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From National Geographic:

Pablo Escobar’s Escaped Hippos Are Thriving in Colombia
Can the dangerous animals be stopped from taking over more territory?

By Brian Clark Howard
PUBLISHED MAY 10, 2016

It is perhaps fitting that invasive hippos, with their “hungry, hungry” reputations, would be the lasting legacy of one of the world’s most notorious drug lords. Colombia’s Pablo Escobar built an empire on cocaine that made him one of the richest, and most feared, people in the world.

… One of those “benefits” was the invitation for locals to visit his private zoo, which Escobar built in the early 1980s on his leafy ranch Hacienda Napoles, about halfway between Medellin and Bogota. …

Natives of Africa, three females and one male hippo were left to their own devices in the ranch’s pond. With mild weather and no competition, the hippos thrived. Over time, some of the animals began to venture away from the pond, into nearby rivers and the surrounding areas. Villagers grew concerned about the large animals, which have a reputation for being dangerous.

I was surprised to learn that hippos aren’t actually tutu-wearing ballet enthusiasts as I had assumed, but are highly dangerous, just like in Jon Voight movies.

… In the lake at the Hacienda Napoles there are between 26 and 28 hippos. There, they find food, water, and tranquility.

We also have evidence that small groups of hippos or solitary individuals have migrated through the Magdalena River to other areas, including Puerto Berrio and Boyaca. There may be as many as 40 hippos total in the area. Within 10 years that could grow to nearly 100, if we don’t manage them.

Here’s a hippo in Africa chasing a powerboat:

 
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  1. Heard about this few years ago when I saw a documentary…..anyway if they’re all descended from 1 male and three females inbreeding should do them in within a few generations…..

    Read More
    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    Heard about this few years ago when I saw a documentary…..anyway if they’re all descended from 1 male and three females inbreeding should do them in within a few generations…..
     
    You make the perfect case for allowing further hippo immigration into Colombia, and for diversity in hippo immigrants, come to think of it.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. We nearly filled the United States with the great beasts: https://magazine.atavist.com/american-hippopotamus

    Read More
    • Replies: @CK
    Thank you for that link.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  3. “Managing” the hippos… that’s some serious anti-immigrant dog whistling right there. #hipposdreamtoo #theycameforthehipposandIsaidnothing

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  4. Pablos estate was redistributed to people from the hinterlands, a rough lot. So the joke was

    “will they eat the hippos, or will the hippos eat them ? “

    Read More
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  5. OT, is it possible that the football induced brain damage actually happens because of drug abuse?

    Read More
    • Replies: @AKAHorace
    Do you need an answer to this quickly ?
    , @AKAHorace
    OT, is it possible that the football induced brain damage actually happens because of drug abuse?


    Do you need an answer to this quickly ?
    , @anon
    Are we including the use of performance enhancers?
    , @TWS
    Embrace the power of and.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  6. @miss marple
    OT, is it possible that the football induced brain damage actually happens because of drug abuse?

    Do you need an answer to this quickly ?

    Read More
    • Replies: @miss marple
    Are you new around here?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  7. @miss marple
    OT, is it possible that the football induced brain damage actually happens because of drug abuse?

    OT, is it possible that the football induced brain damage actually happens because of drug abuse?

    Do you need an answer to this quickly ?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. @AKAHorace
    Do you need an answer to this quickly ?

    Are you new around here?

    Read More
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  9. Traditionally the hides were used for shields. A modern use, perhaps of interest to some Americans, is in holsters…

    http://www.dmbullardleather.com/1429711.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @tyrone
    OR , sjambok which along with the holsters can be very handy
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  10. Rather hippos than the featherless bipedal inhabitants of Africa.

    EU please take note.

    Read More
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  11. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    The good electors of Hackney, London – both Britain’s most enriched and most deprived borough, have voted a hippopotamus to Parliament.

    Strangely enough, the said Hippo spent £16,000 of charitable donations – mostly given by a ‘top City Law Firm’ on a party.
    Perhaps the beanfeast was in memory of King Henry VIII.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    Wasn’t it always known as ‘orrible ‘ackney?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  12. I think that we should recreate the pre-”First Peoples” megafauna of the Western hemisphere by bringing over all the large animals from Africa. They are going to all be killed off over there anyway, sooner or later, in native wars and for the Chinese market.

    Read More
    • Agree: BB753, rogue-one
    • Replies: @David
    We restored musk oxen to Alaska after they'd been wiped out. From Greenland or Ellesmere Island.

    I'm deeply envious of the huge mammoth tusks over the doors of some natives' houses, say in Bettles. I've waded into many a cold river to see if some old branch was really a tusk. So far, no luck.

    Let's bring back the mammoth, too.
    , @Clyde
    If those hippos had horns the Chinese herb-medicinal market would have wiped them out years ago. But there are no horns on hippopotamus so the natives cannot make money selling horns to the Chinese. Rhino horns are Chinese favorites
    _____________

    Jan 20th
    Thai police have arrested a Vietnamese national who they say ran an international network that trafficked massive quantities of elephant ivory, rhino horn and wildlife, threatening the existence of already endangered species in Asia and Africa for years.

    Boonchai Bach, 40, was arrested Friday in Nakhon Phanom, a northeastern Thailand province that borders Laos, in connection to the illegal trafficking of 14 African rhino horns to Thailand in December, according to the Freeland Foundation, an anti-trafficking group that's been tracking Boonchai and his family for years. The case, which involved $1 million worth of rhino horns, also implicated a Thai official, a Chinese smuggler and a Vietnamese courier, the Associated Press reported.

    "This arrest is significant for many reasons. The confiscated items are high in value. And we are able to arrest the whole network involved, starting from the courier, the facilitator, the exporter," who planned to move the goods through the Thai-Laos border, Thai Police Col. Chutrakul Yodmadee said.

    Boonchai has denied the allegations against him.

    Thai authorities have been investigating his family for years. They zeroed in on Boonchai in December, when Thai customs officials found concealed rhino horns in cargo on a flight from Ethiopia. The flight was carrying Vietnamese and Chinese passengers, which raised suspicions among customs officials, according to the Freeland Foundation. A Thai airport official was later arrested and admitted to working with a Chinese smuggler and a relative of Boonchai. The three are being held in a Thai prison.

    Freeland Foundation said new evidence led to Boonchai's arrest this week.

    "The arrest spells hope for wildlife. We hope Thailand, its neighboring countries and counterparts in Africa will build on this arrest and tear Hydra completely apart," the group's founder, Steven Galster, said, referring to a network of suppliers and buyers across Asia.
    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-wildlife-smuggling-arrest-20180120-story.html
    , @prosa123
    Other than elephants and rhinos which are under heavy poaching pressure, most large animal species in Africa are at their highest numbers in at least a century.
    , @Almost Missouri
    In fact, this is already happening. Today there may be more lions in private hands in North America than there are wild lions in Africa. In a couple centuries, after the unchecked African population explosion has wiped the continent clean of megafauna and then of people, the zoos and backyards in what remains of America may be tapped to repopulate the Veldt.

    You heard it here first.
    , @dfordoom

    I think that we should recreate the pre-”First Peoples” megafauna of the Western hemisphere by bringing over all the large animals from Africa.
     
    Within the next couple of decades it should be possible to repopulate North America with its own native megafauna. You know, the megafauna that mysteriously went extinct at the exact moment that the Native Americans arrived. Mammoths, cave bears, American lions, stag-moose, American cheetahs, giant condors (with a 16-foot wingspan), giant sloths and sabre-toothed cats would be a lot cooler than hippos.

    Restore real diversity.
    , @TWS
    As long as we start from the East coast first. Beginning with Manhattan.
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  13. Why destroy Pablo Escobar’s sole good legacy? South America is large enough to accomodate hippos and – why not? – introduce elephants and other megafauna that are doomed to disappear soon in the bellies of Africa’s starving populations. Save the megafauna! (And the pygmies too!)

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  14. This is not a real problem. Real problems with invasive species are with flora and fauna that are small and reproduce fast. Kudzu, certain fish, etc. are a real problem.

    As much as I still sometimes stereotype the hippos as smiling, dancing creatures that do nothing but add to our dieversity, a few hunters would pay damn good money to rid Columbia of the creatures in a few days time. I wonder what caliber they would use? Ever heard of .375 rounds?

    Read More
    • Replies: @CK
    This looks to be the best, current, big-game, shoulder held rifle
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CZ_550

    However, if you have the money to do it right
    https://www.purdey.com/heritage-guns/purdey-double-rifle

    , @Harry Baldwin
    Don't be too relaxed about this. Burmese pythons, released to the wild by pet owners who tired of them, have reproduced wildly and become a big problem in the Everglades. They're taken a big toll on native wildlife. Python hunts are sponsored to try to reduce the population.
    , @prosa123
    Most African countries specify 375H&H Magnum or the similar 9.3x62 as the minimum calibers for hunting Cape buffalo or hippo. Elephant and rhino too, though you can't hunt them any more. Not too many people are capable of handling such heavy calibers, at least without many years of shooting experience.
    Actually, although hippos are plentiful not many hunters go after them, because by being mostly aquatic it's very difficult to recover one after it is shot.
    , @Twodees Partain
    .416 Rigby was one popular choice for African game. .470 in a double rifle was also once commonly used in Africa. Either would work for hippos, I'd imagine.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  15. @Neoconned
    Heard about this few years ago when I saw a documentary.....anyway if they're all descended from 1 male and three females inbreeding should do them in within a few generations.....

    Heard about this few years ago when I saw a documentary…..anyway if they’re all descended from 1 male and three females inbreeding should do them in within a few generations…..

    You make the perfect case for allowing further hippo immigration into Colombia, and for diversity in hippo immigrants, come to think of it.

    Read More
    • Agree: International Jew
    • LOL: Dieter Kief
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  16. Yeah, it is unexpected, but hippos are crazy dangerous animals. You’re not safe on the ground or the water from them. I guess climb a tree if one is after you.

    Read More
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  17. Wow, more unexpected consequences from the misguided War on Drugs.

    Not a small matter, as hippos are one of the biggest killers of humans in Africa.

    Read More
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  18. Pablo Escobar has done his country a service by creating an export pet industry. We will soon see advertising like this (the singer is now 74 years old):

    Read More
    • Agree: j
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  19. @Stephen Marle
    I think that we should recreate the pre-"First Peoples" megafauna of the Western hemisphere by bringing over all the large animals from Africa. They are going to all be killed off over there anyway, sooner or later, in native wars and for the Chinese market.

    We restored musk oxen to Alaska after they’d been wiped out. From Greenland or Ellesmere Island.

    I’m deeply envious of the huge mammoth tusks over the doors of some natives’ houses, say in Bettles. I’ve waded into many a cold river to see if some old branch was really a tusk. So far, no luck.

    Let’s bring back the mammoth, too.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  20. They wrote this article just to work “hungry, hungry” in there.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  21. @Polearm
    We nearly filled the United States with the great beasts: https://magazine.atavist.com/american-hippopotamus

    Thank you for that link.

    Read More
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  22. @Achmed E. Newman
    This is not a real problem. Real problems with invasive species are with flora and fauna that are small and reproduce fast. Kudzu, certain fish, etc. are a real problem.

    As much as I still sometimes stereotype the hippos as smiling, dancing creatures that do nothing but add to our dieversity, a few hunters would pay damn good money to rid Columbia of the creatures in a few days time. I wonder what caliber they would use? Ever heard of .375 rounds?

    This looks to be the best, current, big-game, shoulder held rifle

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CZ_550

    However, if you have the money to do it right

    https://www.purdey.com/heritage-guns/purdey-double-rifle

    Read More
    • Replies: @donut
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDYtxxRU_cY
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  23. Here’s one of my favorite paintings, The Hippopotamus and Crocodile Hunt by Peter Paul Rubens:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hairway To Steven
    I had no idea that Rubens produced such kitsch.
    , @anon
    Great painting by "the prince of painters and the painter of princes".
    , @TWS
    I'm in love with Rubens all over again.
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  24. “which have a reputation for being dangerous. ”

    LOL yeah that’s the understatement of the year. There might not be a more savagely hostile herbivore. They might be the most effective weapon against in the war on drugs since well, forever. Can you imagine a hippo zapped up on coca leaves stampeding through cocaine refineries in the jungle? I’d pay to see that in season 4 of Narcos on netflix.

    Read More
    • LOL: ben tillman
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  25. @Achmed E. Newman
    This is not a real problem. Real problems with invasive species are with flora and fauna that are small and reproduce fast. Kudzu, certain fish, etc. are a real problem.

    As much as I still sometimes stereotype the hippos as smiling, dancing creatures that do nothing but add to our dieversity, a few hunters would pay damn good money to rid Columbia of the creatures in a few days time. I wonder what caliber they would use? Ever heard of .375 rounds?

    Don’t be too relaxed about this. Burmese pythons, released to the wild by pet owners who tired of them, have reproduced wildly and become a big problem in the Everglades. They’re taken a big toll on native wildlife. Python hunts are sponsored to try to reduce the population.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    True, but I feel that tracking down pythons would be a tad harder than hippos. Also, how many baby pythons can a mother birth each year compared to hippos.

    Hippos don't seem like they'd be that hard to control, but if someone could explain why that's an incorrect assumptions, I'd love to hear why.
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    Don’t be too relaxed about this. Burmese pythons, ...
     
    Don't worry, Harry, I won't' be relaxed around Burmes Pythons, believe you me!

    I should have excepted the snakes, as they are indeed hard to keep up with.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  26. @Stephen Marle
    I think that we should recreate the pre-"First Peoples" megafauna of the Western hemisphere by bringing over all the large animals from Africa. They are going to all be killed off over there anyway, sooner or later, in native wars and for the Chinese market.

    If those hippos had horns the Chinese herb-medicinal market would have wiped them out years ago. But there are no horns on hippopotamus so the natives cannot make money selling horns to the Chinese. Rhino horns are Chinese favorites
    _____________

    Jan 20th
    Thai police have arrested a Vietnamese national who they say ran an international network that trafficked massive quantities of elephant ivory, rhino horn and wildlife, threatening the existence of already endangered species in Asia and Africa for years.

    Boonchai Bach, 40, was arrested Friday in Nakhon Phanom, a northeastern Thailand province that borders Laos, in connection to the illegal trafficking of 14 African rhino horns to Thailand in December, according to the Freeland Foundation, an anti-trafficking group that’s been tracking Boonchai and his family for years. The case, which involved $1 million worth of rhino horns, also implicated a Thai official, a Chinese smuggler and a Vietnamese courier, the Associated Press reported.

    “This arrest is significant for many reasons. The confiscated items are high in value. And we are able to arrest the whole network involved, starting from the courier, the facilitator, the exporter,” who planned to move the goods through the Thai-Laos border, Thai Police Col. Chutrakul Yodmadee said.

    Boonchai has denied the allegations against him.

    Thai authorities have been investigating his family for years. They zeroed in on Boonchai in December, when Thai customs officials found concealed rhino horns in cargo on a flight from Ethiopia. The flight was carrying Vietnamese and Chinese passengers, which raised suspicions among customs officials, according to the Freeland Foundation. A Thai airport official was later arrested and admitted to working with a Chinese smuggler and a relative of Boonchai. The three are being held in a Thai prison.

    Freeland Foundation said new evidence led to Boonchai’s arrest this week.

    “The arrest spells hope for wildlife. We hope Thailand, its neighboring countries and counterparts in Africa will build on this arrest and tear Hydra completely apart,” the group’s founder, Steven Galster, said, referring to a network of suppliers and buyers across Asia.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-wildlife-smuggling-arrest-20180120-story.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @CJ
    Boonchai Bach, rhino horn trafficker

    Username available.
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  27. Hmm, with only four founders this is going to be an extremely inbred population! It would be interesting to just let it expand and see what happens. Mutational meltdown maybe?

    Read More
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  28. @Harry Baldwin
    Don't be too relaxed about this. Burmese pythons, released to the wild by pet owners who tired of them, have reproduced wildly and become a big problem in the Everglades. They're taken a big toll on native wildlife. Python hunts are sponsored to try to reduce the population.

    True, but I feel that tracking down pythons would be a tad harder than hippos. Also, how many baby pythons can a mother birth each year compared to hippos.

    Hippos don’t seem like they’d be that hard to control, but if someone could explain why that’s an incorrect assumptions, I’d love to hear why.

    Read More
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  29. @the one they call Desanex
    Here’s one of my favorite paintings, The Hippopotamus and Crocodile Hunt by Peter Paul Rubens:
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/84/Peter_Paul_Rubens_083.jpg/1200px-Peter_Paul_Rubens_083.jpg

    I had no idea that Rubens produced such kitsch.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    I'd propose to look at such a painting with a laugh - it for sure was meant to be looked upon in such a mood, dude.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  30. I know that a drug lord of Columbia had a pet lion that was brought to parties where ’twas given drugs. To cement his status as the narco king, Escobar obviously needed the ultimate conspicuous coke consuming pet, with each enormous Hippo-snort vacuuming up zillions worth of nose powder!

    Read More
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  31. @Cortes
    Traditionally the hides were used for shields. A modern use, perhaps of interest to some Americans, is in holsters...

    http://www.dmbullardleather.com/1429711.html

    OR , sjambok which along with the holsters can be very handy

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  32. @miss marple
    OT, is it possible that the football induced brain damage actually happens because of drug abuse?

    Are we including the use of performance enhancers?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  33. @the one they call Desanex
    Here’s one of my favorite paintings, The Hippopotamus and Crocodile Hunt by Peter Paul Rubens:
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/84/Peter_Paul_Rubens_083.jpg/1200px-Peter_Paul_Rubens_083.jpg

    Great painting by “the prince of painters and the painter of princes”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    They didn’t have action movies in the 17th century. I reckon that painting was the Road Warrior or Terminator II of its day.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  34. OT – Chile welcomes haitian immigrants:

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/as-u-s-slows-immigration-one-latin-american-nation-embraces-it-1516539600

    Le us know how that works out for ya.

    Read More
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  35. @Anonymous
    The good electors of Hackney, London - both Britain's most enriched and most deprived borough, have voted a hippopotamus to Parliament.

    Strangely enough, the said Hippo spent £16,000 of charitable donations - mostly given by a 'top City Law Firm' on a party.
    Perhaps the beanfeast was in memory of King Henry VIII.

    Wasn’t it always known as ‘orrible ‘ackney?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Apparently, in the early 19th century, Hackney was a 'delightful' place full of big houses occupied by London's wealthy.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  36. @Stephen Marle
    I think that we should recreate the pre-"First Peoples" megafauna of the Western hemisphere by bringing over all the large animals from Africa. They are going to all be killed off over there anyway, sooner or later, in native wars and for the Chinese market.

    Other than elephants and rhinos which are under heavy poaching pressure, most large animal species in Africa are at their highest numbers in at least a century.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonguy

    Other than elephants and rhinos which are under heavy poaching pressure, most large animal species in Africa are at their highest numbers in at least a century.
     
    This would be good news if true. Do you have any citations?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  37. @Achmed E. Newman
    This is not a real problem. Real problems with invasive species are with flora and fauna that are small and reproduce fast. Kudzu, certain fish, etc. are a real problem.

    As much as I still sometimes stereotype the hippos as smiling, dancing creatures that do nothing but add to our dieversity, a few hunters would pay damn good money to rid Columbia of the creatures in a few days time. I wonder what caliber they would use? Ever heard of .375 rounds?

    Most African countries specify 375H&H Magnum or the similar 9.3×62 as the minimum calibers for hunting Cape buffalo or hippo. Elephant and rhino too, though you can’t hunt them any more. Not too many people are capable of handling such heavy calibers, at least without many years of shooting experience.
    Actually, although hippos are plentiful not many hunters go after them, because by being mostly aquatic it’s very difficult to recover one after it is shot.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    It's not my thing, but interesting stuff, nevertheless, Prosa.
    , @anonguy

    Not too many people are capable of handling such heavy calibers, at least without many years of shooting experience.
     
    Trying to "handle", or even anticipate, the recoil of a firearm is one of the most common ways people miss and is a complete noob move.
    , @Anonymous
    Given a properly fitted rifle of correct design and weight, the .375 is a fairly manageable rifle for most people in reasonable physical shape. Fitting is important. Getting up into the .577 and .600 NE cartridges, the .458 Win and .378/460 Weatherbys, and the large bore black powder 'stopping rifles', you are dealing with more intimidating pounders, but again, rifle weight is the key.

    All the sporting calibers are small beer compared to the .50 BMG, but most African countries prohibit civilian use of any 'military' caliber, and the single shot ot semiauto .50s are usually in the 25-30 pound range and therefore not something one wants to haul around.
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  38. @prosa123
    Most African countries specify 375H&H Magnum or the similar 9.3x62 as the minimum calibers for hunting Cape buffalo or hippo. Elephant and rhino too, though you can't hunt them any more. Not too many people are capable of handling such heavy calibers, at least without many years of shooting experience.
    Actually, although hippos are plentiful not many hunters go after them, because by being mostly aquatic it's very difficult to recover one after it is shot.

    It’s not my thing, but interesting stuff, nevertheless, Prosa.

    Read More
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  39. @CK
    This looks to be the best, current, big-game, shoulder held rifle
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CZ_550

    However, if you have the money to do it right
    https://www.purdey.com/heritage-guns/purdey-double-rifle

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  40. @Harry Baldwin
    Don't be too relaxed about this. Burmese pythons, released to the wild by pet owners who tired of them, have reproduced wildly and become a big problem in the Everglades. They're taken a big toll on native wildlife. Python hunts are sponsored to try to reduce the population.

    Don’t be too relaxed about this. Burmese pythons, …

    Don’t worry, Harry, I won’t’ be relaxed around Burmes Pythons, believe you me!

    I should have excepted the snakes, as they are indeed hard to keep up with.

    Read More
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  41. @prosa123
    Most African countries specify 375H&H Magnum or the similar 9.3x62 as the minimum calibers for hunting Cape buffalo or hippo. Elephant and rhino too, though you can't hunt them any more. Not too many people are capable of handling such heavy calibers, at least without many years of shooting experience.
    Actually, although hippos are plentiful not many hunters go after them, because by being mostly aquatic it's very difficult to recover one after it is shot.

    Not too many people are capable of handling such heavy calibers, at least without many years of shooting experience.

    Trying to “handle”, or even anticipate, the recoil of a firearm is one of the most common ways people miss and is a complete noob move.

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    • Replies: @prosa123
    "Trying to “handle”, or even anticipate, the recoil of a firearm is one of the most common ways people miss and is a complete noob move."


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ffsv0f-T0dc
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  42. @prosa123
    Other than elephants and rhinos which are under heavy poaching pressure, most large animal species in Africa are at their highest numbers in at least a century.

    Other than elephants and rhinos which are under heavy poaching pressure, most large animal species in Africa are at their highest numbers in at least a century.

    This would be good news if true. Do you have any citations?

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    • Replies: @gcochran
    "most large animal species in Africa are at their highest numbers in at least a century."= bunk
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  43. Wouldn’t their lack of genetic diversity (all descended from one male and three females) eventually cause their numbers to plateau and eventually fall of their own accord?

    Or is that enough for a viable long-term population that can grow to thousands?

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  44. This is among my favorite headlines in iSteve history. If you ever do a book of collected writing, it should be titled “Pablo Escobar’s Escaped Hippos.”

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  45. Proof, once again, that “diversity” and migrant populations aren’t intrinsically positive words or concepts.

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  46. Read More
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  47. @Clyde
    If those hippos had horns the Chinese herb-medicinal market would have wiped them out years ago. But there are no horns on hippopotamus so the natives cannot make money selling horns to the Chinese. Rhino horns are Chinese favorites
    _____________

    Jan 20th
    Thai police have arrested a Vietnamese national who they say ran an international network that trafficked massive quantities of elephant ivory, rhino horn and wildlife, threatening the existence of already endangered species in Asia and Africa for years.

    Boonchai Bach, 40, was arrested Friday in Nakhon Phanom, a northeastern Thailand province that borders Laos, in connection to the illegal trafficking of 14 African rhino horns to Thailand in December, according to the Freeland Foundation, an anti-trafficking group that's been tracking Boonchai and his family for years. The case, which involved $1 million worth of rhino horns, also implicated a Thai official, a Chinese smuggler and a Vietnamese courier, the Associated Press reported.

    "This arrest is significant for many reasons. The confiscated items are high in value. And we are able to arrest the whole network involved, starting from the courier, the facilitator, the exporter," who planned to move the goods through the Thai-Laos border, Thai Police Col. Chutrakul Yodmadee said.

    Boonchai has denied the allegations against him.

    Thai authorities have been investigating his family for years. They zeroed in on Boonchai in December, when Thai customs officials found concealed rhino horns in cargo on a flight from Ethiopia. The flight was carrying Vietnamese and Chinese passengers, which raised suspicions among customs officials, according to the Freeland Foundation. A Thai airport official was later arrested and admitted to working with a Chinese smuggler and a relative of Boonchai. The three are being held in a Thai prison.

    Freeland Foundation said new evidence led to Boonchai's arrest this week.

    "The arrest spells hope for wildlife. We hope Thailand, its neighboring countries and counterparts in Africa will build on this arrest and tear Hydra completely apart," the group's founder, Steven Galster, said, referring to a network of suppliers and buyers across Asia.
    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-wildlife-smuggling-arrest-20180120-story.html

    Boonchai Bach, rhino horn trafficker

    Username available.

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  48. In Africa, hippos kill more humans than any other animal (except humans).

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  49. … In the lake at the Hacienda Napoles there are between 26 and 28 hippos. There, they find food, water, and tranquility.

    I can think of an easier way to say “27″.

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  50. @Stephen Marle
    I think that we should recreate the pre-"First Peoples" megafauna of the Western hemisphere by bringing over all the large animals from Africa. They are going to all be killed off over there anyway, sooner or later, in native wars and for the Chinese market.

    In fact, this is already happening. Today there may be more lions in private hands in North America than there are wild lions in Africa. In a couple centuries, after the unchecked African population explosion has wiped the continent clean of megafauna and then of people, the zoos and backyards in what remains of America may be tapped to repopulate the Veldt.

    You heard it here first.

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    • Replies: @Chris Mallory
    There are roughly 20,000 lions still in the wild. South African game farms have a population of about 8,000 lions. In the US there are an estimated 10,000 big cats of all types in captivity. One source did say that there are 5000 tigers in private hands in the US but only 3200 in the wild.
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  51. @anonguy

    Not too many people are capable of handling such heavy calibers, at least without many years of shooting experience.
     
    Trying to "handle", or even anticipate, the recoil of a firearm is one of the most common ways people miss and is a complete noob move.

    “Trying to “handle”, or even anticipate, the recoil of a firearm is one of the most common ways people miss and is a complete noob move.”

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  52. @Hairway To Steven
    I had no idea that Rubens produced such kitsch.

    I’d propose to look at such a painting with a laugh – it for sure was meant to be looked upon in such a mood, dude.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    That beast is not quite as Rubenesque as his women are.

    Was he being "hippocritical"?

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  53. @Almost Missouri
    In fact, this is already happening. Today there may be more lions in private hands in North America than there are wild lions in Africa. In a couple centuries, after the unchecked African population explosion has wiped the continent clean of megafauna and then of people, the zoos and backyards in what remains of America may be tapped to repopulate the Veldt.

    You heard it here first.

    There are roughly 20,000 lions still in the wild. South African game farms have a population of about 8,000 lions. In the US there are an estimated 10,000 big cats of all types in captivity. One source did say that there are 5000 tigers in private hands in the US but only 3200 in the wild.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Thirty years ago I knew a guy who had a lion in what is now Overland Park, Kansas. It became illegal to have them once the city annexed the area but he was "grandfathered in": when it died, though he could not replace it. It lived a long time and was allowed the run of (part of) the house in the daytime. I remember petting it in the living room.

    I think Texas is the most liberal state in terms of allowing people to have big cats. The amazing thing is that someone is mauled or killed only once every couple of years or so. There are dog breeds that are about as dangerous.
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  54. For my fellow Catholics…

    Grant me chastity and continence, Lord (but not yet):

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Augustine_of_Hippo

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  55. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Getting slightly off-topic, I find it amazing the interest recently for Escobar. There is “Narcos”, where the great character actor, Wagner Moura, interprets the drug lord. There was also a 1.5 hour long biopic made recently by the BBC on him. And from what I’ve heard, there is a film being made on him where Javier Bardem will play him.

    I guess the reason for this fascination with Escobar is that, unlike the vast majority of criminals and even Cartel bosses, Escobar had the makings of a Great Man. He could have actually been the best President ever of Colombia if his life had turned differently. He was highly intelligent and cunning, had an iron-will, was tough-as-nails and had a natural gift of inspiring people to follow him. Many of the professional hitman and “soldados” that served him originally only for pay ended up fighting for him for free, out of sheer love for the man.

    Criminals in general are borderline idiots with severe impulse-control problems, or mentally ill psychopaths unable to reform due to their inability to feel human emotions and thus resent the consequences of their actions and learn from experience. This leads them to being unable of long-term complex plans to further themselves, making them opportunistic predators that live in the moment and never graduate to greater levels of ability in preying others.

    Escobar, conversely, was intelligent and capable of long-term planning. He showed an amazing talent for organization and leadership from a young age: starting as a petty thieve, he quickly became the head of one of the largest armed robbery gangs in Medellin. He did the same when he went into the cocaine trade.

    Escobar was one of the toughest people to ever walk the Earth. When young, he was captured by Colombian Special Forces when he was still a mid-tier guy in the cocaine trade and working for others. They wanted to know who the bosses were. They beat Escobar for three days straight and shattered several of his bones, but he didn’t break. When Escobar was killing judges and senators by the dozens and crushing the Colombian State like he promised in a public message to do, the government tried to bargain for his surrender by kidnapping some of his relatives and threatening to execute them for his crimes if he did not deliver himself to justice. Escobar responded that they could kill his relatives, but that all they would accomplish with that was receiving a more painful death when he won the war. Escobar would continue the war even if they killed his whole family. Why? Because he gave his word that nothing would dissuade him from crushing the Colombian Government, and he never backed down on his word.

    the other thing that sat Escobar apart from other criminals was his incredible ruthlessness. Escobar was cold-blooded and merciless even by the standards of criminals. Other criminals was literally terrified of him. He would gouge eye balls of his rivals out, murder children in front of their mothers if he had to, sat entire families on fire with gasoline. He would nail the chopped heads of his anemies to walls medieval styles. He would often cut all the limbs, tongue, gouge the eyeballs and cut off the ears of people that crossed him, so they would spend the rest of their lives in a dark void with no eye sight, hearing, palate and unable to move. When the U.S Government started to put pressure on Colombia to extradict him and the Colombian Government was showing signs that it would oblige(because Latin American countries are vassal states to the U.S), Escobar went on a rampage with death squads murdering dozens of judges and senators and then chopping their heads off, and bombing airplanes, government buildings and making a direct hit on the DEA headquarters in Colombia, killing several American agents. His major wrath, however, was directed at the U.S and not the Colombian Government. He called American Airlines and told them:

    “Gringos hijos de puta, te los voy a matar a todos.”(gringos SOBs, I will kill all of you).

    That was a threat that he would put bombs on AA planes. He threatened American companies and citizens living in Colombia, murdered several of them , and put their heads and corpses on the foot steps of the American Embassy, with a message written on the corpses that any further pressure to extradict him would result in him attacking the embassy itself and killing the American embasador and his family.

    At his height, Escobar had around 1,000 professional hitman working for him directly, all with background in the military or in guerrilla war, and another 20,000-25,000 “soldados”, men on his payroll that were ready to wage war, all armed with firepower that put to shame the militaries of most countries in the World.

    Escobar and his Medellin Cartel had more than enough firepower to beat the Colombian Military and the American DEA present in Colombia. However, the Medellin Cartel did not have enough firepower to beat the American Military(except for Russia and maybe China, no one has). The *only* thing that Escobar feared was a direct American military intervention in Colombia. He prepared himself for that by building an extensive infra-structure of survival in the Colombian jungle Vietcong style, but it is something that he knew would ruin his business and make him a recluse even if he managed to somehow resist in the jungle forever with his loyal soldiers and hitmen. His top priority became making sure that the Marines wouldn’t be sent from America. But both the DEA and the F.B.I admitted they did not have either the resources or the firepower to fight the Medellin Cartel in Colombia. It goes to show how powerful and dangerous Escobar and his Cartel were that they were more powerful than all American federal armed organizations except for the U.S military itself. Imagine, then, how bad it was for Colombia, a country much weaker than the U.S, to have him as foe.

    Eventually, Escobar made a series of strategic blunders that made him lose a lot of men, he lost a lot of his ability to sent cocaine to Europe and U.S due to increased surveillance over international flights and ship cruises, and was betrayed by several of his close allies, who thought he was too crazy and vicious and ended up delivering him to the state. He eventually found himself surrounded by the police special force unit in that roof, being shot dead in 1993. And Escobar went out guns blazing.

    Escobar was the closest thing in the real World to a super-villain. He truly was: the sheer scale of the destruction that he wrecked, from murdering Supreme Court Justices, bombing airplanes and attacking even the Presidential Palace, as well as his unbelievable ruthlessness is unheard off

    This why the interest in him. No criminal has emerged today that comes even close to Escobar. They don’t have the brains, the personal charisma and the “cojones” of Escobar. Some of them might have some of these things, but not all at the same time. The Sinaloa Cartel and other Cartels are like ants in terms of power compared to the Medellin Cartel and it’s prime, and their leaders are juvenile delinquents compared to Escobar. Not to mention that they are copycats. They are so pathetic that they even use the expression”plata o plomo”(“silver or lead”) when making threats, an expression coined by Escobar

    Escobar was a once-in-a-thousand-years criminal. It’s a good thing that Escobar was a unique criminals and that we’ll never see one like him again, but in a way it sucks because he was, indeed, fascinating. Plata o plomo?

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  56. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @prosa123
    Most African countries specify 375H&H Magnum or the similar 9.3x62 as the minimum calibers for hunting Cape buffalo or hippo. Elephant and rhino too, though you can't hunt them any more. Not too many people are capable of handling such heavy calibers, at least without many years of shooting experience.
    Actually, although hippos are plentiful not many hunters go after them, because by being mostly aquatic it's very difficult to recover one after it is shot.

    Given a properly fitted rifle of correct design and weight, the .375 is a fairly manageable rifle for most people in reasonable physical shape. Fitting is important. Getting up into the .577 and .600 NE cartridges, the .458 Win and .378/460 Weatherbys, and the large bore black powder ‘stopping rifles’, you are dealing with more intimidating pounders, but again, rifle weight is the key.

    All the sporting calibers are small beer compared to the .50 BMG, but most African countries prohibit civilian use of any ‘military’ caliber, and the single shot ot semiauto .50s are usually in the 25-30 pound range and therefore not something one wants to haul around.

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    • Replies: @prosa123
    50 BMG's almost always come with muzzle brakes. So do most of the big Weatherby calibers, Lapuas, and some others.
    In terms of heavy recoil, magnum turkey loads through 12-gauges are up there with some of the most powerful rifles.
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  57. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Chris Mallory
    There are roughly 20,000 lions still in the wild. South African game farms have a population of about 8,000 lions. In the US there are an estimated 10,000 big cats of all types in captivity. One source did say that there are 5000 tigers in private hands in the US but only 3200 in the wild.

    Thirty years ago I knew a guy who had a lion in what is now Overland Park, Kansas. It became illegal to have them once the city annexed the area but he was “grandfathered in”: when it died, though he could not replace it. It lived a long time and was allowed the run of (part of) the house in the daytime. I remember petting it in the living room.

    I think Texas is the most liberal state in terms of allowing people to have big cats. The amazing thing is that someone is mauled or killed only once every couple of years or so. There are dog breeds that are about as dangerous.

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  58. @Achmed E. Newman
    This is not a real problem. Real problems with invasive species are with flora and fauna that are small and reproduce fast. Kudzu, certain fish, etc. are a real problem.

    As much as I still sometimes stereotype the hippos as smiling, dancing creatures that do nothing but add to our dieversity, a few hunters would pay damn good money to rid Columbia of the creatures in a few days time. I wonder what caliber they would use? Ever heard of .375 rounds?

    .416 Rigby was one popular choice for African game. .470 in a double rifle was also once commonly used in Africa. Either would work for hippos, I’d imagine.

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    • Replies: @prosa123
    About a year ago I went to a gun show with the intent of buying both a rifle and a shotgun. Because I knew that I'd be sorely tempted to overspend I set a hard limit of $750. Under no circumstances would I go over that limit.
    Soon after entering what do I see but a rifle in 416 Rigby, a CZ bolt action. Its stock was a bit battered but the rifling seemed okay and the action worked smoothly. And it was priced at $725, right within my limit. After mulling it over for a few minutes I decided against buying it, as I wouldn't be able to buy a shotgun as planned.
    I'm still kicking myself for passing on the Rigby :(
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  59. @Stephen Marle
    I think that we should recreate the pre-"First Peoples" megafauna of the Western hemisphere by bringing over all the large animals from Africa. They are going to all be killed off over there anyway, sooner or later, in native wars and for the Chinese market.

    I think that we should recreate the pre-”First Peoples” megafauna of the Western hemisphere by bringing over all the large animals from Africa.

    Within the next couple of decades it should be possible to repopulate North America with its own native megafauna. You know, the megafauna that mysteriously went extinct at the exact moment that the Native Americans arrived. Mammoths, cave bears, American lions, stag-moose, American cheetahs, giant condors (with a 16-foot wingspan), giant sloths and sabre-toothed cats would be a lot cooler than hippos.

    Restore real diversity.

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  60. @Anonymous
    Given a properly fitted rifle of correct design and weight, the .375 is a fairly manageable rifle for most people in reasonable physical shape. Fitting is important. Getting up into the .577 and .600 NE cartridges, the .458 Win and .378/460 Weatherbys, and the large bore black powder 'stopping rifles', you are dealing with more intimidating pounders, but again, rifle weight is the key.

    All the sporting calibers are small beer compared to the .50 BMG, but most African countries prohibit civilian use of any 'military' caliber, and the single shot ot semiauto .50s are usually in the 25-30 pound range and therefore not something one wants to haul around.

    50 BMG’s almost always come with muzzle brakes. So do most of the big Weatherby calibers, Lapuas, and some others.
    In terms of heavy recoil, magnum turkey loads through 12-gauges are up there with some of the most powerful rifles.

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  61. @Twodees Partain
    .416 Rigby was one popular choice for African game. .470 in a double rifle was also once commonly used in Africa. Either would work for hippos, I'd imagine.

    About a year ago I went to a gun show with the intent of buying both a rifle and a shotgun. Because I knew that I’d be sorely tempted to overspend I set a hard limit of $750. Under no circumstances would I go over that limit.
    Soon after entering what do I see but a rifle in 416 Rigby, a CZ bolt action. Its stock was a bit battered but the rifling seemed okay and the action worked smoothly. And it was priced at $725, right within my limit. After mulling it over for a few minutes I decided against buying it, as I wouldn’t be able to buy a shotgun as planned.
    I’m still kicking myself for passing on the Rigby :(

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    CZ rifles are well made but not especially rare or valuable, no matter what the chambering.

    And if you are not a reloader it's going to be very expensive to feed.
    , @Twodees Partain
    I remember Robert Ruark's books about safaris with the legendary Harry Selby and that he had a .416 that he used often. As a teenager I dreamed of going on safari. I never have gotten around to it. Keep your eyes open and you may find a Weatherby in that cartridge someday. that would be worth a little sacrifice, I think.
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  62. @prosa123
    About a year ago I went to a gun show with the intent of buying both a rifle and a shotgun. Because I knew that I'd be sorely tempted to overspend I set a hard limit of $750. Under no circumstances would I go over that limit.
    Soon after entering what do I see but a rifle in 416 Rigby, a CZ bolt action. Its stock was a bit battered but the rifling seemed okay and the action worked smoothly. And it was priced at $725, right within my limit. After mulling it over for a few minutes I decided against buying it, as I wouldn't be able to buy a shotgun as planned.
    I'm still kicking myself for passing on the Rigby :(

    CZ rifles are well made but not especially rare or valuable, no matter what the chambering.

    And if you are not a reloader it’s going to be very expensive to feed.

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  63. Related golf-course point of interest for our host.

    In South Africa, there is a copper mining town, just outside the famous Israel Sized Kruger National Park in Limpopo province in the North East of the country – Phalaborwa (pronounced roughly Pal-a-bora). It has a rather attractive golf course. On the 17th hole – called Hippo Hollow – there’s a water obstacle with a pod of around 5 hippo in resident, there are also Nile crocodile.

    These large territorial herbivores – males well north of 2 tonnes are common – are extremely dangerous. They kill more people in sub-Saharan Africa than any other animal, other than the mosquito and man. Fortunately they spend the day in water and come out at night to graze, though they can be seen out of water at dawn and dusk. They look slow and ponderous, but with a top speed of 25 mph plus, people can’t outrun them.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I'd like to see a video of a hippo chasing a golf cart. Would you throw your clubs off to go faster?
    , @dfordoom

    there’s a water obstacle with a pod of around 5 hippo in resident, there are also Nile crocodile.
     
    That sounds like a seriously macho golf course. A real high-testosterone golf course. Do the golfers have their caddies carry their guns as well as their golf clubs?

    I've never had much interest in watching golf but I guess the ever-present threat of sudden death would make it a much more exciting spectator sport.
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  64. @NickG
    Related golf-course point of interest for our host.

    In South Africa, there is a copper mining town, just outside the famous Israel Sized Kruger National Park in Limpopo province in the North East of the country - Phalaborwa (pronounced roughly Pal-a-bora). It has a rather attractive golf course. On the 17th hole - called Hippo Hollow - there's a water obstacle with a pod of around 5 hippo in resident, there are also Nile crocodile.

    These large territorial herbivores - males well north of 2 tonnes are common - are extremely dangerous. They kill more people in sub-Saharan Africa than any other animal, other than the mosquito and man. Fortunately they spend the day in water and come out at night to graze, though they can be seen out of water at dawn and dusk. They look slow and ponderous, but with a top speed of 25 mph plus, people can't outrun them.

    I’d like to see a video of a hippo chasing a golf cart. Would you throw your clubs off to go faster?

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    • Replies: @NickG
    Like the Brits, in South Africa golfers tend to walk golf courses.

    As the blurb details...

    The The legendary Bob Grimsdell designed this Par 72 championship with his usual flair for the Parkland layout. The course is a visual masterpiece and the resident wildlife of Giraffe, Hippo and Crocodiles adds a safari element to the game that one would be hard pressed to find elsewhere.

    The course has recently been voted the best walking course in South Africa

    The course itself has been kept in immaculate condition with special attention paid to the Bayview greens. It measures in at 6549m and gladly welcome visitors every day of the week.

    Facilities include: Bars, Pro Shop, Club hire, Caddies, Buggy Hire, Driving Range, Putting Green, Halfway House, Lockers, Accommodation, Conference facilities and more.

    This is truly an outstanding course and we encourage a trip out to experience golfing magic. Just don’t attempt to retrieve any balls lying too close to the waters edge!
     
    4 min video - The Most Amazing Golf Courses of the World: Hans Merensky, South Africa
    , @NickG

    I’d like to see a video of a hippo chasing a golf cart. Would you throw your clubs off to go faster?
     
    Next best thing 30 second video of - hippo chasing a boat up in the astonishingly beautiful Chobe river between Bechuanaland and German South West Africa.

    They're fast on land too. There's no way any normal golf cart will outpace a hippo.

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  65. @Steve Sailer
    I'd like to see a video of a hippo chasing a golf cart. Would you throw your clubs off to go faster?

    Like the Brits, in South Africa golfers tend to walk golf courses.

    As the blurb details…

    The The legendary Bob Grimsdell designed this Par 72 championship with his usual flair for the Parkland layout. The course is a visual masterpiece and the resident wildlife of Giraffe, Hippo and Crocodiles adds a safari element to the game that one would be hard pressed to find elsewhere.

    The course has recently been voted the best walking course in South Africa

    The course itself has been kept in immaculate condition with special attention paid to the Bayview greens. It measures in at 6549m and gladly welcome visitors every day of the week.

    Facilities include: Bars, Pro Shop, Club hire, Caddies, Buggy Hire, Driving Range, Putting Green, Halfway House, Lockers, Accommodation, Conference facilities and more.

    This is truly an outstanding course and we encourage a trip out to experience golfing magic. Just don’t attempt to retrieve any balls lying too close to the waters edge!

    4 min video – The Most Amazing Golf Courses of the World: Hans Merensky, South Africa

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  66. While many invasive species are a big problem, a species that takes 6 years to mature, by which time it weighs three thousand pounds, is not an issue, and can be wiped out with trivial effort at any time

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    They still haven't killed anyone I believe. They'll be allowed to do their thing until they do, then will be wiped out in a fortnight.
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  67. Read More
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  68. @Dieter Kief
    I'd propose to look at such a painting with a laugh - it for sure was meant to be looked upon in such a mood, dude.

    That beast is not quite as Rubenesque as his women are.

    Was he being “hippocritical”?

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    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    Ehhehehe - the hippo-question is well known in the history of art as deep and tricky. I have to think this all through 'n' over - I'm not quite sure yet, but I'd assume, that I might end my strains with a well weighted and loud and - expressive a n d exclamatory!, even: YES - YESSIR! - Your thoughts indeed strike me as definitely Rubenesque!
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  69. @anonguy

    Other than elephants and rhinos which are under heavy poaching pressure, most large animal species in Africa are at their highest numbers in at least a century.
     
    This would be good news if true. Do you have any citations?

    “most large animal species in Africa are at their highest numbers in at least a century.”= bunk

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  70. @Sideways
    While many invasive species are a big problem, a species that takes 6 years to mature, by which time it weighs three thousand pounds, is not an issue, and can be wiped out with trivial effort at any time

    They still haven’t killed anyone I believe. They’ll be allowed to do their thing until they do, then will be wiped out in a fortnight.

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  71. @Alden
    Wasn’t it always known as ‘orrible ‘ackney?

    Apparently, in the early 19th century, Hackney was a ‘delightful’ place full of big houses occupied by London’s wealthy.

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  72. @Steve Sailer
    I'd like to see a video of a hippo chasing a golf cart. Would you throw your clubs off to go faster?

    I’d like to see a video of a hippo chasing a golf cart. Would you throw your clubs off to go faster?

    Next best thing 30 second video of – hippo chasing a boat up in the astonishingly beautiful Chobe river between Bechuanaland and German South West Africa.

    They’re fast on land too. There’s no way any normal golf cart will outpace a hippo.

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    Which golf club would you use to smack the chasing hippo on the nose?

    I figure a sand wedge.

    I imagine hippos are more sprinters than endurance runners.

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  73. @NickG

    I’d like to see a video of a hippo chasing a golf cart. Would you throw your clubs off to go faster?
     
    Next best thing 30 second video of - hippo chasing a boat up in the astonishingly beautiful Chobe river between Bechuanaland and German South West Africa.

    They're fast on land too. There's no way any normal golf cart will outpace a hippo.

    Which golf club would you use to smack the chasing hippo on the nose?

    I figure a sand wedge.

    I imagine hippos are more sprinters than endurance runners.

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    • Replies: @NickG

    Which golf club would you use to smack the chasing hippo on the nose?

    I figure a sand wedge.
     

    Yup, as long as it was a 458 sand wedge, though in truth a well placed chip with a 375 sand iron would likely do just as well, as long as one's short game is up to it. Generally it's best to seek to avoid tweaking their territorial instincts, which is not especially difficult.

    I imagine hippos are more sprinters than endurance runners.
     
    True...it's not often one comes across the magnificent great hippo migration moving at a steady canter across the African Savannah. Though to be fair, something akin can be seen at government buildings at 4 pm sharp in that great wildlife reserve that is Pretoria.

    There was an indecent at Hans Merensky golf course a few years back where an elephant had come through the fence between the course and the adjacent Kruger park, and a female German tourist rather rashly decided to stand next to it to have her photo taken by her daughter; the elephant duly killed her. There are a few of these sort of adventures every year in SA.

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  74. @anon
    Great painting by "the prince of painters and the painter of princes".

    They didn’t have action movies in the 17th century. I reckon that painting was the Road Warrior or Terminator II of its day.

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  75. @Steve Sailer
    Which golf club would you use to smack the chasing hippo on the nose?

    I figure a sand wedge.

    I imagine hippos are more sprinters than endurance runners.

    Which golf club would you use to smack the chasing hippo on the nose?

    I figure a sand wedge.

    Yup, as long as it was a 458 sand wedge, though in truth a well placed chip with a 375 sand iron would likely do just as well, as long as one’s short game is up to it. Generally it’s best to seek to avoid tweaking their territorial instincts, which is not especially difficult.

    I imagine hippos are more sprinters than endurance runners.

    True…it’s not often one comes across the magnificent great hippo migration moving at a steady canter across the African Savannah. Though to be fair, something akin can be seen at government buildings at 4 pm sharp in that great wildlife reserve that is Pretoria.

    There was an indecent at Hans Merensky golf course a few years back where an elephant had come through the fence between the course and the adjacent Kruger park, and a female German tourist rather rashly decided to stand next to it to have her photo taken by her daughter; the elephant duly killed her. There are a few of these sort of adventures every year in SA.

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  76. @Reg Cæsar
    That beast is not quite as Rubenesque as his women are.

    Was he being "hippocritical"?

    Ehhehehe – the hippo-question is well known in the history of art as deep and tricky. I have to think this all through ‘n’ over – I’m not quite sure yet, but I’d assume, that I might end my strains with a well weighted and loud and – expressive a n d exclamatory!, even: YES – YESSIR! – Your thoughts indeed strike me as definitely Rubenesque!

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  77. @miss marple
    OT, is it possible that the football induced brain damage actually happens because of drug abuse?

    Embrace the power of and.

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  78. @Stephen Marle
    I think that we should recreate the pre-"First Peoples" megafauna of the Western hemisphere by bringing over all the large animals from Africa. They are going to all be killed off over there anyway, sooner or later, in native wars and for the Chinese market.

    As long as we start from the East coast first. Beginning with Manhattan.

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  79. @the one they call Desanex
    Here’s one of my favorite paintings, The Hippopotamus and Crocodile Hunt by Peter Paul Rubens:
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/84/Peter_Paul_Rubens_083.jpg/1200px-Peter_Paul_Rubens_083.jpg

    I’m in love with Rubens all over again.

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  80. That the hippo is genetically most closely related to the whale is, it seems to me, a very nice argument for evolution.

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  81. @NickG
    Related golf-course point of interest for our host.

    In South Africa, there is a copper mining town, just outside the famous Israel Sized Kruger National Park in Limpopo province in the North East of the country - Phalaborwa (pronounced roughly Pal-a-bora). It has a rather attractive golf course. On the 17th hole - called Hippo Hollow - there's a water obstacle with a pod of around 5 hippo in resident, there are also Nile crocodile.

    These large territorial herbivores - males well north of 2 tonnes are common - are extremely dangerous. They kill more people in sub-Saharan Africa than any other animal, other than the mosquito and man. Fortunately they spend the day in water and come out at night to graze, though they can be seen out of water at dawn and dusk. They look slow and ponderous, but with a top speed of 25 mph plus, people can't outrun them.

    there’s a water obstacle with a pod of around 5 hippo in resident, there are also Nile crocodile.

    That sounds like a seriously macho golf course. A real high-testosterone golf course. Do the golfers have their caddies carry their guns as well as their golf clubs?

    I’ve never had much interest in watching golf but I guess the ever-present threat of sudden death would make it a much more exciting spectator sport.

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    • Replies: @BB753
    "I’ve never had much interest in watching golf but I guess the ever-present threat of sudden death would make it a much more exciting spectator sport."

    And more of a challenge for golf course architecture!
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  82. Hippos are more feared by Africans than crocodiles are. A full-grown hippo will bite a croc in half to protect it’s young. Hippos view boats as just funny-looking crocodiles and will bite them in half too.

    A great way to be trampled to death is to walk down the path hippos make when walking through high grass near water. They are quiet enough to sneak up on you and crush you practically before you know they’re there.

    On the plus side, they are supposed to taste pretty good.

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  83. @dfordoom

    there’s a water obstacle with a pod of around 5 hippo in resident, there are also Nile crocodile.
     
    That sounds like a seriously macho golf course. A real high-testosterone golf course. Do the golfers have their caddies carry their guns as well as their golf clubs?

    I've never had much interest in watching golf but I guess the ever-present threat of sudden death would make it a much more exciting spectator sport.

    “I’ve never had much interest in watching golf but I guess the ever-present threat of sudden death would make it a much more exciting spectator sport.”

    And more of a challenge for golf course architecture!

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  84. @prosa123
    About a year ago I went to a gun show with the intent of buying both a rifle and a shotgun. Because I knew that I'd be sorely tempted to overspend I set a hard limit of $750. Under no circumstances would I go over that limit.
    Soon after entering what do I see but a rifle in 416 Rigby, a CZ bolt action. Its stock was a bit battered but the rifling seemed okay and the action worked smoothly. And it was priced at $725, right within my limit. After mulling it over for a few minutes I decided against buying it, as I wouldn't be able to buy a shotgun as planned.
    I'm still kicking myself for passing on the Rigby :(

    I remember Robert Ruark’s books about safaris with the legendary Harry Selby and that he had a .416 that he used often. As a teenager I dreamed of going on safari. I never have gotten around to it. Keep your eyes open and you may find a Weatherby in that cartridge someday. that would be worth a little sacrifice, I think.

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