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Reporter Jill Leovy: LAPD Should Arrest More Black Male Murderers

A half-decade ago I wrote a long analysis in VDARE of the data in the Los Angeles TimesHomicide Report detailing each killing in Los Angeles County over a three year period. Now the reporter, Jill Leovy, behind that invaluable resource has written a true crime book. Here she is interviewed on NPR’s Fresh Air:

‘Ghettoside’ Explores Why Murders Are Invisible In Los Angeles
JANUARY 26, 2015 1:14 PM ET

Fresh Air 38 min 9 sec

In her new book, journalist Jill Leovy studies the epidemic of unsolved murders in African-American neighborhoods and the relationships between police and victims’ relatives, witnesses and suspects.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. I’m Dave Davies, in for Terry Gross. The deaths of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Miss., and Eric Garner in Staten Island have sparked debate about whether the police presence in African-American communities is too heavy-handed and often abusive. Our guest today, journalist Jill Leovy, argues that black communities suffer deeply from too little law enforcement, or at least law enforcement of a certain kind. Her new book focuses on the epidemic of unsolved murders in African-American neighborhoods in Los Angeles and the corrosive impact of unpunished crime in those communities.

Leovy’s covered crime for the Los Angeles Times for more than a decade, and as you’ll hear, she doesn’t regard the problem simply as one of poor police work. Part of the problem, she believes, is that these murders are simply invisible to too many of us. In 2007, she started a blog called “The Homicide Report” to document all the murders in Los Angeles County. Leovy spent many years embedded with homicide detectives, and her book is an intimate look at murder investigations and the relationships between police and victims’ relatives, witnesses and suspects. It’s called “Ghettoside: A True Story Of Murder In America.”

Jill Leovy, welcome to FRESH AIR. Let’s talk about this blog that you started back, I guess – what? – 2006, 2007, “The Homicide Report.” One of the things that you noticed, then, was that a lot of murders simply were not covered by any media. And you know, a lot of moms whose lives have been shattered by the – you know, the murder of a relative, often a son, often say there was nothing in the paper.

The DEA’s killing of an 18-year-old violist near my house was barely covered in the L.A. Times, but friends of the dead young man and concerned citizens took to the Times’ Homicide Report comments section to publicize the dubiousness of the official story implying that that Ventura Blvd. parking lot was notorious for drug dealing so whaddaya whaddaya … My wife and I ran into the mother at the parking lot a week after the killing and encouraged her to sue. Three years later, a judge awarded the family $3 million.

Why did so few of these homicides get covered?

JILL LEOVY: Well, you can’t cover everything. The newspaper’s job is to cover unusual events, and when it comes to homicide, that always ends up meaning that you’re covering the very low edges of the bell curve. And you’re never the bulge in the middle because that’s implicitly the routine homicides, even though, of course, a homicide is never routine. Those homicides have gone on in the same form, in the same ways, for so long in America, particularly American cities, that they are the wallpaper of urban life. They are taken for granted, and it’s very difficult to make them into a narrative and a story that works for a newspaper.

DAVIES: Tell us about starting this blog, “The Homicide Report.” What was your purpose?

LEOVY: You know, usually when I get this question, I talk about the statistics, which I think are very important, but honestly, you know, I was frustrated. It’s so hard to tell this story. I could not figure out how to tell it. The newspaper articles I produce always paled to the reality so much. …

A blog is just a stack, an undifferentiated stack of news. You can’t tell the trivial from the weighty. And so it doesn’t work for a lot of things, but it occurred to me that it would work for this, that the form would suit what I was trying to say exactly, which is to give everything equal weight. And so I decided to just list the homicides and to sort of give them as much equivalence as possible as sort of an anti-news story. This is not a new story about the sensational case, about the case getting attention. This is just all of them stacked up in a row so that the reader can peruse them and get an idea of who’s dying.

Did anybody else besides me ever analyze this amazing collection of data?

There are a lot of very bright baseball statistics fans out there, but I’m struck by how few turn their analytical impulses to something besides sports statistics or finance. Granted, sabermetrics is a protected playpen for white males with strong pattern recognition skills to exercise their talents without winding up being demonized on Law & Order. But, still, moneyballers, there’s a world of data out there …

LEOVY: … The way people respond to homicide deaths of loved ones – it’s the worst pain that I’ve seen a human being experience that isn’t physical. It’s astounding what people go through, and it often gets worse as the years go by, instead of better. Doing “The Homicide Report,” I had people who contacted me who had lost their loved ones 20, 30 years before, and would say, you know, I’m just going through my hardest phase now.

You know, I had a mother – in one of the anecdotes that I didn’t include in the book – who, at the funeral, after they cemented the vault in the wall where her son was, she flattened herself against the wet cement, and they – the relatives had to peel her off. She would’ve climbed in there, I think, if she could have.

DAVIES: The first section of your book is called The Plague. What’s the plague you’re referring to?

LEOVY: … And then in very public health terms, it is a plague. The rate of homicide for black Americans has been five to eight times the white rate, going back decades. Year after year after year, we’re talking about thousands and thousands of people. I think – I have in my footnotes, 1995, which was after the big crime wave of the early ’90s – 1995 to 2005 – that decade of falling crime – total homicides in the U.S., I think, are 187,000. Well, about 90,000 of those victims were black, mostly black, adult men. And they’re 13 percent of the population. And so that’s astounding – those numbers.

From Leovy’s Homicide Report for 2007 through 2009 for LA County, I calculated the following rates of homicide victimization (not offending) for 15-29 year-old males:

Using the Census Bureau’s estimates of the numbers of 15-29-year-old males in L.A. County in 2006-2008, we can calculate—relative to non-Hispanic whites—the homicide victimization rates among young men:

Whites: 1.0 times the white rate (by Census definition)
Asians: 1.1x the white rate
Latinos: 6.8x
Pacific Islanders: 12.0x
African-American: 20.7x
Total L.A. County: 6.0x

The offending rates for minorities are probably marginally worse, but no doubt they are similar. So, the black rate in L.A. County in the late last decade wasn’t just five or seven times worse than the white rate, apples for apples in terms of age and sex, it was about twenty times worse. (Los Angeles County isn’t representative of the whole country, it exaggerates patterns seen elsewhere.)

Back to NPR:

DAVIES: You note that black men in particular are being, you know, murdered at an alarming rate. How many of these murderers get solved?

LEOVY: Well, looking at numbers from LAPD from about ’88 through the early 2000s, around 40 percent, if the victims are black men. And I have no reason to think that that’s different with agencies, by the way. I’ve done sort of spot surveys of sheriffs and other agencies. It seems to be pretty consistent across the board. On paper, it’s going to look a little more. When they report it to the federal government, they add in what’s called cleared others.

DAVIES: That’s cleared others – cleared meaning solved, yeah.

LEOVY: Yes, and so that gets you maybe up to the high 40s, low 50 percent. But you also have to consider that injury shootings, which are very similar to homicides, have much lower solve rates – in the LAPD, maybe 25 percent if you don’t count cleared other. So if you put that all together, it ends up with better-than-average odds of getting away with it if you injure somebody by shooting them or kill them.

Murder clearance rates differ a lot by city. It might interesting for moneyballers to build a model of the contributory factors, identify the laggards, and focus attention on the overachievers (who either have a lot to teach or are routinely framing people).

DAVIES: So there’s all these families who want justice for their victims, and it doesn’t happen, at least not from the police. What’s the impact on the community of the failure to solve so many of these shootings?

LEOVY: A pervasive atmosphere of fear, rampant intimidation because, I think, the killers are emboldened. I did a story in the early 2000s where a colleague, Doug Smith, and I looked at all the unsolved homicides in LAPD South Bureau over about 15 years. And we came up with the finding that there were 40 or so unsolved homicides per square mile…

DAVIES: Wow.

LEOVY: …In the South Bureau area of the LAPD. So think about what that means in real terms. It’s one thing if you hear, vaguely, of a homicide that doesn’t involve anyone you know far away from you. It’s another if it happens on your street. And it’s another, still, if you know who did it, and they never get arrested. And by the way, they did it again, and they still didn’t get arrested. And maybe there’s three or four others around you. Imagine what that does to people and what that does to their own assessment of safety and how they’re going to respond.

I spoke to a mother, once, in South Bureau – black woman – her son had just been murdered. I think this was maybe a couple of days after the murder. I had gone to her door. And it was one of these cases where the police just had no witnesses. The case wasn’t going anywhere. The mother told me that since the murder, the killers, who she knew, who were, I think, the gang members who lived on her street, had been knocking on her door and taunting her and laughing at her – her grief. She had another surviving son, and he was, I think, 15, 16. And you could see that he was thinking really, really hard about this situation. And that’s something you see all the time. I go to a lot of funerals, and I always study the pallbearers because they’re generally young men the same age as the victim. And you can just see the smoldering anger and grief in their faces and how they’re trying to hold it down and try not to cry. And then they march out and collect in knots in the parking lot after the funeral, and you could tell what they’re talking about. They’re talking about, what we do now?

DAVIES: You write that when there’s a homicide, you describe situations where there’s a murder scene, and a crowd naturally gathers. And things are said at the police lines that reflect a lot of the community’s attitude towards the police and what they perceive as their attitude toward the crimes and the victims. Do you want to talk a bit about that?

LEOVY: Police hear that all the time. They hear that all the time. You don’t care because he’s black. You’re not going to solve it because he’s black. And it’s very interesting, I – in terms of Ferguson and some of the other recent controversies – I was thinking that this is so complicated because there is, very definitely, a standard black grievance against police that you hear in South LA, that has to do with the generally understood problem – too much consent searches, we say, in LA, too much stop-and-frisk, too heavy of law enforcement, too much presumption of guilt when you take stops.

What I hear, when I’m in these neighborhoods, is a combination. It’s a two-pronged grievance. There’s another half of that. And the other half is, I get stopped too much for nothing, and the police don’t go after the real killers. They don’t go after the really serious criminals in this neighborhood. They’re stopping me for what I’ve got in my pocket, but I know someone who got killed down the street. And they haven’t solved the homicide, and yet, that second half seems to never break out and make it into the national dialogue about it. To me, it has always been that double-sided grievance of too much of the wrong kind of policing, not enough of the policing we actually want in these neighborhoods. …

DAVIES: You know, you write that most of these cases are made not by physical evidence, you know, fibers or that kind of thing, but by witnesses and a phrase that you hear a lot in some of these communities after a homicide is, everybody knows who did it. But it’s the reluctance of witnesses to cooperate that is such a huge barrier. You want to just explore that for a moment and talk about what fears witnesses have and why?

LEOVY: Well, witnesses I think justly fear retaliation. There’s a lot of kind you might call it soft retaliation – signals, hard stares. I had one witness on a case who a couple days after she – the perpetrators clearly saw her at the scene, woke up in the middle of the night, and they’re banging hard on her windows, bunch of guys walking slowly around the house banging, banging on each window for a long time. And they didn’t hurt her, but that’s terrifying. And it’s very clear what that’s saying. What that’s saying is, think about what we will do to you.

So there’s a lot of things that are below the radar of police, a lot of signaling and intimidation that’s going on all the time, and then there are occasional assaults and very, very occasional killings of witnesses.

I never hear anybody discuss keeping the death penalty to deter murderers from then murdering witnesses.

And as I say in my book, it doesn’t take very much for people to make a rational assessment about their own safety in these situations. So people are very, very scared.

And I guess going back to what you said at the beginning about everybody knows, to me part of what has kept me on this so many years is it’s so mysterious. It’s such a strange, strange problem. I could not understand it. Why would one group of Americans have a homicide rate that’s seven times that of, you know, counterparts in other groups? It doesn’t even make any sense. But the semi-furtive nature of these killings is one of the clues about what this is. They can’t be completely furtive. They can’t do this in secret because the purpose is to establish powers, to send messages – is to say, we’re in charge of this neighborhood, don’t mess with us, we’re in control. And if you don’t get that message out, then it doesn’t accomplish what the homicide is supposed to accomplish, which is establishing a power hierarchy in the neighborhood. And so you have to boast. You have to put up graffiti that says this gang did it, and that’s something that’s commonplace with these homicides. …

DAVIES: You write that sometimes detectives who are frustrated at their inability to arrest people who they think have committed murders will arrest them for what you call proxy crimes. Explain that.

LEOVY: Yes. This is a nuance that doesn’t get talked about enough because there’s I think a general impression that the police are just arbitrarily hammering, for example, drug crimes, possession crimes, probation and parole violations – petty stuff that doesn’t do a lot of harm, and yet there’s a lot of penalties built behind them and so they must be racist. They must be just trying to give people a hard time. What you see on the ground is that there’s a tremendous amount of violence. There’s a tremendous amount of impunity, and it’s, as I say, semi-furtive. It’s well known to everybody in this small enclave who’s doing stuff, who’s boasting about it, who’s dangerous. The police are part of that enclave. They’re part of that community. They hear the street rumors, too. They hear so-and-so’s a shooter and so-and-so’s a rider, and they’re frustrated because they cannot put a case on so-and-so for that assault or that homicide. So they think, well, we can get them on a drug offense. He’s in a gang. He’s selling drugs. If we can just get him on possession with intent to sell, at least that gets him off the street. And so you see certain amount of enforcement that’s shaped by a reaction to the impunity for the serious crimes.

It’s almost – when you make the prosecution of some crimes very difficult and very expensive, as we have with homicide, it almost pushes the bubble. It’s – the cops naturally gravitate towards places where they have more discretion and where it’s easier to do the work and stopping and searching and possession and probation, parole – that is low-hanging fruit. It’s easy, cheap stuff to prosecute. And so they are seeing these victims. They are seeing people who are paralyzed or in comas for the rest of their life, and they can’t make an arrest. But they know that clique from such-and-such gang has been doing this stuff, and everyone knows it. And the graffiti on the wall says it, and they can’t make a case. So if we’re going to focus a drug-enforcement project tonight somewhere, why not focus on them? It’s a compensatory strategy that I think ends up being counterproductive but is also somewhat understandable.

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  1. “There are a lot of very bright baseball statistics fans out there, but I’m struck by how few turn their analytical impulses to something besides sports statistics or finance.”

    Bill James did write a saberbmetric book about murder, but even he chose to focus solely on glamorous or famous murders.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Here's my review of Bill James' book on crime:

    http://takimag.com/article/a_statisticians_imprecise_analysis_of_true_crime/print#axzz3RZgM4cuD
    , @anon
    James also had some very though-provoking observations and policy recommendations in that book.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
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  2. LEOVY: Why would one group of Americans have a homicide rate that’s seven times that of, you know, counterparts in other groups? It doesn’t even make any sense.

    I guess she just has to say that. If it suddenly occurred to her why it made sense, and how this fact is consistent everywhere in the world where there are blacks, she’d be persona non grata.

    Read More
  3. @MC
    "There are a lot of very bright baseball statistics fans out there, but I’m struck by how few turn their analytical impulses to something besides sports statistics or finance."

    Bill James did write a saberbmetric book about murder, but even he chose to focus solely on glamorous or famous murders.
    Read More
  4. According to media, TV and Hollywood, black people are only killed by angry white males. A Hispanic that kills a black becomes a white-Hispanic.

    Read More
  5. DEA’s killing of an 18-year-old violist

    “Champommier had come to the Studio City parking lot to meet a friend he’d chatted with online the night before. After he arrived and parked nearby, he saw his friend, Douglas Ryan Oeters, being detained by the officers,”

    My gaydar detector is going off….

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The federal government isn't supposed to shoot you for that.
    , @Danindc
    Hey Jack, you researched the murder just to slander the victim? And Gaydar? Such fresh terminology.....you must be really fun at parties.
  6. @Jack D
    DEA’s killing of an 18-year-old violist


    "Champommier had come to the Studio City parking lot to meet a friend he'd chatted with online the night before. After he arrived and parked nearby, he saw his friend, Douglas Ryan Oeters, being detained by the officers,"

    My gaydar detector is going off....

    The federal government isn’t supposed to shoot you for that.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Absolutely not, but it explains a lot of what went on. The "friend" nervously peering in cars, etc. I think that if the reporters had been ...ahem... straight about it, the story would have made a lot more sense. Still doesn't mean that they should have shot the kid, but at least the whole scenario would have made some sort of sense.
  7. 60 Minutes “In the segment, Cooper interviewed a black community
    activist who argued that the pervasive anti
    -
    snitching code in black neighborhoods contributes
    to witnesses’ fears of coming forward to cooperate wit
    h the police. The show also included
    an interview with rapper Cam’ron (formerly known as “Killa Cam”) from Harlem, who
    insisted that cooperating with the police violates a code of ethics in many black communities.
    In response to a question about his own
    attitudes towards snitching, Cam’ron said that even if
    a serial killer was living next
    -
    door to him, he would not report it to the police:
    “No. I
    wouldn’t call or tell anybody about him. I’d probably move, but I wouldn’t call anybod
    y” ” http://www.albany.edu/scj/jcjpc/vol17is1/Woldoff7_6.pdf

    Urban culture tolerates the serial killer, not the police though.

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  8. That interview was fascinating. The Skaggs fellow especially. A genial, surfer type with the interrogation skills of George Smiley.

    Incidentally, Steve, are you a surfer? You don’t talk about it all that much for a guy from SoCal.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Never a stand-up surfer.

    I did a fair amount of bodysurfing when I was young, and still ride a boogie board every couple of years.

  9. I am so, so tired of the “black community.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan D Mute
    That's called "negro fatigue" and I believe several major pharmaceutical companies are jointly developing a new medicine to cure it. From my understanding, this new treatment, fully funded by ObamaCare, is guaranteed to cure the sufferer in just a single dose. Clinical trials are currently underway in the Oakland County suburbs of Detroit and efficacy of this drug derived from peach pits is said to be 100% with "negro fatigue" patients reporting no symptoms of anything whatsoever following their initial dose. It is expected the drug will receive immediate FDA approval and be distributed nationwide for all white people claiming to be afflicted. An over-the-counter remedy is also expected soon.
  10. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    That interview was fascinating. The Skaggs fellow especially. A genial, surfer type with the interrogation skills of George Smiley.

    Incidentally, Steve, are you a surfer? You don't talk about it all that much for a guy from SoCal.

    Never a stand-up surfer.

    I did a fair amount of bodysurfing when I was young, and still ride a boogie board every couple of years.

    Read More
  11. @Steve Sailer
    The federal government isn't supposed to shoot you for that.

    Absolutely not, but it explains a lot of what went on. The “friend” nervously peering in cars, etc. I think that if the reporters had been …ahem… straight about it, the story would have made a lot more sense. Still doesn’t mean that they should have shot the kid, but at least the whole scenario would have made some sort of sense.

    Read More
  12. I don’t understand how the death penalty would prevent suspects from murdering witnesses. Before conviction the suspect would be that much more motivated to kill them, and afterward would have nothing to lose by killing them.

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    • Replies: @countenance
    You would assume a murder suspect would be in jail, both before conviction on no-bond, and after conviction in terms of state prison. It's the friends of the suspect you have to worry about.
  13. @Jack D
    DEA’s killing of an 18-year-old violist


    "Champommier had come to the Studio City parking lot to meet a friend he'd chatted with online the night before. After he arrived and parked nearby, he saw his friend, Douglas Ryan Oeters, being detained by the officers,"

    My gaydar detector is going off....

    Hey Jack, you researched the murder just to slander the victim? And Gaydar? Such fresh terminology…..you must be really fun at parties.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    You can't slander the dead. Or, actually you can slander them all you want, since their right to file suit for slander (or libel, since this is in writing) dies with them.

    If I wanted to be shouted down for exercising my First Amendment right to express my opinion, then I would post over at Daily Kos or something.
  14. It’s a wonder why Loevy hasn’t been pilloried for her racist crime of noticing. She must have impeccable liberal credentials. Does she in her book perhaps admit she can only see this through the prism of her white privilege and therefore is unable to understand or atone for the fact that all these completely innocent africans are being murdered because of white racism?

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    • Replies: @Harold
    If I were, say, Tim Wise, I wouldn’t want to draw attention to her. People might notice what a reasonable adult sounds like, and notice that, by comparison, Tim Wise sounds like a silly, posturing ideologue.

    The police are part of that enclave. They’re part of that community. They hear the street rumors, too. They hear so-and-so’s a shooter and so-and-so’s a rider, and they’re frustrated because they cannot put a case on so-and-so for that assault or that homicide. So they think, well, we can get them on a drug offense. He’s in a gang. He’s selling drugs. If we can just get him on possession with intent to sell, at least that gets him off the street. And so you see certain amount of enforcement that’s shaped by a reaction to the impunity for the serious crimes.
     
    But I thought Blacks were brought up on petty drug offenses because of racism.
  15. I hear a lot of liberal and libertarian kvetching about how the prisons are full of people only in there for “drug crimes.” Yeah, drug crimes as a proxy crimes to real violent crimes. The black ghetto thug doing twenty for slinging weed probably also murdered someone, but the cops just don’t have enough evidence to cross the beyond a reasonable doubt threshold.

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  16. @jtgw
    I don't understand how the death penalty would prevent suspects from murdering witnesses. Before conviction the suspect would be that much more motivated to kill them, and afterward would have nothing to lose by killing them.

    You would assume a murder suspect would be in jail, both before conviction on no-bond, and after conviction in terms of state prison. It’s the friends of the suspect you have to worry about.

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  17. @Danindc
    Hey Jack, you researched the murder just to slander the victim? And Gaydar? Such fresh terminology.....you must be really fun at parties.

    You can’t slander the dead. Or, actually you can slander them all you want, since their right to file suit for slander (or libel, since this is in writing) dies with them.

    If I wanted to be shouted down for exercising my First Amendment right to express my opinion, then I would post over at Daily Kos or something.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan D Mute
    Actually, I'd contend you have the Natural Law right to free speech. The Bill of Rights merely codifies it. Free born American Citizens had a right to free speech before the Bill of Rights was written. Of course none of us except Ron Unz have a "right" to free speech here, but we can always create our own blog.

    The attempt to silence you is pervasive in our society. Every day it seems the spectrum of what we are permitted to say grows smaller. The censors who lack the actual ability to delete your comments instead try shaming or ridiculing or burying your comment under a mountain of their own comments. This one could have ignored your comment or simply said it was irrelevant, but instead chose to condemn you for noticing. Soon enough there will be an official war on noticing and we will hear cries of "noticer!" with the same intended effect as the current "racist!"
  18. @peterike
    I am so, so tired of the "black community."

    That’s called “negro fatigue” and I believe several major pharmaceutical companies are jointly developing a new medicine to cure it. From my understanding, this new treatment, fully funded by ObamaCare, is guaranteed to cure the sufferer in just a single dose. Clinical trials are currently underway in the Oakland County suburbs of Detroit and efficacy of this drug derived from peach pits is said to be 100% with “negro fatigue” patients reporting no symptoms of anything whatsoever following their initial dose. It is expected the drug will receive immediate FDA approval and be distributed nationwide for all white people claiming to be afflicted. An over-the-counter remedy is also expected soon.

    Read More
  19. I like your vdare analysis of LA murders.

    I did a sloppy, half assed analysis of murders in Chicago, and had similar results. A very low number of murdered whites. There were a few that involved family arguments, and maybe a lovers quarrel run amok. I think those fall into a different category.

    The reason I did this was a New York Times Article http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/01/02/us/chicago-killings.html?_r=0
    I found their reasoning convoluted enough to see for myself.

    The Times was arguing that murder, like real estate, is all about location, location, location. And NAM’s live close to murder neighborhoods, so they are murdered. “A New York Times analysis of homicides and census data in Chicago compared areas near murders to those that were not. Residents living near homicides in the last 12 years were much more likely to be black, earn less money and lack a college degree.”

    I was curious who was getting murdered in the better North Side neighborhoods. And, surprisingly, it was NAM’s. And, in the near north side, since the data ran from 2001 to 2012, it included the time before they tore down Cabrini Green.

    After a couple of hours, the general pattern emerged of NAM’s killing NAM’s .. and usually their own racial/ethnic group. Naturally, race/ethnicity had much more explanatory power than location, although they are related in a segregated city.

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    • Replies: @Boomstick
    "The Times was arguing that murder, like real estate, is all about location, location, location. And NAM’s live close to murder neighborhoods, so they are murdered"

    This argument is an unwitting echo of a scene from Steve Martin's "The Jerk:"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXRM3lFRwRI

    They're so resolutely opposed to noticing that they've created emergent comedy routines.

  20. @Jack D
    You can't slander the dead. Or, actually you can slander them all you want, since their right to file suit for slander (or libel, since this is in writing) dies with them.

    If I wanted to be shouted down for exercising my First Amendment right to express my opinion, then I would post over at Daily Kos or something.

    Actually, I’d contend you have the Natural Law right to free speech. The Bill of Rights merely codifies it. Free born American Citizens had a right to free speech before the Bill of Rights was written. Of course none of us except Ron Unz have a “right” to free speech here, but we can always create our own blog.

    The attempt to silence you is pervasive in our society. Every day it seems the spectrum of what we are permitted to say grows smaller. The censors who lack the actual ability to delete your comments instead try shaming or ridiculing or burying your comment under a mountain of their own comments. This one could have ignored your comment or simply said it was irrelevant, but instead chose to condemn you for noticing. Soon enough there will be an official war on noticing and we will hear cries of “noticer!” with the same intended effect as the current “racist!”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Read this:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/15/magazine/how-one-stupid-tweet-ruined-justine-saccos-life.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&region=CColumn&module=MostEmailed&version=Full&src=me&WT.nav=MostEmailed

    I hadn't realized how sick our society is. There are jackals waiting to pounce on you and do their best to ruin your life if you make so much as one inappropriate joke. Who appointed these people to be the judge, jury and executioner? Sen. McCarthy was a rank amateur compared to these monsters.
  21. @Stan D Mute
    It's a wonder why Loevy hasn't been pilloried for her racist crime of noticing. She must have impeccable liberal credentials. Does she in her book perhaps admit she can only see this through the prism of her white privilege and therefore is unable to understand or atone for the fact that all these completely innocent africans are being murdered because of white racism?

    If I were, say, Tim Wise, I wouldn’t want to draw attention to her. People might notice what a reasonable adult sounds like, and notice that, by comparison, Tim Wise sounds like a silly, posturing ideologue.

    The police are part of that enclave. They’re part of that community. They hear the street rumors, too. They hear so-and-so’s a shooter and so-and-so’s a rider, and they’re frustrated because they cannot put a case on so-and-so for that assault or that homicide. So they think, well, we can get them on a drug offense. He’s in a gang. He’s selling drugs. If we can just get him on possession with intent to sell, at least that gets him off the street. And so you see certain amount of enforcement that’s shaped by a reaction to the impunity for the serious crimes.

    But I thought Blacks were brought up on petty drug offenses because of racism.

    Read More
  22. By coincidence, the Progressive epidemic-of-police-racism version of this story just aired on NPR’s This American Life. The setting is Milwaukee (which Moynihan might have pointed out is closer to the Canadian border than L.A.). Every one of the points that Jill Leovy made, TAL reporter Brian Reed missed. No Noticing here!

    Read More
  23. Interesting interview, but it does smack of the Derbyshire line of “Blackity-black-black-black, black, black blackity black black black.”

    Are there no Hispanics in California. They kill each other too, right? Even Asian gangs must occasionally kill somebody.

    What is the fascination of liberal whites with blacks? To be honest, I find blacks remarkably boring. Maybe if I was 15-years-old, they might be interesting, but past about 18 or, certainly, your early 20s, they would seem to lose their appeal to most whites. They’re a childish people. Perhaps, that’s the allure. Indeed, we have become a childish culture, so perhaps they best personify what we want: Perpetual childhood.

    Regardless, I’ll give this reporter credit. Although she’s careful with her words, she has seen a side of the world that most liberals don’t see. I wonder if/how she continues to hold her liberal beliefs in her head. It can’t be easy to continuing kissing the ring to an archbishop that you’ve seen buggering the neighborhood boys.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ezra
    "Are there no Hispanics in California. They kill each other too, right? Even Asian gangs must occasionally kill somebody"

    I've been reading Leovey's book. She actually discusses this; she focuses on murder among blacks because the murder problem is so much more severe, even in places in South Central where blacks and Hispanics are living cheek-by-jowl in the same neighborhoods.
    , @Former Darfur
    What is the fascination of liberal whites with blacks? To be honest, I find blacks remarkably boring. Maybe if I was 15-years-old, they might be interesting, but past about 18 or, certainly, your early 20s, they would seem to lose their appeal to most whites. They’re a childish people. Perhaps, that’s the allure. Indeed, we have become a childish culture, so perhaps they best personify what we want: Perpetual childhood.

    That's precisely the black problem: they are a group of seven to fifteen year olds , average mental and emotional age roughly eleven (the bell curve restated: the average 11 year old white has an adult-normalized IQ of 85) trapped in often-very-athletic adult bodies. Both the Boers and the American Southern segregationists of 1900-1950 understood that with astonishing clarity and precision and acted on that basis.

    Kids can be amusing, funny, charming, on occasion astonishingly noble-or astonishingly brutal, should they acquire power. Some thirteen year olds are more adult in every way than some chronological adults, but we legally differentiate juveniles all the same. We withhold driving and firearms privileges and the franchise until a certain age. We establish ages of consent for sex, ages of being allowed to smoke otherwise legal substances, of being allowed to buy alcohol. No sane person much questions all of that, although some disagreement is to be had on what the ages should be.

    Children know they will grow up, and adults do too, but blacks and other races of lower cognitive and gratification-postponement levels never will, as we and they also know. I think most blacks realize they are differently abled in these ways, as a group and as individuals, in fact they are more acutely aware of it than most whites today. Blacks in the South generally resented segregation, but they accepted it with less trouble than most people now think until outsiders came in and systematically roiled them.

    How do we solve this issue? There is no solution, today, none that I know of that most people would accept. Can we live with it? We did a hundred years ago, and people back then generally had a decent life. But it will require measures that seem unpalatable in the extreme today, at least to most people. My guess is that as the problem becomes more and more acute the flavor of the medicine will become less objectionable, but then again one can never underestimate people's astonishing capacity for selective ignorance.
  24. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Interesting interview, but it does smack of the Derbyshire line of "Blackity-black-black-black, black, black blackity black black black."

    Are there no Hispanics in California. They kill each other too, right? Even Asian gangs must occasionally kill somebody.

    What is the fascination of liberal whites with blacks? To be honest, I find blacks remarkably boring. Maybe if I was 15-years-old, they might be interesting, but past about 18 or, certainly, your early 20s, they would seem to lose their appeal to most whites. They're a childish people. Perhaps, that's the allure. Indeed, we have become a childish culture, so perhaps they best personify what we want: Perpetual childhood.

    Regardless, I'll give this reporter credit. Although she's careful with her words, she has seen a side of the world that most liberals don't see. I wonder if/how she continues to hold her liberal beliefs in her head. It can't be easy to continuing kissing the ring to an archbishop that you've seen buggering the neighborhood boys.

    “Are there no Hispanics in California. They kill each other too, right? Even Asian gangs must occasionally kill somebody”

    I’ve been reading Leovey’s book. She actually discusses this; she focuses on murder among blacks because the murder problem is so much more severe, even in places in South Central where blacks and Hispanics are living cheek-by-jowl in the same neighborhoods.

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  25. The A&E network has a very popular TV show, The First 48, that does nothing but ‘explore’ these ‘invisible’ murders. Seldom are the victims anything but low lifes themselves. The show tries to be sympathetic but the victim is as likely to be a suspect as not in some future homicide and invariably has ‘dreams’ instead of a career path, one or more children he does little to nothing to support and the person is seldom shot to death in a wholesome setting. I watch it in amazement as the mindless brutality of the underclass is both incredible and alarming but, as an ex San Francisco cop once described these killings to me, they are misdemeanor homicides and are actually therapeutic as one thug is simply doing unto another before it is done unto them.

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  26. @Stan D Mute
    Actually, I'd contend you have the Natural Law right to free speech. The Bill of Rights merely codifies it. Free born American Citizens had a right to free speech before the Bill of Rights was written. Of course none of us except Ron Unz have a "right" to free speech here, but we can always create our own blog.

    The attempt to silence you is pervasive in our society. Every day it seems the spectrum of what we are permitted to say grows smaller. The censors who lack the actual ability to delete your comments instead try shaming or ridiculing or burying your comment under a mountain of their own comments. This one could have ignored your comment or simply said it was irrelevant, but instead chose to condemn you for noticing. Soon enough there will be an official war on noticing and we will hear cries of "noticer!" with the same intended effect as the current "racist!"

    Read this:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/15/magazine/how-one-stupid-tweet-ruined-justine-saccos-life.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&region=CColumn&module=MostEmailed&version=Full&src=me&WT.nav=MostEmailed

    I hadn’t realized how sick our society is. There are jackals waiting to pounce on you and do their best to ruin your life if you make so much as one inappropriate joke. Who appointed these people to be the judge, jury and executioner? Sen. McCarthy was a rank amateur compared to these monsters.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Danindc
    You guys may want to take a breath. Nobody is silencing you- just pointing out the crass nature of slandering a dead kid. It's perverse and rude.

    Steve's mo is to notice bad behavior in hopes that calling attention to it will reduce said behavior. His is group oriented but it can also apply to commenters.

    Now get out there and smile at a stranger....;)
  27. Maybe the baseball sabermetrics fans could be lured into crime research with Rotisserie League gang warfare. Each player gets to draft a few city blocks; the player with the most murders on his team wins. It would be worth it for the team names alone.

    You could make it more interesting with a complex formula, such as total gang score = 10 * murders + 2 * number of armed robberies + number of car thefts. That way you’d have to balance your team; not just black drug-dealing ghettos, but also illegal alien neighborhood car theft districts or drunk driving barrios or maybe some white collar securities fraud enclaves. Within an afternoon you’d have arcane yet interesting statistics like “rapes per car theft.”

    The police could feed the data from the Rotisserie League back into their patrol practices, and let it act as a prediction market.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Ah, an older gentleman like me, using the proper term when referring to fantasy baseball.

    Steve, if a player hits a home run or a pitcher strikes someone out, it happened. True statheads use real data. Police records, ranging from, at best, a wild-assed guess, to, at worst, blatant lies, don't really qualify.
  28. @Jack D
    Read this:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/15/magazine/how-one-stupid-tweet-ruined-justine-saccos-life.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&region=CColumn&module=MostEmailed&version=Full&src=me&WT.nav=MostEmailed

    I hadn't realized how sick our society is. There are jackals waiting to pounce on you and do their best to ruin your life if you make so much as one inappropriate joke. Who appointed these people to be the judge, jury and executioner? Sen. McCarthy was a rank amateur compared to these monsters.

    You guys may want to take a breath. Nobody is silencing you- just pointing out the crass nature of slandering a dead kid. It’s perverse and rude.

    Steve’s mo is to notice bad behavior in hopes that calling attention to it will reduce said behavior. His is group oriented but it can also apply to commenters.

    Now get out there and smile at a stranger….;)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Is it even slander anymore to point out that someone might be gay? Haven't we all decided that there's nothing wrong with being gay - it's probably biologically driven like a lot of things about us. I really meant the poor dead boy no ill.

    I was just giving my theory of some of the circumstances of the shooting, which the news reports were strangely silent about , in the modern not-noticing fashion. It's like those mysterious gang-rapes that DON'T become national stories and then you see a photograph and realize that the accused are all black and the alleged victim is white and then you understand why it's not a big story like that horrific Haven Monahan rape.

    If you assume that he was gay, a lot of the pieces of the story fall into place that make no sense otherwise. It's a sad comedy of errors. These two guys were probably new to the whole gay online hookup scene and nervous about the whole thing. The narcs that happened to be there, who haven't had the noticing trained out of them, picked up on this nervousness and misinterpreted it to mean that there was some crime being planned or committed.

    If I smile at a stranger nowadays it might be interpreted as stalking or something, so it's best not to get involved.
    , @ChaseBizzy
    The obvious homosexual angle has been completely ignored by Steve in his posts about Champommier's death. I didn't have to do any research I simply clicked on the link to the news report Steve provided in a previous post. Champommier as a nervous young closet case puts this tragic incident in a much clearer context.
  29. @unit472

    Reading this, I thought of “First 48″ as well. A fascinating yet depressing show. Human life is valueless to a significant portion of our society.

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  30. @FWIW
    I like your vdare analysis of LA murders.

    I did a sloppy, half assed analysis of murders in Chicago, and had similar results. A very low number of murdered whites. There were a few that involved family arguments, and maybe a lovers quarrel run amok. I think those fall into a different category.

    The reason I did this was a New York Times Article http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/01/02/us/chicago-killings.html?_r=0
    I found their reasoning convoluted enough to see for myself.

    The Times was arguing that murder, like real estate, is all about location, location, location. And NAM's live close to murder neighborhoods, so they are murdered. "A New York Times analysis of homicides and census data in Chicago compared areas near murders to those that were not. Residents living near homicides in the last 12 years were much more likely to be black, earn less money and lack a college degree."

    I was curious who was getting murdered in the better North Side neighborhoods. And, surprisingly, it was NAM's. And, in the near north side, since the data ran from 2001 to 2012, it included the time before they tore down Cabrini Green.

    After a couple of hours, the general pattern emerged of NAM's killing NAM's .. and usually their own racial/ethnic group. Naturally, race/ethnicity had much more explanatory power than location, although they are related in a segregated city.

    “The Times was arguing that murder, like real estate, is all about location, location, location. And NAM’s live close to murder neighborhoods, so they are murdered”

    This argument is an unwitting echo of a scene from Steve Martin’s “The Jerk:”

    They’re so resolutely opposed to noticing that they’ve created emergent comedy routines.

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  31. @Danindc
    You guys may want to take a breath. Nobody is silencing you- just pointing out the crass nature of slandering a dead kid. It's perverse and rude.

    Steve's mo is to notice bad behavior in hopes that calling attention to it will reduce said behavior. His is group oriented but it can also apply to commenters.

    Now get out there and smile at a stranger....;)

    Is it even slander anymore to point out that someone might be gay? Haven’t we all decided that there’s nothing wrong with being gay – it’s probably biologically driven like a lot of things about us. I really meant the poor dead boy no ill.

    I was just giving my theory of some of the circumstances of the shooting, which the news reports were strangely silent about , in the modern not-noticing fashion. It’s like those mysterious gang-rapes that DON’T become national stories and then you see a photograph and realize that the accused are all black and the alleged victim is white and then you understand why it’s not a big story like that horrific Haven Monahan rape.

    If you assume that he was gay, a lot of the pieces of the story fall into place that make no sense otherwise. It’s a sad comedy of errors. These two guys were probably new to the whole gay online hookup scene and nervous about the whole thing. The narcs that happened to be there, who haven’t had the noticing trained out of them, picked up on this nervousness and misinterpreted it to mean that there was some crime being planned or committed.

    If I smile at a stranger nowadays it might be interpreted as stalking or something, so it’s best not to get involved.

    Read More
  32. LEOVY: Well, witnesses I think justly fear retaliation

    http://the-spark.net/np690203.html

    I wouldn’t talk to the cops either . And pls disregard the source . It’s the only place I could find it quickly . I remember the incident though and wondering at the time if the cops were partnered with the guy.

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  33. @Danindc
    You guys may want to take a breath. Nobody is silencing you- just pointing out the crass nature of slandering a dead kid. It's perverse and rude.

    Steve's mo is to notice bad behavior in hopes that calling attention to it will reduce said behavior. His is group oriented but it can also apply to commenters.

    Now get out there and smile at a stranger....;)

    The obvious homosexual angle has been completely ignored by Steve in his posts about Champommier’s death. I didn’t have to do any research I simply clicked on the link to the news report Steve provided in a previous post. Champommier as a nervous young closet case puts this tragic incident in a much clearer context.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I've walked through that parking lot 500 times. I've never seen anything untoward going on except bad driving. It's a sensible place for a kid with a car but little money to arrange to meet somebody he only knows online: it's a free parking lot, but extremely well lit, very high traffic all evening, zero crime, and very simple to get to. If you want to leave, it's very easy to leave. If it looks okay, there's a Chipotle right there or you can drive a couple of miles down Ventura Blvd. to Universal CityWalk.

    Five interagency undercover cops were "debriefing" out behind the Mexicali Grill a couple of doors down from the Chipotle, an upscale bar/restaurant with a lot of pretty girls on a Thursday evening, after trying to serve a warrant on a drug dealer. They were evidently amped up (see "Clockers" by Richard Price for what cops feel like after doing a home invasion on a drug dealer because they have a warrant) and started a brawl with the other guy who was looking around the parking lot for the kid. Since they were out of uniform, instead of looking like a police operation, it looked like some kind of bizarre riot. The kid was driving down a lane and one cop who was headed toward the brawl went up on his hood and rolled off unharmed. One cop opened fire, then exclaimed, "Why did you make me kill you?"

    The judge heard all the evidence and said "$3 million." It sounds about right.

  34. @ChaseBizzy
    The obvious homosexual angle has been completely ignored by Steve in his posts about Champommier's death. I didn't have to do any research I simply clicked on the link to the news report Steve provided in a previous post. Champommier as a nervous young closet case puts this tragic incident in a much clearer context.

    I’ve walked through that parking lot 500 times. I’ve never seen anything untoward going on except bad driving. It’s a sensible place for a kid with a car but little money to arrange to meet somebody he only knows online: it’s a free parking lot, but extremely well lit, very high traffic all evening, zero crime, and very simple to get to. If you want to leave, it’s very easy to leave. If it looks okay, there’s a Chipotle right there or you can drive a couple of miles down Ventura Blvd. to Universal CityWalk.

    Five interagency undercover cops were “debriefing” out behind the Mexicali Grill a couple of doors down from the Chipotle, an upscale bar/restaurant with a lot of pretty girls on a Thursday evening, after trying to serve a warrant on a drug dealer. They were evidently amped up (see “Clockers” by Richard Price for what cops feel like after doing a home invasion on a drug dealer because they have a warrant) and started a brawl with the other guy who was looking around the parking lot for the kid. Since they were out of uniform, instead of looking like a police operation, it looked like some kind of bizarre riot. The kid was driving down a lane and one cop who was headed toward the brawl went up on his hood and rolled off unharmed. One cop opened fire, then exclaimed, “Why did you make me kill you?”

    The judge heard all the evidence and said “$3 million.” It sounds about right.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    The press did not cover itself with glory reporting this story, not that they usually do. According to the press account, the judge found the police NOT to be negligent but awarded the plaintiff $3M anyway. That wasn't at all clear to me - if there was no negligence, why was there an award of damages? The articles did a lousy job of explaining.

    Also, this appeared to be a judge trial - usually plaintiffs prefer (and have a legal right) to request a jury trial, because juries can be persuaded by emotional evidence to make big awards with lots of zeroes, while judges tend to take a more calibrated approach (as Steve said, the award in this case seems about right for the loss of a young life with a full career ahead of him). Again , there must have been some reason why the plaintiff didn't want a jury trial, but no explanation was given. I am guessing that the defense would have put the "friend" on the stand and he would have had to explain the reason for the meeting, and while that is really irrelevant as to whether the police should have murdered that kid or not, it's quite possible that such testimony might have influenced the jury negatively so they thought that they might be better off in front of a judge.

    It's really amazing that our media can be total bloodhounds when they want to be, tracking down every family quarrel and traffic ticket that George Zimmerman ever had and even the non-existent military records of George Bush, but when something is not interesting to them (Obama's college grades, Michael Brown's juvenile record, etc.) suddenly their reporting ability fades to nothing.
  35. Blacks seem, overall, to be content with the violence and code of silence in their communities. So, let them kill one another.

    Despite the bleatings about wanting autonomy, blacks always seem to be appealing to whites to bail them out of their own mess, as if whites had the magical ability to save them.

    Let them kill one another. It’s what they want.

    I’m even a little tired and bored with reading about why they are willing to live with the violence. At one time in my life, I lived in proximity to blacks and I had to be concerned about the violence. I got out and I’m not going back. It’s their problem, and I can’t do anything to fix it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ic1000
    @M_Young

    The transcript of that interview of Jill Leovy by Tavis Smiley is a great read (here).

    ...

    Tavis: The best way I can do this is to frame the conversation with a quote from James Baldwin. Baldwin once said this: “Sentimentality, the ostentatious parading of excessive and spurious emotion, is the mark of dishonesty…the wet eyes of the sentimentalist betray his aversion to experience, his fear of life, his arid heart; and it is always, therefore, the signal of secret and violent inhumanity, the mask of cruelty.”

    That’s a strong quote from Baldwin. But I thought about that when I started reading this because I wonder, honestly, why it is that white folk seem interested in a book about Black people killing Black people.

    And all of the critical praise and all of the quotes on the back of the book, all the blurbs from white Americans, white people, for whatever reason, are so interested in your telling of this story about Black people killing Black people. What do you make of that? You wrote it.

    Leovy: Well, it’s deliberate, you know.

    Tavis: What’s deliberate?

    Leovy: I wanted a book that white people would read. I’ve been covering homicide for almost a decade and, you know, I’ll quote something that an assistant to Chief Bratton once said to me, that “black on black homicide is not a Black problem, it’s a white problem. It’s a problem in which white indifferences is largely implicated.”

    And as a newspaper reporter, I really found that Black readers responded a lot to the stories that I did in South L.A. and that it was like moving a boulder to get white readers to respond.

    So I wanted to find a way to get this story to the people who I thought needed to hear it the most. So some of what you’re picking up on is deliberate and I understand the concern. The concern is, is it maudlin? Is it exploitive? Those are actually super important questions about this and things to think about.

    [snip]

    Tavis: I guess the question is, the follow-up question, is whether or not Black lives matter when Black folk say Black lives matter. Or do Black lives matter only when white folk say Black lives matter?

    Leovy: Well, I’ll tell you what a victim’s mother said to me...

    [snip]

    Tavis: How is it and why is it that, when a book like this is written, we can get a conversation–I use that word advisedly. I’m not sure there’s a conversation, but the book is certainly generating a lot of talk.

    We can generate a conversation, I’ll put it that way, about Black on Black homicide, but we can’t ever seem to generate a conversation about the humanity of Black life, about the dignity of Black life. So that if homicide is the only way in to a conversation, is that acceptable in our society?

    Leovy: Well, this book is about the very specific issue of homicide, unapologetically so, you know. I think these 6,000-some lives that we lose every year in this country are worth this conversation.

    The point of the book, the criminal justice argument that’s being made in the book-and you have to draw this out–but it’s really actually an argument for a more limited version of law enforcement in Black America in saying let’s focus on the violence.

    Let’s catch people. Let’s not spread this preventive net across everybody and throw suspicion across entire demographics of people. Let’s think about what crimes have actually occurred and find the people who’ve committed them and respond to those.

    Tavis: See, in my read–respectfully, Jill, my read of that was the exact opposite. I think that the argument made in the book, as I read it, is an argument that essentially says–and you’re right about this–that the criminal justice system too often fails the Black victims of homicide at the hands of other Black folk, and that is true.

    [snip]
     
    RTWT.

    The point Tavis Smiley keeps returning to is that a Nice White Lady Reporter writing a book on Black problems is itself a problem, unless blurbed by an authentic Black spokesman of the Racial Grievance industry. Hey Jill, I know just the guy for the job!

    Beyond the silly, this PBS celebrity is a walking, talking archetype of various iSteve memes.

    * Black people who really, really like being Black
    * The MSM intellectual who's too lazy for the mental effort of Connecting The Dots.
    * #1, The awful history of white-on-Black oppression is the sole cause of Blacks' problems
    * And #2, Current-day whites' Noticing current-day Blacks' problems is the thoughtcrime that causes them.

    (Capitalization per accepted convention.)
  36. Former Los Angeles County Deputy DA Walt Lewis in his book, “The Criminal Justice Club,” wrote that for a murder trial in LA County to receive media coverage either the suspect or the victim has to be rich, good-looking, or a celebrity.

    Lewis worked in the LA District Attorney’s office from 1968-2000. One of the first things he learned was that few murder trials are covered by the LA media.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Early in Raymond Chandler's "Farewell, My Lovely," Philip Marlowe is at an LAPD station. The loudspeaker announces a quintuple murder has been called in. All the detectives instantly begin straightening their neckties so they'll look good in the newspaper photos that will sure to be on the front pages tomorrow. A couple of hours later they're back looking bored and depressed: "It just turned out to be five blacks carving Harlem Sunsets on each other, so there won't be any press," they complain to Marlowe.
  37. The following schtick gets a big rise out of progressives at dinner parties:

    The Tuskegee Institute compiled as complete a database as exists of lynchings in the US from post-Reconstruction until sometime in the 1920′s or 1930′s, the “golden age” for lynching in the US. There were about 5,000 lynchings over the course of this period. Of these about 3,000 were Negroes. (Progressives have trouble wrapping their minds around the fact that whites were lynched too, so a reference to The Oxbow Incident and various westeern land wars is useful at this point.) Now a good number of these 3,000 were guilty of some crime or other since lynchings weren’t random, spontaneous events. But let’s just ignore this and say that about 60 innocent Negroes per year were once lynched in this country.

    Annual data on murders in the USA going back to Reconstruction are impossible to find but there are some long, annual time-series on murder in a few cities, e.g., Philadelphia. These suggest that murder rates among Negroes were considerably less back in the latter part of the 19th century and early part of the 20th century right up into the 1950s than they have been since the late 1950s. They seem to have been better than 50% less. So if these rates applied today about 3,000 less Negroes would be murdwered per year than actually are.

    Now posit that lynching is a really powerful tool for enforcing social control. Then one can make the case that the absence of lynching is responsible for at least some of those murder victims. There’s a very good chance that lynching actually saved the lives of tens of thousands of innocent Negro victims.

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Now posit that lynching is a really powerful tool for enforcing social control. Then one can make the case that the absence of lynching is responsible for at least some of those murder victims. There’s a very good chance that lynching actually saved the lives of tens of thousands of innocent Negro victims.

    The lynching of blacks was an activity largely confined to the Deep South and some adjacent areas. (The southerly portion of South Carolina; northern and Central Florida; all of Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana; West Tennessee; the Missouri Bootheel; and a swatch of territory running through central Arkansas and north East Texas). Not much of an explanation for the evolution of homicide rates in Philadelphia. Also, the majority of lynchings on record occurred prior to 1902 and the practice was in near monotonic decline for fifty years before disappearing entirely in the post-war period. Not much of an explanation for the rapid increase in inner city homicide which dates from about 1963.
  38. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Dear Ms Leovy,
    The answer to your impassioned diatribe is very, very simple and has 100%, complete, total explanatory power. You really can’t quibble with it.
    It’s something called ‘Rushton’s r/K’. I doubt that you’ve ever heard of it, but I strongly advise you to Google it.
    That is if the enemies of free speech and free thought allow you to do so.

    Yours Respectfully,
    A gentle, bearded leftwinger.

    Read More
  39. @David In TN
    Former Los Angeles County Deputy DA Walt Lewis in his book, "The Criminal Justice Club," wrote that for a murder trial in LA County to receive media coverage either the suspect or the victim has to be rich, good-looking, or a celebrity.

    Lewis worked in the LA District Attorney's office from 1968-2000. One of the first things he learned was that few murder trials are covered by the LA media.

    Early in Raymond Chandler’s “Farewell, My Lovely,” Philip Marlowe is at an LAPD station. The loudspeaker announces a quintuple murder has been called in. All the detectives instantly begin straightening their neckties so they’ll look good in the newspaper photos that will sure to be on the front pages tomorrow. A couple of hours later they’re back looking bored and depressed: “It just turned out to be five blacks carving Harlem Sunsets on each other, so there won’t be any press,” they complain to Marlowe.

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    • Replies: @David In TN
    Walt Lewis (with whom I've exchanged emails) didn't have a big nationally publicized trial but had several covered by the LA media. Google "Lois Haro Murder," which had a few articles on the verdict.

    She was an attractive young married woman raped and murdered after being kidnapped at the Pasadena mall in 1988. Two "teens" were the perpetrators.

    His book, "The Criminal Justice Club" is available on Amazon. The book's theme is the difference between media (the L.A. Times especially) portrayals of criminal justice and how it really is.

    There is a chapter on the Lois Haro case which shows how it was solved and adjudicated.
  40. @Steve Sailer
    Early in Raymond Chandler's "Farewell, My Lovely," Philip Marlowe is at an LAPD station. The loudspeaker announces a quintuple murder has been called in. All the detectives instantly begin straightening their neckties so they'll look good in the newspaper photos that will sure to be on the front pages tomorrow. A couple of hours later they're back looking bored and depressed: "It just turned out to be five blacks carving Harlem Sunsets on each other, so there won't be any press," they complain to Marlowe.

    Walt Lewis (with whom I’ve exchanged emails) didn’t have a big nationally publicized trial but had several covered by the LA media. Google “Lois Haro Murder,” which had a few articles on the verdict.

    She was an attractive young married woman raped and murdered after being kidnapped at the Pasadena mall in 1988. Two “teens” were the perpetrators.

    His book, “The Criminal Justice Club” is available on Amazon. The book’s theme is the difference between media (the L.A. Times especially) portrayals of criminal justice and how it really is.

    There is a chapter on the Lois Haro case which shows how it was solved and adjudicated.

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  41. @Steve Sailer
    I've walked through that parking lot 500 times. I've never seen anything untoward going on except bad driving. It's a sensible place for a kid with a car but little money to arrange to meet somebody he only knows online: it's a free parking lot, but extremely well lit, very high traffic all evening, zero crime, and very simple to get to. If you want to leave, it's very easy to leave. If it looks okay, there's a Chipotle right there or you can drive a couple of miles down Ventura Blvd. to Universal CityWalk.

    Five interagency undercover cops were "debriefing" out behind the Mexicali Grill a couple of doors down from the Chipotle, an upscale bar/restaurant with a lot of pretty girls on a Thursday evening, after trying to serve a warrant on a drug dealer. They were evidently amped up (see "Clockers" by Richard Price for what cops feel like after doing a home invasion on a drug dealer because they have a warrant) and started a brawl with the other guy who was looking around the parking lot for the kid. Since they were out of uniform, instead of looking like a police operation, it looked like some kind of bizarre riot. The kid was driving down a lane and one cop who was headed toward the brawl went up on his hood and rolled off unharmed. One cop opened fire, then exclaimed, "Why did you make me kill you?"

    The judge heard all the evidence and said "$3 million." It sounds about right.

    The press did not cover itself with glory reporting this story, not that they usually do. According to the press account, the judge found the police NOT to be negligent but awarded the plaintiff $3M anyway. That wasn’t at all clear to me – if there was no negligence, why was there an award of damages? The articles did a lousy job of explaining.

    Also, this appeared to be a judge trial – usually plaintiffs prefer (and have a legal right) to request a jury trial, because juries can be persuaded by emotional evidence to make big awards with lots of zeroes, while judges tend to take a more calibrated approach (as Steve said, the award in this case seems about right for the loss of a young life with a full career ahead of him). Again , there must have been some reason why the plaintiff didn’t want a jury trial, but no explanation was given. I am guessing that the defense would have put the “friend” on the stand and he would have had to explain the reason for the meeting, and while that is really irrelevant as to whether the police should have murdered that kid or not, it’s quite possible that such testimony might have influenced the jury negatively so they thought that they might be better off in front of a judge.

    It’s really amazing that our media can be total bloodhounds when they want to be, tracking down every family quarrel and traffic ticket that George Zimmerman ever had and even the non-existent military records of George Bush, but when something is not interesting to them (Obama’s college grades, Michael Brown’s juvenile record, etc.) suddenly their reporting ability fades to nothing.

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  42. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    In places like Chicago the homicide clearance rate is closer to twenty-five percent rather than Leovy’s forty percent. Shooting victims who survive refuse to say anything to the police, there’s no witnesses and nobody knows nutting’. Hard to build cases that way. Sometimes shooters transgress the neighborhood code by killing some uninvolved kid that was standing nearby and the police get some tips as a result. The majority of those murdered have criminal backgrounds; some might have been killers themselves.
    Leovy gets some mileage out of the ‘a mother’s anguish’ angle. The emotions are real enough. However, to tell the truth, most of those women have been lazy, worthless people who were totally derelict in what most people would consider their duties as a parent. The children mostly didn’t have much if any contact with their biological fathers, various men come and go, they just stay on welfare and spend their days socializing and drinking. I’ve met some who weren’t sure of the name of the schools their children attended. The children are all half-siblings to each other and everyone in the household has a different last name. Also, think of all the tens of thousands of youths enrolled in special education because of their borderline mental capability. Most of those are going on to become parents, the men in between stints in prison and the women as career welfare recipients. The worst enemy of the kids grown into youths are their own biological parents.

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  43. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @MC
    "There are a lot of very bright baseball statistics fans out there, but I’m struck by how few turn their analytical impulses to something besides sports statistics or finance."

    Bill James did write a saberbmetric book about murder, but even he chose to focus solely on glamorous or famous murders.

    James also had some very though-provoking observations and policy recommendations in that book.

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  44. @Boomstick
    Maybe the baseball sabermetrics fans could be lured into crime research with Rotisserie League gang warfare. Each player gets to draft a few city blocks; the player with the most murders on his team wins. It would be worth it for the team names alone.

    You could make it more interesting with a complex formula, such as total gang score = 10 * murders + 2 * number of armed robberies + number of car thefts. That way you'd have to balance your team; not just black drug-dealing ghettos, but also illegal alien neighborhood car theft districts or drunk driving barrios or maybe some white collar securities fraud enclaves. Within an afternoon you'd have arcane yet interesting statistics like "rapes per car theft."

    The police could feed the data from the Rotisserie League back into their patrol practices, and let it act as a prediction market.

    Ah, an older gentleman like me, using the proper term when referring to fantasy baseball.

    Steve, if a player hits a home run or a pitcher strikes someone out, it happened. True statheads use real data. Police records, ranging from, at best, a wild-assed guess, to, at worst, blatant lies, don’t really qualify.

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  45. @Shouting Thomas
    Blacks seem, overall, to be content with the violence and code of silence in their communities. So, let them kill one another.

    Despite the bleatings about wanting autonomy, blacks always seem to be appealing to whites to bail them out of their own mess, as if whites had the magical ability to save them.

    Let them kill one another. It's what they want.

    I'm even a little tired and bored with reading about why they are willing to live with the violence. At one time in my life, I lived in proximity to blacks and I had to be concerned about the violence. I got out and I'm not going back. It's their problem, and I can't do anything to fix it.

    The transcript of that interview of Jill Leovy by Tavis Smiley is a great read (here).

    Tavis: The best way I can do this is to frame the conversation with a quote from James Baldwin. Baldwin once said this: “Sentimentality, the ostentatious parading of excessive and spurious emotion, is the mark of dishonesty…the wet eyes of the sentimentalist betray his aversion to experience, his fear of life, his arid heart; and it is always, therefore, the signal of secret and violent inhumanity, the mask of cruelty.”

    That’s a strong quote from Baldwin. But I thought about that when I started reading this because I wonder, honestly, why it is that white folk seem interested in a book about Black people killing Black people.

    And all of the critical praise and all of the quotes on the back of the book, all the blurbs from white Americans, white people, for whatever reason, are so interested in your telling of this story about Black people killing Black people. What do you make of that? You wrote it.

    Leovy: Well, it’s deliberate, you know.

    Tavis: What’s deliberate?

    Leovy: I wanted a book that white people would read. I’ve been covering homicide for almost a decade and, you know, I’ll quote something that an assistant to Chief Bratton once said to me, that “black on black homicide is not a Black problem, it’s a white problem. It’s a problem in which white indifferences is largely implicated.”

    And as a newspaper reporter, I really found that Black readers responded a lot to the stories that I did in South L.A. and that it was like moving a boulder to get white readers to respond.

    So I wanted to find a way to get this story to the people who I thought needed to hear it the most. So some of what you’re picking up on is deliberate and I understand the concern. The concern is, is it maudlin? Is it exploitive? Those are actually super important questions about this and things to think about.

    [snip]

    Tavis: I guess the question is, the follow-up question, is whether or not Black lives matter when Black folk say Black lives matter. Or do Black lives matter only when white folk say Black lives matter?

    Leovy: Well, I’ll tell you what a victim’s mother said to me…

    [snip]

    Tavis: How is it and why is it that, when a book like this is written, we can get a conversation–I use that word advisedly. I’m not sure there’s a conversation, but the book is certainly generating a lot of talk.

    We can generate a conversation, I’ll put it that way, about Black on Black homicide, but we can’t ever seem to generate a conversation about the humanity of Black life, about the dignity of Black life. So that if homicide is the only way in to a conversation, is that acceptable in our society?

    Leovy: Well, this book is about the very specific issue of homicide, unapologetically so, you know. I think these 6,000-some lives that we lose every year in this country are worth this conversation.

    The point of the book, the criminal justice argument that’s being made in the book-and you have to draw this out–but it’s really actually an argument for a more limited version of law enforcement in Black America in saying let’s focus on the violence.

    Let’s catch people. Let’s not spread this preventive net across everybody and throw suspicion across entire demographics of people. Let’s think about what crimes have actually occurred and find the people who’ve committed them and respond to those.

    Tavis: See, in my read–respectfully, Jill, my read of that was the exact opposite. I think that the argument made in the book, as I read it, is an argument that essentially says–and you’re right about this–that the criminal justice system too often fails the Black victims of homicide at the hands of other Black folk, and that is true.

    [snip]

    RTWT.

    The point Tavis Smiley keeps returning to is that a Nice White Lady Reporter writing a book on Black problems is itself a problem, unless blurbed by an authentic Black spokesman of the Racial Grievance industry. Hey Jill, I know just the guy for the job!

    Beyond the silly, this PBS celebrity is a walking, talking archetype of various iSteve memes.

    * Black people who really, really like being Black
    * The MSM intellectual who’s too lazy for the mental effort of Connecting The Dots.
    * #1, The awful history of white-on-Black oppression is the sole cause of Blacks’ problems
    * And #2, Current-day whites’ Noticing current-day Blacks’ problems is the thoughtcrime that causes them.

    (Capitalization per accepted convention.)

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  46. @M_Young
    C'mon Steve, the problem isn't black on black crime, its that only white males were permitted to blurb this book.

    http://www.pbs.org/wnet/tavissmiley/interviews/journalistauthor-jill-leovy/

    My reply is Comment 47.

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  47. @Jus' Sayin'...
    The following schtick gets a big rise out of progressives at dinner parties:

    The Tuskegee Institute compiled as complete a database as exists of lynchings in the US from post-Reconstruction until sometime in the 1920's or 1930's, the "golden age" for lynching in the US. There were about 5,000 lynchings over the course of this period. Of these about 3,000 were Negroes. (Progressives have trouble wrapping their minds around the fact that whites were lynched too, so a reference to The Oxbow Incident and various westeern land wars is useful at this point.) Now a good number of these 3,000 were guilty of some crime or other since lynchings weren't random, spontaneous events. But let's just ignore this and say that about 60 innocent Negroes per year were once lynched in this country.

    Annual data on murders in the USA going back to Reconstruction are impossible to find but there are some long, annual time-series on murder in a few cities, e.g., Philadelphia. These suggest that murder rates among Negroes were considerably less back in the latter part of the 19th century and early part of the 20th century right up into the 1950s than they have been since the late 1950s. They seem to have been better than 50% less. So if these rates applied today about 3,000 less Negroes would be murdwered per year than actually are.

    Now posit that lynching is a really powerful tool for enforcing social control. Then one can make the case that the absence of lynching is responsible for at least some of those murder victims. There's a very good chance that lynching actually saved the lives of tens of thousands of innocent Negro victims.

    Now posit that lynching is a really powerful tool for enforcing social control. Then one can make the case that the absence of lynching is responsible for at least some of those murder victims. There’s a very good chance that lynching actually saved the lives of tens of thousands of innocent Negro victims.

    The lynching of blacks was an activity largely confined to the Deep South and some adjacent areas. (The southerly portion of South Carolina; northern and Central Florida; all of Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana; West Tennessee; the Missouri Bootheel; and a swatch of territory running through central Arkansas and north East Texas). Not much of an explanation for the evolution of homicide rates in Philadelphia. Also, the majority of lynchings on record occurred prior to 1902 and the practice was in near monotonic decline for fifty years before disappearing entirely in the post-war period. Not much of an explanation for the rapid increase in inner city homicide which dates from about 1963.

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    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    The lynching of blacks was an activity largely confined to the Deep South and some adjacent areas. (The southerly portion of South Carolina; northern and Central Florida; all of Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana; West Tennessee; the Missouri Bootheel; and a swatch of territory running through central Arkansas and north East Texas).

    Missouri is an anomaly because the portion roughly below I-70 and a couple of adjacent counties in the eastern portion, surrounding St. Louis and up to just south of Hannibal, is for all intents the Old South, whereas the northern half-with one exception-is surprisingly Northeastern in its outlook. The rural areas are largely German and Scandinavian, whereas the cities tend to be northeastern transplants.

    That exception is Nodaway County, north and west of Kansas City. Nodaway County, bordering Iowa and a half hour drive from Nebraska, is the single most notorious and violent county in Missouri history. Indeed, when you say "Nodaway County" even now, the first thing that comes to most people's minds is Skidmore, the town where "the town bully" was gunned down in broad daylight. FBI agents still talk of trying to find the secret Olympic sized pool table, which the town must have since most of the town claimed to be hiding under it when the shooting happened. Nodaway pretty much still considers itself part of the Old Confederacy to this day.
  48. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Interesting interview, but it does smack of the Derbyshire line of "Blackity-black-black-black, black, black blackity black black black."

    Are there no Hispanics in California. They kill each other too, right? Even Asian gangs must occasionally kill somebody.

    What is the fascination of liberal whites with blacks? To be honest, I find blacks remarkably boring. Maybe if I was 15-years-old, they might be interesting, but past about 18 or, certainly, your early 20s, they would seem to lose their appeal to most whites. They're a childish people. Perhaps, that's the allure. Indeed, we have become a childish culture, so perhaps they best personify what we want: Perpetual childhood.

    Regardless, I'll give this reporter credit. Although she's careful with her words, she has seen a side of the world that most liberals don't see. I wonder if/how she continues to hold her liberal beliefs in her head. It can't be easy to continuing kissing the ring to an archbishop that you've seen buggering the neighborhood boys.

    What is the fascination of liberal whites with blacks? To be honest, I find blacks remarkably boring. Maybe if I was 15-years-old, they might be interesting, but past about 18 or, certainly, your early 20s, they would seem to lose their appeal to most whites. They’re a childish people. Perhaps, that’s the allure. Indeed, we have become a childish culture, so perhaps they best personify what we want: Perpetual childhood.

    That’s precisely the black problem: they are a group of seven to fifteen year olds , average mental and emotional age roughly eleven (the bell curve restated: the average 11 year old white has an adult-normalized IQ of 85) trapped in often-very-athletic adult bodies. Both the Boers and the American Southern segregationists of 1900-1950 understood that with astonishing clarity and precision and acted on that basis.

    Kids can be amusing, funny, charming, on occasion astonishingly noble-or astonishingly brutal, should they acquire power. Some thirteen year olds are more adult in every way than some chronological adults, but we legally differentiate juveniles all the same. We withhold driving and firearms privileges and the franchise until a certain age. We establish ages of consent for sex, ages of being allowed to smoke otherwise legal substances, of being allowed to buy alcohol. No sane person much questions all of that, although some disagreement is to be had on what the ages should be.

    Children know they will grow up, and adults do too, but blacks and other races of lower cognitive and gratification-postponement levels never will, as we and they also know. I think most blacks realize they are differently abled in these ways, as a group and as individuals, in fact they are more acutely aware of it than most whites today. Blacks in the South generally resented segregation, but they accepted it with less trouble than most people now think until outsiders came in and systematically roiled them.

    How do we solve this issue? There is no solution, today, none that I know of that most people would accept. Can we live with it? We did a hundred years ago, and people back then generally had a decent life. But it will require measures that seem unpalatable in the extreme today, at least to most people. My guess is that as the problem becomes more and more acute the flavor of the medicine will become less objectionable, but then again one can never underestimate people’s astonishing capacity for selective ignorance.

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  49. @Art Deco
    Now posit that lynching is a really powerful tool for enforcing social control. Then one can make the case that the absence of lynching is responsible for at least some of those murder victims. There’s a very good chance that lynching actually saved the lives of tens of thousands of innocent Negro victims.

    The lynching of blacks was an activity largely confined to the Deep South and some adjacent areas. (The southerly portion of South Carolina; northern and Central Florida; all of Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana; West Tennessee; the Missouri Bootheel; and a swatch of territory running through central Arkansas and north East Texas). Not much of an explanation for the evolution of homicide rates in Philadelphia. Also, the majority of lynchings on record occurred prior to 1902 and the practice was in near monotonic decline for fifty years before disappearing entirely in the post-war period. Not much of an explanation for the rapid increase in inner city homicide which dates from about 1963.

    The lynching of blacks was an activity largely confined to the Deep South and some adjacent areas. (The southerly portion of South Carolina; northern and Central Florida; all of Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana; West Tennessee; the Missouri Bootheel; and a swatch of territory running through central Arkansas and north East Texas).

    Missouri is an anomaly because the portion roughly below I-70 and a couple of adjacent counties in the eastern portion, surrounding St. Louis and up to just south of Hannibal, is for all intents the Old South, whereas the northern half-with one exception-is surprisingly Northeastern in its outlook. The rural areas are largely German and Scandinavian, whereas the cities tend to be northeastern transplants.

    That exception is Nodaway County, north and west of Kansas City. Nodaway County, bordering Iowa and a half hour drive from Nebraska, is the single most notorious and violent county in Missouri history. Indeed, when you say “Nodaway County” even now, the first thing that comes to most people’s minds is Skidmore, the town where “the town bully” was gunned down in broad daylight. FBI agents still talk of trying to find the secret Olympic sized pool table, which the town must have since most of the town claimed to be hiding under it when the shooting happened. Nodaway pretty much still considers itself part of the Old Confederacy to this day.

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  50. “The Times was arguing that murder, like real estate, is all about location, location, location.”

    The New York Times is retarded. Locations don’t commit murders. Has anybody here ever seen a house come to life Transformers style, pick up a gun, and start shooting people?

    It’s not the location that makes a neighborhood a hellhole to live in, it’s the people who inhabit that area that turn it into a hellhole.

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  51. “Are there no Hispanics in California. They kill each other too, right? Even Asian gangs must occasionally kill somebody.”

    Asian crime is not out of control in California like it is with Black crime. I live in a California zip code where Asians make up almost 50 percent of the population, yet there is very little crime in my area and I feel completely safe walking the streets of my zip code even at night.

    Good luck finding a zip code in California where Blacks make up 50 percent of the population and at the same time is still able to manage having a low crime rate.

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