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From the New York Times:

A Big Test of Police Body Cameras Defies Expectations
Amanda Ripley OCT. 20, 2017

Usually, we behave better when we know we’re being watched. According to decades of research, the presence of other people, cameras or even just a picture of eyes seems to nudge us toward civility: We become more likely to give to charity, for example, and less likely to speed, steal or take more than our fair share of candy.

But what happens when the cameras are on the chests of police officers? The results of the largest, most rigorous study of police body cameras in the United States came out Friday morning, and they are surprising both police officers and researchers.

For seven months, just over a thousand Washington, D.C., police officers were randomly assigned cameras — and another thousand were not. Researchers tracked use-of-force incidents, civilian complaints, charging decisions and other outcomes to see if the cameras changed behavior. But on every metric, the effects were too small to be statistically significant. Officers with cameras used force and faced civilian complaints at about the same rates as officers without cameras.

“These results suggest we should recalibrate our expectations” of cameras’ ability to make a “large-scale behavioral change in policing, particularly in contexts similar to Washington, D.C.,” concluded the study, which was led by David Yokum at the Lab @ DC, a team of scientists embedded in D.C. government, and Anita Ravishankar at D.C.’s Metropolitan Police Department (M.P.D.).

After the public uprising in response to the 2014 police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo.,

“Public uprising?” Personally, I called it “undocumented shopping.”

advocates and many police officials turned to cameras as a way to reduce violent encounters and build trust. By 2015, 95 percent of large police departments reported they were using body cameras or had committed to doing so in the near future, according to a national survey. …

“This is the most important empirical study on the impact of police body-worn cameras to date,” said Harlan Yu from Upturn, a Washington, D.C., nonprofit consulting company that studies how technology affects social issues. It was not directly involved in the research. “The results call into question whether police departments should be adopting body-worn cameras, given their high cost.”

We’re a pretty rich country and information technology gets cheaper and cheaper, so cost is not a big deal.

Why didn’t the cameras change behavior?

Because there really isn’t a Sinister White Male Conspiracy to brutalize angelically innocent black bodies?

It’s mostly just a racist hate-filled conspiracy theory promoted by Obama, Hillary, the press, and the NGOs to get out the vote for the Democratic Party and unite the Democrats’ Coalition of the Fringes.

In reality, most of the notorious incidents involve cops making poor decisions in high adrenaline situations.

Consider the two much publicized police killing in the Twin Cities recently: the Latino affirmative action hire cop shot Philando Castile (which got Obama so worked up that his denunciation of racism helped set off the subsequent Dallas and Baton Rouge terrorist massacres of cops that helped sink Hillary’s campaign) and the Somali affirmative action hire cop shooting the Australian yoga lady. It’s not like both cops went to work in the morning intending to kill somebody, they just screwed up in an instant.

What can we do about that? Better hiring (e.g., less affirmative action), better training, better equipment?

But the media aren’t much interested in boring things like that.

What the Establishment wants instead are Great White Defendants like Jeronimo Yanez and Mohammed Noor, except it wants them to look like Haven Monahan.

 
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  1. unit472 says:

    Watching an old episode of COPS last night a movie star handsome Spokane, Washington cop named Juan Rodriguez was explaining the usual PC crap these cops must utter when he got into a high speed pursuit of a stolen car. When the car thief wrecked and fled on foot Rodriguez ran him down and began to pummel the wiry white youth about the face. This while the TV crew was illuminating and filming the struggle. Rodriguez explained that the youth punched him and though Rodriguez was twice the size of the car thief and blow struck by the thief not clearly visible Rodriguez’s reaction certainly was!

    I thought it was excellent police work by Rodriguez. The suspect was apprehended and given a tutorial on resisting arrest.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    "given a tutorial on resisting arrest..."

    Classical conditioning experts tell us that the nearer in time the "reward" is administered to the action we wish to influence the more effective it is. Truly, Rodriguez is an expert psychologist.
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  2. Sigh, they dilemma for public hiring….quotas. What do you want, more Affirmative Action cops or teachers?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Trelane
    Affirmative action is like inbreeding: The occasional cousin marriage does little harm but the long-continued practice of endogamy results in an inbred population.

    Similarly, the occasional hand up to a middle class minority does little harm but the long continued practice of non-meritocratic admission and promotion eventually results in debased institutions.

    Public schools, police departments and public administration are the most obvious examples of this today.

    How's that affirmative action mayor of yours workin' out Buffalo Joe? I'll see your Byron Brown and raise you one Lovely Warren.
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  3. Goatweed says:

    Would I owe the young woman in Virginia a fee for printing a Haven Monhan T-shirt, or is it in the public domain?

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous
    Let’s be fair, she did create him.
    , @Langley
    Steve - you should sell "I am Haven Monahan" T-shirts.

    (I want Kirk Douglas dressed as a gladiator on mine!)

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  4. Bubba says:

    It’s been well known for years that body cameras help most police officers when they are charged with abuse by the MSM, SJW’s or professional agitators/community organizers like Obama, Jesse Jackson or Al Sharpton. But when there is video-recorded egregious use of force by police it is ignored by the MSM if the victim is a white guy. 17 year old Deven Guilford (white) was shot dead by Sgt. Jonathan Frost (white police officer) in Eaton County, Michigan, but it’s never received national attention. When viewing the video from the police officer’s body cam, it’s obvious that Officer Frost is dangerously overreacting and escalating a typical traffic stop and looking for trouble. Deven was eventually shot 7 times by the police officer, but that wasn’t recorded. Oh, and Officer Frost is still on-duty, so stay away from Eaton County, Michigan.

    Read More
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  5. TWS says:

    Hiring is the key to police work. You cannot teach character, prudence, or the ability to make a good decision every time under stress and on the spot. But that eliminates vast swaths of protected classes so back to useless training, technology, and prohibitively stupid second guessing.

    Read More
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  6. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Goatweed
    Would I owe the young woman in Virginia a fee for printing a Haven Monhan T-shirt, or is it in the public domain?

    Let’s be fair, she did create him.

    Read More
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  7. Langley says:
    @Goatweed
    Would I owe the young woman in Virginia a fee for printing a Haven Monhan T-shirt, or is it in the public domain?

    Steve – you should sell “I am Haven Monahan” T-shirts.

    (I want Kirk Douglas dressed as a gladiator on mine!)

    Read More
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  8. Because most cops are special snowflakes who have forgotten that their job is to serve the citizens. It is well past time we removed the privilege of cops to carry weapons. Citizens should be armed, not government employees.

    Read More
    • Agree: EdwardM
    • Replies: @Hibernian
    Bobbies on bicycles, two by two.
    Westminster Abbey
    The Tower of Big Ben
    The rosy red cheeks of the little chil-dren.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  9. I’m happy to watch the Democrats destroy themselves in a purity spiral – preferably without any more Dallas-type events.

    Read More
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  10. @unit472
    Watching an old episode of COPS last night a movie star handsome Spokane, Washington cop named Juan Rodriguez was explaining the usual PC crap these cops must utter when he got into a high speed pursuit of a stolen car. When the car thief wrecked and fled on foot Rodriguez ran him down and began to pummel the wiry white youth about the face. This while the TV crew was illuminating and filming the struggle. Rodriguez explained that the youth punched him and though Rodriguez was twice the size of the car thief and blow struck by the thief not clearly visible Rodriguez's reaction certainly was!

    I thought it was excellent police work by Rodriguez. The suspect was apprehended and given a tutorial on resisting arrest.

    “given a tutorial on resisting arrest…”

    Classical conditioning experts tell us that the nearer in time the “reward” is administered to the action we wish to influence the more effective it is. Truly, Rodriguez is an expert psychologist.

    Read More
    • Replies: @silviosilver

    Classical conditioning experts tell us that the nearer in time the “reward” is administered to the action we wish to influence the more effective it is.
     
    Actually, that's operant conditioning.
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  11. res says:

    Did the outcomes of civilian complaints change at all?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Perhaps the number of complaints registered remains the same, but the complainant may have to drop his complaint when the body-cam video is reviewed. This happened a few years ago when a black preacher accused a traffic cop of treating him very disrespectfully. Video of the event showed the preacher's accusation to be without merit.

    While unsuccessfully searching for a link to that story, I found this:

    The recent case of liberal Connecticut activist Professor Minati Roychoudhuri, who falsely accused a state trooper of racial profiling, is one of many in which video/audio recordings have shown accusations of police misconduct to be totally false. The recordings show Trooper John Such was courteous and professional, and the professor’s public accusations were false and malicious. Roychoudhuri is being prosecuted for her demonstrably false charges against the trooper. In other similar recent examples, police videos have exonerated officers in “celebrity” racism/brutality accusation cases, such as these: in Texas, Democratic state representative Garnet Coleman; California, actress Taraji Henson; Kansas, activist John Sherman; and California, actress Daniele Watts. Many additional cases have shown that ideologues with a political agenda, as well as opportunists attempting to avoid the consequences of their criminal activities, have adopted the practice of hollering “racism” and “brutality” at the first contact with police officers.
     
    https://www.thenewamerican.com/usnews/item/21591-what-about-police-brutality
    Also:

    ...many law enforcement agencies are discussing the use of body cameras for police officers in the hopes it will not only minimize the use of excessive force but also reduce the number of false claims. According to Newsweek, a recent trial has shown that body cameras for police officers “reduced the use of force by roughly 50 percent.” Complaints and accusations against police officers also dropped by 90 percent during the course of the 12-month trial, as compared to the prior year.
     
    https://www.sevenishlaw.com/blog/police-officer-body-cameras-help-reduce-false-claims.cfm
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  12. “large-scale behavioral change in policing”

    Isn’t a job just a job and there is only one way to do it? Does a pilot fly a plane differently if he/she is on camera?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hibernian
    They probably would.
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  13. Trelane says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    Sigh, they dilemma for public hiring....quotas. What do you want, more Affirmative Action cops or teachers?

    Affirmative action is like inbreeding: The occasional cousin marriage does little harm but the long-continued practice of endogamy results in an inbred population.

    Similarly, the occasional hand up to a middle class minority does little harm but the long continued practice of non-meritocratic admission and promotion eventually results in debased institutions.

    Public schools, police departments and public administration are the most obvious examples of this today.

    How’s that affirmative action mayor of yours workin’ out Buffalo Joe? I’ll see your Byron Brown and raise you one Lovely Warren.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Trelane, you are from Rochester? Byron Brown, aka Urkel, is a puppet and Cuomo's latest pet.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  14. Hibernian says:
    @Chris Mallory
    Because most cops are special snowflakes who have forgotten that their job is to serve the citizens. It is well past time we removed the privilege of cops to carry weapons. Citizens should be armed, not government employees.

    Bobbies on bicycles, two by two.
    Westminster Abbey
    The Tower of Big Ben
    The rosy red cheeks of the little chil-dren.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  15. Hibernian says:
    @interesting
    “large-scale behavioral change in policing"


    Isn't a job just a job and there is only one way to do it? Does a pilot fly a plane differently if he/she is on camera?

    They probably would.

    Read More
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  16. zaknick says: • Website

    2 The Southern Strategy. The success of law and order rhetoric among working-class whites and the intense resentment of racial reforms, particularly in the South, led conservative Republican analysts to believe that a “new majority” could be created by the Republican Party, one that included the traditional Republican base, the white South, and half the Catholic, blue-collar vote of the big cities.49 Some conservative political strategists admitted that appealing to racial fears and antagonisms was central to this strategy, though it had to be done surreptitiously. H.R. Haldeman, one of Nixon’s key advisers, recalls that Nixon himself deliberately pursued a southern, racial strategy: “ Nixon emphasized that you have to face the fact that the whole problem is really the blacks. The key is to devise a system that recognizes this while not appearing to.”50 Similarly, John Ehrlichman, special counsel to the president, explained the Nixon administration’s campaign strategy of 1968 in this way: “We’ll go after the racists.”51 In Ehrlichman’s view, “that subliminal appeal to the anti-black voter was always present in Nixon’s statements and speeches.”

    [MORE]

    Republican strategist Kevin Phillips is often credited for offering the most influential argument in favor of a race-based strategy for Republican political dominance in the South. He argued in The Emerging Republican Majority, published in 1969, that Nixon’s successful presidential election campaign could point the way toward long-term political realignment and the building of a new Republican majority, if Republicans continued to campaign primarily on the basis of racial issues, using coded antiblack rhetoric.53 He argued that Southern white Democrats had become so angered and alienated by the Democratic Party’s support for civil rights reforms, such as desegregation and busing, that those voters could be easily persuaded to switch parties if those racial resentments could be maintained. Warren Weaver, a New York Times journalist who reviewed the book upon its release, observed that Phillips’s strategy largely depended upon creating and maintaining a racially polarized political environment. “Full racial polarization is an essential ingredient of Phillip’s political pragmatism. He wants to see a black Democratic party, particularly in the South, because this will drive into the Republican party precisely the kind of anti-Negro whites who will help constitute the emerging majority.

    The War on Drugs proved popular among key white voters, particularly whites who remained resentful of black progress, civil rights enforcement, and affirmative action. Beginning in the 1970s, researchers found that racial attitudes—not crime rates or likelihood of victimization—are an important determinant of white support for “get tough on crime” and antiwelfare measures. 87 Among whites, those expressing the highest degree of concern about crime also tend to oppose racial reform, and their punitive attitudes toward crime are largely unrelated to their likelihood of victimization.88 Whites, on average, are more punitive than blacks, despite the fact that blacks are far more likely to be victims of crime. Rural whites are often the most punitive, even though they are least likely to be crime victims.89 The War on Drugs, cloaked in race-neutral language, offered whites opposed to racial reform a unique opportunity to express their hostility toward blacks and black progress, without being exposed to the charge of racism.
    Reagan’s successor, President George Bush Sr., did not hesitate to employ implicit racial appeals, having learned from the success of other conservative politicians that subtle negative references to race could mobilize poor and working-class whites who once were loyal to the Democratic Party. Bush’s most famous racial appeal, the Willie Horton ad, featured a dark-skinned black man, a convicted murderer who escaped while on a work furlough and then raped and murdered a white woman in her home. The ad blamed Bush’s opponent, Massachusetts governor Michael Dukakis, for the death of the white woman, because he approved the furlough program. For months, the ad played repeatedly on network news stations and was the subject of incessant political commentary. Though controversial, the ad was stunningly effective; it destroyed Dukakis’s chances of ever becoming president.
    Once in the Oval Office, Bush stayed on message, opposing affirmative action and aggressive civil rights enforcement, and embracing the drug war with great enthusiasm. In August 1989, President Bush characterized drug use as “the most pressing problem facing the nation.”90 Shortly thereafter, a New York Times/CBS News Poll reported that 64 percent of those polled—the highest percentage ever recorded—now thought that drugs were the most significant problem in the United States.91 This surge of public concern did not correspond to a dramatic shift in illegal drug activity, but instead was the product of a carefully orchestrated political campaign. The level of public concern about crime and drugs was only weakly correlated with actual crime rates, but highly correlated with political initiatives, campaigns, and partisan appeals.92

    Read More
    • Replies: @Negrolphin Pool

    Rural whites are often the most punitive, even though they are least likely to be crime victims.
     
    Maybe their views towards crime help to create places in which crime rates are low, in contrast to black don't-snitch permisiveness and apathy towards crime, which creates Detroit.
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  17. @ThreeCranes
    "given a tutorial on resisting arrest..."

    Classical conditioning experts tell us that the nearer in time the "reward" is administered to the action we wish to influence the more effective it is. Truly, Rodriguez is an expert psychologist.

    Classical conditioning experts tell us that the nearer in time the “reward” is administered to the action we wish to influence the more effective it is.

    Actually, that’s operant conditioning.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  18. J.Ross says: • Website

    In Detroit there has been a concerted effort by journalists, academics and activists to rename the riot as an “uprising” or a “rebellion,” manifesting during the anniversary with daily sermons on the radio and a Kathryn Bigelow film.
    There’s your unbridgeable political divide right there, at the end of O’Brien’s hand.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Trelane
    Smart fraction theory in action:

    https://youtu.be/TrFvAiQDuEo
    , @Negrolphin Pool
    It's funny how throughout the entire history of U.S. slavery there was really only one serious rebellion, the Nat Turner episode, in which around 55 people were killed. Compare that with the Hatian Revolution, in which 15,000 whites were slaughtered, mostly occurring, afaik, by the time that blacks enjoyed full sovereignty.

    After blacks were granted special rights, the number of serious "rebellions" have accelerated, particularly post-1965. One could even argue that entire areas of Detroit, for just one instance, have been in more or less open rebellion since the late 60s, with thousands killed in the lawlessness.

    Clearly, the freedom and rights of blacks is strongly correlated with their tendency for widespread, serious disorder.
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  19. “Public uprising?” Personally, I called it “undocumented shopping.”

    In reality, it was a black uprising. Would citizenism permit that observation to be made, or would it require the same sort of obfuscation that’s mandatory under the present regime, merely substituting “citizenist harmony” for “anti-racism” as the justification given?

    (To say it wasn’t a black uprising is like saying the Easter Rising wasn’t an Irish uprising. Obviously not every single black rose up, just as not every Irishman though rebellion was the wisest course of action, but the respective descriptions “black” and “Irish” are entirely appropriate.)

    Read More
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  20. Vinay says:

    I expected the cameras to simply allow us to be more certain of what actually happens. If you read the top comments, the liberal NYT readers seem to have had similar expectations and disagree with the editorial’s presumption that we already know what happens and just needed the cameras to prove it.

    Read More
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  21. AndrewR says:

    I was also surprised to see body cams referred to as high-cost. I distinctly recall advocating for them in 2004. I wonder how much the cost has fallen since then. In retrospect, I’m not entirely certain the technology wasn’t cost-prohibitive back then for widespread adoption.

    Sadly, I was not surprised to see the Ferguson riots referred to as an “uprising.” That word lends what happened a legitimacy it didn’t have. Even if the Ferguson police really were corrupt and abusive, the legitimacy of Darren Wilson’s actions were so clear that all protest stemming from that incident was inherently illegitimate in my book.

    Read More
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  22. Trelane says:
    @J.Ross
    In Detroit there has been a concerted effort by journalists, academics and activists to rename the riot as an "uprising" or a "rebellion," manifesting during the anniversary with daily sermons on the radio and a Kathryn Bigelow film.
    There's your unbridgeable political divide right there, at the end of O'Brien's hand.

    Smart fraction theory in action:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Negrolphin Pool
    Looks like they may have confused Robert's Rules with the Convict Code.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  23. @zaknick
    2 The Southern Strategy. The success of law and order rhetoric among working-class whites and the intense resentment of racial reforms, particularly in the South, led conservative Republican analysts to believe that a “new majority” could be created by the Republican Party, one that included the traditional Republican base, the white South, and half the Catholic, blue-collar vote of the big cities.49 Some conservative political strategists admitted that appealing to racial fears and antagonisms was central to this strategy, though it had to be done surreptitiously. H.R. Haldeman, one of Nixon’s key advisers, recalls that Nixon himself deliberately pursued a southern, racial strategy: “ Nixon emphasized that you have to face the fact that the whole problem is really the blacks. The key is to devise a system that recognizes this while not appearing to.”50 Similarly, John Ehrlichman, special counsel to the president, explained the Nixon administration’s campaign strategy of 1968 in this way: “We’ll go after the racists.”51 In Ehrlichman’s view, “that subliminal appeal to the anti-black voter was always present in Nixon’s statements and speeches.”



    Republican strategist Kevin Phillips is often credited for offering the most influential argument in favor of a race-based strategy for Republican political dominance in the South. He argued in The Emerging Republican Majority, published in 1969, that Nixon’s successful presidential election campaign could point the way toward long-term political realignment and the building of a new Republican majority, if Republicans continued to campaign primarily on the basis of racial issues, using coded antiblack rhetoric.53 He argued that Southern white Democrats had become so angered and alienated by the Democratic Party’s support for civil rights reforms, such as desegregation and busing, that those voters could be easily persuaded to switch parties if those racial resentments could be maintained. Warren Weaver, a New York Times journalist who reviewed the book upon its release, observed that Phillips’s strategy largely depended upon creating and maintaining a racially polarized political environment. “Full racial polarization is an essential ingredient of Phillip’s political pragmatism. He wants to see a black Democratic party, particularly in the South, because this will drive into the Republican party precisely the kind of anti-Negro whites who will help constitute the emerging majority.

    The War on Drugs proved popular among key white voters, particularly whites who remained resentful of black progress, civil rights enforcement, and affirmative action. Beginning in the 1970s, researchers found that racial attitudes—not crime rates or likelihood of victimization—are an important determinant of white support for “get tough on crime” and antiwelfare measures. 87 Among whites, those expressing the highest degree of concern about crime also tend to oppose racial reform, and their punitive attitudes toward crime are largely unrelated to their likelihood of victimization.88 Whites, on average, are more punitive than blacks, despite the fact that blacks are far more likely to be victims of crime. Rural whites are often the most punitive, even though they are least likely to be crime victims.89 The War on Drugs, cloaked in race-neutral language, offered whites opposed to racial reform a unique opportunity to express their hostility toward blacks and black progress, without being exposed to the charge of racism.
    Reagan’s successor, President George Bush Sr., did not hesitate to employ implicit racial appeals, having learned from the success of other conservative politicians that subtle negative references to race could mobilize poor and working-class whites who once were loyal to the Democratic Party. Bush’s most famous racial appeal, the Willie Horton ad, featured a dark-skinned black man, a convicted murderer who escaped while on a work furlough and then raped and murdered a white woman in her home. The ad blamed Bush’s opponent, Massachusetts governor Michael Dukakis, for the death of the white woman, because he approved the furlough program. For months, the ad played repeatedly on network news stations and was the subject of incessant political commentary. Though controversial, the ad was stunningly effective; it destroyed Dukakis’s chances of ever becoming president.
    Once in the Oval Office, Bush stayed on message, opposing affirmative action and aggressive civil rights enforcement, and embracing the drug war with great enthusiasm. In August 1989, President Bush characterized drug use as “the most pressing problem facing the nation.”90 Shortly thereafter, a New York Times/CBS News Poll reported that 64 percent of those polled—the highest percentage ever recorded—now thought that drugs were the most significant problem in the United States.91 This surge of public concern did not correspond to a dramatic shift in illegal drug activity, but instead was the product of a carefully orchestrated political campaign. The level of public concern about crime and drugs was only weakly correlated with actual crime rates, but highly correlated with political initiatives, campaigns, and partisan appeals.92

    Rural whites are often the most punitive, even though they are least likely to be crime victims.

    Maybe their views towards crime help to create places in which crime rates are low, in contrast to black don’t-snitch permisiveness and apathy towards crime, which creates Detroit.

    Read More
    • Agree: San Fernando Curt
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  24. @J.Ross
    In Detroit there has been a concerted effort by journalists, academics and activists to rename the riot as an "uprising" or a "rebellion," manifesting during the anniversary with daily sermons on the radio and a Kathryn Bigelow film.
    There's your unbridgeable political divide right there, at the end of O'Brien's hand.

    It’s funny how throughout the entire history of U.S. slavery there was really only one serious rebellion, the Nat Turner episode, in which around 55 people were killed. Compare that with the Hatian Revolution, in which 15,000 whites were slaughtered, mostly occurring, afaik, by the time that blacks enjoyed full sovereignty.

    After blacks were granted special rights, the number of serious “rebellions” have accelerated, particularly post-1965. One could even argue that entire areas of Detroit, for just one instance, have been in more or less open rebellion since the late 60s, with thousands killed in the lawlessness.

    Clearly, the freedom and rights of blacks is strongly correlated with their tendency for widespread, serious disorder.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dc.sunsets
    History doesn't quite repeat because underlying conditions change.

    The 20th Century was a time of advancing leftism so when blacks burned their cities the response was largely appeasement.

    It looks like leftism reached apogee with World War T's attempt to normalize open insanity. If that was the high-water mark, the move to the Right has only just begun. My expectation is that when the debt bubble bursts and it is no longer possible to just issue IOU's to underwrite the Great Society et. al., everyone's expectations will be dashed, and blacks will burn cities again.

    The difference is that as society shifts to the Right, the response won't be appeasement. It will be (ahem) considerably less touchy-feely.
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  25. @Trelane
    Smart fraction theory in action:

    https://youtu.be/TrFvAiQDuEo

    Looks like they may have confused Robert’s Rules with the Convict Code.

    Read More
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  26. The result of this study (little difference between cops who carry a bodycam and cops who don’t) is not surprising. How visible are bodycams? Will a civilian interacting with a policeman readily notice the cop’s bodycam, or be too upset to notice the bodycam? Also, it takes time for the public to come to know that police usually carry bodycams. Until that happens, bodycams will have little effect on the public’s behavior.

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  27. What can we do about that? Better hiring (e.g., less affirmative action), better training, better equipment?

    Police Departments have been successful in acquiring better (& more deadly military) equipment but we’ve been hearing the rest of this solution since, well, forever.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    There ought to be ways to subdue the-crazy-man-with-a-knife without just shooting him.
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  28. @E. Rekshun
    What can we do about that? Better hiring (e.g., less affirmative action), better training, better equipment?

    Police Departments have been successful in acquiring better (& more deadly military) equipment but we've been hearing the rest of this solution since, well, forever.

    There ought to be ways to subdue the-crazy-man-with-a-knife without just shooting him.

    Read More
    • Agree: E. Rekshun
    • Replies: @william munny
    There are, of course, including leg shots. For whatever reason, cops are still taught not to pull their weapon unless they plan on using it, and not to shoot unless they need to kill. Someone somewhere told them that this cuts down on unnecessary shootings in less-than-life-threatening circumstances, but I don't know if that is true, or still true.
    , @Stan d Mute

    There ought to be ways to subdue the-crazy-man-with-a-knife without just shooting him.
     
    Why?
    , @EdwardM
    Agreed. Why not equip police with Tasers? Of course a Taser is not as foolproof a way to stop someone (especially a PCP-addled thug) but I would accept that margin of error in exchange for the negatives associated with police firearms.

    And why does every law enforcement agency have a doctrine of "shoot to kill," i.e., once you decide to shoot, you keep shooting until the guy is dead. There is no concept of trying to hit him in the thigh to stop the advance. I would prefer that approach, even with the slightly higher risk to the officer that the attack won't be effective.

    As to to the main article of the post, maybe there was no statistically significant difference in outcomes because there are so few outcomes? It mentions "use-of-force incidents, civilian complaints, charging decisions and other outcomes to see if the cameras changed behavior."

    If 98% of the time when police interact with citizens, there is no use of force, no civilian complaint, and no crime charged, then the data might not be very useful and impacts of cameras would be hard to tease out at the margin where police behavior is really variable. I wonder how they looked at the data. Could they somehow separate high-impact, or non-routine, instances of police presence and see if cameras made a difference in those cases? Not sure.
    , @Vendetta
    http://www.breachbangclear.com/should-cops-make-limb-shots-breach-bang-clear/
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  29. Thomas says:

    The basic assumption of “Black Lives Matter” is that liberal whites and their oddball hipster Huxtable Black Best Friends (usually only fractionally black) know more about the lives and times of underclass blacks than police who work dealing with them full time. Questionable, to say the least.

    Wasn’t there a theory awhile back that WorldStarHipHop could’ve been some devious evil white supremacist plan to make blacks look bad by providing a forum for self-produced video? I know Steve has played with that idea a little, that the emergence of cell phone cameras and such hasn’t necessarily done to uphold The Narrative. I wouldn’t be surprised if one of the results of police body cameras becoming widespread is that liberals wind up having to spin even more furiously about what’s depicted.

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  30. Body cameras hurt the typical person who comes into contact with the police more than help. In a one-in-a-million case, it may show that a cop used force unjustifiably. Very rarely, a cop might reconsider using deadly force, hopefully not getting himself killed in the process. Often enough, a dirty cop won’t be as free in violating constitutional rights. Most often, cops lose the discretion NOT to charge people with minor violations. I know of plenty of cases where cops are forced to charge people with marijuana and other minor offenses because they are on camera. Not too long ago, the same cop would dump an ashtray with a roach out and say “I bet that was there when you bought this car, huh? (hint, hint)” Or dump a small quantity of “oregano” down the sewer. Now, they can’t. There are dozens of others I could cite, and cops are saddled with paperwork for minor offenses instead of doing real police work. I don’t know which is better for the community in the long run, but time will tell.

    Read More
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  31. @Steve Sailer
    There ought to be ways to subdue the-crazy-man-with-a-knife without just shooting him.

    There are, of course, including leg shots. For whatever reason, cops are still taught not to pull their weapon unless they plan on using it, and not to shoot unless they need to kill. Someone somewhere told them that this cuts down on unnecessary shootings in less-than-life-threatening circumstances, but I don’t know if that is true, or still true.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dc.sunsets
    Leg shots?

    Seriously? You know that little about pistol-shooting? Let me ask you, can you produce a photo of a target you shot, with a typical handgun, that was placed at least 21 feet (the Tueller Drill) away, where you hit consistently in a three inch circle (don't want to miss that leg!!), having taken the time to be sure there are no hard surfaces behind your point of aim (because few legs will actually stop a typical handgun bullet) and do so when the target is moving?

    Go to youtube and look up IPSC or IDPA matches where competitors who shoot tens of thousand of rounds a year in practice can't do that.

    (Facepalm. We live in a world of people whose "knowledge" comes from television.)

    BTW, legally a gun is a deadly weapon. There is not a single legal jurisdiction in America where one can pull out a gun for anything less than a deadly-force defensive use.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    A leg shot that severs the femoral artery would cause someone to bleed out and die in a few minutes, at most about five. Shooting someone in the leg is hardly safe.
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  32. @Steve Sailer
    There ought to be ways to subdue the-crazy-man-with-a-knife without just shooting him.

    There ought to be ways to subdue the-crazy-man-with-a-knife without just shooting him.

    Why?

    Read More
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  33. @Trelane
    Affirmative action is like inbreeding: The occasional cousin marriage does little harm but the long-continued practice of endogamy results in an inbred population.

    Similarly, the occasional hand up to a middle class minority does little harm but the long continued practice of non-meritocratic admission and promotion eventually results in debased institutions.

    Public schools, police departments and public administration are the most obvious examples of this today.

    How's that affirmative action mayor of yours workin' out Buffalo Joe? I'll see your Byron Brown and raise you one Lovely Warren.

    Trelane, you are from Rochester? Byron Brown, aka Urkel, is a puppet and Cuomo’s latest pet.

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  34. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Having moved from L.A. to the upper NE coast toward the end of that decade I always got a chuckle seeing columns in the local op-ed sections describe the ’92 riots as an “uprising”

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  35. EdwardM says:
    @Steve Sailer
    There ought to be ways to subdue the-crazy-man-with-a-knife without just shooting him.

    Agreed. Why not equip police with Tasers? Of course a Taser is not as foolproof a way to stop someone (especially a PCP-addled thug) but I would accept that margin of error in exchange for the negatives associated with police firearms.

    And why does every law enforcement agency have a doctrine of “shoot to kill,” i.e., once you decide to shoot, you keep shooting until the guy is dead. There is no concept of trying to hit him in the thigh to stop the advance. I would prefer that approach, even with the slightly higher risk to the officer that the attack won’t be effective.

    As to to the main article of the post, maybe there was no statistically significant difference in outcomes because there are so few outcomes? It mentions “use-of-force incidents, civilian complaints, charging decisions and other outcomes to see if the cameras changed behavior.”

    If 98% of the time when police interact with citizens, there is no use of force, no civilian complaint, and no crime charged, then the data might not be very useful and impacts of cameras would be hard to tease out at the margin where police behavior is really variable. I wonder how they looked at the data. Could they somehow separate high-impact, or non-routine, instances of police presence and see if cameras made a difference in those cases? Not sure.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dc.sunsets
    Your shooting to wound is:
    1. ILLEGAL. Every jurisdiction in the USA considers firearms to be deadly weapons. It is thus utterly illegal to use one for anything less than a life-and-death, deadly-force defense.
    2. Ridiculously saturated with risk. Do you know what police hits/shots fired average, when by definition they are aiming "center of mass?" 20%. That's hitting a person-sized target at all, when aiming right in the middle of it. Do you really think aiming for the thigh (or knee, or ankle, or genitals) is remotely a real-world possibility?

    (Speaking of that, what kind of lawsuit do you imagine, when the "aimed for thigh" blows the guy's genitals off by accident? "Oh, ooops....sorry.....")

    We can't have nice things any more because cops are increasingly jittery due to what appear to be increasing levels of violence among "certain" quadrants of society. That, and of course, Affirmative Action, nepotism, lousy screening of candidates and the "professionalism track" of people who want to boss others around getting a college degree in "law enforcement" (which is like people who should never be around kids getting a teaching degree.)
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  36. Vendetta says:
    @Steve Sailer
    There ought to be ways to subdue the-crazy-man-with-a-knife without just shooting him.
    Read More
    • Replies: @dc.sunsets
    Great discussion and video (most gruesome things I've ever seen on youtube) that emphasizes how phenomenally rare would be employing a gun for anything less than shoot-to-stop/deadly force.

    Solid backstop, no bystanders.
    Static target.
    Adequate distance (>20-25 feet.)
    Not winded/amp'd on adrenaline.
    Adequate marksmanship (few cops are gun enthusiasts.)

    I do agree that cops (like all people) should regard shooting another person as an absolute last resort, not an "is this within department policy" question alone. Civilians who use deadly force are subject to great scrutiny; the same should be the case for police officers.
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  37. @res
    Did the outcomes of civilian complaints change at all?

    Perhaps the number of complaints registered remains the same, but the complainant may have to drop his complaint when the body-cam video is reviewed. This happened a few years ago when a black preacher accused a traffic cop of treating him very disrespectfully. Video of the event showed the preacher’s accusation to be without merit.

    While unsuccessfully searching for a link to that story, I found this:

    The recent case of liberal Connecticut activist Professor Minati Roychoudhuri, who falsely accused a state trooper of racial profiling, is one of many in which video/audio recordings have shown accusations of police misconduct to be totally false. The recordings show Trooper John Such was courteous and professional, and the professor’s public accusations were false and malicious. Roychoudhuri is being prosecuted for her demonstrably false charges against the trooper. In other similar recent examples, police videos have exonerated officers in “celebrity” racism/brutality accusation cases, such as these: in Texas, Democratic state representative Garnet Coleman; California, actress Taraji Henson; Kansas, activist John Sherman; and California, actress Daniele Watts. Many additional cases have shown that ideologues with a political agenda, as well as opportunists attempting to avoid the consequences of their criminal activities, have adopted the practice of hollering “racism” and “brutality” at the first contact with police officers.

    https://www.thenewamerican.com/usnews/item/21591-what-about-police-brutality
    Also:

    …many law enforcement agencies are discussing the use of body cameras for police officers in the hopes it will not only minimize the use of excessive force but also reduce the number of false claims. According to Newsweek, a recent trial has shown that body cameras for police officers “reduced the use of force by roughly 50 percent.” Complaints and accusations against police officers also dropped by 90 percent during the course of the 12-month trial, as compared to the prior year.

    https://www.sevenishlaw.com/blog/police-officer-body-cameras-help-reduce-false-claims.cfm

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  38. @william munny
    There are, of course, including leg shots. For whatever reason, cops are still taught not to pull their weapon unless they plan on using it, and not to shoot unless they need to kill. Someone somewhere told them that this cuts down on unnecessary shootings in less-than-life-threatening circumstances, but I don't know if that is true, or still true.

    Leg shots?

    Seriously? You know that little about pistol-shooting? Let me ask you, can you produce a photo of a target you shot, with a typical handgun, that was placed at least 21 feet (the Tueller Drill) away, where you hit consistently in a three inch circle (don’t want to miss that leg!!), having taken the time to be sure there are no hard surfaces behind your point of aim (because few legs will actually stop a typical handgun bullet) and do so when the target is moving?

    Go to youtube and look up IPSC or IDPA matches where competitors who shoot tens of thousand of rounds a year in practice can’t do that.

    (Facepalm. We live in a world of people whose “knowledge” comes from television.)

    BTW, legally a gun is a deadly weapon. There is not a single legal jurisdiction in America where one can pull out a gun for anything less than a deadly-force defensive use.

    Read More
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  39. @EdwardM
    Agreed. Why not equip police with Tasers? Of course a Taser is not as foolproof a way to stop someone (especially a PCP-addled thug) but I would accept that margin of error in exchange for the negatives associated with police firearms.

    And why does every law enforcement agency have a doctrine of "shoot to kill," i.e., once you decide to shoot, you keep shooting until the guy is dead. There is no concept of trying to hit him in the thigh to stop the advance. I would prefer that approach, even with the slightly higher risk to the officer that the attack won't be effective.

    As to to the main article of the post, maybe there was no statistically significant difference in outcomes because there are so few outcomes? It mentions "use-of-force incidents, civilian complaints, charging decisions and other outcomes to see if the cameras changed behavior."

    If 98% of the time when police interact with citizens, there is no use of force, no civilian complaint, and no crime charged, then the data might not be very useful and impacts of cameras would be hard to tease out at the margin where police behavior is really variable. I wonder how they looked at the data. Could they somehow separate high-impact, or non-routine, instances of police presence and see if cameras made a difference in those cases? Not sure.

    Your shooting to wound is:
    1. ILLEGAL. Every jurisdiction in the USA considers firearms to be deadly weapons. It is thus utterly illegal to use one for anything less than a life-and-death, deadly-force defense.
    2. Ridiculously saturated with risk. Do you know what police hits/shots fired average, when by definition they are aiming “center of mass?” 20%. That’s hitting a person-sized target at all, when aiming right in the middle of it. Do you really think aiming for the thigh (or knee, or ankle, or genitals) is remotely a real-world possibility?

    (Speaking of that, what kind of lawsuit do you imagine, when the “aimed for thigh” blows the guy’s genitals off by accident? “Oh, ooops….sorry…..”)

    We can’t have nice things any more because cops are increasingly jittery due to what appear to be increasing levels of violence among “certain” quadrants of society. That, and of course, Affirmative Action, nepotism, lousy screening of candidates and the “professionalism track” of people who want to boss others around getting a college degree in “law enforcement” (which is like people who should never be around kids getting a teaching degree.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @EdwardM
    I agree with all of this. Given all of the societal changes that have occurred since the idyllic days of police-citizen interactions during which these doctrines, including the legal framework, were mostly established, perhaps there is scope to re-think some of these doctrines. I am not sure that police impunity and the militarization of police forces, while a natural counterbalance to some of said societal changes, has served us well.
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  40. @Vendetta
    http://www.breachbangclear.com/should-cops-make-limb-shots-breach-bang-clear/

    Great discussion and video (most gruesome things I’ve ever seen on youtube) that emphasizes how phenomenally rare would be employing a gun for anything less than shoot-to-stop/deadly force.

    Solid backstop, no bystanders.
    Static target.
    Adequate distance (>20-25 feet.)
    Not winded/amp’d on adrenaline.
    Adequate marksmanship (few cops are gun enthusiasts.)

    I do agree that cops (like all people) should regard shooting another person as an absolute last resort, not an “is this within department policy” question alone. Civilians who use deadly force are subject to great scrutiny; the same should be the case for police officers.

    Read More
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  41. @Negrolphin Pool
    It's funny how throughout the entire history of U.S. slavery there was really only one serious rebellion, the Nat Turner episode, in which around 55 people were killed. Compare that with the Hatian Revolution, in which 15,000 whites were slaughtered, mostly occurring, afaik, by the time that blacks enjoyed full sovereignty.

    After blacks were granted special rights, the number of serious "rebellions" have accelerated, particularly post-1965. One could even argue that entire areas of Detroit, for just one instance, have been in more or less open rebellion since the late 60s, with thousands killed in the lawlessness.

    Clearly, the freedom and rights of blacks is strongly correlated with their tendency for widespread, serious disorder.

    History doesn’t quite repeat because underlying conditions change.

    The 20th Century was a time of advancing leftism so when blacks burned their cities the response was largely appeasement.

    It looks like leftism reached apogee with World War T’s attempt to normalize open insanity. If that was the high-water mark, the move to the Right has only just begun. My expectation is that when the debt bubble bursts and it is no longer possible to just issue IOU’s to underwrite the Great Society et. al., everyone’s expectations will be dashed, and blacks will burn cities again.

    The difference is that as society shifts to the Right, the response won’t be appeasement. It will be (ahem) considerably less touchy-feely.

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  42. @william munny
    There are, of course, including leg shots. For whatever reason, cops are still taught not to pull their weapon unless they plan on using it, and not to shoot unless they need to kill. Someone somewhere told them that this cuts down on unnecessary shootings in less-than-life-threatening circumstances, but I don't know if that is true, or still true.

    A leg shot that severs the femoral artery would cause someone to bleed out and die in a few minutes, at most about five. Shooting someone in the leg is hardly safe.

    Read More
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  43. Jeez, just a suggestion. A friend was shot in the leg during a street fight by a friend of his opponent and it stopped him in his tracks. Fight was over. He’s fine now, many years later.

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  44. Mootz says:

    No matter how much data is gathered and published on the behavior of Afro-Americans on black on black murders; ca. 80% black babies born to Black men that don’t support the mother or the babies; more Afro-American black men between the ages of 18 and 25 are in prison than in college; that Afro-American women and men are signicantly more apt to violence than any other ethnic group in the U.S.
    Think of the preponderance of black football players beating their spouses and girl friends, WILL MAKE NO DIFFERENCE OR CHANGE IN THE OVERALL BEHAVIOR OF THE AFRO-AMERICAN COMMUNITY!

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  45. EdwardM says:
    @dc.sunsets
    Your shooting to wound is:
    1. ILLEGAL. Every jurisdiction in the USA considers firearms to be deadly weapons. It is thus utterly illegal to use one for anything less than a life-and-death, deadly-force defense.
    2. Ridiculously saturated with risk. Do you know what police hits/shots fired average, when by definition they are aiming "center of mass?" 20%. That's hitting a person-sized target at all, when aiming right in the middle of it. Do you really think aiming for the thigh (or knee, or ankle, or genitals) is remotely a real-world possibility?

    (Speaking of that, what kind of lawsuit do you imagine, when the "aimed for thigh" blows the guy's genitals off by accident? "Oh, ooops....sorry.....")

    We can't have nice things any more because cops are increasingly jittery due to what appear to be increasing levels of violence among "certain" quadrants of society. That, and of course, Affirmative Action, nepotism, lousy screening of candidates and the "professionalism track" of people who want to boss others around getting a college degree in "law enforcement" (which is like people who should never be around kids getting a teaching degree.)

    I agree with all of this. Given all of the societal changes that have occurred since the idyllic days of police-citizen interactions during which these doctrines, including the legal framework, were mostly established, perhaps there is scope to re-think some of these doctrines. I am not sure that police impunity and the militarization of police forces, while a natural counterbalance to some of said societal changes, has served us well.

    Read More
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