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Pedestrians Continue to be Killed at a Higher Rate
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The good news is that the sharp increase U.S. pedestrian fatalities from 2014 to 2016 has tailed off. But 2018 represents the high since 1990.

My guess would be that the rise of around 23% in pedestrian fatalities from 2014 to 2016, the Late Obama Age Collapse, was due to smartphones. But it’s odd that it was almost exactly the same percentage increase as in homicides between 2014, the Year of Ferguson, and 2016.

 
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  1. I wonder what the % of black (motorist) on black (pedestrian) is – I’m guessing a pretty big chunk – but that could be due to my prejudice as a commuter to Newark.

    • Replies: @Bugg
    Generally how many pedestrians get slammed with their faces buried in their phones rather than paying attention to red/green and traffic.

    Corey Booker-let Spartacus do for America the great work he did in Newark...uh, yeah, may be not.

    , @James Braxton
    If we could just see these numbers broken out by zip code we could draw all the necessary conclusions.
    , @ken
    Not prejudice, same thing happens in Chicago area.
  2. How many of these are unrecognized suicides?

  3. Hey, driving while reading Black twitter takes skill, dedication, and ohh sh%# (swerves, crashes.)

    • LOL: Bubba
  4. Hey, driving while reading Black twitter takes skill, dedication, and (SWIRVE *Crash*)

    • Replies: @Kronos
    I thought it didn’t go through the first time.
  5. @Kronos
    Hey, driving while reading Black twitter takes skill, dedication, and (SWIRVE *Crash*)

    I thought it didn’t go through the first time.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    You rack disciprine.
  6. In addition to smartphones, there has been a steady increase in the presence of screen/menu control centers in cars.

    BMW was an early offender, beginning with its fugly, van Hooydonk era E65 7 Series in 2001. Naturally, the inscrutable interface was named “iDrive.” That was the time when everything, even new blogs, had an “i” attached to the front.

    As always, new stuff moves from expensive cars eventually into every cheap piece of crap on the road. By now probably every new car has a screen with a knob that controls a menu, or maybe a touch screen — requiring the driver to take his eyes off the road and play mouse-computer jockey, or smartphone addict, while driving.

    Whatever the new technology, everyone always thinks everything will be better with it. That is why cars began to have mouses and computer screens to control things like radio volume and tuning, air conditioning, etc. Real convenient.

    • Replies: @Kaz
    Yeah some car companies are wising up and not making EVERYTHING digital.

    Like they recently brought back the physical volume knob in the 2019 Honda Pilot (what I drive) after going to be a big screen infotainment only thing in the previous few years.
    , @Anonymous
    I agree that touchpad control centers are a terrible trend. Traditional controls with intuitive dials and knobs are better and much less distracting.

    Back up cameras are nice, but I feel like they've made me a less attentive driver. Before them, I'd automatically scan everywhere outside and be very careful. Now I feel like I rely too much on the camera and feel more careless.

    Smartphones have definitely made me a worse driver. I'm careful not to touch them in serious situations and at high speeds, but I've almost gotten into fender benders due to fiddling with them/trying to text etc., which never would have happened before smartphones.

    There is some evidence to suggest touchscreens mess up people's driving:

    https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1121372_why-mazda-is-purging-touchscreens-from-its-vehicles

    “Doing our research, when a driver would reach towards a touch-screen interface in any vehicle, they would unintentionally apply torque to the steering wheel, and the vehicle would drift out of its lane position,” said Matthew Valbuena, Mazda North America’s lead engineer for HMI and infotainment.

    “And of course with a touchscreen you have to be looking at the screen while you’re touching...so for that reason we were comfortable removing the touch-screen functionality,” he added.
     
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Whatever the new technology, everyone always thinks everything will be better with it.
     
    That's the problem-- everything does get better. So people get lazy and careless. It's called "risk compensation", or "risk homeostasis".

    https://www.wired.com/2011/07/active-safety-systems-could-create-passive-drivers/

    https://carbuzz.com/features/is-car-safety-equipment-making-us-more-dangerous-drivers
    , @International Jew
    Yuck. Fortunately, I live in California so if I'm lucky, I can keep my pre-touchscreen car running for another 20-30 years.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Yeah, I took my brother to the airport recently and on the way back could not figure out how to turn down the radio in his car. These things are a PITA as well as being dangerous. I can do the radio, the heat, everything in my 2005 CRV without taking my eyes off the road.

    I also see more and more people walking around with headphones on and their faces glued to their phone who seem completely oblivious to their surroundings. It's especially annoying on the crowded sidewalks of NYC. I had several people who would have walked into me if I had not avoided them.
    , @Mr. Anon
    My wife's car is new, and the radio controls are all touch-screen. I hate 'em. Knobs and buttons give you tactile feedback - you can feel your way around the controls without taking your eyes off the road. And I hate the backup camera - I just find it distracting. The left-turn rear-view camera might actually be useful, but it doesn' have one for right-turns.
    , @Alden
    Yes, yes, yes. They are very dangerous. I just don’t use them. Even on an empty freeway through the desert I find as soon as I start fiddling with the screen the car starts going off sideways.

    The personal injury lawyers and federal safety laws succeeded in making cars very safe for both passengers and the pedestrians they hit.

    But the manufacturers decided to install those useless extras that requiring taking your eyes off the road and mirrors and concentrating on the screen.
  7. It’s an open secret in every negro-infested city that blacks will aim their cars at whites on foot, and when on foot themselves will walk into traffic with total impunity. If they’re lucky, they win the ghetto lottery.

    • Agree: anon19
    • Replies: @slumber_j

    If they’re lucky, they win the ghetto lottery.
     
    Yeah, whenever I drive in The Harlems it's like playing reverse-Frogger.
  8. OT:

    LA Times with a report from mud world how Sikhs are taking over trucking:

    https://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-col1-sikh-truckers-20190627

    I like how the brown hero of the story is a filthy hypocrite who is a vegetarian at home that relishes the chance to eat meat on the road.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    The link is broken. Sikhs are not vegetarian, AFAIK.
    , @Ray Huffman
    I like how the brown hero of the story is a filthy hypocrite who is a vegetarian at home that relishes the chance to eat meat on the road.

    LOL, kind of like Southern Baptists and their booze.
    , @jcd1974
    Canada is about twenty years ahead of the USA on this. Sikhs have completely taken over the Canadian independent trucking industry.

    This is the result: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humboldt_Broncos_bus_crash
    , @Marty
    Ten days ago on my morning walk in San Rafael, a big rig driver leaving McDonald's asked for directions to Sonoma. It was a turbaned Sikh. I continued about a half-mile, up a steep peripheral road past a church known as a Honduran sanctuary, and got stopped by another big-rig turban, also looking for Sonoma. Unlike most Sikhs, this guy was jolly, but I thought, "Sikhs massing in Sonoma!"
    , @anon19
    Here in Canada we just had one of these brown "heroes" kill sixteen white kids in Saskatchewan.
  9. In California, it’s common knowledge that drunk illegals mow people down and they NEVER stop to help the victims. The numbers are staggering.

    Also to blame in CA is the dumb law that if a pedestrian steps off the curb the driver must stop or face the possibility of getting a ticket. The result is that pedestrians in CA have a false sense of security when stepping in front of cars, whereas a pedestrian in NY knows that cars must be avoided because they can kill you.

    I actually lobbied with the AAA to have this law changed but nothing could be done.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    A Latin American alien (legal or not I never found out) ran a red light, t-boned my wife, nearly totaled our Mercedes convertible, and then drove off. Hilariously, the front license plate fell off his car, so the cops were able to put out a bulletin, and the asshole was pulled over on a highway somewhere.

    He had no license and was driving someone else's car, with permission. His record indicated that he had perpetrated a hit-and-run before.

    I hired the greasiest, most connected, ambulance chasing firm I could find, in the capital of America's insurance industry, which happens to be an easy drive from where I live. They worked up a suit against the owner of the car, and we took him for the entire value of his insurance policy.

    The driver could barely speak English during deposition.

    The owner of the car lived in Greenwich, Connecticut and had a very nice insurance policy indeed.

    I feel very good about having used our "justice" system to screw somebody like that.

    BTW my wife is fine. Benzes are stout automobiles, even the convertibles.

    , @Western
    "also to blame in CA is the dumb law that if a pedestrian steps off the curb the driver must stop or face the possibility of getting a ticket."

    These are stupid laws, My state has been putting up pedestrian crossings where you are supposed to stop if someone is standing on the curb. Drivers are not used to that. Drivers should have the right of way unless there is a stop light that is red or stop sign otherwise it gets too confusing.

    Whatever happened to look left right and left. Now people start walking and assume the driver will stop. Pedestrians should never assume some will stop even if the light is red.

    , @MikeatMikedotMike
    "The result is that pedestrians in CA have a false sense of security when stepping in front of cars,"

    I would say that our traffic laws have installed a sense of impunity in pedestrians and bicyclists. Even when a collision is their fault, they can file a suit against a motorist's insurance company and reasonably expect a settlement.
    , @Alden
    You don’t get tickets for that. We drive paranoid about pedestrians and other drivers. We walk paranoid about drivers and bikes.

    Its instinctive when you grow up seeing your parents doing it and do it from age 15. Didn’t your Drivers Ed teacher tell you not to expect that other drivers and pedestrians will follow the laws? “ Anything and everything can be a hazard, anticipate hazards, dispose of hazards promptly”. I still remember that.

    That law is because people can be killed injured and injured so seriously they spend the rest of their lives in a nursing home if hit be a car.

    I think those electric scooters should be banned from streets and confined to sidewalks and bike lanes. They are as vulnerable as if they were walking around in the middle of the streets. If hit from behind those metal handles will smash into abdomen or chest. If hit in the side they’ll be hurt as well.

    In reality it’s no problem at all. 50 years of driving, much of it in congested city areas I can’t remember any problems with pedestrians including children running out in front of my car. Deer and raccoons on the other hand
  10. Pedestrians walk into traffic today without fear and as though entitled to a path across oncoming traffic. When I was young you let cars go by first.

    • Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Pedestrians walk into traffic today without fear and as though entitled to a path across oncoming traffic. When I was young you let cars go by first.
     
    I guess it sucks that I'm in a wheelchair now, but at least everyone knows that pedestrians always have the right-of-way in California....
  11. Curious to know the racial breakdown of the motorists and pedestrians involved in these fatalities. My non scientific theory is that as we continue to import 3rd world hordes, as well as continuing to decriminalize negro criminality, we will continue to see an increase in 3rd world level motorist/pedestrian habits.

  12. Tim says:

    No one has brought this up, but I’ve noticed that Hispanics just walk in the road a lot at night . . . well, really at all times.

    It just seems like something Hispanics like to do, sort of like the way they enjoy taking their family to the park and barbecuing . . . . then just leaving their trash and shit all over the place.

    Who are we to judge?

    • Replies: @Anonymousse
    Yep... near the local illegal apartment complexes there is a constant flow of jaywalkers across the very busy street. Often hispanic women carrying babies or walking with small children. They’ll readily risk their own children’s lives to avoid an extra one minute walk half a block to the cross walk.

    Puts the gulf between us and them into extremely sharp relief.
  13. @Buzz Mohawk
    In addition to smartphones, there has been a steady increase in the presence of screen/menu control centers in cars.

    BMW was an early offender, beginning with its fugly, van Hooydonk era E65 7 Series in 2001. Naturally, the inscrutable interface was named "iDrive." That was the time when everything, even new blogs, had an "i" attached to the front.

    As always, new stuff moves from expensive cars eventually into every cheap piece of crap on the road. By now probably every new car has a screen with a knob that controls a menu, or maybe a touch screen -- requiring the driver to take his eyes off the road and play mouse-computer jockey, or smartphone addict, while driving.

    Whatever the new technology, everyone always thinks everything will be better with it. That is why cars began to have mouses and computer screens to control things like radio volume and tuning, air conditioning, etc. Real convenient.

    Yeah some car companies are wising up and not making EVERYTHING digital.

    Like they recently brought back the physical volume knob in the 2019 Honda Pilot (what I drive) after going to be a big screen infotainment only thing in the previous few years.

  14. @Robert Dolan
    In California, it's common knowledge that drunk illegals mow people down and they NEVER stop to help the victims. The numbers are staggering.

    Also to blame in CA is the dumb law that if a pedestrian steps off the curb the driver must stop or face the possibility of getting a ticket. The result is that pedestrians in CA have a false sense of security when stepping in front of cars, whereas a pedestrian in NY knows that cars must be avoided because they can kill you.

    I actually lobbied with the AAA to have this law changed but nothing could be done.

    A Latin American alien (legal or not I never found out) ran a red light, t-boned my wife, nearly totaled our Mercedes convertible, and then drove off. Hilariously, the front license plate fell off his car, so the cops were able to put out a bulletin, and the asshole was pulled over on a highway somewhere.

    He had no license and was driving someone else’s car, with permission. His record indicated that he had perpetrated a hit-and-run before.

    I hired the greasiest, most connected, ambulance chasing firm I could find, in the capital of America’s insurance industry, which happens to be an easy drive from where I live. They worked up a suit against the owner of the car, and we took him for the entire value of his insurance policy.

    The driver could barely speak English during deposition.

    The owner of the car lived in Greenwich, Connecticut and had a very nice insurance policy indeed.

    I feel very good about having used our “justice” system to screw somebody like that.

    BTW my wife is fine. Benzes are stout automobiles, even the convertibles.

    • Replies: @Robert Dolan
    Good for you!

    It's nice to hear of a white victory once in a while.
    , @bomag
    Nice for the happy ending.

    Though I'm a little uncomfortable feeding the legal/insurance racket; I'd rather see our courts and political leadership make it easier to attach the earnings of those actually involved in flagrant accidents, and deport such illegals/recent immigrants plus a random ten thousand of their cohorts, pour encourager les autres. Collective punishment, baby!
    , @Romanian
    Wow, sounds hair raising. Good to see it all worked out. But why was the guy driving some other guy's car? What was the relation between them?
    , @Alden
    Illegal alien was probably a handyman. Owner of car the employer of illegal aliens.
  15. In 2013, marijuana was legalized in Colorado and Washington. Of course, almost immediately they were selling more than the state residents could ever have consumed. Consumption has certainly increased since then. All sorts of bad trendlines begin in 2014

  16. Legalized dope is another huge factor. Pedestrians and drivers both at fault as they are high.

  17. Speaking of getting killed … am surprised there is no thread about the mormon sweet young thing from El Segundo who (oops!) was living a double life as a sugar baby and got killed and burned by the black guy in Utah. Getting into a car at 3 AM at a public park with a strange black man that you connected with on the internet … golly, what could go wrong?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    ... no thread about the mormon sweet young thing...
     
    Maybe not yet.

    As usual, because the suspect isn't White, the chief or whoever at the press conference said "Ayoola Adisa Ajayi" one time and then said, "We will not say his name again."

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D-KnSGMVAAA-7BE.jpg
    The one black guy in Utah. What are the odds?

    As for the girl's double life, if it's true, people should learn that there are quite a few "nice" girls out there doing that sort of thing. Plenty of pretty college girls get involved in various forms of adult entertainment for the money -- and perhaps also for affirmation of their attractiveness. Usually it's stripping or soft-core nude modeling though, which are relatively safe.
    , @Anon
    A prostitute got murdered.

    Dog bites man.
    , @Alden
    She was a prostitute operating on her own without a pimp or Escort Agency and the drivers the agencies employ to drive the girls to and from appointments. The pimps take everything. The agencies take half but better split the money than be a hooker without a body guard.
  18. @ziel
    I wonder what the % of black (motorist) on black (pedestrian) is - I'm guessing a pretty big chunk - but that could be due to my prejudice as a commuter to Newark.

    Generally how many pedestrians get slammed with their faces buried in their phones rather than paying attention to red/green and traffic.

    Corey Booker-let Spartacus do for America the great work he did in Newark…uh, yeah, may be not.

    • LOL: bomag
  19. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    In addition to smartphones, there has been a steady increase in the presence of screen/menu control centers in cars.

    BMW was an early offender, beginning with its fugly, van Hooydonk era E65 7 Series in 2001. Naturally, the inscrutable interface was named "iDrive." That was the time when everything, even new blogs, had an "i" attached to the front.

    As always, new stuff moves from expensive cars eventually into every cheap piece of crap on the road. By now probably every new car has a screen with a knob that controls a menu, or maybe a touch screen -- requiring the driver to take his eyes off the road and play mouse-computer jockey, or smartphone addict, while driving.

    Whatever the new technology, everyone always thinks everything will be better with it. That is why cars began to have mouses and computer screens to control things like radio volume and tuning, air conditioning, etc. Real convenient.

    I agree that touchpad control centers are a terrible trend. Traditional controls with intuitive dials and knobs are better and much less distracting.

    Back up cameras are nice, but I feel like they’ve made me a less attentive driver. Before them, I’d automatically scan everywhere outside and be very careful. Now I feel like I rely too much on the camera and feel more careless.

    Smartphones have definitely made me a worse driver. I’m careful not to touch them in serious situations and at high speeds, but I’ve almost gotten into fender benders due to fiddling with them/trying to text etc., which never would have happened before smartphones.

    There is some evidence to suggest touchscreens mess up people’s driving:

    https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1121372_why-mazda-is-purging-touchscreens-from-its-vehicles

    “Doing our research, when a driver would reach towards a touch-screen interface in any vehicle, they would unintentionally apply torque to the steering wheel, and the vehicle would drift out of its lane position,” said Matthew Valbuena, Mazda North America’s lead engineer for HMI and infotainment.

    “And of course with a touchscreen you have to be looking at the screen while you’re touching…so for that reason we were comfortable removing the touch-screen functionality,” he added.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    ... Doing our research, when a driver would reach towards a touch-screen interface in any vehicle, they would unintentionally apply torque to the steering wheel, and the vehicle would drift out of its lane position...
     
    Doing my research, driving since the Carter administration was in office, I can tell you that only in these past very few years have so many cars started to drift over the line coming at me. It is a really, really stupid epidemic, and it must be caused by something.

    Wait until more cars have self-driving features and lane drift warning systems. People will gradually rely more and more on those things, as you have come to rely on your backup camera. Hilarity and tragedy will ensue. Residents of the left side of the bell curve, and many others, will become like the pilots who can't handle a 737 Max 8.

    Add the magic text string, "immigra..." to that scenario, and you have a formerly great road system devolving rapidly into the circle around the Roman Colosseum.

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    Thank you for the interesting reply, BTW.
    , @stillCARealist
    This was obvious to me, the touchscreen problem, the first time I drove a car with one. You can't feel it, and if you try to not look, you'll mess it up. Then you wind up practically having to pull over to fix whatever on the screen. Terrible idea.

    why did they put these things in all the cars? Teslas. You should see their screens (yikes!) because the goal was that the car would make the decisions and the driver could just watch the progress on the screen... like airline pilots.
    , @Romanian
    Wow, very interesting, thanks! We need a thanks button!
    , @Alden
    So that’s why my car always drifts when I used the touch screen I thought the problem was taking my eyes off the road. I stopped using them.
  20. Maybe Larry Niven was right in the novel Ringworld, and you can genetically select for luck?

  21. @Buzz Mohawk
    A Latin American alien (legal or not I never found out) ran a red light, t-boned my wife, nearly totaled our Mercedes convertible, and then drove off. Hilariously, the front license plate fell off his car, so the cops were able to put out a bulletin, and the asshole was pulled over on a highway somewhere.

    He had no license and was driving someone else's car, with permission. His record indicated that he had perpetrated a hit-and-run before.

    I hired the greasiest, most connected, ambulance chasing firm I could find, in the capital of America's insurance industry, which happens to be an easy drive from where I live. They worked up a suit against the owner of the car, and we took him for the entire value of his insurance policy.

    The driver could barely speak English during deposition.

    The owner of the car lived in Greenwich, Connecticut and had a very nice insurance policy indeed.

    I feel very good about having used our "justice" system to screw somebody like that.

    BTW my wife is fine. Benzes are stout automobiles, even the convertibles.

    Good for you!

    It’s nice to hear of a white victory once in a while.

  22. @Robert Dolan
    In California, it's common knowledge that drunk illegals mow people down and they NEVER stop to help the victims. The numbers are staggering.

    Also to blame in CA is the dumb law that if a pedestrian steps off the curb the driver must stop or face the possibility of getting a ticket. The result is that pedestrians in CA have a false sense of security when stepping in front of cars, whereas a pedestrian in NY knows that cars must be avoided because they can kill you.

    I actually lobbied with the AAA to have this law changed but nothing could be done.

    “also to blame in CA is the dumb law that if a pedestrian steps off the curb the driver must stop or face the possibility of getting a ticket.”

    These are stupid laws, My state has been putting up pedestrian crossings where you are supposed to stop if someone is standing on the curb. Drivers are not used to that. Drivers should have the right of way unless there is a stop light that is red or stop sign otherwise it gets too confusing.

    Whatever happened to look left right and left. Now people start walking and assume the driver will stop. Pedestrians should never assume some will stop even if the light is red.

    • Agree: Robert Dolan
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Whatever happened to look left right and left. Now people start walking and assume the driver will stop. Pedestrians should never assume some will stop even if the light is red.
     
    Some people never figured out that that white line painted on the road won't keep a 5,000 lb. automobile from hitting them and busting them up.
    , @Alden
    So pedestrians shouldn’t cross in the green light because a driver might just blow thru the red light. What about other cars that have the green light? Should they not go thru the intersection because someone might blow thru the red light and T bone them?

    Have you noticed that even going very slowly in congested traffic it takes your car a couple feet to stop?
    , @JeremiahJohnbalaya
    I was astonished when i moved to california and learned this. It is absolute insane to make a driver responsible for what is going on OFF THE ROAD. Rule #1 in driving is to keep your eyes ON THE ROAD.
  23. Anon[328] • Disclaimer says:

    There are so many variables, as others have said. One under-the-radar thing is the coming and going of traffic engineering fads: signage, street line painting, turn lane engineering, crosswalk strategies. I stumbled into this arcane field by following links a few years ago and ended up down a rabbit hole reading all kinds of specialist journals.

    I visited my mom in the U.S. for the first time in a year, and there are half a dozen traffic circles in the neighborhood that weren’t there before. My guess is that those cause a small initial spike in accidents, followed by a drop below pre-traffic circle numbers — for drivers. For pedestrians, hmmm ….

  24. I think the smart phones, along with the screens in the vehicles are indeed the problem. The taking of eyes off the road is worse with touch screens. Real buttons and knobs can be held and felt, but these screens must be stared at to make sure a virtual push of a button really took.

    At night, I really scared the crap out of myself trying to just get the PW in and dialing one phone number. Criminy! With an old Nokia, it can all be done with very little glancing at it’s tiny screen.

    Plus, yes, the drunk Mexicans.

    • Replies: @Alden
    Don’t forget the Hondurans who’ve never been in a car in their lives till they sit in the drivers seat and a buddy tells them, here’s the ignition and there’s the gas pedal.
  25. @The Wild Geese Howard
    OT:

    LA Times with a report from mud world how Sikhs are taking over trucking:

    https://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-col1-sikh-truckers-20190627

    I like how the brown hero of the story is a filthy hypocrite who is a vegetarian at home that relishes the chance to eat meat on the road.

    The link is broken. Sikhs are not vegetarian, AFAIK.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    Fixed:

    https://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-col1-sikh-truckers-20190627-htmlstory.html
    , @Anon
    Yes, they are. Panjab has some of the lowest meat consumption in India.
  26. @Mike_from_SGV
    Speaking of getting killed … am surprised there is no thread about the mormon sweet young thing from El Segundo who (oops!) was living a double life as a sugar baby and got killed and burned by the black guy in Utah. Getting into a car at 3 AM at a public park with a strange black man that you connected with on the internet … golly, what could go wrong?

    … no thread about the mormon sweet young thing…

    Maybe not yet.

    As usual, because the suspect isn’t White, the chief or whoever at the press conference said “Ayoola Adisa Ajayi” one time and then said, “We will not say his name again.”


    The one black guy in Utah. What are the odds?

    As for the girl’s double life, if it’s true, people should learn that there are quite a few “nice” girls out there doing that sort of thing. Plenty of pretty college girls get involved in various forms of adult entertainment for the money — and perhaps also for affirmation of their attractiveness. Usually it’s stripping or soft-core nude modeling though, which are relatively safe.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    “Ayoola Adisa Ajayi”
     
    If that isn't a hit dance song title, it should be.


    Ayoola Adisa Ajayi = Alias: O, yaa, I do a jay.
    , @The Wild Geese Howard

    As for the girl’s double life, if it’s true, people should learn that there are quite a few “nice” girls out there doing that sort of thing.
     
    I reviewed photos of the victim, and I can easily see the naivete in the young lady's face. No doubt the killer also read this and used it to his advantage.

    Physiognomy is real.
    , @denjae

    The one black guy in Utah. What are the odds?
     
    The one Nigerian ‘care-giver’

    employed at my girl-friend’s home

    saw the name -Ajayi - scroll the tv

    and exclaimed, “he’s from my tribe!”

    Odds of THAT? Skyrocketing!
  27. @Tim
    No one has brought this up, but I've noticed that Hispanics just walk in the road a lot at night . . . well, really at all times.

    It just seems like something Hispanics like to do, sort of like the way they enjoy taking their family to the park and barbecuing . . . . then just leaving their trash and shit all over the place.

    Who are we to judge?

    Yep… near the local illegal apartment complexes there is a constant flow of jaywalkers across the very busy street. Often hispanic women carrying babies or walking with small children. They’ll readily risk their own children’s lives to avoid an extra one minute walk half a block to the cross walk.

    Puts the gulf between us and them into extremely sharp relief.

  28. @Kronos
    I thought it didn’t go through the first time.

    You rack disciprine.

    • Agree: Kronos
  29. @Buzz Mohawk
    In addition to smartphones, there has been a steady increase in the presence of screen/menu control centers in cars.

    BMW was an early offender, beginning with its fugly, van Hooydonk era E65 7 Series in 2001. Naturally, the inscrutable interface was named "iDrive." That was the time when everything, even new blogs, had an "i" attached to the front.

    As always, new stuff moves from expensive cars eventually into every cheap piece of crap on the road. By now probably every new car has a screen with a knob that controls a menu, or maybe a touch screen -- requiring the driver to take his eyes off the road and play mouse-computer jockey, or smartphone addict, while driving.

    Whatever the new technology, everyone always thinks everything will be better with it. That is why cars began to have mouses and computer screens to control things like radio volume and tuning, air conditioning, etc. Real convenient.

    Whatever the new technology, everyone always thinks everything will be better with it.

    That’s the problem– everything does get better. So people get lazy and careless. It’s called “risk compensation”, or “risk homeostasis”.

    https://www.wired.com/2011/07/active-safety-systems-could-create-passive-drivers/

    https://carbuzz.com/features/is-car-safety-equipment-making-us-more-dangerous-drivers

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    That's true. See my reply to Anonymous[375]. However, in the case of touch screens and knob mice in cars, driving got worse, not better.

    It's more analogous to putting a microchip in a chainsaw to tell you how far you've cut through the tree and at what angle, with an iPad bolted on that you must operate while cutting.
  30. @Anonymous
    I agree that touchpad control centers are a terrible trend. Traditional controls with intuitive dials and knobs are better and much less distracting.

    Back up cameras are nice, but I feel like they've made me a less attentive driver. Before them, I'd automatically scan everywhere outside and be very careful. Now I feel like I rely too much on the camera and feel more careless.

    Smartphones have definitely made me a worse driver. I'm careful not to touch them in serious situations and at high speeds, but I've almost gotten into fender benders due to fiddling with them/trying to text etc., which never would have happened before smartphones.

    There is some evidence to suggest touchscreens mess up people's driving:

    https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1121372_why-mazda-is-purging-touchscreens-from-its-vehicles

    “Doing our research, when a driver would reach towards a touch-screen interface in any vehicle, they would unintentionally apply torque to the steering wheel, and the vehicle would drift out of its lane position,” said Matthew Valbuena, Mazda North America’s lead engineer for HMI and infotainment.

    “And of course with a touchscreen you have to be looking at the screen while you’re touching...so for that reason we were comfortable removing the touch-screen functionality,” he added.
     

    … Doing our research, when a driver would reach towards a touch-screen interface in any vehicle, they would unintentionally apply torque to the steering wheel, and the vehicle would drift out of its lane position…

    Doing my research, driving since the Carter administration was in office, I can tell you that only in these past very few years have so many cars started to drift over the line coming at me. It is a really, really stupid epidemic, and it must be caused by something.

    Wait until more cars have self-driving features and lane drift warning systems. People will gradually rely more and more on those things, as you have come to rely on your backup camera. Hilarity and tragedy will ensue. Residents of the left side of the bell curve, and many others, will become like the pilots who can’t handle a 737 Max 8.

    Add the magic text string, “immigra…” to that scenario, and you have a formerly great road system devolving rapidly into the circle around the Roman Colosseum.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The problem with high tech features is that once they get any attention, they get mandated. Universal ABS and airbag (actually sodium azide bag) systems have led to greatly increased jackass driving over what was common decades ago. I had to drive a late 40s Pontiac, basically stock, about fifty miles not long ago and it's scary at first to think that you have to think ahead when you're driving these things. But you should always be thinking ahead anyway.
  31. What part of these pedestrian deaths are due to pedestrian error vs. driver error? Smartphones could be to blame for a lot of this, depending; facial recognition for unlocking phones is bound to increase deaths.

    If the increase is due to smartphones, it would be interesting to know what apps the victim was using at time of death. Instagram? Facebook? Gmail? Google Maps?

  32. @PiltdownMan
    The link is broken. Sikhs are not vegetarian, AFAIK.

    Yes, they are. Panjab has some of the lowest meat consumption in India.

    • Replies: @BengaliCanadianDude
    Read that sentence again...
  33. @Mike_from_SGV
    Speaking of getting killed … am surprised there is no thread about the mormon sweet young thing from El Segundo who (oops!) was living a double life as a sugar baby and got killed and burned by the black guy in Utah. Getting into a car at 3 AM at a public park with a strange black man that you connected with on the internet … golly, what could go wrong?

    A prostitute got murdered.

    Dog bites man.

  34. @Buzz Mohawk

    ... no thread about the mormon sweet young thing...
     
    Maybe not yet.

    As usual, because the suspect isn't White, the chief or whoever at the press conference said "Ayoola Adisa Ajayi" one time and then said, "We will not say his name again."

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D-KnSGMVAAA-7BE.jpg
    The one black guy in Utah. What are the odds?

    As for the girl's double life, if it's true, people should learn that there are quite a few "nice" girls out there doing that sort of thing. Plenty of pretty college girls get involved in various forms of adult entertainment for the money -- and perhaps also for affirmation of their attractiveness. Usually it's stripping or soft-core nude modeling though, which are relatively safe.

    “Ayoola Adisa Ajayi”

    If that isn’t a hit dance song title, it should be.

    Ayoola Adisa Ajayi = Alias: O, yaa, I do a jay.

  35. @Reg Cæsar

    Whatever the new technology, everyone always thinks everything will be better with it.
     
    That's the problem-- everything does get better. So people get lazy and careless. It's called "risk compensation", or "risk homeostasis".

    https://www.wired.com/2011/07/active-safety-systems-could-create-passive-drivers/

    https://carbuzz.com/features/is-car-safety-equipment-making-us-more-dangerous-drivers

    That’s true. See my reply to Anonymous[375]. However, in the case of touch screens and knob mice in cars, driving got worse, not better.

    It’s more analogous to putting a microchip in a chainsaw to tell you how far you’ve cut through the tree and at what angle, with an iPad bolted on that you must operate while cutting.

  36. Have you seen the commercial with the young woman, barely an adult, rather nice looking and very nicely dressed, strolling along the sidewalk while texting, “I think I may be addicted to opioids.” She gets a comforting and supportive reply and smiles. All the while, face and fingers glued to the phone. Ridiculous.

  37. @Anonymous
    I agree that touchpad control centers are a terrible trend. Traditional controls with intuitive dials and knobs are better and much less distracting.

    Back up cameras are nice, but I feel like they've made me a less attentive driver. Before them, I'd automatically scan everywhere outside and be very careful. Now I feel like I rely too much on the camera and feel more careless.

    Smartphones have definitely made me a worse driver. I'm careful not to touch them in serious situations and at high speeds, but I've almost gotten into fender benders due to fiddling with them/trying to text etc., which never would have happened before smartphones.

    There is some evidence to suggest touchscreens mess up people's driving:

    https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1121372_why-mazda-is-purging-touchscreens-from-its-vehicles

    “Doing our research, when a driver would reach towards a touch-screen interface in any vehicle, they would unintentionally apply torque to the steering wheel, and the vehicle would drift out of its lane position,” said Matthew Valbuena, Mazda North America’s lead engineer for HMI and infotainment.

    “And of course with a touchscreen you have to be looking at the screen while you’re touching...so for that reason we were comfortable removing the touch-screen functionality,” he added.
     

    Thank you for the interesting reply, BTW.

  38. @Buzz Mohawk
    In addition to smartphones, there has been a steady increase in the presence of screen/menu control centers in cars.

    BMW was an early offender, beginning with its fugly, van Hooydonk era E65 7 Series in 2001. Naturally, the inscrutable interface was named "iDrive." That was the time when everything, even new blogs, had an "i" attached to the front.

    As always, new stuff moves from expensive cars eventually into every cheap piece of crap on the road. By now probably every new car has a screen with a knob that controls a menu, or maybe a touch screen -- requiring the driver to take his eyes off the road and play mouse-computer jockey, or smartphone addict, while driving.

    Whatever the new technology, everyone always thinks everything will be better with it. That is why cars began to have mouses and computer screens to control things like radio volume and tuning, air conditioning, etc. Real convenient.

    Yuck. Fortunately, I live in California so if I’m lucky, I can keep my pre-touchscreen car running for another 20-30 years.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    In much of California, with moderate temps and no road salt, if you have a garage and a little DIY moxie, you can use anything from a Model A Ford to an 80s car as a daily driver if it will keep up on the freeway. (With an A that means some mods.) You can afford two or three old cars if you are not buying new ones and losing all that depreciation. Of course, your survival chances in a serious wreck are crummy in a lot of these things. So, don't have a serious wreck.

    Famed engineer Robert Pease was killed in his vintage VW, which was his daily driver, ironically on the way to the funeral of another engineering legend, Jim Williams:

    https://www.edn.com/electronics-blogs/readerschoice/4368147/Analog-engineering-legend-Bob-Pease-killed-in-car-crash


    Analog engineering legend Bob Pease killed in car crash
    Paul Rako -June 20, 2011

    Analog guru Bob PeaseAnalog guru and industry legend Bob Pease was killed when his car left the road Saturday afternoon as he was leaving a memorial service for his friend and fellow analog expert Jim Williams, who died Sunday, June 12. Bob was driving his beloved 1969 Volkswagen Beetle at the time of the accident. He was 70 years old.

    Bob had left his office at National Semiconductor late in the day Saturday, no doubt distraught by the loss of his comrade Jim Williams. By the time Bob arrived at the memorial service most attendees had left. The service for Jim Williams was at the Mountain Winery, a music venue in the hills outside Saratoga California. Leaving the venue, in the steep descent and curvy roads, Bob's car missed a turn and left the road. He may have suffered a heart attack or stroke. He was killed instantly, around 5:45pm. Bob is survived by his wife Nancy, two sons, Benjamin and Jonathan, and three grandchildren.

    Bob was loved by the analog community. After getting a degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1961, Bob worked at Philbrick Researches, designing vacuum tube amplifiers and voltage-to-frequency converters. He considered working at Analog Devices, in the Boston area, but instead came out to Silicon Valley to work at National Semiconductor. He lived in San Francisco with his wife Nancy, in part so his sons could avail themselves of the choir venues where they loved to sing.

    Starting at National Semiconductor in 1976, Bob ultimately became a face of the company. This was partially due to his participating in the analog seminars that National put on every few years. Bob would travel to a different city every day, for months, teaching analog engineers the secrets of good design. These tours included Europe, India, and China. Indeed, when Bob showed up at a Chinese meeting hall in 2004, the fire marshals had to intervene since almost 700 engineers came to hear what he had to say.

    Pease was very humble for someone who had written 200 "Pease Porridge" articles, become an expert in bandgap voltage references, written the acclaimed book "Troubleshooting Analog Circuits," and won a Certificate of Merit from the Jesse H Neal Awards Committee of American Business Publications in 1992. He designed more than 20 integrated circuits and held 21 patents.

    Bob let his work speak for itself. If he had a fault, it was that he never told his bosses how much work he was doing. He would drive down from San Francisco to National's Sunnyvale campus in his 1969 Beetle at about 9:30 or 10:00am to avoid the traffic. He would then stay until 7:00 or 8:00pm working in the lab and in his notoriously messy office. What many people did not know is that Bob was working for National from his house in San Francisco, as well. He would get up at 5:30 or so, have breakfast and start answering e-mail at 6:30. This allowed him to help dozens of National customers before he even stepped into his office.

    National kept Bob on as staff scientist long past his 65th birthday. In 2009 they offered him an extremely generous retirement package and then hired him back as a contractor. Pease spent time at National working on the Saturday that he died. He was still writing his monthly column at Electronics Design and writing Design Ideas for EDN, as well as offering comments on its content.

    Bob has a legacy as one of the greatest analog engineers in history due to his unique experiences. These days some analog engineers design ICs using Spice and UNIX, while other engineers do system-level work on boards and circuits. Bob was the rare analog creature that had designed analog functions with tubes and discrete circuits, as well as using rubylith masking materials to design ICs, as well as apply those ICs to system-level problems. This gave him a unique outlook on analog design. Like Bob Widlar and analog greats from the past, Bob Pease could think about the physics underlying the device. This was true whether the device was a silicon chip or a vacuum tube.

    Bob had intimate knowledge of what was going on inside the chip. That let him do brilliant work when he used the chip in a board-level circuit. When I worked with him at National, he walked past my lab bench where I had an oscilloscope showing the temperature of a laser driver chip as it heated and cooled. "Oh look," Bob said, "You can see at least three time-constants as the die cools off." Puzzled, I asked, "What do you mean Bob, this is temperature, not a voltage response, how can there be time constants?" He patiently explained that temperature flow has time-constants just like electronics. He pointed to the three slopes in the temperature response. "See, this first one is the dominant one. It is heat flowing out the die-attach paddle and into the circuit board. Then he pointed to the second slope, "This one is probably heat going out through the bond wires." Lastly, he pointed at the third slope and said "This slow one is heat going thought the plastic package, that is a slow phenomena, so you would expect it to come last." He pointed out there were probably more than just the three time constants, and it "would be fun" to study it further. Years later I based an entire EDN article, "Hot, cold, and broken:Thermal-design techniques," on his simple, off-handed comment.

    Bob always had time to help fellow engineers. He was, by nature and disposition, a teacher. That is why he loved traveling on the analog seminar and why he willingly answered hundreds of e-mail every week. He was just as helpful to those he worked around as to those who worked at analog competitors. Siu Williams, wife of recently deceased Linear Technology staff scientist Jim Williams, called me in tears when she heard the news. She related how Bob would often stop by their house to give Jim some article he had written or an interesting part he found in his junk bin.

    All that mattered to Bob was that you had an analog problem. Bob would spend hours helping a hobbyist or small customer of National. Bob did not care how many chips you bought or even if you were not using chips at all. He would spend time helping fellow engineers with transistor circuits that didn't have a single IC in them. All that mattered to Bob was that you needed help with tricky analog problem.

    Bob did not suffer fools and he would not appease or mollify people he thought were being stupid, even if they were his managers. But if you came to him with a problem that you really were stuck on, and asked him where you went wrong, he was as patient as a saint and would never raise his voice or demean you. I was a decent engineer when I went to work with Bob, but by no means an amplifier expert. Bob taught me concepts like noise gain and cross-plot distortion measurements.

    Bob could dive into the details of analog design, but he also had an uncanny ability to see the bigger picture. He was a great advocate of "back of the envelope" calculations-the quick calculations you could almost do in your head. They let you understand the general scope of the problem. He would walk up to engineer's offices where they were punching their calculators or trying to run Spice simulations. He would get the basic facts--microseconds, nanofarads, microhenries--then demonstrate how you could devise time constants just by taking the decades of magnitude away from one component and "walking it up" the decades of magnitude of other physical constants in the problem. While the engineer was still typing in data, Bob would say, "Look, it seems like the first lag, the dominant pole, will be at about 3 microseconds. You can see that will ..." and suddenly the general scope of the problem would become clear.

    Bob's use of the words lag and lead demonstrated another interesting fact. Like most systems engineers, Bob thought and analyzed problems in the time domain, not the frequency domain. Most IC designers talk about poles and zeros and Bode Plots. Bob would translate these sometimes baffling concepts into simple delays. Rather than talk about low phase margin, a frequency-domain concept you need a network analyzer to see, Bob would talk about the ringing of a square wave in the time domain. This was a much more direct and intuitive approach for most engineers. Most every electrical engineer is more familiar with an oscilloscope than a network analyzer.

    Bob's health was failing in the later years of his life. He had diabetes and had lost half of his foot to frostbite when he was trekking in New Hampshire one winter. That really slowed him down but it did not hurt his sense of humor. I was taking him and some National pals to lunch a year ago. Typical Bob, he got into the back seat of my Honda. I protested, we all did, and pointed out he would be more comfortable in the roomier front seat. "No, no," Pease said, "I only need half a foot." We couldn't contain our laughter, and that is just the way Bob wanted it.

    It is a shame that Bob's mobility had become limited in his later years. Even back in his MIT days he was famous for sprinting up the stairs of the engineering buildings. It was his way to keep in shape. He had a two-story house in San Francisco and he used the stairs to keep in shape. He explained that before he went on one of his famous treks in Nepal, he would prepare by walking up and down the stairs in his house. He said when he was able to do it 150 times in rapid succession, he knew he could handle the thin mountain air of Nepal.

    Bob had a concern for the environment long before it became fashionable. He would drive his old 1969 VW Beetle around, getting 30 to 40 miles per gallon even back in the go-go 1980s. This was the second old Beetle that Bob was putting miles on. The first, he almost accidentally made into a convertible. He was leaving the National Semiconductor parking lot late one evening. The security department had strung a chain up over the entrance, as was their custom after 11:00pm. The chain did not have a sign or any tell-tales on it. Bob totaled his little Beetle. He insisted National buy him a new car, which they did. I assume they were surprised when he bought a 1969 Beetle instead of a Mercedes. I asked if he ever considered suing National, he could have been killed. Bob responded, "Don't be ridiculous, it is not like they did it on purpose." That chain had big yellow signs on it from that week forward. I think that is all that Bob cared about, that National did something to keep it from happening to another employee. I also asked Bob why he did not go buy some expensive new car. He explained that he drove an old Beetle because that was exactly the car he wanted to drive. If he bought a Rolls Royce with National's money, he would have to drive it. He preferred his old Beetles. "I totaled a 1967 VW model, but bought a 1969 to replace it," he grinned. The replacement car already had 80,000 miles on it when Bob bought it.

    Then there was Pease's famously cluttered office. Bob said that he used the chronological method of filing. The older the paper was, the lower down in the pile he would look for it. Stories abound of engineers going into Bob's office and asking for some obscure document, and Pease would just wheel around and pull it out from one of the dozens of piles of paper. One National alumni, related how he went into Bob's office needing a bond-out diagram for one of Bob's old chips. Bob wheeled, dug deep, and delivered. The engineer took the drawing and came back a week later to give it back to Bob. As he talked he noticed Bob put it on top an entirely different pile of paper. The engineer waited six months. Then he went back and asked for the same bond-out diagram. To his astonishment, Bob wheeled around, and went down about 4 inches, the depth that accumulated in the six months, and once gains presented the document. Pease may have been messy, but he knew where things were.

    When Jim Williams passed away just a week ago, I wrote that he will be impossible to replace, and the same goes for Bob. But that is not to say that the world will go lacking for brilliant analog engineers. We still have Bonnie Baker and Howard Johnson helping out here at EDN. Dave Van Ess is doing great work over at Electronic Design magazine. If you take time to hang around the younger engineers, you will meet fine young men like my protégé Francis Lau, as well as Bob Pease's good friends, application engineers Paul Grohe and Alan Martin. Over at Maxim there is Eric Schlaepfer and Len Sherman. Analog Devices has Dave Kress and dozens of young analog aficionados that will do work just as brilliant as the analog giants of yesteryear. If there is one message Bob's passing should convey it is that we should spend as much time teaching as we do designing and selling chips. Many people do analog design because it makes them a lot of money. Bob Pease did analog design because it was beautiful. So was he. Farewell my good friend, my mentor, and my standard of excellence.
     
    Would he have survived in a more modern car? Hard to say.
  39. “My guess would be that the rise of around 23% in pedestrian fatalities from 2014 to 2016, the Late Obama Age Collapse, was due to smartphones. But it’s odd that it was almost exactly the same percentage increase as in homicides between 2014, the Year of Ferguson, and 2016.”

    Are you thinking that some of these accidents might not be accidents?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Or maybe cops retreated to the donut shop in 2015 & 2016, which led to an increase in both crime and bad driving?
  40. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    ... Doing our research, when a driver would reach towards a touch-screen interface in any vehicle, they would unintentionally apply torque to the steering wheel, and the vehicle would drift out of its lane position...
     
    Doing my research, driving since the Carter administration was in office, I can tell you that only in these past very few years have so many cars started to drift over the line coming at me. It is a really, really stupid epidemic, and it must be caused by something.

    Wait until more cars have self-driving features and lane drift warning systems. People will gradually rely more and more on those things, as you have come to rely on your backup camera. Hilarity and tragedy will ensue. Residents of the left side of the bell curve, and many others, will become like the pilots who can't handle a 737 Max 8.

    Add the magic text string, "immigra..." to that scenario, and you have a formerly great road system devolving rapidly into the circle around the Roman Colosseum.

    The problem with high tech features is that once they get any attention, they get mandated. Universal ABS and airbag (actually sodium azide bag) systems have led to greatly increased jackass driving over what was common decades ago. I had to drive a late 40s Pontiac, basically stock, about fifty miles not long ago and it’s scary at first to think that you have to think ahead when you’re driving these things. But you should always be thinking ahead anyway.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    The third taillight is my favorite. This has been been proven to do nothing for driver safety.

    Agree about ABS. Threshold braking was a useful driving skill that made one a little more engaged and thoughtful when driving.
  41. My guess would be that the rise of around 23% in pedestrian fatalities from 2014 to 2016, the Late Obama Age Collapse, was due to smartphones

    So what was distracting us to our deaths in 1990 then?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Good question. Perhaps Steve is assuming that improvements in safety and control were reducing deaths over time. It is true, for example, that brakes and tires, stopping distances and control, are phenomenal today on more cars. Attitude control systems and ABS braking too. Not sure how much these things reduced collisions with pedestrians, but without them the death toll would probably be even higher.

    Oh, and he has suggested before that improvements in medicine, emergency procedures, surgery, etc. were steadily reducing deaths of people who got hit by cars. Without the distractions of smartphones and touchscreen controls, that graph would probably have continued to go downhill.

    , @Kronos
    What about the level of insurance scammers? Probably a lot high higher before dash cams became somewhat popular.

    https://youtu.be/HFoes7rsZBA
  42. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @International Jew
    Yuck. Fortunately, I live in California so if I'm lucky, I can keep my pre-touchscreen car running for another 20-30 years.

    In much of California, with moderate temps and no road salt, if you have a garage and a little DIY moxie, you can use anything from a Model A Ford to an 80s car as a daily driver if it will keep up on the freeway. (With an A that means some mods.) You can afford two or three old cars if you are not buying new ones and losing all that depreciation. Of course, your survival chances in a serious wreck are crummy in a lot of these things. So, don’t have a serious wreck.

    Famed engineer Robert Pease was killed in his vintage VW, which was his daily driver, ironically on the way to the funeral of another engineering legend, Jim Williams:

    https://www.edn.com/electronics-blogs/readerschoice/4368147/Analog-engineering-legend-Bob-Pease-killed-in-car-crash

    Analog engineering legend Bob Pease killed in car crash
    Paul Rako -June 20, 2011

    Analog guru Bob PeaseAnalog guru and industry legend Bob Pease was killed when his car left the road Saturday afternoon as he was leaving a memorial service for his friend and fellow analog expert Jim Williams, who died Sunday, June 12. Bob was driving his beloved 1969 Volkswagen Beetle at the time of the accident. He was 70 years old.

    Bob had left his office at National Semiconductor late in the day Saturday, no doubt distraught by the loss of his comrade Jim Williams. By the time Bob arrived at the memorial service most attendees had left. The service for Jim Williams was at the Mountain Winery, a music venue in the hills outside Saratoga California. Leaving the venue, in the steep descent and curvy roads, Bob’s car missed a turn and left the road. He may have suffered a heart attack or stroke. He was killed instantly, around 5:45pm. Bob is survived by his wife Nancy, two sons, Benjamin and Jonathan, and three grandchildren.

    Bob was loved by the analog community. After getting a degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1961, Bob worked at Philbrick Researches, designing vacuum tube amplifiers and voltage-to-frequency converters. He considered working at Analog Devices, in the Boston area, but instead came out to Silicon Valley to work at National Semiconductor. He lived in San Francisco with his wife Nancy, in part so his sons could avail themselves of the choir venues where they loved to sing.

    Starting at National Semiconductor in 1976, Bob ultimately became a face of the company. This was partially due to his participating in the analog seminars that National put on every few years. Bob would travel to a different city every day, for months, teaching analog engineers the secrets of good design. These tours included Europe, India, and China. Indeed, when Bob showed up at a Chinese meeting hall in 2004, the fire marshals had to intervene since almost 700 engineers came to hear what he had to say.

    Pease was very humble for someone who had written 200 “Pease Porridge” articles, become an expert in bandgap voltage references, written the acclaimed book “Troubleshooting Analog Circuits,” and won a Certificate of Merit from the Jesse H Neal Awards Committee of American Business Publications in 1992. He designed more than 20 integrated circuits and held 21 patents.

    Would he have survived in a more modern car? Hard to say.

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    Don't you guys in California have Emissions Testing?

    Doesn't that pose a problem keeping an old car on the road, or is there someone you bribe?
  43. @Oleaginous Outrager

    My guess would be that the rise of around 23% in pedestrian fatalities from 2014 to 2016, the Late Obama Age Collapse, was due to smartphones
     
    So what was distracting us to our deaths in 1990 then?

    Good question. Perhaps Steve is assuming that improvements in safety and control were reducing deaths over time. It is true, for example, that brakes and tires, stopping distances and control, are phenomenal today on more cars. Attitude control systems and ABS braking too. Not sure how much these things reduced collisions with pedestrians, but without them the death toll would probably be even higher.

    Oh, and he has suggested before that improvements in medicine, emergency procedures, surgery, etc. were steadily reducing deaths of people who got hit by cars. Without the distractions of smartphones and touchscreen controls, that graph would probably have continued to go downhill.

    • Replies: @Oleaginous Outrager

    Without the distractions of smartphones and touchscreen controls
     
    Europeans have plenty of smartphones. Are they just more responsible in their use?

    "While some may regard a pedestrian death toll as somehow unavoidable, the recent experience of European countries as a group suggests that there’s nothing about modern life (Europeans have high rates of car ownership and as many smart phones as Americans) that means the pedestrian death toll must be high and rising. In fact, at the same time pedestrian deaths have been soaring the US, they’ve been dropping steadily in Europe. In the latest nine year period for which European data are available, pedestrian deaths decreased from 8,342 to 5,320, a decline of 36 percent."

    "In the past decade, Europe and the US have reversed positions in pedestrian death rates. It used to be that the number of pedestrian deaths per million population were higher in Europe, now the US pedestrian death rate per million population is now 75 percent higher than in Europe."
  44. @Buzz Mohawk
    Good question. Perhaps Steve is assuming that improvements in safety and control were reducing deaths over time. It is true, for example, that brakes and tires, stopping distances and control, are phenomenal today on more cars. Attitude control systems and ABS braking too. Not sure how much these things reduced collisions with pedestrians, but without them the death toll would probably be even higher.

    Oh, and he has suggested before that improvements in medicine, emergency procedures, surgery, etc. were steadily reducing deaths of people who got hit by cars. Without the distractions of smartphones and touchscreen controls, that graph would probably have continued to go downhill.

    Without the distractions of smartphones and touchscreen controls

    Europeans have plenty of smartphones. Are they just more responsible in their use?

    “While some may regard a pedestrian death toll as somehow unavoidable, the recent experience of European countries as a group suggests that there’s nothing about modern life (Europeans have high rates of car ownership and as many smart phones as Americans) that means the pedestrian death toll must be high and rising. In fact, at the same time pedestrian deaths have been soaring the US, they’ve been dropping steadily in Europe. In the latest nine year period for which European data are available, pedestrian deaths decreased from 8,342 to 5,320, a decline of 36 percent.”

    “In the past decade, Europe and the US have reversed positions in pedestrian death rates. It used to be that the number of pedestrian deaths per million population were higher in Europe, now the US pedestrian death rate per million population is now 75 percent higher than in Europe.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Americans drive about twice as much as Europeans do. American roads are also a lot bigger. Even European highways tend to be quite small and narrow relative to US highways and often only have 2 or 3 lanes. A lot of the roads in Europe are small, old 2 lane roads that snake through old villages and towns.
    , @Buzz Mohawk

    Europeans have plenty of smartphones. Are they just more responsible in their use?
     
    Maybe, but I've seen some crazy driving over there. It probably depends on the country. Which parts of Europe? I know licenses are a little harder to get. (The exams are tougher than ours, but that's not saying much.)

    People over there don't drive as much as Americans. The distances are shorter and fuel prices are much higher. So, fewer opportunities for tragedies per million population. Apples and oranges.

    This, however, doesn't explain why their numbers are falling while ours are rising. I've met common workers over there who will tell you to your face that Americans have no culture. They're wrong, but maybe they are becoming increasingly right. Our population, whatever qualifies as American now (all 7 billion humans!) is definitely becoming stupider and more careless.

  45. car crash deaths were down 1% from 2017 to 2018, though that was from a 40 year high in 2017 or some such number. probably also cell phone related.

    that 1% however could easily just be the yearly improvement in the safety of vehicles as old vehicles from 20 years ago get steadily rotated out for new vehicles. or less vehicle miles as the price of gasoline goes up. et cetera. would have to check on that.

    so the cell phone car crash death rate may be unchanged.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Crash deaths should go down a few percent per year.
  46. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @Oleaginous Outrager

    Without the distractions of smartphones and touchscreen controls
     
    Europeans have plenty of smartphones. Are they just more responsible in their use?

    "While some may regard a pedestrian death toll as somehow unavoidable, the recent experience of European countries as a group suggests that there’s nothing about modern life (Europeans have high rates of car ownership and as many smart phones as Americans) that means the pedestrian death toll must be high and rising. In fact, at the same time pedestrian deaths have been soaring the US, they’ve been dropping steadily in Europe. In the latest nine year period for which European data are available, pedestrian deaths decreased from 8,342 to 5,320, a decline of 36 percent."

    "In the past decade, Europe and the US have reversed positions in pedestrian death rates. It used to be that the number of pedestrian deaths per million population were higher in Europe, now the US pedestrian death rate per million population is now 75 percent higher than in Europe."

    Americans drive about twice as much as Europeans do. American roads are also a lot bigger. Even European highways tend to be quite small and narrow relative to US highways and often only have 2 or 3 lanes. A lot of the roads in Europe are small, old 2 lane roads that snake through old villages and towns.

    • Replies: @Corn
    My parents went to Ireland twenty years ago. They basically drove up and down the western coast because my grandmother was from western Ireland.

    They were struck by how small the roads were. My parents claimed what the Irish considered a two lane road was often 1-1/2 lanes at best by our standards, and if two cars met very often one car had to pull over and yield or both cars would have to slow and drive on the shoulder a little.

    I wouldn’t think of Ireland as free-range but they also had to brake for sheep once or twice. My sister took pictures of the herds.
  47. Did a big state change the speed limit or reduce anti-drink driving measures?

  48. “Benzes are stout automobiles, even the convertibles.”

    big mercedes and BMWs have the lowest driver death rate of any car.

    “In 2013, marijuana was legalized in Colorado and Washington.”

    the car crash rate went up 7% in colorado, or that’s what i read. if that’s accurate, that’s less than what i expected, but it’s still not zero, and dozens of extra people killed every year. colorado is the best possible case scenario for making marijuana legal, so we shouldn’t extrapolate from there as what to expect in other states. “It worked out ok in Colorado, so…” is not that good of an argument. colorado is the healthiest, fittest state in the US by far.

    in other states, i assume the rate will go up a lot higher than that. a 25% increase in car crashes does not seem unlikely if a few states in the south make marijuana legal, or washington DC.

    “Smartphones have definitely made me a worse driver.”

    GPS has made most drivers a lot worse at getting around. hippocampuses everywhere rotting in the fields! but since GPS will never not be around from now on, knowing where you’re going, or even actually reading a map, are skills that will decline.

    • Replies: @Charon

    big mercedes and BMWs have the lowest driver death rate of any car.
     
    Even if that is true, which I don't know, their insurance costs are sky-high which is probably an effect of their sky-high repair costs.
    , @The Wild Geese Howard

    GPS will never not be around from now on, knowing where you’re going, or even actually reading a map, are skills that will decline.
     
    Uh, the GPS satellite constellation is a huge ongoing infrastructure project that requires tons of capital and high IQ manpower to keep functioning.

    GPS certainly could go dark if Kamala cuts its budget to fund reparations.
  49. @Oleaginous Outrager

    Without the distractions of smartphones and touchscreen controls
     
    Europeans have plenty of smartphones. Are they just more responsible in their use?

    "While some may regard a pedestrian death toll as somehow unavoidable, the recent experience of European countries as a group suggests that there’s nothing about modern life (Europeans have high rates of car ownership and as many smart phones as Americans) that means the pedestrian death toll must be high and rising. In fact, at the same time pedestrian deaths have been soaring the US, they’ve been dropping steadily in Europe. In the latest nine year period for which European data are available, pedestrian deaths decreased from 8,342 to 5,320, a decline of 36 percent."

    "In the past decade, Europe and the US have reversed positions in pedestrian death rates. It used to be that the number of pedestrian deaths per million population were higher in Europe, now the US pedestrian death rate per million population is now 75 percent higher than in Europe."

    Europeans have plenty of smartphones. Are they just more responsible in their use?

    Maybe, but I’ve seen some crazy driving over there. It probably depends on the country. Which parts of Europe? I know licenses are a little harder to get. (The exams are tougher than ours, but that’s not saying much.)

    People over there don’t drive as much as Americans. The distances are shorter and fuel prices are much higher. So, fewer opportunities for tragedies per million population. Apples and oranges.

    This, however, doesn’t explain why their numbers are falling while ours are rising. I’ve met common workers over there who will tell you to your face that Americans have no culture. They’re wrong, but maybe they are becoming increasingly right. Our population, whatever qualifies as American now (all 7 billion humans!) is definitely becoming stupider and more careless.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    Exactly. And I would like to add that, here in America, we simply have way too many cars on the road. The subprime auto bubble is a large and pernicious force out there that doesn't get a lot of mention. We have long since reached the point of market saturation whereat everybody who wants a car and can actually afford one, already has one. In response to this, dealerships and financiers have lowered their lending standards to embrace the sludge at the bottom of the credit barrel. The 72-month, zero-due-at-signing car loan is specifically designed to place automobiles into the hands of the least competent, least responsible members of society. Not only is this likely to increase accident rates, it also wrecks the solvency of the whole transportation sector.The depreciation curve of a new car is much steeper than the principal-remaining curve of the loan, meaning that these loans are guaranteed to go underwater before reaching maturity, if indeed they are ever paid back at all. This greatly distorts the used car market and results in tens of billions of bad auto debt that must be liquidated somehow.

    These boom-bust cycles are the inevitable result of the unnatural credit expansions that are necessary to breathe life into a zombie industry that no longer has a legitimate path to profitability. The real, long term cost of maintaining the happy motoring culture cannot be successfully amortized. One way or another, a day of reckoning is coming for the automobile. If serious people do not devote themselves to this problem, the unserious (e.g. Elon Musk) certainly will.
  50. My state has been putting up pedestrian crossings where you are supposed to stop if someone is standing on the curb. Drivers are not used to that. Drivers should have the right of way unless there is a stop light that is red or stop sign otherwise it gets too confusing.

    They’ve worked pretty well in the UK for 80-odd years: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belisha_beacon

    • Replies: @Alden
    We have pedestrian right of way in California.

    It’s an excellent thing. When driving we keep an eye on the sidewalks and pedestrians and are prepared to stop. Also keep an eye on bikes skateboards electric scooters construction dogs cats deer raccoons possums coyotes and other wildlife. Deer are the worst pedestrians. They just stand there a few minutes to figure it out and then amble off.

    We grow up seeing our parents do it. Driving teachers DMV manuals and parents emphasize it
    The reason is very simple. Even at 10 miles an hour, a one ton car will injure, seriously injure or kill a pedestrian.
  51. @prime noticer
    car crash deaths were down 1% from 2017 to 2018, though that was from a 40 year high in 2017 or some such number. probably also cell phone related.

    that 1% however could easily just be the yearly improvement in the safety of vehicles as old vehicles from 20 years ago get steadily rotated out for new vehicles. or less vehicle miles as the price of gasoline goes up. et cetera. would have to check on that.

    so the cell phone car crash death rate may be unchanged.

    Crash deaths should go down a few percent per year.

  52. @Not Raul
    “My guess would be that the rise of around 23% in pedestrian fatalities from 2014 to 2016, the Late Obama Age Collapse, was due to smartphones. But it’s odd that it was almost exactly the same percentage increase as in homicides between 2014, the Year of Ferguson, and 2016.”

    Are you thinking that some of these accidents might not be accidents?

    Or maybe cops retreated to the donut shop in 2015 & 2016, which led to an increase in both crime and bad driving?

    • Replies: @TWS
    It's about the time judicial activism for illegals really kicked in. With no consequences and judges actually letting guys slide so they won't get deported this behavior was bound to increase.
    , @Desiderius
    And now we've got Soros DAs to not prosecute the perps they're not arresting. It's the perfect marriage of malice and indolence.
    , @Lot
    Red light cameras peaked around 2012 or so, right?

    I don’t think my city has them anymore, and I know many others took them down, sometimes because of scandals involving rigged red lights.

    While we still have DUI checkpoints, the State made conservative suburbs stop doing license and registration checkpoints a few years ago. When Escondido was still doing them, they’d nab a couple dozen illegals with no license, registration, or insurance each time, and then impound their junker.
  53. Let’s hope it is natural selection at work.

  54. @prime noticer
    "Benzes are stout automobiles, even the convertibles."

    big mercedes and BMWs have the lowest driver death rate of any car.

    "In 2013, marijuana was legalized in Colorado and Washington."

    the car crash rate went up 7% in colorado, or that's what i read. if that's accurate, that's less than what i expected, but it's still not zero, and dozens of extra people killed every year. colorado is the best possible case scenario for making marijuana legal, so we shouldn't extrapolate from there as what to expect in other states. "It worked out ok in Colorado, so..." is not that good of an argument. colorado is the healthiest, fittest state in the US by far.

    in other states, i assume the rate will go up a lot higher than that. a 25% increase in car crashes does not seem unlikely if a few states in the south make marijuana legal, or washington DC.

    "Smartphones have definitely made me a worse driver."

    GPS has made most drivers a lot worse at getting around. hippocampuses everywhere rotting in the fields! but since GPS will never not be around from now on, knowing where you're going, or even actually reading a map, are skills that will decline.

    big mercedes and BMWs have the lowest driver death rate of any car.

    Even if that is true, which I don’t know, their insurance costs are sky-high which is probably an effect of their sky-high repair costs.

  55. @The Wild Geese Howard
    OT:

    LA Times with a report from mud world how Sikhs are taking over trucking:

    https://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-col1-sikh-truckers-20190627

    I like how the brown hero of the story is a filthy hypocrite who is a vegetarian at home that relishes the chance to eat meat on the road.

    I like how the brown hero of the story is a filthy hypocrite who is a vegetarian at home that relishes the chance to eat meat on the road.

    LOL, kind of like Southern Baptists and their booze.

  56. @ziel
    I wonder what the % of black (motorist) on black (pedestrian) is - I'm guessing a pretty big chunk - but that could be due to my prejudice as a commuter to Newark.

    If we could just see these numbers broken out by zip code we could draw all the necessary conclusions.

  57. I almost became one of those 2017 statistics.

  58. @Anonymous
    Americans drive about twice as much as Europeans do. American roads are also a lot bigger. Even European highways tend to be quite small and narrow relative to US highways and often only have 2 or 3 lanes. A lot of the roads in Europe are small, old 2 lane roads that snake through old villages and towns.

    My parents went to Ireland twenty years ago. They basically drove up and down the western coast because my grandmother was from western Ireland.

    They were struck by how small the roads were. My parents claimed what the Irish considered a two lane road was often 1-1/2 lanes at best by our standards, and if two cars met very often one car had to pull over and yield or both cars would have to slow and drive on the shoulder a little.

    I wouldn’t think of Ireland as free-range but they also had to brake for sheep once or twice. My sister took pictures of the herds.

  59. @Anonymous
    The problem with high tech features is that once they get any attention, they get mandated. Universal ABS and airbag (actually sodium azide bag) systems have led to greatly increased jackass driving over what was common decades ago. I had to drive a late 40s Pontiac, basically stock, about fifty miles not long ago and it's scary at first to think that you have to think ahead when you're driving these things. But you should always be thinking ahead anyway.

    The third taillight is my favorite. This has been been proven to do nothing for driver safety.

    Agree about ABS. Threshold braking was a useful driving skill that made one a little more engaged and thoughtful when driving.

    • Replies: @Lot
    Hard to believe a third taillight doesn’t have even a tiny safety increase. Let’s say it is 0.5% fewer fender benders and for 20% of rear collisions it reduces their severity by an average of 5%.

    Such a tiny effect would be impossible to ever measure as it would be swamped by other variables, but it could still pass cost-benefit. Especially now with LEDs being so cheap and efficient.
  60. @prime noticer
    "Benzes are stout automobiles, even the convertibles."

    big mercedes and BMWs have the lowest driver death rate of any car.

    "In 2013, marijuana was legalized in Colorado and Washington."

    the car crash rate went up 7% in colorado, or that's what i read. if that's accurate, that's less than what i expected, but it's still not zero, and dozens of extra people killed every year. colorado is the best possible case scenario for making marijuana legal, so we shouldn't extrapolate from there as what to expect in other states. "It worked out ok in Colorado, so..." is not that good of an argument. colorado is the healthiest, fittest state in the US by far.

    in other states, i assume the rate will go up a lot higher than that. a 25% increase in car crashes does not seem unlikely if a few states in the south make marijuana legal, or washington DC.

    "Smartphones have definitely made me a worse driver."

    GPS has made most drivers a lot worse at getting around. hippocampuses everywhere rotting in the fields! but since GPS will never not be around from now on, knowing where you're going, or even actually reading a map, are skills that will decline.

    GPS will never not be around from now on, knowing where you’re going, or even actually reading a map, are skills that will decline.

    Uh, the GPS satellite constellation is a huge ongoing infrastructure project that requires tons of capital and high IQ manpower to keep functioning.

    GPS certainly could go dark if Kamala cuts its budget to fund reparations.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    the GPS satellite constellation is a huge ongoing infrastructure project that requires tons of capital and high IQ manpower to keep functioning.
     
    Please elaborate.
    , @Intelligent Dasein
    Not to mention the fact that most of what we imprecisely refer to as "GPS" isn't really GPS at all. The mapping feature on your smartphone, for instance, typically uses triangulation from the known locations of nearby cell towers, a sort of radiographic topological map of cell signals, and dead-reckoning with its own internal accelerometers to figure out location. When GPS is used, it needs to be augmented to improve accuracy.

    The GPS system is often cited by science buffs as a backdoor "proof" of the theory of relativity. They say that if the relativistic corrections weren't applied, the accuracy of GPS readings would drift by 10 kilometers per day. This, however, is total nonsense. GPS "works" not because of relativity but because the entire system is tared once a week to correct for station keeping errors. Without this constant maintenance, GPS would quickly become unusable.
  61. @Robert Dolan
    In California, it's common knowledge that drunk illegals mow people down and they NEVER stop to help the victims. The numbers are staggering.

    Also to blame in CA is the dumb law that if a pedestrian steps off the curb the driver must stop or face the possibility of getting a ticket. The result is that pedestrians in CA have a false sense of security when stepping in front of cars, whereas a pedestrian in NY knows that cars must be avoided because they can kill you.

    I actually lobbied with the AAA to have this law changed but nothing could be done.

    “The result is that pedestrians in CA have a false sense of security when stepping in front of cars,”

    I would say that our traffic laws have installed a sense of impunity in pedestrians and bicyclists. Even when a collision is their fault, they can file a suit against a motorist’s insurance company and reasonably expect a settlement.

  62. Does the death count include the people who were killed as they were socializing around their cars with friends and family in the expressway emergency lane, or are those considered highway fatalities?

  63. @Buzz Mohawk
    A Latin American alien (legal or not I never found out) ran a red light, t-boned my wife, nearly totaled our Mercedes convertible, and then drove off. Hilariously, the front license plate fell off his car, so the cops were able to put out a bulletin, and the asshole was pulled over on a highway somewhere.

    He had no license and was driving someone else's car, with permission. His record indicated that he had perpetrated a hit-and-run before.

    I hired the greasiest, most connected, ambulance chasing firm I could find, in the capital of America's insurance industry, which happens to be an easy drive from where I live. They worked up a suit against the owner of the car, and we took him for the entire value of his insurance policy.

    The driver could barely speak English during deposition.

    The owner of the car lived in Greenwich, Connecticut and had a very nice insurance policy indeed.

    I feel very good about having used our "justice" system to screw somebody like that.

    BTW my wife is fine. Benzes are stout automobiles, even the convertibles.

    Nice for the happy ending.

    Though I’m a little uncomfortable feeding the legal/insurance racket; I’d rather see our courts and political leadership make it easier to attach the earnings of those actually involved in flagrant accidents, and deport such illegals/recent immigrants plus a random ten thousand of their cohorts, pour encourager les autres. Collective punishment, baby!

  64. @ziel
    I wonder what the % of black (motorist) on black (pedestrian) is - I'm guessing a pretty big chunk - but that could be due to my prejudice as a commuter to Newark.

    Not prejudice, same thing happens in Chicago area.

  65. @HammerJack
    It's an open secret in every negro-infested city that blacks will aim their cars at whites on foot, and when on foot themselves will walk into traffic with total impunity. If they're lucky, they win the ghetto lottery.

    If they’re lucky, they win the ghetto lottery.

    Yeah, whenever I drive in The Harlems it’s like playing reverse-Frogger.

  66. @Buzz Mohawk

    Europeans have plenty of smartphones. Are they just more responsible in their use?
     
    Maybe, but I've seen some crazy driving over there. It probably depends on the country. Which parts of Europe? I know licenses are a little harder to get. (The exams are tougher than ours, but that's not saying much.)

    People over there don't drive as much as Americans. The distances are shorter and fuel prices are much higher. So, fewer opportunities for tragedies per million population. Apples and oranges.

    This, however, doesn't explain why their numbers are falling while ours are rising. I've met common workers over there who will tell you to your face that Americans have no culture. They're wrong, but maybe they are becoming increasingly right. Our population, whatever qualifies as American now (all 7 billion humans!) is definitely becoming stupider and more careless.

    Exactly. And I would like to add that, here in America, we simply have way too many cars on the road. The subprime auto bubble is a large and pernicious force out there that doesn’t get a lot of mention. We have long since reached the point of market saturation whereat everybody who wants a car and can actually afford one, already has one. In response to this, dealerships and financiers have lowered their lending standards to embrace the sludge at the bottom of the credit barrel. The 72-month, zero-due-at-signing car loan is specifically designed to place automobiles into the hands of the least competent, least responsible members of society. Not only is this likely to increase accident rates, it also wrecks the solvency of the whole transportation sector.The depreciation curve of a new car is much steeper than the principal-remaining curve of the loan, meaning that these loans are guaranteed to go underwater before reaching maturity, if indeed they are ever paid back at all. This greatly distorts the used car market and results in tens of billions of bad auto debt that must be liquidated somehow.

    These boom-bust cycles are the inevitable result of the unnatural credit expansions that are necessary to breathe life into a zombie industry that no longer has a legitimate path to profitability. The real, long term cost of maintaining the happy motoring culture cannot be successfully amortized. One way or another, a day of reckoning is coming for the automobile. If serious people do not devote themselves to this problem, the unserious (e.g. Elon Musk) certainly will.

  67. @The Wild Geese Howard
    OT:

    LA Times with a report from mud world how Sikhs are taking over trucking:

    https://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-col1-sikh-truckers-20190627

    I like how the brown hero of the story is a filthy hypocrite who is a vegetarian at home that relishes the chance to eat meat on the road.

    Canada is about twenty years ahead of the USA on this. Sikhs have completely taken over the Canadian independent trucking industry.

    This is the result: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humboldt_Broncos_bus_crash

  68. @The Wild Geese Howard
    OT:

    LA Times with a report from mud world how Sikhs are taking over trucking:

    https://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-col1-sikh-truckers-20190627

    I like how the brown hero of the story is a filthy hypocrite who is a vegetarian at home that relishes the chance to eat meat on the road.

    Ten days ago on my morning walk in San Rafael, a big rig driver leaving McDonald’s asked for directions to Sonoma. It was a turbaned Sikh. I continued about a half-mile, up a steep peripheral road past a church known as a Honduran sanctuary, and got stopped by another big-rig turban, also looking for Sonoma. Unlike most Sikhs, this guy was jolly, but I thought, “Sikhs massing in Sonoma!”

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    And the carnage from wayward tractor trailers runs to many thousands of American citizens every year. Not one of whom make a whit of difference to the SJWs wailing incessantly about a single migrant child.
  69. @trelane
    Pedestrians walk into traffic today without fear and as though entitled to a path across oncoming traffic. When I was young you let cars go by first.

    Pedestrians walk into traffic today without fear and as though entitled to a path across oncoming traffic. When I was young you let cars go by first.

    I guess it sucks that I’m in a wheelchair now, but at least everyone knows that pedestrians always have the right-of-way in California….

  70. @Anonymous
    I agree that touchpad control centers are a terrible trend. Traditional controls with intuitive dials and knobs are better and much less distracting.

    Back up cameras are nice, but I feel like they've made me a less attentive driver. Before them, I'd automatically scan everywhere outside and be very careful. Now I feel like I rely too much on the camera and feel more careless.

    Smartphones have definitely made me a worse driver. I'm careful not to touch them in serious situations and at high speeds, but I've almost gotten into fender benders due to fiddling with them/trying to text etc., which never would have happened before smartphones.

    There is some evidence to suggest touchscreens mess up people's driving:

    https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1121372_why-mazda-is-purging-touchscreens-from-its-vehicles

    “Doing our research, when a driver would reach towards a touch-screen interface in any vehicle, they would unintentionally apply torque to the steering wheel, and the vehicle would drift out of its lane position,” said Matthew Valbuena, Mazda North America’s lead engineer for HMI and infotainment.

    “And of course with a touchscreen you have to be looking at the screen while you’re touching...so for that reason we were comfortable removing the touch-screen functionality,” he added.
     

    This was obvious to me, the touchscreen problem, the first time I drove a car with one. You can’t feel it, and if you try to not look, you’ll mess it up. Then you wind up practically having to pull over to fix whatever on the screen. Terrible idea.

    why did they put these things in all the cars? Teslas. You should see their screens (yikes!) because the goal was that the car would make the decisions and the driver could just watch the progress on the screen… like airline pilots.

  71. @Anon
    Yes, they are. Panjab has some of the lowest meat consumption in India.

    Read that sentence again…

  72. Illegals flee the scene every time. They have no reason not to. Most minorities are in the same situation, minimal chance of getting caught and low repercussions.

  73. @Steve Sailer
    Or maybe cops retreated to the donut shop in 2015 & 2016, which led to an increase in both crime and bad driving?

    It’s about the time judicial activism for illegals really kicked in. With no consequences and judges actually letting guys slide so they won’t get deported this behavior was bound to increase.

  74. @Buzz Mohawk
    A Latin American alien (legal or not I never found out) ran a red light, t-boned my wife, nearly totaled our Mercedes convertible, and then drove off. Hilariously, the front license plate fell off his car, so the cops were able to put out a bulletin, and the asshole was pulled over on a highway somewhere.

    He had no license and was driving someone else's car, with permission. His record indicated that he had perpetrated a hit-and-run before.

    I hired the greasiest, most connected, ambulance chasing firm I could find, in the capital of America's insurance industry, which happens to be an easy drive from where I live. They worked up a suit against the owner of the car, and we took him for the entire value of his insurance policy.

    The driver could barely speak English during deposition.

    The owner of the car lived in Greenwich, Connecticut and had a very nice insurance policy indeed.

    I feel very good about having used our "justice" system to screw somebody like that.

    BTW my wife is fine. Benzes are stout automobiles, even the convertibles.

    Wow, sounds hair raising. Good to see it all worked out. But why was the guy driving some other guy’s car? What was the relation between them?

    • Replies: @Alden
    Driver was most probably an employee. Owner was the employer of an illegal alien.
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    Alden is correct, though I didn't find out if the alien employee was illegal or not.
  75. @Anonymous
    I agree that touchpad control centers are a terrible trend. Traditional controls with intuitive dials and knobs are better and much less distracting.

    Back up cameras are nice, but I feel like they've made me a less attentive driver. Before them, I'd automatically scan everywhere outside and be very careful. Now I feel like I rely too much on the camera and feel more careless.

    Smartphones have definitely made me a worse driver. I'm careful not to touch them in serious situations and at high speeds, but I've almost gotten into fender benders due to fiddling with them/trying to text etc., which never would have happened before smartphones.

    There is some evidence to suggest touchscreens mess up people's driving:

    https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1121372_why-mazda-is-purging-touchscreens-from-its-vehicles

    “Doing our research, when a driver would reach towards a touch-screen interface in any vehicle, they would unintentionally apply torque to the steering wheel, and the vehicle would drift out of its lane position,” said Matthew Valbuena, Mazda North America’s lead engineer for HMI and infotainment.

    “And of course with a touchscreen you have to be looking at the screen while you’re touching...so for that reason we were comfortable removing the touch-screen functionality,” he added.
     

    Wow, very interesting, thanks! We need a thanks button!

  76. @Buzz Mohawk
    In addition to smartphones, there has been a steady increase in the presence of screen/menu control centers in cars.

    BMW was an early offender, beginning with its fugly, van Hooydonk era E65 7 Series in 2001. Naturally, the inscrutable interface was named "iDrive." That was the time when everything, even new blogs, had an "i" attached to the front.

    As always, new stuff moves from expensive cars eventually into every cheap piece of crap on the road. By now probably every new car has a screen with a knob that controls a menu, or maybe a touch screen -- requiring the driver to take his eyes off the road and play mouse-computer jockey, or smartphone addict, while driving.

    Whatever the new technology, everyone always thinks everything will be better with it. That is why cars began to have mouses and computer screens to control things like radio volume and tuning, air conditioning, etc. Real convenient.

    Yeah, I took my brother to the airport recently and on the way back could not figure out how to turn down the radio in his car. These things are a PITA as well as being dangerous. I can do the radio, the heat, everything in my 2005 CRV without taking my eyes off the road.

    I also see more and more people walking around with headphones on and their faces glued to their phone who seem completely oblivious to their surroundings. It’s especially annoying on the crowded sidewalks of NYC. I had several people who would have walked into me if I had not avoided them.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    This young woman miraculously survived getting run over by a tram in Oregon, though she did lose her leg. She had her headphones on while trying to cross the tracks. She was awarded $15 million after suing the state for not having enough safety features installed on the tram.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86Mp-hOdADQ
  77. @Oleaginous Outrager

    My guess would be that the rise of around 23% in pedestrian fatalities from 2014 to 2016, the Late Obama Age Collapse, was due to smartphones
     
    So what was distracting us to our deaths in 1990 then?

    What about the level of insurance scammers? Probably a lot high higher before dash cams became somewhat popular.

  78. @Buzz Mohawk

    ... no thread about the mormon sweet young thing...
     
    Maybe not yet.

    As usual, because the suspect isn't White, the chief or whoever at the press conference said "Ayoola Adisa Ajayi" one time and then said, "We will not say his name again."

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D-KnSGMVAAA-7BE.jpg
    The one black guy in Utah. What are the odds?

    As for the girl's double life, if it's true, people should learn that there are quite a few "nice" girls out there doing that sort of thing. Plenty of pretty college girls get involved in various forms of adult entertainment for the money -- and perhaps also for affirmation of their attractiveness. Usually it's stripping or soft-core nude modeling though, which are relatively safe.

    As for the girl’s double life, if it’s true, people should learn that there are quite a few “nice” girls out there doing that sort of thing.

    I reviewed photos of the victim, and I can easily see the naivete in the young lady’s face. No doubt the killer also read this and used it to his advantage.

    Physiognomy is real.

  79. @Buzz Mohawk
    In addition to smartphones, there has been a steady increase in the presence of screen/menu control centers in cars.

    BMW was an early offender, beginning with its fugly, van Hooydonk era E65 7 Series in 2001. Naturally, the inscrutable interface was named "iDrive." That was the time when everything, even new blogs, had an "i" attached to the front.

    As always, new stuff moves from expensive cars eventually into every cheap piece of crap on the road. By now probably every new car has a screen with a knob that controls a menu, or maybe a touch screen -- requiring the driver to take his eyes off the road and play mouse-computer jockey, or smartphone addict, while driving.

    Whatever the new technology, everyone always thinks everything will be better with it. That is why cars began to have mouses and computer screens to control things like radio volume and tuning, air conditioning, etc. Real convenient.

    My wife’s car is new, and the radio controls are all touch-screen. I hate ’em. Knobs and buttons give you tactile feedback – you can feel your way around the controls without taking your eyes off the road. And I hate the backup camera – I just find it distracting. The left-turn rear-view camera might actually be useful, but it doesn’ have one for right-turns.

  80. @Steve Sailer
    Or maybe cops retreated to the donut shop in 2015 & 2016, which led to an increase in both crime and bad driving?

    And now we’ve got Soros DAs to not prosecute the perps they’re not arresting. It’s the perfect marriage of malice and indolence.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    The Burrough of Queens just elected a newly minted Soros DA who is committed to not enforcing the law. Soros' campaign to fill DA's, Attorney's General, and Secretaries of State offices with his own commissars has been going on for several years now. I heard about it years ago. It has been commented on in blogs for some time. Does the GOP make an issue out of it, or even draw attention to it? No.
  81. @Western
    "also to blame in CA is the dumb law that if a pedestrian steps off the curb the driver must stop or face the possibility of getting a ticket."

    These are stupid laws, My state has been putting up pedestrian crossings where you are supposed to stop if someone is standing on the curb. Drivers are not used to that. Drivers should have the right of way unless there is a stop light that is red or stop sign otherwise it gets too confusing.

    Whatever happened to look left right and left. Now people start walking and assume the driver will stop. Pedestrians should never assume some will stop even if the light is red.

    Whatever happened to look left right and left. Now people start walking and assume the driver will stop. Pedestrians should never assume some will stop even if the light is red.

    Some people never figured out that that white line painted on the road won’t keep a 5,000 lb. automobile from hitting them and busting them up.

    • Replies: @Alden
    And some people stand on their right of way and end up injuring or killing some idiot and paying for it.
  82. @Desiderius
    And now we've got Soros DAs to not prosecute the perps they're not arresting. It's the perfect marriage of malice and indolence.

    The Burrough of Queens just elected a newly minted Soros DA who is committed to not enforcing the law. Soros’ campaign to fill DA’s, Attorney’s General, and Secretaries of State offices with his own commissars has been going on for several years now. I heard about it years ago. It has been commented on in blogs for some time. Does the GOP make an issue out of it, or even draw attention to it? No.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    What hath the GOP to do with Queens?
  83. @Buzz Mohawk
    In addition to smartphones, there has been a steady increase in the presence of screen/menu control centers in cars.

    BMW was an early offender, beginning with its fugly, van Hooydonk era E65 7 Series in 2001. Naturally, the inscrutable interface was named "iDrive." That was the time when everything, even new blogs, had an "i" attached to the front.

    As always, new stuff moves from expensive cars eventually into every cheap piece of crap on the road. By now probably every new car has a screen with a knob that controls a menu, or maybe a touch screen -- requiring the driver to take his eyes off the road and play mouse-computer jockey, or smartphone addict, while driving.

    Whatever the new technology, everyone always thinks everything will be better with it. That is why cars began to have mouses and computer screens to control things like radio volume and tuning, air conditioning, etc. Real convenient.

    Yes, yes, yes. They are very dangerous. I just don’t use them. Even on an empty freeway through the desert I find as soon as I start fiddling with the screen the car starts going off sideways.

    The personal injury lawyers and federal safety laws succeeded in making cars very safe for both passengers and the pedestrians they hit.

    But the manufacturers decided to install those useless extras that requiring taking your eyes off the road and mirrors and concentrating on the screen.

  84. @RobUK

    My state has been putting up pedestrian crossings where you are supposed to stop if someone is standing on the curb. Drivers are not used to that. Drivers should have the right of way unless there is a stop light that is red or stop sign otherwise it gets too confusing.
     
    They've worked pretty well in the UK for 80-odd years: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belisha_beacon

    We have pedestrian right of way in California.

    It’s an excellent thing. When driving we keep an eye on the sidewalks and pedestrians and are prepared to stop. Also keep an eye on bikes skateboards electric scooters construction dogs cats deer raccoons possums coyotes and other wildlife. Deer are the worst pedestrians. They just stand there a few minutes to figure it out and then amble off.

    We grow up seeing our parents do it. Driving teachers DMV manuals and parents emphasize it
    The reason is very simple. Even at 10 miles an hour, a one ton car will injure, seriously injure or kill a pedestrian.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    California has something stronger than nominal pedestrian right of way, which at the weakest level is I believe universal (no car is "allowed" to slam into people, it's just accepted as being sometimes more difficult to avoid them). But it'd never work in Detroit.
    There's not enough blacks for this to be the full answer, but everyone who has driven through a "diverse" city will be familiar with "Make Whitey Stop." After "We Presdent Now," not only the election but Obama's later swing left, "Make Whitey Stop" almost certainly increased as a celebration of felt prestige. But I'm sure that increasing "Make Whitey Stop" while driver reflexes enjoyed no parallel increase wouldn't give you enough crashes to explain that severe curve.
    , @Anonymous
    California is so car centric and unwalkalbe that "pedestrian right of way" means something quite different there relative to other places. Jaywalking is less common and heavily ticketed there. Whereas on the east coast, jaywalking is very common. In a place like NYC, there are a lot more pedestrians and jaywalking is the norm.
  85. @Buzz Mohawk
    A Latin American alien (legal or not I never found out) ran a red light, t-boned my wife, nearly totaled our Mercedes convertible, and then drove off. Hilariously, the front license plate fell off his car, so the cops were able to put out a bulletin, and the asshole was pulled over on a highway somewhere.

    He had no license and was driving someone else's car, with permission. His record indicated that he had perpetrated a hit-and-run before.

    I hired the greasiest, most connected, ambulance chasing firm I could find, in the capital of America's insurance industry, which happens to be an easy drive from where I live. They worked up a suit against the owner of the car, and we took him for the entire value of his insurance policy.

    The driver could barely speak English during deposition.

    The owner of the car lived in Greenwich, Connecticut and had a very nice insurance policy indeed.

    I feel very good about having used our "justice" system to screw somebody like that.

    BTW my wife is fine. Benzes are stout automobiles, even the convertibles.

    Illegal alien was probably a handyman. Owner of car the employer of illegal aliens.

  86. @Achmed E. Newman
    I think the smart phones, along with the screens in the vehicles are indeed the problem. The taking of eyes off the road is worse with touch screens. Real buttons and knobs can be held and felt, but these screens must be stared at to make sure a virtual push of a button really took.

    At night, I really scared the crap out of myself trying to just get the PW in and dialing one phone number. Criminy! With an old Nokia, it can all be done with very little glancing at it's tiny screen.

    Plus, yes, the drunk Mexicans.

    Don’t forget the Hondurans who’ve never been in a car in their lives till they sit in the drivers seat and a buddy tells them, here’s the ignition and there’s the gas pedal.

  87. Lot says:
    @The Wild Geese Howard
    The third taillight is my favorite. This has been been proven to do nothing for driver safety.

    Agree about ABS. Threshold braking was a useful driving skill that made one a little more engaged and thoughtful when driving.

    Hard to believe a third taillight doesn’t have even a tiny safety increase. Let’s say it is 0.5% fewer fender benders and for 20% of rear collisions it reduces their severity by an average of 5%.

    Such a tiny effect would be impossible to ever measure as it would be swamped by other variables, but it could still pass cost-benefit. Especially now with LEDs being so cheap and efficient.

  88. Lot says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Or maybe cops retreated to the donut shop in 2015 & 2016, which led to an increase in both crime and bad driving?

    Red light cameras peaked around 2012 or so, right?

    I don’t think my city has them anymore, and I know many others took them down, sometimes because of scandals involving rigged red lights.

    While we still have DUI checkpoints, the State made conservative suburbs stop doing license and registration checkpoints a few years ago. When Escondido was still doing them, they’d nab a couple dozen illegals with no license, registration, or insurance each time, and then impound their junker.

    • Replies: @Alden
    A big problem with red might cameras is that they weren’t a city operation. They were run by independent contractors. The city paid the contractor for the service. The city was supposed to make a profit from the tickets issued and paid.

    The cities paid a huge amount to the contractor but didn’t make enough from the tickets paid, not issued, but paid.

    For one thing, running thru red lights is seldom done. Usually it’s going thru the yellow light too late. The sales critters way oversold the number of drivers who ran red lights

    Most important thing is that the kind of people who do run red lights usually don’t have the money to pay the tickets. In Los Angeles the price was $390.00 last I heard. That’s too much for a lot of people. Plus if it’s not paid real soon unless a court date is set, the price doubles

    What with no one actually paying the tickets it was a big loss to the city. Haven’t noticed if they’ve been taken down or not.
    , @Alden
    Another thing about the red lighting cameras. Running red light conviction causes car insurance rates to soar.
    So people who had insurance usually hired attorneys to fight the ticket. They often won as the attorneys could argue about camera angles whatever.
  89. @Robert Dolan
    In California, it's common knowledge that drunk illegals mow people down and they NEVER stop to help the victims. The numbers are staggering.

    Also to blame in CA is the dumb law that if a pedestrian steps off the curb the driver must stop or face the possibility of getting a ticket. The result is that pedestrians in CA have a false sense of security when stepping in front of cars, whereas a pedestrian in NY knows that cars must be avoided because they can kill you.

    I actually lobbied with the AAA to have this law changed but nothing could be done.

    You don’t get tickets for that. We drive paranoid about pedestrians and other drivers. We walk paranoid about drivers and bikes.

    Its instinctive when you grow up seeing your parents doing it and do it from age 15. Didn’t your Drivers Ed teacher tell you not to expect that other drivers and pedestrians will follow the laws? “ Anything and everything can be a hazard, anticipate hazards, dispose of hazards promptly”. I still remember that.

    That law is because people can be killed injured and injured so seriously they spend the rest of their lives in a nursing home if hit be a car.

    I think those electric scooters should be banned from streets and confined to sidewalks and bike lanes. They are as vulnerable as if they were walking around in the middle of the streets. If hit from behind those metal handles will smash into abdomen or chest. If hit in the side they’ll be hurt as well.

    In reality it’s no problem at all. 50 years of driving, much of it in congested city areas I can’t remember any problems with pedestrians including children running out in front of my car. Deer and raccoons on the other hand

  90. @Lot
    Red light cameras peaked around 2012 or so, right?

    I don’t think my city has them anymore, and I know many others took them down, sometimes because of scandals involving rigged red lights.

    While we still have DUI checkpoints, the State made conservative suburbs stop doing license and registration checkpoints a few years ago. When Escondido was still doing them, they’d nab a couple dozen illegals with no license, registration, or insurance each time, and then impound their junker.

    A big problem with red might cameras is that they weren’t a city operation. They were run by independent contractors. The city paid the contractor for the service. The city was supposed to make a profit from the tickets issued and paid.

    The cities paid a huge amount to the contractor but didn’t make enough from the tickets paid, not issued, but paid.

    For one thing, running thru red lights is seldom done. Usually it’s going thru the yellow light too late. The sales critters way oversold the number of drivers who ran red lights

    Most important thing is that the kind of people who do run red lights usually don’t have the money to pay the tickets. In Los Angeles the price was $390.00 last I heard. That’s too much for a lot of people. Plus if it’s not paid real soon unless a court date is set, the price doubles

    What with no one actually paying the tickets it was a big loss to the city. Haven’t noticed if they’ve been taken down or not.

  91. @Lot
    Red light cameras peaked around 2012 or so, right?

    I don’t think my city has them anymore, and I know many others took them down, sometimes because of scandals involving rigged red lights.

    While we still have DUI checkpoints, the State made conservative suburbs stop doing license and registration checkpoints a few years ago. When Escondido was still doing them, they’d nab a couple dozen illegals with no license, registration, or insurance each time, and then impound their junker.

    Another thing about the red lighting cameras. Running red light conviction causes car insurance rates to soar.
    So people who had insurance usually hired attorneys to fight the ticket. They often won as the attorneys could argue about camera angles whatever.

  92. @Western
    "also to blame in CA is the dumb law that if a pedestrian steps off the curb the driver must stop or face the possibility of getting a ticket."

    These are stupid laws, My state has been putting up pedestrian crossings where you are supposed to stop if someone is standing on the curb. Drivers are not used to that. Drivers should have the right of way unless there is a stop light that is red or stop sign otherwise it gets too confusing.

    Whatever happened to look left right and left. Now people start walking and assume the driver will stop. Pedestrians should never assume some will stop even if the light is red.

    So pedestrians shouldn’t cross in the green light because a driver might just blow thru the red light. What about other cars that have the green light? Should they not go thru the intersection because someone might blow thru the red light and T bone them?

    Have you noticed that even going very slowly in congested traffic it takes your car a couple feet to stop?

  93. @Anonymous
    I agree that touchpad control centers are a terrible trend. Traditional controls with intuitive dials and knobs are better and much less distracting.

    Back up cameras are nice, but I feel like they've made me a less attentive driver. Before them, I'd automatically scan everywhere outside and be very careful. Now I feel like I rely too much on the camera and feel more careless.

    Smartphones have definitely made me a worse driver. I'm careful not to touch them in serious situations and at high speeds, but I've almost gotten into fender benders due to fiddling with them/trying to text etc., which never would have happened before smartphones.

    There is some evidence to suggest touchscreens mess up people's driving:

    https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1121372_why-mazda-is-purging-touchscreens-from-its-vehicles

    “Doing our research, when a driver would reach towards a touch-screen interface in any vehicle, they would unintentionally apply torque to the steering wheel, and the vehicle would drift out of its lane position,” said Matthew Valbuena, Mazda North America’s lead engineer for HMI and infotainment.

    “And of course with a touchscreen you have to be looking at the screen while you’re touching...so for that reason we were comfortable removing the touch-screen functionality,” he added.
     

    So that’s why my car always drifts when I used the touch screen I thought the problem was taking my eyes off the road. I stopped using them.

  94. @Mr. Anon

    Whatever happened to look left right and left. Now people start walking and assume the driver will stop. Pedestrians should never assume some will stop even if the light is red.
     
    Some people never figured out that that white line painted on the road won't keep a 5,000 lb. automobile from hitting them and busting them up.

    And some people stand on their right of way and end up injuring or killing some idiot and paying for it.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    And some people stand on their right of way and end up injuring or killing some idiot and paying for it.
     
    I agree. I've noticed a lot of pedestrians acting recklessly, but I've also noticed a lot of drivers acting recklessly.
  95. @Romanian
    Wow, sounds hair raising. Good to see it all worked out. But why was the guy driving some other guy's car? What was the relation between them?

    Driver was most probably an employee. Owner was the employer of an illegal alien.

  96. @Alden
    We have pedestrian right of way in California.

    It’s an excellent thing. When driving we keep an eye on the sidewalks and pedestrians and are prepared to stop. Also keep an eye on bikes skateboards electric scooters construction dogs cats deer raccoons possums coyotes and other wildlife. Deer are the worst pedestrians. They just stand there a few minutes to figure it out and then amble off.

    We grow up seeing our parents do it. Driving teachers DMV manuals and parents emphasize it
    The reason is very simple. Even at 10 miles an hour, a one ton car will injure, seriously injure or kill a pedestrian.

    California has something stronger than nominal pedestrian right of way, which at the weakest level is I believe universal (no car is “allowed” to slam into people, it’s just accepted as being sometimes more difficult to avoid them). But it’d never work in Detroit.
    There’s not enough blacks for this to be the full answer, but everyone who has driven through a “diverse” city will be familiar with “Make Whitey Stop.” After “We Presdent Now,” not only the election but Obama’s later swing left, “Make Whitey Stop” almost certainly increased as a celebration of felt prestige. But I’m sure that increasing “Make Whitey Stop” while driver reflexes enjoyed no parallel increase wouldn’t give you enough crashes to explain that severe curve.

    • Replies: @Alden
    I don’t live in a black neighborhood
  97. @Western
    "also to blame in CA is the dumb law that if a pedestrian steps off the curb the driver must stop or face the possibility of getting a ticket."

    These are stupid laws, My state has been putting up pedestrian crossings where you are supposed to stop if someone is standing on the curb. Drivers are not used to that. Drivers should have the right of way unless there is a stop light that is red or stop sign otherwise it gets too confusing.

    Whatever happened to look left right and left. Now people start walking and assume the driver will stop. Pedestrians should never assume some will stop even if the light is red.

    I was astonished when i moved to california and learned this. It is absolute insane to make a driver responsible for what is going on OFF THE ROAD. Rule #1 in driving is to keep your eyes ON THE ROAD.

    • Replies: @Alden
    So your former state’s DMV code was written in the expectation that pedestrians, children bikers skateboarders and animals would behave sensibly. Does anyone teach the pedestrians that cars have the right of way? What about deer?
  98. @Romanian
    Wow, sounds hair raising. Good to see it all worked out. But why was the guy driving some other guy's car? What was the relation between them?

    Alden is correct, though I didn’t find out if the alien employee was illegal or not.

  99. @Mr. Anon
    The Burrough of Queens just elected a newly minted Soros DA who is committed to not enforcing the law. Soros' campaign to fill DA's, Attorney's General, and Secretaries of State offices with his own commissars has been going on for several years now. I heard about it years ago. It has been commented on in blogs for some time. Does the GOP make an issue out of it, or even draw attention to it? No.

    What hath the GOP to do with Queens?

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    What hath the GOP to do with Queens?
     
    Nothing. But it isn't just local officials in Democratic cities that Soros is trying to place in office.
  100. My homicidal encounters with pedestrians while I’m driving are pretty infrequent. Of course, I don’t live in the Tri-state Area anymore.

    In my suburban world, bicyclists are a real problem; they are positively suicidal. The potential body work…

  101. @The Wild Geese Howard

    GPS will never not be around from now on, knowing where you’re going, or even actually reading a map, are skills that will decline.
     
    Uh, the GPS satellite constellation is a huge ongoing infrastructure project that requires tons of capital and high IQ manpower to keep functioning.

    GPS certainly could go dark if Kamala cuts its budget to fund reparations.

    the GPS satellite constellation is a huge ongoing infrastructure project that requires tons of capital and high IQ manpower to keep functioning.

    Please elaborate.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    This should give a sense of the incredible amount of effort it takes to keep the GPS constellation up and running:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Positioning_System
  102. @Mike_from_SGV
    Speaking of getting killed … am surprised there is no thread about the mormon sweet young thing from El Segundo who (oops!) was living a double life as a sugar baby and got killed and burned by the black guy in Utah. Getting into a car at 3 AM at a public park with a strange black man that you connected with on the internet … golly, what could go wrong?

    She was a prostitute operating on her own without a pimp or Escort Agency and the drivers the agencies employ to drive the girls to and from appointments. The pimps take everything. The agencies take half but better split the money than be a hooker without a body guard.

  103. @Alden
    And some people stand on their right of way and end up injuring or killing some idiot and paying for it.

    And some people stand on their right of way and end up injuring or killing some idiot and paying for it.

    I agree. I’ve noticed a lot of pedestrians acting recklessly, but I’ve also noticed a lot of drivers acting recklessly.

  104. @Desiderius
    What hath the GOP to do with Queens?

    What hath the GOP to do with Queens?

    Nothing. But it isn’t just local officials in Democratic cities that Soros is trying to place in office.

  105. @J.Ross
    California has something stronger than nominal pedestrian right of way, which at the weakest level is I believe universal (no car is "allowed" to slam into people, it's just accepted as being sometimes more difficult to avoid them). But it'd never work in Detroit.
    There's not enough blacks for this to be the full answer, but everyone who has driven through a "diverse" city will be familiar with "Make Whitey Stop." After "We Presdent Now," not only the election but Obama's later swing left, "Make Whitey Stop" almost certainly increased as a celebration of felt prestige. But I'm sure that increasing "Make Whitey Stop" while driver reflexes enjoyed no parallel increase wouldn't give you enough crashes to explain that severe curve.

    I don’t live in a black neighborhood

  106. @JeremiahJohnbalaya
    I was astonished when i moved to california and learned this. It is absolute insane to make a driver responsible for what is going on OFF THE ROAD. Rule #1 in driving is to keep your eyes ON THE ROAD.

    So your former state’s DMV code was written in the expectation that pedestrians, children bikers skateboarders and animals would behave sensibly. Does anyone teach the pedestrians that cars have the right of way? What about deer?

  107. @The Wild Geese Howard

    GPS will never not be around from now on, knowing where you’re going, or even actually reading a map, are skills that will decline.
     
    Uh, the GPS satellite constellation is a huge ongoing infrastructure project that requires tons of capital and high IQ manpower to keep functioning.

    GPS certainly could go dark if Kamala cuts its budget to fund reparations.

    Not to mention the fact that most of what we imprecisely refer to as “GPS” isn’t really GPS at all. The mapping feature on your smartphone, for instance, typically uses triangulation from the known locations of nearby cell towers, a sort of radiographic topological map of cell signals, and dead-reckoning with its own internal accelerometers to figure out location. When GPS is used, it needs to be augmented to improve accuracy.

    The GPS system is often cited by science buffs as a backdoor “proof” of the theory of relativity. They say that if the relativistic corrections weren’t applied, the accuracy of GPS readings would drift by 10 kilometers per day. This, however, is total nonsense. GPS “works” not because of relativity but because the entire system is tared once a week to correct for station keeping errors. Without this constant maintenance, GPS would quickly become unusable.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    This, however, is total nonsense. GPS “works” not because of relativity but because the entire system is tared once a week to correct for station keeping errors.
     
    What does tared mean? Thanks for the reply.
  108. @Jim Don Bob

    the GPS satellite constellation is a huge ongoing infrastructure project that requires tons of capital and high IQ manpower to keep functioning.
     
    Please elaborate.

    This should give a sense of the incredible amount of effort it takes to keep the GPS constellation up and running:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Positioning_System

  109. @Buzz Mohawk

    ... no thread about the mormon sweet young thing...
     
    Maybe not yet.

    As usual, because the suspect isn't White, the chief or whoever at the press conference said "Ayoola Adisa Ajayi" one time and then said, "We will not say his name again."

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D-KnSGMVAAA-7BE.jpg
    The one black guy in Utah. What are the odds?

    As for the girl's double life, if it's true, people should learn that there are quite a few "nice" girls out there doing that sort of thing. Plenty of pretty college girls get involved in various forms of adult entertainment for the money -- and perhaps also for affirmation of their attractiveness. Usually it's stripping or soft-core nude modeling though, which are relatively safe.

    The one black guy in Utah. What are the odds?

    The one Nigerian ‘care-giver’

    employed at my girl-friend’s home

    saw the name -Ajayi – scroll the tv

    and exclaimed, “he’s from my tribe!”

    Odds of THAT? Skyrocketing!

  110. @The Wild Geese Howard
    OT:

    LA Times with a report from mud world how Sikhs are taking over trucking:

    https://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-col1-sikh-truckers-20190627

    I like how the brown hero of the story is a filthy hypocrite who is a vegetarian at home that relishes the chance to eat meat on the road.

    Here in Canada we just had one of these brown “heroes” kill sixteen white kids in Saskatchewan.

  111. @Marty
    Ten days ago on my morning walk in San Rafael, a big rig driver leaving McDonald's asked for directions to Sonoma. It was a turbaned Sikh. I continued about a half-mile, up a steep peripheral road past a church known as a Honduran sanctuary, and got stopped by another big-rig turban, also looking for Sonoma. Unlike most Sikhs, this guy was jolly, but I thought, "Sikhs massing in Sonoma!"

    And the carnage from wayward tractor trailers runs to many thousands of American citizens every year. Not one of whom make a whit of difference to the SJWs wailing incessantly about a single migrant child.

  112. In Los Angeles, the morning news regularly features a story about the latest hit-and-run fatality, usually someone who got run down while trying to jaywalk across 5 lanes where the speed limit is 45 but some traffic is 10-15 mph over the speed limit, drivers possibly half or fully drunk, texting, eating, fiddling with the stereo.

    Also getting full coverage in LA are The Drivers Who Will Not Pull Over For The Cops, commonly in a stolen or carjacked vehicle, who lead the CHP and local cops on a not-so-merry chase across So. Cal., officially termed a pursuit. I’ve seen stolen semis, mail trucks, and a few weeks ago a women with two dogs in a stolen RV, who not only fled the cops, but also managed to engage in her own little demolition derby with the RV, ripping off most of the passenger side after hitting a utility pole, with the RV’s contents and debris blowing in the wind and falling from the fleeing vehicle, and at one point, a dog either jumped or was thrown from the RV in what can be described only as complete and full-blown idiocy.

    Many of these pursuits end in a crash, but sometimes the vehicle pulls up somewhere, the doors fly open, and four or five guys jump out and take off in different directions.

    A few drivers may be full-blown murderous maniacs, even in Silicon Valley:

    Car rams into 8 people at California intersection, possibly on purpose

    Bicycle at scene in Sunnyvale, California, where a car hit 8 people on a sidewalk on evening of April 23, 2019.
    Shahar Hart

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/sunnyvale-california-car-rams-8-people-intersection-possibly-on-purpose/

    Police identify driver arrested after striking 8 pedestrians in Sunnyvale

    Isaiah Joel Peoples.
    Photo courtesy Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety.

    Isaiah Joel Peoples, 34, of Sunnyvale, admitted to driving the car into the crowd intentionally, according to Capt. Jim Choi.

    https://mv-voice.com/news/2019/04/24/car-strikes-8-pedestrians-in-sunnyvale-driver-arrested

    This one, of course, has been all over the MSM.

  113. @Intelligent Dasein
    Not to mention the fact that most of what we imprecisely refer to as "GPS" isn't really GPS at all. The mapping feature on your smartphone, for instance, typically uses triangulation from the known locations of nearby cell towers, a sort of radiographic topological map of cell signals, and dead-reckoning with its own internal accelerometers to figure out location. When GPS is used, it needs to be augmented to improve accuracy.

    The GPS system is often cited by science buffs as a backdoor "proof" of the theory of relativity. They say that if the relativistic corrections weren't applied, the accuracy of GPS readings would drift by 10 kilometers per day. This, however, is total nonsense. GPS "works" not because of relativity but because the entire system is tared once a week to correct for station keeping errors. Without this constant maintenance, GPS would quickly become unusable.

    This, however, is total nonsense. GPS “works” not because of relativity but because the entire system is tared once a week to correct for station keeping errors.

    What does tared mean? Thanks for the reply.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    The word tare comes from "the tare weight," which means the weight of a container. You subtract the tare weight from the total weight in order to find out the weight of the contents. Chemists use this concept quite a bit when doing basic laboratory work, since they are always weighing out precise quantities of things in beakers and flasks. As a result, nearly all modern digital scales have "tare" button which resets the current weight as the new zero point.

    It works like this. You place an empty vessel on the scale; say, a beaker that weighs 101.25 grams. Your digital scale now reads 101.25. Then you hit the "tare" button and the readout switches to 0.00 with the beaker still on the scale. Now if you want to weigh out 100 grams of water, you need only pour water into the beaker until the scale reads 100.00, and you don't have to worry about performing calculations with awkward constants. Taring is a useful habit to have on hand for any sort of work that depends on frequently adjusting weights and measures.

    Similarly, the GPS system is regularly "reset" so that the current position of the satellites becomes the new baseline. Obviously, the hard limit of the accuracy of a GPS reading is set by knowledge of the satellites' own positions, but these will vary due to gravitational perturbations, atmospheric drag, and other factors. Because perfect station keeping is impossible, once per week the system is re-zeroed, i.e. it is "tared."
  114. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jim Don Bob
    Yeah, I took my brother to the airport recently and on the way back could not figure out how to turn down the radio in his car. These things are a PITA as well as being dangerous. I can do the radio, the heat, everything in my 2005 CRV without taking my eyes off the road.

    I also see more and more people walking around with headphones on and their faces glued to their phone who seem completely oblivious to their surroundings. It's especially annoying on the crowded sidewalks of NYC. I had several people who would have walked into me if I had not avoided them.

    This young woman miraculously survived getting run over by a tram in Oregon, though she did lose her leg. She had her headphones on while trying to cross the tracks. She was awarded $15 million after suing the state for not having enough safety features installed on the tram.

  115. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden
    We have pedestrian right of way in California.

    It’s an excellent thing. When driving we keep an eye on the sidewalks and pedestrians and are prepared to stop. Also keep an eye on bikes skateboards electric scooters construction dogs cats deer raccoons possums coyotes and other wildlife. Deer are the worst pedestrians. They just stand there a few minutes to figure it out and then amble off.

    We grow up seeing our parents do it. Driving teachers DMV manuals and parents emphasize it
    The reason is very simple. Even at 10 miles an hour, a one ton car will injure, seriously injure or kill a pedestrian.

    California is so car centric and unwalkalbe that “pedestrian right of way” means something quite different there relative to other places. Jaywalking is less common and heavily ticketed there. Whereas on the east coast, jaywalking is very common. In a place like NYC, there are a lot more pedestrians and jaywalking is the norm.

  116. @Anonymous
    In much of California, with moderate temps and no road salt, if you have a garage and a little DIY moxie, you can use anything from a Model A Ford to an 80s car as a daily driver if it will keep up on the freeway. (With an A that means some mods.) You can afford two or three old cars if you are not buying new ones and losing all that depreciation. Of course, your survival chances in a serious wreck are crummy in a lot of these things. So, don't have a serious wreck.

    Famed engineer Robert Pease was killed in his vintage VW, which was his daily driver, ironically on the way to the funeral of another engineering legend, Jim Williams:

    https://www.edn.com/electronics-blogs/readerschoice/4368147/Analog-engineering-legend-Bob-Pease-killed-in-car-crash


    Analog engineering legend Bob Pease killed in car crash
    Paul Rako -June 20, 2011

    Analog guru Bob PeaseAnalog guru and industry legend Bob Pease was killed when his car left the road Saturday afternoon as he was leaving a memorial service for his friend and fellow analog expert Jim Williams, who died Sunday, June 12. Bob was driving his beloved 1969 Volkswagen Beetle at the time of the accident. He was 70 years old.

    Bob had left his office at National Semiconductor late in the day Saturday, no doubt distraught by the loss of his comrade Jim Williams. By the time Bob arrived at the memorial service most attendees had left. The service for Jim Williams was at the Mountain Winery, a music venue in the hills outside Saratoga California. Leaving the venue, in the steep descent and curvy roads, Bob's car missed a turn and left the road. He may have suffered a heart attack or stroke. He was killed instantly, around 5:45pm. Bob is survived by his wife Nancy, two sons, Benjamin and Jonathan, and three grandchildren.

    Bob was loved by the analog community. After getting a degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1961, Bob worked at Philbrick Researches, designing vacuum tube amplifiers and voltage-to-frequency converters. He considered working at Analog Devices, in the Boston area, but instead came out to Silicon Valley to work at National Semiconductor. He lived in San Francisco with his wife Nancy, in part so his sons could avail themselves of the choir venues where they loved to sing.

    Starting at National Semiconductor in 1976, Bob ultimately became a face of the company. This was partially due to his participating in the analog seminars that National put on every few years. Bob would travel to a different city every day, for months, teaching analog engineers the secrets of good design. These tours included Europe, India, and China. Indeed, when Bob showed up at a Chinese meeting hall in 2004, the fire marshals had to intervene since almost 700 engineers came to hear what he had to say.

    Pease was very humble for someone who had written 200 "Pease Porridge" articles, become an expert in bandgap voltage references, written the acclaimed book "Troubleshooting Analog Circuits," and won a Certificate of Merit from the Jesse H Neal Awards Committee of American Business Publications in 1992. He designed more than 20 integrated circuits and held 21 patents.

    Bob let his work speak for itself. If he had a fault, it was that he never told his bosses how much work he was doing. He would drive down from San Francisco to National's Sunnyvale campus in his 1969 Beetle at about 9:30 or 10:00am to avoid the traffic. He would then stay until 7:00 or 8:00pm working in the lab and in his notoriously messy office. What many people did not know is that Bob was working for National from his house in San Francisco, as well. He would get up at 5:30 or so, have breakfast and start answering e-mail at 6:30. This allowed him to help dozens of National customers before he even stepped into his office.

    National kept Bob on as staff scientist long past his 65th birthday. In 2009 they offered him an extremely generous retirement package and then hired him back as a contractor. Pease spent time at National working on the Saturday that he died. He was still writing his monthly column at Electronics Design and writing Design Ideas for EDN, as well as offering comments on its content.

    Bob has a legacy as one of the greatest analog engineers in history due to his unique experiences. These days some analog engineers design ICs using Spice and UNIX, while other engineers do system-level work on boards and circuits. Bob was the rare analog creature that had designed analog functions with tubes and discrete circuits, as well as using rubylith masking materials to design ICs, as well as apply those ICs to system-level problems. This gave him a unique outlook on analog design. Like Bob Widlar and analog greats from the past, Bob Pease could think about the physics underlying the device. This was true whether the device was a silicon chip or a vacuum tube.

    Bob had intimate knowledge of what was going on inside the chip. That let him do brilliant work when he used the chip in a board-level circuit. When I worked with him at National, he walked past my lab bench where I had an oscilloscope showing the temperature of a laser driver chip as it heated and cooled. "Oh look," Bob said, "You can see at least three time-constants as the die cools off." Puzzled, I asked, "What do you mean Bob, this is temperature, not a voltage response, how can there be time constants?" He patiently explained that temperature flow has time-constants just like electronics. He pointed to the three slopes in the temperature response. "See, this first one is the dominant one. It is heat flowing out the die-attach paddle and into the circuit board. Then he pointed to the second slope, "This one is probably heat going out through the bond wires." Lastly, he pointed at the third slope and said "This slow one is heat going thought the plastic package, that is a slow phenomena, so you would expect it to come last." He pointed out there were probably more than just the three time constants, and it "would be fun" to study it further. Years later I based an entire EDN article, "Hot, cold, and broken:Thermal-design techniques," on his simple, off-handed comment.

    Bob always had time to help fellow engineers. He was, by nature and disposition, a teacher. That is why he loved traveling on the analog seminar and why he willingly answered hundreds of e-mail every week. He was just as helpful to those he worked around as to those who worked at analog competitors. Siu Williams, wife of recently deceased Linear Technology staff scientist Jim Williams, called me in tears when she heard the news. She related how Bob would often stop by their house to give Jim some article he had written or an interesting part he found in his junk bin.

    All that mattered to Bob was that you had an analog problem. Bob would spend hours helping a hobbyist or small customer of National. Bob did not care how many chips you bought or even if you were not using chips at all. He would spend time helping fellow engineers with transistor circuits that didn't have a single IC in them. All that mattered to Bob was that you needed help with tricky analog problem.

    Bob did not suffer fools and he would not appease or mollify people he thought were being stupid, even if they were his managers. But if you came to him with a problem that you really were stuck on, and asked him where you went wrong, he was as patient as a saint and would never raise his voice or demean you. I was a decent engineer when I went to work with Bob, but by no means an amplifier expert. Bob taught me concepts like noise gain and cross-plot distortion measurements.

    Bob could dive into the details of analog design, but he also had an uncanny ability to see the bigger picture. He was a great advocate of "back of the envelope" calculations-the quick calculations you could almost do in your head. They let you understand the general scope of the problem. He would walk up to engineer's offices where they were punching their calculators or trying to run Spice simulations. He would get the basic facts--microseconds, nanofarads, microhenries--then demonstrate how you could devise time constants just by taking the decades of magnitude away from one component and "walking it up" the decades of magnitude of other physical constants in the problem. While the engineer was still typing in data, Bob would say, "Look, it seems like the first lag, the dominant pole, will be at about 3 microseconds. You can see that will ..." and suddenly the general scope of the problem would become clear.

    Bob's use of the words lag and lead demonstrated another interesting fact. Like most systems engineers, Bob thought and analyzed problems in the time domain, not the frequency domain. Most IC designers talk about poles and zeros and Bode Plots. Bob would translate these sometimes baffling concepts into simple delays. Rather than talk about low phase margin, a frequency-domain concept you need a network analyzer to see, Bob would talk about the ringing of a square wave in the time domain. This was a much more direct and intuitive approach for most engineers. Most every electrical engineer is more familiar with an oscilloscope than a network analyzer.

    Bob's health was failing in the later years of his life. He had diabetes and had lost half of his foot to frostbite when he was trekking in New Hampshire one winter. That really slowed him down but it did not hurt his sense of humor. I was taking him and some National pals to lunch a year ago. Typical Bob, he got into the back seat of my Honda. I protested, we all did, and pointed out he would be more comfortable in the roomier front seat. "No, no," Pease said, "I only need half a foot." We couldn't contain our laughter, and that is just the way Bob wanted it.

    It is a shame that Bob's mobility had become limited in his later years. Even back in his MIT days he was famous for sprinting up the stairs of the engineering buildings. It was his way to keep in shape. He had a two-story house in San Francisco and he used the stairs to keep in shape. He explained that before he went on one of his famous treks in Nepal, he would prepare by walking up and down the stairs in his house. He said when he was able to do it 150 times in rapid succession, he knew he could handle the thin mountain air of Nepal.

    Bob had a concern for the environment long before it became fashionable. He would drive his old 1969 VW Beetle around, getting 30 to 40 miles per gallon even back in the go-go 1980s. This was the second old Beetle that Bob was putting miles on. The first, he almost accidentally made into a convertible. He was leaving the National Semiconductor parking lot late one evening. The security department had strung a chain up over the entrance, as was their custom after 11:00pm. The chain did not have a sign or any tell-tales on it. Bob totaled his little Beetle. He insisted National buy him a new car, which they did. I assume they were surprised when he bought a 1969 Beetle instead of a Mercedes. I asked if he ever considered suing National, he could have been killed. Bob responded, "Don't be ridiculous, it is not like they did it on purpose." That chain had big yellow signs on it from that week forward. I think that is all that Bob cared about, that National did something to keep it from happening to another employee. I also asked Bob why he did not go buy some expensive new car. He explained that he drove an old Beetle because that was exactly the car he wanted to drive. If he bought a Rolls Royce with National's money, he would have to drive it. He preferred his old Beetles. "I totaled a 1967 VW model, but bought a 1969 to replace it," he grinned. The replacement car already had 80,000 miles on it when Bob bought it.

    Then there was Pease's famously cluttered office. Bob said that he used the chronological method of filing. The older the paper was, the lower down in the pile he would look for it. Stories abound of engineers going into Bob's office and asking for some obscure document, and Pease would just wheel around and pull it out from one of the dozens of piles of paper. One National alumni, related how he went into Bob's office needing a bond-out diagram for one of Bob's old chips. Bob wheeled, dug deep, and delivered. The engineer took the drawing and came back a week later to give it back to Bob. As he talked he noticed Bob put it on top an entirely different pile of paper. The engineer waited six months. Then he went back and asked for the same bond-out diagram. To his astonishment, Bob wheeled around, and went down about 4 inches, the depth that accumulated in the six months, and once gains presented the document. Pease may have been messy, but he knew where things were.

    When Jim Williams passed away just a week ago, I wrote that he will be impossible to replace, and the same goes for Bob. But that is not to say that the world will go lacking for brilliant analog engineers. We still have Bonnie Baker and Howard Johnson helping out here at EDN. Dave Van Ess is doing great work over at Electronic Design magazine. If you take time to hang around the younger engineers, you will meet fine young men like my protégé Francis Lau, as well as Bob Pease's good friends, application engineers Paul Grohe and Alan Martin. Over at Maxim there is Eric Schlaepfer and Len Sherman. Analog Devices has Dave Kress and dozens of young analog aficionados that will do work just as brilliant as the analog giants of yesteryear. If there is one message Bob's passing should convey it is that we should spend as much time teaching as we do designing and selling chips. Many people do analog design because it makes them a lot of money. Bob Pease did analog design because it was beautiful. So was he. Farewell my good friend, my mentor, and my standard of excellence.
     
    Would he have survived in a more modern car? Hard to say.

    Don’t you guys in California have Emissions Testing?

    Doesn’t that pose a problem keeping an old car on the road, or is there someone you bribe?

    • Replies: @danand

    “Don’t you guys in California have Emissions Testing?”
     

    Inquiring Mind,

    Indeed we do, but it’s a little “convoluted”. Cars newer than 5 years require no testing. Cars 2000 and newer require bi-annual testing “computer compliance & visual” only, no tailpipe. Years 1976-1999 are required to pass a tailpipe test while rolling on a dyno.

    Year 1975 and older, no testing, no inspection. This distorts the collector car market, at least to some degree, on a nationwide level. “California compliant” (1975 and older) cars go for at least a slight premium over those that are not.

    There are roughly half a dozen counties in California that only require emissions testing at purchase/ownership transfer. They charge a one time premium at registration over other counties; I guess they do this knowing outsiders will registers vehicles in their jurisdictions?
  117. I like when GPS sends you into a swamp. And you go there. And then wonder what happened.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Oh yes, my GPS has sent me on some wild adventures over the years.
  118. @Jim Don Bob

    This, however, is total nonsense. GPS “works” not because of relativity but because the entire system is tared once a week to correct for station keeping errors.
     
    What does tared mean? Thanks for the reply.

    The word tare comes from “the tare weight,” which means the weight of a container. You subtract the tare weight from the total weight in order to find out the weight of the contents. Chemists use this concept quite a bit when doing basic laboratory work, since they are always weighing out precise quantities of things in beakers and flasks. As a result, nearly all modern digital scales have “tare” button which resets the current weight as the new zero point.

    It works like this. You place an empty vessel on the scale; say, a beaker that weighs 101.25 grams. Your digital scale now reads 101.25. Then you hit the “tare” button and the readout switches to 0.00 with the beaker still on the scale. Now if you want to weigh out 100 grams of water, you need only pour water into the beaker until the scale reads 100.00, and you don’t have to worry about performing calculations with awkward constants. Taring is a useful habit to have on hand for any sort of work that depends on frequently adjusting weights and measures.

    Similarly, the GPS system is regularly “reset” so that the current position of the satellites becomes the new baseline. Obviously, the hard limit of the accuracy of a GPS reading is set by knowledge of the satellites’ own positions, but these will vary due to gravitational perturbations, atmospheric drag, and other factors. Because perfect station keeping is impossible, once per week the system is re-zeroed, i.e. it is “tared.”

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    I am familiar with tare as a noun. You see it on scales, meat packages, shipping containers, etc., but I had never heard it used as a verb. I read the wiki GPS; quite an undertaking.

    Thanks for the reply.
  119. @Intelligent Dasein
    The word tare comes from "the tare weight," which means the weight of a container. You subtract the tare weight from the total weight in order to find out the weight of the contents. Chemists use this concept quite a bit when doing basic laboratory work, since they are always weighing out precise quantities of things in beakers and flasks. As a result, nearly all modern digital scales have "tare" button which resets the current weight as the new zero point.

    It works like this. You place an empty vessel on the scale; say, a beaker that weighs 101.25 grams. Your digital scale now reads 101.25. Then you hit the "tare" button and the readout switches to 0.00 with the beaker still on the scale. Now if you want to weigh out 100 grams of water, you need only pour water into the beaker until the scale reads 100.00, and you don't have to worry about performing calculations with awkward constants. Taring is a useful habit to have on hand for any sort of work that depends on frequently adjusting weights and measures.

    Similarly, the GPS system is regularly "reset" so that the current position of the satellites becomes the new baseline. Obviously, the hard limit of the accuracy of a GPS reading is set by knowledge of the satellites' own positions, but these will vary due to gravitational perturbations, atmospheric drag, and other factors. Because perfect station keeping is impossible, once per week the system is re-zeroed, i.e. it is "tared."

    I am familiar with tare as a noun. You see it on scales, meat packages, shipping containers, etc., but I had never heard it used as a verb. I read the wiki GPS; quite an undertaking.

    Thanks for the reply.

  120. @Inquiring Mind
    Don't you guys in California have Emissions Testing?

    Doesn't that pose a problem keeping an old car on the road, or is there someone you bribe?

    “Don’t you guys in California have Emissions Testing?”

    Inquiring Mind,

    Indeed we do, but it’s a little “convoluted”. Cars newer than 5 years require no testing. Cars 2000 and newer require bi-annual testing “computer compliance & visual” only, no tailpipe. Years 1976-1999 are required to pass a tailpipe test while rolling on a dyno.

    Year 1975 and older, no testing, no inspection. This distorts the collector car market, at least to some degree, on a nationwide level. “California compliant” (1975 and older) cars go for at least a slight premium over those that are not.

    There are roughly half a dozen counties in California that only require emissions testing at purchase/ownership transfer. They charge a one time premium at registration over other counties; I guess they do this knowing outsiders will registers vehicles in their jurisdictions?

  121. Occam’s razor. Smart phone use by both drivers and pedestrians. I work in a Downtown area, and it’s everyday occurrence to see a high percentage of pedestrians crossing the street staring at their phones. But it should be also noted within the time frame was when several states legalized recreational marijuana.

  122. Anonymous[406] • Disclaimer says:
    @obwandiyag
    I like when GPS sends you into a swamp. And you go there. And then wonder what happened.

    Oh yes, my GPS has sent me on some wild adventures over the years.

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