    Medicare doesn't pay if you are outside the US which is a deterrent to retiring abroad.

    Government cannot even see clearly when an issue is in it’s own interest. When I signed up for Medicare I asked what the taxpayer bill was for my freebie (which I’ve not used after four years) and the reply was 10k. Some of these expats are paying a few hundred, if that, for full services, and Medicare doesn’t pay. If government were privately run we would be paying citizens to vacation in the places they were to receive otherwise expensive services.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Uh- oh, James, you're awfully close to the 3rd, 400 V-DC electrified rail here! What you wrote about sounds a lot like, .... OMG, a free market!

    Please don't say that too much, as there are some very sensitive people on here who may faint in the middle of reading your stuff. Then they'd have to call 911 and get their only friend, the US Government, involved to pay for transport to the ER to wait in line after the Mexicans.

    A free market in health care, you say? Sacre Blue!
  117. Mark Caplan says: • Website
    @Seminumerical
    I am semi retired to South Africa, alternating a Cape Town southern suburb six months of the year and Canada's Laurentian Mountains for the Boreal summer. The 18 hours in the air twice a year is a bit of a trial, though a Kindle and an iPad preloaded with movies make it easier.

    They speak English in Cape Town. There's a symphony orchestra, huge public library, often plays at the university, and surfing daily is something one can do over 60. There are modern shopping malls and cinemas, food is much cheaper, and one can always get away to the Knysna Oyster Festival, or camping at Up the Creek (a sort of annual Woodstock), or camping in Namibia or the Okavango Delta (if you don't mind being around lions).

    There is less to worry about when it comes to crime than I found living in Chicago, where just riding the L after dark was nerve wracking.

    Yours and AmRen’s descriptions of the life of white people in South Africa are in total disagreement. You’re saying whites are not targeted for extinction?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    I don't think that his age he's a prime target. But if you're an Afrikaaner, you're pretty screwed.
    , @L Woods
    The Western Cape is the most functional part of the country and indeed quite pleasant. That doesn't change the fact that crime is rampant and much of it is violent and racially motivated, nor that racial tensions continue to intensify.
    , @Seminumerical
    People get the wrong idea from some Amren postings about South Africa. Or from Gavin McInnes interview with South Africans on the Anthony Cumia show.

    It is like reporting on the weekly murders in Chicago (where I used to live) and then thinking that that describes Vermont (where I go for the weekend). In South Africa I have never even been to Gauteng, and in the safer western provinces (I have been to them all) I don't go to the bad neighbourhoods in the cities at night.

    I used to live in Santa Barbara, and I simply looked up the crime stats by zip code if I wanted to visit LA. Same thing in Cape Town. I don't go to Philippi at night - or ever, for that matter.

    One difference between Chicago and South Africa is less guns, and they don't have cars. They'd have to walk 2o km, riot, and walk 2o km home. Not going to happen, except once a year on Boxing Day. For some reason there is a tradition of them invading the beaches where I surf. They rent buses or take minibus taxis to get to the train to come. A hard core are left after dark, drunk and loud. But that is only once a year.

    As for "targeted for extinction" well no. Demagogic, psychopathic politicians, and the black underclass might call for that, but whites, though a tiny minority have half the wealth of the country. And they make wealth for employed blacks, and they pay the taxes that pay for social services. What with the flood of migrants coming from the north I have lost count of the population of South Africa, but it is more than 50 million with five million taxpayers. On the other hand my own country is something like 30 million with 20 million taxpayers. So in South Africa the more sensible members of the ruling party know what would happen if they drive more whites to emigrate to New Zealand and Australia. Financial collapse.

    I am not saying that the nuttier elements of the ANC won't bring us to that, but there are whites, coloureds, Asians, and yes, even blacks who are trying to run the country properly.

    The farm murders are sickening, but then so are the home invasion murders by blacks in the US that the faggoty main stream media don't report on.
  118. Jack D says:
    @Mike Sylwester
    My wife is Lithuanian, and I have visited Lithuania with her many times.

    I am 64 years old, and I have felt for many years that retiring to Lithuania would be a good idea. I know Lithuanian Americans who have retired there and live well on their Social Security benefits.

    There is no way, however, that my wife would agree to go back and live in Lithuania. She likes it here.

    I have visited Lithuania and it’s a great country to visit… in the summer. Clean, relatively low crime, part of the EU, cost of living low but modern conveniences are available, etc. In the winter (approx. 10 months of the year – I only exaggerate slightly) not so much. Usually people like to retire to places with less snow and ice and more sunlight in the winter.

    The other problem is the language which resembles nothing else (except Latvian) and is devilishly hard to learn (it’s one of those languages with a million different tenses and in which you have to inflect EVERYTHING, not just verbs.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    Highly inflected languages are very difficult to learn. I'm studying Russian and there's nothing more frustrating than being unable to find a word in a dictionary, or even in the 501 Russian Verbs reference book.
  119. Kirt says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    I am surprised that nobody mentioned Uruguay yet as a Latin American bug-out or ex-pat destination. It's not just that John Derbyshire has mentioned it multiple times, which could be read here on unz. I was reading on it a couple of years back after I noticed that it is 90% white. That's greater than the US of A by a long shot. Now, these white people are not all Englishmen and Americans, but many of German, Italian, and Spanish ancestry.

    I came upon Uruguay when I was looking for out-of-the-way places, starting with the Guianas. Those are a big no-go demographically, and the climate would be tough on some. All most people know about them is British Guiana from Jim Jones of that Kool-Aid crowd (not OUR Jim Jones), and French Guiana from Euro rockets and Papillon. Surinam, or Dutch Guiana, hardly ever pops up in any story about anything. That sounds really good sometimes. However, again, look at the demographics. It's cool to look at these places via google-earth and just imagine who the hell is living down there. Cayenne, capital of French Guiana looks to be a town of no more than 10,000 people from the map.

    Anyway, I had hoped it could be my secret, but between Derb and me, now it's not. No, I've not been there yet.

    I’ve visited Uruguay as a tourist and it’s nice. Very American looking and feeling, so you don’t have to be an adventurous ex-pat.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Thanks for the info, Kirt. Did you get there via boat from Argentina or fly in directly? I know there's a direct flight from Miami, Florida.

    Except for the wearing of a ball-cap (MAGA!) or flip-flops and being seen bitching about weird-tasting food at McDonalds, do you think an American would fit in there and not be noticed visually as a foreigner?
  120. the language [Lithuanian] which resembles nothing else (except Latvian) and is devilishly hard to learn

    I’ve gone through a textbook three times, but I don’t keep it up. I intend to try again.

    When I was younger, I had much more persistence in studying foreign languages.

    Read More
  121. MikeCLT says:
    @peterike

    The city is trying to combat local fears that the retirees are both driving up land prices and bleeding the public healthcare system, she said. And the language barrier has become a source of local irritation. Some restaurants and even neighborhoods seem like English-only spaces.

     

    Am I the only one that notices the rather extreme irony here?

    Amen. Irony or chutzpah?

    Read More
  122. Kirt says:
    @anonymous
    It's not difficult to live outside crime in Brazil. All these "experienced world travelers" must do to live in big cities, if they have money, is to buy expensive apartments or gated communities in the big cities that risks are really diminished. Since risk is still there, just learn to drive in your armoured car (if you don't have, don't worry) straight from home to work or wherever you go without taking detours and you are okay.
    .
    Or you can just go the countryside or the southern region into the more homogeneous european immigrant towns. It's all about money in all these cases. But then, many if not most of people who immigrate to Brazil in order to retire or live there thinking about their "educated white privileges" end up ashamed of their choice, since they won't be able to escape from being permeated with all the socioecomical problems and even cultural chaos there.
    .
    .
    In relation to the article, this tendency to move to Latin America sounds a real big hypocrisy. All these Baby Boomers or even people from recent generations wanting to retire or make career in South America clearly because everything will be easier, an cheap and easy-going like which they will be well received because they're "moneyed, educated americans" or "europeans". I mean, it doesn't lack good places to live in the US or Europe, where they are well among their equals. It's even bad when nationalists complain about migrants in their countries, but decide to "run away" or retire to these countries if things doesn't end well for them, believing they can hang in any closed group of people in some "peaceful" South American country and better it by themselves, no matter how much untapped potential might have.

    The guys I know are not wealthy, just middle class and they gravitate toward Rio, Salvador de Bahia, Recife, etc.; not the much more European extreme south. Some have been victims of robbery but to them it’s just another adventure to be recounted. They don’t live in anything like fortress gated communities or ride in armored cars. They usually travel by bus or taxi. They are all single guys with a taste for Brazilian women, music and culture.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    Wow, with all respect to your friends, they must have very low standards. Or, although I partly disagree with the other anon on some things, to be really satisfied with the conditions there coming from abroad, they must be living, at least, with really good conditions. Even the most humble person living in these cities complains a lot about the current problems. Public transportation is horrible, the police is really inept, people are "used to" violence and robbery since they still have to get out to work, but there's always the fear something might happen.
    Rio, for example, is in a broken state and there's nothing that guarantees recovery any time soon. Recife and Salvador are full of robbery and just recently São Paulo is getting better treatment, but still a long way to go. IMO, Brazilian culture itself is really shallow and woman in these big cities aren't that beautiful as it is usually promoted, although the remnants of the old immigrant culture and imperial times is very interesting.
  123. @Kirt
    I've visited Uruguay as a tourist and it's nice. Very American looking and feeling, so you don't have to be an adventurous ex-pat.

    Thanks for the info, Kirt. Did you get there via boat from Argentina or fly in directly? I know there’s a direct flight from Miami, Florida.

    Except for the wearing of a ball-cap (MAGA!) or flip-flops and being seen bitching about weird-tasting food at McDonalds, do you think an American would fit in there and not be noticed visually as a foreigner?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kirt
    I flew from Buenos Aires to Punta del Este, which is a big tourist spot, very popular with Germans and other Europeans as well as Latin Americans. So no, an American would not stand out there visually, but I don't know about Montevideo and other places. I spent some time in Buenos Aires and Mar del Plata in Argentina as well. White Americans do not stand out there visually either and I think Argentina and Uruguay are very similar ethnically. Blacks really stand out. I remember seeing only one in Argentina and none in Uruguay.
  124. Kirt says:
    @Hapalong Cassidy
    "People tend to forget that South America is not south of North America, but southeast of North America."

    Back in the 1500s, the Spanish and the Pope didn't realize that fact either, when they drew that longitude line dividing the world between Spain and Portugal. The original idea was Spain would get all of the New World, while Portugal would have claim to Africa and all the islands of its coast. Imagine the pleasant surprise to the Portuguese (and the shock to the Spanish), when it was discovered that a big chunk of South America extended east of that longitude line.

    There are those who don’t think the Portuguese were surprised. There is a theory that Portuguese mariners had already made landfall in Brazil, but it was kept a closely guarded state secret pending the treaty for dividing the world and the subsequent adjustment of the treaty to push the dividing line hundreds of miles west. After that Brazil was conveniently “discovered” by the Portuguese.

    Read More
  125. BB753 says:
    @Tiny Duck
    Reading the comments it has become quite evident that the people here are old as dirt

    This explains the retrograde opinions and ignorance

    You are probably right on this one. I’m in my late forties and I’m probably one of the youngests regulars here.

    Read More
    • Replies: @L Woods
    Yet, the more extreme elements of the alt-right seem to be markedly youthful. If his sock puppet persona doesn't like retrograde ignorance he sees here, he's really not going to like where things are headed.
    , @Anonym
    If one of, you are a decade older than me approximately. And there is "27 year old", who probably is 30 now but I can't keep track.

    OT: with the numbers of comments in this thread, these terrorist attacks sure are good for comment numbers and likely, page views. I wonder how much of that is astroturf. Have we broken a grand in comments before?
    , @Kyle
    I'm in my early 20's do I not count as a regular?
  126. @fitzGetty
    ... London was a superb relocation spot and many parents of friends went to live there ... now though, as the mohammadan population has risen above the red line of 3%, the situation is untenable ...

    I’ve joked elsewhere in these pages, but it is a true observation: I see more hijabs, naquibs and headscarves in London nowadays than I saw in Beirut in 1983.

    Read More
  127. eah says:

    OT (nothing to do w/ retirement)

    Refugee Resettlement Watch — Costa Rica: Are US taxpayers supporting HIAS office?

    The Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society has opened an office in Costa Rica (how many Hebrew immigrants needing aid are there in Costa Rica?) — they are one of the contractors the State Dept pays to dump refugees onto local taxpayers resettle refugees.

    “What we’re doing here is unprecedented in the current system.”

    I believe it.

    Read More
  128. @james wilson
    Government cannot even see clearly when an issue is in it's own interest. When I signed up for Medicare I asked what the taxpayer bill was for my freebie (which I've not used after four years) and the reply was 10k. Some of these expats are paying a few hundred, if that, for full services, and Medicare doesn't pay. If government were privately run we would be paying citizens to vacation in the places they were to receive otherwise expensive services.

    Uh- oh, James, you’re awfully close to the 3rd, 400 V-DC electrified rail here! What you wrote about sounds a lot like, …. OMG, a free market!

    Please don’t say that too much, as there are some very sensitive people on here who may faint in the middle of reading your stuff. Then they’d have to call 911 and get their only friend, the US Government, involved to pay for transport to the ER to wait in line after the Mexicans.

    A free market in health care, you say? Sacre Blue!

    Read More
  129. Kirt says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    Thanks for the info, Kirt. Did you get there via boat from Argentina or fly in directly? I know there's a direct flight from Miami, Florida.

    Except for the wearing of a ball-cap (MAGA!) or flip-flops and being seen bitching about weird-tasting food at McDonalds, do you think an American would fit in there and not be noticed visually as a foreigner?

    I flew from Buenos Aires to Punta del Este, which is a big tourist spot, very popular with Germans and other Europeans as well as Latin Americans. So no, an American would not stand out there visually, but I don’t know about Montevideo and other places. I spent some time in Buenos Aires and Mar del Plata in Argentina as well. White Americans do not stand out there visually either and I think Argentina and Uruguay are very similar ethnically. Blacks really stand out. I remember seeing only one in Argentina and none in Uruguay.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    I've been told many times that an American is always easy to spot in a crowd. (A big maple-leaf sticker on one's backpack is a dead giveaway.)
    , @Flip
    I was in Buenos Aires once with some American business colleagues, one of whom was black, and the locals assumed she was from Brazil.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    I flew from Rio de Janeiro to Buenos Aires on an Argentinian airline (about a 3 hour flight). They were very retro when it came to their flight attendants, who were thin and beautiful.
  130. We own what is considered a good apartment/condo in my wife’s obscure, Eastern European home city. It is apparently immune (thus far) from the demographic disasters happening in Western Europe and America. People aren’t PC there, they don’t like invaders, and they don’t care for “diversity.”

    There is fresh food at the old outdoor markets within walking distance, and there is a real, honest-to-goodness opera house that ordinary people go to like it’s no big deal.

    I half seriously think of the place as a possible bug out retirement location if we ever need it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    I've thought of eastern Europe too, but my experience in trying to learn Russian has convinced me that trying to learn one of those languages would be an exercise in purposeless frustration. If your wife is a native speaker, or course, or if you learn languages readily, this negative factor would not apply.
  131. eah says:

    OT (but I am reminded of a ‘banana republic’)

    Harvard Rescinds Acceptances for At Least Ten Students for Obscene Memes

    Harvard College rescinded admissions offers to at least ten prospective members of the Class of 2021 after the students traded sexually explicit memes and messages that sometimes targeted minority groups in a private Facebook group chat.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    Harvard once rescinded a girl's admission offer after finding out that she had murdered her mother:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gina_Grant_college_admissions_controversy

    And we all know that folks who trade "explicit memes" are the lowest form of scum - far worse than matricidal maniacs.
    , @jesse helms think-alike
    I can top that:

    Harvard College rescinded admissions offers to at least ten prospective members of the Class of 2021 after the students traded sexually explicit memes and messages that sometimes targeted minority groups in a private Facebook group chat.
     
    AA Harvard student submits (c)rap album as senior thesis, graduates with honors

    Obasi Shaw made Havard University history with ‘Liminal Minds.’ Obasi Shaw, a 20-year-old senior will be graduating from Havard University with one of the highest honors after submitting a 10-track Hip-Hop album entitled Liminal Minds for his final thesis.
    , @Carbon blob
    So glad to see Harvard affirm snitching as one of the pillars of the academy.
    , @International Jew
    I guess those were the last ten conservatives that accidentally passed through the admissions office's political filter.
  132. I know several retirees at my job (all white men) who have retired happily to Puerto Rico. A couple of them owned land down there when they were still on the job and used to go there in the winter for a week or two and then moved there for at least half-time after retiring. There are apparently several large tax benefits (no capital gains is one) to living there at least half the time http://puertoricotaxincentives.com/. Also PR is part of the United States and you won’t be an expat or anything like that. My impression of the island having visited a few times over the years is that a lot of their trash (human-wise I mean) has been imported to NYC, Allentown, Reading, North Philly etc., and the people on the island are far whiter (both in appearance and behavior) and more genial than you would expect. This is especially true outside of the San Juan metro which is a big city environment similar to Miami. In fact I would consider the majority of the people in the Western portion of the Island (Cabo Rojo, Central Cordillera Mountains, Yauco, San Germain, Rincon, Boqueron etc) to be descendants of Europeans and majority-white.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave
    This was my general impression after visiting PR several years ago. I've lived in NYC for 30 years and thus have worked with and been exposed to large numbers of Nuyoricans, as PR's living in NYC refer to themselves.
    There was a world of difference between Puerto Ricans in NYC and the natives on the Island. I was pleasantly surprised by my visit, and realized Puerto Rico has regularly offshored it's worst elements to NYC/Chicago/Miami for decades.
    , @Art Deco
    The homicide rate for the island as a whole is 25 per 100,000, more than 5x that on the mainland. Imagine what it is in sketchier neighborhoods in San Juan. The place is as dangerous as Brazil.
    , @Truth

    In fact I would consider the majority of the people in the Western portion of the Island (Cabo Rojo, Central Cordillera Mountains, Yauco, San Germain, Rincon, Boqueron etc) to be descendants of Europeans and majority-white.
     
    The crime rate in Puerto Rico is higher than it is in Mississippi. In San Juan it is higher than it is in Detroit.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    My impression of the island having visited a few times over the years is that a lot of their trash...

    Having visited the island myself, I thought this sentence would end "...has been dumped along the roads and on their beaches."
  133. @Father O'Hara
    One possible downside that occurs to me is the possibility that the people there'll kill you.

    I don’t know, there are plenty of people here that have no qualms about violence against the elderly.

    http://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/elderly-woman-burned-beaten-in-her-home-dies-weeks-after-attack/430968502

    Read More
  134. @whorefinder
    That TV show NCIS had two characters retire to Mexico: Gibbs (temporarily) and Gibbs's predecessor (whom Gibbs went to live with).

    Of course, even when retired both of them came back to the U.S. a lot to do stuff. The underlying theme was that retirement to a foreign land sounds nice, but there's a reason why it's so cheap to live in a villa in a sleepy Mexican village: it's friggin' boring. No one's around, the local TV is crap, there's nothing to do.

    I've never really understood people who work and live and raise a family their entire adult lives in one state only to move to another on retirement. Leave everything you've built and known just for warmer weather? What's wrong with you? Why didn't you just move there in the first place, if you thought it so wonderful?

    Then I realized most people who permanently do it are either Jews or the kind of "rootless cosmopolitans" who hang out with Jews (e.g. Joe Kennedy, Sr.). So, really, if you don't give a crap where you lived but used it to make money and don't have any deep human connections, yeah, it makes sense. But most goyim ain't like that.

    Personally, I like where I live. That's why I live here.

    My dad grew up in Alabama and my mom in Louisiana. They met in Philadelphia when my dad was in medical school. He joined a practice in South Jersey and lived there for the 35 years. When my dad retired, my mom wanted to move as “Gloucester County has been ruined”.

    The population doubled from 1970 to 1980 alone. In the full year they were in NJ the property taxes on their house were $15,000.

    And this was before the opiod epidemic. The county has one of the higher OD rates in the country. I biked through there 2 weeks ago and saw two women in their 50′s dazed and stumbling down the sidewalk. My Mom was right to get out.

    So they returned to the South and retired to the Shenandoah Valley where they play lots of bridge. My mother figures by the time they ruin The Valley she’ll be dead.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Fair, this is a valid reason. I have no doubt that many old Detroiters did the same when they tried to retire in the 1970s and 80s. It must have saddened them personally that the Arsenal of America became the ultra-ghetto it predictably did when blacks took over.

    But that's an emergency exception.

    , @Art Deco
    So they returned to the South and retired to the Shenandoah Valley where they play lots of bridge. My mother figures by the time they ruin The Valley she’ll be dead.

    The Valley could hardly be more dissimilar to the Gulf Coast.

    They've had quite rapid urban development in the Valley conjoined to wretched town planning. The results could not be more charmless.
  135. @Anatoly Karlin
    High elevations are good for life expectancy, though. If anything might be worth favoring such places.

    Downshifting to Latin America or some other cheap place is for most American retirees a no brainer, I would imagine. The reason most don't consider it, I imagine, is for the same reason that they go to the nearest MacDonald's upon landing in Paris or Shanghai: cultural conservatism. A preference for the way things are.

    I’m 60, retired fed, working for a private university because I want to. Considered moving to South America until this Easter when my daughter told me she was pregnant. Now, no way. That’s more powerful than McDonald’s.

    Having said that, does anyone think that Puerto Rico’s financial troubles present an opportunity to buy a nice vacation place?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Catholic Philly Prole
    I do think that PR's current financial troubles present an opportunity to buy a nice vacation place. I was in Vieques recently and saw "se vende" written on houses everywhere. If I didn't have responsibilities up here, I wouldn't mind having a place down there for myself
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Jimbo, Puerto Rico is a beautiful island home to some of the best resorts in the Carribbean. As soon as all the Puerto Ricans have fled to the States, it will probably be a great place to live.
    , @dcthrowback
    Many of our nation's most evil bankers are long Puerto Rico (and of course, corporate sellout Paul Ryan spearheaded the PR bailout bill). Follow the smart money?
  136. Art Deco says:
    @E. Rekshun
    Re Honolulu - a couple of acquaintances that travel every other year from the east coast advise of huge numbers of vagrants milling around the public spaces and beaches. The City of Honolulu even offers full-paid one-way tickets to mainland US for any vagrant. The NYT has covered this quite a bit.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/04/us/hawaii-homeless-criminal-law-sitting-ban.html?_r=0

    https://www.google.com/#q=%22new+york+times%22+AND+%22honolulu%22+AND+%22homeless%22

    Wasn’t like that ca. 1975.

    Since their export trade is crucially dependent on their amenities, they need to be very vigorous about reducing the number of vagrants to a feasible minimum.

    Read More
  137. Barnard says:
    @whorefinder
    That TV show NCIS had two characters retire to Mexico: Gibbs (temporarily) and Gibbs's predecessor (whom Gibbs went to live with).

    Of course, even when retired both of them came back to the U.S. a lot to do stuff. The underlying theme was that retirement to a foreign land sounds nice, but there's a reason why it's so cheap to live in a villa in a sleepy Mexican village: it's friggin' boring. No one's around, the local TV is crap, there's nothing to do.

    I've never really understood people who work and live and raise a family their entire adult lives in one state only to move to another on retirement. Leave everything you've built and known just for warmer weather? What's wrong with you? Why didn't you just move there in the first place, if you thought it so wonderful?

    Then I realized most people who permanently do it are either Jews or the kind of "rootless cosmopolitans" who hang out with Jews (e.g. Joe Kennedy, Sr.). So, really, if you don't give a crap where you lived but used it to make money and don't have any deep human connections, yeah, it makes sense. But most goyim ain't like that.

    Personally, I like where I live. That's why I live here.

    I have wondered that about Latin American retirees as well. What do they do all day and who do they see on a regular basis? The Florida or Arizona retirement community makes a lot more sense.

    Read More
  138. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Kirt
    The guys I know are not wealthy, just middle class and they gravitate toward Rio, Salvador de Bahia, Recife, etc.; not the much more European extreme south. Some have been victims of robbery but to them it's just another adventure to be recounted. They don't live in anything like fortress gated communities or ride in armored cars. They usually travel by bus or taxi. They are all single guys with a taste for Brazilian women, music and culture.

    Wow, with all respect to your friends, they must have very low standards. Or, although I partly disagree with the other anon on some things, to be really satisfied with the conditions there coming from abroad, they must be living, at least, with really good conditions. Even the most humble person living in these cities complains a lot about the current problems. Public transportation is horrible, the police is really inept, people are “used to” violence and robbery since they still have to get out to work, but there’s always the fear something might happen.
    Rio, for example, is in a broken state and there’s nothing that guarantees recovery any time soon. Recife and Salvador are full of robbery and just recently São Paulo is getting better treatment, but still a long way to go. IMO, Brazilian culture itself is really shallow and woman in these big cities aren’t that beautiful as it is usually promoted, although the remnants of the old immigrant culture and imperial times is very interesting.

    Read More
  139. @27 year old
    >Parts of those states are so heavily Latin American already that moving to Latin America itself isn’t much of a difference


    This exactly. If you're going to be a foreigner in the country you grew up in, surrounded by people unlike you speaking a strange different language then why not go be a foreigner in a country you didn't grow up in that's cheaper and has a better climate?

    Montezuma’s Revenge?

    Read More
  140. @Mark Caplan
    Yours and AmRen's descriptions of the life of white people in South Africa are in total disagreement. You're saying whites are not targeted for extinction?

    I don’t think that his age he’s a prime target. But if you’re an Afrikaaner, you’re pretty screwed.

    Read More
  141. Nico says:
    @Polynikes
    Why so many from Florida and Texas? Maybe because they are Latin Americans to begin with. How long until Democrats vote illegal immigrants who worked here their entire lives Social security benefits? We'll really see some outflows of SS money then.

    Why so many from Florida and Texas? Maybe because they are Latin Americans to begin with.

    I’m from Florida (Miami, in fact) and my mother is from Texas. My anecdotal experience suggests the bulk of the retirees in question are either Anglos or wealthy (and white) Latin Americans – mostly Cubans – who have been in the States for decades and have their lives pretty much set Stateside. The real culprit is 1. the spike in coastal real estate prices and 2. the major setback for a large number of pension funds in 2008-09: snowbirding it in Florida or Texas suddenly became out of the reach of a large number of middle-class boomer retirees, in contrast to the lot of their Greatest/Silent generation forebearers.

    How long until Democrats vote illegal immigrants who worked here their entire lives Social security benefits?

    In France medical care requires a copayment for most people, but illegal aliens get 100% coverage from the moment they set foot on French soil. And that is official policy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Man From K Street

    I’m from Florida (Miami, in fact) and my mother is from Texas. My anecdotal experience suggests the bulk of the retirees in question are either Anglos or wealthy (and white) Latin Americans – mostly Cubans – who have been in the States for decades and have their lives pretty much set Stateside. The real culprit is 1. the spike in coastal real estate prices
     
    Not being facetious here, but looking ahead 10-20 years, aren't we looking at a coastal real estate bubble bursting in Florida as soon as post-Castro Cuba liberalizes its property laws? Doubling the existing square footage of beachfront Florida, maybe tripling if you count all those huge cays...

    The first wave of retiring Gen Xers with decent 401(k)s could come to see a personal Cuban hacienda as practically a birthright.
  142. Lot says:

    One of the London slashers was profiled on TV!

    Butt had been known as an extremist in his east London neighborhood and was featured last year in a documentary on Britain’s Channel 4 called “The Jihadis Next Door.”

    Read More
  143. @Anonymous
    Germany is full of American military retirees and their German wives.

    Several thousand … you don’t trip over military retirees in Germany unless you are near a still extant base. What you do find a lot of is accountants and lawyers.

    Read More
  144. @Roger
    Do those countries have good internet connections? Phone service? English language TV?

    English language TV?

    English-language TV is the greatest force for evil the world has ever known. It is the wellspring of multiculti worship, Trump-bashing, and all such unholy bullshit.

    Smash your television and free your mind.

    Read More
  145. @Roger
    Do those countries have good internet connections? Phone service? English language TV?

    Speaking of technology, Ecuador has restrictions on the number of electronic goods that a traveler can bring into the country duty-free. There may be a tax on items over the limit.

    1 new and 1 unit used the following portable items: photographic cameras; imagesetter; PDA or PC tablet (tablet); Portable global positioning system (GPS) ;. Laptop and peripherals (mouse, headphones, cameras, keyboard, and the like); Video games console (portable or not); Electronic calculator ;

    1 new or used unit, of the following goods: Player image / video or portable sound; TV (up to 24 “); Desktop computer and its peripherals (mouse, headphones, cameras, keyboard, scanner and the like); Binoculars; Projection apparatus and screen; Computer monitor up to 22 “; Printer; and, telephone or fax.

    If found two or more units of the items in the above list regardless of the second unit is new or used, it shall be deemed taxable goods.

    http://ecuadorresources.com/what-can-you-bring-with-you-to-ecuador/

    Read More
  146. @jim jones
    Spain is the standard retirement spot for Brits, I am surprised more Yanks don`t consider it - only a short hop across the Pond.

    Portugal is popular with French retirees. Morocco was once, and may still be, but I think more people are nervous about the political situation there.

    Read More
  147. @Jack D
    I have visited Lithuania and it's a great country to visit... in the summer. Clean, relatively low crime, part of the EU, cost of living low but modern conveniences are available, etc. In the winter (approx. 10 months of the year - I only exaggerate slightly) not so much. Usually people like to retire to places with less snow and ice and more sunlight in the winter.

    The other problem is the language which resembles nothing else (except Latvian) and is devilishly hard to learn (it's one of those languages with a million different tenses and in which you have to inflect EVERYTHING, not just verbs.

    Highly inflected languages are very difficult to learn. I’m studying Russian and there’s nothing more frustrating than being unable to find a word in a dictionary, or even in the 501 Russian Verbs reference book.

    Read More
  148. @Tiny Duck
    Reading the comments it has become quite evident that the people here are old as dirt

    This explains the retrograde opinions and ignorance

    At least we’re younger than the rocks inside your head.

    Show some respect for your elders, boy. Children should be seen and not heard.

    Read More
  149. syonredux says:

    Off-topic,

    Critic reduced to tears by Wonder Woman:

    I did not expect to cry during “Wonder Woman.”

    Specifically, I did not expect to tear up during the fight scenes. OK, maybe if Gal Gadot’s Diana, Amazon princess, had given some terrific speech, or if a character I liked had died, but I certainly did not expect to get all misty eyed during the battle scenes.

    But that’s exactly what happened; when Wonder Woman started fighting, out came the waterworks.

    It started on the beach, when Gen. Antiope (Robin Wright) rode into battle with a smile and Queen Hippolyta (Connie Nielsen) leaped off her horse, spinning into the air to wipe out two armed men with her sword. As the battle raged on, it became clear that the scene was not window-dressing, 10 seconds of Amazon showtime before the real movie started. This was the movie — female warriors kicking ass.

    They were fierce and powerful, highly trained soldiers who knew what they were doing, and the film took that, and them, seriously. It was overwhelming.

    I felt like I was discovering something I didn’t even know I had always wanted. A need that I had boxed up and buried deep after three movies of Iron Man punching bad guys in the face, three more movies of Captain America punching bad guys in the face, a movie about Superman and Batman punching each other in the face and then “Suicide Squad.”

    Witnessing a woman hold the field, and the camera, for that long blew open an arguably monotonous genre. We didn’t need a computer-generated tree or a sassy raccoon to change the superhero game; what we needed was a woman.

    http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/herocomplex/la-et-hc-wonder-woman-crying-20170605-htmlstory.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "I did not expect to cry during “Wonder Woman....It started on the beach, when Gen. Antiope (Robin Wright) rode into battle with a smile and Queen Hippolyta (Connie Nielsen) leaped off her horse, spinning into the air to wipe out two armed men with her sword. As the battle raged on, it became clear that the scene was not window-dressing, 10 seconds of Amazon showtime before the real movie started. This was the movie — female warriors kicking ass."

    Yeah, when I was 5, I shed a tear or two while watching 'Watership Down'. Pure fantasy disconnected with reality can do that sometimes.
    , @Autochthon

    Meredith Woerner is the editor for Hero Complex. She previously worked as senior reporter for io9.com, Gawker Media’s science fiction and futurism site. A graduate of University of Missouri, she has penned a vampire guidebook, witnessed Harrison Ford fight aliens (twice), and booped Rocket Raccoon’s prop nose when no one was looking on the set of “Guardians of the Galaxy.” [sic]
     
    *

    I suppose she's being honest when she says she "discovered something [she] didn't even know she had always wanted," because I'm not seeing anything in her résumé about her time in the marines or the years she spent training to become the next Ronda Rousey. Or is the thing she had always wanted just to watch a silly movie and fantasize about being tough rather than, you know, actually being tough? (The latter is a lot...tougher....)

    *I'd thought this Guardians of the Galaxy business was a feature-length film; apparently it is a poem, a song, or perhaps an episode of a televised programme (it does have a set and props, after all...), since the professional writer citing it placed its title in quotation marks rather than italicising or underlining it.
  150. res says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country
    OT: Sorry if this has been mentioned already, but Eric Turkheimer has written a new piece over at his Genetics and Human Agency blog (sort of) responding to Steve and others. He even links to Steve.

    In the post, he lays down the gauntlet to Steve and others.

    http://www.geneticshumanagency.org/gha/origin-of-race-differences-in-intelligence-is-not-a-scientific-question/

    It is the hereditarians who are trying to reach a strong and potentially destructive conclusion, and the burden is absolutely on them to demonstrate that they have a well-grounded empirical and quantitative theory to work with. So, if you are out there and think that group differences t are at least partially genetic, please explain exactly what you mean, in empirical terms. Do you mean that some portion of the IQ gap will never go away, no matter what we do environmentally? Do you mean we will discover genes with hard-wired biological consequences for IQ, and their frequencies will differ across groups? Are polygenic risk scores going to do it somehow? But don’t let me mischaracterize your position: explain it yourself.

     

    Ironically (or not), you can't leave a comment. :)

    Turkheimer seems to be saying that the hereditarians and anti-hereditarians can't prove their case scientifically so it's all just an argument about how many angels you fit on the head of a pin. (Not sure what that means for his own research.)

    The third reason why this argument never gets anywhere is the most important: there is no valid scientific basis for answering the question in the first place.

     


    I predict that in a relatively short period of time, contemporary race science will seem just as transparently unscientific and empirically untrue as the race science of the early 20th Century now appears from our modern perspective.
     
    Mind you, Turkheimer doesn't explain why, but promises to do so in the future.

    Frankly, the entire post was odd, confusing and somewhat cryptic. He kept promising to explain himself in later posts.

    Anyway, Steve, you have been challenged.

    Worth noting that Turkheimer linked to both Steve and Razib in that post.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Which is why I mentioned Steve's post being linked. ;)

    But, yes, I'll give Turkheimer credit for acknowledging the heretics.

    Still Turkheimer's post is odd to my very layman mind. He seems perfectly fine with the idea of the existence of race, IQ existing and IQ being heritable on individual basis, i.e. smart parents tend to have above average IQ kids. But then he says that the possibility of genetic differences among races is crazy and can't be proved anyway.

    I don't see how those go together. But, again, it's not my field so maybe he has perfectly sound reasons.
  151. @Buzz Mohawk
    We own what is considered a good apartment/condo in my wife's obscure, Eastern European home city. It is apparently immune (thus far) from the demographic disasters happening in Western Europe and America. People aren't PC there, they don't like invaders, and they don't care for "diversity."

    There is fresh food at the old outdoor markets within walking distance, and there is a real, honest-to-goodness opera house that ordinary people go to like it's no big deal.

    I half seriously think of the place as a possible bug out retirement location if we ever need it.

    I’ve thought of eastern Europe too, but my experience in trying to learn Russian has convinced me that trying to learn one of those languages would be an exercise in purposeless frustration. If your wife is a native speaker, or course, or if you learn languages readily, this negative factor would not apply.

    Read More
  152. res says:
    @Roger
    Do those countries have good internet connections? Phone service? English language TV?

    A good internet connection goes a long way towards covering the other two. Well, not cell phone coverage I guess, but the landline aspect.

    Read More
  153. Dave says:
    @Catholic Philly Prole
    I know several retirees at my job (all white men) who have retired happily to Puerto Rico. A couple of them owned land down there when they were still on the job and used to go there in the winter for a week or two and then moved there for at least half-time after retiring. There are apparently several large tax benefits (no capital gains is one) to living there at least half the time http://puertoricotaxincentives.com/. Also PR is part of the United States and you won't be an expat or anything like that. My impression of the island having visited a few times over the years is that a lot of their trash (human-wise I mean) has been imported to NYC, Allentown, Reading, North Philly etc., and the people on the island are far whiter (both in appearance and behavior) and more genial than you would expect. This is especially true outside of the San Juan metro which is a big city environment similar to Miami. In fact I would consider the majority of the people in the Western portion of the Island (Cabo Rojo, Central Cordillera Mountains, Yauco, San Germain, Rincon, Boqueron etc) to be descendants of Europeans and majority-white.

    This was my general impression after visiting PR several years ago. I’ve lived in NYC for 30 years and thus have worked with and been exposed to large numbers of Nuyoricans, as PR’s living in NYC refer to themselves.
    There was a world of difference between Puerto Ricans in NYC and the natives on the Island. I was pleasantly surprised by my visit, and realized Puerto Rico has regularly offshored it’s worst elements to NYC/Chicago/Miami for decades.

    Read More
  154. @Kirt
    I flew from Buenos Aires to Punta del Este, which is a big tourist spot, very popular with Germans and other Europeans as well as Latin Americans. So no, an American would not stand out there visually, but I don't know about Montevideo and other places. I spent some time in Buenos Aires and Mar del Plata in Argentina as well. White Americans do not stand out there visually either and I think Argentina and Uruguay are very similar ethnically. Blacks really stand out. I remember seeing only one in Argentina and none in Uruguay.

    I’ve been told many times that an American is always easy to spot in a crowd. (A big maple-leaf sticker on one’s backpack is a dead giveaway.)

    Read More
  155. @res
    Worth noting that Turkheimer linked to both Steve and Razib in that post.

    Which is why I mentioned Steve’s post being linked. ;)

    But, yes, I’ll give Turkheimer credit for acknowledging the heretics.

    Still Turkheimer’s post is odd to my very layman mind. He seems perfectly fine with the idea of the existence of race, IQ existing and IQ being heritable on individual basis, i.e. smart parents tend to have above average IQ kids. But then he says that the possibility of genetic differences among races is crazy and can’t be proved anyway.

    I don’t see how those go together. But, again, it’s not my field so maybe he has perfectly sound reasons.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "Citizen of a Silly Country"

    We all are, at this point.
  156. @eah
    OT (but I am reminded of a 'banana republic')

    Harvard Rescinds Acceptances for At Least Ten Students for Obscene Memes

    Harvard College rescinded admissions offers to at least ten prospective members of the Class of 2021 after the students traded sexually explicit memes and messages that sometimes targeted minority groups in a private Facebook group chat.

    Harvard once rescinded a girl’s admission offer after finding out that she had murdered her mother:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gina_Grant_college_admissions_controversy

    And we all know that folks who trade “explicit memes” are the lowest form of scum – far worse than matricidal maniacs.

    Read More
  157. @Jimbo in OPKS
    I'm 60, retired fed, working for a private university because I want to. Considered moving to South America until this Easter when my daughter told me she was pregnant. Now, no way. That's more powerful than McDonald's.

    Having said that, does anyone think that Puerto Rico's financial troubles present an opportunity to buy a nice vacation place?

    I do think that PR’s current financial troubles present an opportunity to buy a nice vacation place. I was in Vieques recently and saw “se vende” written on houses everywhere. If I didn’t have responsibilities up here, I wouldn’t mind having a place down there for myself

    Read More
  158. 22pp22 says:

    You say:

    – I think Ecuador is in the same time zone as the Eastern U.S. (although, being on the Equator, it doesn’t have daylight savings time). It’s convenient to be in the same time zone as most of your contacts so having a second home at a different latitude but not longitude

    My property investments are in NZ, but I live in Cyprus. The working day in NZ starts at midnight Cyprus time. It’s the only real drawback to being here. People are really bad about reading emails carefully and you often have no choice but to phone.

    However, I really do recommend life without winter.

    Retiring abroad may not have taken off in the US, but 60,000 POMs live here and the quality of life is ridiculously high.

    Also, Cyprus may not be as efficient as Switzerland, but it is very, very far from being a Third World country. It shows how nice the Middle East might be if it weren’t filled by Muslim religious zealots who marry their cousins.

    Read More
  159. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    OT: Sorry if this has been mentioned already, but Eric Turkheimer has written a new piece over at his Genetics and Human Agency blog (sort of) responding to Steve and others. He even links to Steve.

    In the post, he lays down the gauntlet to Steve and others.

    http://www.geneticshumanagency.org/gha/origin-of-race-differences-in-intelligence-is-not-a-scientific-question/

    It is the hereditarians who are trying to reach a strong and potentially destructive conclusion, and the burden is absolutely on them to demonstrate that they have a well-grounded empirical and quantitative theory to work with. So, if you are out there and think that group differences t are at least partially genetic, please explain exactly what you mean, in empirical terms. Do you mean that some portion of the IQ gap will never go away, no matter what we do environmentally? Do you mean we will discover genes with hard-wired biological consequences for IQ, and their frequencies will differ across groups? Are polygenic risk scores going to do it somehow? But don’t let me mischaracterize your position: explain it yourself.

     

    Ironically (or not), you can't leave a comment. :)

    Turkheimer seems to be saying that the hereditarians and anti-hereditarians can't prove their case scientifically so it's all just an argument about how many angels you fit on the head of a pin. (Not sure what that means for his own research.)

    The third reason why this argument never gets anywhere is the most important: there is no valid scientific basis for answering the question in the first place.

     


    I predict that in a relatively short period of time, contemporary race science will seem just as transparently unscientific and empirically untrue as the race science of the early 20th Century now appears from our modern perspective.
     
    Mind you, Turkheimer doesn't explain why, but promises to do so in the future.

    Frankly, the entire post was odd, confusing and somewhat cryptic. He kept promising to explain himself in later posts.

    Anyway, Steve, you have been challenged.

    The thing to keep in mind about people like Turkheimer is that they aren’t, at heart, scientists. They are, instead, lawyers– lawyers arguing for a position dictated by ideology.

    When the facts are against you, pound the table. Turkheimer is pounding that table with every ad hominem he can think of.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Forbes
    Agreed. As well, table-pounding doesn't deserve a response, either.

    He has no argument. It is in essence a lawyer's statement of claim: prove your case to my satisfaction--otherwise you are wrong.

    Silly.
  160. 22pp22 says:

    My main gripe with Latin America is the superficiality of the culture. Greek Cyprus has amazing cultural depth and fascinating and easily accessible geology. Malta and Spain are also popular places for POMs to retire to.

    Read More
  161. carol says:
    @ATX Hipster
    I don't know, there are plenty of people here that have no qualms about violence against the elderly.

    http://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/elderly-woman-burned-beaten-in-her-home-dies-weeks-after-attack/430968502

    One suspect named Shanquavious. Uhhh…

    Read More
  162. Whoever says: • Website
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Everybody sleeps, except for those leaning their heads together, whispering secrets to strangers.
     
    That’s Beautiful: Jenner Ickham Errican

    (*^▽^)/

    Read More
  163. whorefinder says: • Website
    @Milo Minderbinder
    My dad grew up in Alabama and my mom in Louisiana. They met in Philadelphia when my dad was in medical school. He joined a practice in South Jersey and lived there for the 35 years. When my dad retired, my mom wanted to move as "Gloucester County has been ruined".


    The population doubled from 1970 to 1980 alone. In the full year they were in NJ the property taxes on their house were $15,000.

    And this was before the opiod epidemic. The county has one of the higher OD rates in the country. I biked through there 2 weeks ago and saw two women in their 50's dazed and stumbling down the sidewalk. My Mom was right to get out.

    So they returned to the South and retired to the Shenandoah Valley where they play lots of bridge. My mother figures by the time they ruin The Valley she'll be dead.

    Fair, this is a valid reason. I have no doubt that many old Detroiters did the same when they tried to retire in the 1970s and 80s. It must have saddened them personally that the Arsenal of America became the ultra-ghetto it predictably did when blacks took over.

    But that’s an emergency exception.

    Read More
  164. Forbes says:
    @candid_observer
    The thing to keep in mind about people like Turkheimer is that they aren't, at heart, scientists. They are, instead, lawyers-- lawyers arguing for a position dictated by ideology.

    When the facts are against you, pound the table. Turkheimer is pounding that table with every ad hominem he can think of.

    Agreed. As well, table-pounding doesn’t deserve a response, either.

    He has no argument. It is in essence a lawyer’s statement of claim: prove your case to my satisfaction–otherwise you are wrong.

    Silly.

    Read More
  165. @Dave
    Instead of relying on your broken BS detector you could try crawling out of your cave and travel the world, including the dreaded Third World, and then you might realize that many parts of South America are quite safe, quite inexpensive and populated with easy going, hospitable people.
    Cuenca is actually a beautiful city, and certainly not as dangerous as Baltimore or Chicago.
    In fact, the worst that would probably happen to you in many parts of South America is pickpocketing .
    Some of you guys need to get out of the house a bit more.

    Not to argue with your point, but you responded to a comment about socialized medicine with a comment about crime.

    Read More
  166. L Woods says:
    @BB753
    You are probably right on this one. I'm in my late forties and I'm probably one of the youngests regulars here.

    Yet, the more extreme elements of the alt-right seem to be markedly youthful. If his sock puppet persona doesn’t like retrograde ignorance he sees here, he’s really not going to like where things are headed.

    Read More
  167. L Woods says:
    @Mark Caplan
    Yours and AmRen's descriptions of the life of white people in South Africa are in total disagreement. You're saying whites are not targeted for extinction?

    The Western Cape is the most functional part of the country and indeed quite pleasant. That doesn’t change the fact that crime is rampant and much of it is violent and racially motivated, nor that racial tensions continue to intensify.

    Read More
  168. Since Fred Reed was mentioned, he’s blogged specifically about living in Mexico more specifically in Lake Chapala. I have a work colleague who is taking two weeks vacation there this summer with his wife to see if it might work for them in retirement.

    https://fredoneverything.org/expat-mexico-arroz-by-any-other-name-would-smell-like-rice/

    Fred has mentioned in other blog pieces that someone considering this should already have experience living in other countries such as ex military, state department employees etc.

    Read More
  169. Flip says:
    @Kirt
    I flew from Buenos Aires to Punta del Este, which is a big tourist spot, very popular with Germans and other Europeans as well as Latin Americans. So no, an American would not stand out there visually, but I don't know about Montevideo and other places. I spent some time in Buenos Aires and Mar del Plata in Argentina as well. White Americans do not stand out there visually either and I think Argentina and Uruguay are very similar ethnically. Blacks really stand out. I remember seeing only one in Argentina and none in Uruguay.

    I was in Buenos Aires once with some American business colleagues, one of whom was black, and the locals assumed she was from Brazil.

    Read More
  170. Art Deco says:
    @Catholic Philly Prole
    I know several retirees at my job (all white men) who have retired happily to Puerto Rico. A couple of them owned land down there when they were still on the job and used to go there in the winter for a week or two and then moved there for at least half-time after retiring. There are apparently several large tax benefits (no capital gains is one) to living there at least half the time http://puertoricotaxincentives.com/. Also PR is part of the United States and you won't be an expat or anything like that. My impression of the island having visited a few times over the years is that a lot of their trash (human-wise I mean) has been imported to NYC, Allentown, Reading, North Philly etc., and the people on the island are far whiter (both in appearance and behavior) and more genial than you would expect. This is especially true outside of the San Juan metro which is a big city environment similar to Miami. In fact I would consider the majority of the people in the Western portion of the Island (Cabo Rojo, Central Cordillera Mountains, Yauco, San Germain, Rincon, Boqueron etc) to be descendants of Europeans and majority-white.

    The homicide rate for the island as a whole is 25 per 100,000, more than 5x that on the mainland. Imagine what it is in sketchier neighborhoods in San Juan. The place is as dangerous as Brazil.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Catholic Philly Prole
    True, but don't forget that the island is a hub of drug trafficking activity between mainland South America and the US so I would assume that many (most) of the departed are involved with drug trade. Also related, there are some pretty nasty caserios (gov't housing projects) in San Juan area and Ponce that lots of crime is isolated to. Places that you'd have no reason to be. I'm not saying it's a Utopian place by any stretch just that it has a huge upside.
  171. I twice worked in Columbia rebuilding the country’s lone blast furnace. The nearest town, where we stayed was Sogamosa , at an altitude of 8500 feet. I was in my early thirties and a heavy smoker, but even the non smokers felt the effects of the high elevation. I still vividly remember the sight of hanging meat at the market covered in a blanket of flies and the pungent smell of diesel fuel, that how they heated, mixed with charcoal smoke and donkey shit.I doubt that most of these retirees have their own cars and truly what level is the health care? For what it’s worth, plenty of Canadians like spending half of the year in the states, regardless of their endless protesting about how terrible America and Americans are.

    Read More
  172. Anonym says:
    @BB753
    You are probably right on this one. I'm in my late forties and I'm probably one of the youngests regulars here.

    If one of, you are a decade older than me approximately. And there is “27 year old”, who probably is 30 now but I can’t keep track.

    OT: with the numbers of comments in this thread, these terrorist attacks sure are good for comment numbers and likely, page views. I wonder how much of that is astroturf. Have we broken a grand in comments before?

    Read More
  173. Art Deco says:
    @Milo Minderbinder
    My dad grew up in Alabama and my mom in Louisiana. They met in Philadelphia when my dad was in medical school. He joined a practice in South Jersey and lived there for the 35 years. When my dad retired, my mom wanted to move as "Gloucester County has been ruined".


    The population doubled from 1970 to 1980 alone. In the full year they were in NJ the property taxes on their house were $15,000.

    And this was before the opiod epidemic. The county has one of the higher OD rates in the country. I biked through there 2 weeks ago and saw two women in their 50's dazed and stumbling down the sidewalk. My Mom was right to get out.

    So they returned to the South and retired to the Shenandoah Valley where they play lots of bridge. My mother figures by the time they ruin The Valley she'll be dead.

    So they returned to the South and retired to the Shenandoah Valley where they play lots of bridge. My mother figures by the time they ruin The Valley she’ll be dead.

    The Valley could hardly be more dissimilar to the Gulf Coast.

    They’ve had quite rapid urban development in the Valley conjoined to wretched town planning. The results could not be more charmless.

    Read More
  174. @E. Rekshun
    Hawaii has waaay better surf!

    Yes, but the water is cold year-round.

    Not as cold as the Pacific Ocean north of Point Conception! It does keep the crowds down to a minimum though.

    Read More
  175. @Jimbo in OPKS
    I'm 60, retired fed, working for a private university because I want to. Considered moving to South America until this Easter when my daughter told me she was pregnant. Now, no way. That's more powerful than McDonald's.

    Having said that, does anyone think that Puerto Rico's financial troubles present an opportunity to buy a nice vacation place?

    Jimbo, Puerto Rico is a beautiful island home to some of the best resorts in the Carribbean. As soon as all the Puerto Ricans have fled to the States, it will probably be a great place to live.

    Read More
  176. @fitzGetty
    ... and soon, Quantas nonstop from LHR to Perth - with no distasteful stop in any distasteful Mid East hell hole...

    Wow, 9,000 miles! It does have the disadvantage of traversing the entire length of Iran though.

    Read More
  177. @Reg Cæsar

    Ballerino Leaps Onto Subway Tracks and Lifts Man to Safety
     
    Most remarkable thing about this story-- the dancer has a wife.

    Reg, they are both nimble and strong. Doesn’t matter that the ballerina weighs a hundred pounds, they still lift her and prance about the stage. Whoa, prance, bad choice of words. Rahm Emanuel was a ballerino

    Read More
  178. @Deckin
    I actually know someone who retired to Cuenca. Here are some observations he told me:
    1. The food is bland--I would have thought it would be hot and spicy, but that's not part of the native diet there, for whatever reason.
    2. The retirees there really try to sell it to others.
    3. It's super cheap.
    4. There's a sort of benign lawlessness to the place. People, if they get in car wrecks, will just walk away and leave the car on the side of the road. He said it's not uncommon to see this everywhere.
    5. It's never super hot or super cold--so they do have a nice climate.

    There’s a sort of benign lawlessness to the place. People, if they get in car wrecks, will just walk away and leave the car on the side of the road. He said it’s not uncommon to see this everywhere.

    Sounds like the San Joaquin Valley!

    Read More
  179. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Kirt
    I flew from Buenos Aires to Punta del Este, which is a big tourist spot, very popular with Germans and other Europeans as well as Latin Americans. So no, an American would not stand out there visually, but I don't know about Montevideo and other places. I spent some time in Buenos Aires and Mar del Plata in Argentina as well. White Americans do not stand out there visually either and I think Argentina and Uruguay are very similar ethnically. Blacks really stand out. I remember seeing only one in Argentina and none in Uruguay.

    I flew from Rio de Janeiro to Buenos Aires on an Argentinian airline (about a 3 hour flight). They were very retro when it came to their flight attendants, who were thin and beautiful.

    Read More
  180. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Formerly CARealist
    I've already shared this, but my husband was a ballet/broadway dancer who took classes with Baryshnikov in the 80's. He claims women paid Baryshnikov money to try to get pregnant by him.

    He also said about 2/3 of the male ballet dancers were queers.

    In our teen/child ballet world the males all claim to be straight and the few who are likely not wind up leaving ballet. You have to be really, really confident of your masculinity to be a straight male ballet dancer.

    I didn’t realize you were a woman. Interesting.

    Read More
  181. @eah
    OT (but I am reminded of a 'banana republic')

    Harvard Rescinds Acceptances for At Least Ten Students for Obscene Memes

    Harvard College rescinded admissions offers to at least ten prospective members of the Class of 2021 after the students traded sexually explicit memes and messages that sometimes targeted minority groups in a private Facebook group chat.

    I can top that:

    Harvard College rescinded admissions offers to at least ten prospective members of the Class of 2021 after the students traded sexually explicit memes and messages that sometimes targeted minority groups in a private Facebook group chat.

    AA Harvard student submits (c)rap album as senior thesis, graduates with honors

    Obasi Shaw made Havard University history with ‘Liminal Minds.’ Obasi Shaw, a 20-year-old senior will be graduating from Havard University with one of the highest honors after submitting a 10-track Hip-Hop album entitled Liminal Minds for his final thesis.

    Read More
  182. @jim jones
    Spain is the standard retirement spot for Brits, I am surprised more Yanks don`t consider it - only a short hop across the Pond.

    I know a couple who retired there from Canada about a year ago. They can see the Rock of Gibraltar from their patio. It’s still quite inexpensive despite a real estate recovery, however anything with an engine costs an arm and a leg.

    Read More
  183. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    My impression is that traditional cultures, including surviving ones, are full of men dancing. Call it “folk dancing’ if you like. I suppose the aversion is to the hip-thrusting, negroid twerking that’s called “dancing” these days.

    Read More
  184. @Art Deco
    The homicide rate for the island as a whole is 25 per 100,000, more than 5x that on the mainland. Imagine what it is in sketchier neighborhoods in San Juan. The place is as dangerous as Brazil.

    True, but don’t forget that the island is a hub of drug trafficking activity between mainland South America and the US so I would assume that many (most) of the departed are involved with drug trade. Also related, there are some pretty nasty caserios (gov’t housing projects) in San Juan area and Ponce that lots of crime is isolated to. Places that you’d have no reason to be. I’m not saying it’s a Utopian place by any stretch just that it has a huge upside.

    Read More
  185. Curle says:
    @dsgntd_plyr

    There’s no accurate way to measure the phenomenon, but the Social Security Administration was sending payments to 380,000 retired U.S. workers living abroad in 2014 — up 50 percent from a decade ago.
     
    no one who lives outside the country should be able to get welfare. if you can afford international travel you're not poor.

    I understand it is very common for college students to use student loans for travel, including overseas vacations.

    Read More
  186. @Flip
    http://roguehealthandfitness.com/higher-altitude-means-much-lower-death-rates/

    People’s bodies acclimate to altitude within a few days or a week at most, regardless of age.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    It's not that simple when you're talking about seriously high altitudes. Give me a call when you've been up on Mt. Rainier (14.5 thousand ft.) for a week. Atmospheric pressure is about 60% of that of sea level. That means you'd be getting 60% of the Oxygen into your bloodstream as you would at sea level. If it ends up being hard to talk for you, just text me about it.
  187. Cornbeef says:
    @AndrewR
    Brazil is a very large country and simply cannot be easily generalized. Some parts of Brazil have less crime than the US average, and obviously most of Brazil has less crime than the worst cities in the US.

    I can easily generalize. The South is predominantly white and white pleasant. The rest of the country is less pleasant and more stabby.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    The southern state of Santa Catarina has a GDP per capita on par with Puerto Rico, but a homicide rate about a third lower, per Wiki (I'd have assumed it was a lot lower).

    Rio de Janeiro has a few pleasant and pretty safe neighborhoods, but a lot of sketchiness outside of them, and you'd probably want to avoid public transportation.
  188. Bel Riose says:
    @Corvinus
    I would imagine that the locals are also sick and tired of the invading Gringos inviting themselves. First a trickle, then a torrent, of blue hairs lamenting why the townies are at siesta when they should be opening up their restaurants to serve up the early bird specials of the day.

    “I would imagine that the locals are also sick and tired of the invading Gringos inviting themselves.”

    The “Gringos” aren’t invading anyone. They are merely taking advantage of their host country’s immigration / tourist / foreign retiree laws — just like immigrants who move to America take advantage of OUR laws.

    If the citizens of the country to which the “Gringos” have moved don’t like the fact that the “Gringos” “invite themselves” into their land, they are free to change their laws accordingly.

    Until then, the citizens of said country don’t have any right to complain

    After all, if a country has laws which permits Gringo retirees to move to and live in said country, those laws are really an “invitation” for such Gringos to arrive and take up residence, no?

    You’ve made this argument so often yourself (only if favor of unlimited Muslim immigration into the U.S.) that it’s an integral part of your shtick when it comes to immigration.

    So, Corvinus old boy, consider yourself — hoist by your own petard.

    And feel free to consider yourself a hypocrite as well.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Corvinus
    I'm surprised you came back. Recall that you asked me this question--“Sources and citations, please. Aren’t your really just projecting your own opinions and biases onto ALL Americans? How do you know that “when pressed, they talk about their ancestral roots?”

    I supplied the requisite links. Somehow you avoided a rebuttal. Interesting to say the least.

    Now, when I made this statement “I would imagine that the locals are also sick and tired of the invading Gringos inviting themselves”, I was MOCKING those individuals who on one hand believe they can retire in foreign lands and take advantage of those "relaxed" laws, while on the other hand get upset when foreigners come for the exact reason to their nation.

    "The “Gringos” aren’t invading anyone. They are merely taking advantage of their host country’s immigration / tourist / foreign retiree laws — just like immigrants who move to America take advantage of OUR laws. If the citizens of the country to which the “Gringos” have moved don’t like the fact that the “Gringos” “invite themselves” into their land, they are free to change their laws accordingly. Until then, the citizens of said country don’t have any right to complain. After all, if a country has laws which permits Gringo retirees to move to and live in said country, those laws are really an “invitation” for such Gringos to arrive and take up residence, no?

    Absolutely, that is my position, which I haven't deviated from in any way, shape, or form. Is this YOUR position, too? Are you now a convert?

    You were so quick to "get me" that you didn't even realize the snark in my comment. Again, I was poking fun at people who leave America for "greener pastures" even though the residents there might not be fans of their presence.
  189. Tony says:

    Fred should know that booty bandits are not looked upon too highly in Mexico.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    That's okay, I don't look too kindly on Mexican booty in general.
  190. @Mark Caplan
    Yours and AmRen's descriptions of the life of white people in South Africa are in total disagreement. You're saying whites are not targeted for extinction?

    People get the wrong idea from some Amren postings about South Africa. Or from Gavin McInnes interview with South Africans on the Anthony Cumia show.

    It is like reporting on the weekly murders in Chicago (where I used to live) and then thinking that that describes Vermont (where I go for the weekend). In South Africa I have never even been to Gauteng, and in the safer western provinces (I have been to them all) I don’t go to the bad neighbourhoods in the cities at night.

    I used to live in Santa Barbara, and I simply looked up the crime stats by zip code if I wanted to visit LA. Same thing in Cape Town. I don’t go to Philippi at night – or ever, for that matter.

    One difference between Chicago and South Africa is less guns, and they don’t have cars. They’d have to walk 2o km, riot, and walk 2o km home. Not going to happen, except once a year on Boxing Day. For some reason there is a tradition of them invading the beaches where I surf. They rent buses or take minibus taxis to get to the train to come. A hard core are left after dark, drunk and loud. But that is only once a year.

    As for “targeted for extinction” well no. Demagogic, psychopathic politicians, and the black underclass might call for that, but whites, though a tiny minority have half the wealth of the country. And they make wealth for employed blacks, and they pay the taxes that pay for social services. What with the flood of migrants coming from the north I have lost count of the population of South Africa, but it is more than 50 million with five million taxpayers. On the other hand my own country is something like 30 million with 20 million taxpayers. So in South Africa the more sensible members of the ruling party know what would happen if they drive more whites to emigrate to New Zealand and Australia. Financial collapse.

    I am not saying that the nuttier elements of the ANC won’t bring us to that, but there are whites, coloureds, Asians, and yes, even blacks who are trying to run the country properly.

    The farm murders are sickening, but then so are the home invasion murders by blacks in the US that the faggoty main stream media don’t report on.

    Read More
  191. Truth says:
    @Kirt
    I know guys who have retired to Brazil. They are socially adventurous experienced world travelers, who are not deterred by the high crime. I've heard that Chile and New Zealand are also increasingly popular ex-pat destinations for Americans. I've also heard that Phuket, Thailand, is host to significant ex-pat communities of both Americans and Russians. Maybe a good location for a Trump/Putin summit.

    I’ve also heard that Phuket, Thailand, is host to significant ex-pat communities of both Americans and Russians.

    If there weren’t too many SWiPpLes there, I’d retire there, Phuk it.

    Read More
  192. Pepe says:
    @Roger
    Do those countries have good internet connections? Phone service? English language TV?

    Do those countries have good internet connections? Phone service? English language TV?

    In central Mexico, I pay about $45.00 US a month to a cable company that provides internet, cable and phone service.

    The internet is 20 mbps, which allows me to work online. I get around 200 cable channels, about half of which are HD including 20 pay movie channels. All English language entertainment and sports channels are available in English. The phone service is unlimited calls for Mexico, the US and Canada, including cell phones.

    I could get Netflix and stuff like that, but I really would rather watch less tv. Most big US and European films will play down here with Spanish subtitles. I do miss some of the smaller independent or foreign films, but I sense fewer of these are being made. At any rate, I check movie review sites weekly and make notes on any films I might want to see and order them from Amazon or look for them when I go up to the US once or twice a year for weekly trips. Pirated dvd’s cost about 75 US cents and will pretty much cover all films released in Mexico.

    Read More
  193. @Jack Highlands

    Co-worker took care of the saltwater aquarium at Gates’ Rancho Santa Fe home
     
    OK, that's not quite up there with the guy who spent his apocryphal working life carrying ice to the polar bear at Hearst Castle, but it's close. I thought Gates stood for something much nobler in the history of American capitalism: increasing the population of Africa to 5 billion by 2100.

    No one in the Gates family wants poor people to have more children. Bill and Melinda Gates are pro-contraception and pro-abortion. Bill Gates Sr. served on the board of Planned Parenthood. LINK

    After Trump cut funding to international organizations that provide abortion information, an international group called She Decides was formed to replace the loss funding. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation promised $20 million. “The money will go to five agencies to pay for contraception supplies, counselling, safe abortion services in countries where abortion is legal and other family planning programs, primarily in Africa and other regions of the developing world.” LINK

    In response to the abortion-related cuts, Melinda Gates wrote a strange opinion piece for CNN.

    Less than 1% of the US federal budget goes to aid, and the dollars spent abroad reap dividends for our country, too. …

    The money we spend on foreign aid is a long-term investment in Americans themselves. …

    When the United States invests in strengthening health systems abroad, it also makes deadly epidemics less likely to land on our shores. …

    Investing in global health and development also helps keep Americans safe. When people in the world’s poorest places have the chance to support their families and contribute to their communities, they are less likely to resort to violence. …

    What’s more, by helping countries lift themselves out of poverty, we also create markets for US products. …

    Another US investment that yields enormous returns for the global economy is contraceptives. …

    Smaller families mean women are better able to work outside the home…

    For all these reasons, I will spend my time in D.C. this week making the case that if we care about keeping America healthy, safe and prosperous, then we must prioritize foreign aid. The cost of these cuts is far too great for our country — or our conscience — to bear.

    http://edition.cnn.com/2017/04/20/opinions/melinda-gates-the-best-investment-america-can-make/index.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @anarchyst
    Bill Gates is not the "smartest guy in the room", but was "at the right place at the right time". You see, Gates WAS born with a silver spoon in his mouth.
    Gates purchased an "operating system" from a REAL "smart guy" for $20,000.00
    When IBM came looking for an "operating system" for its line of home computers, Microsoft filled the bill with its DOS (Disk Operating System).
    Gates' "smarts" actually came from his daddy's law firm (one of the most prestigious law firms in the Seattle area) with a tight "licensing agreement" crafted which required the purchase of hardware in order to purchase the software. One could not purchase the software without the requisite hardware. This one step assured Microsoft's success in the marketplace.
    Gates' ideas on eugenics (actually white genocide) as well as his penchant for depopulation schemes makes him (and his foundations) very dangerous. In fact, Gates has "scholarship programs" available only to "people of color"...no whites need apply...
    Far from being the "smartest guy in the room" ethically, Gates has the money to get what ever he wants...
    , @George Taylor
    503c Non-profits are the best tax loophole for the very rich. Bill Gates cost basis on Microsoft shares is effectively zero. So any shares that he sells are subject to capital gains taxes on virtually the entire amount. However if you "donate" the shares to a 503c, waalaa no capital gains taxes. Not only that, he gets out of Estate Taxes as well which rates are far more draconian than capital gain taxes. Of course if you're smart you don't give it charitable organizations that already exist, you create your own "The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation" just like the Clintons. This can provide many more benefits than just a tax shelter. It can be your own personal PR machine. Look bad boy Trump wants to shut off funding to the third world but here at the The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will make some of that up because we're special and forward thinking people. You can use it throw perks to your family and friends. Just like the Presidential winner gets to appoint ambassadors, the The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation can create high salaried trustee's, director positions etc., almost at will. Which is a great gig if you can get it.
  194. Truth says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    Steve once pointed out that in Eastern Europe, a ballet career is as much or more about class aspirations than about letting one's butterflies flutter free.

    Nureyev was bi-- he was introduced to "the art of male love" by his girlfriend's other boyfriend. Speaking of class, few celebrities were willing to appear on The Muppet Show at first, but after Nureyev agreed to, suddenly every other A-lister wanted to as well.

    Baryshnikov sired a pony-- okay, a Pony. His daughter with Jessica Lange went to Stillwater Area High School while living with Jessica and Sam Shepard. Misha has three other kids elsewhere.

    http://wikivisually.com/wiki/Shura_Baryshnikov
    http://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/jessica-lange-article-032006

    His daughter with Jessica Lange

    I guess science has scarily advanced over the past 40 years…

    Read More
  195. Truth says:
    @Catholic Philly Prole
    I know several retirees at my job (all white men) who have retired happily to Puerto Rico. A couple of them owned land down there when they were still on the job and used to go there in the winter for a week or two and then moved there for at least half-time after retiring. There are apparently several large tax benefits (no capital gains is one) to living there at least half the time http://puertoricotaxincentives.com/. Also PR is part of the United States and you won't be an expat or anything like that. My impression of the island having visited a few times over the years is that a lot of their trash (human-wise I mean) has been imported to NYC, Allentown, Reading, North Philly etc., and the people on the island are far whiter (both in appearance and behavior) and more genial than you would expect. This is especially true outside of the San Juan metro which is a big city environment similar to Miami. In fact I would consider the majority of the people in the Western portion of the Island (Cabo Rojo, Central Cordillera Mountains, Yauco, San Germain, Rincon, Boqueron etc) to be descendants of Europeans and majority-white.

    In fact I would consider the majority of the people in the Western portion of the Island (Cabo Rojo, Central Cordillera Mountains, Yauco, San Germain, Rincon, Boqueron etc) to be descendants of Europeans and majority-white.

    The crime rate in Puerto Rico is higher than it is in Mississippi. In San Juan it is higher than it is in Detroit.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Not that many Puerto Ricans are really 'white'; maybe by Latin American standards, but not by American standards, which is what most of the readers here are thinking in terms of. They tend to be clearly mixed, with a good bit of African and native in there. It doesn't take much coffee in your milk to spoil your nice cup of milk. There's plenty of redbones in ghetto college for 5-20 who can attest to that.
    , @Catholic Philly Prole
    Uh huh. And what do the slums of San Juan have to do places 2 and a half hours away on the opposite end of the island? Thats like telling someone to stay away from Amish Country because crime in North Philly or something. And i addressed upthread that the island had a higher crime rate than you'd expect because drug traffickers kill one another mainly in San Juan area housing projects.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    Where would this comment section be without our hoochie-coochie man Truth?
  196. Jack D says:
    @Roger
    Do those countries have good internet connections? Phone service? English language TV?

    I can’t speak to Ecuador specifically, but because the US was the earliest adopter of cell phone technology and because of our tendency toward unregulated oligopoly carriers, the US in general has among the worst and highest cost cell phone service in the world. Ditto for internet service. We think of the US being ahead on this kind of stuff but sadly when you go abroad you realize that we have fallen behind on a lot of things. Most 3rd world countries would be ashamed to have an airport like La Guardia. We have spent all of our treasure on wars, on welfare, on security theater, on unnecessary college degrees, on all sorts of BS and have badly neglected our infrastructure

    English TV – this can be satisfied with streaming services if you have good enough internet or cell service, which you probably will. You can also get a satellite dish of some kind.

    Phone – most 3rd worldish places never had good wireline service to begin with (usually run, badly, by the local post office) so most people switched to cell long ago. Wireline phone service is a relic – I know a lot of seniors are used to having it and it is not without its advantages, but it’s somewhere up there with carburetors and tube TVs on the list of obsolete technologies.

    Read More
  197. @CapitalistRoader
    People's bodies acclimate to altitude within a few days or a week at most, regardless of age.

    It’s not that simple when you’re talking about seriously high altitudes. Give me a call when you’ve been up on Mt. Rainier (14.5 thousand ft.) for a week. Atmospheric pressure is about 60% of that of sea level. That means you’d be getting 60% of the Oxygen into your bloodstream as you would at sea level. If it ends up being hard to talk for you, just text me about it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    Edemas in various forms can hit low-landers hard. When brains swell and lungs begin to fill up with liquids then dropping down to lower elevation is urgent for those expecting to function somewhat normally, even live. Acclimatization takes a longer time than tourists may imagine, and life at 7,000' is much easier than 11,000'. If people have to try, visit Leadville, Colorado and see how long you want to hang out with the locals beyond an afternoon.
  198. Jack D says:
    @BB753
    But then very few men think that overcoming their aversion to dancing is worth it. I bet 95% of straight males hate dancing
    It's a girly thing.

    I assume you are talking about ballet dancing. When it comes to social dancing, this has traditionally been a pair activity so there has to be a 1:1 sex ratio of partners. Perhaps this is like the # of sexual partners where men report having more than women. One of the genders has to be lying.

    In the past, dancing was considered an essential part of the matching process but I guess people now just swipe on Tinder and go right at it like dogs so that men can skip the dancing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    No, I was mentioning all kinds of dancing. The sole reason men used to dance socially was to meet girls. I've never met an heterosexual man who liked dancing at all, not to mention ballet dancing.
    You can hardly call the grinding and humping that nowadays happen on the dance floor of clubs "dancing".
    , @Johann Ricke

    Perhaps this is like the # of sexual partners where men report having more than women. One of the genders has to be lying.
     
    What about hookers?
    , @Opinionator
    Was it part of the process for you? How adept are you at various dance styles?
    , @Dave Pinsen

    When it comes to social dancing, this has traditionally been a pair activity so there has to be a 1:1 sex ratio of partners. Perhaps this is like the # of sexual partners where men report having more than women. One of the genders has to be lying.
     
    At formal dances a 1:1 ratio may have been arranged, but there's no one making sure everyone has a mate in the sexual market, so some have many mates, some have a few, and some have none.

    And, generally, both sexes are lying about the number of partners, but in different directions. The heuristic from one of the American Pie movies was to divide men's claims by 3 and multiply women's by 3.
  199. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    “while Bill Gates’ summer home is in Redmond, WA and winter home is in Ranch Santa Fe, CA”

    Why is it that those who are publicly shoving their finger in everyone else’s face demanding they repent from their climate changing ways are the ones making the biggest carbon footprints? Could it be that they care less about the issue they so vociferously proclaim than they do about virtue signalling?

    Read More
  200. BB753 says:
    @Jack D
    I assume you are talking about ballet dancing. When it comes to social dancing, this has traditionally been a pair activity so there has to be a 1:1 sex ratio of partners. Perhaps this is like the # of sexual partners where men report having more than women. One of the genders has to be lying.

    In the past, dancing was considered an essential part of the matching process but I guess people now just swipe on Tinder and go right at it like dogs so that men can skip the dancing.

    No, I was mentioning all kinds of dancing. The sole reason men used to dance socially was to meet girls. I’ve never met an heterosexual man who liked dancing at all, not to mention ballet dancing.
    You can hardly call the grinding and humping that nowadays happen on the dance floor of clubs “dancing”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Regarding the numbers of sexual partners: there is not as much dishonesty as you may suspect: the women with many partners are all riding a smaller carousel of so-called "alphas...."
    , @Art Deco
    The sole reason men used to dance socially was to meet girls.

    You mean when my father danced with my mother at nightspots he was trying to meet girls?
  201. My friends who investigated Latin-American retirement had the following relevant observations:
    - Poor Spanish skills will make life difficult for you
    - You will stand in line for hours
    - “Come back tomorrow” actually means “I don’t want to do it today” or “I don’t know whom to ask”
    - The electric bill consumes most of your budget, and it’s amazingly unreliable
    - Not everyone is happy to see you
    - Instead of admitting they don’t know the answer to your question, locals will tell you some long-winded story that is complete B.S.
    - Pioneer skills and a can-do attitude really help

    These are typically things that will result in many retirees throwing in the towel after a couple of years.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Latin America is an awfully big place - I think it varies a lot by country and region. There are places where the power goes out a lot and places where it's very reliable. There are places where you can get by in English and places where you can't (though I think it's pretty presumptuous to move to another country and not expect to learn the local language at at least a basic level). Etc. Utilities may somewhat costly (the locals don't run the A/C full blast 24/7) but if you are paying $500/month for a lovely furnished condo then so what? The whole point of moving to a place like this is that people are laid back and no one is in a big hurry. If you want snappy service, move to Zurich.
    , @Pepe
    Writing from central Mexico, I'd say most of what you say is true except:

    The standing in lines for hours is now less of a problem. The only time Mexicans stand in really long lines is waiting for cash withdrawals that can't be done thru an ATM machine. And even this is not too much of problem if you avoid going to banks around the first and the 15th of the month. There are usually ways to avoid long lines in other situations, but you might have to pay a small fee (50 US cents) that many Mexicans consider an extravagance.

    I have no idea where this high electric bill stuff comes from, unless you're talking to ex-pats with Olympic sized pools and AC in beach climates. A typical power bill, once you get above 5 or 6,000 feet, is less than $25 US a month. I have a small house, and my bill is less than $1o US a month. My power goes out much less frequently, and for much shorter periods, than when I lived in the S.E. US.
    , @tsotha

    “Come back tomorrow” actually means “I don’t want to do it today” or “I don’t know whom to ask”
     
    Heh. In Puerto Rico I learned mañana doesn't mean "morning" or "tomorrow" like you read in the dictionary. It means "some day after today, possibly never".
  202. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Cornbeef
    I can easily generalize. The South is predominantly white and white pleasant. The rest of the country is less pleasant and more stabby.

    The southern state of Santa Catarina has a GDP per capita on par with Puerto Rico, but a homicide rate about a third lower, per Wiki (I’d have assumed it was a lot lower).

    Rio de Janeiro has a few pleasant and pretty safe neighborhoods, but a lot of sketchiness outside of them, and you’d probably want to avoid public transportation.

    Read More
  203. @eah
    OT (but I am reminded of a 'banana republic')

    Harvard Rescinds Acceptances for At Least Ten Students for Obscene Memes

    Harvard College rescinded admissions offers to at least ten prospective members of the Class of 2021 after the students traded sexually explicit memes and messages that sometimes targeted minority groups in a private Facebook group chat.

    So glad to see Harvard affirm snitching as one of the pillars of the academy.

    Read More
  204. Lurker says:
    @Bragadocious
    Lake Chapala used to sound interesting, but I'm not sure I could stomach Fred Reed holding forth in the local diner about how Mexicans are god's gift to humanity and to not want 30 million of them in your local emergency rooms is just so gringo privilegist.

    I’m not sure I could stomach Fred Reed holding forth in the local diner about how Mexicans are god’s gift to humanity

    It’s OK, eventually he’d have to go and serve another table.

    Read More
  205. @eah
    OT (but I am reminded of a 'banana republic')

    Harvard Rescinds Acceptances for At Least Ten Students for Obscene Memes

    Harvard College rescinded admissions offers to at least ten prospective members of the Class of 2021 after the students traded sexually explicit memes and messages that sometimes targeted minority groups in a private Facebook group chat.

    I guess those were the last ten conservatives that accidentally passed through the admissions office’s political filter.

    Read More
  206. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Truth

    In fact I would consider the majority of the people in the Western portion of the Island (Cabo Rojo, Central Cordillera Mountains, Yauco, San Germain, Rincon, Boqueron etc) to be descendants of Europeans and majority-white.
     
    The crime rate in Puerto Rico is higher than it is in Mississippi. In San Juan it is higher than it is in Detroit.

    Not that many Puerto Ricans are really ‘white’; maybe by Latin American standards, but not by American standards, which is what most of the readers here are thinking in terms of. They tend to be clearly mixed, with a good bit of African and native in there. It doesn’t take much coffee in your milk to spoil your nice cup of milk. There’s plenty of redbones in ghetto college for 5-20 who can attest to that.

    Read More
  207. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Which is why I mentioned Steve's post being linked. ;)

    But, yes, I'll give Turkheimer credit for acknowledging the heretics.

    Still Turkheimer's post is odd to my very layman mind. He seems perfectly fine with the idea of the existence of race, IQ existing and IQ being heritable on individual basis, i.e. smart parents tend to have above average IQ kids. But then he says that the possibility of genetic differences among races is crazy and can't be proved anyway.

    I don't see how those go together. But, again, it's not my field so maybe he has perfectly sound reasons.

    “Citizen of a Silly Country”

    We all are, at this point.

    Read More
  208. Jack D says:
    @Deckin
    I actually know someone who retired to Cuenca. Here are some observations he told me:
    1. The food is bland--I would have thought it would be hot and spicy, but that's not part of the native diet there, for whatever reason.
    2. The retirees there really try to sell it to others.
    3. It's super cheap.
    4. There's a sort of benign lawlessness to the place. People, if they get in car wrecks, will just walk away and leave the car on the side of the road. He said it's not uncommon to see this everywhere.
    5. It's never super hot or super cold--so they do have a nice climate.

    It’s funny that because Mexican cuisine uses a lot of chili peppers (though even Mexican food is not as relentlessly hot as some people imagine it to be) somehow people assume that this carries over to the rest of Latin America and even Spain. The climate of Ecuador is not really suited to growing chili peppers, especially at high altitudes. Potatoes are more like it.

    As for climate, it’s a good idea to look at places where you can grow high quality Arabica coffee beans. Coffee thrives in mild rather than hot temperatures but cannot tolerate any frost so it grows mostly on mountains in the tropics.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pepe
    You don't have to go all the way to Ecuador to see this. Once you get south of Guatemala, the food is very distinct from Mexico. No tortillas and very little use of hot chiles.
  209. I’d never consider retiring to Mexico, much less Ecuador. I value American rule of law (yeah, what’s left of it but that’s still a lot) way more than any conceivable cost of living advantage those places offer. I like my police policing, not running protection and kidnapping rackets.

    I’d rather live in a hovel in West Virginia, than in a luxury villa at Lake Chapala.

    I also wouldn’t want to live in a place where people can tell I’m a stranger just by looking at me.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    I think that what you are missing (and actually the same thing is true to some extent in the US) is that there is a big difference in crime, police corruption, etc. between say the slum areas of Tijuana and an upscale expat area in the mountains such as San Miguel Allende. In the latter you would be much safer than in say the ghetto of Chicago.
    , @Curle
    If you're in West Virginia and your neighbors can't place you on the family tree, believe me you're a stranger, probably some form of dessicated Yankee.
  210. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @syonredux
    Off-topic,

    Critic reduced to tears by Wonder Woman:

    I did not expect to cry during “Wonder Woman.”

    Specifically, I did not expect to tear up during the fight scenes. OK, maybe if Gal Gadot’s Diana, Amazon princess, had given some terrific speech, or if a character I liked had died, but I certainly did not expect to get all misty eyed during the battle scenes.

    But that’s exactly what happened; when Wonder Woman started fighting, out came the waterworks.

    It started on the beach, when Gen. Antiope (Robin Wright) rode into battle with a smile and Queen Hippolyta (Connie Nielsen) leaped off her horse, spinning into the air to wipe out two armed men with her sword. As the battle raged on, it became clear that the scene was not window-dressing, 10 seconds of Amazon showtime before the real movie started. This was the movie — female warriors kicking ass.

    They were fierce and powerful, highly trained soldiers who knew what they were doing, and the film took that, and them, seriously. It was overwhelming.
     

    I felt like I was discovering something I didn’t even know I had always wanted. A need that I had boxed up and buried deep after three movies of Iron Man punching bad guys in the face, three more movies of Captain America punching bad guys in the face, a movie about Superman and Batman punching each other in the face and then “Suicide Squad.”

    Witnessing a woman hold the field, and the camera, for that long blew open an arguably monotonous genre. We didn’t need a computer-generated tree or a sassy raccoon to change the superhero game; what we needed was a woman.

     

    http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/herocomplex/la-et-hc-wonder-woman-crying-20170605-htmlstory.html

    “I did not expect to cry during “Wonder Woman….It started on the beach, when Gen. Antiope (Robin Wright) rode into battle with a smile and Queen Hippolyta (Connie Nielsen) leaped off her horse, spinning into the air to wipe out two armed men with her sword. As the battle raged on, it became clear that the scene was not window-dressing, 10 seconds of Amazon showtime before the real movie started. This was the movie — female warriors kicking ass.”

    Yeah, when I was 5, I shed a tear or two while watching ‘Watership Down’. Pure fantasy disconnected with reality can do that sometimes.

    Read More
  211. @Truth

    In fact I would consider the majority of the people in the Western portion of the Island (Cabo Rojo, Central Cordillera Mountains, Yauco, San Germain, Rincon, Boqueron etc) to be descendants of Europeans and majority-white.
     
    The crime rate in Puerto Rico is higher than it is in Mississippi. In San Juan it is higher than it is in Detroit.

    Uh huh. And what do the slums of San Juan have to do places 2 and a half hours away on the opposite end of the island? Thats like telling someone to stay away from Amish Country because crime in North Philly or something. And i addressed upthread that the island had a higher crime rate than you’d expect because drug traffickers kill one another mainly in San Juan area housing projects.

    Read More
  212. Jack D says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    There are some real doozies on this list

    https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/nonstop-flights-20-longest-flights-in-the-world-ranked-by-mileage

     

    I've done the Newark-Hong Kong flight (and also Chicago-HK, which isn't much shorter, i.e. 15 hours+), and many many flights in the 12-14 hour range.

    I find that after about eight hours, the length of the flight becomes less and less relevant; one enters a psychological state akin to Homer's in that Simpson's episode when he's eaten the super-spicy peppers and Johnny Cash is his spirit guide.

    I did UAL Chicago-HK on an ancient 747 – the “in flight entertainment” was a CRT hanging from the ceiling every 10th row.

    Luckily I had brought some books (don’t have to worry about the batteries dying on those – needless to say there were no power outlets). As far as I could tell, the Chinese all took massive doses of Ambien and slept the whole way. This is probably because they work 23 hours/day when they are not traveling and are badly sleep deprived.

    Speaking of ancient, the “stewardesses” were all surly old ladies (flights get assigned by seniority due to union rules and I guess this flight is considered desirable) who had been flying longer than the plane. For one of them it was her last flight before retirement and the rest of the crew kept parading her around with balloons and songs and such, as if I gave a damn.

    My next flight after that was Dragon Air HK to Shanghai – the stewardesses were all attractive 20 something females, the plane was brand new, they kept coming around with booze and hot towels. I felt like I was in an Asian version of Mad Men – the only thing missing (which I did not miss) were the clouds of cigarette smoke.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    LOL -- you've nailed down the most salient differences between flying an Asian airline and a US airline. That retirement flight sounds like a nightmare.

    Dragon Air is now Cathay Dragon; the quality differential between Cathay Pacific and Cathay Dragon has now diminished to not much.

    I did that UAL HK-Chicago flight a couple of times, but never again. We Calvinists swore off United about 1o years ago after an inexcusable series of customer service debacles on a trip from HK to the USA, and we've stuck to it. Actually, that trip included the O'Hare-HKG leg, which was bad enough, but the real problems were in -- thread theme? -- Florida, Orlando, specifically.

  213. @Lot
    Most of Florida is not very expensive either.

    Most of Florida is not very expensive either.

    Yeah but the problem is … you’re living in Florida.

    (The ocean waves felt terrific this morning. Saw several pretty bikini clad girls–without tats! There are some pluses. But man the geography is deathly boring.)

    Read More
  214. Jack D says:
    @International Jew
    I'd never consider retiring to Mexico, much less Ecuador. I value American rule of law (yeah, what's left of it but that's still a lot) way more than any conceivable cost of living advantage those places offer. I like my police policing, not running protection and kidnapping rackets.

    I'd rather live in a hovel in West Virginia, than in a luxury villa at Lake Chapala.

    I also wouldn't want to live in a place where people can tell I'm a stranger just by looking at me.

    I think that what you are missing (and actually the same thing is true to some extent in the US) is that there is a big difference in crime, police corruption, etc. between say the slum areas of Tijuana and an upscale expat area in the mountains such as San Miguel Allende. In the latter you would be much safer than in say the ghetto of Chicago.

    Read More
  215. @Tony
    Fred should know that booty bandits are not looked upon too highly in Mexico.

    That’s okay, I don’t look too kindly on Mexican booty in general.

    Read More
  216. Right in all counts, sir. This source states that the typical Puerto Rican has TWENTY percent subsaharan african DNA:

    http://voices.nationalgeographic.com/2014/07/25/genographic-project-dna-results-reveal-details-of-puerto-rican-history/

    Explains a lot about their more violent and volatile nature, which I have personally experienced and observed (mostly in NYC and NJ).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    20% is the average but not necessarily the typical amount. Puerto Ricans come in many shades. While it's true that very few (except for recent arrivals) are 100% white, there is quite a range from say 35% white (the rest being African and Amerindian), which reads as black or mulatto, to 95% white, which averages out to 65% white. A Puerto Rican who is 90 or 95% white could pass for an olive skinned Italian like Ariana Grande (or vice versa).
  217. Jack D says:
    @Another Canadian
    My friends who investigated Latin-American retirement had the following relevant observations:
    - Poor Spanish skills will make life difficult for you
    - You will stand in line for hours
    - "Come back tomorrow" actually means "I don't want to do it today" or "I don't know whom to ask"
    - The electric bill consumes most of your budget, and it's amazingly unreliable
    - Not everyone is happy to see you
    - Instead of admitting they don't know the answer to your question, locals will tell you some long-winded story that is complete B.S.
    - Pioneer skills and a can-do attitude really help

    These are typically things that will result in many retirees throwing in the towel after a couple of years.

    Latin America is an awfully big place – I think it varies a lot by country and region. There are places where the power goes out a lot and places where it’s very reliable. There are places where you can get by in English and places where you can’t (though I think it’s pretty presumptuous to move to another country and not expect to learn the local language at at least a basic level). Etc. Utilities may somewhat costly (the locals don’t run the A/C full blast 24/7) but if you are paying $500/month for a lovely furnished condo then so what? The whole point of moving to a place like this is that people are laid back and no one is in a big hurry. If you want snappy service, move to Zurich.

    Read More
  218. @Jack D
    I did UAL Chicago-HK on an ancient 747 - the "in flight entertainment" was a CRT hanging from the ceiling every 10th row.

    Luckily I had brought some books (don't have to worry about the batteries dying on those - needless to say there were no power outlets). As far as I could tell, the Chinese all took massive doses of Ambien and slept the whole way. This is probably because they work 23 hours/day when they are not traveling and are badly sleep deprived.

    Speaking of ancient, the "stewardesses" were all surly old ladies (flights get assigned by seniority due to union rules and I guess this flight is considered desirable) who had been flying longer than the plane. For one of them it was her last flight before retirement and the rest of the crew kept parading her around with balloons and songs and such, as if I gave a damn.

    My next flight after that was Dragon Air HK to Shanghai - the stewardesses were all attractive 20 something females, the plane was brand new, they kept coming around with booze and hot towels. I felt like I was in an Asian version of Mad Men - the only thing missing (which I did not miss) were the clouds of cigarette smoke.

    LOL — you’ve nailed down the most salient differences between flying an Asian airline and a US airline. That retirement flight sounds like a nightmare.

    Dragon Air is now Cathay Dragon; the quality differential between Cathay Pacific and Cathay Dragon has now diminished to not much.

    I did that UAL HK-Chicago flight a couple of times, but never again. We Calvinists swore off United about 1o years ago after an inexcusable series of customer service debacles on a trip from HK to the USA, and we’ve stuck to it. Actually, that trip included the O’Hare-HKG leg, which was bad enough, but the real problems were in — thread theme? — Florida, Orlando, specifically.

    Read More
  219. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Reg Cæsar

    Ballerino Leaps Onto Subway Tracks and Lifts Man to Safety
     
    Most remarkable thing about this story-- the dancer has a wife.

    Funny. I was in and around the dance world for a while. Lots of gays of course but lots of gays in all the arts. However there is a certain percent of male dancers who are alpha. Often these guys learned as kids and are soloist or higher. So they are both high status in the ballet world and have lots of young girls to hit on. Essentially they are foxes in the hen house. Btw I had to google ballerino to see if it was real as I had never heard it used. I guess I never met many Italian dancers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Is "ballerino" a real word? My Italian-American mother-in-law used it.

    The ballerino who rescued the man off the subway tracks is married to a prima ballerina. Baryshnikov-types do very well with the ladies.

    , @Curle
    I take it there aren't many lesbian ballerinas?
  220. ganderson says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    I didn't want to screw up the video embedment, which is very, very sensitive, apparently, so last comment here for the time being.

    How appropos are these lyrics still!

    "I went home with Ann Coulter (in my dreams)
    the way I always do.
    How was I to know
    she was with the Russians too"

    Then comes that great guitar riff! I never knew this guy's music much when he was alive - only "Werewolves of London" of course. RIP Warren.

    Warren is very underrated- his first , self titled album is a gem, as is Excitable Boy. He has a lot of great later stuff- “Mr Bad Example”, “Transverse City” just to name a couple. The Dead used to do “”Werewolves” as an encore, with the Wolf guitar!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    How similar are the guitar chords in Werewolves of London and Sweet Home Alabama?
  221. @Anon
    Funny. I was in and around the dance world for a while. Lots of gays of course but lots of gays in all the arts. However there is a certain percent of male dancers who are alpha. Often these guys learned as kids and are soloist or higher. So they are both high status in the ballet world and have lots of young girls to hit on. Essentially they are foxes in the hen house. Btw I had to google ballerino to see if it was real as I had never heard it used. I guess I never met many Italian dancers.

    Is “ballerino” a real word? My Italian-American mother-in-law used it.

    The ballerino who rescued the man off the subway tracks is married to a prima ballerina. Baryshnikov-types do very well with the ladies.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    That's because ballerinos have extremely well developed pelvic muscles. Pelvic muscles are the muscles that Kegel exercises target. Ballerino training and routines involve intense use of the pelvic muscles. It's like they're constantly doing Kegel exercises. In other words, these guys have phenomenal stamina. That's why they do very well with the ladies.
  222. mobi says:
    @FKA Max
    NASA Astronaut Brian O'Leary https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_O%27Leary retired to and died in Vilcabamba, Ecuador https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vilcabamba,_Ecuador :


    Located in a historical and scenic valley, it is a common destination for tourists, in part because it is widely believed that its inhabitants grow to a very old age. Locals assert that it is not uncommon to see a person reach 100 years of age and it is claimed that many have gotten to 120, even up to 135, which would make it an area with the oldest inhabitants in the world. It is often called the Valley of Longevity.
    [...]
    The researchers speculated that the villagers had originally exaggerated their ages in order to gain prestige in the community. This practice appeared to have been occurring for generations, long before academic researchers had arrived in the village. Additionally Dr. Leaf speculated that the international publicity, and subsequent rise in tourism, may have encouraged the villagers' exaggerations to grow more prolific.
    [...]
    Although the Vilcabambans did not enjoy greater longevity than the rest of the world, researchers noted that the Vilcabamban lifestyle, which included hard work in a high altitude combined with a low-calorie, low-animal-fat diet, did seem to keep the villagers healthy and vigorous in their old age.
     

    Although the Vilcabambans did not enjoy greater longevity than the rest of the world, researchers noted that the Vilcabamban lifestyle, which included hard work in a high altitude combined with a low-calorie, low-animal-fat diet, did seem to keep the villagers healthy and vigorous in their old age.

    There is, or was, a hypothesis kicking around the ageing-research community that chronic, low-level exposure to stressors like heat or radiation might actually prolong lifespan.

    The idea was that it triggers a very ancient stress-response mechanism at the cellular level, analogous to very hardy, extraordinarily long-lived states of spores, or virtually ageless, defensive ‘dauer’ states in roundworms, etc.

    The suggestion was that living long-term at very high altitudes, by exposing one to chronically somewhat higher (though not high) radiation levels (eg cosmic rays) might be triggering such a state, and might even be tied to the widespread anecdotes about exceptionally long-lived mountain peoples.

    There’s some evidence medical workers chronically exposed to higher levels of radiation live longer, for example, and get less, not more, cancer.

    Calorie restriction appears similarly promising (and might be working via similar pathways).

    Read More
  223. @ganderson
    Warren is very underrated- his first , self titled album is a gem, as is Excitable Boy. He has a lot of great later stuff- "Mr Bad Example", "Transverse City" just to name a couple. The Dead used to do ""Werewolves" as an encore, with the Wolf guitar!

    How similar are the guitar chords in Werewolves of London and Sweet Home Alabama?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Sure they're the same, Steve, but you can find that same chord progression, 5th, 4th, tonic (x2) in loads of other songs too. Skynyrd* made it great with so many guitars, and Warren Zevon with his piano playing, great energy, and fun lyrics.

    * Ha, the spell-checker does not even know Lyrnryd or Skynyrd - what kind of damn yankee software did Unz put on here (or is it local to my machine... ummmm, never mind.) Or was it programmed by Neil Young.
    , @27 year old
    They're so much alike that future Michigan Senator Kid Rock merged the two songs into his hit "all summer long".


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=uwIGZLjugKA
  224. Ivy says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    It's not that simple when you're talking about seriously high altitudes. Give me a call when you've been up on Mt. Rainier (14.5 thousand ft.) for a week. Atmospheric pressure is about 60% of that of sea level. That means you'd be getting 60% of the Oxygen into your bloodstream as you would at sea level. If it ends up being hard to talk for you, just text me about it.

    Edemas in various forms can hit low-landers hard. When brains swell and lungs begin to fill up with liquids then dropping down to lower elevation is urgent for those expecting to function somewhat normally, even live. Acclimatization takes a longer time than tourists may imagine, and life at 7,000′ is much easier than 11,000′. If people have to try, visit Leadville, Colorado and see how long you want to hang out with the locals beyond an afternoon.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    And even if you thrive at high altitude, what if one of your grandchildren doesn't?

    All I'm saying is that it's an interesting human biodiversity question. Low latitude and high altitude is an interesting combination, but I don't read much about it from the retirement community standpoint.

  225. @Ivy
    Edemas in various forms can hit low-landers hard. When brains swell and lungs begin to fill up with liquids then dropping down to lower elevation is urgent for those expecting to function somewhat normally, even live. Acclimatization takes a longer time than tourists may imagine, and life at 7,000' is much easier than 11,000'. If people have to try, visit Leadville, Colorado and see how long you want to hang out with the locals beyond an afternoon.

    And even if you thrive at high altitude, what if one of your grandchildren doesn’t?

    All I’m saying is that it’s an interesting human biodiversity question. Low latitude and high altitude is an interesting combination, but I don’t read much about it from the retirement community standpoint.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    As someone (or maybe multiple commenters) mentioned above, it's one thing to live your life at high altitude. There may be other, bad effects (lots of UV), but I can't see that being anything but good for your cardio and pulmonary parts. Imagine coming down to sea level after a life in Bolivia at 12,000 ft. You'd feel like you'd been reborn, or at least that you are in an oxygen chamber.

    The other way around could be very bad for old people or anyone who already has some problems with cardio-pulmonary stuff. Whatever you have will feel much worse up there. Even my V-8 Camaro had a hell of a time getting up the Molass pass on the way to Durango way back - it wasn't old then, but it had a carburetor, non-adjustable, at least by me.
    , @Jack D
    Unless the kid has some horrible disease, it's much more likely that you'll have a problem than your grandkids. Kids are very resilient.
  226. peterike says:

    I suppose my overall reaction to this topic is: why the HELL should I have to leave my own country to be able to retire in a reasonably nice place at a reasonable cost? Why does an 85 year old Chinese grandmother fresh off the plane get Social Security? How are these two things connected?

    I want my country back.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D

    Why does an 85 year old Chinese grandmother fresh off the plane get Social Security?
     
    The answer is that she doesn't. Generally speaking, you have to pay in for 10 years to draw Social Security. There is a separate welfare like program called SSI (Supplemental Security Income) that elderly (legal) low income immigrants may be eligible for. Social security (technically OASI - old age and survivor's insurance) pays out around $800 billion/ year to 50 million recipients (average benefit $16,000) . SSI pays $60 billion to 8 million recipients (average benefit $7,500).
  227. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Steve Sailer
    Is "ballerino" a real word? My Italian-American mother-in-law used it.

    The ballerino who rescued the man off the subway tracks is married to a prima ballerina. Baryshnikov-types do very well with the ladies.

    That’s because ballerinos have extremely well developed pelvic muscles. Pelvic muscles are the muscles that Kegel exercises target. Ballerino training and routines involve intense use of the pelvic muscles. It’s like they’re constantly doing Kegel exercises. In other words, these guys have phenomenal stamina. That’s why they do very well with the ladies.

    Read More
  228. @Jack D
    I assume you are talking about ballet dancing. When it comes to social dancing, this has traditionally been a pair activity so there has to be a 1:1 sex ratio of partners. Perhaps this is like the # of sexual partners where men report having more than women. One of the genders has to be lying.

    In the past, dancing was considered an essential part of the matching process but I guess people now just swipe on Tinder and go right at it like dogs so that men can skip the dancing.

    Perhaps this is like the # of sexual partners where men report having more than women. One of the genders has to be lying.

    What about hookers?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    See my reply below at #247 (or thereabouts). Individuals may have more or fewer partners (or none) but the total # of heterosexual sex acts (and the average frequency) is by definition the same for both genders as a whole. But that's not what people report.
    , @Corvinus
    "What about hookers?"

    Ask our resident "expert" on the matter, Whorefinder. He apparently has a long list at his disposal.
  229. @Steve Sailer
    How similar are the guitar chords in Werewolves of London and Sweet Home Alabama?

    Sure they’re the same, Steve, but you can find that same chord progression, 5th, 4th, tonic (x2) in loads of other songs too. Skynyrd* made it great with so many guitars, and Warren Zevon with his piano playing, great energy, and fun lyrics.

    * Ha, the spell-checker does not even know Lyrnryd or Skynyrd – what kind of damn yankee software did Unz put on here (or is it local to my machine… ummmm, never mind.) Or was it programmed by Neil Young.

    Read More
  230. @Steve Sailer
    And even if you thrive at high altitude, what if one of your grandchildren doesn't?

    All I'm saying is that it's an interesting human biodiversity question. Low latitude and high altitude is an interesting combination, but I don't read much about it from the retirement community standpoint.

    As someone (or maybe multiple commenters) mentioned above, it’s one thing to live your life at high altitude. There may be other, bad effects (lots of UV), but I can’t see that being anything but good for your cardio and pulmonary parts. Imagine coming down to sea level after a life in Bolivia at 12,000 ft. You’d feel like you’d been reborn, or at least that you are in an oxygen chamber.

    The other way around could be very bad for old people or anyone who already has some problems with cardio-pulmonary stuff. Whatever you have will feel much worse up there. Even my V-8 Camaro had a hell of a time getting up the Molass pass on the way to Durango way back – it wasn’t old then, but it had a carburetor, non-adjustable, at least by me.

    Read More
  231. Karl says:
    @James Richard
    There are some real doozies on this list

    https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/nonstop-flights-20-longest-flights-in-the-world-ranked-by-mileage

    but the longest current regularly scheduled non-stop flight is from Doha,Qatar to Auckland. 9032 miles. I was just reading that United has ordered some specially built 787s (fewer seats, more fuel) for a proposed flight from the US to Singapore that is even longer. Singapore is becoming a popular hub for long distance flights to the Orient that were previously routed to Hong Kong.

    The manufacturers are increasing the air pressure to simulate a lower altitude of 6000 feet on these long flights too. I guess they don't want elderly tourists to expire before they arrive at their destination. I hear tell that Emirates is the best airline but their first class fares cost as much as a good car.

    22 James Richard > I was just reading that United has ordered some specially built 787s (fewer seats, more fuel) for a proposed flight from the US to Singapore that is even longer.

    be super careful if/when you book a Singsapore Airlines First Class seat from SG to California.

    some of the flights are codeshares with United. You pay the ridiculously high price, but you don’t get the ridiculously high level of outfitment & service-rendered on Sing Air aircrafts by S-A crews

    It is always best to buy the ticket at a real S-Air office. However, evem they will not mention the fact of codeshare unless you ask….

    Read More
  232. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @whorefinder
    That TV show NCIS had two characters retire to Mexico: Gibbs (temporarily) and Gibbs's predecessor (whom Gibbs went to live with).

    Of course, even when retired both of them came back to the U.S. a lot to do stuff. The underlying theme was that retirement to a foreign land sounds nice, but there's a reason why it's so cheap to live in a villa in a sleepy Mexican village: it's friggin' boring. No one's around, the local TV is crap, there's nothing to do.

    I've never really understood people who work and live and raise a family their entire adult lives in one state only to move to another on retirement. Leave everything you've built and known just for warmer weather? What's wrong with you? Why didn't you just move there in the first place, if you thought it so wonderful?

    Then I realized most people who permanently do it are either Jews or the kind of "rootless cosmopolitans" who hang out with Jews (e.g. Joe Kennedy, Sr.). So, really, if you don't give a crap where you lived but used it to make money and don't have any deep human connections, yeah, it makes sense. But most goyim ain't like that.

    Personally, I like where I live. That's why I live here.

    Retiring away from family and living (or at least trying to live) independently into advanced age is more of a WASP thing. Elderly Jews might retire to Florida but they’re known for constantly pestering their families.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    No, it's a Jew thing. Just because they're pestering their families doesn't mean squat. They move to Miami Beach at age 65 and leave their worlds behind. Rootless cosmopolitans, indeed.
  233. @BB753
    No, I was mentioning all kinds of dancing. The sole reason men used to dance socially was to meet girls. I've never met an heterosexual man who liked dancing at all, not to mention ballet dancing.
    You can hardly call the grinding and humping that nowadays happen on the dance floor of clubs "dancing".

    Regarding the numbers of sexual partners: there is not as much dishonesty as you may suspect: the women with many partners are all riding a smaller carousel of so-called “alphas….”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    If you are talking about an entire population, it takes 2 to tango so the total number of male (heterosexual) sex acts is equal to the # of female sex acts (never mind that some men or women are getting a lot more action than others). If a population of men reports that they have sex on average 2x/week and a population of women reports 1x, then someone is lying. This BTW is what happens when they do surveys.
  234. Karl says:
    @dr kill
    And for most of Steve's readers, rural FL will be just as foreign as any place in SA. Except we do speak English.

    53 Dr Kill > Except we do speak English

    Ostensibly, so do blacks in deep-rural Parishes of Louisiana.

    Read More
  235. @Steve Sailer
    How similar are the guitar chords in Werewolves of London and Sweet Home Alabama?

    They’re so much alike that future Michigan Senator Kid Rock merged the two songs into his hit “all summer long”.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=uwIGZLjugKA

    Read More
  236. Pepe says:
    @Another Canadian
    My friends who investigated Latin-American retirement had the following relevant observations:
    - Poor Spanish skills will make life difficult for you
    - You will stand in line for hours
    - "Come back tomorrow" actually means "I don't want to do it today" or "I don't know whom to ask"
    - The electric bill consumes most of your budget, and it's amazingly unreliable
    - Not everyone is happy to see you
    - Instead of admitting they don't know the answer to your question, locals will tell you some long-winded story that is complete B.S.
    - Pioneer skills and a can-do attitude really help

    These are typically things that will result in many retirees throwing in the towel after a couple of years.

    Writing from central Mexico, I’d say most of what you say is true except:

    The standing in lines for hours is now less of a problem. The only time Mexicans stand in really long lines is waiting for cash withdrawals that can’t be done thru an ATM machine. And even this is not too much of problem if you avoid going to banks around the first and the 15th of the month. There are usually ways to avoid long lines in other situations, but you might have to pay a small fee (50 US cents) that many Mexicans consider an extravagance.

    I have no idea where this high electric bill stuff comes from, unless you’re talking to ex-pats with Olympic sized pools and AC in beach climates. A typical power bill, once you get above 5 or 6,000 feet, is less than $25 US a month. I have a small house, and my bill is less than $1o US a month. My power goes out much less frequently, and for much shorter periods, than when I lived in the S.E. US.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Another Canadian
    High electric bills comes from coastal areas like Roatan or Bocas del Toro not the high Andes.
  237. Pepe says:
    @Jack D
    It's funny that because Mexican cuisine uses a lot of chili peppers (though even Mexican food is not as relentlessly hot as some people imagine it to be) somehow people assume that this carries over to the rest of Latin America and even Spain. The climate of Ecuador is not really suited to growing chili peppers, especially at high altitudes. Potatoes are more like it.

    As for climate, it's a good idea to look at places where you can grow high quality Arabica coffee beans. Coffee thrives in mild rather than hot temperatures but cannot tolerate any frost so it grows mostly on mountains in the tropics.

    You don’t have to go all the way to Ecuador to see this. Once you get south of Guatemala, the food is very distinct from Mexico. No tortillas and very little use of hot chiles.

    Read More
    • Replies: @(((Owen)))
    The authentic original Mexican food zone runs from San Francisco to San Salvador. Outside that band, the Mexican food is a foreign import and not the same at all. The northeast boundary is somewhere near Dallas. In the really Maya parts of Yucatan there are even some areas in Mexico proper where the Mexican food is not entirely native.

    And the areas in that region outside Mexico are not just fuzzy borders with lots of crossings. Burritos were invented in Alta California around San Diego somewhere. Tex-Mex was invented in Texas. A lot of brightly colored suckling pig barbecue was invented in Guatemala. Mexican food is a cultural movement a couple hundred miles bigger than the political boundaries of Mexico.

    In fact, there are at least two major regional Mexican cuisines that don't exist natively inside Mexico at all.

    And that's just modern Mexican food, of course. Corn is originally Mexican wherever it grows. Vanilla and Chocolate were cross-bred into existence in Mexico. Every chile pepper and tomato in the world traces its ancestry to Oaxaca and Veracruz. Pumpkins and all the other squashes are from Mexico, too. But that isn't what we're talking about when we discuss regional Mexican food.
  238. Jack D says:
    @peterike
    I suppose my overall reaction to this topic is: why the HELL should I have to leave my own country to be able to retire in a reasonably nice place at a reasonable cost? Why does an 85 year old Chinese grandmother fresh off the plane get Social Security? How are these two things connected?

    I want my country back.

    Why does an 85 year old Chinese grandmother fresh off the plane get Social Security?

    The answer is that she doesn’t. Generally speaking, you have to pay in for 10 years to draw Social Security. There is a separate welfare like program called SSI (Supplemental Security Income) that elderly (legal) low income immigrants may be eligible for. Social security (technically OASI – old age and survivor’s insurance) pays out around $800 billion/ year to 50 million recipients (average benefit $16,000) . SSI pays $60 billion to 8 million recipients (average benefit $7,500).

    Read More
  239. Jack D says:
    @Steve Sailer
    And even if you thrive at high altitude, what if one of your grandchildren doesn't?

    All I'm saying is that it's an interesting human biodiversity question. Low latitude and high altitude is an interesting combination, but I don't read much about it from the retirement community standpoint.

    Unless the kid has some horrible disease, it’s much more likely that you’ll have a problem than your grandkids. Kids are very resilient.

    Read More
    • Replies: @FPD72
    I spend a week to ten days in Breckinridge, CO every summer. The altitude is 9,600 feet. It's not uncommon to see newborns up to six months with oxygen tubes in their noses. I asked one mother and she said that her pediatrician recommended it for all newborns for proper brain development.
  240. Kyle says:
    @BB753
    You are probably right on this one. I'm in my late forties and I'm probably one of the youngests regulars here.

    I’m in my early 20′s do I not count as a regular?

    Read More
  241. @Pepe
    Writing from central Mexico, I'd say most of what you say is true except:

    The standing in lines for hours is now less of a problem. The only time Mexicans stand in really long lines is waiting for cash withdrawals that can't be done thru an ATM machine. And even this is not too much of problem if you avoid going to banks around the first and the 15th of the month. There are usually ways to avoid long lines in other situations, but you might have to pay a small fee (50 US cents) that many Mexicans consider an extravagance.

    I have no idea where this high electric bill stuff comes from, unless you're talking to ex-pats with Olympic sized pools and AC in beach climates. A typical power bill, once you get above 5 or 6,000 feet, is less than $25 US a month. I have a small house, and my bill is less than $1o US a month. My power goes out much less frequently, and for much shorter periods, than when I lived in the S.E. US.

    High electric bills comes from coastal areas like Roatan or Bocas del Toro not the high Andes.

    Read More
  242. Jack D says:
    @RadicalCenter
    Right in all counts, sir. This source states that the typical Puerto Rican has TWENTY percent subsaharan african DNA:

    http://voices.nationalgeographic.com/2014/07/25/genographic-project-dna-results-reveal-details-of-puerto-rican-history/

    Explains a lot about their more violent and volatile nature, which I have personally experienced and observed (mostly in NYC and NJ).

    20% is the average but not necessarily the typical amount. Puerto Ricans come in many shades. While it’s true that very few (except for recent arrivals) are 100% white, there is quite a range from say 35% white (the rest being African and Amerindian), which reads as black or mulatto, to 95% white, which averages out to 65% white. A Puerto Rican who is 90 or 95% white could pass for an olive skinned Italian like Ariana Grande (or vice versa).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Catholic Philly Prole
    Correct, and furthermore in my experience, the San Juan area is much more "diverse" than the rest of the island and is where most of the population lives. Loiza for instance is mostly afro-caribbean as are parts of Santurce and Carolina (all in metro San Juan). These areas skew the numbers considerably. The western portion of the island however is much whiter and considerably nicer.
  243. Art Deco says:
    @BB753
    No, I was mentioning all kinds of dancing. The sole reason men used to dance socially was to meet girls. I've never met an heterosexual man who liked dancing at all, not to mention ballet dancing.
    You can hardly call the grinding and humping that nowadays happen on the dance floor of clubs "dancing".

    The sole reason men used to dance socially was to meet girls.

    You mean when my father danced with my mother at nightspots he was trying to meet girls?

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    Maybe he was trying to please your mother rather than enjoying the dance himself. Like going to the mall with the wife.
  244. Karl says:
    @Lot
    My anecdotal knowledge of this is they are not hot 19 year olds. More typical is mid-50s American man with early 30's foreign woman who is average looking and argues.

    Lot > My anecdotal knowledge of this

    quoted without comment. Next you’ll be quoting CNN documentaries.

    > is they are not hot 19 year olds. More typical is mid-50s American man

    If they are mid-50′s it’s not very likely that they are actually retired

    > with early 30′s foreign woman who is average looking and argues

    In this world, you get the kind of government you deserve, and the kind of pussy you deserve..

    Read More
  245. Expensive Londonistan aside, surely there must be small towns and villages in the English countryside that are inexpensive by greater Los Angeles standards, while having the advantages of a lower cost of living and a congenial culture?

    For that matter, surely there are small towns in America that offer the same advantages? I know that many metropolitan types decry “flyover” country as being opioid-addict infested in their stereotypes, but Sailer’s crowd surely doesn’t think like that?

    I understand Cottonwood Falls, Kansas is very nice, from my brother, who is looking to hole up someplace nice after living and working in New York City for the last 45 years.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Matra
    Expensive Londonistan aside, surely there must be small towns and villages in the English countryside that are inexpensive by greater Los Angeles standards, while having the advantages of a lower cost of living and a congenial culture?

    Canada would be much better for Americans but judging by some of the comments above it has to be a warm weather country or they ain't going. England would fail the weather test as well. At least in Canada, most of it, they get a summer.

  246. Jack D says:
    @Autochthon
    Regarding the numbers of sexual partners: there is not as much dishonesty as you may suspect: the women with many partners are all riding a smaller carousel of so-called "alphas...."

    If you are talking about an entire population, it takes 2 to tango so the total number of male (heterosexual) sex acts is equal to the # of female sex acts (never mind that some men or women are getting a lot more action than others). If a population of men reports that they have sex on average 2x/week and a population of women reports 1x, then someone is lying. This BTW is what happens when they do surveys.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon

    Perhaps this is like the # of sexual partners where men report having more than women. One of the genders has to be lying.
     
    Silly me; I thought "partners" referred to people, not "sexual acts."

    #nonsequitur
    , @Anonym
    I wonder how many prostitutes get surveyed. That's potentially the "dark matter" of such surveys.
  247. Jack D says:
    @Johann Ricke

    Perhaps this is like the # of sexual partners where men report having more than women. One of the genders has to be lying.
     
    What about hookers?

    See my reply below at #247 (or thereabouts). Individuals may have more or fewer partners (or none) but the total # of heterosexual sex acts (and the average frequency) is by definition the same for both genders as a whole. But that’s not what people report.

    Read More
    • Replies: @FPD72
    I made a similar point to a men's fellowship group I was teaching at church one evening. The narrative within much of evangelicalism is that women are sexually more moral than men. I pointed out that the averages for consensual heterosexual acts outside of marriage, the number had to be the same. One guy (who had three daughters and no sons) blew up. After being forced to recognize the truth of the math, he responded, "What about porn?" My response was that the top three best sellers the previous year were Fifty Shades of Grey I, II, and III.
  248. @The Last Real Calvinist

    It’s a really, really long way from Los Angeles to Rio de Janeiro.

     

    Using Google Maps' 'Measure distance' feature, it looks as if it's roughly 6,300 miles from LA to Rio. That same distance gets you from LA to Rome or Beijing, or even to within a couple hundred miles of Auckland, New Zealand.

    Yes, it's a long way.

    And strangely, it is 7,300 miles to Manila from LA, a miserable, 15 hour flight I’ve made several times. Seems counter-intuitive that Auckland is closer though but I checked and the posters are right.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Auckland is so far south of the equator that the earth is narrower there, which shrinks the east-west distance.

    Years ago, when the Pittsburgh Steelers played the San Diego Chargers in an exhibition game in Japan, Rush Limbaugh, who is a private jet owner and aviation geek, pointed out that it was a shorter flight to Japan from Pittsburgh than from San Diego, for similar reasons.
  249. Matra says:
    @PiltdownMan
    Expensive Londonistan aside, surely there must be small towns and villages in the English countryside that are inexpensive by greater Los Angeles standards, while having the advantages of a lower cost of living and a congenial culture?

    For that matter, surely there are small towns in America that offer the same advantages? I know that many metropolitan types decry "flyover" country as being opioid-addict infested in their stereotypes, but Sailer's crowd surely doesn't think like that?

    I understand Cottonwood Falls, Kansas is very nice, from my brother, who is looking to hole up someplace nice after living and working in New York City for the last 45 years.

    Expensive Londonistan aside, surely there must be small towns and villages in the English countryside that are inexpensive by greater Los Angeles standards, while having the advantages of a lower cost of living and a congenial culture?

    Canada would be much better for Americans but judging by some of the comments above it has to be a warm weather country or they ain’t going. England would fail the weather test as well. At least in Canada, most of it, they get a summer.

    Read More
    • Replies: @22pp22
    I live in Cyprus. For 700 euros a month I live in a palace with views to die for. The 60,000 Brits who live here despise political correctness and are not afraid to say so. The local Cypriots have equally unreconstructed views. We live in the mountains, but a ten minute drive takes you to a clean and empty beach. Greek culture is ancient and profound. Paphos has 4,000 years of written history. There is an inscrition in Koukklia in the early script. A Cypriot standing next to me made a reasonable stab of reading the transcrition into modern Greek letters. The great majority of the immigrants are from Eastern Europe. My quality of life is so high it is ridiculous.

    I am going back to England to see my brother. I haven't been back in a long, long time. I dread to think what I'm going to find.
  250. Mark F. says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    The creator of Sex and the City, Candace Bushnell, married a Ballerino. And Baryshnikov is famously straight. I wouldn't be surprised if most were straight, but I don't know.

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2002/07/07/style/weddings-vows-candace-bushnell-charles-askegard.html?referer=

    No, most professional dancers are gay. But not all.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Yeah, the consensus in the comments here seems to be about two-thirds to three-fourths gay. Sounds reasonable.
  251. Curle says:
    @Anon
    Funny. I was in and around the dance world for a while. Lots of gays of course but lots of gays in all the arts. However there is a certain percent of male dancers who are alpha. Often these guys learned as kids and are soloist or higher. So they are both high status in the ballet world and have lots of young girls to hit on. Essentially they are foxes in the hen house. Btw I had to google ballerino to see if it was real as I had never heard it used. I guess I never met many Italian dancers.

    I take it there aren’t many lesbian ballerinas?

    Read More
  252. Curle says:
    @International Jew
    I'd never consider retiring to Mexico, much less Ecuador. I value American rule of law (yeah, what's left of it but that's still a lot) way more than any conceivable cost of living advantage those places offer. I like my police policing, not running protection and kidnapping rackets.

    I'd rather live in a hovel in West Virginia, than in a luxury villa at Lake Chapala.

    I also wouldn't want to live in a place where people can tell I'm a stranger just by looking at me.

    If you’re in West Virginia and your neighbors can’t place you on the family tree, believe me you’re a stranger, probably some form of dessicated Yankee.

    Read More
    • Replies: @International Jew
    Probably so. I didn't mean to say I actually want to live in a West Virginia village though. Only that I'd prefer it to any place in Mexico.
    , @(((Owen)))
    In West Virginia they need to be able to trace a connection to you on the family at least two different ways or you're just a darn Yankee.
  253. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    I was reading the comments of a guy who lived in Baja California until it was hit by a hurricane. He said it took a week before the troops could show up and stop the looters. It was dog-eat-dog, guard your property with your rifle 24/7, and he now lives in Argentina. The moral is, third world countries can be okay until they aren’t.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    Baja has some nice surfing spots, provided that you pay for security. In a more civilized era, that meant a couple of bucks to a little kid sitting by your vehicle to keep away thieves! That was based on the theory that they all knew one another, and the kids could make a few bucks instead of getting the area a bad rep. Now you shell out for the para-military upgrade with weapons and adults.
  254. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Discordiax
    Don't underestimate the profit motive and competition. REtirement communities in Florida are a lot like summer camp for grownups--there is a full menu of activities, excursions, etc to keep you as busy as you want to be. My father bought a place for about $70,000 (roughly $50,000 for the land, $20,000 for the double-wide trailer*, plus about $5,000 for the realtor to furnish it) in a community, and signed up for (and narrowly escaped being made officers in) the IRish, Italian, German clubs, VFW, Legion (Friday clam bake, I think). Day trips to activities in Orlando, Miami, Tampa (each a 2 hour drive or so.)

    There is an extensive choice of things to do, and a bunch of people to do it with. He was advised to lock his doors at night, or wake up to find a widow in his bed.

    I don't think retiring to a foreign country has the same package.

    * Yes, it is technically a trailer park. But as I learned as an adolescent watching Boyz N The Hood, and seeing the same houses and yard plots that you'd see in nice 1940's built white neighborhoods in the northeast, it's not the architecture, it's the population.

    I’d never buy a trailer in a hurricane-prone state, no matter what the amenities. I’d rather not get blown to smithereens.

    Read More
  255. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Jim Sweeney
    And strangely, it is 7,300 miles to Manila from LA, a miserable, 15 hour flight I've made several times. Seems counter-intuitive that Auckland is closer though but I checked and the posters are right.

    Auckland is so far south of the equator that the earth is narrower there, which shrinks the east-west distance.

    Years ago, when the Pittsburgh Steelers played the San Diego Chargers in an exhibition game in Japan, Rush Limbaugh, who is a private jet owner and aviation geek, pointed out that it was a shorter flight to Japan from Pittsburgh than from San Diego, for similar reasons.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    That doesn't sound right. The difference in latitude between Pitts and SD isn't that great.
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    ... so far south of the equator that the earth is narrower there which shrinks the east-west distance.
     
    That is a really unmathematical way to put it. How about "the world is a sphere so long distance paths don't look right on any flat map".*

    No offense; it just sounded funny. More on the great circle route in relation to Moslem prayer practices.

    * unless they are mostly oriented North-South or are near the equator.
  256. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Mark F.
    No, most professional dancers are gay. But not all.

    Yeah, the consensus in the comments here seems to be about two-thirds to three-fourths gay. Sounds reasonable.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    It would be interesting to compare the numbers with bodybuilding, gymnastics, acting, and vocal music. What are the relevant aspects that attract gays? Performance? Physical aesthetics? Training style?
  257. 22pp22 says:
    @Matra
    Expensive Londonistan aside, surely there must be small towns and villages in the English countryside that are inexpensive by greater Los Angeles standards, while having the advantages of a lower cost of living and a congenial culture?

    Canada would be much better for Americans but judging by some of the comments above it has to be a warm weather country or they ain't going. England would fail the weather test as well. At least in Canada, most of it, they get a summer.

    I live in Cyprus. For 700 euros a month I live in a palace with views to die for. The 60,000 Brits who live here despise political correctness and are not afraid to say so. The local Cypriots have equally unreconstructed views. We live in the mountains, but a ten minute drive takes you to a clean and empty beach. Greek culture is ancient and profound. Paphos has 4,000 years of written history. There is an inscrition in Koukklia in the early script. A Cypriot standing next to me made a reasonable stab of reading the transcrition into modern Greek letters. The great majority of the immigrants are from Eastern Europe. My quality of life is so high it is ridiculous.

    I am going back to England to see my brother. I haven’t been back in a long, long time. I dread to think what I’m going to find.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D

    A Cypriot standing next to me made a reasonable stab of reading the transcrition into modern Greek letters.
     
    Aside from the changes in vocabulary, this is not easy because

    ANCIENTWRITINGWASDONEINAL
    LCAPITALLETTERSWITHNOSPACE
    SORPUNCTUATIONANDARBITRAR
    YLINEBREAKSANDOFTTHEYWLDA
    BRVBCITWSAPAINTOCARVEALLTH
    OSELETTERS
  258. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Dave Pinsen
    Are there even any direct flights? Last time I went there from New York it was via Houston then São Paulo. Maybe 12-14 hours all together.

    Just checked Wolfram Alpha, and if there were a direct flight from Los Angeles it Rio, it would be 11.5 hours. A direct flight from New York would be about 8.5 hours.

    Read More
    • Replies: @prosa123
    Some years back, when Varig Airlines was still around, it flew from Rio to Tokyo with a stop in Los Angeles.
  259. @Curle
    If you're in West Virginia and your neighbors can't place you on the family tree, believe me you're a stranger, probably some form of dessicated Yankee.

    Probably so. I didn’t mean to say I actually want to live in a West Virginia village though. Only that I’d prefer it to any place in Mexico.

    Read More
  260. @Jack D
    20% is the average but not necessarily the typical amount. Puerto Ricans come in many shades. While it's true that very few (except for recent arrivals) are 100% white, there is quite a range from say 35% white (the rest being African and Amerindian), which reads as black or mulatto, to 95% white, which averages out to 65% white. A Puerto Rican who is 90 or 95% white could pass for an olive skinned Italian like Ariana Grande (or vice versa).

    Correct, and furthermore in my experience, the San Juan area is much more “diverse” than the rest of the island and is where most of the population lives. Loiza for instance is mostly afro-caribbean as are parts of Santurce and Carolina (all in metro San Juan). These areas skew the numbers considerably. The western portion of the island however is much whiter and considerably nicer.

    Read More
    • Replies: @prosa123
    "the San Juan area is much more “diverse” than the rest of the island and is where most of the population lives. Loiza for instance is mostly afro-caribbean as are parts of Santurce and Carolina (all in metro San Juan). These areas skew the numbers considerably. The western portion of the island however is much whiter and considerably nicer."

    Dunno. The Connecticut city where I grew up has had a substantial Puerto Rican population for decades, and most of them were from the southwestern part of the island. Primarily Ponce, and oddly enough the small town of Penuelas to the northwest of Ponce. Very few were from San Juan or its metro area.

    While there was quite a bit of variation in color, the overwhelming majority of the Puerto Ricans were visibly nonwhite. I would say no more than 5% of the total could pass for white. One interesting thing is that people who were mixed Puerto Rican and white, of whom there were many, generally looked white.

  261. @Dave Pinsen
    Yeah, the consensus in the comments here seems to be about two-thirds to three-fourths gay. Sounds reasonable.

    It would be interesting to compare the numbers with bodybuilding, gymnastics, acting, and vocal music. What are the relevant aspects that attract gays? Performance? Physical aesthetics? Training style?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    It probably varies a lot with the level. I don't know about today, given that open gayness is higher-status than it was in the past, but the arts used to attract kids that felt out of place in the mainstream, and that probably included most gays. But to stick with it requires more persistence than many alienated kids might have.

    When I was in college at Rutgers University, there were kids from the art school in my freshman dorm. The acting program there used to cut something like half of the students after the first year or two (they had the option of transferring to an academic school at the university, if their grades were decent). I don't know what percentage were gay, but I wonder if that percentage declined in higher grades.
  262. @Dave Pinsen
    Auckland is so far south of the equator that the earth is narrower there, which shrinks the east-west distance.

    Years ago, when the Pittsburgh Steelers played the San Diego Chargers in an exhibition game in Japan, Rush Limbaugh, who is a private jet owner and aviation geek, pointed out that it was a shorter flight to Japan from Pittsburgh than from San Diego, for similar reasons.

    That doesn’t sound right. The difference in latitude between Pitts and SD isn’t that great.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    You know what, checking Wolfram Alpha now, you're right and Rush was wrong. Looks like it's 2 hours shorter from SD.

    The weird thing is that I checked Wolfram Alpha before I wrote my initial comment, and thought I saw the opposite result -- must have been my confirmation bias.
  263. Anonym says:

    OT: Have you been following the “Reality Winner” episode Steve?

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/06/05/first-deep-state-arrest-government-contractor-busted-leaking-nsa-docs-to-the-intercept/

    It sounds like the end times. If the meek inherit the earth, maybe the winners will become losers. Or at least the Winners, and the Weiners for that matter as well.

    Reality Winner speaks Pashto, Farsi and Dari (according to r/the_donald). Apparently Farsi and Dari are mutually intelligible dialects, and Pashto is related but not mutually intelligible. So she is padding her CV a bit.

    I’m not sure if I have seen it here, but I thought to google “language tree”, as languages obviously have a genetic aspect to them. Obviously this is a frequent subject of the blog.

    I like the look of this the most (though it is “only” Indo-European”):

    This is another:
    In relation to the “Reality Winner” story, note that West Persian = Farsi. So Dari is very close to that, although Pashto is significantly up the branch.

    To consider English, the language closest to mutually intelligible (which it’s not AFAIK) is Frisian, which only have about 500k speakers. It’s kind of lonely being us, but on the bright side we have the world language. (Suck it, Esperanto!) It is quite amazing considering that it all comes from a little island off Europe, albeit one that had an empire controlling two continents, a subcontinent, with ports in China etc.

    https://www.quora.com/What-languages-are-closest-to-English

    The British empire surely was pervasive.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    It's very interesting to realize that Sanskrit and Greek are related. Apparently all European languages reflect an original language, proto Indo-European. This connection was originally discovered by a British Judge named Jones who had classical training in Greek and Latin, and took it upon himself to learn Sanskrit.

    https://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/IE_Main4_Sanskrit.html

    The following article and map is interesting.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proto-Indo-Europeans

    I realize that others on the blog likely know this stuff, and maybe I did too at one time, but I find it interesting.
  264. Anonym says:
    @Anonym
    OT: Have you been following the "Reality Winner" episode Steve?

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/06/05/first-deep-state-arrest-government-contractor-busted-leaking-nsa-docs-to-the-intercept/

    It sounds like the end times. If the meek inherit the earth, maybe the winners will become losers. Or at least the Winners, and the Weiners for that matter as well.

    Reality Winner speaks Pashto, Farsi and Dari (according to r/the_donald). Apparently Farsi and Dari are mutually intelligible dialects, and Pashto is related but not mutually intelligible. So she is padding her CV a bit.

    I'm not sure if I have seen it here, but I thought to google "language tree", as languages obviously have a genetic aspect to them. Obviously this is a frequent subject of the blog.

    I like the look of this the most (though it is "only" Indo-European"):

    http://images.mentalfloss.com/sites/default/files/196.jpg

    This is another:
    http://learnenglishonline101.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/the-language-tree.png

    In relation to the "Reality Winner" story, note that West Persian = Farsi. So Dari is very close to that, although Pashto is significantly up the branch.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iranian_languages#/media/File:Iranian_Family_Tree_v2.0.png

    To consider English, the language closest to mutually intelligible (which it's not AFAIK) is Frisian, which only have about 500k speakers. It's kind of lonely being us, but on the bright side we have the world language. (Suck it, Esperanto!) It is quite amazing considering that it all comes from a little island off Europe, albeit one that had an empire controlling two continents, a subcontinent, with ports in China etc.

    https://www.quora.com/What-languages-are-closest-to-English

    The British empire surely was pervasive.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Empire#/media/File:The_British_Empire_Anachronous.png

    It’s very interesting to realize that Sanskrit and Greek are related. Apparently all European languages reflect an original language, proto Indo-European. This connection was originally discovered by a British Judge named Jones who had classical training in Greek and Latin, and took it upon himself to learn Sanskrit.

    https://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/IE_Main4_Sanskrit.html

    The following article and map is interesting.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proto-Indo-Europeans

    I realize that others on the blog likely know this stuff, and maybe I did too at one time, but I find it interesting.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Crispian Mills' mother is an actress who got into Hinduism back when Indian culture was big in the West. He sang a hit song in liturgical Sanskrit.
    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/869443248233775104
  265. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Chrisnonymous
    That doesn't sound right. The difference in latitude between Pitts and SD isn't that great.

    You know what, checking Wolfram Alpha now, you’re right and Rush was wrong. Looks like it’s 2 hours shorter from SD.

    The weird thing is that I checked Wolfram Alpha before I wrote my initial comment, and thought I saw the opposite result — must have been my confirmation bias.

    Read More
  266. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Chrisnonymous
    It would be interesting to compare the numbers with bodybuilding, gymnastics, acting, and vocal music. What are the relevant aspects that attract gays? Performance? Physical aesthetics? Training style?

    It probably varies a lot with the level. I don’t know about today, given that open gayness is higher-status than it was in the past, but the arts used to attract kids that felt out of place in the mainstream, and that probably included most gays. But to stick with it requires more persistence than many alienated kids might have.

    When I was in college at Rutgers University, there were kids from the art school in my freshman dorm. The acting program there used to cut something like half of the students after the first year or two (they had the option of transferring to an academic school at the university, if their grades were decent). I don’t know what percentage were gay, but I wonder if that percentage declined in higher grades.

    Read More
  267. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Anonym
    It's very interesting to realize that Sanskrit and Greek are related. Apparently all European languages reflect an original language, proto Indo-European. This connection was originally discovered by a British Judge named Jones who had classical training in Greek and Latin, and took it upon himself to learn Sanskrit.

    https://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/IE_Main4_Sanskrit.html

    The following article and map is interesting.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proto-Indo-Europeans

    I realize that others on the blog likely know this stuff, and maybe I did too at one time, but I find it interesting.

    Crispian Mills’ mother is an actress who got into Hinduism back when Indian culture was big in the West. He sang a hit song in liturgical Sanskrit.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    Crispian Mills’ mother is an actress who got into Hinduism back when Indian culture was big in the West. He sang a hit song in liturgical Sanskrit.
    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/869443248233775104
     
    Thank you for the link. The only other popular song I know from that family was by none other than his mother. I used to ask for it to be played over and over—when I was about four years old.

    https://youtu.be/F1IyrZZQd0g?t=57s

    , @anon
    OT: Liturgical Sanskrit:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4kdjHFBvd4
  268. @Jack D
    I assume you are talking about ballet dancing. When it comes to social dancing, this has traditionally been a pair activity so there has to be a 1:1 sex ratio of partners. Perhaps this is like the # of sexual partners where men report having more than women. One of the genders has to be lying.

    In the past, dancing was considered an essential part of the matching process but I guess people now just swipe on Tinder and go right at it like dogs so that men can skip the dancing.

    Was it part of the process for you? How adept are you at various dance styles?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bill
    I'm very adept at the Elaine Dance. Generally, though, I found it a pretty effective way to meet girls since there were usually about ten girls for every boy on the dance floor at a typical college party (this was before social dancing devolved to the indescribably awful thing it is now). One time, this agitated girl was berating her boyfriend for refusing to dance with her: "Look, if that guy isn't afraid to go out on the dance floor, what's your problem?" You get a lot of effort points for things girls want to do much more than do boys.
  269. @Dave Pinsen
    Crispian Mills' mother is an actress who got into Hinduism back when Indian culture was big in the West. He sang a hit song in liturgical Sanskrit.
    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/869443248233775104

    Crispian Mills’ mother is an actress who got into Hinduism back when Indian culture was big in the West. He sang a hit song in liturgical Sanskrit.

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/869443248233775104

    Thank you for the link. The only other popular song I know from that family was by none other than his mother. I used to ask for it to be played over and over—when I was about four years old.

    https://youtu.be/F1IyrZZQd0g?t=57s

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Oh, wow. The resemblance is amazing. Definitely his mother's son.

    Kula Shaker had a bigger hit in the U.S. 21 years ago with Tatva. This one was only partly in Sanskrit:


    https://youtu.be/2bYj2o7y4rk
  270. @PiltdownMan
    I wonder if any American senior citizens live in El Alto, which is a million person suburb of La Paz, Bolivia?

    Elevation 13,615 feet.

    You’ll go a long, long time before you find a white person in El Alto. It’s apparently pretty nice, but white people just aren’t biologically suited to it. HBD and all that.

    Here, have a tour:

    https://goo.gl/maps/rHaH5Z2wDvt

    Read More
  271. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @PiltdownMan

    Crispian Mills’ mother is an actress who got into Hinduism back when Indian culture was big in the West. He sang a hit song in liturgical Sanskrit.
    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/869443248233775104
     
    Thank you for the link. The only other popular song I know from that family was by none other than his mother. I used to ask for it to be played over and over—when I was about four years old.

    https://youtu.be/F1IyrZZQd0g?t=57s

    Oh, wow. The resemblance is amazing. Definitely his mother’s son.

    Kula Shaker had a bigger hit in the U.S. 21 years ago with Tatva. This one was only partly in Sanskrit:

    https://youtu.be/2bYj2o7y4rk

    Read More
  272. Medvedev says:
    @Jack Highlands

    Co-worker took care of the saltwater aquarium at Gates’ Rancho Santa Fe home
     
    OK, that's not quite up there with the guy who spent his apocryphal working life carrying ice to the polar bear at Hearst Castle, but it's close. I thought Gates stood for something much nobler in the history of American capitalism: increasing the population of Africa to 5 billion by 2100.

    I thought Gates stood for something much nobler in the history of American capitalism: increasing the population of Africa to 5 billion by 2100.

    The problem with liberal intellectuals, they assume that people in Africa have the same IQ and think the same way as they think:
    “Let’s give them aid and vaccines and food, so they don’t starve. Sure, they don’t want their children to starve and suffer, so they won’t have any more children after that.” Turns out they don’t care and have as many children as they can. That’s why population of Africa skyrocketed from ~220 mln in 1950 to ~1200 mln today and is set to reach 4.3 bln by the end of the century.
    As Haiti and Jamaica demonstrate it’s better to let them destroy country’s ecosystem and learn the importance of family planning the hard way. Faster and more effective.

    Read More
    • Agree: Triumph104
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    The problem with liberal intellectuals, they assume that people in Africa have the same IQ and think the same way as they think:
    “Let’s give them aid and vaccines and food, so they don’t starve. Sure, they don’t want their children to starve and suffer, so they won’t have any more children after that.” Turns out they don’t care and have as many children as they can. That’s why population of Africa skyrocketed from ~220 mln in 1950 to ~1200 mln today and is set to reach 4.3 bln by the end of the century.


    Total fertility rates in Africa have been declining for 50-odd years. Strange as it may seem to you, the continent has an ample population of peasants and herdsmen who are self-supporting. There are service providers as well, and some industry. The ratio of overseas development aid to gross national income in Tropical and Southern Africa is about 0.03. The majority of the adult population is now literate as well. Life expectancy at birth has increased by about 19 years since 1960. About 35% of all children under 5 show signs of malnutrition.
  273. Medvedev says:

    If you don’t mind winter and sh*tty weather consider Lithuania or Latvia.
    Cities have decent transportation, low crime rates, life is inexpensive. You can rent nice apartment for 500 euros in the capital or for 400 euros in a smaller city (Liepaja, Dauglavpis, Rezekne etc), get 30-50 mbit/s internet for 25-30 euros, etc. A lot of younger people speak English and government promotes use of English. So, go and try living there. And if you like it move and bring your retired friends with you.

    Read More
  274. @Achmed E. Newman
    I don't know why the 1st video of the thread didn't show up embedded. Do it for the Parrotheads! However, this Steve Goodman was such a great songwriter (as is Jimmy Buffett) that I gotta put all the lyrics in:

    Down to the Banana Republics,
    down to the tropical sun,
    go the expatriated Americans
    hopin' to find some fun.

    Some of them go for the sailing,
    called by the lure of the sea,
    tryin' to find what is ailing
    living in the land of the free.
    Some of them are running to lovers,
    leaving no forward address.
    Some of them are running tons of ganja <---
    Oh, I did get this wrong.
    Some are running from the IRS

    Late at night you will find them
    in the cheap hotels and bar,s
    hustling the senoritas
    while they dance beneath the star.s
    Spending those renegade pesos
    on a bottle of rum and a lime,
    singin' give me some words I can dance to
    or a melody that rhymes.

    First you learn the native custom
    soon a word of Spanish or two.
    You know that you cannot trust them.
    They know they can't trust you.

    Expatriated Americans, feelin' so all alone,
    telling themselves the same lies
    that they told themselves back home.

    Down to the Banana Republics,
    things aren't as warm as they seem.
    None of the natives are buying
    any second hand American dreams.

    Late at night you will find them
    in the cheap hotels and bars.
    Hustling the senoritas
    while they dance beneath the stars.
    Spending those renegade pesos
    on a bottle of rum and a lime,
    singing give me some words I can dance to
    or a melody that rhymes

    Down to the Banana Republics,
    down to the tropical sun,
    go the expatriated Americans
    hopin' to find some fun

     
    From Buffett's 1977 album "Changes in Lattitudes, Changes in Attitudes"

    This is Steve Goodman’s year, three decades on from his youthful death. His Cubs are finally the World Series champions (for five more months). It’s a small comfort to know that he passed away in 1984 just before the collapse when they went up 2-0 against the Padres and lost the series 3-2.

    And yes, he was a darn good songwriter. City of New Orleans is still a favorite.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Travis
    "You Never Even Called Me by My Name" is another favorite of mine, made famous by David Allan Coe. The perfect country and western song...https://youtu.be/8QUSQJQml40?t=20s
  275. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Jack D
    I assume you are talking about ballet dancing. When it comes to social dancing, this has traditionally been a pair activity so there has to be a 1:1 sex ratio of partners. Perhaps this is like the # of sexual partners where men report having more than women. One of the genders has to be lying.

    In the past, dancing was considered an essential part of the matching process but I guess people now just swipe on Tinder and go right at it like dogs so that men can skip the dancing.

    When it comes to social dancing, this has traditionally been a pair activity so there has to be a 1:1 sex ratio of partners. Perhaps this is like the # of sexual partners where men report having more than women. One of the genders has to be lying.

    At formal dances a 1:1 ratio may have been arranged, but there’s no one making sure everyone has a mate in the sexual market, so some have many mates, some have a few, and some have none.

    And, generally, both sexes are lying about the number of partners, but in different directions. The heuristic from one of the American Pie movies was to divide men’s claims by 3 and multiply women’s by 3.

    Read More
  276. Karl says:
    @Corvinus
    I would imagine that the locals are also sick and tired of the invading Gringos inviting themselves. First a trickle, then a torrent, of blue hairs lamenting why the townies are at siesta when they should be opening up their restaurants to serve up the early bird specials of the day.

    80 Corvinus > I would imagine that the locals are also sick and tired of the invading Gringos inviting themselves

    and here I was, thinking that countries COMPETE LIKE CRAZY to get western retirees with their steady monthly income of hard currencies.

    No need to “imagine”, sir,…. you can just google on “retirement visa”, or (e.g.) “Malaysia My Second Home”

    Now I understand why Mr Trump didn’t appoint you to be Secretary of the Treasury

    Read More
  277. @James Richard
    Because we all grew up and got real jobs?

    Continue, please…

    bored identity is dying of curiosity to hear what grown-up-make-a-diference important function you mantain on this planet.

    Something tells me that with your ass and nose being constantly Way Up In The Air, your frequent flyer douchebagery is fully inflated by the same sense of self-importance as is the case with this fictional Airport Dweller:

    https://youtu.be/ZDgFAFQGZbI

    Don’t you think it’s time for you to renew your Condé Nast Package subscription?

    ?

    S

    Read More
  278. @Pepe
    You don't have to go all the way to Ecuador to see this. Once you get south of Guatemala, the food is very distinct from Mexico. No tortillas and very little use of hot chiles.

    The authentic original Mexican food zone runs from San Francisco to San Salvador. Outside that band, the Mexican food is a foreign import and not the same at all. The northeast boundary is somewhere near Dallas. In the really Maya parts of Yucatan there are even some areas in Mexico proper where the Mexican food is not entirely native.

    And the areas in that region outside Mexico are not just fuzzy borders with lots of crossings. Burritos were invented in Alta California around San Diego somewhere. Tex-Mex was invented in Texas. A lot of brightly colored suckling pig barbecue was invented in Guatemala. Mexican food is a cultural movement a couple hundred miles bigger than the political boundaries of Mexico.

    In fact, there are at least two major regional Mexican cuisines that don’t exist natively inside Mexico at all.

    And that’s just modern Mexican food, of course. Corn is originally Mexican wherever it grows. Vanilla and Chocolate were cross-bred into existence in Mexico. Every chile pepper and tomato in the world traces its ancestry to Oaxaca and Veracruz. Pumpkins and all the other squashes are from Mexico, too. But that isn’t what we’re talking about when we discuss regional Mexican food.

    Read More
  279. @Curle
    If you're in West Virginia and your neighbors can't place you on the family tree, believe me you're a stranger, probably some form of dessicated Yankee.

    In West Virginia they need to be able to trace a connection to you on the family at least two different ways or you’re just a darn Yankee.

    Read More
  280. KM32 says:

    Cuencanos don’t like spicy food, that’s for sure. They use a lot of plantains (which they call verde) there, plus potatoes. You’ll see roasting pigs on spits (chancho a la barbosa) in some areas of the city, but not all. They eat cuy (guinea pig), but it’s kind of a special treat. Tastes a bit like rabbit or squirrel.

    The city is big enough to find lots of different kinds of food, though. I used to eat arepas at a couple of Venezuelan places, cheap Chilean empanadas if I wanted to grab something, and know a great Thai restaurant. There are some shwarma and Indian places, too. The easiest, most local food is chicken and pork.

    Read More
  281. dcthrowback says: • Website
    @Jimbo in OPKS
    I'm 60, retired fed, working for a private university because I want to. Considered moving to South America until this Easter when my daughter told me she was pregnant. Now, no way. That's more powerful than McDonald's.

    Having said that, does anyone think that Puerto Rico's financial troubles present an opportunity to buy a nice vacation place?

    Many of our nation’s most evil bankers are long Puerto Rico (and of course, corporate sellout Paul Ryan spearheaded the PR bailout bill). Follow the smart money?

    Read More
  282. dcthrowback says: • Website
    @Achmed E. Newman
    I am surprised that nobody mentioned Uruguay yet as a Latin American bug-out or ex-pat destination. It's not just that John Derbyshire has mentioned it multiple times, which could be read here on unz. I was reading on it a couple of years back after I noticed that it is 90% white. That's greater than the US of A by a long shot. Now, these white people are not all Englishmen and Americans, but many of German, Italian, and Spanish ancestry.

    I came upon Uruguay when I was looking for out-of-the-way places, starting with the Guianas. Those are a big no-go demographically, and the climate would be tough on some. All most people know about them is British Guiana from Jim Jones of that Kool-Aid crowd (not OUR Jim Jones), and French Guiana from Euro rockets and Papillon. Surinam, or Dutch Guiana, hardly ever pops up in any story about anything. That sounds really good sometimes. However, again, look at the demographics. It's cool to look at these places via google-earth and just imagine who the hell is living down there. Cayenne, capital of French Guiana looks to be a town of no more than 10,000 people from the map.

    Anyway, I had hoped it could be my secret, but between Derb and me, now it's not. No, I've not been there yet.
    Read More
  283. FPD72 says:
    @Jack D
    Unless the kid has some horrible disease, it's much more likely that you'll have a problem than your grandkids. Kids are very resilient.

    I spend a week to ten days in Breckinridge, CO every summer. The altitude is 9,600 feet. It’s not uncommon to see newborns up to six months with oxygen tubes in their noses. I asked one mother and she said that her pediatrician recommended it for all newborns for proper brain development.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    What did people do before oxygen tanks? It's my understanding that newborn brains in particular are somewhat tolerant of oxygen deprivation because they often don't get a lot during the birth process, are born a little premature, etc. If we were dependent on perfect oxygenation then a lot of kids wouldn't make it. Also newborns are not running around a lot - your oxygen needs vary based on exercise and newborns mostly just lie there.

    However, I was thinking of kids that are a little older. It's probably not a good idea to take a newborn on the plane to see grandma who lives up in the mountains anyway. Planes are sardine cans of infection with air that recirculates a lot (adding fresh air uses fuel). I'd be more concerned about that than the thin air at altitude.
  284. FPD72 says:
    @Jack D
    See my reply below at #247 (or thereabouts). Individuals may have more or fewer partners (or none) but the total # of heterosexual sex acts (and the average frequency) is by definition the same for both genders as a whole. But that's not what people report.

    I made a similar point to a men’s fellowship group I was teaching at church one evening. The narrative within much of evangelicalism is that women are sexually more moral than men. I pointed out that the averages for consensual heterosexual acts outside of marriage, the number had to be the same. One guy (who had three daughters and no sons) blew up. After being forced to recognize the truth of the math, he responded, “What about porn?” My response was that the top three best sellers the previous year were Fifty Shades of Grey I, II, and III.

    Read More
  285. Travis says:
    @(((Owen)))
    This is Steve Goodman's year, three decades on from his youthful death. His Cubs are finally the World Series champions (for five more months). It's a small comfort to know that he passed away in 1984 just before the collapse when they went up 2-0 against the Padres and lost the series 3-2.

    And yes, he was a darn good songwriter. City of New Orleans is still a favorite.

    “You Never Even Called Me by My Name” is another favorite of mine, made famous by David Allan Coe. The perfect country and western song…https://youtu.be/8QUSQJQml40?t=20s

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    better version by David Allan Coe

    https://youtu.be/tLRHVGPkFds

  286. @Dave Pinsen
    Auckland is so far south of the equator that the earth is narrower there, which shrinks the east-west distance.

    Years ago, when the Pittsburgh Steelers played the San Diego Chargers in an exhibition game in Japan, Rush Limbaugh, who is a private jet owner and aviation geek, pointed out that it was a shorter flight to Japan from Pittsburgh than from San Diego, for similar reasons.

    … so far south of the equator that the earth is narrower there which shrinks the east-west distance.

    That is a really unmathematical way to put it. How about “the world is a sphere so long distance paths don’t look right on any flat map”.*

    No offense; it just sounded funny. More on the great circle route in relation to Moslem prayer practices.

    * unless they are mostly oriented North-South or are near the equator.

    Read More
  287. @E. Rekshun
    Re Honolulu - a couple of acquaintances that travel every other year from the east coast advise of huge numbers of vagrants milling around the public spaces and beaches. The City of Honolulu even offers full-paid one-way tickets to mainland US for any vagrant. The NYT has covered this quite a bit.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/04/us/hawaii-homeless-criminal-law-sitting-ban.html?_r=0

    https://www.google.com/#q=%22new+york+times%22+AND+%22honolulu%22+AND+%22homeless%22

    Re Honolulu – a couple of acquaintances that travel every other year from the east coast advise of huge numbers of vagrants milling around the public spaces and beaches.

    True. However, they are pretty harmless and keep to themselves. Anyone who becomes loud and/or appearing to act crazily/aggressively is quickly removed by HPD. Lots of aggressive panhandlers or crazy homeless would depress the primary industry (tourism). Its a balancing act; too many homeless, even harmless ones, will negatively impact the State’s bottom line.

    Read More
  288. @whorefinder
    That TV show NCIS had two characters retire to Mexico: Gibbs (temporarily) and Gibbs's predecessor (whom Gibbs went to live with).

    Of course, even when retired both of them came back to the U.S. a lot to do stuff. The underlying theme was that retirement to a foreign land sounds nice, but there's a reason why it's so cheap to live in a villa in a sleepy Mexican village: it's friggin' boring. No one's around, the local TV is crap, there's nothing to do.

    I've never really understood people who work and live and raise a family their entire adult lives in one state only to move to another on retirement. Leave everything you've built and known just for warmer weather? What's wrong with you? Why didn't you just move there in the first place, if you thought it so wonderful?

    Then I realized most people who permanently do it are either Jews or the kind of "rootless cosmopolitans" who hang out with Jews (e.g. Joe Kennedy, Sr.). So, really, if you don't give a crap where you lived but used it to make money and don't have any deep human connections, yeah, it makes sense. But most goyim ain't like that.

    Personally, I like where I live. That's why I live here.

    I’ve never really understood people who work and live and raise a family their entire adult lives in one state only to move to another on retirement. Leave everything you’ve built and known just for warmer weather? What’s wrong with you? Why didn’t you just move there in the first place, if you thought it so wonderful?

    I understand and am a bit sympathetic to your sentiment. However, health has a lot to do with these decisions. Many elderly can’t function well in temperate (but with a robust winter)/cold climates. I know this will drive our retirement location decision; my wife suffers from a condition called Reynaud’s syndrome, where her extremities lose blood circulation in colder weather:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raynaud_syndrome

    Her family evolved for tropical living, so temperate/cold weather is an anomaly for her. I have no problems with the cold, but ultimately I want to live somewhere where she will be comfortable and not have to worry about that; health problems tend to worsen with age, but if you can ameliorate the effects, then do so.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    The # of people who are truly unable to hack a cold climate for medical reasons is very small. There are a lot more people who are just sick of wintry weather and would prefer not to endure it. They lived where they lived because of job requirements and now that they are retired they don't want to have to deal with icy roads and shoveling snow, etc.

    I think the key factor is how socially connected you are to your family and friends. Some people consider seeing their grandkids or friends all the time more important than the weather. Others have different circumstances or priorities. Sometimes part of your social circle relocates to the same place or you make new friends.
    , @whorefinder
    I agree, health reasons are a good reason. Transport, too, since the elderly are poor drivers and get nervous driving since their reflexes are now slower. And, of course, household chores.

    City retirements seem to be a hip thing in Blue States these days since blacks were cleared out in gentrification. Paul Krugman, I believe, talked about how when his mother gets really old they will move her to Manhattan. It makes sense: in a good, safe city neighborhood, your snow removal and maintenance is taken care of, everything can be delivered or is within walking distance, no driving is required, security is around, and your square footage is smaller so easier to take care of. It also encourages physical mobility that isn't too taxing (walking for a lottery ticket or grab some milk as opposed to driving), and gives Mom&Dad a lot of people around to make them feel less lonely.

    Condos in the suburbs also are popular to solve the maintenance/snow removal/square footage/security issues, though the travel problems persist. Uber would reduce this problem a lot, so I'd suggest getting your parents to start using the app. Having an Uber "get around town" fund for Mom & Dad (say, $300-$500 a month) might become a thing for children of boomers/Gen Xers so that the parents can get around and the kids don't have to worry about accidents or isolation.

  289. I recently lived in Cuenca for five fairly pleasant years. I have now moved back to the US, a decision anticipated by the name of my category of Ecuadorian visa. They don’t call it Permanent Residence, because they know that four out of five of these gringo sojourners are not going to stick around for life; it’s Indefinite Residence.

    The population number for Cuenca is low, it’s nearly 500,000 metro. There is not much hostility to the gringo population, who are about 5000 including students. We are more of a standing joke. “It would be nice if more of you learned some Spanish, and – !Dios mio! – would it kill some of y