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Pediatricians Warned to be on Lookout for Bad Juju
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During his years of fieldwork in Africa, anthropologist Henry Harpending learned about African ways of thinking about witchcraft, which is conceived of very much like the now fashionable menaces of “systemic racism” and “implicit bias.” It can harm its victims even without malign or merely conscious intent on the part of the perpetrators.

That evening we had something like a seminar with our employees and neighbors about witchcraft. Everyone except the Americans agreed that witchcraft was a terrible problem, that there was danger all around, and that it was vitally important to maintain amicable relations with others and to reject feelings of anger or jealousy in oneself. The way it works is like this: perhaps Greg falls and hurts himself, he knows it must be witchcraft, he discovers that I am seething with jealousy of his facility with words, so it was my witchcraft that made him fall. What is surprising is that I was completely unaware of having witched him so he bears me no ill will. I feel bad about his misfortune and do my best to get rid of my bad feelings because with them I am a danger to friends and family. Among Herero there is no such thing as an accident, there is no such thing as a natural death, witchcraft in some form is behind all of it. Did you have a gastrointestinal upset this morning? Clearly someone slipped some pink potion in the milk. Except for a few atheists there was no disagreement about this. Emotions get projected over vast distances so beware.

Even more interesting to us was the universal understanding that white people were not vulnerable to witchcraft and could neither feel it nor understand it. White people literally lack a crucial sense, or part of the brain. An upside, I was told, was that we did not face the dangers that locals faced. On the other hand our bad feelings could be projected so as good citizens we had to monitor carefull our own “hearts”.

Unsurprisingly, in an era when black women point out they are more intersectional than thou and thus deserve to have their intuitions validated by society, traditional African conceptions of witchcraft are starting to influence Establishment ideas here in the U.S.

A colleague pointed out a few weeks ago, after hearing this story, that if it is nearly pan-African then perhaps some of it came to the New World. Prominent and not so prominent talkers from the American Black population come out with similar theories of vague and invisible forces that are oppressing people, like ‘institutional racism’ and ‘white privilege’.”

For example, from the New York Times news section:

The Impact of Racism on Children’s Health

A new statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics looks at the effects of racism on children’s development, starting in the womb.

By Perri Klass, M.D., Aug. 12, 2019

This month the American Academy of Pediatrics put out its first policy statement on how racism affects the health and development of children and adolescents.

“Racism is a significant social determinant of health clearly prevalent in our society now,” said Dr. Maria Trent, a professor of pediatrics at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, who was one of the co-authors of the statement.

Racism has an impact on children and families who are targeted, she said, but also on those who witness it. “We call it a socially transmitted disease: It’s taught, it’s passed down, but the impacts on children and families are significant from a health perspective,” said Dr. Trent, who is the chairwoman of the A.A.P. section on adolescent health. Social transmission makes sense here, because race itself is a social construct, she said: “Genetically, we’re very much the same.”

Science Has Spoken!

So don’t even think about inquiring about scientific research into racial differences in gestation …

But the impact of bias on children’s health starts even before they’re born, Dr. Trent said. Persistent racial disparities in birth weight and maternal mortality in the United States today may in part reflect the deprivations of poverty, with less availability of good prenatal care, and poorer medical care in general for minority families, sometimes shaped by unacknowledged biases on the part of medical personnel. High rates of heart disease and hypertension also persist among African-Americans.

Do NOT, however, ask about Mexican-Americans’ health statistics. We don’t talk about that.

(If you are a bad person, however, according to the federal Office of Minority Health, Mexican-Americans suffer slightly less infant mortality than do non-Hispanic white Americans:

That would seem to punch a hole in the Racism Theory, so shut up about it.) Back to the NYT:

There is also increasing attention to the ongoing stress of living with discrimination and racism, and the toll that takes on body and mind throughout life.

Therefore, we are indoctrinating blacks into being hyperaware of Racist Microaggressions … for the good of their health, of course.

That kind of chronic stress can lead to hormonal changes and inflammation, which set people up for chronic disease. Studies show that mothers who report experiencing discrimination are more likely to have infants with low birth weight.

Dr. Nia Heard-Garris, an attending physician at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, was the lead author of a 2017 review of research studies looking at the impact of racism on children’s health. Too often, she said, studies control for race without considering what experiences are structured into society by race.

The experiences that shape parents also resonate in their children’s lives, Dr. Trent said;

For example, if parents stretch their necks to eat leaves higher up on trees, then their descendants will have longer necks.

parents and caregivers who reported they had been treated unfairly were more likely to have children with behavioral issues such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In another study, African-American boys from 10 to 15 who had experiences with racism were more likely to have behavior problems like aggression.

The Arrow of Causality couldn’t possibly point in the opposite direction.

During childhood, she said, stress can create hypervigilance in children who sense that they are living in a threatening world.

Look at Ta-Nehisi Coates: the poor nerdy lad was forced to be exposed to all the white racists on his block in Baltimore and so he grew up to be hyper-racist against the people who bullied him. Or something, I can’t recall the actual details.

And though the A.A.P. has been preparing the statement for almost two years, it comes at a moment when discussions of racism are often in the news, and children may need extra support and care. “While I think society has made tremendous leaps, the reality is we’re seeing a bump in these issues right now,” Dr. Trent said.

Okaaay…

The statement directs pediatricians to consider their own practices from this perspective. “It’s not just the academy telling other people what to do, but examining ourselves,” Dr. Trent said. Pediatricians and others involved in children’s health need to be aware of the effects of racism on children’s development, starting in the womb, she said.

Pediatric clinical settings need to make everyone feel explicitly welcome, with images of diverse families up on the wall …

One problem with Harpending’s theory is that the causal mechanisms by which African conceptions of witchcraft influence modern American conceptions of racism is that the causal mechanisms are vague. Presumably, ways of thought are passed down from black woman to black woman (e.g., grandmother to granddaughter) for hundreds of years, but how exactly has never been studied, as far as I know.

Yet, while Racism Research is funded lavishly these days, even greater vagueness about the means of transmission from the Bad Thoughts in the heads of white people to life outcomes for black people exists.

 
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  1. BenKenobi says:

    Racist microaggressions are just part and parcel of living in a diverse society.

    Wait… or was that acts of terrorism?

    My Ingsoc is a little rusty, so bear with me. We’ve always been at war with Eurasia, right? I believe they crashed 2 facebook ads into the 2016 election which caused Hillary and Jeb! to collapse into their own footprints at the speed of gravity.

    • LOL: Kyle, YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
  2. Off topic but….

    The silver coffins are still arriving back to America….from shithole Afghanistan…shithole Iraq….BUT FANTASY FOOTBALL STARTS IN MONTH!!!…SO WHO CARES?.. Did you know that War Hawk Chickenhawk Vietnam War Draft Dodger former Giant Head Coach Tom Caughlin supports Ours Troops….SUPPORT THE TROOPS!!!…by buying a Budweiser or six at Giant Home Games…a donation will be made to WOUNDED WARRIOR so our maimed Warriors protecting OUR FREEDOM!!!….can be fitted with 4 glittering stainless steel limbs…..AND THAT’S AMERICA 2019!!!

  3. Forbes says:

    The beatings will continue until the conduct improves…

    With actual instances of indivious racial discrimination less and less prevalent it is necessary to talk about its pervasive presence more and more.

  4. Flip says:

    So how do blacks do in majority black African and Caribbean countries?

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    , @eric
  5. Forbes says:

    Pediatric clinical settings need to make everyone feel explicitly welcome, with images of diverse families up on the wall.

    Where will non-diverse families go to feel explicitly welcome??

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
  6. Anonymous[277] • Disclaimer says:

    John Derbyshire once wrote that Baby Boomer morality sometimes seemed like a photonegative of Greatest Generation morality: the things the older types enjoyed (cigarettes, drinking, traditional gender roles) were evil by definition and the things they abhorred (drugs, homosexuality, divorce) were ipso facto good. Their whole world view was just the juvenile contrarianism of a bunch of perpetual adolescents. Something to think about in the context of AAP, for whom giving a “gender dysphoric” 11 year old puberty blockers is good medical practice but e-cigarettes are a scourge on mankind.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    , @Kronos
  7. Ibound1 says:

    Both doctors quoted here are women.
    It’s not only literature that is becoming feminized and mediocre.
    Dr. Trent says: “My goal is to empower you to achieve your most elite, excellent existence”.
    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/psychiatrists/dr-maria-l-trent-annapolis-md/420081

    What about effervescent?

    You can see the exact same quotes and conclusions in a legal or sociology article by the way.

    Everything these days is so predictable.

  8. R.G. Camara says: • Website

    Unremarkably, the American black-satanic form of witchcraft known as hoodoo (which is different from voodoo) that is practiced in pockets of the Deep South and Caribbean by slave descendants bears a similarity to the African beliefs about witchcraft. According to practitioners, hoodoo only works if the person who is subject to the spell actually believes in hoodoo.

    This explains (to hoodoo believers) why whites and uppity blacks aren’t affected by hoodoo spells and such, because they don’t believe or have stopped believing, while lower-totem blacks in the area usually believe and are thus affected.

    There was a decent horror movie with Goldie Hawn’s daughter Kate Hudson based on hoodoo, where the bad guys spook Hudson for most of the film to convince her that hoodoo is real, so that in the final act they can use actual hoodoo on her.

    • Replies: @Ian Smith
    , @El Dato
  9. parents and caregivers who reported they had been treated unfairly were more likely to have children with behavioral issues . . .

    So parents who have self-control problems and no sense of personal responsibility (i.e., they think “life is unfair to me”), have similar children.

    What a shocker!

  10. JimB says:

    That kind of chronic stress can lead to hormonal changes and inflammation, which set people up for chronic disease. Studies show that mothers who report experiencing discrimination are more likely to have infants with low birth weight.

    Obesity is a proven cause of hormonal changes and inflammation. Hmm. Now which demographic group has the highest rates of obesity?

  11. @Anonymous

    Anonymous[277] wrote:

    John Derbyshire once wrote that Baby Boomer morality sometimes seemed like a photonegative of Greatest Generation morality: the things the older types enjoyed (cigarettes, drinking, traditional gender roles) were evil by definition and the things they abhorred (drugs, homosexuality, divorce) were ipso facto good.

    Growing up in the ’60s, I never could understand why almost no one could see that the “culture” and the “counter-culture” were basically theme and variation.

    The grown-ups used tobacco and alcohol. The kids used pot and acid. The grown-ups’ uniform was a crew-cut and a gray flannel suit. The kids’ uniform was long hair and tie-dyed outfits. The grown-ups all loved Sinatra; the kids’ badge of group identity was to love the Beatles (or maybe the Stones).

    It always seemed to me that my generation’s idea of rebellion was… unimaginative. Real rebellion would have been to abstain from all mind-altering drugs, to wear the clothes one personally found comfortable or appealing, and to get turned on by Bach and Debussy.

    Human beings, at least in the mass, seem to be culturally conservative even when they think they are being edgy.

    • Agree: Paleo Liberal
    • Replies: @Disordered D
  12. Haole says:

    Read about AOC and the virus of white supremacy, you can have the virus and not know it

  13. ‘…A colleague pointed out a few weeks ago, after hearing this story, that if it is nearly pan-African then perhaps some of it came to the New World…’

    Isn’t it more plausible that this is just what the consensus will move towards in a group with an average IQ of 70?

    ‘We’ (virtually no one here is black) have an average IQ of 100. The consensus — if it were defined — would probably accept something like the enlightenment view of reality: Newton and so on.

    We might vaguely figure something like ‘space is curved’ must be so since smart people assure us it is — but practically speaking, few of us operate on that assumption. We pretty much find classical physics, etc comprehensible and satisfactory as an explanation. Never mind atomic bombs going ‘boom.’

    …sort of like Africans tend to settle down at witchcraft. After all, if our average IQ was 130, we’d probably all have bestirred ourselves to grasp relativity and get comfortable with it. But our average IQ isn’t 130. So views requiring such an IQ remain an outliers — kind of like wrapping one’s head around germ theory et al isn’t really something the Herero are up to. Presumably a few do — but most are happier with witchcraft as a day-to-day working premise.

    • Replies: @dr kill
  14. Anon[240] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    Isn’t ADHD the white version of witchcraft/being jinxed? Or is that chronic fatigue syndrome, caused by uncompensated emotional labor? Or chronic Lyme disease?

    Whites are much more creative than blacks in their medical witchcraft.

  15. Segregation would have done Ta-Nahesi some good, methinks.

    Also, socially-transmitted disease… that wording is not accidental. Being branded with racist charges is closer and closer to being branded an AIDS-sufferer in the 80s… if not worse, because at least leftists pooled up money for the AIDS-sufferers…

    • Replies: @peterike
  16. The experiences that shape parents also resonate in their children’s lives, Dr. Trent said

    For example, if parents stretch their necks to eat leaves higher up on trees, then their descendants will have longer necks.

    The “shape parents” and “resonate” bit made me think of an obese mother unleashing a fart so thunderous that its blast sets her obese child’s blubber rippling in resonance.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  17. @PhysicistDave

    Yes, all “revolutions” are nothing but changes of paradigm. There is no such thing as absolutely freeing yourself from the influence of someone else’s thought or actions, save you go the hermit route… and even then, you are influenced by the natural environs. Libertarians and anarchists be damned.

    Thus, it makes more sense to remain traditional, though perhaps with updates developing organically as needed, and not as brusque as 1968 (since you mention the Beatles, compare “Revolution 9” to Debussy’s Claire de Lune; even if both are musical pieces, the similarities stop there).

  18. OT but there’s an annoying bug here: when I want to follow a link to a response, Ron’s Javascript takes me to the wrong place in the page. This happens when I’m on someone’s user page (for example, https://www.unz.com/comments/all/?commenterfilter=International+Jew) Surely others have noticed this, or am I the only person here who cares to read people’s responses to my comments? 😉

    Thus, it’s a problem when the software has to take me to a different page; within the same page (i.e. a given post by Steve), everything’s fine.

    There used to be a forum at unz.com for reporting software bugs, but I can’t find it anymore.

    I hope Ron fixes this before the anxiety it causes me gets passed on to my progeny.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  19. @Flip

    Better, according to people who don’t pay close attention to how statistics are collected. The US is the only country that includes severely premature births in infant mortality statistics. These account for up to 90% of the difference in infant mortality between the US and other countries. But we can’t mention that, because reasons.

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    , @Spangel
  20. tyrone says:

    Great new business opportunity : suppling chickens to pediatricians!

  21. Lot says:

    Anti-Trumpers take note of the stats in this article.

    This is before the new public charge rule is even in effect:

    Immigration visa denials on “public charge” grounds went from 1,000 a year under Obama to 12,000 in 2018.

    For Mexicans, the number went from 7 to 5,343!

    https://t.co/R5e57dQ6CL?amp=1

    The new rule is 800 pages and will be very hard to block in court because it is an official regulation, not an executive order. Total legal immigration via third worlder chain migration could drop by 75%!

    How many US citizens with third world siblings aren’t on Medicaid, food stamps, or SSI? Not too many.

    • Replies: @peterike
  22. Your comparison of today’s view of racism to Harpending’s observations of witchcraft in Africa and this “doctor”‘s theory on the cause of transmission is interesting, but why are almost all of the believers in the modern version SJW whites? I see that Mrs. Trent believes this BS, but I generally note that it’s white people that come up with these theories about racism as a disease. Black people usually just say we hate them, and leave it at that… oh, and tell their kids that.

    BTW, I have nothing against women pediatricians, but when I read this kind of thing, let’s just say I wouldn’t take any child to this lady. This is another example of why having women in these high positions doesn’t work out so well. It’s not that men don’t come out with some stupid stuff – Rosie – but women seem to get into this BS in order to get away from the real work. This is not any kind of real science that a Professor of Pediatrics (with an MD-PhD) should be involved in. She’s wasting the taxpayers’ and donors’ money.

    I think “Professor” Trent would be happier writing children’s books about, say, Giraffes.

    • Replies: @Mister.Baseball
    , @Spangel
  23. @International Jew

    I see this one all the time, I.J., but I think it’s related to which browser I’m using. I have to end up doing a search after I should have landed at the page position of that comment.

    If you’re moving around on the same page, I that’s a different use of the “anchor” tags for the browser, as the page is not reloaded at all – I only have a problem with this when my idiot browser on another device of mine reloads the page anyway, for the hell of it, I guess.

    • Replies: @International Jew
  24. So Goddam ridiculous it triggers your gag reflex – but there’s nothing you can do about it, and nothing we can do to make is stop!

  25. @International Jew

    Sort of like shaped charges, but with fart energy rather than shock waves. Keep up these theories and YOU’LL make a great pediatrician, or parent. The boys especially love that stuff.

    • Replies: @International Jew
  26. Except doctors and nurses do believe that negative vibes can effect a patient’s condition. Why that should be is vague but intuitive. I wouldn’t be surprised if black patients are effected more.

  27. “We call it a socially transmitted disease: …”

    I’m a genuine example …

    Sorry, Steve, but there’s just too much to make fun of in there. Plus, Goodbye Yellowbrick Road is such a fantastic album … from Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt cowboy.

    If this is what they call me, so be it:

    and the ladies are all getting wrinkles,
    and they’re falling apart at the seams.
    Well I just get high on tequila
    and see visions of vineyards in my dreams.

    and I get bombed for breakfast in the morning.
    I get bombed for dinner time and tea.
    I dress in rags, smell a lot, and have a real good time
    I’m a genuine example of a social disease
    I’m a genuine example of a social disease

  28. donut says:

    Man we can always hope for a catastrophic natural disaster right ? Start over again with flint knives and axes and arrow heads . We’ve got all the time in the world .

    • Replies: @HammerJack
  29. With apologies to Stephen Sondheim:

    In my opinion, this child does not need
    To have his head shrunk at all
    Racism is purely a social disease
    So take him to a social worker!…

    Officer Krupke, you’ve done it again
    This boy don’t need a job, he needs a
    Year in the pen
    It ain’t just a question of misunderstood;
    Deep down inside him, he’s no good!

    We’re no good, we’re no good
    We’re no earthly good
    Like the best of us is no damn good!…

    Gee, Officer Krupke
    We’re down on our knees
    ‘Cause no one wants a fella with
    A social disease

    Gee, Officer Krupke
    What are we to do?
    Gee, Officer Krupke —
    Krup you!

  30. eric says:
    @Flip

    Does anyone have data on the black income/capita across various countries? Where would the US stand?

  31. Pediatricians Warned to be on Lookout for Bad Juju

    The answer to bad juju is good feng shui. Thus, China is well-poised to succeed in Africa where gwei-lo has failed.

    Is it good or bad to have a Subway too close to the Subway?

  32. @Achmed E. Newman

    I see it on both my platforms — Android and Linux — and both my browsers — Chrome and Firefox.

  33. @Achmed E. Newman

    Too late, my kids are already adults.

    Good thing there’s still unz.com where I can tell fat jokes and not lose social standing. A couple years ago I got slapped down pretty hard. It was a discussion, with a French lady and some other Americans, about France’s Burka ban. My sin was to say that alot of Walmart shoppers would look better in a burka.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  34. bjdubbs says:

    Witches and science discussed at University of Cape Town in South Africa. Start at 1:57:

    • Replies: @fish
  35. anonymous[366] • Disclaimer says:

    As a racist I am usually perfectly happy to blame blacks for their mistakes.

    But even I have to admit that a given individual isn’t necessarily at fault for claiming a traffic stop was “racist.” That’s what Obama and the entire culture tells them. Why wouldn’t it be true? I say this because I, a law-abiding white man, have had *multiple* interactions where cops were complete dicks to me for no reason and/or accused me of a traffic violation I didn’t commit. If I were black it would be extremely tempting to assume the reason was racism since there was no rational explanation based on my actions.

    Because I’m white I have just had to conclude that sometimes cops are jerks and sometimes they’re not.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  36. At root, minoritarianism–minorities good, majorities bad–is an incoherent ideology. It’s core assertion is “evil white majority” but it’s core demand is “hey white majority you must let us–and everyone else– hang around with you”. (This obviously comes from and is baked into the tribal, majority hostile, but need-to-have-the-majority-around-to-exploit middle-man-minority nature of Ashkenazi Judaism. But if i point this obvious fact out i’ll have to hear a bunch of tedious nonsense that boils down to i’m imagining the sky being blue.)

    The interesting thing recently is how ridiculously “out” this incoherence is now, so that every example literally screams “separate nations!”.

    Brett Stephens or Max Boot or Jennifer Rubin or (insert name of dozens of other Jewish commentators here) demean white gentiles and call for their replacement by wonderful immigrants.
    — Hey …. why don’t *you* go live with your rainbow hued immigrants and leave us alone? … separate nations!”

    Gentle Giant decides to fight with cop, Darren Wilson and try to take his gun away then charges at him, called “murder” by assorted blacks, BLM, Liz Warren, etc.
    — Hey … if blacks do not want to live by white norms … separate nations!

    Yet another Democrat telling me, it’s not “who we are” to restrict immigration … even restricting immigration to those not sucking up welfare.
    — Hey … we don’t need any immigrants, but even if we wanted to admit some the zeroth order requirement is that they take care of themselves and not cause trouble. You want them–you support them yourself. Separate nations!

    Structural racism creeping into black wombs resulting in low birthweights.
    — Hey … i really want you folks to live as you wish and take care of yourself … separate nations!

    Anyway … keep it up! The dumber and more obviously anti-white the better.

    We white people aren’t the brightest bunch, but i’d imagine more of my co-ethnics are waking up everyday and thinking “f’you! a*hole”.

    • Replies: @Ibound1
  37. Anonymous[328] • Disclaimer says:

    The American Academy of Religion resoundingly condemns white nationalism and urges all members, individually, institutionally, and collectively, to fight against white supremacy and white nationalism while standing alongside those who bear the brunt of this violent ideology, willful ignorance, and oppressive behavior. The American Academy of Religion advocates for the study of religion as a powerful means to resist white supremacist structures, policies, and thought patterns. In promoting its values of academic excellence, professional responsibility, free inquiry, critical examination, diversity, inclusion, respect, and transparency in the study of religion, the American Academy of Religion hopes to help uncover and dismantle white supremacy at the structural and personal levels. The American Academy of Religion acknowledges that the lives of scholars, teachers, and students of religion are made better, more productive, and more meaningful by diversity of all kinds.

    • Replies: @Pericles
  38. @BenKenobi

    Cole Porter put it so much more succinctly (and melodically!) back in 1929.

    “You do something to me
    Something that simply mystifies me
    Tell me, why should it be?
    You have the pow’r to hypnotize me
    Let me live ‘neath your spell
    Do do that voodoo that you do so well

    For you do something to me
    That nobody else can do!”

  39. JuJu better not be bad this fall when Steelers play their AFC South division rivals. That’s JuJu Smith-Shuster (WR, PIT). If JuJu has bad Mojo catching the ball, they don’t have a chance.

    Wonder why there are folks actually named JuJu but hardly anyone is named Mojo?

    • Replies: @Ozymandias
    , @fish
  40. Juju, feng shui, and the American (and Steve’s) counterpart– marketing:

    The Best and Worst Political Branding of the 2020 Democratic Primary Race

    Spoiler: Buttigieg on top, two others we’re tired of are surprisingly runners-up. Buttigieg cheats, though, by borrowing Notre Dame’s color scheme, and having each of his states’ campaigns steal their flagships’ palettes.

    Weird Warren and Williamson are weirdly boring, as are some of the fresher faces. (Who the hell are Adm. Sestak and Seth Moulton? Every week we see a new name in the field we’ve never seen anywhere before.)

    Hickenlooper and Yang get fascinating consolation prizes. Yang’s a businessman, and it sure shows.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
  41. Dr. X says:

    Racism has an impact on children and families who are targeted, she said, but also on those who witness it. “We call it a socially transmitted disease…”

    Huh.

    What about that “socially transmitted disease” spread by anal intercourse? Doesn’t that have a pretty high mortality rate? Perhaps the good doctor should be trying to elminate buggery instead…

  42. Ibound1 says:
    @AnotherDad

    The American religion of anti-racism – and it is a religion, a very deeply held faith – will prevent anyone from waking up and saying “F you”. Just like in the Muslim world, where the “solution” to all the problems brought by Islam is always more Islam (thus digging the hole ever deeper) the solution to the problems created by the religion of anti-racism must always be more anti-racism.. It’s why we are doomed.

  43. Sean says:

    The most important 9 months of your life is before you are born.

    • LOL: fish
  44. Ian Smith says:
    @R.G. Camara

    Skeleton Key is criminally underrated!

  45. TWS says:

    We’re past peak idiocy here. She’d do less damage if she just walked around and smacked kids with a hammer.

  46. @Redneck farmer

    Remember hearing about that right before Hilary’s national health care program cratered. I believe it was in a conservative magazine interviewing a doctor who specialized in health statistics, but you know I mean being a hatefact, it can’t ever be mentioned in the NYT or Washington Post obviously.

  47. @Forbes

    They can go to those non-diverse countries, of course. IDK, Japan maybe?

    That kind of chronic stress can lead to hormonal changes and inflammation

    More groundwork is being laid for first-class everything for selected ‘minorities’ and second-class citizenship (at best) for ‘non-minorities’. It’s just beginning.

    • Agree: bomag
  48. @donut

    I’m praying for an asteroid strike.

    Is that so wrong?

  49. @Reg Cæsar

    Yep, the glassware is clever, but wtf is h8ck3nlookwr trying to conjure with the Giza reference? Power of the Pyramids?

    P.S. You know your trail is steep when autocorrect has no clue about that thing you call your name.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  50. Kronos says:
    @Anonymous

    The Baby Boomers don’t recoil at things like cigarettes because of morality but from snobbishness. Cigarettes are a working class vice. It’s a strong marker in public and in the work place. Alcoholism and drug addiction are low-status affairs. It’s one of reasons the Opioid Epidemic occurred. Middle-Upper Class parents couldn’t accept that one of their kid’s died from de facto heroin. (Often they started on painkillers and moved to black tar heroin because it’s cheaper. Both used the morphine molecule.) But the kids died from a low-class African American drug. Not the hip Cancer or what have you. So you had plenty of parents in denial when deaths surged in the 2000s.

    The Baby Boomers are very hedonistic for sure, but different social-stratas possess different tastes and preferences.

    Remember, it’s not WHAT they do so much as WHO does it.

  51. As medical specialties go, Pediatrics is now perhaps the most feminized and laden with nonsense and SJW froth.

    The specialty is, to some extent, the victim of its own success. Due to improvements in hygiene, public health, and early detection since the 1960’s, there really aren’t that many really sick kids anymore.

    Most really sick kids nowadays are immediately shunted to a subspecialist (pediatric cardiologist, pediatric neurologist, etc.) A general pediatrician sees healthy kids and worried moms all day and there really isn’t that much interesting or challenging for them to do. So pediatricians, still needing to feel important, get interested in SJW causes: the health effects of structural racism, gun ownership as a public health crisis, etc.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Barnard
    , @Kronos
  52. @PennTothal

    Jared Diamond’s dad, “the father of pediatric hematology,” invented a transfusion technique in 1946 that is said to have saved hundreds of thousands of children’s lives.

    • Replies: @bomag
  53. @Achmed E. Newman

    I think it comes down to having an underdeveloped concept of property (not just in the legal sense). Relaxing the challenge and pressures to maintain a culture lessens a need to develop a sense of objects and object possession out in the world. So the sole focus becomes other people and one’s relation to them.

  54. Black people don’t do modern medicine and most Africans in America owe their very existence to Anglo-Saxons and the medical science and institutions Anglo-Saxons created, but because it is impolitic to mention this fact the Dr. Trents of this world are in a position to serve up their nonsense.

  55. Maybe they can devise a social program to somehow induce white women to carry black babies to increase their rate of survival, while undermining the rate of survival for white babies?

    Hey, wait a second…

  56. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    “Wonder why there are folks actually named JuJu but hardly anyone is named Mojo?”

    Because Mojo is occasionally found to be working, although no one seems to know what for.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
  57. Dave2 says:

    Then I suppose it is my duty as a white American to stay as far as possible away from black people so I don’t accidentally injure them with my racist mind-rays.

    • Agree: Dtbb
  58. El Dato says:
    @R.G. Camara

    Now I know why “hackers” in stock photos are wearing hoodies.

  59. HoekomSA says:

    Bantu culture

    what is quite normal in Bantu culture is the use of human sacrifice for magical purposes. This is usually carried out by the Sangoma (witchdoctor). The purpose of this for use in spells to harm your opponent, or to give you prosperity and of course to win over a lady. The more violent and traumatic the murder, the more powerful the magic involved. Even today the witchdoctor has terrific influence in the black community, and ”Muti” murders still take place. Muti murders are often reported particularly in rural areas. Top politicians are reputed to be involved in Muti.

    Within the tribe, life could be very warm although limiting. The concept of Ubuntu applied, that is that is there was great common humanity and sharing. But outside of that tribe were regarded with great suspicion.
    Tribal life was very superstition driven. The ancestors ruled all events. The capricious weather and general insecurity created a culture of jealousy. Culture was dominated by the concept of limited cosmic good ( Occultism in an African context: a case for the Vhavenda-speaking people of the Limpopo Province T.D. Mashau. Violence in South Africa: a variety of perspectives, Bornman, Van Eerden & Wentzel Chapter 7. although written about the Venda it is applicable to most Bantu Tribes) . Anyone who stood out, became an object of jealousy. And then unless he was popular, the witchdoctors would sniff him out (as a threat to the tribe) and have him punished. Part of the reason why the big man is so powerful in African politics is that he is supposed to dole out to his tribal members to goods that he’s received through his power over the state. Even today, unless the person is strongly Christian or very secular, jealousy is very common among the Blacks in South Africa. This is relevant particularly to relationships with whites.

  60. Pericles says:
    @Anonymous

    In promoting its values of academic excellence, professional responsibility, free inquiry, critical examination, diversity, inclusion, respect, and transparency in the study of religion, the American Academy of Religion hopes to help uncover and dismantle white supremacy at the structural and personal levels.

    Those values still seem awfully white though.

  61. Anonymous[588] • Disclaimer says:

    Stuff and nonsense. Stuff and nonsense.

    The world’s biggest and most devout believers in ‘juju’ are not those of African descent. No, as it happens, they are a lot closer to home. In fact they run the American media and the parallel ‘Deep State’ political apparatus.
    You see, a key tenet of their belief system is in the ‘very real’ existence of an all-power supernatural maleovelent entity called ‘Putin’. Putin, apparently, is able to ‘fix’ the results of American elections – the hundreds of millions of individual voter choices – merely by the power of magic. Putin – and the horde of imps at his beck and call – is also, apparently, capable of all manner of supernatural feats, apparently stymying the Deep State whenever it tries to exercise its ‘natural right’ of All Power.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  62. Whitehall says:

    Somehow this brings to mind a best-selling book of about 20 years ago “The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind” by Julian Jaynes.

    Sometime after the fall of Troy, humans stopped hearing voices in their head, like Achilles did, according to the Illiad. Once we stopped listening to voices in the head and started to use our fore-brains more (ie reason) our cultures made huge advances.

    At least cultures in the Eastern and Northern Mediterranean basin and at least among males. It could have been a mutation that weakened the tie between the hemispheres of the brain (the bicameral mind”.) Neuroscience tells us that women retain much closer communications between the two sides of the brain than men typically do. That’s probably why women can multitask better than men and men can focus “simplemindedly” on a task or quandary.

    I haven’t seen any research on the recognized male/female brain differences extended to racial types either.

    Perhaps the belief in or even utility of “witchcraft by projection” is related.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
  63. Even more interesting to us was the universal understanding that white people were not vulnerable to witchcraft ….

    Then explain the longevity of the political lives of Bill & Hillary Clinton and the death of Jeffrey Epstein and a few other Arkancides. It can only be black magic.

  64. Kronos says:

    It’s happening Baby! They’re bringing back the ideas of Trofim Lysenko to explain-away the faults of the black man! Lysenkoism and Lamarckism will lead the way to the future.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @Kronos
  65. Maybe mexican-american women aren’t waiting till their late thirties before they start bearing children.

    • Replies: @Spangel
  66. @Pericles

    Those values still seem awfully white though.

    Right, I think they’re good too.

    Counterinsurgency

  67. @Pericles

    Re: article

    If you wanted to look at African belief in witchcraft from the functional anthropology standpoint, you could note:
    a) The belief suppresses within-village conflict by
    1) inducing individual people to suppress hostility towards other villagers and those of allied / trading villages (avoid practicing witchcraft).
    2) providing a pretext for enforcing common judgements on who is good and who is bad (accuse them of witchcraft).
    b) Enhances between-village warfare
    1) by providing a pretext for any conflict (witchcraft by the village being attacked).
    2) by providing a way to eliminate undesirable troops (accuse them of witchcraft)

    Such a belief would tend to be retained through slavery for the same reason that Judaism and Catholocism were retained by immigrants to America: it increases group solidarity, hence group protection.

    Just a hypothesis, of course.

    Counterinsurgency

    • Replies: @El Dato
  68. El Dato says:
    @Kronos

    So if you cut off the tails of the blacks, they will have smaller ones in subsequent generations? 👌

    The telling thing about witchcraft is that no-one has ever pulled any engineering books out of all of that.

    There are no known recipes on statistically tested & known-working procedures about how to apply witchraft. Or even witchcraft generators, witchcraft machines and witchcraft reprocessing plants. A public utility service that has vans spray-painting Seals of Solomon at urban problem spots every morning starting from 06:30. Just arbitrary mumbo-jumbo and “special people invested with special power”.

    (Did anyone except whites and japs ever fantasize about magic being a teachable profession? Is Harry Potter big in Africa?)

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    , @Anonymous
  69. El Dato says:
    @Pericles

    academic excellence, professional responsibility, free inquiry, critical examination, diversity, inclusion, respect, and transparency in the study of religion

    Also, if the above were the case “the study of religion” would be over very quickly, and only a rarely-visited bookshelf in a library basement would remain.

  70. @El Dato

    I hate to point out the obvious (Always start the day with a lie)

    Witchcraft is merely the cause of actions that one doesn’t understand.

    The dumber you are the more witchcraft is afoot in the world.

    If you understand enough about something to engineer it, it ceases to be witchcraft.

  71. anonymous[935] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s not causal from Africa; it’s just one of the plausible (if wrong) theories people would naturally have about the way the world works. So it’s independent re-invention. Or, you could trace it back to Christian Science (old rich white ladies), with its concept of “malicious animal magnetism”.

  72. Barnard says:
    @PennTothal

    Most of them are big on preventing childhood obesity. If your toddler has a healthy appetite and is in the upper 25% of the weight range you can expect a lecture from the pediatrician about his or her diet, making sure you getting enough exercise, etc., at a well check appointment. It happened to us and nearly every other set of parents we have talked to who take their kids to a pediatrician. The ones who take their kids to family practice doctors say they don’t get the obesity lecture.

    I would say they see a fair number of ear infections, RSV and influenza cases, but on the whole it is one of the easier jobs in the medical profession. One of the harder parts has to be not getting sick from everything the kids bring into the clinic.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  73. bomag says:
    @Steve Sailer

    …invented a transfusion technique in 1946 that is said to have saved hundreds of thousands of children’s lives

    I’m wondering how to reflect upon such as this. Modern tech has much devotion to saving lives and reducing labor, with the result that we have more and more people with nothing to do.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  74. El Dato says:
    @bomag

    “The devil makes work for idle hands”

    There is a megaton of stuff to do (like clean up Baltimore), but nobody is doing it and people are playing League of Legends instead.

    How is that possible.

    • Replies: @Joe Schmoe
    , @bomag
  75. @International Jew

    My sin was to say that alot of Walmart shoppers would look better in a burka.

    I like Walmart because they have everything. But it seems to be a requirement that Walmart shoppers dress down before they go there. Or maybe their houses have no mirrors.

  76. David says:

    OT. Chris Cuomo will never appear in public again without hearing, “Fredo!” The name will appear in his obituary.

    • LOL: William Badwhite
  77. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    The world’s biggest and most devout believers in ‘juju’ are not those of African descent. No, as it happens, they are a lot closer to home. In fact they run the American media and the parallel ‘Deep State’ political apparatus.

    Belief in juju is pretty common among white people. Anyone remember the satanic ritual abuse hysteria about thirty years ago? There was also the UFO craze. There are the moon landing hoax believers. The 9/11 truthers.

    Most people do not understand how the world works. Unless you devote your life to science you can’t understand it because it’s too complicated. And that’s just natural phenomena. Add in human institutions and human behaviour and it’s impossible to understand fully. Nobody knows how the economy works. Most of us just accept the explanations we’re given by people that we assume are in possession of the necessary expert knowledge. When people start to doubt those experts they turn to conspiracy theories – it’s all a plot by the Freemasons or the Russians or whatever.

    Magical thinking is more common than rational thinking even among white people.

  78. Alfa158 says:
    @Whitehall

    Jaynes also asserted that pre Iron Age humans, rather like mollusks or computers, had no consciousness of themselves and were simply mechanisms reacting to a combination of outside stimuli and self induced hallucinations. Apparently Cogito ergo sum was invented during the Trojan Wars and after that all humans suddenly gained the awareness of “Hey: waddaya know, I’m a Me!”
    The utter lack of any objective biological evidence for this gibberish and the fact that practitioners of the “science” of psychology actually debate these theories as potentially valid, demonstrate the decadent state of current Western academia.
    I can understand when the practitioners of old time religion assert the most astonishing things without objective evidence and discuss the nature of angels or whatever, because at least they concede religion is something taken on faith. They don’t pretend to be scientists.

    • Replies: @Whitehall
  79. @anonymous

    I told my kids repeatedly that sometimes people act like jerks for no good reason, and that they should not take it personally.

    But blacks have been told by whites for the past 50+ years that every slight (now called a micro-agression to give it cachet) is the result of racism.

  80. White people have powerful magic. See any episode of the television series Charmed, as an example.

  81. Whitehall says:
    @Alfa158

    I believe I DID offer a piece of supporting science in my original post – the relative cross-ties of the corpus callosum between the sexes. Certainly not definitive but supportive and a tie in to the original post. Which sex is more likely to believe in witchcraft?

    Certainly Jaynes took a humanities-based approach in his book, if I remember from reading it 20 years ago or so. Lots of stuff in the book about hypnosis that seemed to imply that the less the hemispheres were differentiated, the easier an individual was to hypnotize.

    But I’ll specifically pose the question that I implied above – how widely and how deeply did this reasoning facility spread amongst the diversity of human beings.

    Whether Jaynes offered proof of a specific date for the “Dawn of Human Consciousness” or not may not be a scientific question anyway.

  82. peterike says:
    @Disordered D

    Being branded with racist charges is closer and closer to being branded an AIDS-sufferer in the 80s

    Huh? Were you around in the 80s? Because I was, and I distinctly remember AIDS sufferers being lauded as tragic heroes, victims of the Evil Ronnie Raygun who just wouldn’t unleash the billions in spending that would magically cure AIDS overnight.

    The initial “oh my God I might catch AIDS by touching a gay person!” was effectively eradicated by a media and education system fire storm in a few months. After that, AIDS victims went straight to secular sainthood, and have stayed there ever since.

  83. peterike says:
    @Lot

    How many US citizens with third world siblings aren’t on Medicaid, food stamps, or SSI? Not too many.

    Is Obama’s aunt or uncle or whoever that was, still lounging around on public assistance? I’m not sure whatever happened to that story, other than the usual dying from media neglect.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  84. Mike1 says:

    Passing things down through families and groups makes sense. As an immigrant, the most striking thing to me about African Americans is that they have a distinctive accent with only minor regional variation. Americans never get how weird this is, even when it is pointed out to them.

    Skin color does not create an accent. African Americans deeply love their culture.

    • Replies: @newrouter
    , @Flip
    , @Ibound1
  85. Svevlad says:

    Ah, society is literally being Africanized now.

    Makes me think, some of these beliefs are so fucking weird, that if Africa had an IQ equal to Europe it would probably turn into something utterly alien, to the point globalization wouldn’t even be possible

  86. Kronos says:
    @Kronos

    “Lamarckism (or Lamarckian inheritance) is the hypothesis that an organism can pass on characteristics that it has acquired through use or disuse during its lifetime to its offspring. It is also known as the inheritance of acquired characteristics or soft inheritance.” -Wikipedia

    So racism is afflicting black fetuses in the womb. It’s transforming blacks via a proto-evolutionary process into gangs and criminals. (It’s the same process that creates the long necks of giraffes and the long limbs of NBA players.)

  87. @Ozymandias

    Perhaps its time to have a new hyphenated name: JuJu-Mojo, or JuMo for short.

  88. Spangel says:
    @Redneck farmer

    There are fairly sized difference in infant mortality between states. I assume they all tally infant mortality in the same way? If we break it down by race, are there still differences?

    In any case, black infant mortality is likely high because of their own decision making. They are more likely to be obese, which causes complications and probably less likely to diligently comply with medical advice such as to take medications x times a day or stay on pelvic rest etc. some of it could be lack of access to good doctors or lack of work flexibility to see doctors as often during work hours, but I bet ther would still be differnces in infant mortality by race if we restricted the sample to those who have health insurance and see doctors regularly.

  89. Spangel says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Do you imagine that a male pediatrician writing for the New York Times would produce a more evidence based article?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  90. @dfordoom

    Indeed. And anyone not convinced you’re right, will be if they read just the introduction to Hutson’s Seven Laws of Magical Thinking.

  91. @Barnard

    Preventing obesity is not exactly an ignoble cause.

  92. @HammerJack

    I thought he took it from his license plate. Or the Slovak flag.

    Or the Slovak peak Kriváň:

  93. rob says:

    Sailer said,
    “One problem with Harpending’s theory is that the causal mechanisms by which African conceptions of witchcraft influence modern American conceptions of racism is that the causal mechanisms are vague. Presumably, ways of thought are passed down from black woman to black woman (e.g., grandmother to granddaughter) for hundreds of years, but how exactly has never been studied, as far as I know.”

    The causal mechanism is biological. The mind is what the brain does, and the brain is built from genetic recipes. Common black thought patterns as as genetically influenced as common black black behavioral patterns. It’s just how blacks think, and they pick whatever is reified culturally, whether witchcraft or racism.

    This is not to say that whites are immune to magical thinking, but it seems to be a bigger hammer In black peoples’ cognitive toolbox.

  94. NYMOM says:

    Just to let you know you have to be careful with teachers as well…when you talk with your children and/or grandchildren about the dangers of hanging around with minorities in your neighborhood or their neighborhood (even more dangerous) you have to be very careful how you phrase the warning.

    An innocent kid, too young to realize the implications of what you are telling them, could easily mention your warning to their teachers and the next thing you know you are getting a letter from the school…or worse yet they could tell some of their little friends with woke parents and wind up getting beat up at school for ‘not liking black kids’…

    All language in warnings must be age appropriate and not use foul language…just explain to them in a straightforward manner the situation and why care must be taken to avoid situations where they find themselves in the minority: not hanging around in parks, shopping malls, swimming pools etc., and never ever go to someone’s house or neighborhood ever.

    Just a word of warning from someone who’s been there already twice: with my own kids and then later with my grandkids…

  95. NYMOM says:

    “…a lot of Walmart shoppers would look better in a burka…”

    I second the emotion here especially after spending a day at the beach in the US…

    What are people thinking to walk out of their house wearing some of this stuff! In public!!! BTW what’s the equivalent for a male burka because we definately need some of those as well…

  96. fish says:
    @bjdubbs

    …..Africa wins again!

  97. fish says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Wonder why there are folks actually named JuJu but hardly anyone is named Mojo?

    Please….pray for Mojo!

    https://giphy.com/gifs/season-9-the-simpsons-9×21-l2Je6m6JQhZ8eByJq

  98. @Spangel

    I believe he wouldn’t be wasting his time writing an article for the NY Times at all, unless it was a break from his serious work in pediatric health research… to actually help a lot of kids.

  99. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @El Dato

    Occult bookstores and publishers are a profitable business.

    At least in this lifetime.

  100. newrouter says:
    @Mike1

    >As an immigrant, the most striking thing to me about African Americans is that they have a distinctive accent with only minor regional variation. Americans never get how weird this is,<

    African slavers didn't send their best to America?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  101. Flip says:
    @Mike1

    They typically have a common origin in the South which could explain the accent.

  102. Kronos says:
    @PennTothal

    What about childhood obesity? That’s running rampant across the country. Wouldn’t that give them something to do?

  103. Kronos says:
    @dfordoom

    Don’t forget all the Baby Boomers who turned eastern religions into a self-serving/self help salad bar. My neighbor has so many Tibetan prayer flags that I want to puke.

  104. There are a few books describing magic among southern blacks (and southern folk culture in general).

    This one is worthwhile, among other things I recall it instructs one on how to bury a hairball by moonlight and piss on it to put a hex on someone – valuable information:

    http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/article/h-1596

  105. @dfordoom

    Magical thinking is more common than rational thinking even among white people.

    Magical thinking is rampant in Asia also. It has been said that our western concept of the finely developed nature of Buddhist and Taoist philosophy has been shaped by pro-eastern writers, Alan Watts, Eugen Herrigel e.g., who sanitized these ways of thought by omitting to write about the rampant beliefs in demons and magic among the practitioners.

  106. Ibound1 says:
    @Mike1

    In South Carolina, along the coast, African Americans have a very distinctive – very different – accent. So do white people from there, although the accent is gradually disappearing.

  107. dr kill says:
    @Colin Wright

    One good thing about us all having an IQ of 80 in teh year 2100 is that there will be lots of manual labor required.

    • LOL: Ibound1
  108. MEH 0910 says:

    Jane Coaston tweets about a Linda Villarosa piece in The New York Times Magazine:

  109. J.Ross says:
    @newrouter

    I’m not sure how much of what survives in Ebonics is Bantu, but surely African slavers were not drawing evenly from every corner of their continent.

  110. @El Dato

    I would rather play League of Legends than clean up Baltimore.

    I think that is just rational

  111. bomag says:
    @El Dato

    There is a megaton of stuff to do (like clean up Baltimore), but nobody is doing it and people are playing League of Legends instead.

    How is that possible.

    There may be a ton of stuff to do, but finding productive work is the difficult thing. Investors are hungry for productive ways to invest money, and productive work quickly gets captured by machines and market leaders.

    Stuff like cleaning up Baltimore is non-productive.

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