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  1. “”Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark”

    http://variety.com/2018/tv/news/anderson-cooper-defends-haiti-chokes-up-donald-trump-1202662627

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    If anyone knows poop-holes, it's Anderson Cooper.
    , @Mr. Anon

    “”Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark”
     
    Yeah, well, Anderson Cooper is rather fond of s**tholes.
    , @Mr. Anon
    Tucker Carlson has a running gag about Chris Cuomo being some kind of spiritual guru, ushering in a new age of enlightenment. It's pretty funny.
    , @Anonymous
    “Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark”

    Figures. Isn't his mother some kind of actress?
    , @anon
    “”Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark”

    Gay.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Haiti in the 80s was a favorite destination for the homos; maybe AC remembers it fondly.
    , @SteveRogers42
    I'm sure that Anderson Pooper has many warm, fond memories of Haiti.

    Oh, yeah.
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  2. Steve, as you probably know, Andrew Cuomo is really stupid, as is his brother. He’s even stupider than Michelle Obama

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stephen Paul Foster
    Yes, Andy is as stupid as it gets. Consider his remarks after that Afghan guy in NYC ran over those people with his rented truck.

    http://fosterspeak.blogspot.com/2017/11/democrats-pronouns-and-muslim-immigrants.html
    , @Art Deco
    He isn't unintelligent. However, he remains in essence a common-and-garden JD, and his understanding of the world is limited (and distorted) by his education and social background. Joseph Stiglitz told an economist of my acquaintance that a lot of the arguments on policy that he witnessed in the Clinton administration were disputes between economists and lawyers. Cuomo would have been on the side that usually deserves to lose the argument. (Recall that Cuomo was Secretary of HUD). Also, he's a New York pol. It's a populous state with all manner of ambitious people in it, but the political class is not that way. A dear friend of mine quite active in New York politics described it this way: "your father reaches a particular perch, the future of the son is assured". Also, the Cuomos are disliked by people in the same stable because they break the rules that society sets for itself. One scion put it thus: "The Cuomos have always been thugs at heart". Terms like 'vindictive' and 'megalomaniac' were applied to his father. The real problem with Andrew Cuomo is that he's a deeply unpleasant and unscrupulous man whose expertise is in leveraging connections and rent-seeking.
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  3. Read More
    • Replies: @Glaivester
    "Statue of Liberty Law of the Land."
    "Statue of Liberty Law of the Land"
    "Staute of Liberty Poem Law of the Land."
    Then Miller starts realizing that Jim Acosta is too stupid to understand sarcasm.
    , @anonymous
    Could only listen to about two minutes of Acosta before shutting this down. It appears as though Acosta etal are of the opinion that the Lazarus poem has become the twenty-eighth amendment to the US Constitution. In so far as I am aware, the US Constitution still consists of twenty - seven amendments.

    Oops, wait a minute, I forgot--it's the Zeroth Amendment.

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  4. Give me your most retarded, destitude, flea infested, refuse-scented masses yearning for WIC benefits, along with $400 apiece and we will sent them on the Amtrack to NY City and put an end to this thing, once and for all!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chris Mallory

    WIC benefits
     
    WIC is a voucher for baby formula, milk, cheese, dried beans, cereal, and juice.
    , @Corvinus
    "Give me your most retarded, destitude, flea infested, refuse-scented masses yearning for WIC benefits, along with $400 apiece and we will sent them on the Amtrack to NY City and put an end to this thing, once and for all!"

    Exactly the sentiments on display by nativists if one's ancestors had been from Eastern and Southern Europe in the late 1800's. Decidedly other than civilized.

    They must go back.
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  5. Emma Lazarus’ stupid quote should be removed from the Statue of Liberty forthwith.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    Emma Lazarus’ stupid quote should be removed from the Statue of Liberty forthwith.
     
    Indeed. Remove her juvenile mush and replace it with a real poem:

    Rudyard Kipling, 'The Stranger"

    The Stranger within my gate,
    He may be true or kind,
    But he does not talk my talk--
    I cannot feel his mind.
    I see the face and the eyes and the mouth,
    But not the soul behind.

    The men of my own stock,
    They may do ill or well,
    But they tell the lies I am wanted to,
    They are used to the lies I tell;
    And we do not need interpreters
    When we go to buy or sell.

    The Stranger within my gates,
    He may be evil or good,
    But I cannot tell what powers control--
    What reasons sway his mood;
    Nor when the Gods of his far-off land
    Shall repossess his blood.

    The men of my own stock,
    Bitter bad they may be,
    But, at least, they hear the things I hear,
    And see the things I see;
    And whatever I think of them and their likes
    They think of the likes of me.

    This was my father's belief
    And this is also mine:
    Let the corn be all one sheaf--
    And the grapes be all one vine,
    Ere our children's teeth are set on edge
    By bitter bread and wine.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Anonymous, if only we can find some confederate heritage in her background the plaque would be gone in a heartbeat.
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  6. In the 1880s the federal government took over the task of screening immigrants, building the Ellis Island inspection station which opened in 1892 within easy sight of the Statue of Liberty. Ellis Island processed millions between 1892 and 1914, when the outbreak of World War I pretty much cut off overseas immigration, and again from 1919 to 1924, when a sharply restrictive immigration act was passed, barring virtually all immigrants from southern and eastern Europe.

    The Ellis Island regime was not, however, the kind of open immigration system Jim Acosta and an increasing number of liberals and Democrats seem to favor. For one thing, the most tired and poor seldom made it to the United States, because they lacked the money or the heartiness to afford or weather even steerage passage on a trans-Atlantic steamship. More importantly, the government excluded those deemed (at their Ellis Island inspection or elsewhere) suffering from communicable diseases, those deemed to be insane or “loathsome” and those “likely to become a public charge.” (Here’s a sample of exclusions for such reasons.)

    Thus paupers were not allowed, or elderly people with no assets or relatives; there was even a political test, for “anarchists,” which is not so surprising considering that in the 1890-1901 period anarchist terrorists murdered the president of France, the empress of Austria, and the president of the United States.

    My understanding is that the overwhelming majority of would-be immigrants at the Ellis Island and other entry stations were approved. But I suspect it’s likely that many people who knew they would not be approved or suspected they well might not be, simply didn’t make the journey. They would have been deterred from coming by America’s non-open-immigration policy, as many Central Americans today seem to have been deterred from crossing the southern U.S. border because of the way that the Trump administration is enforcing existing statutes. (The steamship companies, if they had the responsibility to ship back rejected applicants, would have screened for the likelihood of rejection, just as airlines today won’t let you board an international flight if you don’t have the passport or visa necessary for entry at the destination.)

    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/stephen-miller-is-right-lazarus-immigration-poem-is-not-us-law/article/2630657

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    And never forget that we had no welfare, free medical care (or free schooling in many places!), free housing, free food, and on and on. None of it, excepting trivial amounts of immigrant-aid societies (often run by other immigrants).

    Nope, most weren't coming for freebies 100 and 200 years ago. It's almost as if they had ambition or something, and it's also worth noting that America was a sparsely-populated frontier at the time.

    Things have changed, haven't they.

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  7. Did that Emma Lazarus poem get appended to the Bill of Rights or something?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    We seem to have developed an "unwritten constitution", and it is certainly affecting our federal court decisions. Immigration, at least of the non-white sort, shall not to be questioned. The left will say without the slightest hesitation that we are "un-American" for desiring to remain the ethno-religious supermajority.

    Strikingly, Emma Lazarus was an early supporter of Zionism, even before Herzl became its Founding Father. Support for Israel being a Jewish supermajority state is written in the U.S. law.
    , @Anonymous
    You must be new around here. Steve calls it the Zeroth Amendment.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/its-right-there-in-the-zeroth-amendment/
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  8. Chain migration is bad, but geez, Chaim migration is worse as it gave us Lazarus, Hart and Celler.

    Read More
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  9. If you stop following politics for a few days, then come back, you’re guaranteed to see the media freaking out over something Trump said yesterday. That’s the only reason to root for his reelection. Policy-wise he’s the same thing as Hillary, but unlike her he has a negative emotional effect on the worst people in the world.

    Read More
    • Replies: @istevefan

    Policy-wise he’s the same thing as Hillary,
     
    Is he? He put Gorsuch on the SC. He's cut a boatload of regulations. He just torpedoed the key component of obamacare. And so far he hasn't caved on DACA or the wall.
    , @The preferred nomenclature is...
    Policy wise he's the same as Hillary.

    Are you that f'n stupid?
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  10. @Anonymous
    Emma Lazarus' stupid quote should be removed from the Statue of Liberty forthwith.

    Emma Lazarus’ stupid quote should be removed from the Statue of Liberty forthwith.

    Indeed. Remove her juvenile mush and replace it with a real poem:

    Rudyard Kipling, ‘The Stranger”

    The Stranger within my gate,
    He may be true or kind,
    But he does not talk my talk–
    I cannot feel his mind.
    I see the face and the eyes and the mouth,
    But not the soul behind.

    The men of my own stock,
    They may do ill or well,
    But they tell the lies I am wanted to,
    They are used to the lies I tell;
    And we do not need interpreters
    When we go to buy or sell.

    The Stranger within my gates,
    He may be evil or good,
    But I cannot tell what powers control–
    What reasons sway his mood;
    Nor when the Gods of his far-off land
    Shall repossess his blood.

    The men of my own stock,
    Bitter bad they may be,
    But, at least, they hear the things I hear,
    And see the things I see;
    And whatever I think of them and their likes
    They think of the likes of me.

    This was my father’s belief
    And this is also mine:
    Let the corn be all one sheaf–
    And the grapes be all one vine,
    Ere our children’s teeth are set on edge
    By bitter bread and wine.

    Read More
    • Agree: Thomas, Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @Thomas
    Dang, and when I thought I knew Kipling. Based before that was a thing.

    I hoped awhile ago for Trump to take the steps to have the Lazarus poem removed, melted down, and turned into a urinal. Would have the most bang for the buck of anything that would straighten the national consciousness.
    , @J.Ross
    This reminds me of something I have been reflecting on. If you hear the media of another language and culture, you will hear regional and class variations in accent, but you will not endure anything like the gibberish and arrogant mispronunciation that are now normal in English language broadcast media. We uniquely have to put up with non-native speakers stumbling through basic constructions in their own pronunciation schemes, and at times leaving whole sentences to be guessed at. Even if you can catch every word, the language is graceless and inexpert. And of course, when non-English speakers come to mention a word that is foreign to them (like a name) there is nothing like our deferential kowtowing. I wonder if that one Hispanic radio journalist who always pronounces her name thoroughly within Spanish rules (down to the speed), who clearly accepts this leftist idea that we should be responsible to every different language system on Earth in some spirit of fairness, ever encountered a Polish speaker with a highly consonantal name, who shared her opinion about not meeting the listener half way.
    , @Mr. Anon
    A great poem. Pithy, profound, and true. Kipling was a wise dude.
    , @ChrisZ
    If "The Stranger" is Kipling's take on "Invite the world," then "The Man Who Would be King," is his take on "Invade the world."

    Last night I watched the great 1970s Huston film of Kipling's story (with it's amazing cast of Connery, Caine, Plummer ... and thousands of our future fellow Americans). Connery and Caine are two English ex-Indian Army rogues who enter one of those sh**hole countries and take it over in a few months with little more than an arsenal of 20 rifles. Turns out the whole population of warring tribes is a cargo cult living off dim memories of Alexander's conquest 2,200 years earlier. Connery's character gets acclaimed Alexander's prophesied heir, and begins to imagine that he can bring law and civilization to the country; but Caine tries to remind him that they're dealing with irredeemable savages, and that the two English buddies should stick to their plan of looting the country of the riches its people have no use for.

    Guess which one is proven right?

    Alas, an ill-considered moment of sentimentality condemns one to death, the other to lifelong disfigurement. A parable for our time.
    , @ChrisZ
    I want to add to my previous comment that Kipling's "The Stranger" has made several appearances in this forum in recent months (no doubt thanks to Syonredux) and always receives a warm response. Orwell called Kipling England's "greatest bad poet" (he meant it as a compliment); but I marvel at Kipling's imagination, his insight into the darkness and folly of human nature, and of course his prolific output.

    With regard to the dispensation of the Emma Lazarus poem: It seems to me that the way to diminish its "canonicity" is not to remove it entirely, but to dilute it in a sea of other poems--including "The Stranger"--which express alternate ("diverse"?) judgments about nationhood, immigration, and the statue itself (which, after all, was conceived and erected as a tribute to "Liberty Enlightening the World"). Make a garden of poems at some remove from the statue, where they could all be displayed; and limit the display to pieces roughly contemporary with the statue itself (so as to avoid the inevitable call for modern PC representation). Let the preponderance of poems reflect the theme of liberty rather than immigration.

    Of course there would be a big argument about it; but that's why it would be important to act *now*, while American patriots still have an influence (relatively speaking) over appointments and executive orders.
    , @Rosamond Vincy
    Since we're quoting Kipling:

    Dane-Geld

    A.D. 980-1016
    It is always a temptation to an armed and agile nation
    To call upon a neighbour and to say: --
    "We invaded you last night--we are quite prepared to fight,
    Unless you pay us cash to go away."

    And that is called asking for Dane-geld,
    And the people who ask it explain
    That you've only to pay 'em the Dane-geld
    And then you'll get rid of the Dane!

    It is always a temptation for a rich and lazy nation,
    To puff and look important and to say: --
    "Though we know we should defeat you, we have not the time to meet you.
    We will therefore pay you cash to go away."

    And that is called paying the Dane-geld;
    But we've proved it again and again,
    That if once you have paid him the Dane-geld
    You never get rid of the Dane.

    It is wrong to put temptation in the path of any nation,
    For fear they should succumb and go astray;
    So when you are requested to pay up or be molested,
    You will find it better policy to say: --

    "We never pay any-one Dane-geld,
    No matter how trifling the cost;
    For the end of that game is oppression and shame,
    And the nation that pays it is lost!"
    , @Rosamond Vincy
    And then there's Ogden Nash:

    How courteous is the Japanese;
    He always says, “Excuse it, please.”
    He climbs into his neighbor’s garden,
    And smiles, and says, “I beg your pardon”;
    He bows and grins a friendly grin,
    And calls his hungry family in;
    He grins, and bows a friendly bow;
    “So sorry, this my garden now.”
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  11. @syonredux
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85KmtsbMYVU

    “Statue of Liberty Law of the Land.”
    “Statue of Liberty Law of the Land”
    “Staute of Liberty Poem Law of the Land.”
    Then Miller starts realizing that Jim Acosta is too stupid to understand sarcasm.

    Read More
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  12. Andrew Cuomo

    @NYGovCuomo

    Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door

    Fake Constitution

    We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

    Real Constitution

    Read More
    • Agree: syonredux
    • Replies: @istevefan
    Nice comparison. It always confuses me that people equate the poem on the giant with the Founding documents. First, they are separated by over 100 years. I know many are bad at dates, but not being able to conceptualize different written works being separated by over a century is pretty bad.

    Second, the poem on the giant was written well after the USA was a going concern. It would have been one thing for the poem to have been written when our nascent nation's future was very much in doubt. But the poem came about after the fledgling nation sprang up, fought and survived three major conflicts (including the Civil War) and had become the leading industrialized nation in the world.

    In other words when this poem was written the heavy lifting was done. The nation stretched from the Atlantic to the Pacific and was connected by rail and telegraph. Yet people act like this nation would not exist without the poem and the wretched refuse it seeks to invite.
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  13. @syonredux

    Emma Lazarus’ stupid quote should be removed from the Statue of Liberty forthwith.
     
    Indeed. Remove her juvenile mush and replace it with a real poem:

    Rudyard Kipling, 'The Stranger"

    The Stranger within my gate,
    He may be true or kind,
    But he does not talk my talk--
    I cannot feel his mind.
    I see the face and the eyes and the mouth,
    But not the soul behind.

    The men of my own stock,
    They may do ill or well,
    But they tell the lies I am wanted to,
    They are used to the lies I tell;
    And we do not need interpreters
    When we go to buy or sell.

    The Stranger within my gates,
    He may be evil or good,
    But I cannot tell what powers control--
    What reasons sway his mood;
    Nor when the Gods of his far-off land
    Shall repossess his blood.

    The men of my own stock,
    Bitter bad they may be,
    But, at least, they hear the things I hear,
    And see the things I see;
    And whatever I think of them and their likes
    They think of the likes of me.

    This was my father's belief
    And this is also mine:
    Let the corn be all one sheaf--
    And the grapes be all one vine,
    Ere our children's teeth are set on edge
    By bitter bread and wine.

    Dang, and when I thought I knew Kipling. Based before that was a thing.

    I hoped awhile ago for Trump to take the steps to have the Lazarus poem removed, melted down, and turned into a urinal. Would have the most bang for the buck of anything that would straighten the national consciousness.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    The Acela/I-95 corridor cannot be reasonably seen as part of the "real America" or "Middle America". Despite being an NYC native, Trump was massively defeated in four of the five boroughs, and the GOP hasn't won the Presidential election in NYC since 1924.

    The people there literally see Trump in the same way that the South saw the Reconstruction era carpetbaggers and scalawags.
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    I have a collection of his poems. I think he was one of the wisest men in history.
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  14. @The Alarmist
    Did that Emma Lazarus poem get appended to the Bill of Rights or something?

    We seem to have developed an “unwritten constitution”, and it is certainly affecting our federal court decisions. Immigration, at least of the non-white sort, shall not to be questioned. The left will say without the slightest hesitation that we are “un-American” for desiring to remain the ethno-religious supermajority.

    Strikingly, Emma Lazarus was an early supporter of Zionism, even before Herzl became its Founding Father. Support for Israel being a Jewish supermajority state is written in the U.S. law.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    Commerce Clause, "general welfare," 14th Amendment--is there anything they can't do?

    The Constitution is a conservative prayer shawl at this point. It's actually gotten kind of hilarious.
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  15. @syonredux

    Emma Lazarus’ stupid quote should be removed from the Statue of Liberty forthwith.
     
    Indeed. Remove her juvenile mush and replace it with a real poem:

    Rudyard Kipling, 'The Stranger"

    The Stranger within my gate,
    He may be true or kind,
    But he does not talk my talk--
    I cannot feel his mind.
    I see the face and the eyes and the mouth,
    But not the soul behind.

    The men of my own stock,
    They may do ill or well,
    But they tell the lies I am wanted to,
    They are used to the lies I tell;
    And we do not need interpreters
    When we go to buy or sell.

    The Stranger within my gates,
    He may be evil or good,
    But I cannot tell what powers control--
    What reasons sway his mood;
    Nor when the Gods of his far-off land
    Shall repossess his blood.

    The men of my own stock,
    Bitter bad they may be,
    But, at least, they hear the things I hear,
    And see the things I see;
    And whatever I think of them and their likes
    They think of the likes of me.

    This was my father's belief
    And this is also mine:
    Let the corn be all one sheaf--
    And the grapes be all one vine,
    Ere our children's teeth are set on edge
    By bitter bread and wine.

    This reminds me of something I have been reflecting on. If you hear the media of another language and culture, you will hear regional and class variations in accent, but you will not endure anything like the gibberish and arrogant mispronunciation that are now normal in English language broadcast media. We uniquely have to put up with non-native speakers stumbling through basic constructions in their own pronunciation schemes, and at times leaving whole sentences to be guessed at. Even if you can catch every word, the language is graceless and inexpert. And of course, when non-English speakers come to mention a word that is foreign to them (like a name) there is nothing like our deferential kowtowing. I wonder if that one Hispanic radio journalist who always pronounces her name thoroughly within Spanish rules (down to the speed), who clearly accepts this leftist idea that we should be responsible to every different language system on Earth in some spirit of fairness, ever encountered a Polish speaker with a highly consonantal name, who shared her opinion about not meeting the listener half way.

    Read More
    • Replies: @larry lurker
    What's hilarious is that monolingual English speakers are also picking up this habit.

    I can't remember what show it was, but I once heard a middle-aged white guy on some panel say the phrase "Latino community." He tried to unaspirate/dentalize the t in Latino to show everybody how woke he was, but he was a little too subtle in the execution and it came out as something between "Ladino" and "Layino". Delightful.

    , @Chrisnonymous
    I always prefer the example of German. When someone says something about CHEE-lay (Chile) or KOO-bah (Cuba), I bring up something about Deutschland or, better, Osterreich, in an overraught accent. This either makes them either mad or confused. Either way, they shut up.
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  16. @Thomas
    Dang, and when I thought I knew Kipling. Based before that was a thing.

    I hoped awhile ago for Trump to take the steps to have the Lazarus poem removed, melted down, and turned into a urinal. Would have the most bang for the buck of anything that would straighten the national consciousness.

    The Acela/I-95 corridor cannot be reasonably seen as part of the “real America” or “Middle America”. Despite being an NYC native, Trump was massively defeated in four of the five boroughs, and the GOP hasn’t won the Presidential election in NYC since 1924.

    The people there literally see Trump in the same way that the South saw the Reconstruction era carpetbaggers and scalawags.

    Read More
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  17. @Anonymous
    ""Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark"

    http://variety.com/2018/tv/news/anderson-cooper-defends-haiti-chokes-up-donald-trump-1202662627

    If anyone knows poop-holes, it’s Anderson Cooper.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    Spit the coffee on that one.
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  18. @Glossy
    If you stop following politics for a few days, then come back, you're guaranteed to see the media freaking out over something Trump said yesterday. That's the only reason to root for his reelection. Policy-wise he's the same thing as Hillary, but unlike her he has a negative emotional effect on the worst people in the world.

    Policy-wise he’s the same thing as Hillary,

    Is he? He put Gorsuch on the SC. He’s cut a boatload of regulations. He just torpedoed the key component of obamacare. And so far he hasn’t caved on DACA or the wall.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Not to mention a little thing called AFFA destroying neighborhoods coast to coast.
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  19. @Anonymous
    ""Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark"

    http://variety.com/2018/tv/news/anderson-cooper-defends-haiti-chokes-up-donald-trump-1202662627

    “”Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark”

    Yeah, well, Anderson Cooper is rather fond of s**tholes.

    Read More
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  20. Whenever this comes up, I’m going g to quote from my favorite immigration poem, One in a Million, by W. Axl Rose:

    Immigrants and faggots
    They make no sense to me
    They come to our country
    And think they’ll do as they please
    Like start some mini-Iran
    Or spread some effing disease
    And they talk so many Goddamn ways
    It’s all Greek to me

    Read More
    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    Good catch!
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  21. The chief problem with trying to govern using noble lies and polite fictions is that eventually power passes into the hands of people who aren’t bright enough to figure out the real score, and they go off and try to govern as if the polite fictions are as rock-solid as gravity.

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    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    Very perceptive comment, Mr. Blank. Not to be OT, but that's somewhat similar to what happened at Vatican II and what gave us the Novus Ordo Missae. The nonsense religion of the masses, consisting of vague moral bromides and pastoral tripe, overwhelmed and dissolved the real theology of which the clergy were supposed to be the guardians. The precise liturgical language was replaced by an insipid jargon designed to confirm the commoners in their hypnotic state. Nowadays, as you say nobody even knows the score, so real Catholicism is as good as dead except in the old books and in a few tiny Traditionalist circles.
    , @Anon
    "The chief problem with trying to govern using noble lies and polite fictions is that eventually power passes into the hands of people who aren’t bright enough to figure out the real score, and they go off and try to govern as if the polite fictions are as rock-solid as gravity."

    Indeed. That's how Christianity started.
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  22. @Anonymous
    ""Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark"

    http://variety.com/2018/tv/news/anderson-cooper-defends-haiti-chokes-up-donald-trump-1202662627

    Tucker Carlson has a running gag about Chris Cuomo being some kind of spiritual guru, ushering in a new age of enlightenment. It’s pretty funny.

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  23. @syonredux

    Emma Lazarus’ stupid quote should be removed from the Statue of Liberty forthwith.
     
    Indeed. Remove her juvenile mush and replace it with a real poem:

    Rudyard Kipling, 'The Stranger"

    The Stranger within my gate,
    He may be true or kind,
    But he does not talk my talk--
    I cannot feel his mind.
    I see the face and the eyes and the mouth,
    But not the soul behind.

    The men of my own stock,
    They may do ill or well,
    But they tell the lies I am wanted to,
    They are used to the lies I tell;
    And we do not need interpreters
    When we go to buy or sell.

    The Stranger within my gates,
    He may be evil or good,
    But I cannot tell what powers control--
    What reasons sway his mood;
    Nor when the Gods of his far-off land
    Shall repossess his blood.

    The men of my own stock,
    Bitter bad they may be,
    But, at least, they hear the things I hear,
    And see the things I see;
    And whatever I think of them and their likes
    They think of the likes of me.

    This was my father's belief
    And this is also mine:
    Let the corn be all one sheaf--
    And the grapes be all one vine,
    Ere our children's teeth are set on edge
    By bitter bread and wine.

    A great poem. Pithy, profound, and true. Kipling was a wise dude.

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  24. @AnotherDad

    Andrew Cuomo

    @NYGovCuomo

    Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door
     
    Fake Constitution

    We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.
     
    Real Constitution

    Nice comparison. It always confuses me that people equate the poem on the giant with the Founding documents. First, they are separated by over 100 years. I know many are bad at dates, but not being able to conceptualize different written works being separated by over a century is pretty bad.

    Second, the poem on the giant was written well after the USA was a going concern. It would have been one thing for the poem to have been written when our nascent nation’s future was very much in doubt. But the poem came about after the fledgling nation sprang up, fought and survived three major conflicts (including the Civil War) and had become the leading industrialized nation in the world.

    In other words when this poem was written the heavy lifting was done. The nation stretched from the Atlantic to the Pacific and was connected by rail and telegraph. Yet people act like this nation would not exist without the poem and the wretched refuse it seeks to invite.

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  25. People are tweeting about the zeroth amendment under comey’s tweet.

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  26. It’s like journolist or something.

    Who is the puppet master coordinating their narrative?

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  27. Our creative comedians:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Comedians? Sounds good to me!
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  28. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    In the 1880s the federal government took over the task of screening immigrants, building the Ellis Island inspection station which opened in 1892 within easy sight of the Statue of Liberty. Ellis Island processed millions between 1892 and 1914, when the outbreak of World War I pretty much cut off overseas immigration, and again from 1919 to 1924, when a sharply restrictive immigration act was passed, barring virtually all immigrants from southern and eastern Europe.

    The Ellis Island regime was not, however, the kind of open immigration system Jim Acosta and an increasing number of liberals and Democrats seem to favor. For one thing, the most tired and poor seldom made it to the United States, because they lacked the money or the heartiness to afford or weather even steerage passage on a trans-Atlantic steamship. More importantly, the government excluded those deemed (at their Ellis Island inspection or elsewhere) suffering from communicable diseases, those deemed to be insane or "loathsome" and those "likely to become a public charge." (Here's a sample of exclusions for such reasons.)

    Thus paupers were not allowed, or elderly people with no assets or relatives; there was even a political test, for "anarchists," which is not so surprising considering that in the 1890-1901 period anarchist terrorists murdered the president of France, the empress of Austria, and the president of the United States.

    My understanding is that the overwhelming majority of would-be immigrants at the Ellis Island and other entry stations were approved. But I suspect it's likely that many people who knew they would not be approved or suspected they well might not be, simply didn't make the journey. They would have been deterred from coming by America's non-open-immigration policy, as many Central Americans today seem to have been deterred from crossing the southern U.S. border because of the way that the Trump administration is enforcing existing statutes. (The steamship companies, if they had the responsibility to ship back rejected applicants, would have screened for the likelihood of rejection, just as airlines today won't let you board an international flight if you don't have the passport or visa necessary for entry at the destination.)

     

    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/stephen-miller-is-right-lazarus-immigration-poem-is-not-us-law/article/2630657

    And never forget that we had no welfare, free medical care (or free schooling in many places!), free housing, free food, and on and on. None of it, excepting trivial amounts of immigrant-aid societies (often run by other immigrants).

    Nope, most weren’t coming for freebies 100 and 200 years ago. It’s almost as if they had ambition or something, and it’s also worth noting that America was a sparsely-populated frontier at the time.

    Things have changed, haven’t they.

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  29. @The Alarmist
    Did that Emma Lazarus poem get appended to the Bill of Rights or something?

    You must be new around here. Steve calls it the Zeroth Amendment.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/its-right-there-in-the-zeroth-amendment/

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  30. @istevefan

    Policy-wise he’s the same thing as Hillary,
     
    Is he? He put Gorsuch on the SC. He's cut a boatload of regulations. He just torpedoed the key component of obamacare. And so far he hasn't caved on DACA or the wall.

    Not to mention a little thing called AFFA destroying neighborhoods coast to coast.

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  31. @Anonymous
    ""Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark"

    http://variety.com/2018/tv/news/anderson-cooper-defends-haiti-chokes-up-donald-trump-1202662627

    “Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark”

    Figures. Isn’t his mother some kind of actress?

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    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Isn't he gay? Isn't it enough?
    , @Art Deco
    About 60 years ago. She's still alive. The number of people who live past 90 these days is an amazement.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    I always find it vaguely amusing that he's a Vanderbilt elite. They have fallen so far.
    , @Anonymous
    Gloria Vanderbilt was famous in the late 70s as being the socialite who introduced her own brand of designer jeans :

    During the 1970s, Vanderbilt ventured into the fashion business, first with Glentex, licensing her name for a line of scarves. In 1976, Indian designer Mohan Murjani's Murjani Corporation, proposed launching a line of designer jeans carrying Vanderbilt's signature embroidered on the back pocket, as well as her swan logo. Her jeans were more tightly fitted than other jeans of that time. The logo eventually appeared on dresses and perfumes, while Vanderbilt also launched a line of blouses, sheets, shoes, leather goods, liqueurs, and accessories. Vanderbilt was one of the first designers to make public appearances, which was a difficult thing for her because of her shyness.

    In 1978, Vanderbilt sold the rights to her name to the Murjani Group.[19] She then launched her own company, "GV Ltd.," on 7th Avenue in New York. In the period from 1982 to 2002, L'Oreal launched eight fragrances under the brand name Gloria Vanderbilt.[20] Jones Apparel Group acquired the rights to Gloria Vanderbilt jeans in 2002.
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AkcQOAFkESQ

    Geena Davis and Deborah Harry did TV ads for them. Harry's were legendary.
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  32. At the time many feared the Ellis Island immigrants would fundamentally change America for the worse, if anything they weren’t pessimistic enoug.

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    • Replies: @Saint Louis
    Thank you! Absolutely. I've been saying this for years and people look at me like I have three heads. The pro-immigrant/invader folks like to bring up the Know-Nothings and how horrible they were. We're just supposed to accept this argument because we all know that those horrible anti-immigrant people in the 19th century were bad guys because they didn't want our ancestors to come here.

    While I'm glad some of my ancestors immigrated here in the late 19th-early 20th century (or else I wouldn't be here), the Know-Nothings weren't actually wrong. They feared that waves of Catholic immigrants would change the nation they knew and loved, and they were right.
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  33. @J.Ross
    This reminds me of something I have been reflecting on. If you hear the media of another language and culture, you will hear regional and class variations in accent, but you will not endure anything like the gibberish and arrogant mispronunciation that are now normal in English language broadcast media. We uniquely have to put up with non-native speakers stumbling through basic constructions in their own pronunciation schemes, and at times leaving whole sentences to be guessed at. Even if you can catch every word, the language is graceless and inexpert. And of course, when non-English speakers come to mention a word that is foreign to them (like a name) there is nothing like our deferential kowtowing. I wonder if that one Hispanic radio journalist who always pronounces her name thoroughly within Spanish rules (down to the speed), who clearly accepts this leftist idea that we should be responsible to every different language system on Earth in some spirit of fairness, ever encountered a Polish speaker with a highly consonantal name, who shared her opinion about not meeting the listener half way.

    What’s hilarious is that monolingual English speakers are also picking up this habit.

    I can’t remember what show it was, but I once heard a middle-aged white guy on some panel say the phrase “Latino community.” He tried to unaspirate/dentalize the t in Latino to show everybody how woke he was, but he was a little too subtle in the execution and it came out as something between “Ladino” and “Layino”. Delightful.

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  34. @Meretricious
    Steve, as you probably know, Andrew Cuomo is really stupid, as is his brother. He's even stupider than Michelle Obama

    Yes, Andy is as stupid as it gets. Consider his remarks after that Afghan guy in NYC ran over those people with his rented truck.

    http://fosterspeak.blogspot.com/2017/11/democrats-pronouns-and-muslim-immigrants.html

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  35. “Storied pomp,” indeed.

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  36. @Mr. Blank
    The chief problem with trying to govern using noble lies and polite fictions is that eventually power passes into the hands of people who aren’t bright enough to figure out the real score, and they go off and try to govern as if the polite fictions are as rock-solid as gravity.

    Very perceptive comment, Mr. Blank. Not to be OT, but that’s somewhat similar to what happened at Vatican II and what gave us the Novus Ordo Missae. The nonsense religion of the masses, consisting of vague moral bromides and pastoral tripe, overwhelmed and dissolved the real theology of which the clergy were supposed to be the guardians. The precise liturgical language was replaced by an insipid jargon designed to confirm the commoners in their hypnotic state. Nowadays, as you say nobody even knows the score, so real Catholicism is as good as dead except in the old books and in a few tiny Traditionalist circles.

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    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "The nonsense religion of the masses, consisting of vague moral bromides and pastoral tripe, overwhelmed and dissolved the real theology..."

    Not "real theology", just theology. Not "real Catholicism", just Catholicism. So who made you the expert here on doctrine? How are you the arbiter as to what constitutes "true faith"?
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  37. They come from their primitive sh*t-holes;
    Square pegs that don’t easily fit holes
    In our nation’s work force,
    So too many, perforce,
    Suck milk from Miss Liberty’s t*t-holes.

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    • Replies: @ChrisZ
    Des, you rose to the challenge and met it. Quite a creative set of rhymes. Congratulations.
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  38. @guest
    If anyone knows poop-holes, it's Anderson Cooper.

    Spit the coffee on that one.

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  39. @Thomas
    Dang, and when I thought I knew Kipling. Based before that was a thing.

    I hoped awhile ago for Trump to take the steps to have the Lazarus poem removed, melted down, and turned into a urinal. Would have the most bang for the buck of anything that would straighten the national consciousness.

    I have a collection of his poems. I think he was one of the wisest men in history.

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  40. @Maj. Kong
    We seem to have developed an "unwritten constitution", and it is certainly affecting our federal court decisions. Immigration, at least of the non-white sort, shall not to be questioned. The left will say without the slightest hesitation that we are "un-American" for desiring to remain the ethno-religious supermajority.

    Strikingly, Emma Lazarus was an early supporter of Zionism, even before Herzl became its Founding Father. Support for Israel being a Jewish supermajority state is written in the U.S. law.

    Commerce Clause, “general welfare,” 14th Amendment–is there anything they can’t do?

    The Constitution is a conservative prayer shawl at this point. It’s actually gotten kind of hilarious.

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    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    You forgot the "Good and Plenty" clause (AKA Necessary and Proper clause).

    What's truly amazing is that Jeff Sessions, supposedly brilliant lawyer that he is, could tell Trump that the stays issued by the Ninth Circuit are ultra vires and Trump could issue a statement to the various Executive Branch departments telling them that and telling them to enforce the orders he has given. If the Supreme Court, which is the only court specifically created by the Constitution, has an issue with that, they will weigh in. Instead of an Executive guarding and protecting his Constitutional prerogatives, we get wishy washy statements that the Executive is looking forward to litigating this as high as the Supreme Court, which so far has weighed in on the side of the Executive. Don't get me started on Congress and all the undeclared warfare masquerading as the GWOT.

    The Constitution isn't a prayer shawl at this point ... it is a doormat.
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  41. @Anonymous
    ""Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark"

    http://variety.com/2018/tv/news/anderson-cooper-defends-haiti-chokes-up-donald-trump-1202662627

    “”Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark”

    Gay.

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  42. @Anonymous
    “Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark”

    Figures. Isn't his mother some kind of actress?

    Isn’t he gay? Isn’t it enough?

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  43. @Anonymous
    Our creative comedians:

    https://twitter.com/AlbertBrooks/status/951620911790219266

    https://twitter.com/NewYorker/status/951602727645310977

    Comedians? Sounds good to me!

    Read More
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  44. @J.Ross
    This reminds me of something I have been reflecting on. If you hear the media of another language and culture, you will hear regional and class variations in accent, but you will not endure anything like the gibberish and arrogant mispronunciation that are now normal in English language broadcast media. We uniquely have to put up with non-native speakers stumbling through basic constructions in their own pronunciation schemes, and at times leaving whole sentences to be guessed at. Even if you can catch every word, the language is graceless and inexpert. And of course, when non-English speakers come to mention a word that is foreign to them (like a name) there is nothing like our deferential kowtowing. I wonder if that one Hispanic radio journalist who always pronounces her name thoroughly within Spanish rules (down to the speed), who clearly accepts this leftist idea that we should be responsible to every different language system on Earth in some spirit of fairness, ever encountered a Polish speaker with a highly consonantal name, who shared her opinion about not meeting the listener half way.

    I always prefer the example of German. When someone says something about CHEE-lay (Chile) or KOO-bah (Cuba), I bring up something about Deutschland or, better, Osterreich, in an overraught accent. This either makes them either mad or confused. Either way, they shut up.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Prima.
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  45. @Glossy
    If you stop following politics for a few days, then come back, you're guaranteed to see the media freaking out over something Trump said yesterday. That's the only reason to root for his reelection. Policy-wise he's the same thing as Hillary, but unlike her he has a negative emotional effect on the worst people in the world.

    Policy wise he’s the same as Hillary.

    Are you that f’n stupid?

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  46. @The Anti-Gnostic
    Commerce Clause, "general welfare," 14th Amendment--is there anything they can't do?

    The Constitution is a conservative prayer shawl at this point. It's actually gotten kind of hilarious.

    You forgot the “Good and Plenty” clause (AKA Necessary and Proper clause).

    What’s truly amazing is that Jeff Sessions, supposedly brilliant lawyer that he is, could tell Trump that the stays issued by the Ninth Circuit are ultra vires and Trump could issue a statement to the various Executive Branch departments telling them that and telling them to enforce the orders he has given. If the Supreme Court, which is the only court specifically created by the Constitution, has an issue with that, they will weigh in. Instead of an Executive guarding and protecting his Constitutional prerogatives, we get wishy washy statements that the Executive is looking forward to litigating this as high as the Supreme Court, which so far has weighed in on the side of the Executive. Don’t get me started on Congress and all the undeclared warfare masquerading as the GWOT.

    The Constitution isn’t a prayer shawl at this point … it is a doormat.

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  47. @Meretricious
    Steve, as you probably know, Andrew Cuomo is really stupid, as is his brother. He's even stupider than Michelle Obama

    He isn’t unintelligent. However, he remains in essence a common-and-garden JD, and his understanding of the world is limited (and distorted) by his education and social background. Joseph Stiglitz told an economist of my acquaintance that a lot of the arguments on policy that he witnessed in the Clinton administration were disputes between economists and lawyers. Cuomo would have been on the side that usually deserves to lose the argument. (Recall that Cuomo was Secretary of HUD). Also, he’s a New York pol. It’s a populous state with all manner of ambitious people in it, but the political class is not that way. A dear friend of mine quite active in New York politics described it this way: “your father reaches a particular perch, the future of the son is assured”. Also, the Cuomos are disliked by people in the same stable because they break the rules that society sets for itself. One scion put it thus: “The Cuomos have always been thugs at heart”. Terms like ‘vindictive’ and ‘megalomaniac’ were applied to his father. The real problem with Andrew Cuomo is that he’s a deeply unpleasant and unscrupulous man whose expertise is in leveraging connections and rent-seeking.

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    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Art, truly he is not unintelligent but he is a pompous ass and maybe in time we will find that he is also a criminal. NY is now 4 Billion in debt and that number is rising. NY has become the petri dish for all liberal ideas.
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  48. @Anonymous
    “Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark”

    Figures. Isn't his mother some kind of actress?

    About 60 years ago. She’s still alive. The number of people who live past 90 these days is an amazement.

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    • Replies: @oddsbodkins
    I'm sure being a Vanderbilt helps one avoid a lifestyle that causes wear and tear.
    , @a reader
    There was much talk recently about the [re] publishing of wartime pamphlets by french author Louis-Ferdinand Céline.

    A (((public))) outcry ensued, it was thus cancelled.

    His widow is 105. (and half)
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  49. Kakutani attacked Sam Huntington in a NY Times review of Huntington’s book “WHO ARE WE: The Challenges To America’s National Identity.”

    Kakutani is some type of Asian. Kakutani made nasty comments about Huntington and his concerns about how multiculturalism was damaging the United States.

    Huntington said the United States was a British Protestant settler nation. Kakutani is a rabid supporter of nation-wrecking multiculturalism and mass immigration. Kakutani obviously despises the British Protestant and European Christian ancestral core of the United States.

    I say Kakutani can go straight to hell.

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    • Replies: @anon

    Kakutani attacked Sam Huntington in a NY Times review of Huntington’s book “WHO ARE WE: The Challenges To America’s National Identity.”

    Kakutani is some type of Asian. Kakutani made nasty comments about Huntington and his concerns about how multiculturalism was damaging the United States.

    Huntington said the United States was a British Protestant settler nation. Kakutani is a rabid supporter of nation-wrecking multiculturalism and mass immigration. Kakutani obviously despises the British Protestant and European Christian ancestral core of the United States.

    I say Kakutani can go straight to hell.
     

    Never even heard of Michiko Kakutani until now. She is apparently a former NY Times Book Review literary critic, graduate of Yale. I agree, she can KMA. Huntington's Who Are We? was brilliant. His Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order should be required reading for all members of all 3 branches of government.
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  50. @Anonymous
    “Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark”

    Figures. Isn't his mother some kind of actress?

    I always find it vaguely amusing that he’s a Vanderbilt elite. They have fallen so far.

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    He's said his mother told him the money's pretty much gone.
    , @Art Deco
    The Rockefellers make a more interesting case. The size of John D. Rockefeller's fortune at the time of his death in 1937 was (compared to the assets in the economy as a whole) I think about 3x larger than is Bill Gates' fortune today. The thing is, the Rockefellers are fairly fecund and they lost interest in business. There are a scatter of business executives among Rockefeller scions, but it's been a generation since any of them ran an enterprise of institutional importance. They now make up an archipellago of prominent local patricians. (One guess floating around is that the Rockefeller scions have a collective net worth of $11 bn).


    They've proved more durable than the Kennedys. Maybe 3 or 4 of Joseph Kennedy's grandchildren had demonstrable skills of note. The Johnsons of Johnson and Johnson are a reality show (but so rich it may take a while for them to descend to a familiar level). The DuPonts have been the most durable, and you could find DuPonts among the Forbes 400 as recently as 30-odd years ago. (Not now, as far as I'm aware).

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  51. I doubt many Haitian immigrants are moving to their gated communities.

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  52. Looks like they all got a Deep State “Queen of Diamonds” Email.

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  53. Here’s another example of the creativity of our SJW elites.

    Are You Supporting White Supremacy?
    Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstadt provides a checklist.

    https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2018/01/12/checklist-determine-if-you-are-supporting-white-supremacy-opinion

    There are 15 items on the checklist, but the bottom line is basically that if you’re white, your existence supports white supremacy. Tim Wise might be an exception, but I’d have to check with Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstadt to be sure.

    The level of rabid hostility to white people now tolerated and even supported in academia is truly amazing.

    I’d comment there at IHE, but I’ve been banned.

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  54. The left will say without the slightest hesitation that we are “un-American” for desiring to remain the ethno-religious supermajority.

    The left: kill Jane, wear her skin, call everyone “un-Jane.”

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  55. “”Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark”

    8_(

    Like someone’s going to revoke his season tickets to Haiti, or something.

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  56. @syonredux

    Emma Lazarus’ stupid quote should be removed from the Statue of Liberty forthwith.
     
    Indeed. Remove her juvenile mush and replace it with a real poem:

    Rudyard Kipling, 'The Stranger"

    The Stranger within my gate,
    He may be true or kind,
    But he does not talk my talk--
    I cannot feel his mind.
    I see the face and the eyes and the mouth,
    But not the soul behind.

    The men of my own stock,
    They may do ill or well,
    But they tell the lies I am wanted to,
    They are used to the lies I tell;
    And we do not need interpreters
    When we go to buy or sell.

    The Stranger within my gates,
    He may be evil or good,
    But I cannot tell what powers control--
    What reasons sway his mood;
    Nor when the Gods of his far-off land
    Shall repossess his blood.

    The men of my own stock,
    Bitter bad they may be,
    But, at least, they hear the things I hear,
    And see the things I see;
    And whatever I think of them and their likes
    They think of the likes of me.

    This was my father's belief
    And this is also mine:
    Let the corn be all one sheaf--
    And the grapes be all one vine,
    Ere our children's teeth are set on edge
    By bitter bread and wine.

    If “The Stranger” is Kipling’s take on “Invite the world,” then “The Man Who Would be King,” is his take on “Invade the world.”

    Last night I watched the great 1970s Huston film of Kipling’s story (with it’s amazing cast of Connery, Caine, Plummer … and thousands of our future fellow Americans). Connery and Caine are two English ex-Indian Army rogues who enter one of those sh**hole countries and take it over in a few months with little more than an arsenal of 20 rifles. Turns out the whole population of warring tribes is a cargo cult living off dim memories of Alexander’s conquest 2,200 years earlier. Connery’s character gets acclaimed Alexander’s prophesied heir, and begins to imagine that he can bring law and civilization to the country; but Caine tries to remind him that they’re dealing with irredeemable savages, and that the two English buddies should stick to their plan of looting the country of the riches its people have no use for.

    Guess which one is proven right?

    Alas, an ill-considered moment of sentimentality condemns one to death, the other to lifelong disfigurement. A parable for our time.

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    • Agree: syonredux
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Chris, a remarkable movie, well cast and scripted.
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  57. The inscription OUGHT to read:

    “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses whining for WICS and EBT,

    the wretched refuse of your teeming shore.

    Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me,

    I lift my Obamaphone at the entrance to the .99 Cent Store!”

    Our so called elites are a very trenchant example of the reign of mediocrity, bland conformity, lack of creativity, intellectual curiosity, sense of pride in origin and an absolute ignorance of history.

    Outside of the hard sciences and engineering, American higher education has become the one eyed leading the blind; turning even most of its charges’ minds into buckets of steaming manure.

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  58. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85KmtsbMYVU

    Could only listen to about two minutes of Acosta before shutting this down. It appears as though Acosta etal are of the opinion that the Lazarus poem has become the twenty-eighth amendment to the US Constitution. In so far as I am aware, the US Constitution still consists of twenty – seven amendments.

    Oops, wait a minute, I forgot–it’s the Zeroth Amendment.

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  59. @Art Deco
    About 60 years ago. She's still alive. The number of people who live past 90 these days is an amazement.

    I’m sure being a Vanderbilt helps one avoid a lifestyle that causes wear and tear.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Or promotes it. People who can clip coupons are at liberty to drink and drug themselves to death, and some do.
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  60. @syonredux

    Emma Lazarus’ stupid quote should be removed from the Statue of Liberty forthwith.
     
    Indeed. Remove her juvenile mush and replace it with a real poem:

    Rudyard Kipling, 'The Stranger"

    The Stranger within my gate,
    He may be true or kind,
    But he does not talk my talk--
    I cannot feel his mind.
    I see the face and the eyes and the mouth,
    But not the soul behind.

    The men of my own stock,
    They may do ill or well,
    But they tell the lies I am wanted to,
    They are used to the lies I tell;
    And we do not need interpreters
    When we go to buy or sell.

    The Stranger within my gates,
    He may be evil or good,
    But I cannot tell what powers control--
    What reasons sway his mood;
    Nor when the Gods of his far-off land
    Shall repossess his blood.

    The men of my own stock,
    Bitter bad they may be,
    But, at least, they hear the things I hear,
    And see the things I see;
    And whatever I think of them and their likes
    They think of the likes of me.

    This was my father's belief
    And this is also mine:
    Let the corn be all one sheaf--
    And the grapes be all one vine,
    Ere our children's teeth are set on edge
    By bitter bread and wine.

    I want to add to my previous comment that Kipling’s “The Stranger” has made several appearances in this forum in recent months (no doubt thanks to Syonredux) and always receives a warm response. Orwell called Kipling England’s “greatest bad poet” (he meant it as a compliment); but I marvel at Kipling’s imagination, his insight into the darkness and folly of human nature, and of course his prolific output.

    With regard to the dispensation of the Emma Lazarus poem: It seems to me that the way to diminish its “canonicity” is not to remove it entirely, but to dilute it in a sea of other poems–including “The Stranger”–which express alternate (“diverse”?) judgments about nationhood, immigration, and the statue itself (which, after all, was conceived and erected as a tribute to “Liberty Enlightening the World”). Make a garden of poems at some remove from the statue, where they could all be displayed; and limit the display to pieces roughly contemporary with the statue itself (so as to avoid the inevitable call for modern PC representation). Let the preponderance of poems reflect the theme of liberty rather than immigration.

    Of course there would be a big argument about it; but that’s why it would be important to act *now*, while American patriots still have an influence (relatively speaking) over appointments and executive orders.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Orwell called Kipling England’s “greatest bad poet” (he meant it as a compliment); but I marvel at Kipling’s imagination, his insight into the darkness and folly of human nature, and of course his prolific output.
     
    Orwell liked his writing but not his politics or attitudes:

    It is no use pretending that Kipling's view of life, as a whole, can be accepted or even forgiven by any civilized person. It is no use claiming, for instance, that when Kipling describes a British soldier beating a "nigger" with a cleaning rod in order to get money out of him, he is acting merely as a reporter and does not necessarily approve what he describes. There is not the slightest sign anywhere in Kipling's work that he disapproves of that kind of conduct — on the contrary, there is a definite strain of sadism in him, over and above the brutality which a writer of that type has to have. Kipling is a jingo imperialist, he is morally insensitive and aesthetically disgusting...

    ....What (Elliot) does not say, and what I think one ought to start by saying in any discussion of Kipling, is that most of Kipling’s verse is so horribly vulgar that it gives one the same sensation as one gets from watching a third-rate music-hall performer recite ‘The Pigtail of Wu Fang Fu’ with the purple limelight on his face, AND yet there is much of it that is capable of giving pleasure to people who know what poetry means. At his worst, and also his most vital, in poems like ‘Gunga Din’ or ‘Danny Deever’, Kipling is almost a shameful pleasure, like the taste for cheap sweets that some people secretly carry into middle life. But even with his best passages one has the same sense of being seduced by something spurious, and yet unquestionably seduced.


     

    For better or worse, Orwell thought that racism was disgusting and markers of inferiors, uncivilized men:

    “If he were allowed contact with foreigners he would discover that they are creatures similar to himself and that most of what he has been told about them is lies. The sealed world in which he lives would be broken, and the fear, hatred, and self-righteousness on which his morale depends might evaporate."

    , @syonredux
    If someone gave me the power establish a middle-school/ junior high English lit syllabus for the USA, it would have a healthy dose of Kipling: "The Stranger," "The Gods of the Copybook Headings," The Man Who Would Be King, Puck of Pook's Hill, Rewards and Fairies, etc

    Needless to say, the Harry Potter books would be banned.
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  61. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Blank
    The chief problem with trying to govern using noble lies and polite fictions is that eventually power passes into the hands of people who aren’t bright enough to figure out the real score, and they go off and try to govern as if the polite fictions are as rock-solid as gravity.

    “The chief problem with trying to govern using noble lies and polite fictions is that eventually power passes into the hands of people who aren’t bright enough to figure out the real score, and they go off and try to govern as if the polite fictions are as rock-solid as gravity.”

    Indeed. That’s how Christianity started.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Indeed. That’s how Christianity started.

    St. Peter and St. Paul weren't governing anything, politely or no
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  62. @Daniel Chieh
    I always find it vaguely amusing that he's a Vanderbilt elite. They have fallen so far.

    He’s said his mother told him the money’s pretty much gone.

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  63. @Daniel Chieh
    I always find it vaguely amusing that he's a Vanderbilt elite. They have fallen so far.

    The Rockefellers make a more interesting case. The size of John D. Rockefeller’s fortune at the time of his death in 1937 was (compared to the assets in the economy as a whole) I think about 3x larger than is Bill Gates’ fortune today. The thing is, the Rockefellers are fairly fecund and they lost interest in business. There are a scatter of business executives among Rockefeller scions, but it’s been a generation since any of them ran an enterprise of institutional importance. They now make up an archipellago of prominent local patricians. (One guess floating around is that the Rockefeller scions have a collective net worth of $11 bn).

    They’ve proved more durable than the Kennedys. Maybe 3 or 4 of Joseph Kennedy’s grandchildren had demonstrable skills of note. The Johnsons of Johnson and Johnson are a reality show (but so rich it may take a while for them to descend to a familiar level). The DuPonts have been the most durable, and you could find DuPonts among the Forbes 400 as recently as 30-odd years ago. (Not now, as far as I’m aware).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It's not all that unusual for descendants of tycoons to become tycoons all over again since their is a lot of assortative mating among the very rich and it's easier to make a billion dollars if you start out with 100 million dollars. This is harder to notice, however, because lots of descendants of tycoons don't share their surnames because they aren't in the direct male line of descent.
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  64. Cuomo was cucked by his RFK offspring wife banging a millionaire polo-playing McDonald’s franchisee. Fries with that, Andrew?

    Also overpronounces everything to sound important, and goes on TV for hours at a time every time it snows. And he thinks he has a shot at the Oval Office. In a sane world, would be assigned to dog poop removal. NY state, sadly, different story. Big problem when Cuomo, like most Dems, is so bad at math.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Big problem when Cuomo, like most Dems, is so bad at math.

    No doubt he is, but the state's had a series of comptrollers who were better at it or who knew who to ask. The state's public sector pensions are among the most actuarially sound in the country. The queuing problems and endless continuances you see in other state's court systems are much less pronounced as well. For all that the legislature is repellent and for all that everything seems so disorganized, there are things which run comparatively well in New York. Not sure who to credit that to.
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  65. @syonredux

    Emma Lazarus’ stupid quote should be removed from the Statue of Liberty forthwith.
     
    Indeed. Remove her juvenile mush and replace it with a real poem:

    Rudyard Kipling, 'The Stranger"

    The Stranger within my gate,
    He may be true or kind,
    But he does not talk my talk--
    I cannot feel his mind.
    I see the face and the eyes and the mouth,
    But not the soul behind.

    The men of my own stock,
    They may do ill or well,
    But they tell the lies I am wanted to,
    They are used to the lies I tell;
    And we do not need interpreters
    When we go to buy or sell.

    The Stranger within my gates,
    He may be evil or good,
    But I cannot tell what powers control--
    What reasons sway his mood;
    Nor when the Gods of his far-off land
    Shall repossess his blood.

    The men of my own stock,
    Bitter bad they may be,
    But, at least, they hear the things I hear,
    And see the things I see;
    And whatever I think of them and their likes
    They think of the likes of me.

    This was my father's belief
    And this is also mine:
    Let the corn be all one sheaf--
    And the grapes be all one vine,
    Ere our children's teeth are set on edge
    By bitter bread and wine.

    Since we’re quoting Kipling:

    Dane-Geld

    A.D. 980-1016
    It is always a temptation to an armed and agile nation
    To call upon a neighbour and to say: –
    “We invaded you last night–we are quite prepared to fight,
    Unless you pay us cash to go away.”

    And that is called asking for Dane-geld,
    And the people who ask it explain
    That you’ve only to pay ‘em the Dane-geld
    And then you’ll get rid of the Dane!

    It is always a temptation for a rich and lazy nation,
    To puff and look important and to say: –
    “Though we know we should defeat you, we have not the time to meet you.
    We will therefore pay you cash to go away.”

    And that is called paying the Dane-geld;
    But we’ve proved it again and again,
    That if once you have paid him the Dane-geld
    You never get rid of the Dane.

    It is wrong to put temptation in the path of any nation,
    For fear they should succumb and go astray;
    So when you are requested to pay up or be molested,
    You will find it better policy to say: –

    “We never pay any-one Dane-geld,
    No matter how trifling the cost;
    For the end of that game is oppression and shame,
    And the nation that pays it is lost!”

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  66. @syonredux

    Emma Lazarus’ stupid quote should be removed from the Statue of Liberty forthwith.
     
    Indeed. Remove her juvenile mush and replace it with a real poem:

    Rudyard Kipling, 'The Stranger"

    The Stranger within my gate,
    He may be true or kind,
    But he does not talk my talk--
    I cannot feel his mind.
    I see the face and the eyes and the mouth,
    But not the soul behind.

    The men of my own stock,
    They may do ill or well,
    But they tell the lies I am wanted to,
    They are used to the lies I tell;
    And we do not need interpreters
    When we go to buy or sell.

    The Stranger within my gates,
    He may be evil or good,
    But I cannot tell what powers control--
    What reasons sway his mood;
    Nor when the Gods of his far-off land
    Shall repossess his blood.

    The men of my own stock,
    Bitter bad they may be,
    But, at least, they hear the things I hear,
    And see the things I see;
    And whatever I think of them and their likes
    They think of the likes of me.

    This was my father's belief
    And this is also mine:
    Let the corn be all one sheaf--
    And the grapes be all one vine,
    Ere our children's teeth are set on edge
    By bitter bread and wine.

    And then there’s Ogden Nash:

    How courteous is the Japanese;
    He always says, “Excuse it, please.”
    He climbs into his neighbor’s garden,
    And smiles, and says, “I beg your pardon”;
    He bows and grins a friendly grin,
    And calls his hungry family in;
    He grins, and bows a friendly bow;
    “So sorry, this my garden now.”

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  67. @Anonymous
    ""Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark"

    http://variety.com/2018/tv/news/anderson-cooper-defends-haiti-chokes-up-donald-trump-1202662627

    Haiti in the 80s was a favorite destination for the homos; maybe AC remembers it fondly.

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  68. @Art Deco
    About 60 years ago. She's still alive. The number of people who live past 90 these days is an amazement.

    There was much talk recently about the [re] publishing of wartime pamphlets by french author Louis-Ferdinand Céline.

    A (((public))) outcry ensued, it was thus cancelled.

    His widow is 105. (and half)

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  69. Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, and anyone else who’s inclined to vote Democrat.
    .
    .

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  70. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @ChrisZ
    I want to add to my previous comment that Kipling's "The Stranger" has made several appearances in this forum in recent months (no doubt thanks to Syonredux) and always receives a warm response. Orwell called Kipling England's "greatest bad poet" (he meant it as a compliment); but I marvel at Kipling's imagination, his insight into the darkness and folly of human nature, and of course his prolific output.

    With regard to the dispensation of the Emma Lazarus poem: It seems to me that the way to diminish its "canonicity" is not to remove it entirely, but to dilute it in a sea of other poems--including "The Stranger"--which express alternate ("diverse"?) judgments about nationhood, immigration, and the statue itself (which, after all, was conceived and erected as a tribute to "Liberty Enlightening the World"). Make a garden of poems at some remove from the statue, where they could all be displayed; and limit the display to pieces roughly contemporary with the statue itself (so as to avoid the inevitable call for modern PC representation). Let the preponderance of poems reflect the theme of liberty rather than immigration.

    Of course there would be a big argument about it; but that's why it would be important to act *now*, while American patriots still have an influence (relatively speaking) over appointments and executive orders.

    Orwell called Kipling England’s “greatest bad poet” (he meant it as a compliment); but I marvel at Kipling’s imagination, his insight into the darkness and folly of human nature, and of course his prolific output.

    Orwell liked his writing but not his politics or attitudes:

    It is no use pretending that Kipling’s view of life, as a whole, can be accepted or even forgiven by any civilized person. It is no use claiming, for instance, that when Kipling describes a British soldier beating a “nigger” with a cleaning rod in order to get money out of him, he is acting merely as a reporter and does not necessarily approve what he describes. There is not the slightest sign anywhere in Kipling’s work that he disapproves of that kind of conduct — on the contrary, there is a definite strain of sadism in him, over and above the brutality which a writer of that type has to have. Kipling is a jingo imperialist, he is morally insensitive and aesthetically disgusting…

    ….What (Elliot) does not say, and what I think one ought to start by saying in any discussion of Kipling, is that most of Kipling’s verse is so horribly vulgar that it gives one the same sensation as one gets from watching a third-rate music-hall performer recite ‘The Pigtail of Wu Fang Fu’ with the purple limelight on his face, AND yet there is much of it that is capable of giving pleasure to people who know what poetry means. At his worst, and also his most vital, in poems like ‘Gunga Din’ or ‘Danny Deever’, Kipling is almost a shameful pleasure, like the taste for cheap sweets that some people secretly carry into middle life. But even with his best passages one has the same sense of being seduced by something spurious, and yet unquestionably seduced.

    For better or worse, Orwell thought that racism was disgusting and markers of inferiors, uncivilized men:

    “If he were allowed contact with foreigners he would discover that they are creatures similar to himself and that most of what he has been told about them is lies. The sealed world in which he lives would be broken, and the fear, hatred, and self-righteousness on which his morale depends might evaporate.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    For better or worse, Orwell thought that racism was disgusting and markers of inferiors, uncivilized men:

    “If he were allowed contact with foreigners he would discover that they are creatures similar to himself and that most of what he has been told about them is lies. The sealed world in which he lives would be broken, and the fear, hatred, and self-righteousness on which his morale depends might evaporate.”
     
    and yet, I tend to doubt that Orwell would look with approval upon the racial transformation of England.....
    , @syonredux
    And Orwell also appreciated Kipling's clarity of vision regarding certain unpleasant realities:

    A humanitarian is always a hypocrite, and Kipling's understanding of this is perhaps the central secret of his power to create telling phrases. It would be difficult to hit off the one-eyed pacifism of the English in fewer words than in the phrase, ‘making mock of uniforms that guard you while you sleep’. It is true that Kipling does not understand the economic aspect of the relationship between the highbrow and the blimp. He does not see that the map is painted red chiefly in order that the coolie may be exploited. Instead of the coolie he sees the Indian Civil Servant; but even on that plane his grasp of function, of who protects whom, is very sound. He sees clearly that men can only be highly civilized while other men, inevitably less civilized, are there to guard and feed them.
     
    http://orwell.ru/library/reviews/kipling/english/e_rkip
    , @unpc downunder
    A lot of alt-righters ignore the predominantly left-wing aspects of Orwell's thinking and ignore the right-wing/populist aspects of other important left-wing thinkers. For example, Marx was a strong supporter of science and industry and believed all wealth comes from production, not urban paper shuffling, while Rousseau was a populist who believed that elites should bow to majority opinion on issues of existential importance.

    If Marx, Orwell and Rousseau were alive today, it's more likely Marx and Rousseau would vote for nationalist parties than Orwell.
    , @ChrisZ
    Anonymous, the essay you quote--Orwell's "Rudyard Kipling"--is of course the one to which I was referring. It looks like Syon links to it in one of his replies to your comment, and I'd recommend others here to read it.

    It's true that there would have been disagreement between Orwell and Kipling. What's refreshing to me is to see to see two genuinely honest writers--each with their respective blind spots, to be sure--"interacting" (if that's the word) in this way. There's no guile in either them, no desire to deceive the reader or to ingratiate themselves with the powerful. (Orwell seems to suggest that Kipling might be unconsciously guilty of the latter, but he doesn't thereby negate Kipling's ability to seize on the truth.)

    How different from the malicious, self-serving "opinion-shapers" of our own day--who are all the more contemptible for their ignorance. Against these, I like to think Kipling and Orwell would stand together.

    Thanks for the thoughtful reply.
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  71. @Anon
    "The chief problem with trying to govern using noble lies and polite fictions is that eventually power passes into the hands of people who aren’t bright enough to figure out the real score, and they go off and try to govern as if the polite fictions are as rock-solid as gravity."

    Indeed. That's how Christianity started.

    Indeed. That’s how Christianity started.

    St. Peter and St. Paul weren’t governing anything, politely or no

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  72. @Bugg
    Cuomo was cucked by his RFK offspring wife banging a millionaire polo-playing McDonald's franchisee. Fries with that, Andrew?

    Also overpronounces everything to sound important, and goes on TV for hours at a time every time it snows. And he thinks he has a shot at the Oval Office. In a sane world, would be assigned to dog poop removal. NY state, sadly, different story. Big problem when Cuomo, like most Dems, is so bad at math.

    Big problem when Cuomo, like most Dems, is so bad at math.

    No doubt he is, but the state’s had a series of comptrollers who were better at it or who knew who to ask. The state’s public sector pensions are among the most actuarially sound in the country. The queuing problems and endless continuances you see in other state’s court systems are much less pronounced as well. For all that the legislature is repellent and for all that everything seems so disorganized, there are things which run comparatively well in New York. Not sure who to credit that to.

    Read More
    • Replies: @EriK

    No doubt he is, but the state’s had a series of comptrollers who were better at it or who knew who to ask.
     
    You mean like Alan Hevesi?

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Alan_G._Hevesi
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  73. Great minds think alike in the digital hive. And yes, Haiti is a crappy place. Baron Samedi escaped to Miami back in 1997.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    SunBaked, yes you can tip toe around Trump's shithole comment, but Haiti is a shithole, not a crappy place. Baltimore, Newark, St. Louis, Buffalo, Cleveland, Chicago can also be called shitholes.
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  74. @oddsbodkins
    I'm sure being a Vanderbilt helps one avoid a lifestyle that causes wear and tear.

    Or promotes it. People who can clip coupons are at liberty to drink and drug themselves to death, and some do.

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  75. I find Emma Lazarus’s Play about “cuckoo’s egg” Jews more interesting:

    Schnetzen. Enough. “I pray of you, my lord President, End this unseemly scene. This wretched Jew Would thrust a cuckoo’s egg within my nest. I have had timely warning. Send the twain Back to their people, that the court’s decree be published unto all.”

    Can anyone link a summary of this play?

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  76. @LondonBob
    At the time many feared the Ellis Island immigrants would fundamentally change America for the worse, if anything they weren't pessimistic enoug.

    Thank you! Absolutely. I’ve been saying this for years and people look at me like I have three heads. The pro-immigrant/invader folks like to bring up the Know-Nothings and how horrible they were. We’re just supposed to accept this argument because we all know that those horrible anti-immigrant people in the 19th century were bad guys because they didn’t want our ancestors to come here.

    While I’m glad some of my ancestors immigrated here in the late 19th-early 20th century (or else I wouldn’t be here), the Know-Nothings weren’t actually wrong. They feared that waves of Catholic immigrants would change the nation they knew and loved, and they were right.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ThaS47rqlE
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  77. @Art Deco
    Big problem when Cuomo, like most Dems, is so bad at math.

    No doubt he is, but the state's had a series of comptrollers who were better at it or who knew who to ask. The state's public sector pensions are among the most actuarially sound in the country. The queuing problems and endless continuances you see in other state's court systems are much less pronounced as well. For all that the legislature is repellent and for all that everything seems so disorganized, there are things which run comparatively well in New York. Not sure who to credit that to.

    No doubt he is, but the state’s had a series of comptrollers who were better at it or who knew who to ask.

    You mean like Alan Hevesi?

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Alan_G._Hevesi

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  78. Time to take down that New Colossus plaque that’s desecrated the Statue of Liberty long enough and send it on to its rightful resting place: Emma Lazarus’ ancestral homeland of Israel. The world’s wretched refuse and tempest-tost have benefitted America enough, it’s time for them to Make Israel Great Again.

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  79. @ChrisZ
    I want to add to my previous comment that Kipling's "The Stranger" has made several appearances in this forum in recent months (no doubt thanks to Syonredux) and always receives a warm response. Orwell called Kipling England's "greatest bad poet" (he meant it as a compliment); but I marvel at Kipling's imagination, his insight into the darkness and folly of human nature, and of course his prolific output.

    With regard to the dispensation of the Emma Lazarus poem: It seems to me that the way to diminish its "canonicity" is not to remove it entirely, but to dilute it in a sea of other poems--including "The Stranger"--which express alternate ("diverse"?) judgments about nationhood, immigration, and the statue itself (which, after all, was conceived and erected as a tribute to "Liberty Enlightening the World"). Make a garden of poems at some remove from the statue, where they could all be displayed; and limit the display to pieces roughly contemporary with the statue itself (so as to avoid the inevitable call for modern PC representation). Let the preponderance of poems reflect the theme of liberty rather than immigration.

    Of course there would be a big argument about it; but that's why it would be important to act *now*, while American patriots still have an influence (relatively speaking) over appointments and executive orders.

    If someone gave me the power establish a middle-school/ junior high English lit syllabus for the USA, it would have a healthy dose of Kipling: “The Stranger,” “The Gods of the Copybook Headings,” The Man Who Would Be King, Puck of Pook’s Hill, Rewards and Fairies, etc

    Needless to say, the Harry Potter books would be banned.

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    If.
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  80. @Anonymous
    Emma Lazarus' stupid quote should be removed from the Statue of Liberty forthwith.

    Anonymous, if only we can find some confederate heritage in her background the plaque would be gone in a heartbeat.

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  81. @Saint Louis
    Thank you! Absolutely. I've been saying this for years and people look at me like I have three heads. The pro-immigrant/invader folks like to bring up the Know-Nothings and how horrible they were. We're just supposed to accept this argument because we all know that those horrible anti-immigrant people in the 19th century were bad guys because they didn't want our ancestors to come here.

    While I'm glad some of my ancestors immigrated here in the late 19th-early 20th century (or else I wouldn't be here), the Know-Nothings weren't actually wrong. They feared that waves of Catholic immigrants would change the nation they knew and loved, and they were right.

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    • Replies: @ChrisZ
    What a great scene. I've never gotten around to seeing this movie. Guess I need to change that.
    , @Corvinus
    Yep, those dirty Irish. How dare they have come to America. Justice would be served only if they self-deport.

    Alt Right leader Vox Day would even include Germans--"Nations are people. If you want to live like Haiti, bring in Haitians. They won't become Americans, they'll just make America more like Haiti. Which, if you are honest with yourself, is exactly what all the Germans did too."
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  82. @Anonymous

    Orwell called Kipling England’s “greatest bad poet” (he meant it as a compliment); but I marvel at Kipling’s imagination, his insight into the darkness and folly of human nature, and of course his prolific output.
     
    Orwell liked his writing but not his politics or attitudes:

    It is no use pretending that Kipling's view of life, as a whole, can be accepted or even forgiven by any civilized person. It is no use claiming, for instance, that when Kipling describes a British soldier beating a "nigger" with a cleaning rod in order to get money out of him, he is acting merely as a reporter and does not necessarily approve what he describes. There is not the slightest sign anywhere in Kipling's work that he disapproves of that kind of conduct — on the contrary, there is a definite strain of sadism in him, over and above the brutality which a writer of that type has to have. Kipling is a jingo imperialist, he is morally insensitive and aesthetically disgusting...

    ....What (Elliot) does not say, and what I think one ought to start by saying in any discussion of Kipling, is that most of Kipling’s verse is so horribly vulgar that it gives one the same sensation as one gets from watching a third-rate music-hall performer recite ‘The Pigtail of Wu Fang Fu’ with the purple limelight on his face, AND yet there is much of it that is capable of giving pleasure to people who know what poetry means. At his worst, and also his most vital, in poems like ‘Gunga Din’ or ‘Danny Deever’, Kipling is almost a shameful pleasure, like the taste for cheap sweets that some people secretly carry into middle life. But even with his best passages one has the same sense of being seduced by something spurious, and yet unquestionably seduced.


     

    For better or worse, Orwell thought that racism was disgusting and markers of inferiors, uncivilized men:

    “If he were allowed contact with foreigners he would discover that they are creatures similar to himself and that most of what he has been told about them is lies. The sealed world in which he lives would be broken, and the fear, hatred, and self-righteousness on which his morale depends might evaporate."

    For better or worse, Orwell thought that racism was disgusting and markers of inferiors, uncivilized men:

    “If he were allowed contact with foreigners he would discover that they are creatures similar to himself and that most of what he has been told about them is lies. The sealed world in which he lives would be broken, and the fear, hatred, and self-righteousness on which his morale depends might evaporate.”

    and yet, I tend to doubt that Orwell would look with approval upon the racial transformation of England…..

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Well, he did explain what he meant pretty clearly:

    A nationalist is one who thinks solely, or mainly, in terms of competitive prestige. He may be a positive or a negative nationalist — that is, he may use his mental energy either in boosting or in denigrating — but at any rate his thoughts always turn on victories, defeats, triumphs and humiliations. He sees history, especially contemporary history, as the endless rise and decline of great power units, and every event that happens seems to him a demonstration that his own side is on the upgrade and some hated rival is on the downgrade...

    ...So long as it is applied merely to the more notorious and identifiable nationalist movements in Germany, Japan, and other countries, all this is obvious enough. Confronted with a phenomenon like Nazism, which we can observe from the outside, nearly all of us would say much the same things about it. But here I must repeat what I said above, that I am only using the word ‘nationalism’ for lack of a better. Nationalism, in the extended sense in which I am using the word, includes such movements and tendencies as Communism, political Catholicism, Zionism, Antisemitism, Trotskyism and Pacifism. It does not necessarily mean loyalty to a government or a country, still less to one's own country, and it is not even strictly necessary that the units in which it deals should actually exist. To name a few obvious examples, Jewry, Islam, Christendom, the Proletariat and the White Race are all of them objects of passionate nationalistic feeling: but their existence can be seriously questioned, and there is no definition of any one of them that would be universally accepted....



    ...The nationalist does not go on the principle of simply ganging up with the strongest side. On the contrary, having picked his side, he persuades himself that it is the strongest, and is able to stick to his belief even when the facts are overwhelmingly against him. Nationalism is power-hunger tempered by self-deception. Every nationalist is capable of the most flagrant dishonesty, but he is also — since he is conscious of serving something bigger than himself — unshakeably certain of being in the right.

     

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  83. @Art Deco
    He isn't unintelligent. However, he remains in essence a common-and-garden JD, and his understanding of the world is limited (and distorted) by his education and social background. Joseph Stiglitz told an economist of my acquaintance that a lot of the arguments on policy that he witnessed in the Clinton administration were disputes between economists and lawyers. Cuomo would have been on the side that usually deserves to lose the argument. (Recall that Cuomo was Secretary of HUD). Also, he's a New York pol. It's a populous state with all manner of ambitious people in it, but the political class is not that way. A dear friend of mine quite active in New York politics described it this way: "your father reaches a particular perch, the future of the son is assured". Also, the Cuomos are disliked by people in the same stable because they break the rules that society sets for itself. One scion put it thus: "The Cuomos have always been thugs at heart". Terms like 'vindictive' and 'megalomaniac' were applied to his father. The real problem with Andrew Cuomo is that he's a deeply unpleasant and unscrupulous man whose expertise is in leveraging connections and rent-seeking.

    Art, truly he is not unintelligent but he is a pompous ass and maybe in time we will find that he is also a criminal. NY is now 4 Billion in debt and that number is rising. NY has become the petri dish for all liberal ideas.

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  84. @Anonymous

    Orwell called Kipling England’s “greatest bad poet” (he meant it as a compliment); but I marvel at Kipling’s imagination, his insight into the darkness and folly of human nature, and of course his prolific output.
     
    Orwell liked his writing but not his politics or attitudes:

    It is no use pretending that Kipling's view of life, as a whole, can be accepted or even forgiven by any civilized person. It is no use claiming, for instance, that when Kipling describes a British soldier beating a "nigger" with a cleaning rod in order to get money out of him, he is acting merely as a reporter and does not necessarily approve what he describes. There is not the slightest sign anywhere in Kipling's work that he disapproves of that kind of conduct — on the contrary, there is a definite strain of sadism in him, over and above the brutality which a writer of that type has to have. Kipling is a jingo imperialist, he is morally insensitive and aesthetically disgusting...

    ....What (Elliot) does not say, and what I think one ought to start by saying in any discussion of Kipling, is that most of Kipling’s verse is so horribly vulgar that it gives one the same sensation as one gets from watching a third-rate music-hall performer recite ‘The Pigtail of Wu Fang Fu’ with the purple limelight on his face, AND yet there is much of it that is capable of giving pleasure to people who know what poetry means. At his worst, and also his most vital, in poems like ‘Gunga Din’ or ‘Danny Deever’, Kipling is almost a shameful pleasure, like the taste for cheap sweets that some people secretly carry into middle life. But even with his best passages one has the same sense of being seduced by something spurious, and yet unquestionably seduced.


     

    For better or worse, Orwell thought that racism was disgusting and markers of inferiors, uncivilized men:

    “If he were allowed contact with foreigners he would discover that they are creatures similar to himself and that most of what he has been told about them is lies. The sealed world in which he lives would be broken, and the fear, hatred, and self-righteousness on which his morale depends might evaporate."

    And Orwell also appreciated Kipling’s clarity of vision regarding certain unpleasant realities:

    A humanitarian is always a hypocrite, and Kipling’s understanding of this is perhaps the central secret of his power to create telling phrases. It would be difficult to hit off the one-eyed pacifism of the English in fewer words than in the phrase, ‘making mock of uniforms that guard you while you sleep’. It is true that Kipling does not understand the economic aspect of the relationship between the highbrow and the blimp. He does not see that the map is painted red chiefly in order that the coolie may be exploited. Instead of the coolie he sees the Indian Civil Servant; but even on that plane his grasp of function, of who protects whom, is very sound. He sees clearly that men can only be highly civilized while other men, inevitably less civilized, are there to guard and feed them.

    http://orwell.ru/library/reviews/kipling/english/e_rkip

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  85. @ChrisZ
    If "The Stranger" is Kipling's take on "Invite the world," then "The Man Who Would be King," is his take on "Invade the world."

    Last night I watched the great 1970s Huston film of Kipling's story (with it's amazing cast of Connery, Caine, Plummer ... and thousands of our future fellow Americans). Connery and Caine are two English ex-Indian Army rogues who enter one of those sh**hole countries and take it over in a few months with little more than an arsenal of 20 rifles. Turns out the whole population of warring tribes is a cargo cult living off dim memories of Alexander's conquest 2,200 years earlier. Connery's character gets acclaimed Alexander's prophesied heir, and begins to imagine that he can bring law and civilization to the country; but Caine tries to remind him that they're dealing with irredeemable savages, and that the two English buddies should stick to their plan of looting the country of the riches its people have no use for.

    Guess which one is proven right?

    Alas, an ill-considered moment of sentimentality condemns one to death, the other to lifelong disfigurement. A parable for our time.

    Chris, a remarkable movie, well cast and scripted.

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    • Replies: @ChrisZ
    It’s great on its own merits, Joe; but boy did it seem timely in light of yesterday’s antics (and after a few years of frequenting iSteve).

    Here’s just one example. The tribes of Kafiristan have been at war with each other forever. But when their headmen articulate the big complaint they have against their enemies, it’s always the same: “Whenever we bathe in the river, they all come out to piss in it upstream.”

    That’s the big offense motivating the endless cycle of revenge.

    I’m sure there’s some genius in our State Dept. who would see it as a rationale for special-status asylum-seeking. But to me it just shows the B.S. the underlies so much of the chronic misery in the world. And it reflects some of the real-world “justifications” I’ve heard from foreigners about why their rivals back home are so intolerable, and why America should either (a) take them in as refugees or (b) deploy our military to blow their upstream-pissing rivals to kingdom come.

    For anyone who instinctively understood what was meant by “sh***ole countries,” “Man Who Would Be King” is your movie.
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  86. @SunBakedSuburb
    Great minds think alike in the digital hive. And yes, Haiti is a crappy place. Baron Samedi escaped to Miami back in 1997.

    SunBaked, yes you can tip toe around Trump’s shithole comment, but Haiti is a shithole, not a crappy place. Baltimore, Newark, St. Louis, Buffalo, Cleveland, Chicago can also be called shitholes.

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    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    Yeah, Haiti is a shithole. I just try to avoid overuse of expletives.
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  87. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    For better or worse, Orwell thought that racism was disgusting and markers of inferiors, uncivilized men:

    “If he were allowed contact with foreigners he would discover that they are creatures similar to himself and that most of what he has been told about them is lies. The sealed world in which he lives would be broken, and the fear, hatred, and self-righteousness on which his morale depends might evaporate.”
     
    and yet, I tend to doubt that Orwell would look with approval upon the racial transformation of England.....

    Well, he did explain what he meant pretty clearly:

    A nationalist is one who thinks solely, or mainly, in terms of competitive prestige. He may be a positive or a negative nationalist — that is, he may use his mental energy either in boosting or in denigrating — but at any rate his thoughts always turn on victories, defeats, triumphs and humiliations. He sees history, especially contemporary history, as the endless rise and decline of great power units, and every event that happens seems to him a demonstration that his own side is on the upgrade and some hated rival is on the downgrade…

    …So long as it is applied merely to the more notorious and identifiable nationalist movements in Germany, Japan, and other countries, all this is obvious enough. Confronted with a phenomenon like Nazism, which we can observe from the outside, nearly all of us would say much the same things about it. But here I must repeat what I said above, that I am only using the word ‘nationalism’ for lack of a better. Nationalism, in the extended sense in which I am using the word, includes such movements and tendencies as Communism, political Catholicism, Zionism, Antisemitism, Trotskyism and Pacifism. It does not necessarily mean loyalty to a government or a country, still less to one’s own country, and it is not even strictly necessary that the units in which it deals should actually exist. To name a few obvious examples, Jewry, Islam, Christendom, the Proletariat and the White Race are all of them objects of passionate nationalistic feeling: but their existence can be seriously questioned, and there is no definition of any one of them that would be universally accepted….

    …The nationalist does not go on the principle of simply ganging up with the strongest side. On the contrary, having picked his side, he persuades himself that it is the strongest, and is able to stick to his belief even when the facts are overwhelmingly against him. Nationalism is power-hunger tempered by self-deception. Every nationalist is capable of the most flagrant dishonesty, but he is also — since he is conscious of serving something bigger than himself — unshakeably certain of being in the right.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    …The nationalist does not go on the principle of simply ganging up with the strongest side. On the contrary, having picked his side, he persuades himself that it is the strongest, and is able to stick to his belief even when the facts are overwhelmingly against him. Nationalism is power-hunger tempered by self-deception. Every nationalist is capable of the most flagrant dishonesty, but he is also — since he is conscious of serving something bigger than himself — unshakeably certain of being in the right.
     
    Indeed. Which is why Orwell was, first and foremost, an English patriot. The patriot loves his nation, not because it is faultless, but because it is his:

    The intellectuals who hope to see it [England] Russianised or Germanised will be disappointed. The gentleness, the hypocrisy, the thoughtlessness, the reverence for law and the hatred of uniforms will remain, along with the suet puddings and the misty skies. It needs some very great disaster, such as prolonged subjugation by a foreign enemy, to destroy a national culture. The Stock Exchange will be pulled down, the horse plough will give way to the tractor, the country houses will be turned into children's holiday camps, the Eton and Harrow match will be forgotten, but England will still be England, an everlasting animal stretching into the future and the past, and, like all living things, having the power to change out of recognition and yet remain the same.

     

    http://orwell.ru/library/essays/lion/english/e_eye


    How could Orwell ever have imagined that his dear England would simply open her doors to the enemy and allow her daughters to be raped?

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  88. Side note, I was unaware that Kipling and his wife lived in and loved Vermont. The “Jungle Book” was written while he lived here.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Naulakha, also known as the Rudyard Kipling House, is a historic Shingle Style house on Kipling Road in Dummerston, Vermont, a few miles outside Brattleboro. The house was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1993 for its association with the author Rudyard Kipling (1865–1936), who had it built in 1893 and made it his home until 1896. It is in this house that Kipling wrote Captains Courageous, The Jungle Book, The Day's Work, and The Seven Seas, and did work on Kim and The Just So Stories.[1] Kipling named the house after the Naulakha Pavilion, situated inside Lahore Fort in Pakistan. The house is now owned by the Landmark Trust, and is available for rent.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naulakha_(Rudyard_Kipling_House)


    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/10/07/article-2449165-18897B4D00000578-167_634x422.jpg
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  89. @syonredux
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ThaS47rqlE

    What a great scene. I’ve never gotten around to seeing this movie. Guess I need to change that.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    What a great scene. I’ve never gotten around to seeing this movie. Guess I need to change that.
     
    Gangs of New York is quite mediocre, but every scene with Daniel Day-Lewis is fantastic:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdhxL9r9hkg
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  90. @Anonymous

    Orwell called Kipling England’s “greatest bad poet” (he meant it as a compliment); but I marvel at Kipling’s imagination, his insight into the darkness and folly of human nature, and of course his prolific output.
     
    Orwell liked his writing but not his politics or attitudes:

    It is no use pretending that Kipling's view of life, as a whole, can be accepted or even forgiven by any civilized person. It is no use claiming, for instance, that when Kipling describes a British soldier beating a "nigger" with a cleaning rod in order to get money out of him, he is acting merely as a reporter and does not necessarily approve what he describes. There is not the slightest sign anywhere in Kipling's work that he disapproves of that kind of conduct — on the contrary, there is a definite strain of sadism in him, over and above the brutality which a writer of that type has to have. Kipling is a jingo imperialist, he is morally insensitive and aesthetically disgusting...

    ....What (Elliot) does not say, and what I think one ought to start by saying in any discussion of Kipling, is that most of Kipling’s verse is so horribly vulgar that it gives one the same sensation as one gets from watching a third-rate music-hall performer recite ‘The Pigtail of Wu Fang Fu’ with the purple limelight on his face, AND yet there is much of it that is capable of giving pleasure to people who know what poetry means. At his worst, and also his most vital, in poems like ‘Gunga Din’ or ‘Danny Deever’, Kipling is almost a shameful pleasure, like the taste for cheap sweets that some people secretly carry into middle life. But even with his best passages one has the same sense of being seduced by something spurious, and yet unquestionably seduced.


     

    For better or worse, Orwell thought that racism was disgusting and markers of inferiors, uncivilized men:

    “If he were allowed contact with foreigners he would discover that they are creatures similar to himself and that most of what he has been told about them is lies. The sealed world in which he lives would be broken, and the fear, hatred, and self-righteousness on which his morale depends might evaporate."

    A lot of alt-righters ignore the predominantly left-wing aspects of Orwell’s thinking and ignore the right-wing/populist aspects of other important left-wing thinkers. For example, Marx was a strong supporter of science and industry and believed all wealth comes from production, not urban paper shuffling, while Rousseau was a populist who believed that elites should bow to majority opinion on issues of existential importance.

    If Marx, Orwell and Rousseau were alive today, it’s more likely Marx and Rousseau would vote for nationalist parties than Orwell.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    A lot of alt-righters ignore the predominantly left-wing aspects of Orwell’s thinking and ignore the right-wing/populist aspects of other important left-wing thinkers. For example, Marx was a strong supporter of science and industry and believed all wealth comes from production, not urban paper shuffling, while Rousseau was a populist who believed that elites should bow to majority opinion on issues of existential importance.

    If Marx, Orwell and Rousseau were alive today, it’s more likely Marx and Rousseau would vote for nationalist parties than Orwell.
     
    Marx was full of crimethink:

    Marx on the US seizure of Mexico: “Is it a misfortune that magnificent California was seized from the lazy Mexicans who did not know what to do with it?”

    Marx on Ferdinand Lassalle: " It is now completely clear to me that he, as is proved by his cranial formation and his hair, descends from the Negroes who had joined Moses’ exodus from Egypt, assuming that his mother or grandmother on the paternal side had not interbred with a n—–. Now this union of Judaism and Germanism with a basic Negro substance must produce a peculiar product."


    Marx on Jews:"What is the worldly religion of the Jew? Huckstering. What is his worldly God? Money. … Money is the jealous god of Israel, in face of which no other god may exist. Money degrades all the gods of man—and turns them into commodities. … The bill of exchange is the real god of the Jew. His god is only an illusory bill of exchange. … The chimerical nationality of the Jew is the nationality of the merchant, of the man of money in general."
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  91. @Anonymous

    Orwell called Kipling England’s “greatest bad poet” (he meant it as a compliment); but I marvel at Kipling’s imagination, his insight into the darkness and folly of human nature, and of course his prolific output.
     
    Orwell liked his writing but not his politics or attitudes:

    It is no use pretending that Kipling's view of life, as a whole, can be accepted or even forgiven by any civilized person. It is no use claiming, for instance, that when Kipling describes a British soldier beating a "nigger" with a cleaning rod in order to get money out of him, he is acting merely as a reporter and does not necessarily approve what he describes. There is not the slightest sign anywhere in Kipling's work that he disapproves of that kind of conduct — on the contrary, there is a definite strain of sadism in him, over and above the brutality which a writer of that type has to have. Kipling is a jingo imperialist, he is morally insensitive and aesthetically disgusting...

    ....What (Elliot) does not say, and what I think one ought to start by saying in any discussion of Kipling, is that most of Kipling’s verse is so horribly vulgar that it gives one the same sensation as one gets from watching a third-rate music-hall performer recite ‘The Pigtail of Wu Fang Fu’ with the purple limelight on his face, AND yet there is much of it that is capable of giving pleasure to people who know what poetry means. At his worst, and also his most vital, in poems like ‘Gunga Din’ or ‘Danny Deever’, Kipling is almost a shameful pleasure, like the taste for cheap sweets that some people secretly carry into middle life. But even with his best passages one has the same sense of being seduced by something spurious, and yet unquestionably seduced.


     

    For better or worse, Orwell thought that racism was disgusting and markers of inferiors, uncivilized men:

    “If he were allowed contact with foreigners he would discover that they are creatures similar to himself and that most of what he has been told about them is lies. The sealed world in which he lives would be broken, and the fear, hatred, and self-righteousness on which his morale depends might evaporate."

    Anonymous, the essay you quote–Orwell’s “Rudyard Kipling”–is of course the one to which I was referring. It looks like Syon links to it in one of his replies to your comment, and I’d recommend others here to read it.

    It’s true that there would have been disagreement between Orwell and Kipling. What’s refreshing to me is to see to see two genuinely honest writers–each with their respective blind spots, to be sure–”interacting” (if that’s the word) in this way. There’s no guile in either them, no desire to deceive the reader or to ingratiate themselves with the powerful. (Orwell seems to suggest that Kipling might be unconsciously guilty of the latter, but he doesn’t thereby negate Kipling’s ability to seize on the truth.)

    How different from the malicious, self-serving “opinion-shapers” of our own day–who are all the more contemptible for their ignorance. Against these, I like to think Kipling and Orwell would stand together.

    Thanks for the thoughtful reply.

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  92. @the one they call Desanex
    They come from their primitive sh*t-holes;
    Square pegs that don’t easily fit holes
    In our nation’s work force,
    So too many, perforce,
    Suck milk from Miss Liberty’s t*t-holes.

    Des, you rose to the challenge and met it. Quite a creative set of rhymes. Congratulations.

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  93. Speaking of our creative elites, they’re at it again! PBS is apparently going to present the ump-teenth rendition of Les Miserables. Featuring all these very French actors.

    The new Javert.

    The new Eponine.

    https://www.curtisbrown.co.uk/client/erin-kellyman/images

    The new Monsieur Thénardier (don’t worry, his wife is white).

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  94. @Anonymous
    ""Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark"

    http://variety.com/2018/tv/news/anderson-cooper-defends-haiti-chokes-up-donald-trump-1202662627

    I’m sure that Anderson Pooper has many warm, fond memories of Haiti.

    Oh, yeah.

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  95. @unpc downunder
    A lot of alt-righters ignore the predominantly left-wing aspects of Orwell's thinking and ignore the right-wing/populist aspects of other important left-wing thinkers. For example, Marx was a strong supporter of science and industry and believed all wealth comes from production, not urban paper shuffling, while Rousseau was a populist who believed that elites should bow to majority opinion on issues of existential importance.

    If Marx, Orwell and Rousseau were alive today, it's more likely Marx and Rousseau would vote for nationalist parties than Orwell.

    A lot of alt-righters ignore the predominantly left-wing aspects of Orwell’s thinking and ignore the right-wing/populist aspects of other important left-wing thinkers. For example, Marx was a strong supporter of science and industry and believed all wealth comes from production, not urban paper shuffling, while Rousseau was a populist who believed that elites should bow to majority opinion on issues of existential importance.

    If Marx, Orwell and Rousseau were alive today, it’s more likely Marx and Rousseau would vote for nationalist parties than Orwell.

    Marx was full of crimethink:

    Marx on the US seizure of Mexico: “Is it a misfortune that magnificent California was seized from the lazy Mexicans who did not know what to do with it?”

    Marx on Ferdinand Lassalle: ” It is now completely clear to me that he, as is proved by his cranial formation and his hair, descends from the Negroes who had joined Moses’ exodus from Egypt, assuming that his mother or grandmother on the paternal side had not interbred with a n—–. Now this union of Judaism and Germanism with a basic Negro substance must produce a peculiar product.”

    Marx on Jews:”What is the worldly religion of the Jew? Huckstering. What is his worldly God? Money. … Money is the jealous god of Israel, in face of which no other god may exist. Money degrades all the gods of man—and turns them into commodities. … The bill of exchange is the real god of the Jew. His god is only an illusory bill of exchange. … The chimerical nationality of the Jew is the nationality of the merchant, of the man of money in general.”

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Marx was an airhead who reflected the obsessions of his day. As an idiot, Marx is exonerated of all those worrying specific errors, since he didn't know what he was doing. Speaking of which, was Emma Lazarus's day too long before the eugenics craze? It was certainly well within Social Darwinism.
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  96. @ChrisZ
    What a great scene. I've never gotten around to seeing this movie. Guess I need to change that.

    What a great scene. I’ve never gotten around to seeing this movie. Guess I need to change that.

    Gangs of New York is quite mediocre, but every scene with Daniel Day-Lewis is fantastic:

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  97. @guest
    Whenever this comes up, I'm going g to quote from my favorite immigration poem, One in a Million, by W. Axl Rose:

    Immigrants and faggots
    They make no sense to me
    They come to our country
    And think they'll do as they please
    Like start some mini-Iran
    Or spread some effing disease
    And they talk so many Goddamn ways
    It's all Greek to me

    Good catch!

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  98. @Buffalo Joe
    Side note, I was unaware that Kipling and his wife lived in and loved Vermont. The "Jungle Book" was written while he lived here.

    Naulakha, also known as the Rudyard Kipling House, is a historic Shingle Style house on Kipling Road in Dummerston, Vermont, a few miles outside Brattleboro. The house was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1993 for its association with the author Rudyard Kipling (1865–1936), who had it built in 1893 and made it his home until 1896. It is in this house that Kipling wrote Captains Courageous, The Jungle Book, The Day’s Work, and The Seven Seas, and did work on Kim and The Just So Stories.[1] Kipling named the house after the Naulakha Pavilion, situated inside Lahore Fort in Pakistan. The house is now owned by the Landmark Trust, and is available for rent.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naulakha_(Rudyard_Kipling_House)

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    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Kipling Road in Dummerston, Vermont
     
    Says you! I happen to know that Kipling Road was a typical East End Street. People were in and out of each other's houses, with each other's property, all day long. Hoo hoo! Yes, they were a cheery lot. Cheery and violent.

    [cf: the Piranha Brothers]

    But seriously, thanks for the intelligence. I never knew he even visited Vermont.
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  99. @Anonymous
    Well, he did explain what he meant pretty clearly:

    A nationalist is one who thinks solely, or mainly, in terms of competitive prestige. He may be a positive or a negative nationalist — that is, he may use his mental energy either in boosting or in denigrating — but at any rate his thoughts always turn on victories, defeats, triumphs and humiliations. He sees history, especially contemporary history, as the endless rise and decline of great power units, and every event that happens seems to him a demonstration that his own side is on the upgrade and some hated rival is on the downgrade...

    ...So long as it is applied merely to the more notorious and identifiable nationalist movements in Germany, Japan, and other countries, all this is obvious enough. Confronted with a phenomenon like Nazism, which we can observe from the outside, nearly all of us would say much the same things about it. But here I must repeat what I said above, that I am only using the word ‘nationalism’ for lack of a better. Nationalism, in the extended sense in which I am using the word, includes such movements and tendencies as Communism, political Catholicism, Zionism, Antisemitism, Trotskyism and Pacifism. It does not necessarily mean loyalty to a government or a country, still less to one's own country, and it is not even strictly necessary that the units in which it deals should actually exist. To name a few obvious examples, Jewry, Islam, Christendom, the Proletariat and the White Race are all of them objects of passionate nationalistic feeling: but their existence can be seriously questioned, and there is no definition of any one of them that would be universally accepted....



    ...The nationalist does not go on the principle of simply ganging up with the strongest side. On the contrary, having picked his side, he persuades himself that it is the strongest, and is able to stick to his belief even when the facts are overwhelmingly against him. Nationalism is power-hunger tempered by self-deception. Every nationalist is capable of the most flagrant dishonesty, but he is also — since he is conscious of serving something bigger than himself — unshakeably certain of being in the right.

     

    …The nationalist does not go on the principle of simply ganging up with the strongest side. On the contrary, having picked his side, he persuades himself that it is the strongest, and is able to stick to his belief even when the facts are overwhelmingly against him. Nationalism is power-hunger tempered by self-deception. Every nationalist is capable of the most flagrant dishonesty, but he is also — since he is conscious of serving something bigger than himself — unshakeably certain of being in the right.

    Indeed. Which is why Orwell was, first and foremost, an English patriot. The patriot loves his nation, not because it is faultless, but because it is his:

    The intellectuals who hope to see it [England] Russianised or Germanised will be disappointed. The gentleness, the hypocrisy, the thoughtlessness, the reverence for law and the hatred of uniforms will remain, along with the suet puddings and the misty skies. It needs some very great disaster, such as prolonged subjugation by a foreign enemy, to destroy a national culture. The Stock Exchange will be pulled down, the horse plough will give way to the tractor, the country houses will be turned into children’s holiday camps, the Eton and Harrow match will be forgotten, but England will still be England, an everlasting animal stretching into the future and the past, and, like all living things, having the power to change out of recognition and yet remain the same.

    http://orwell.ru/library/essays/lion/english/e_eye

    How could Orwell ever have imagined that his dear England would simply open her doors to the enemy and allow her daughters to be raped?

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    As some commentators noted in another thread, Orwell seemed to believe in some form of "magic dirt" or "individualism" which allowed patriotism to coexist with his other beliefs. In Burmese Days, for example, while he generally wrote horribly about everyone, the Burmese overall come off as generally less loathsome while the hypocrisy of English intellectuals is that they are simultaneously racist, morally degenerate and ultimately encourage only the worst in other races.

    The proxy for himself, naturally, is the one "good" white man who can distinguish race from individual.

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  100. @Achmed E. Newman
    Give me your most retarded, destitude, flea infested, refuse-scented masses yearning for WIC benefits, along with $400 apiece and we will sent them on the Amtrack to NY City and put an end to this thing, once and for all!

    WIC benefits

    WIC is a voucher for baby formula, milk, cheese, dried beans, cereal, and juice.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Yes, I knew that when I wrote it.
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  101. @Chrisnonymous
    I always prefer the example of German. When someone says something about CHEE-lay (Chile) or KOO-bah (Cuba), I bring up something about Deutschland or, better, Osterreich, in an overraught accent. This either makes them either mad or confused. Either way, they shut up.

    Prima.

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  102. @Buffalo Joe
    SunBaked, yes you can tip toe around Trump's shithole comment, but Haiti is a shithole, not a crappy place. Baltimore, Newark, St. Louis, Buffalo, Cleveland, Chicago can also be called shitholes.

    Yeah, Haiti is a shithole. I just try to avoid overuse of expletives.

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    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Sun, you hardly overuse expletives and anyhow you are repeating a quote. Thank you for the reply my friend.
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  103. @syonredux

    A lot of alt-righters ignore the predominantly left-wing aspects of Orwell’s thinking and ignore the right-wing/populist aspects of other important left-wing thinkers. For example, Marx was a strong supporter of science and industry and believed all wealth comes from production, not urban paper shuffling, while Rousseau was a populist who believed that elites should bow to majority opinion on issues of existential importance.

    If Marx, Orwell and Rousseau were alive today, it’s more likely Marx and Rousseau would vote for nationalist parties than Orwell.
     
    Marx was full of crimethink:

    Marx on the US seizure of Mexico: “Is it a misfortune that magnificent California was seized from the lazy Mexicans who did not know what to do with it?”

    Marx on Ferdinand Lassalle: " It is now completely clear to me that he, as is proved by his cranial formation and his hair, descends from the Negroes who had joined Moses’ exodus from Egypt, assuming that his mother or grandmother on the paternal side had not interbred with a n—–. Now this union of Judaism and Germanism with a basic Negro substance must produce a peculiar product."


    Marx on Jews:"What is the worldly religion of the Jew? Huckstering. What is his worldly God? Money. … Money is the jealous god of Israel, in face of which no other god may exist. Money degrades all the gods of man—and turns them into commodities. … The bill of exchange is the real god of the Jew. His god is only an illusory bill of exchange. … The chimerical nationality of the Jew is the nationality of the merchant, of the man of money in general."

    Marx was an airhead who reflected the obsessions of his day. As an idiot, Marx is exonerated of all those worrying specific errors, since he didn’t know what he was doing. Speaking of which, was Emma Lazarus’s day too long before the eugenics craze? It was certainly well within Social Darwinism.

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  104. Will the elites ever state the number of immigrants we shaould admit each year ? Over the last 20 years we have admitted almost 30 million legal immigrants. 1,295,000 foreigners obtain green cards each year , while another 125,000 obtain work visas.

    Based on their rhetoric they want no restrictions, which would result in upwards of 25 million arriving each year…….we reject 97% of those who apply for the diversity visa and even Obama rejected 95% of the Syrian refugees , yet few elites complained… should we assume the current policies, rejecting 97% of this who apply for the diversity visa is ok ? If so , why not reject 99.99% ? These shithole nations would hardly notice.

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  105. I had a buddy in Army special forces. He served as a peacekeeper in “Operation Upholding Democracy” in Haiti under Clinton, and did some tours in Afghanistan. I asked him which people he liked better, hands down the Afghani’s. He said this, “the Haitians will steal the food out of their children’s mouths” the Afghani’s would kill someone doing that. The Haitians will shit where they eat and blame the resulting disease on a voodoo curse. The Afghans know basic hygiene. He told me a story about the village in Haiti that they were providing security too. Just before they arrived, there apparently had been a quarrel between two families resulting in the death/murder of a man. The body lay aside a busy village path for several days getting bloated etc., with no one doing anything about it. They (his squad) eventually had to force the villagers to bury the body at gun point, otherwise they weren’t going to do it.

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  106. “WIC is a voucher for baby formula, milk, cheese, dried beans, cereal, and juice.”

    Which you can exchange in any Paki run bodega for… anything you want, including a 40 and a pack of Newports. At a suitable markup for “processing”.

    You do realize that every welfare program has been fully corrupted at street level, don’t you?

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    • Replies: @Lars Porsena
    Maybe there are unspoken parts of the liberals (particular NY) war on soda because at some convenience stores cases of soda pop are the foodstamp laundering equivalent of bit coin or silver ingots.
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  107. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    …The nationalist does not go on the principle of simply ganging up with the strongest side. On the contrary, having picked his side, he persuades himself that it is the strongest, and is able to stick to his belief even when the facts are overwhelmingly against him. Nationalism is power-hunger tempered by self-deception. Every nationalist is capable of the most flagrant dishonesty, but he is also — since he is conscious of serving something bigger than himself — unshakeably certain of being in the right.
     
    Indeed. Which is why Orwell was, first and foremost, an English patriot. The patriot loves his nation, not because it is faultless, but because it is his:

    The intellectuals who hope to see it [England] Russianised or Germanised will be disappointed. The gentleness, the hypocrisy, the thoughtlessness, the reverence for law and the hatred of uniforms will remain, along with the suet puddings and the misty skies. It needs some very great disaster, such as prolonged subjugation by a foreign enemy, to destroy a national culture. The Stock Exchange will be pulled down, the horse plough will give way to the tractor, the country houses will be turned into children's holiday camps, the Eton and Harrow match will be forgotten, but England will still be England, an everlasting animal stretching into the future and the past, and, like all living things, having the power to change out of recognition and yet remain the same.

     

    http://orwell.ru/library/essays/lion/english/e_eye


    How could Orwell ever have imagined that his dear England would simply open her doors to the enemy and allow her daughters to be raped?

    As some commentators noted in another thread, Orwell seemed to believe in some form of “magic dirt” or “individualism” which allowed patriotism to coexist with his other beliefs. In Burmese Days, for example, while he generally wrote horribly about everyone, the Burmese overall come off as generally less loathsome while the hypocrisy of English intellectuals is that they are simultaneously racist, morally degenerate and ultimately encourage only the worst in other races.

    The proxy for himself, naturally, is the one “good” white man who can distinguish race from individual.

    Read More
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  108. @Peterike
    “WIC is a voucher for baby formula, milk, cheese, dried beans, cereal, and juice.”

    Which you can exchange in any Paki run bodega for... anything you want, including a 40 and a pack of Newports. At a suitable markup for “processing”.

    You do realize that every welfare program has been fully corrupted at street level, don’t you?

    Maybe there are unspoken parts of the liberals (particular NY) war on soda because at some convenience stores cases of soda pop are the foodstamp laundering equivalent of bit coin or silver ingots.

    Read More
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  109. @SunBakedSuburb
    Yeah, Haiti is a shithole. I just try to avoid overuse of expletives.

    Sun, you hardly overuse expletives and anyhow you are repeating a quote. Thank you for the reply my friend.

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  110. @Buffalo Joe
    Chris, a remarkable movie, well cast and scripted.

    It’s great on its own merits, Joe; but boy did it seem timely in light of yesterday’s antics (and after a few years of frequenting iSteve).

    Here’s just one example. The tribes of Kafiristan have been at war with each other forever. But when their headmen articulate the big complaint they have against their enemies, it’s always the same: “Whenever we bathe in the river, they all come out to piss in it upstream.”

    That’s the big offense motivating the endless cycle of revenge.

    I’m sure there’s some genius in our State Dept. who would see it as a rationale for special-status asylum-seeking. But to me it just shows the B.S. the underlies so much of the chronic misery in the world. And it reflects some of the real-world “justifications” I’ve heard from foreigners about why their rivals back home are so intolerable, and why America should either (a) take them in as refugees or (b) deploy our military to blow their upstream-pissing rivals to kingdom come.

    For anyone who instinctively understood what was meant by “sh***ole countries,” “Man Who Would Be King” is your movie.

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  111. Chris, Thank you I am going to pull it up on Movies on Demand and re watch it tonight.

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  112. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    Kakutani attacked Sam Huntington in a NY Times review of Huntington's book "WHO ARE WE: The Challenges To America's National Identity."

    Kakutani is some type of Asian. Kakutani made nasty comments about Huntington and his concerns about how multiculturalism was damaging the United States.

    Huntington said the United States was a British Protestant settler nation. Kakutani is a rabid supporter of nation-wrecking multiculturalism and mass immigration. Kakutani obviously despises the British Protestant and European Christian ancestral core of the United States.

    I say Kakutani can go straight to hell.

    Kakutani attacked Sam Huntington in a NY Times review of Huntington’s book “WHO ARE WE: The Challenges To America’s National Identity.”

    Kakutani is some type of Asian. Kakutani made nasty comments about Huntington and his concerns about how multiculturalism was damaging the United States.

    Huntington said the United States was a British Protestant settler nation. Kakutani is a rabid supporter of nation-wrecking multiculturalism and mass immigration. Kakutani obviously despises the British Protestant and European Christian ancestral core of the United States.

    I say Kakutani can go straight to hell.

    Never even heard of Michiko Kakutani until now. She is apparently a former NY Times Book Review literary critic, graduate of Yale. I agree, she can KMA. Huntington’s Who Are We? was brilliant. His Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order should be required reading for all members of all 3 branches of government.

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  113. @Art Deco
    The Rockefellers make a more interesting case. The size of John D. Rockefeller's fortune at the time of his death in 1937 was (compared to the assets in the economy as a whole) I think about 3x larger than is Bill Gates' fortune today. The thing is, the Rockefellers are fairly fecund and they lost interest in business. There are a scatter of business executives among Rockefeller scions, but it's been a generation since any of them ran an enterprise of institutional importance. They now make up an archipellago of prominent local patricians. (One guess floating around is that the Rockefeller scions have a collective net worth of $11 bn).


    They've proved more durable than the Kennedys. Maybe 3 or 4 of Joseph Kennedy's grandchildren had demonstrable skills of note. The Johnsons of Johnson and Johnson are a reality show (but so rich it may take a while for them to descend to a familiar level). The DuPonts have been the most durable, and you could find DuPonts among the Forbes 400 as recently as 30-odd years ago. (Not now, as far as I'm aware).

    It’s not all that unusual for descendants of tycoons to become tycoons all over again since their is a lot of assortative mating among the very rich and it’s easier to make a billion dollars if you start out with 100 million dollars. This is harder to notice, however, because lots of descendants of tycoons don’t share their surnames because they aren’t in the direct male line of descent.

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    I think you'd have a difficult time substantiating that.
    , @Johann Ricke

    It’s not all that unusual for descendants of tycoons to become tycoons all over again
     
    A guy who supposedly deals with the scions of wealthy families suggests that this is unusual, mainly because of a lack of ambition and out-sized spending habits:

    Profligate spending by heirs -- the type chronicled on sites like Rich Kids of Instagram -- is often a reason for a loss of wealth, as is a simple lack of ambition.

    "The people who created the wealth were often obsessive," said Russ Prince, president of the wealth research and consulting firm Prince and Associates. "But their kids were not hungry."

    Perhaps the most famous example is the Vanderbilt family. Cornelius, the patriarch, built a fortune on railroads and shipping during the mid-1800s. Adjusted for the size of the economy, he was the second richest American ever, worth over $200 billion -- well above Bill Gates.

    Yet his children -- and especially, his grandchildren -- lived lavishly, building huge mansions in New York City, Newport, R.I., and elsewhere, and did little to preserve the fortune. By the 1970s, the family held a reunion with 120 members attending, and there wasn't a millionaire among them, wrote Michael Klepper and Robert Gunther in their book The Wealthy 100.
     
    , @J.Ross
    On 4chan they say that the reason we are having all these problems is because our current set of elites are the third generation which cannot retain the family wealth (like the Chinese aphorism, wealth doesn't make it past three generations).
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  114. @Achmed E. Newman
    Give me your most retarded, destitude, flea infested, refuse-scented masses yearning for WIC benefits, along with $400 apiece and we will sent them on the Amtrack to NY City and put an end to this thing, once and for all!

    “Give me your most retarded, destitude, flea infested, refuse-scented masses yearning for WIC benefits, along with $400 apiece and we will sent them on the Amtrack to NY City and put an end to this thing, once and for all!”

    Exactly the sentiments on display by nativists if one’s ancestors had been from Eastern and Southern Europe in the late 1800′s. Decidedly other than civilized.

    They must go back.

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    • Replies: @David Davenport
    Exactly the sentiments on display by nativists if one’s ancestors had been from Eastern and Southern Europe in the late 1800′s. Decidedly other than civilized.

    They must go back.


    Corvinus, are you a white person? Where did your ancestors come from when they came to America?
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    They must go back.
     
    Personally, I'd be glad to. Give me the galactice coordinates. I don't need no Mr. Sulu, as I can still navigate. Miss Sulu, on the other hand, can't drive* but she will stay in my cabin in suspended animation with daily 5-minute sex-break resuscitations.


    .

    * worth a damn, I mean.
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  115. @syonredux
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ThaS47rqlE

    Yep, those dirty Irish. How dare they have come to America. Justice would be served only if they self-deport.

    Alt Right leader Vox Day would even include Germans–”Nations are people. If you want to live like Haiti, bring in Haitians. They won’t become Americans, they’ll just make America more like Haiti. Which, if you are honest with yourself, is exactly what all the Germans did too.”

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Yep, those dirty Irish. How dare they have come to America. Justice would be served only if they self-deport.

    Alt Right leader Vox Day would even include Germans–”Nations are people. If you want to live like Haiti, bring in Haitians. They won’t become Americans, they’ll just make America more like Haiti. Which, if you are honest with yourself, is exactly what all the Germans did too.”
     
    An important lesson was lost. Mass immigration from Europe caused a lot of problems, but America managed to pull through. But those were fellow Europeans, and the pre-1960s USA was ruled by a WASP elite that was willing to put the hammer down on uppity foreigners.

    Now, however, we are being invaded by non-Europeans: Mestizo/Amerind Latinx
    , Blacks, Muslims, etc. And out ruling elites are gutless cucks (cf the odious ¡Jeb! Bush).
    , @Art Deco
    Alt Right leader Vox Day would even include Germans–”Nations are people. If you want to live like Haiti, bring in Haitians. They won’t become Americans, they’ll just make America more like Haiti. Which, if you are honest with yourself, is exactly what all the Germans did too.”

    OK, Vox Day hasn't figured out that there's a spectrum of behavior and disposition in a country at any one time and variation in common behaviors over time.
    , @Neil Templeton
    Agreed. And the various British tribes before them. Pushed the natives out and changed the land. Maybe there's a lesson in this. Call me nativist, racist, hypocritical if you like. Crow, I just don't care. Morals are personal, not universal. I don't subscribe to moral imperatives that demand acquiescence to erasure and shame.
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  116. @Intelligent Dasein
    Very perceptive comment, Mr. Blank. Not to be OT, but that's somewhat similar to what happened at Vatican II and what gave us the Novus Ordo Missae. The nonsense religion of the masses, consisting of vague moral bromides and pastoral tripe, overwhelmed and dissolved the real theology of which the clergy were supposed to be the guardians. The precise liturgical language was replaced by an insipid jargon designed to confirm the commoners in their hypnotic state. Nowadays, as you say nobody even knows the score, so real Catholicism is as good as dead except in the old books and in a few tiny Traditionalist circles.

    “The nonsense religion of the masses, consisting of vague moral bromides and pastoral tripe, overwhelmed and dissolved the real theology…”

    Not “real theology”, just theology. Not “real Catholicism”, just Catholicism. So who made you the expert here on doctrine? How are you the arbiter as to what constitutes “true faith”?

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  117. @Corvinus
    Yep, those dirty Irish. How dare they have come to America. Justice would be served only if they self-deport.

    Alt Right leader Vox Day would even include Germans--"Nations are people. If you want to live like Haiti, bring in Haitians. They won't become Americans, they'll just make America more like Haiti. Which, if you are honest with yourself, is exactly what all the Germans did too."

    Yep, those dirty Irish. How dare they have come to America. Justice would be served only if they self-deport.

    Alt Right leader Vox Day would even include Germans–”Nations are people. If you want to live like Haiti, bring in Haitians. They won’t become Americans, they’ll just make America more like Haiti. Which, if you are honest with yourself, is exactly what all the Germans did too.”

    An important lesson was lost. Mass immigration from Europe caused a lot of problems, but America managed to pull through. But those were fellow Europeans, and the pre-1960s USA was ruled by a WASP elite that was willing to put the hammer down on uppity foreigners.

    Now, however, we are being invaded by non-Europeans: Mestizo/Amerind Latinx
    , Blacks, Muslims, etc. And out ruling elites are gutless cucks (cf the odious ¡Jeb! Bush).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "An important lesson was lost. Mass immigration from Europe caused a lot of problems, but America managed to pull through. But those were fellow Europeans..."

    There were not "fellow Europeans", there were considered undesirable and alien ethnic groups intent on replacing the founding stock.

    "and the pre-1960s USA was ruled by a WASP elite that was willing to put the hammer down on uppity foreigners."

    Nostalgia has a funny way of playing tricks on the mind. Now, what "uppity foreigners" are you referring to?

    "Now, however, we are being invaded by non-Europeans: Mestizo/Amerind Latinx, Blacks, Muslims, etc."

    There is no "invasion" taking place.

    "And out ruling elites are gutless cucks (cf the odious ¡Jeb! Bush)."

    Cuck is an overused term. It observably means little to the average man and woman. Furthermore, why don't you run for political office? Heed the call of Trumpism.
    , @Anonymous
    America WAS made more like Germany when Germans came in, but that was an improvement in some ways.
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  118. @syonredux

    Yep, those dirty Irish. How dare they have come to America. Justice would be served only if they self-deport.

    Alt Right leader Vox Day would even include Germans–”Nations are people. If you want to live like Haiti, bring in Haitians. They won’t become Americans, they’ll just make America more like Haiti. Which, if you are honest with yourself, is exactly what all the Germans did too.”
     
    An important lesson was lost. Mass immigration from Europe caused a lot of problems, but America managed to pull through. But those were fellow Europeans, and the pre-1960s USA was ruled by a WASP elite that was willing to put the hammer down on uppity foreigners.

    Now, however, we are being invaded by non-Europeans: Mestizo/Amerind Latinx
    , Blacks, Muslims, etc. And out ruling elites are gutless cucks (cf the odious ¡Jeb! Bush).

    “An important lesson was lost. Mass immigration from Europe caused a lot of problems, but America managed to pull through. But those were fellow Europeans…”

    There were not “fellow Europeans”, there were considered undesirable and alien ethnic groups intent on replacing the founding stock.

    “and the pre-1960s USA was ruled by a WASP elite that was willing to put the hammer down on uppity foreigners.”

    Nostalgia has a funny way of playing tricks on the mind. Now, what “uppity foreigners” are you referring to?

    “Now, however, we are being invaded by non-Europeans: Mestizo/Amerind Latinx, Blacks, Muslims, etc.”

    There is no “invasion” taking place.

    “And out ruling elites are gutless cucks (cf the odious ¡Jeb! Bush).”

    Cuck is an overused term. It observably means little to the average man and woman. Furthermore, why don’t you run for political office? Heed the call of Trumpism.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    “An important lesson was lost. Mass immigration from Europe caused a lot of problems, but America managed to pull through. But those were fellow Europeans…”

    There were not “fellow Europeans”, there were considered undesirable and alien ethnic groups intent on replacing the founding stock.
     
    Of course they were fellow Europeans. Germans aren't Australian Aborigines, and Italians aren't Amerinds.

    The important lesson to be learned from large-scale immigration to Anglo-America: Europeans can be successfully assimilated. We've not had much success with non-Europeans.

    “and the pre-1960s USA was ruled by a WASP elite that was willing to put the hammer down on uppity foreigners.”

    Nostalgia has a funny way of playing tricks on the mind. Now, what “uppity foreigners” are you referring to?
     
    Germans, Irish, Italians, etc. Back then, foreigners had to assimilate. If they didn't.....Of course, since they were Europeans, assimilation was possible. Blacks, Mestizos, and Muslims, being non-Europeans, simply can't assimilate...at least not in large numbers....

    “Now, however, we are being invaded by non-Europeans: Mestizo/Amerind Latinx, Blacks, Muslims, etc.”

    There is no “invasion” taking place.

     

    Sure there is.For example, countless towns and neighborhoods in my native California have been overrun by the Latinx. Of course, the invasion is being facilitated by White Anglo traitors and cucks, but that is hardly novel. Cf people like Quisling....

    “And out ruling elites are gutless cucks (cf the odious ¡Jeb! Bush).”

    Cuck is an overused term. It observably means little to the average man and woman.
     
    I disagree. It needs to be used more often. And the term seems to be gaining ground.

    Furthermore, why don’t you run for political office? Heed the call of Trumpism.

     

    Not the candidate type. My role is more professorial. For example, for the last few semesters now, I've been running an informal study group where we discuss crimethink: The Blank Slate, Why Men Rule, The Bell Curve, Human Accomplishment, Kipling, Lovecraft, T.S. Eliot, etc.

    Needless to say, it's invitation only (I don't want to be targeted by campus AntiFa), and the membership is restricted to Europeans.
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  119. @Steve Sailer
    It's not all that unusual for descendants of tycoons to become tycoons all over again since their is a lot of assortative mating among the very rich and it's easier to make a billion dollars if you start out with 100 million dollars. This is harder to notice, however, because lots of descendants of tycoons don't share their surnames because they aren't in the direct male line of descent.

    I think you’d have a difficult time substantiating that.

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  120. @Corvinus
    Yep, those dirty Irish. How dare they have come to America. Justice would be served only if they self-deport.

    Alt Right leader Vox Day would even include Germans--"Nations are people. If you want to live like Haiti, bring in Haitians. They won't become Americans, they'll just make America more like Haiti. Which, if you are honest with yourself, is exactly what all the Germans did too."

    Alt Right leader Vox Day would even include Germans–”Nations are people. If you want to live like Haiti, bring in Haitians. They won’t become Americans, they’ll just make America more like Haiti. Which, if you are honest with yourself, is exactly what all the Germans did too.”

    OK, Vox Day hasn’t figured out that there’s a spectrum of behavior and disposition in a country at any one time and variation in common behaviors over time.

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  121. Give us your Overton Window and we’ll make sure that it never offers a view to halting immigration.

    Read More
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  122. “Vox Day hasn’t figured out that there’s a spectrum of behavior and disposition in a country at any one time and variation in common behaviors over time.”

    Thank you, Art Deco.

    My own 5-generation, 150-year links with friends and family from those “other” European places that Corvenus so readily denigrates had finally tagged him/her to be a wasted read.

    And beyond a handful of pithy remarks, Vox soon became a one-trick pony.

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  123. Place this URL on your bookmark bar and everytime some elite gets “creative” like this, respond with it:

    http://jimbowery.blogspot.com/2016/09/diversity-vs-human-development.html

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  124. @syonredux
    If someone gave me the power establish a middle-school/ junior high English lit syllabus for the USA, it would have a healthy dose of Kipling: "The Stranger," "The Gods of the Copybook Headings," The Man Who Would Be King, Puck of Pook's Hill, Rewards and Fairies, etc

    Needless to say, the Harry Potter books would be banned.

    If.

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  125. @syonredux

    Yep, those dirty Irish. How dare they have come to America. Justice would be served only if they self-deport.

    Alt Right leader Vox Day would even include Germans–”Nations are people. If you want to live like Haiti, bring in Haitians. They won’t become Americans, they’ll just make America more like Haiti. Which, if you are honest with yourself, is exactly what all the Germans did too.”
     
    An important lesson was lost. Mass immigration from Europe caused a lot of problems, but America managed to pull through. But those were fellow Europeans, and the pre-1960s USA was ruled by a WASP elite that was willing to put the hammer down on uppity foreigners.

    Now, however, we are being invaded by non-Europeans: Mestizo/Amerind Latinx
    , Blacks, Muslims, etc. And out ruling elites are gutless cucks (cf the odious ¡Jeb! Bush).

    America WAS made more like Germany when Germans came in, but that was an improvement in some ways.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux


    America WAS made more like Germany when Germans came in, but that was an improvement in some ways.
     

     
    Not very. Again, as I mentioned upthread, the old WASP elite was willing to bring the hammer down back in the day. Note, for example, the Kulturkampf that was waged against German culture during the Great War.

    If only our current elites weren't a bunch of traitors and cucks......
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  126. @Corvinus
    Yep, those dirty Irish. How dare they have come to America. Justice would be served only if they self-deport.

    Alt Right leader Vox Day would even include Germans--"Nations are people. If you want to live like Haiti, bring in Haitians. They won't become Americans, they'll just make America more like Haiti. Which, if you are honest with yourself, is exactly what all the Germans did too."

    Agreed. And the various British tribes before them. Pushed the natives out and changed the land. Maybe there’s a lesson in this. Call me nativist, racist, hypocritical if you like. Crow, I just don’t care. Morals are personal, not universal. I don’t subscribe to moral imperatives that demand acquiescence to erasure and shame.

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  127. @Corvinus
    "Give me your most retarded, destitude, flea infested, refuse-scented masses yearning for WIC benefits, along with $400 apiece and we will sent them on the Amtrack to NY City and put an end to this thing, once and for all!"

    Exactly the sentiments on display by nativists if one's ancestors had been from Eastern and Southern Europe in the late 1800's. Decidedly other than civilized.

    They must go back.

    Exactly the sentiments on display by nativists if one’s ancestors had been from Eastern and Southern Europe in the late 1800′s. Decidedly other than civilized.

    They must go back.

    Corvinus, are you a white person? Where did your ancestors come from when they came to America?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "They must go back."

    No one is going back. Not unless it is by force by the Alt Right henchmen. Are you willing to use force against this "invasion"?

    "Corvinus, are you a white person? Where did your ancestors come from when they came to America?"

    I am white. My ancestry is German, Polish, and Dutch. I trace my mother's side to the 1830's (German and Dutch) and my father's side to the 1880's (Polish).
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  128. Ah, yes, the old meritocracy argument. Just let in high-quality people while excluding the riff-raff.

    Yes, very popular among the tribe that practices a rather more ethnocentric version of the old meritocratic immigration policy, in their country.

    I’m from the “do as they do, not as they say,” school of thought; let’s try an Israeli style policy, but tailored to our needs and interests.

    Yep, those dirty Irish. How dare they have come to America. Justice would be served only if they self-deport.

    He puts the gun to his head, pulls the trigger, hears a click. He thinks, “that worked once, it must work again!” He puts the gun to his head, pulls the trigger…

    The Corvanus philosophy; roll the dice until you lose.

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  129. @Steve Sailer
    It's not all that unusual for descendants of tycoons to become tycoons all over again since their is a lot of assortative mating among the very rich and it's easier to make a billion dollars if you start out with 100 million dollars. This is harder to notice, however, because lots of descendants of tycoons don't share their surnames because they aren't in the direct male line of descent.

    It’s not all that unusual for descendants of tycoons to become tycoons all over again

    A guy who supposedly deals with the scions of wealthy families suggests that this is unusual, mainly because of a lack of ambition and out-sized spending habits:

    Profligate spending by heirs — the type chronicled on sites like Rich Kids of Instagram — is often a reason for a loss of wealth, as is a simple lack of ambition.

    “The people who created the wealth were often obsessive,” said Russ Prince, president of the wealth research and consulting firm Prince and Associates. “But their kids were not hungry.”

    Perhaps the most famous example is the Vanderbilt family. Cornelius, the patriarch, built a fortune on railroads and shipping during the mid-1800s. Adjusted for the size of the economy, he was the second richest American ever, worth over $200 billion — well above Bill Gates.

    Yet his children — and especially, his grandchildren — lived lavishly, building huge mansions in New York City, Newport, R.I., and elsewhere, and did little to preserve the fortune. By the 1970s, the family held a reunion with 120 members attending, and there wasn’t a millionaire among them, wrote Michael Klepper and Robert Gunther in their book The Wealthy 100.

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  130. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    “Anderson Cooper, Fighting Back Tears, Defends Haiti Against Trump’s ‘S–hole’ Remark”

    Figures. Isn't his mother some kind of actress?

    Gloria Vanderbilt was famous in the late 70s as being the socialite who introduced her own brand of designer jeans :

    During the 1970s, Vanderbilt ventured into the fashion business, first with Glentex, licensing her name for a line of scarves. In 1976, Indian designer Mohan Murjani’s Murjani Corporation, proposed launching a line of designer jeans carrying Vanderbilt’s signature embroidered on the back pocket, as well as her swan logo. Her jeans were more tightly fitted than other jeans of that time. The logo eventually appeared on dresses and perfumes, while Vanderbilt also launched a line of blouses, sheets, shoes, leather goods, liqueurs, and accessories. Vanderbilt was one of the first designers to make public appearances, which was a difficult thing for her because of her shyness.

    In 1978, Vanderbilt sold the rights to her name to the Murjani Group.[19] She then launched her own company, “GV Ltd.,” on 7th Avenue in New York. In the period from 1982 to 2002, L’Oreal launched eight fragrances under the brand name Gloria Vanderbilt.[20] Jones Apparel Group acquired the rights to Gloria Vanderbilt jeans in 2002.

    Geena Davis and Deborah Harry did TV ads for them. Harry’s were legendary.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    More Stevily this begat Gilda Radner's famous "Jewess Jeans" routine:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZ1Z5TIx4wI
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  131. @Anonymous
    Gloria Vanderbilt was famous in the late 70s as being the socialite who introduced her own brand of designer jeans :

    During the 1970s, Vanderbilt ventured into the fashion business, first with Glentex, licensing her name for a line of scarves. In 1976, Indian designer Mohan Murjani's Murjani Corporation, proposed launching a line of designer jeans carrying Vanderbilt's signature embroidered on the back pocket, as well as her swan logo. Her jeans were more tightly fitted than other jeans of that time. The logo eventually appeared on dresses and perfumes, while Vanderbilt also launched a line of blouses, sheets, shoes, leather goods, liqueurs, and accessories. Vanderbilt was one of the first designers to make public appearances, which was a difficult thing for her because of her shyness.

    In 1978, Vanderbilt sold the rights to her name to the Murjani Group.[19] She then launched her own company, "GV Ltd.," on 7th Avenue in New York. In the period from 1982 to 2002, L'Oreal launched eight fragrances under the brand name Gloria Vanderbilt.[20] Jones Apparel Group acquired the rights to Gloria Vanderbilt jeans in 2002.
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AkcQOAFkESQ

    Geena Davis and Deborah Harry did TV ads for them. Harry's were legendary.

    More Stevily this begat Gilda Radner’s famous “Jewess Jeans” routine:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I never, ever get tired of that one. La Dolce Gilda forever!
    , @3g4me
    @131 Anonymous: "More Stevily this begat Gilda Radner’s famous “Jewess Jeans” routine"

    Lord, I really did not remember that and I used to watch the original SNL often. My younger son heard me laughing and came to investigate (he claims I don't have a sense of humor because many things that make him and his brother laugh might occasionally elicit a smile from me). I told him he really wouldn't understand - the early years when being conscious of JAPs was a new thing, when people were wearing Vanderbilt jeans, and Gilda Radner and her various personae including a pseudo sex symbol. A true classic.
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  132. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Congressman Tim Ryan @RepTimRyan
    Alisyn Camerota said it best: “What happened to the foundational principle of our country: “Give me your tired, your poor..?” I was on @NewDay to discuss how @realDonaldTrump’s recent comments are not new, but a continuation of a long history of disparaging remarks and actions.

    Alisyn Lane Camerota is an American television journalist and novelist. She is currently co-anchoring CNN’s New Day. She has co-anchored CNN Tonight, and served in many roles during a 16-year career at the Fox News Channel. She is the author of Amanda Wakes Up.

    Read More
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  133. @Anonymous
    America WAS made more like Germany when Germans came in, but that was an improvement in some ways.

    America WAS made more like Germany when Germans came in, but that was an improvement in some ways.

    Not very. Again, as I mentioned upthread, the old WASP elite was willing to bring the hammer down back in the day. Note, for example, the Kulturkampf that was waged against German culture during the Great War.

    If only our current elites weren’t a bunch of traitors and cucks……

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Not very. Again, as I mentioned upthread, the old WASP elite was willing to bring the hammer down back in the day. Note, for example, the Kulturkampf that was waged against German culture during the Great War.

    That came and went in a couple of years, and some of it was a function of federal demagogy. I'll wager more salient was the formation of exclusive societies (I've got some ancestors who joined the DAR and the Society of Colonial Wars), the five-o'clock shadow, and more personal incorporated associations like in-town and country clubs. People's sense of embarrassment and status was considerably different, hence you had the culture of the Lace Curtain Irish, the 'Tuskeegee ethic' among bourgeois blacks, and affluent Jews like Lionel Trilling and Robert Oppenheimer who seemed to play against type (though that might have just been their idiosyncratic personalities). See The Great Gatsby. Those in West Egg wanted an ineffable quality possessed only by those in East Egg.
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  134. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    OT, or maybe not:

    https://www.glamour.com/story/catherine-deneuve-signs-controversial-open-letter-criticizing-me-too

    French Icon Catherine Deneuve Signs Controversial Open Letter Criticizing #MeToo Movement

    Highlights:

    In the letter the women also denounced #MeToo for punishing men too abruptly. Likening the public reckoning that’s ousted many high-profile men from positions of power to a “witch hunt,” they lamented that “expedited justice already has its victims, men prevented from practicing their profession as punishment, forced to resign, etc., while the only thing they did wrong was touching a knee, trying to steal a kiss, or speaking about ‘intimate’ things at a work dinner….”

    The letter is likely an example of problematic generational divides that complicate the #MeToo conversation and fail to hold men accountable for their behavior: Last year designer Donna Karan, 69, apologized after saying that women who were assaulted by film producer Harvey Weinstein were “asking for it.” Ninety-two-year-old actress Angela Lansbury also made the world cringe when she said women “must sometimes take blame” for harassment. And, in an interview with The Sunday Times Magazine back in 2015, rocker Chrissie Hynde, 66, said she took “full responsibility” for a sexual assault incident she experienced at age 21, in which she was raped by a motorcycle gang member who offered her a ride to a party.

    Plus, as The Atlantic points out, there are also cultural differences at play here. While women in the U.S. may feel a strength in numbers and solidarity in speaking out French women may fear that “naming names will more likely win you accusations of being a ‘collabo,’ or turncoat, not to mention an affront to your own sex appeal.”

    Needless to say, Le Monde letter met with a wave of backlash that was swift and biting.

    Italian actress Asia Argento—one of the first women to accuse Harvey Weinstein of sexual misconduct—tweeted, “Deneuve and other French women tell the world how their interiorized misogyny has lobotomized them to the point of no return,” while a group of about 30 activists, led by French feminist Caroline De Haas, responded by saying that Deneuve and the cosigners had conflated flirting and sexual violence.

    Young women live in fantasyland of ‘I am woman, hear me roar’. The old broads have learnt the score.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Old women need to die, amirite? Imagine taking any responsibility at all. I can't even.

    Let me unpack that for you: The young women of today should be able to slutwalk naked through men's prison barracks without fear. Until and unless that can happen, we're all complicit in the interiority of misogyny.

    PS: We need to read the Deneuve letter in its original form, rather than as interpreted by the MSM, and btw Argento is an Italian FWP surname.

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  135. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    Naulakha, also known as the Rudyard Kipling House, is a historic Shingle Style house on Kipling Road in Dummerston, Vermont, a few miles outside Brattleboro. The house was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1993 for its association with the author Rudyard Kipling (1865–1936), who had it built in 1893 and made it his home until 1896. It is in this house that Kipling wrote Captains Courageous, The Jungle Book, The Day's Work, and The Seven Seas, and did work on Kim and The Just So Stories.[1] Kipling named the house after the Naulakha Pavilion, situated inside Lahore Fort in Pakistan. The house is now owned by the Landmark Trust, and is available for rent.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naulakha_(Rudyard_Kipling_House)


    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/10/07/article-2449165-18897B4D00000578-167_634x422.jpg

    Kipling Road in Dummerston, Vermont

    Says you! I happen to know that Kipling Road was a typical East End Street. People were in and out of each other’s houses, with each other’s property, all day long. Hoo hoo! Yes, they were a cheery lot. Cheery and violent.

    [cf: the Piranha Brothers]

    But seriously, thanks for the intelligence. I never knew he even visited Vermont.

    Read More
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  136. @Anonymous
    More Stevily this begat Gilda Radner's famous "Jewess Jeans" routine:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZ1Z5TIx4wI

    I never, ever get tired of that one. La Dolce Gilda forever!

    Read More
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  137. @Anonymous
    OT, or maybe not:

    https://www.glamour.com/story/catherine-deneuve-signs-controversial-open-letter-criticizing-me-too

    French Icon Catherine Deneuve Signs Controversial Open Letter Criticizing #MeToo Movement

    Highlights:

    In the letter the women also denounced #MeToo for punishing men too abruptly. Likening the public reckoning that's ousted many high-profile men from positions of power to a “witch hunt,” they lamented that “expedited justice already has its victims, men prevented from practicing their profession as punishment, forced to resign, etc., while the only thing they did wrong was touching a knee, trying to steal a kiss, or speaking about ‘intimate’ things at a work dinner….”

    The letter is likely an example of problematic generational divides that complicate the #MeToo conversation and fail to hold men accountable for their behavior: Last year designer Donna Karan, 69, apologized after saying that women who were assaulted by film producer Harvey Weinstein were "asking for it." Ninety-two-year-old actress Angela Lansbury also made the world cringe when she said women “must sometimes take blame" for harassment. And, in an interview with The Sunday Times Magazine back in 2015, rocker Chrissie Hynde, 66, said she took "full responsibility" for a sexual assault incident she experienced at age 21, in which she was raped by a motorcycle gang member who offered her a ride to a party.

    Plus, as The Atlantic points out, there are also cultural differences at play here. While women in the U.S. may feel a strength in numbers and solidarity in speaking out French women may fear that "naming names will more likely win you accusations of being a 'collabo,' or turncoat, not to mention an affront to your own sex appeal."

    Needless to say, Le Monde letter met with a wave of backlash that was swift and biting.

    Italian actress Asia Argento—one of the first women to accuse Harvey Weinstein of sexual misconduct—tweeted, “Deneuve and other French women tell the world how their interiorized misogyny has lobotomized them to the point of no return," while a group of about 30 activists, led by French feminist Caroline De Haas, responded by saying that Deneuve and the cosigners had conflated flirting and sexual violence.
     
    Young women live in fantasyland of 'I am woman, hear me roar'. The old broads have learnt the score.

    Old women need to die, amirite? Imagine taking any responsibility at all. I can’t even.

    Let me unpack that for you: The young women of today should be able to slutwalk naked through men’s prison barracks without fear. Until and unless that can happen, we’re all complicit in the interiority of misogyny.

    PS: We need to read the Deneuve letter in its original form, rather than as interpreted by the MSM, and btw Argento is an Italian FWP surname.

    Read More
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  138. @syonredux


    America WAS made more like Germany when Germans came in, but that was an improvement in some ways.
     

     
    Not very. Again, as I mentioned upthread, the old WASP elite was willing to bring the hammer down back in the day. Note, for example, the Kulturkampf that was waged against German culture during the Great War.

    If only our current elites weren't a bunch of traitors and cucks......

    Not very. Again, as I mentioned upthread, the old WASP elite was willing to bring the hammer down back in the day. Note, for example, the Kulturkampf that was waged against German culture during the Great War.

    That came and went in a couple of years, and some of it was a function of federal demagogy. I’ll wager more salient was the formation of exclusive societies (I’ve got some ancestors who joined the DAR and the Society of Colonial Wars), the five-o’clock shadow, and more personal incorporated associations like in-town and country clubs. People’s sense of embarrassment and status was considerably different, hence you had the culture of the Lace Curtain Irish, the ‘Tuskeegee ethic’ among bourgeois blacks, and affluent Jews like Lionel Trilling and Robert Oppenheimer who seemed to play against type (though that might have just been their idiosyncratic personalities). See The Great Gatsby. Those in West Egg wanted an ineffable quality possessed only by those in East Egg.

    Read More
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  139. @Chris Mallory

    WIC benefits
     
    WIC is a voucher for baby formula, milk, cheese, dried beans, cereal, and juice.

    Yes, I knew that when I wrote it.

    Read More
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  140. @Corvinus
    "Give me your most retarded, destitude, flea infested, refuse-scented masses yearning for WIC benefits, along with $400 apiece and we will sent them on the Amtrack to NY City and put an end to this thing, once and for all!"

    Exactly the sentiments on display by nativists if one's ancestors had been from Eastern and Southern Europe in the late 1800's. Decidedly other than civilized.

    They must go back.

    They must go back.

    Personally, I’d be glad to. Give me the galactice coordinates. I don’t need no Mr. Sulu, as I can still navigate. Miss Sulu, on the other hand, can’t drive* but she will stay in my cabin in suspended animation with daily 5-minute sex-break resuscitations.

    .

    * worth a damn, I mean.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "Personally, I'd be glad to."

    Yet another low-T, armchair warrior making an empty threat. Why don't you actually repel this alleged invasion by shithole nations Rambo-style? Wait, don't answer, we already know the response. Fortunately, you are just blowing off some steam, as even you realize you just don't have it in you to carry it out.
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  141. This is the best thing “Michiko Kakutani” ever wrote.

    https://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/i-am-michiko-kakutani

    What started as a basically innocent college prank has gotten seriously out of hand, and, at the urging of the small group of people who know the truth, I have decided to come forward and admit it.
    I am Michiko Kakutani.

    The whole thing started at Yale in the winter of 1972 when my roommates and I made up the name as an all-purpose coinage.
    We’d answer the phone: “Kevin? No, he’s not here. This is his roommate Michiko Kakutani.”

    We’d use it as a catch-all for any nameless broken part of our stereo: “Aha! The problem’s with the michiko kakutani.”

    We’d use it, I’m embarrassed to say, as a metaphor for onanism.
    “What’d you do last night?”
    “Had a big date with Michiko Kakutani.”

    One night Fred asked me if I was coming out with him and Peter for late night hot tuna grinders.
    “I’d like to, but Michiko Kakutani has had a long day. She wants to turn in.”
    There was a long pause.
    “Colin,” Fred began gingerly, “there is no Michiko Kakutani.”
    I blew up.
    “There is! She’s got more guts and brains than all of you jerks put together. And one of these days, she’s going to expose American culture for the simpering, self-referential, pretentious fraud that it is!”
    After that, my friends started giving me a little more space.
    The next semester, Michiko Kakutani’s folklore professor abruptly announced the final exams would be oral.
    I didn’t have to think about what I was going to do. I bought a wig, a pretty silk blouse and lots of makeup. I was thin already, but I dieted down and wore a girdle. I caused a lot of trouble when I characterized Zora Neale Hurston’s work as “an overrated hodgepodge exalted by three generations of self-hating, guilt-ridden white men,” but I got an A.

    I have not dressed up as her more than 50 times in my life, and, to be brutally frank, one reason I’ve come forward now is that I’m 44 and my body is thickening, my metabolism slowing, and getting ready to be Michiko Kakutani now requires three weeks of obsessive exercise, diuretics and amphetamines.
    The last time I did it, for a function at the New York Public Library, I arrived in a state of speed-fueled psychosis, which caused me to wait until Dale Peck was walking down a shadowy corridor and cold-cock him. Just turned his fucking lights out.
    Looking back, I’m sorry I did that.
    But, well, it was Dale Peck. Can I be blamed?
    There were mornings when I lay exhausted in my bed, and Alice Shaughnessy, the Sligo-bred housekeeper I inexplicably have, would tiptoe in with coddled eggs and toast points.
    “Sure and you’ve been at it again, sir,” she’d gasp. “Herself came out again last night?”
    “She reviewed Norman Mailer’s silly, self-important, inadvertently comical Jesus novel,” I’d groan. “Somebody had to knock that fat bastard down, Alice. Michiko Kakutani was the only one with the spine for the job.”

    The conclusive tell is that Control-F for “limn” reveals no results.

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  142. @Corvinus
    "An important lesson was lost. Mass immigration from Europe caused a lot of problems, but America managed to pull through. But those were fellow Europeans..."

    There were not "fellow Europeans", there were considered undesirable and alien ethnic groups intent on replacing the founding stock.

    "and the pre-1960s USA was ruled by a WASP elite that was willing to put the hammer down on uppity foreigners."

    Nostalgia has a funny way of playing tricks on the mind. Now, what "uppity foreigners" are you referring to?

    "Now, however, we are being invaded by non-Europeans: Mestizo/Amerind Latinx, Blacks, Muslims, etc."

    There is no "invasion" taking place.

    "And out ruling elites are gutless cucks (cf the odious ¡Jeb! Bush)."

    Cuck is an overused term. It observably means little to the average man and woman. Furthermore, why don't you run for political office? Heed the call of Trumpism.

    “An important lesson was lost. Mass immigration from Europe caused a lot of problems, but America managed to pull through. But those were fellow Europeans…”

    There were not “fellow Europeans”, there were considered undesirable and alien ethnic groups intent on replacing the founding stock.

    Of course they were fellow Europeans. Germans aren’t Australian Aborigines, and Italians aren’t Amerinds.

    The important lesson to be learned from large-scale immigration to Anglo-America: Europeans can be successfully assimilated. We’ve not had much success with non-Europeans.

    “and the pre-1960s USA was ruled by a WASP elite that was willing to put the hammer down on uppity foreigners.”

    Nostalgia has a funny way of playing tricks on the mind. Now, what “uppity foreigners” are you referring to?

    Germans, Irish, Italians, etc. Back then, foreigners had to assimilate. If they didn’t…..Of course, since they were Europeans, assimilation was possible. Blacks, Mestizos, and Muslims, being non-Europeans, simply can’t assimilate…at least not in large numbers….

    “Now, however, we are being invaded by non-Europeans: Mestizo/Amerind Latinx, Blacks, Muslims, etc.”

    There is no “invasion” taking place.

    Sure there is.For example, countless towns and neighborhoods in my native California have been overrun by the Latinx. Of course, the invasion is being facilitated by White Anglo traitors and cucks, but that is hardly novel. Cf people like Quisling….

    “And out ruling elites are gutless cucks (cf the odious ¡Jeb! Bush).”

    Cuck is an overused term. It observably means little to the average man and woman.

    I disagree. It needs to be used more often. And the term seems to be gaining ground.

    Furthermore, why don’t you run for political office? Heed the call of Trumpism.

    Not the candidate type. My role is more professorial. For example, for the last few semesters now, I’ve been running an informal study group where we discuss crimethink: The Blank Slate, Why Men Rule, The Bell Curve, Human Accomplishment, Kipling, Lovecraft, T.S. Eliot, etc.

    Needless to say, it’s invitation only (I don’t want to be targeted by campus AntiFa), and the membership is restricted to Europeans.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "Of course they were fellow Europeans. Germans aren’t Australian Aborigines, and Italians aren’t Amerinds."

    Germans, the Irish, and the Italians were low-class Europeans according to nativists, not on their intellectual or ethnic level. Not much better than the Aborigines or the Amerinds, only useful when the nativists needed them as "Europeans" against non-Europeans to secure political and economic fortunes.

    "Germans, Irish, Italians, etc. Back then, foreigners had to assimilate. If they didn’t….."

    There wasn't any "had to", just "wanted to". Immigrants of yesteryear and today share that same desire.

    "Blacks, Mestizos, and Muslims, being non-Europeans, simply can’t assimilate…at least not in large numbers."

    Of course blacks, Mestizos, and Muslims can, and have, and will, assimilate.

    "The important lesson to be learned from large-scale immigration to Anglo-America..."

    Not "Anglo-America", but the United States of America.

    "For example, countless towns and neighborhoods in my native California have been overrun by the Latinx. Of course, the invasion is being facilitated by White Anglo traitors and cucks, but that is hardly novel."

    Not overrun, but simply populated.

    "Needless to say, it’s invitation only (I don’t want to be targeted by campus AntiFa), and the membership is restricted to Europeans."

    Which is exactly how SJW's manage their narrative--confirmation bias is their tool.
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  143. @Anonymous
    More Stevily this begat Gilda Radner's famous "Jewess Jeans" routine:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZ1Z5TIx4wI

    @131 Anonymous: “More Stevily this begat Gilda Radner’s famous “Jewess Jeans” routine”

    Lord, I really did not remember that and I used to watch the original SNL often. My younger son heard me laughing and came to investigate (he claims I don’t have a sense of humor because many things that make him and his brother laugh might occasionally elicit a smile from me). I told him he really wouldn’t understand – the early years when being conscious of JAPs was a new thing, when people were wearing Vanderbilt jeans, and Gilda Radner and her various personae including a pseudo sex symbol. A true classic.

    Read More
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  144. @Steve Sailer
    It's not all that unusual for descendants of tycoons to become tycoons all over again since their is a lot of assortative mating among the very rich and it's easier to make a billion dollars if you start out with 100 million dollars. This is harder to notice, however, because lots of descendants of tycoons don't share their surnames because they aren't in the direct male line of descent.

    On 4chan they say that the reason we are having all these problems is because our current set of elites are the third generation which cannot retain the family wealth (like the Chinese aphorism, wealth doesn’t make it past three generations).

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  145. @syonredux

    “An important lesson was lost. Mass immigration from Europe caused a lot of problems, but America managed to pull through. But those were fellow Europeans…”

    There were not “fellow Europeans”, there were considered undesirable and alien ethnic groups intent on replacing the founding stock.
     
    Of course they were fellow Europeans. Germans aren't Australian Aborigines, and Italians aren't Amerinds.

    The important lesson to be learned from large-scale immigration to Anglo-America: Europeans can be successfully assimilated. We've not had much success with non-Europeans.

    “and the pre-1960s USA was ruled by a WASP elite that was willing to put the hammer down on uppity foreigners.”

    Nostalgia has a funny way of playing tricks on the mind. Now, what “uppity foreigners” are you referring to?
     
    Germans, Irish, Italians, etc. Back then, foreigners had to assimilate. If they didn't.....Of course, since they were Europeans, assimilation was possible. Blacks, Mestizos, and Muslims, being non-Europeans, simply can't assimilate...at least not in large numbers....

    “Now, however, we are being invaded by non-Europeans: Mestizo/Amerind Latinx, Blacks, Muslims, etc.”

    There is no “invasion” taking place.

     

    Sure there is.For example, countless towns and neighborhoods in my native California have been overrun by the Latinx. Of course, the invasion is being facilitated by White Anglo traitors and cucks, but that is hardly novel. Cf people like Quisling....

    “And out ruling elites are gutless cucks (cf the odious ¡Jeb! Bush).”

    Cuck is an overused term. It observably means little to the average man and woman.
     
    I disagree. It needs to be used more often. And the term seems to be gaining ground.

    Furthermore, why don’t you run for political office? Heed the call of Trumpism.

     

    Not the candidate type. My role is more professorial. For example, for the last few semesters now, I've been running an informal study group where we discuss crimethink: The Blank Slate, Why Men Rule, The Bell Curve, Human Accomplishment, Kipling, Lovecraft, T.S. Eliot, etc.

    Needless to say, it's invitation only (I don't want to be targeted by campus AntiFa), and the membership is restricted to Europeans.

    “Of course they were fellow Europeans. Germans aren’t Australian Aborigines, and Italians aren’t Amerinds.”

    Germans, the Irish, and the Italians were low-class Europeans according to nativists, not on their intellectual or ethnic level. Not much better than the Aborigines or the Amerinds, only useful when the nativists needed them as “Europeans” against non-Europeans to secure political and economic fortunes.

    “Germans, Irish, Italians, etc. Back then, foreigners had to assimilate. If they didn’t…..”

    There wasn’t any “had to”, just “wanted to”. Immigrants of yesteryear and today share that same desire.

    “Blacks, Mestizos, and Muslims, being non-Europeans, simply can’t assimilate…at least not in large numbers.”

    Of course blacks, Mestizos, and Muslims can, and have, and will, assimilate.

    “The important lesson to be learned from large-scale immigration to Anglo-America…”

    Not “Anglo-America”, but the United States of America.

    “For example, countless towns and neighborhoods in my native California have been overrun by the Latinx. Of course, the invasion is being facilitated by White Anglo traitors and cucks, but that is hardly novel.”

    Not overrun, but simply populated.

    “Needless to say, it’s invitation only (I don’t want to be targeted by campus AntiFa), and the membership is restricted to Europeans.”

    Which is exactly how SJW’s manage their narrative–confirmation bias is their tool.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    Of course they were fellow Europeans. Germans aren’t Australian Aborigines, and Italians aren’t Amerinds.”

    Germans, the Irish, and the Italians were low-class Europeans according to nativists, not on their intellectual or ethnic level. Not much better than the Aborigines or the Amerinds, only useful when the nativists needed them as “Europeans” against non-Europeans to secure political and economic fortunes.
     

    Being awfully pleb-tier there, dear fellow. Sure, Anglo-Saxons thought that they were better than everybody else....but, as you just noted, they still knew that the Germans, Irish, Italians, etc were fellow Europeans. Come on, try harder!

    “Germans, Irish, Italians, etc. Back then, foreigners had to assimilate. If they didn’t…..”

    There wasn’t any “had to”, just “wanted to”.
     

    Some wanted to, and some had to be made to.

    Immigrants of yesteryear and today share that same desire.
     
    Some do, some don't. As a college professor, I mostly run into the ones who don't. And the ones who don't are nearly all non-European.

    “Blacks, Mestizos, and Muslims, being non-Europeans, simply can’t assimilate…at least not in large numbers.”

    Of course blacks, Mestizos, and Muslims can, and have, and will, assimilate.
     

    Some can and have. Most can't.

    “The important lesson to be learned from large-scale immigration to Anglo-America…”

    Not “Anglo-America”, but the United States of America.
     

    The USA is part of Anglo-America. You know, that's why the USA has more in common with Canada than we do with El Salvador.

    “For example, countless towns and neighborhoods in my native California have been overrun by the Latinx. Of course, the invasion is being facilitated by White Anglo traitors and cucks, but that is hardly novel.”

    Not overrun, but simply populated.

     

    No, overrun. Areas that were once heavily Anglo are now nearly all Latinx.

    “Needless to say, it’s invitation only (I don’t want to be targeted by campus AntiFa), and the membership is restricted to Europeans.”

    Which is exactly how SJW’s manage their narrative–confirmation bias is their tool.
     

    Surely you are not suggesting that I allow in SJWs? They would have us shut-down in a heartbeat. My students have to hide their copies of the The Bell-Curve. One poor girl got careless, and a couple of Blacks ripped her copy to shreds. She barely escaped unharmed.
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  146. @David Davenport
    Exactly the sentiments on display by nativists if one’s ancestors had been from Eastern and Southern Europe in the late 1800′s. Decidedly other than civilized.

    They must go back.


    Corvinus, are you a white person? Where did your ancestors come from when they came to America?

    “They must go back.”

    No one is going back. Not unless it is by force by the Alt Right henchmen. Are you willing to use force against this “invasion”?

    “Corvinus, are you a white person? Where did your ancestors come from when they came to America?”

    I am white. My ancestry is German, Polish, and Dutch. I trace my mother’s side to the 1830′s (German and Dutch) and my father’s side to the 1880′s (Polish).

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  147. @Corvinus
    "Of course they were fellow Europeans. Germans aren’t Australian Aborigines, and Italians aren’t Amerinds."

    Germans, the Irish, and the Italians were low-class Europeans according to nativists, not on their intellectual or ethnic level. Not much better than the Aborigines or the Amerinds, only useful when the nativists needed them as "Europeans" against non-Europeans to secure political and economic fortunes.

    "Germans, Irish, Italians, etc. Back then, foreigners had to assimilate. If they didn’t….."

    There wasn't any "had to", just "wanted to". Immigrants of yesteryear and today share that same desire.

    "Blacks, Mestizos, and Muslims, being non-Europeans, simply can’t assimilate…at least not in large numbers."

    Of course blacks, Mestizos, and Muslims can, and have, and will, assimilate.

    "The important lesson to be learned from large-scale immigration to Anglo-America..."

    Not "Anglo-America", but the United States of America.

    "For example, countless towns and neighborhoods in my native California have been overrun by the Latinx. Of course, the invasion is being facilitated by White Anglo traitors and cucks, but that is hardly novel."

    Not overrun, but simply populated.

    "Needless to say, it’s invitation only (I don’t want to be targeted by campus AntiFa), and the membership is restricted to Europeans."

    Which is exactly how SJW's manage their narrative--confirmation bias is their tool.

    Of course they were fellow Europeans. Germans aren’t Australian Aborigines, and Italians aren’t Amerinds.”

    Germans, the Irish, and the Italians were low-class Europeans according to nativists, not on their intellectual or ethnic level. Not much better than the Aborigines or the Amerinds, only useful when the nativists needed them as “Europeans” against non-Europeans to secure political and economic fortunes.

    Being awfully pleb-tier there, dear fellow. Sure, Anglo-Saxons thought that they were better than everybody else….but, as you just noted, they still knew that the Germans, Irish, Italians, etc were fellow Europeans. Come on, try harder!

    “Germans, Irish, Italians, etc. Back then, foreigners had to assimilate. If they didn’t…..”

    There wasn’t any “had to”, just “wanted to”.

    Some wanted to, and some had to be made to.

    Immigrants of yesteryear and today share that same desire.

    Some do, some don’t. As a college professor, I mostly run into the ones who don’t. And the ones who don’t are nearly all non-European.

    “Blacks, Mestizos, and Muslims, being non-Europeans, simply can’t assimilate…at least not in large numbers.”

    Of course blacks, Mestizos, and Muslims can, and have, and will, assimilate.

    Some can and have. Most can’t.

    “The important lesson to be learned from large-scale immigration to Anglo-America…”

    Not “Anglo-America”, but the United States of America.

    The USA is part of Anglo-America. You know, that’s why the USA has more in common with Canada than we do with El Salvador.

    “For example, countless towns and neighborhoods in my native California have been overrun by the Latinx. Of course, the invasion is being facilitated by White Anglo traitors and cucks, but that is hardly novel.”

    Not overrun, but simply populated.

    No, overrun. Areas that were once heavily Anglo are now nearly all Latinx.

    “Needless to say, it’s invitation only (I don’t want to be targeted by campus AntiFa), and the membership is restricted to Europeans.”

    Which is exactly how SJW’s manage their narrative–confirmation bias is their tool.

    Surely you are not suggesting that I allow in SJWs? They would have us shut-down in a heartbeat. My students have to hide their copies of the The Bell-Curve. One poor girl got careless, and a couple of Blacks ripped her copy to shreds. She barely escaped unharmed.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "Being awfully pleb-tier there, dear fellow. Sure, Anglo-Saxons thought that they were better than everybody else….but, as you just noted, they still knew that the Germans, Irish, Italians, etc were fellow Europeans. Come on, try harder!"

    Low-class Europeans. There was a pecking order. There was even disdain toward's one's brethren within each nation when it came to migration. In other words, if Frank the Frenchman from the sticks wanted to move to Paris, you would think it would have been easy, peasy. Well, Houston, we have a problem...

    --> Migration levels would probably have been even higher than they were had town and city officials allowed them to be, since many urban governments did not eagerly welcome all newcomers at all times. Local legislation, as in the case of many early modern German towns, regional statutes regulating the numbers and qualities of migrants admitted to Italian towns, and national laws, such as England’s Tudor Poor Laws, enabled authorities to expel migrants for reasons ranging from poverty or immoral conduct to officials’ fear of unemployment and disorder.

    Katherine A. Lynch , Individuals, Families, and Communities in Europe, 1200-1800: The Urban Foundations of Western Society, 2003.

    "As a college professor, I mostly run into the ones who don’t. And the ones who don’t are nearly all non-European."

    So, from your experiences, which is not necessarily universal. And chances are your judgement is clouded. Damn that confirmation bias.

    "The USA is part of Anglo-America."

    No, the USA is its own entity. It includes the English, who along with several other ethnic groups, helped to settle our great land.

    "Areas that were once heavily Anglo are now nearly all Latinx."

    Areas that were once exclusively Native American are now nearly all mutt American. Again, populated, not overrun.

    "Some can and have. Most can’t."

    Again, the same argument was made by nativists toward their fellow Europeans, especially those from Southern and Eastern Europe, that they were utterly incapable of assimilation. It didn't matter that these groups were European, it mattered that they were Slavic or Polish or Jewish or Roman Catholic. "Gutter people" they were called.

    "Surely you are not suggesting that I allow in SJWs? They would have us shut-down in a heartbeat."

    Have your private study sessions. But remember you are engaging in the same behavior as SJW's.

    "One poor girl got careless, and a couple of Blacks ripped her copy to shreds. She barely escaped unharmed."

    Highly doubtful that happened.
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  148. @Achmed E. Newman

    They must go back.
     
    Personally, I'd be glad to. Give me the galactice coordinates. I don't need no Mr. Sulu, as I can still navigate. Miss Sulu, on the other hand, can't drive* but she will stay in my cabin in suspended animation with daily 5-minute sex-break resuscitations.


    .

    * worth a damn, I mean.

    “Personally, I’d be glad to.”

    Yet another low-T, armchair warrior making an empty threat. Why don’t you actually repel this alleged invasion by shithole nations Rambo-style? Wait, don’t answer, we already know the response. Fortunately, you are just blowing off some steam, as even you realize you just don’t have it in you to carry it out.

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  149. @syonredux

    Of course they were fellow Europeans. Germans aren’t Australian Aborigines, and Italians aren’t Amerinds.”

    Germans, the Irish, and the Italians were low-class Europeans according to nativists, not on their intellectual or ethnic level. Not much better than the Aborigines or the Amerinds, only useful when the nativists needed them as “Europeans” against non-Europeans to secure political and economic fortunes.
     

    Being awfully pleb-tier there, dear fellow. Sure, Anglo-Saxons thought that they were better than everybody else....but, as you just noted, they still knew that the Germans, Irish, Italians, etc were fellow Europeans. Come on, try harder!

    “Germans, Irish, Italians, etc. Back then, foreigners had to assimilate. If they didn’t…..”

    There wasn’t any “had to”, just “wanted to”.
     

    Some wanted to, and some had to be made to.

    Immigrants of yesteryear and today share that same desire.
     
    Some do, some don't. As a college professor, I mostly run into the ones who don't. And the ones who don't are nearly all non-European.

    “Blacks, Mestizos, and Muslims, being non-Europeans, simply can’t assimilate…at least not in large numbers.”

    Of course blacks, Mestizos, and Muslims can, and have, and will, assimilate.
     

    Some can and have. Most can't.

    “The important lesson to be learned from large-scale immigration to Anglo-America…”

    Not “Anglo-America”, but the United States of America.
     

    The USA is part of Anglo-America. You know, that's why the USA has more in common with Canada than we do with El Salvador.

    “For example, countless towns and neighborhoods in my native California have been overrun by the Latinx. Of course, the invasion is being facilitated by White Anglo traitors and cucks, but that is hardly novel.”

    Not overrun, but simply populated.

     

    No, overrun. Areas that were once heavily Anglo are now nearly all Latinx.

    “Needless to say, it’s invitation only (I don’t want to be targeted by campus AntiFa), and the membership is restricted to Europeans.”

    Which is exactly how SJW’s manage their narrative–confirmation bias is their tool.
     

    Surely you are not suggesting that I allow in SJWs? They would have us shut-down in a heartbeat. My students have to hide their copies of the The Bell-Curve. One poor girl got careless, and a couple of Blacks ripped her copy to shreds. She barely escaped unharmed.

    “Being awfully pleb-tier there, dear fellow. Sure, Anglo-Saxons thought that they were better than everybody else….but, as you just noted, they still knew that the Germans, Irish, Italians, etc were fellow Europeans. Come on, try harder!”

    Low-class Europeans. There was a pecking order. There was even disdain toward’s one’s brethren within each nation when it came to migration. In other words, if Frank the Frenchman from the sticks wanted to move to Paris, you would think it would have been easy, peasy. Well, Houston, we have a problem…

    –> Migration levels would probably have been even higher than they were had town and city officials allowed them to be, since many urban governments did not eagerly welcome all newcomers at all times. Local legislation, as in the case of many early modern German towns, regional statutes regulating the numbers and qualities of migrants admitted to Italian towns, and national laws, such as England’s Tudor Poor Laws, enabled authorities to expel migrants for reasons ranging from poverty or immoral conduct to officials’ fear of unemployment and disorder.

    Katherine A. Lynch , Individuals, Families, and Communities in Europe, 1200-1800: The Urban Foundations of Western Society, 2003.

    “As a college professor, I mostly run into the ones who don’t. And the ones who don’t are nearly all non-European.”

    So, from your experiences, which is not necessarily universal. And chances are your judgement is clouded. Damn that confirmation bias.

    “The USA is part of Anglo-America.”

    No, the USA is its own entity. It includes the English, who along with several other ethnic groups, helped to settle our great land.

    “Areas that were once heavily Anglo are now nearly all Latinx.”

    Areas that were once exclusively Native American are now nearly all mutt American. Again, populated, not overrun.

    “Some can and have. Most can’t.”

    Again, the same argument was made by nativists toward their fellow Europeans, especially those from Southern and Eastern Europe, that they were utterly incapable of assimilation. It didn’t matter that these groups were European, it mattered that they were Slavic or Polish or Jewish or Roman Catholic. “Gutter people” they were called.

    “Surely you are not suggesting that I allow in SJWs? They would have us shut-down in a heartbeat.”

    Have your private study sessions. But remember you are engaging in the same behavior as SJW’s.

    “One poor girl got careless, and a couple of Blacks ripped her copy to shreds. She barely escaped unharmed.”

    Highly doubtful that happened.

    Read More
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  150. To the Kipling fans here, I recommend you look up Peter Bellamy’s musical recordings of Kipling’s poems.

    Read More
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