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From The Forward:

Here Are All Of Sunday’s Jewish Oscar Nominees
January 22, 2019 By Jenny Singer

Not a good year for movies, so not a good year for Jews in the movie business. I should go back and look at older Forward articles like this, but this might be the worst year for Jews in movies in the last century.

On the bright side …

Rachel Weisz is, as usual, very good as Mrs. Churchill in The Favourite, although Emma Stone and Olivia Colman as Queen Anne might be even better.

Justin Hurwitz’s score for First Man is fine, but Moon movie scores have to compete against the two Strausses of 2001. The only outer space movie to top 2001 in scoring was von Trier’s Melancholia, which used Wagner’s epochal prelude to Tristan und Isolde.

Cold War has a really nifty trailer (much better cinematography than “Roma”) but I haven’t seen the movie. The Polish director is part Jewish.

The Coen Brothers are nominated for Best Adaptation, even though 4/6ths of Buster Scruggs is original. But the 2 best sequences are adapted from Jack London and another old time novelist, Stewart Edward White. White’s grand wagon train story is adapted almost word for word from that forgotten writer of Westerns, but that’s what the real talents do: they know when the original doesn’t need much of their help. For example, John Huston’s first draft of The Maltese Falcon just consisted of him crossing out parts of the Hammett novel and then having his secretary type up the rest.

I haven’t seen A Star Is Born or Green Book, but I probably remember more lucidly Buster Scruggs than any of the six Best Picture nominees I’ve seen. The idea that, after 34 years and 18 movies, the Coens are simply the best filmmakers of our era is unexciting, but I can live with it.

BlacKkKlansman was all-around terrible, except for Adam Driver, who isn’t Jewish, and, to a lesser extent, Topher Grace, who isn’t Jewish either. The Jewish screenwriters’ contribution to the movie is dismal. In comparison to BlackKkKlansman’s incompetence, Black Panther is the second coming of The Maltese Falcon.

But the concocted Jewish subplot of BlacKkKlansman might get Spike Lee his first Best Director Oscar 28 years after he was widely accused of anti-Semitism for the Flatbush brothers in Mo’ Better Blues.

Deep down, Spike hates interracial marriage, especially black men marrying Jewish women. I believe, although I could be wrong, that Spike’s stepmother, Susan Kaplan, is Jewish. Spike’s beloved mother died of cancer when Spike was 17. Like many semi-orphans, Spike felt that his widower father, a jazz musician, should live monastically for the rest of his life. (Children naturally worry that their widowed parents’ remarriage will endanger their inheritance. Spike comes from an affluent family — his grandmother gave him $25,000 in the mid-1980s to make his first movie.) But Bill Lee, still alive today in his 90s, thought his son’s feelings were unreasonable.

“Can You Ever Forgive Me” was too homosexual-cultish for my taste, although Richard E. Grant, who isn’t Jewish, was wonderful.

Vice features superb acting by Christian Bale, Amy Adams, and Sam Rockwell, but Adam McKay’s writing and directing is horrible. Nobody Jewish can take either the credit or blame for Vice.

Bohemian Rhapsody is adequately good. Director Brian May got #MeTooed partway through. But the movie really belongs to Rami Malek, a Coptic Christian from my old high school, as Parsi singer Freddie Mercury, and doctor of astrophysics Dr. Brian May, Queen’s guitarist, for insisting upon a reasonably realistic telling of the tale.

The Death of Stalin didn’t get any Oscar nominations, although Jason Isaacs as Marshall Zhukov as a hearty Yorkshireman was a blast.

 
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  1. Wow, I wouldn’t have even known, much less cared, that it was Oscar Sunday if you hadn’t mentioned it. Ignorance was bliss. Now my day is shot.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    Woke and broke: Oscars resort to purging rather than risking going off script

    The organizers now live in a such a state of fear of causing offence that it’s going ahead without a host this year. Comedian Kevin Hart was going to take on the low-reward, high-risk gig, but someone unearthed homophobic tweets he’d sent back in 2010, so that was the end of that, and he stepped down.

    In some ways, I was impressed how ahead of his time Hart was. There can’t have been many people who had spotted Twitter’s potential for bigotry all the way back in 2010!

    Personally, I’m waiting for a remake of ‘Back to the Future’ where, after being sacked over an inappropriate photograph taken decades earlier, Marty McFly takes his DeLorean back in time to burn all the copies of his high-school yearbook and assassinate the inventors of Twitter. Now THAT would be a film deserving of an Oscar.

    Anyway, I digress. The response from the organizers of the Oscar committee over Hart’s decision to step down in the face of the now-familiar public outrage was not to replace him, but to have no host at all. That is a reaction in the best traditions of freedom of expression; if you can’t find someone to say the right thing just purge the position altogether. It’s an authoritarian tactic that has always worked so well in the past.

    Instead we’ll be treated to a string of actors presenting individual awards in a way they do best, reading the words from a script. That’s the official script, not the unwritten one which everyone is expected to know off by heart so as not to offend.
     
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Wow, I wouldn’t have even known, much less cared, that it was Oscar Sunday if you hadn’t mentioned it. Ignorance was bliss. Now my day is shot.

     

    Is the Academy on the lunar calendar? I always thought this came a little later, closer to Easter rather than before Ash Wednesday. (Not that any of these people fast, except perhaps the vegans.)

    That shows just how much attention I pay to the whole thing.

    I do suspect that, like with the Grammys and Wikipedia, the attention-getting categories are a joke, but the lesser-known, particularly technical, ones are the domain of people who know something and can mostly be trusted. A form of Conquest's Law.
  2. @The Alarmist
    Wow, I wouldn't have even known, much less cared, that it was Oscar Sunday if you hadn't mentioned it. Ignorance was bliss. Now my day is shot.

    Woke and broke: Oscars resort to purging rather than risking going off script

    The organizers now live in a such a state of fear of causing offence that it’s going ahead without a host this year. Comedian Kevin Hart was going to take on the low-reward, high-risk gig, but someone unearthed homophobic tweets he’d sent back in 2010, so that was the end of that, and he stepped down.

    In some ways, I was impressed how ahead of his time Hart was. There can’t have been many people who had spotted Twitter’s potential for bigotry all the way back in 2010!

    Personally, I’m waiting for a remake of ‘Back to the Future’ where, after being sacked over an inappropriate photograph taken decades earlier, Marty McFly takes his DeLorean back in time to burn all the copies of his high-school yearbook and assassinate the inventors of Twitter. Now THAT would be a film deserving of an Oscar.

    Anyway, I digress. The response from the organizers of the Oscar committee over Hart’s decision to step down in the face of the now-familiar public outrage was not to replace him, but to have no host at all. That is a reaction in the best traditions of freedom of expression; if you can’t find someone to say the right thing just purge the position altogether. It’s an authoritarian tactic that has always worked so well in the past.

    Instead we’ll be treated to a string of actors presenting individual awards in a way they do best, reading the words from a script. That’s the official script, not the unwritten one which everyone is expected to know off by heart so as not to offend.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    Kevin Hart seems like a good bloke. He is hard working, self-effacing and basically stays apolitical. He seems to prefer mixing humour and pathos to scolding his audience. I suppose he had to be unpersoned at some point.
    , @Trevor H.
    Part of the problem is that (according to the precepts of the Woke Stack) a black man may only be replaced with a black woman. This leaves fairly few options if they want anyone to watch at all.

    Something similar happened when our schools supervisor--a black man for whom we had to pay mightily--moved on to a political sinecure. Since his performance had been mediocre at best, it made little sense to boost the salary even further for diminishing results.

    So we cut the salary by 50% (essentially back to where it had been before our little experiment) and hired a white male who's doing a great job and actually moving us closer to our goals.

    No one's daring to talk about any of the implications, but the good thing is that we've demonstrated our racial-cultural bona fides for the time being, and can actually get down to work for awhile.

    , @donut
    If you could go back in time would you strangle the infant Jack Dorsey in his crib ?
    , @JimB
    Public figures should hire PR companies to do all their social media posts. Seriously, nobody cares what Jennifer Lawrence thinks about Jussie Smollett or Brett Kavanaugh. Men want to see her anatomy, and women want to see what designer dress she’s wearing. Why alienate potential fans?
    , @Mark F.
    "Roma " was good, but very art house. Not for everyone. Stick with it, the ending is moving. "Green Book" was enjoyable, but pretty clichéd and predictable. "Bohemian Rhapsody" was entertaining. "First Man" was extremely good. "Black Klansman" is Spike Lee informing us the Klan is very bad. Thanks Spike, I didn't know that. Spike thought "Green Book" was racist and threw a tantrum. It's not easy being purple. Olivia Coleman is always wonderful, of course.
  3. We have fallen from grace as a nation.

    Oscars 1971 : Sammy Davis & Issac Hayes.

    Oscars 2019 : Jussie is out on bail.

  4. I think you made a typographical error. I don’t think Brian May directed the film or got ousted (wasn’t it Brian Singer?).

    By all means delete this comment; I just hoped to he helpful.

  5. Jared talks the talk, Stephen walks the walk, Part Two:

    • Replies: @interesting
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DVoL-1gQgU
  6. I have a friend who tries to remain intellectual in her tastes. She often invites me to higher-brow films. Annoyingly, when I look them up, the summary always reads like a sermon of bizarre “current year” issues. This usually means a ridiculously simplistic morality play with a lot of still camera work. I’d rather get drunk and watch The Avengers for the flashing lights; or General Zhukov no nonsensing Beria.

    My friend has now recognised this and tries to find clever-seeming films that aren’t limited in this way, but to no success.

    I rather hoped that Black Panther would be the reductio ad adsurdam of this trend. That by 1-2 punching with low brow styling and storyline, it might make people notice…but it doesn’t seem so. Perhaps if it wins?

    • Replies: @Apollo
    Dude, a girl just wants to take you to the movies. Quit thinking about it so much!
    , @Tyrion 2
    Even the Guardian is noticing.

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/feb/23/oscars-life-support-academy-mess

    For a film, as well as a figure, to survive current conditions, a social message is compulsory. A Star is Born was considered a shoo-in for best picture six months ago. Now it has no chance, for it cannot be tethered to a political bandwagon. It’s an insular story about the fabulousness of showbiz – a subject that would, until recently, have been catnip to the Academy, but is insufficient today. You need confidence to celebrate yourself so explicitly, and the Oscars are a gibbering mess. The film that will win, Roma, acquits Oscar voters on artistic grounds: foreign-language, black and white, long and resolutely unsexy. It is just political enough: set in a country under attack by Trump, sympathetic to a class and ethnicity of domestic workers to whom white Californian artistic types could feel especially indebted. That it is also the best film on the list is coincidental.
  7. In comparison to BlackKkKlansman’s incompetence, Black Panther is the second coming of The Maltese Falcon.

    That may be but at least BlackKKKlansman is actual Oscar Bait. It’s like having a competition for best in breed for German Shepard’s and pointing out how much more you like a nice Persian cat to a particularly sickly German Shepard, it’s a contest for best German Shepard. (You don’t even have to agree with the terms of best breed like disgusting back deformations or even like German Shepard)

    Black Panther is probably the only best picture nominee to not have any accompanying nominations for acting, cinematography or directing. It just has some for costumes and soundtrack. (Because of the novelty of hip hop soundtrack that is actually a pretty bad hip hop soundtrack.)

    This is up for best song. I don’t get it, it seems like a bad mashup of a lot of better songs, very forgettable. But it was the ‘Black Panther song’ so therefore it ‘had significance to the black community’.

    You don’t have to agree with the pretentious of Oscar considerations to find Black Panther the more objectionable nomination, even if it is a better and more interesting film. (That’s hardly what the Oscars is about!) At least BlackKKKlansman pretends to be a ‘serious’ film.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    The novelty of a hip-hop soundtrackfoe the Oscars? Ia this another clever witticism inime with Mr. Sailer's motif that its always fifty years ago? Like the need for a Negro president to show racism and lynchings can maybe, finally, become a thing of the past?

    But maybe the Oscar didn't count because it was won by a white guy who is better at hip-hop than most any black person, and the soundtrack he created is actually compelling and integral to the film, instead of politically correct, SJW propoganda dressed up as mostly bad music?

    Actually, it's even worse, since the folm and the music both emphasised overcoming horrible circumstances no fault of one'd own by perseverence, self-reliance, and responsibility for loved ones unable to care for themselves. No mention of looking to The Man for salvation (although prayers to God are there – yikes!).

    https://youtu.be/gQalFjdOKIs

    https://youtu.be/O2_PAW_8fos

    But it won an Oscar, perplexing and pissing off Barbra Streisand to no end. That was a different eon, only about twenty years back. A couple decades earlier still, some actress with no business singing butchered a piece called "Take a Look at Me Now," apparently because the geriatric academy had never heard of the affable, hardworking British guy who wrote and sang it himself.

    The academy just likes being clueless even when they've a clue; it's how they roll. I haven't watched an awards show in more than twenty years. I think most of us with lives reach a point when we haven't heard if half the people or works involved in these things and just ignore them, as the heady days when as teenagers with the time for it we knew all the details and excitedly watched the whole thing waiting for out favourites to perform. They'venalso suffered from dilution: The BET Awards; The Video Music Awards; The MTV Movie Awards; the Golden Globes; the People's Choice (which sounds hilariously communist, or like the sibriquet of a corny wrestler); the American Music Awards, the stalwart Emmys, Grammys, Tonys, and Oscars; the Espys; the Academy of Country Music Awards, and on and on. I'm pretty aure at this point Dickie's Barbecue & That Blonde Girl At The Safeway have an annual awards show carried on primetime television. Yeesh.
  8. @Tyrion 2
    I have a friend who tries to remain intellectual in her tastes. She often invites me to higher-brow films. Annoyingly, when I look them up, the summary always reads like a sermon of bizarre "current year" issues. This usually means a ridiculously simplistic morality play with a lot of still camera work. I'd rather get drunk and watch The Avengers for the flashing lights; or General Zhukov no nonsensing Beria.

    My friend has now recognised this and tries to find clever-seeming films that aren't limited in this way, but to no success.

    I rather hoped that Black Panther would be the reductio ad adsurdam of this trend. That by 1-2 punching with low brow styling and storyline, it might make people notice...but it doesn't seem so. Perhaps if it wins?

    Dude, a girl just wants to take you to the movies. Quit thinking about it so much!

  9. @El Dato
    Woke and broke: Oscars resort to purging rather than risking going off script

    The organizers now live in a such a state of fear of causing offence that it’s going ahead without a host this year. Comedian Kevin Hart was going to take on the low-reward, high-risk gig, but someone unearthed homophobic tweets he’d sent back in 2010, so that was the end of that, and he stepped down.

    In some ways, I was impressed how ahead of his time Hart was. There can’t have been many people who had spotted Twitter’s potential for bigotry all the way back in 2010!

    Personally, I’m waiting for a remake of ‘Back to the Future’ where, after being sacked over an inappropriate photograph taken decades earlier, Marty McFly takes his DeLorean back in time to burn all the copies of his high-school yearbook and assassinate the inventors of Twitter. Now THAT would be a film deserving of an Oscar.

    Anyway, I digress. The response from the organizers of the Oscar committee over Hart’s decision to step down in the face of the now-familiar public outrage was not to replace him, but to have no host at all. That is a reaction in the best traditions of freedom of expression; if you can’t find someone to say the right thing just purge the position altogether. It’s an authoritarian tactic that has always worked so well in the past.

    Instead we’ll be treated to a string of actors presenting individual awards in a way they do best, reading the words from a script. That’s the official script, not the unwritten one which everyone is expected to know off by heart so as not to offend.
     

    Kevin Hart seems like a good bloke. He is hard working, self-effacing and basically stays apolitical. He seems to prefer mixing humour and pathos to scolding his audience. I suppose he had to be unpersoned at some point.

  10. Patronize the best in Hollywood, and you still help sustain the worst.

    Flush it all — twice.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    I still don’t understand why my comments often swirl around in moderation as others pile up.
  11. @Tyrion 2
    I have a friend who tries to remain intellectual in her tastes. She often invites me to higher-brow films. Annoyingly, when I look them up, the summary always reads like a sermon of bizarre "current year" issues. This usually means a ridiculously simplistic morality play with a lot of still camera work. I'd rather get drunk and watch The Avengers for the flashing lights; or General Zhukov no nonsensing Beria.

    My friend has now recognised this and tries to find clever-seeming films that aren't limited in this way, but to no success.

    I rather hoped that Black Panther would be the reductio ad adsurdam of this trend. That by 1-2 punching with low brow styling and storyline, it might make people notice...but it doesn't seem so. Perhaps if it wins?

    Even the Guardian is noticing.

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/feb/23/oscars-life-support-academy-mess

    For a film, as well as a figure, to survive current conditions, a social message is compulsory. A Star is Born was considered a shoo-in for best picture six months ago. Now it has no chance, for it cannot be tethered to a political bandwagon. It’s an insular story about the fabulousness of showbiz – a subject that would, until recently, have been catnip to the Academy, but is insufficient today. You need confidence to celebrate yourself so explicitly, and the Oscars are a gibbering mess. The film that will win, Roma, acquits Oscar voters on artistic grounds: foreign-language, black and white, long and resolutely unsexy. It is just political enough: set in a country under attack by Trump, sympathetic to a class and ethnicity of domestic workers to whom white Californian artistic types could feel especially indebted. That it is also the best film on the list is coincidental.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    The main thing I got from the Grauniad article was a nice white pill that they are having money trouble, which warmed my heart.

    Apart from that, they notice that Oscar winners are getting older. I think it's basically baby boomers clinging on to power and the icons that they can recognize and make them happy. Kind of like the movie RBG perhaps. As the grim reaper inexorably comes for the boomers as well, things will begin to be different for the rest of us.
    , @Lot
    "Roma, acquits Oscar voters on artistic grounds: foreign-language, black and white"

    I find it hard to watch movies in black in white.

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.
    , @inertial

    [...] set in a country under attack by Trump.
     
    Syria? Afghanistan? Venezuela?

    Oh, I see. It's Mexico.

    Building a wall on a country's border is attacking it; but actually attacking it is bringing democracy or something.
  12. I was disappointed that smollett wasn’t up for best hate hoax until I realized we have to wait until this time next year since his production was in 2019. He could win multiple categories:
    Best Director of a hate hoax
    Best actor in a hate hoax
    Best post production denial of your production
    Etc.

    • LOL: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I was disappointed that smollett wasn’t up for best hate hoax until I realized we have to wait until this time next year since his production was in 2019
     
    But it wasn't caught on camera! It will have to wait for the Tonys.
  13. If a film was made after 1966, it’d probably poor.

  14. Edit:The director of Bohemian Rhapsody was Bryan Singer, not Brian May.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Bryan May controlled a lot of the song rights and thus, with the drummer, had a lot of influence in shaping the movie to be less Woke than you'd expect.
  15. @El Dato
    Woke and broke: Oscars resort to purging rather than risking going off script

    The organizers now live in a such a state of fear of causing offence that it’s going ahead without a host this year. Comedian Kevin Hart was going to take on the low-reward, high-risk gig, but someone unearthed homophobic tweets he’d sent back in 2010, so that was the end of that, and he stepped down.

    In some ways, I was impressed how ahead of his time Hart was. There can’t have been many people who had spotted Twitter’s potential for bigotry all the way back in 2010!

    Personally, I’m waiting for a remake of ‘Back to the Future’ where, after being sacked over an inappropriate photograph taken decades earlier, Marty McFly takes his DeLorean back in time to burn all the copies of his high-school yearbook and assassinate the inventors of Twitter. Now THAT would be a film deserving of an Oscar.

    Anyway, I digress. The response from the organizers of the Oscar committee over Hart’s decision to step down in the face of the now-familiar public outrage was not to replace him, but to have no host at all. That is a reaction in the best traditions of freedom of expression; if you can’t find someone to say the right thing just purge the position altogether. It’s an authoritarian tactic that has always worked so well in the past.

    Instead we’ll be treated to a string of actors presenting individual awards in a way they do best, reading the words from a script. That’s the official script, not the unwritten one which everyone is expected to know off by heart so as not to offend.
     

    Part of the problem is that (according to the precepts of the Woke Stack) a black man may only be replaced with a black woman. This leaves fairly few options if they want anyone to watch at all.

    Something similar happened when our schools supervisor–a black man for whom we had to pay mightily–moved on to a political sinecure. Since his performance had been mediocre at best, it made little sense to boost the salary even further for diminishing results.

    So we cut the salary by 50% (essentially back to where it had been before our little experiment) and hired a white male who’s doing a great job and actually moving us closer to our goals.

    No one’s daring to talk about any of the implications, but the good thing is that we’ve demonstrated our racial-cultural bona fides for the time being, and can actually get down to work for awhile.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Isn’t that how NFL head coaching works?
  16. Anon[210] • Disclaimer says:

    Justin Hurwitz’s score for First Man is fine, but Moon movie scores have to compete against the two Strausses of 2001. The only outer space movie to top 2001 in scoring was von Trier’s Melancholia, which used Wagner’s epochal prelude to Tristan und Isolde.

    Long term, a movie is better off having a great original score, rather than a classical chestnut.

    Not every director has the bandwidth to, along with everything else he has to do, work with a score composer. Ennio Morricone has a sort of informal autobiography coming out in which he bitches about being ignored by directors, or dealing with mercurial directors, or being micromanaged.

    http://global.oup.com/academic/covers/uk/pop-up/9780190681012

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2019/feb/23/ennio-morricone-composer-film-makers-directors-cliches-music

    Sergio Leone comes off pretty well in the book.

    By the way, the Danish National Symphony Orchestra’s performance of Morricone’s Leone themes included a guy in a noose hanging from the right balcony. They’re touring with this repertory. I wonder if any U.S. appearances will have the noose.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Sergio Leone and Ennio Morricone were a match made in heaven. Each benefited greatly from the artistry of the other in those first three westerns.

    I was surprised to learn that Morricone had scored 450 films, as I only was conscious of a few. His music for Leone's not-very-memorable "Once Upon a Time in America" was also not very memorable.

    , @e
    I've always loved this theme and watch this youtube. Did you catch the guns as earrings in the "wah, wah" singer's ears? Nice touch.
    , @Olorin
    At a glance, and in this context, I thought that the typographically styled caption on the left of that frame was Hollywood's latest pronouncement on the pretty white gal on the right.
  17. “Can You Ever Forgive Me” was too homosexual-cultish for my taste, although Richard E. Grant, who isn’t Jewish, was wonderful.

    I can never understand all this homo-crap in the media? Ok, I understand it’s creation, I can never understand who the hell watches it.

    I didn’t allow my kids to watch TV growing up. So I was out of “current year” media loop a bit for 20 years, but when I peaked back in in retirement a few years back, wow, fags everywhere! What normal person wants to see any of that? I see that crap coming–click. I’m just a normal guy, with normal healthy disgust reflex. I can’t be the only one.

    I look forward to the day when medical science figures this out and we can be done with it. Future generations will look back on this age–fags, fats+tats–and want to barf. (What the hell was wrong with those primitives!)

    • Replies: @El Dato

    I look forward to the day when medical science figures this out and we can be done with it. Future generations will look back on this age–fags, fats+tats–and want to barf. (What the hell was wrong with those primitives!)
     
    In "The Forever War" Joe Haldeman predicts that the future will be more state-enforced homosexuality and evidently more war/socialism against constructed enemies.

    Brace yourself!
    , @Anonymous
    I didn’t allow my kids to watch TV growing up.

    How were you able to pull that off? Did your children resist it? Did it mot make them outcasts among their peers?
    , @Anonymous
    "I look forward to the day when medical science figures this out and we can be done with it. Future generations will look back on this age–fags, fats+tats–and want to barf. (What the hell was wrong with those primitives)"

    This is a very important question. Not only about human sexuality, but also about every important human trait. In the long term, the solution of all human problems will be solved through the modulation of children without defects and limitations. It will have deep impact in human societies. Including the discussion about immigration. The blacks will not be psychologically blacks anymore. They certainly will become more like whites, with more self-control and higher IQ.
    At the end of the day, eugenics will prevail, not the control of immigration.
    , @Jack Hanson
    I hate to break it to you but "medical science" is often at the forefront of this nonsense.
    , @Old Prude
    Yeah. When ever the effete weather"man"comes on channel 6, I flip to 8 to watch the fat lady. Much preferable. Channel 7 is out of Boston, so the weather is a bit irrelevant, but the sweet young cheesecake in the dress is balm to the eyes.
  18. The list of Oscar nominees is so hilariously bad a collection of films one is left almost speechless at the enormity of the lack of taste and judgement involved. Obviously the changes in the nominating process over the last few years haven’t worked out for the best. Not to mention that a collection of the most self-absorbed, narcissistic, and desperately under0-educated fools in the history of mankind getting together for a self congratulation orgy is always an unappealing process………..

    There may have actually been a time when Hollywood wanted to be proud of its work. I understand in the studio days many of those film Moguls were deadly serious about the best scripts, actors, directors, cameramen and so forth that money could buy, leading to the best films that they could make. And it showed in the quality of the films.

    Now film makers chief concern is their overweening moral posturing, and the filmmaker’s unending capitulations of obvious moral superiority to the film goer.

    Why any normal decent person would tolerate their morally abscessed garbage for even one second is beyond me. That all of you commenting one these films indicates that you bothered to watch them is something you need to come to grips with. (For the record, of all those films I have seen First Man and Ballad, primarily because the Directors have made some good films. And some bad ones too- I found Fargo to be pretty loathsome.) So here is an Idea: Stop watching crap! Stop talking about crap. Stop supporting crap. Let Hollywood die the death it deserves, from a million cuts of film goer indifference.

    • Agree: Bruce County, BB753
  19. You wrote “Brian May” twice, though the director of Bohemian Rhapsody is surnamed Singer.

    I haven’t read the original memoir, but my understanding is that the actual attack plotted (but never attempted) in Black Klansman was the firebombing of a gay bar. I don’t know if that angle was removed because Spike wasn’t interested in gays as the targets of the KKK or just because there wouldn’t be room for that with the focus on black student radicals.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  20. @Tyrion 2
    Even the Guardian is noticing.

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/feb/23/oscars-life-support-academy-mess

    For a film, as well as a figure, to survive current conditions, a social message is compulsory. A Star is Born was considered a shoo-in for best picture six months ago. Now it has no chance, for it cannot be tethered to a political bandwagon. It’s an insular story about the fabulousness of showbiz – a subject that would, until recently, have been catnip to the Academy, but is insufficient today. You need confidence to celebrate yourself so explicitly, and the Oscars are a gibbering mess. The film that will win, Roma, acquits Oscar voters on artistic grounds: foreign-language, black and white, long and resolutely unsexy. It is just political enough: set in a country under attack by Trump, sympathetic to a class and ethnicity of domestic workers to whom white Californian artistic types could feel especially indebted. That it is also the best film on the list is coincidental.

    The main thing I got from the Grauniad article was a nice white pill that they are having money trouble, which warmed my heart.

    Apart from that, they notice that Oscar winners are getting older. I think it’s basically baby boomers clinging on to power and the icons that they can recognize and make them happy. Kind of like the movie RBG perhaps. As the grim reaper inexorably comes for the boomers as well, things will begin to be different for the rest of us.

  21. @anonymous
    Patronize the best in Hollywood, and you still help sustain the worst.

    Flush it all — twice.

    I still don’t understand why my comments often swirl around in moderation as others pile up.

    • Replies: @Bruce County
    I asked the same thing.. I thought maybe i was writing in Ebonics or Swahili..
  22. The Ruskies know what’s up with the Oscars.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    FWIW, the subtitles are of remarkably high quality.
  23. @AnotherDad

    “Can You Ever Forgive Me” was too homosexual-cultish for my taste, although Richard E. Grant, who isn’t Jewish, was wonderful.
     
    I can never understand all this homo-crap in the media? Ok, I understand it's creation, I can never understand who the hell watches it.

    I didn't allow my kids to watch TV growing up. So I was out of "current year" media loop a bit for 20 years, but when I peaked back in in retirement a few years back, wow, fags everywhere! What normal person wants to see any of that? I see that crap coming--click. I'm just a normal guy, with normal healthy disgust reflex. I can't be the only one.

    I look forward to the day when medical science figures this out and we can be done with it. Future generations will look back on this age--fags, fats+tats--and want to barf. (What the hell was wrong with those primitives!)

    I look forward to the day when medical science figures this out and we can be done with it. Future generations will look back on this age–fags, fats+tats–and want to barf. (What the hell was wrong with those primitives!)

    In “The Forever War” Joe Haldeman predicts that the future will be more state-enforced homosexuality and evidently more war/socialism against constructed enemies.

    Brace yourself!

  24. Anonymous[376] • Disclaimer says:

    Not a good year for movies, so not a good year for Jews in the movie business.

    What is the logic here? If it’s not a good year for movies, it’s not a good year for Jews in the movie business?

    Couldn’t that be said of the individuals in the movie business who belong to any group? Why are you focusing on Jews?

  25. @AnotherDad

    “Can You Ever Forgive Me” was too homosexual-cultish for my taste, although Richard E. Grant, who isn’t Jewish, was wonderful.
     
    I can never understand all this homo-crap in the media? Ok, I understand it's creation, I can never understand who the hell watches it.

    I didn't allow my kids to watch TV growing up. So I was out of "current year" media loop a bit for 20 years, but when I peaked back in in retirement a few years back, wow, fags everywhere! What normal person wants to see any of that? I see that crap coming--click. I'm just a normal guy, with normal healthy disgust reflex. I can't be the only one.

    I look forward to the day when medical science figures this out and we can be done with it. Future generations will look back on this age--fags, fats+tats--and want to barf. (What the hell was wrong with those primitives!)

    I didn’t allow my kids to watch TV growing up.

    How were you able to pull that off? Did your children resist it? Did it mot make them outcasts among their peers?

  26. I’ve got a couple late entrants for supporting actor

    Warning: language

  27. Groundbreaking year for Jews in football though, thanks based Edelman

  28. Bryan Singer (who was adopted into a Jewish family; not sure if he is biologically Jewish) was the original director of Bohemian Rhapsody, not Brian May.

    Singer was recently #MeTooed. In fact serious allegations against him date back to 1997, with other lawsuits in 2014, before Hollywood started taking them “seriously” (LOL). But the reported reason he was terminated was because of erratic behavior during production “B.R.” That behavior may have caused by his awareness of a new investigation into his sexual misconduct.

  29. I’m a big movie buff, one who goes to the cinema 2-3 times per month at least, and among the Best Picture nominees, I have only seen THE FAVORITE (which was a pretty good movie, albeit overly degenerate, and not really Best Picture-level quality). I could imagine seeing GREEN BOOK. I probably never will, but the mix of an artsy Black homosexual who puts on aristocratic airs, the segregated Deep South, and a “wise guy” bodyguard, sounds kinda funny. I’d probably want to see it…if it were made 10-20 years ago. But these days it may be just a little too woke for yours truly.

    Other than for VICE (which I skipped based on your review), the other films seem, well…”uninteresting” would almost be a compliment. I don’t see how the recent trend of nominating a bunch of shitty movies every year for Best Picture really works out for Hollywood, but I guess we’ll all be finding out.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Since you are a movie buff, let me ask you if you saw Liam Neesom's latest whose title escapes me right now. I liked the Taken series.
  30. Anonymous[194] • Disclaimer says:

    “I look forward to the day when medical science figures this out and we can be done with it. Future generations will look back on this age–fags, fats+tats–and want to barf. (What the hell was wrong with those primitives!”

    Medical science is working very hard to come up with better ways to take biological men and turn then into women (and vice-versa). What it is absolutely not allowed to do is figure out why the hell biological men want to become women (and vice-versa) and produce a cure. That is a hate crime. And we won’t even begin to go near figuring out how to stop same-sex attraction. Figuring out how to stop that is considered equivalent to genocide. (Speaking of Bryan Singer, that was exactly the theme of one of the X-Men movies: a scientist who had a cure for homo…superheroism.)

    About two decades ago, iirc, there was a scientist, later outed as a fraud, who claimed to have found a gene that caused homosexuality. His first act was going to be patenting the gene to (somehow) prevent prenatal testing for homosexuality so that women could not abort them (“choice” and all that).

  31. Speaking of “Vice” and “Can You Ever Forgive Me”; can The Hackademy just, please, gib that glorified, gold-plated dildos to both of these honorary-chosen thespians :

    https://twitter.com/hashtag/Venezuela?src=hash

  32. I get my entertainment from games now, they are not as PC as movies. Metro Exodus is pretty good:

  33. “Children naturally worry that their widowed parents’ remarriage will endanger their inheritance.”

    Because they get shafted – a lot. And maybe not even intentionally. One parent dies; other parent remarries, then dies. Even if the new step-parent is a decent sort and has a good relationship with them they may stick around and hang on to the money, property and mementos for an extra decade or three. They may blow all the money, or just keep it even if they don’t need it (old people often feel very financially insecure, even when they clearly have far more money than they’ll ever need). If step-parents have children of their own then all bets are off.

    My brother-in-law’s step-mother spent almost all his dad’s money traveling the world until her health finally failed her. My two cousins saw their mother remarry just a few years before she was diagnosed with cancer and died. Her husband wouldn’t even part with mementos that meant nothing to him. They disappeared somewhere, given to his own children or sold off at a yard sale, for all they know.

    I have other cousins currently in a different situation. Their father and his mother (our grandmother) are both probably going to die soon. If grandma goes first, the their dad dies, then their stepmother (a good woman, to be sure) gets all their share of our grandparents money. If dad goes first, then grandma, then they will get the inheritance. Two of the three of them have young families and could really benefit from the extra money. Our grandmother refuses to rewrite the will, mostly because she doesn’t want to acknowledge that my uncle is probably going to die. They are great children to their father, so it’s sad that they almost have to wish for their dad to die first in order to get what should go to them anyway, no matter which order they die in.

    • Agree: Lot
    • Replies: @donut
    My step mother never even told me my father had died although she knew where I lived and how to contact me .
    , @Kildare

    (old people often feel very financially insecure, even when they clearly have far more money than they’ll ever need)
     
    How much would that be? If you have a stroke, and need managed home care, it'll cost you plenty. I have a relative who is elderly, worth about $2M, and is suffering from Alzheimer’s. His in-home care is $17K a month, on top of all his other bills. If he lingers on the next 10 years, it'll be a financial white knuckler to the finish line for his family.

    When you’re crippled by a stroke, or suffering from Alzheimer's, you don’t want to end up a ward of the state. Competent privately paid health care givers are almost impossible to find. Would you like to hand your crippled ass to a STATE paid health worker? Do you believe in Magic?

    Old people with common sense sock away money for good reason. Dying is a shitty enough process without having to endure the wrath of an underpaid Somoan who hates you at 2 in the morning.
    , @LondonBob
    Remembering reading that in researching old wills from the 16th and 17th century, when people died early a lot, that the parents went to great extents to ensure their money went to their biological offspring, not someone else's if the surviving spouse remarried, as they often did.
    , @The preferred nomenclature is...
    My CPA practice has a heavy focus in the estate and trust area. In my experience, mixed families always in end in a dispute after the wealth creator dies.

    Best suggestion, if you want your money to go to your biological children, have a very well-written trust instrument, have the step-spouse (the one without the money) have their own separate independent counsel review the document. Then have the non-money spouse sign off on the document in conjunction with their counsel and their children that are not from the moneyed spouse. And do all this while in good health. I'd also renew those signatures annually if the pot is big enough.
  34. The most entertaining thing about Oscar Sunday isn’t the Oscars. The morning political shows are full of people running around with their hair on fire over the upcoming Mueller report. Based on their reactions it suggests that the report will be that essentially there is nothing there implicating Trump in “muRussian” collusion. They are already turning their hopes to Democrat prosecutors trying to indict Trump for pre-Presidential financial shenanigans, and on demanding that Mueller release the entire content of the investigation so it can be mined for nuggets that will prove the moon landings were a hoax.

  35. Camille Paglia in the Hollywood Reporter:

    https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/camille-paglia-sexism-star-is-born-films-guest-column-1186741

    The highlight of the year from Hollywood was Joe Atwill dubbing Harvey as “Fatty” Weinstein on the powers principalities podcast.

    (According to Karina Longworth there wasn’t very much evidence against Arbuckle although he was a skank but Hollywood has always been full of skanks so that part was never news.)

    http://www.youmustrememberthispodcast.com/episodes/2018/7/10/roscoe-fatty-arbuckle-and-virginia-rappe-fake-news-fact-checking-hollywood-babylon-episode-3

    Also: Longworth’s average podcast is better than the average Hollywood movie although some people do not like her distinctive (Scarsdale?) accent.

  36. another old time novelist, Stewart Edward White. White’s grand wagon train story is adapted almost word for word from that forgotten writer of Westerns,

    The Coen brothers’ ending to the story is similar to that which Stewart Edward White wrote, but the set-up, characters, and relationships are quite different. The original story was put up on Slate, with the usual warnings about its racism, misogyny, and “proto-incel” attitudes toward women.

    https://slate.com/culture/2018/11/ballad-buster-scruggs-coen-brothers-steward-edward-white-girl-gal-rattled-full-text.html

  37. Cold War is a great looking pretty good story that is a brutal takedown of communism, all of which adds up to a very solid film. The director’s barely-Jewishness sounds like a fortunate revelation for him professionally, rather than an actual cultural/religious/political/legal/significant-genetic influence. But he’s claimable:

    “In his late teens, he learned that his paternal grandmother was Jewish and had died in Auschwitz.”

  38. @El Dato
    Woke and broke: Oscars resort to purging rather than risking going off script

    The organizers now live in a such a state of fear of causing offence that it’s going ahead without a host this year. Comedian Kevin Hart was going to take on the low-reward, high-risk gig, but someone unearthed homophobic tweets he’d sent back in 2010, so that was the end of that, and he stepped down.

    In some ways, I was impressed how ahead of his time Hart was. There can’t have been many people who had spotted Twitter’s potential for bigotry all the way back in 2010!

    Personally, I’m waiting for a remake of ‘Back to the Future’ where, after being sacked over an inappropriate photograph taken decades earlier, Marty McFly takes his DeLorean back in time to burn all the copies of his high-school yearbook and assassinate the inventors of Twitter. Now THAT would be a film deserving of an Oscar.

    Anyway, I digress. The response from the organizers of the Oscar committee over Hart’s decision to step down in the face of the now-familiar public outrage was not to replace him, but to have no host at all. That is a reaction in the best traditions of freedom of expression; if you can’t find someone to say the right thing just purge the position altogether. It’s an authoritarian tactic that has always worked so well in the past.

    Instead we’ll be treated to a string of actors presenting individual awards in a way they do best, reading the words from a script. That’s the official script, not the unwritten one which everyone is expected to know off by heart so as not to offend.
     

    If you could go back in time would you strangle the infant Jack Dorsey in his crib ?

    • Replies: @njguy73

    If you could go back in time would you strangle the infant Jack Dorsey in his crib ?
     
    No, if I could go back to 1976, I'd buy 100 shares of Walmart, place a bet on Seattle Slew to win the Triple Crown, and pitch a story to Hollywood about a teenage girl who falls in love with a vampire.
  39. @Wilkey
    "Children naturally worry that their widowed parents’ remarriage will endanger their inheritance."

    Because they get shafted - a lot. And maybe not even intentionally. One parent dies; other parent remarries, then dies. Even if the new step-parent is a decent sort and has a good relationship with them they may stick around and hang on to the money, property and mementos for an extra decade or three. They may blow all the money, or just keep it even if they don't need it (old people often feel very financially insecure, even when they clearly have far more money than they'll ever need). If step-parents have children of their own then all bets are off.

    My brother-in-law's step-mother spent almost all his dad's money traveling the world until her health finally failed her. My two cousins saw their mother remarry just a few years before she was diagnosed with cancer and died. Her husband wouldn't even part with mementos that meant nothing to him. They disappeared somewhere, given to his own children or sold off at a yard sale, for all they know.

    I have other cousins currently in a different situation. Their father and his mother (our grandmother) are both probably going to die soon. If grandma goes first, the their dad dies, then their stepmother (a good woman, to be sure) gets all their share of our grandparents money. If dad goes first, then grandma, then they will get the inheritance. Two of the three of them have young families and could really benefit from the extra money. Our grandmother refuses to rewrite the will, mostly because she doesn't want to acknowledge that my uncle is probably going to die. They are great children to their father, so it's sad that they almost have to wish for their dad to die first in order to get what should go to them anyway, no matter which order they die in.

    My step mother never even told me my father had died although she knew where I lived and how to contact me .

  40. I saw a number of first-run movies last year – more than I usually do, and a few of them were not bad:

    Chappaquiddick – good all round.

    7 days at Entebbe – good until it fell apart at the end (a note to the director: historical thrillers don’t benefit from the addition of interperative dancing)

    Gosnell – good, actually much better than I had expected

    First Man – pretty good.

    I didn’t see a single movie I would call exceptional.

  41. @Tyrion 2
    Even the Guardian is noticing.

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/feb/23/oscars-life-support-academy-mess

    For a film, as well as a figure, to survive current conditions, a social message is compulsory. A Star is Born was considered a shoo-in for best picture six months ago. Now it has no chance, for it cannot be tethered to a political bandwagon. It’s an insular story about the fabulousness of showbiz – a subject that would, until recently, have been catnip to the Academy, but is insufficient today. You need confidence to celebrate yourself so explicitly, and the Oscars are a gibbering mess. The film that will win, Roma, acquits Oscar voters on artistic grounds: foreign-language, black and white, long and resolutely unsexy. It is just political enough: set in a country under attack by Trump, sympathetic to a class and ethnicity of domestic workers to whom white Californian artistic types could feel especially indebted. That it is also the best film on the list is coincidental.

    “Roma, acquits Oscar voters on artistic grounds: foreign-language, black and white”

    I find it hard to watch movies in black in white.

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I find it hard to watch movies in black in white.
     
    Then don't watch them.

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.
     
    Then you're a Philistine. And maybe we should fill in all of Van Gogh's pencil sketches with crayon, as if they were pages out of a child's coloring book.
    , @Wilkey
    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    Artistically I'm not sure that will ever come around. True "artists" will always insist that the original is sacrosanct. Given what we've seen with the bowdlerization of the original Star Wars trilogy, Tom & Jerry cartoons, etc., I think that's a hill worth dying on, even when the change just involves colorization. Besides, a good quality restored black and white version on a good quality TV isnt too hard on the eyes.

    Which brings up the elephant not in the room at this year's Oscars: Peter Jackson's by all reports astounding WW1 documentary "They Shall Not Grow Old." It is original footage of actual WW1 soldiers on the front lines. Not only is it colorized, but they brought in professional lip readers to figure out what the soldiers were saying. It's not up for a Best Documentary since it wasn't released in the proper theatres in time, but a year from now it should be making some noise. If it isn't then you can tell the Oscars are ruined.
    , @R.G. Camara

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.
     
    HEATHEN.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    I find it hard to watch movies in black in white.
     
    Do they still sell those special glasses in the back of comic books?

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.
     
    Because some underpaid West Hollywood hack is up to the level of Jean Renoir, James Wong Howe, and Nestor Almendros. Yeah, right.
    , @EliteCommInc.
    "Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea."


    Anyone colorizing anything originally produced in black and white has the wrong idea and has the wrong idea in every way the idea can be wrong.

    Destroys the history

    Destroys the clarity

    Fractures the reality
    , @Autochthon

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.
     
    https://youtu.be/L4NsQYlmvZM
    , @EliteCommInc.
    I am on the tail end of watching an entire weekend of Burn's and Allen, to colorize that series would be to demolish history, in the same way colorizing WWI and WWII documentary films wrecks so much more than the films themselves ---
  42. Don’t forget the half-Jewish Jussie Smolett’s performance in “The Nigerian Bros.”

  43. Watching Victoria on PBS instead. Great costumes, although they’re not yet up to Disraeli, whose family was Jewish.

    Does it count that Penge, the steward, seems to hate Catholics, particularly Irish Catholics?

  44. @Tyrion 2
    Even the Guardian is noticing.

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/feb/23/oscars-life-support-academy-mess

    For a film, as well as a figure, to survive current conditions, a social message is compulsory. A Star is Born was considered a shoo-in for best picture six months ago. Now it has no chance, for it cannot be tethered to a political bandwagon. It’s an insular story about the fabulousness of showbiz – a subject that would, until recently, have been catnip to the Academy, but is insufficient today. You need confidence to celebrate yourself so explicitly, and the Oscars are a gibbering mess. The film that will win, Roma, acquits Oscar voters on artistic grounds: foreign-language, black and white, long and resolutely unsexy. It is just political enough: set in a country under attack by Trump, sympathetic to a class and ethnicity of domestic workers to whom white Californian artistic types could feel especially indebted. That it is also the best film on the list is coincidental.

    […] set in a country under attack by Trump.

    Syria? Afghanistan? Venezuela?

    Oh, I see. It’s Mexico.

    Building a wall on a country’s border is attacking it; but actually attacking it is bringing democracy or something.

  45. Just found this…

    “Over the past decades most countries have made great inroads fighting homophobia and hate; however, the current divisive rhetoric seems to have taken us back to the 1970s,” Plastic Jesus argued. “So much of the Entertainment industry output comes from LGBTQ Individuals we should be celebrating it and not creating a hateful environment.” Hmmm. is this why maybe everyone is so sick of Hollywood. I remember a time in the past when there were only 2 genders and cowboys were white.

    https://www.msn.com/en-ca/entertainment/celebrity/gold-statue-of-kevin-hart-holding-rainbow-flag-erected-outside-of-oscars-venue/ar-BBTZyXV?li=AAggFp5

  46. I usually wait for movies to come to TV, so I can watch them in closed captioning and pause them for a snack break. We watched “Bohemian Rhapsody” and I will watch it again. Never a great fan of any rock band but a big fan of some songs, in this case the title song. The Freddy Mercury actor could be his clone. Enjoyable movie but I don’t think it wins anything.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    IRL, Malek doesn't look that much like Mercury, but they did a great job with the makeup - prosthetic nose, prosthetic teeth, hair, etc.

    https://s1.r29static.com//bin/entry/64c/680x816,85/2097805/image.webp
    , @Danindc
    I like watching w closed captions as well. I understand better and still follow along easily. Plus it sort of feels like reading so less guilt.
    , @R.G. Camara
    Queen wrote crowd-pleasers at a time when the big name bands were being artsy-fartsy and shooting for esoteric crap. Queen were lambasted during their day---the libelists at Rolling Stone famously called them "fascis rock" (????)----but Mike Myers helped revive them by putting them on the soundtrack to Wayne's World and making them a sing along in the opening scene, which reminded people (1) how much fun Queen was; and (2) how they really were worthy of being worshiped rock stars:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thyJOnasHVE

    , @Anonymous

    We watched “Bohemian Rhapsody” and I will watch it again.
     
    Why would you spend any time on this at all when you could be learning something?
  47. Anonymous[201] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad

    “Can You Ever Forgive Me” was too homosexual-cultish for my taste, although Richard E. Grant, who isn’t Jewish, was wonderful.
     
    I can never understand all this homo-crap in the media? Ok, I understand it's creation, I can never understand who the hell watches it.

    I didn't allow my kids to watch TV growing up. So I was out of "current year" media loop a bit for 20 years, but when I peaked back in in retirement a few years back, wow, fags everywhere! What normal person wants to see any of that? I see that crap coming--click. I'm just a normal guy, with normal healthy disgust reflex. I can't be the only one.

    I look forward to the day when medical science figures this out and we can be done with it. Future generations will look back on this age--fags, fats+tats--and want to barf. (What the hell was wrong with those primitives!)

    “I look forward to the day when medical science figures this out and we can be done with it. Future generations will look back on this age–fags, fats+tats–and want to barf. (What the hell was wrong with those primitives)”

    This is a very important question. Not only about human sexuality, but also about every important human trait. In the long term, the solution of all human problems will be solved through the modulation of children without defects and limitations. It will have deep impact in human societies. Including the discussion about immigration. The blacks will not be psychologically blacks anymore. They certainly will become more like whites, with more self-control and higher IQ.
    At the end of the day, eugenics will prevail, not the control of immigration.

  48. “Not a good year for movies”

    movies are over, very plainly. their peak is in the rear view mirror now. it took longer, because you have to be older to make good movies, versus music, where only men between 20 and 40 can make any music of value. european and jewish men up to 60 can still make a movie of any value. but those guys are almost all done now. once nolan is done, there won’t be a single movie of any value ever made again. it’s all comic book movies from now on, plus a unending supply of sundry non-comic book stuff of zero value, largely informed by cultural marxist doctrine.

    again, i ask my usual question. how does steve watch this detritus?

    but more than that now. movies suck. so it’s more than just watching people who hate you and hate your country. now you’re watching something more like a cable television version of movies.

    everywhere i go now, the background music is stuff from the 70s to the 90s, and very little from after 2000. movies are turning into the same thing. half the ‘new’ movies now are remakes or sequels of stuff from the peak of the movie era. their only other source of new material is from books or comic books. they have defaulted to converting books into movies.

    • Agree: Autochthon, Kylie
    • Replies: @Kaganovitch
    european and jewish men up to 60 can still make a movie of any value.

    Eastwood made good movies in his late seventies, and even his pushing ninety movies are above average
  49. @Buffalo Joe
    I usually wait for movies to come to TV, so I can watch them in closed captioning and pause them for a snack break. We watched "Bohemian Rhapsody" and I will watch it again. Never a great fan of any rock band but a big fan of some songs, in this case the title song. The Freddy Mercury actor could be his clone. Enjoyable movie but I don't think it wins anything.

    IRL, Malek doesn’t look that much like Mercury, but they did a great job with the makeup – prosthetic nose, prosthetic teeth, hair, etc.

    https://s1.r29static.com//bin/entry/64c/680×816,85/2097805/image.webp

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Jack, Protruding teeth were Mercury's most notable facial feature, so yes they are prosthetics. Did not know about the nose but hair is easily done. Better make up was Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill in "Darkest Hour."
    , @TelfoedJohn
    The prosthetic teeth were terrible. When Mercury sang he unselfconsciously pulled back his lips so you could see his teeth. When the actor sang, his mouth was not expressive, but frozen like a horse with botoxed lips. It came across as if the character was ashamed of his teeth, but it was probably just that the actor didn’t want to show the bad prosthetics,
  50. @Lot
    "Roma, acquits Oscar voters on artistic grounds: foreign-language, black and white"

    I find it hard to watch movies in black in white.

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    I find it hard to watch movies in black in white.

    Then don’t watch them.

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    Then you’re a Philistine. And maybe we should fill in all of Van Gogh’s pencil sketches with crayon, as if they were pages out of a child’s coloring book.

  51. OT but could someone experienced write a primer on how to become a Twitter troll? No, seriously. Almost everywhere I go now, I read stupid stuff but the disappearance of comment sections frustrates my natural impulse to stick something in the author’s eye.

    I see the Twitter logo, but I don’t understand some basics. Like, who will see my tweet? It seems the Twitter logo takes you to a general-purpose forum devoted to the publication as a whole, not to the specific article.

    I see Steve tweets, and famous people respond to him. Is that because Steve himself is (semi-)famous? Or would my eye-poking also be felt, even a little?

    • Replies: @res
    Hopefully someone more knowledgeable than I am will respond, but here are some basics.

    who will see my tweet?
     
    Your followers and the followers of anyone who retweets it. Plus anyone who looks for it directly (say through a blog post link).

    Is that because Steve himself is (semi-)famous?
     
    I would say yes. First, people have to see the tweet. Second, people have to feel the tweet is worth retweeting or responding to (or requires a response).

    Or would my eye-poking also be felt, even a little?
     
    The issue is who would feel it. If you tweet under your own name then people you know in real life (most likely to be early followers) would see it. Which may be good or bad, depending.

    If you tweet under a pseudonym it is probably harder to gain early followers.

    Beyond that, much depends on your ability to make trenchant observations which other people find worthwhile enough to retweet. iSteve is good at this which helps get his ideas passed along and in turn makes him more "famous" (a nice virtuous cycle).

    P.S. In depth background: https://blog.hootsuite.com/twitter-algorithm/
    , @Anonymous

    I see Steve tweets, and famous people respond to him. Is that because Steve himself is (semi-)famous? Or would my eye-poking also be felt, even a little?
     
    Go to the twitter feeds of famous people you wish to interact with, and reply to the tweet in question. Eye poking will likely be felt if they don't have an avalanche of replies to a particular tweet and they haven't muted or blocked you. Many, especially journalists, pundits, academics, and activists, read the replies to their own tweets.
    , @Ghost of Bull Moose
    I was on Twitter, but they 'temporarily' banned me when Roseanne retweeted one of my trolly tweets. She got in some trouble IRL as a result, but me they just suspended my sock puppet account. Twitter wanted 'more contact information' in order to reactivate me, but by then I was bored of Twitter so I didn't bother.

    People will engage you. The key is not to be too nasty or crazy or use profanity, because they will (understandably) block you. Michael Ian Black and I used to go back and forth quite a bit, but again, you can't just attack them. I had some random followers, Roger Stone(until he was banned), a couple of comics, a couple of NYTimes writers, some NYC media people and local politics people, because I'd tweet about local politics. Bill de Blasio's idiot spokesperson would @ me at 3 in the morning while I was asleep, he was probably drunk.

    The easiest people to troll are folks like the lady Steve posted about, who was complaining of Russian trolls. Think HuffPo writers or Teen Vogue think-piece authors. These (usually) ladies get very stroppy very easily, but they're not so good with the persiflage.

    There's a thing called 'ratio-ing' where packs of someone's fans fill your responses, giving you a bad 'ratio' or something. This is what the Chapo Trap House fans like to do, and they've swarmed a couple of conservative-leaning writers I know. But they are just extremely dumb pothead leftist mosquitos, and you get to decide who you want to respond to as well.

    If you're gonna be a twitter troll, have fun with it and keep it light. It can be mildly amusing, in the way that playing that Candy Crush game presumably is. It's a time suck, and I promise you no one has ever spent an hour and a half snarking at some antiFa dipshit on Twitter and afterwards thought, 'That was great, what a great use of my precious and finite time on earth.'

    One thing to know, iSteve will 'like' virtually anything you send to him, because he's a nice guy, and also he knows what Italian men know about compliments, that a 'like' costs you nothing so why be stingy.

    , @Lot
    Check my comment history on getting an AI made avatar and no-phone-number gmail account.

    Your troll will get 5x the followers if the avitar is of an attractive woman.

    Good luck and report back.
  52. @Buffalo Joe
    I usually wait for movies to come to TV, so I can watch them in closed captioning and pause them for a snack break. We watched "Bohemian Rhapsody" and I will watch it again. Never a great fan of any rock band but a big fan of some songs, in this case the title song. The Freddy Mercury actor could be his clone. Enjoyable movie but I don't think it wins anything.

    I like watching w closed captions as well. I understand better and still follow along easily. Plus it sort of feels like reading so less guilt.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  53. Their awards show is all about promoting their religion of Leftism. Yet most people abhor or are turned off by their religion. So they don’t watch.

    I mean, look, if the Oscars spent its time promoting conversions to Scientology or Evangelical Christianity, the ratings would be low and folks would have no problem seeing why. You’re basically running an infomercial/preaching show for your religion, dressed up with pretty people in pretty dresses.

    But somehow many people on the Left and here on the non-Left can’t recognize that Leftism is equally a religion, and the show is about promoting it.

    And beyond all that—these people are so hilariously incompetent they can’t even get their own Best Picture winner correct. Why would we consider them glamorous and wise?

    • Agree: Colin Wright
  54. Posted this on my site:

    And the winner is…

    Me and anyone else who passes on the annual self-congratulatory circle jerk of smug, virtue signaling assholes from Hollywood. I will once again pass on being lectured by insulated, vain, self absorbed people who pretend to be something or someone else for a living. The reason we see so many remakes and reboots is because many of these folks have not had an original idea in ages. They can keep their glib, trite, condescending acceptance speeches. I’ll keep my gold, guns, and bible.

  55. @Lot
    "Roma, acquits Oscar voters on artistic grounds: foreign-language, black and white"

    I find it hard to watch movies in black in white.

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    Artistically I’m not sure that will ever come around. True “artists” will always insist that the original is sacrosanct. Given what we’ve seen with the bowdlerization of the original Star Wars trilogy, Tom & Jerry cartoons, etc., I think that’s a hill worth dying on, even when the change just involves colorization. Besides, a good quality restored black and white version on a good quality TV isnt too hard on the eyes.

    Which brings up the elephant not in the room at this year’s Oscars: Peter Jackson’s by all reports astounding WW1 documentary “They Shall Not Grow Old.” It is original footage of actual WW1 soldiers on the front lines. Not only is it colorized, but they brought in professional lip readers to figure out what the soldiers were saying. It’s not up for a Best Documentary since it wasn’t released in the proper theatres in time, but a year from now it should be making some noise. If it isn’t then you can tell the Oscars are ruined.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    A film as great as this (and it is prodigiously great) would only be debased by the attentions of the moral and artistic pygmies who now infest Hollywood.
    , @Orson

    Which brings up the elephant not in the room at this year’s Oscars: Peter Jackson’s by all reports astounding WW1 documentary “They Shall Not Grow Old.” It is original footage of actual WW1 soldiers on the front lines. Not only is it colorized, but they brought in professional lip readers to figure out what the soldiers were saying. It’s not up for a Best Documentary since it wasn’t released in the proper theatres in time, but a year from now it should be making some noise. If it isn’t then you can tell the Oscars are ruined.
     
    I saw that movie at the Cinerama Dome, in hi def 3D. IMO, it has about 15 minutes of what they advertised, which is a perfectly restored, colorized 3D experience like no other to make you feel as if you’re walking crouched in a foxhole with the other soldiers. It was just as good as I was hoping. Just astounding. The majority, while interesting, wasn’t as distinctly restored with the same precision. It was colorized, but less dynamic.

    Jackson spent over 3 years on the project. I suspect it was very time-intensive. The footage they had to work with had all kinds of problems going in. What likely happened was they had to get the film released, and did the best they could by vamping a lot, and introducing the best of what they had within the colorized contest.

    The best of what they had was top-notch. The viewer will feel like he’s standing next to other soldiers in a WWI foxhole. They apparently didn’t have the time to make it happen throughout the film. If you can see it in hi def 3D, it’s certainly worth going out to the theater to catch it. It’s still quite an achievement, and should be supported. I’d love to see another one.
    , @JMcG
    Believe the reports, it’s extraordinary. I’m keeping my fingers crossed that he might work his magic on some Great War aviation and naval footage as well.
    , @Autochthon
    For all his faults, in many ways Jackson is the cloesest thing going nowadays tk an Orson Welles: a talented guy doing what he wants to do, often attracted to his material and driven by that material precisely because it presents challenges never before adressed adequately, then working to overcome those challenges by creating his own solutions and spending his own money. We've seen this with Weta, Meet the Feebles, and now this latest film. He's pretty globo-homo, but at least he is not a hack at his craft.
  56. @Buffalo Joe
    I usually wait for movies to come to TV, so I can watch them in closed captioning and pause them for a snack break. We watched "Bohemian Rhapsody" and I will watch it again. Never a great fan of any rock band but a big fan of some songs, in this case the title song. The Freddy Mercury actor could be his clone. Enjoyable movie but I don't think it wins anything.

    Queen wrote crowd-pleasers at a time when the big name bands were being artsy-fartsy and shooting for esoteric crap. Queen were lambasted during their day—the libelists at Rolling Stone famously called them “fascis rock” (????)—-but Mike Myers helped revive them by putting them on the soundtrack to Wayne’s World and making them a sing along in the opening scene, which reminded people (1) how much fun Queen was; and (2) how they really were worthy of being worshiped rock stars:

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    R.G., Thank you for the reply. As I searched a bit about Queen online I found a new favorite song..."Fat Bottom Girls."
  57. @Lot
    "Roma, acquits Oscar voters on artistic grounds: foreign-language, black and white"

    I find it hard to watch movies in black in white.

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    HEATHEN.

  58. If/when Black Panther wins best picture I’m going to die laughing. Not only will it exonerate The Greatest Show on Earth as the worst Best Picture of all time, no one in Hollywood will ever be able to admit it was horrible, because race. They will have permanently trapped themselves in their religious wokeness. Hollywood will truly have reached a new level of stupid.

    • Replies: @Hail
    The phrase/concept "Jump the Shark" is a pretty dated reference by now.

    Black Panther may symbolize a conceptual fusion of "Jumping the Shark," in the classic entertainment-biz/culture sense, with what people meant by "Affirmative Action Nobel Peace Prize" when Obama got it after a few months in office in 2009.

    Maybe "Black Panther" or "Wakanda" will be transformed into a "Jump the Shark"-like idiom for the 2020s and beyond.
  59. “I didn’t allow my kids to watch TV growing up. So I was out of “current year” media loop a bit for 20 years, but when I peaked back in in retirement a few years back, wow, fags everywhere! What normal person wants to see any of that? I see that crap coming–click. I’m just a normal guy, with normal healthy disgust reflex. I can’t be the only one.”

    AnoutherDad,

    Occasionally I have the boob tube running in the background while performing chores around the house during the day. The current running’s of the “old time” game shows, specifically Let’s Make a Deal, The Price is Right, and their ilk are littered with overtly gay contestants. I’d put it roughly in the 1 out of 3 or 4 range. I have to think their advocacy groups have made it a mission/priority to target these shows; to promote “normalcy”.

    “I look forward to the day when medical science figures this out and we can be done with it. Future generations will look back on this age–fags, fats+tats–and want to barf. (What the hell was wrong with those primitives!)”

    The only upside I can see to “gays” being out in the open, is that fewer may feel the need for “beards”, and will be not passing on their genes on thru to future generations. But then again, soon there’s a fair chance CRISPR will make the traditional method of passing on genes irrelevant?

    • Replies: @Lot
    I bet homosexuality is mostly random rare mutations like schizophrenia, combined with pre-natal environmental events. So CRISPR isn't going to do anything about it.

    However, embryo screening and selection of the least mutated embryos I'd guess would reduce the risk of homosexuality in people who use it to select the fittest embryo by 10%-20%, depending on how many embryos are screened.

    A test of this theory would be if high materal and paternal age increases homosexuality like they do schizophrenia and autism.
  60. @Jack D
    IRL, Malek doesn't look that much like Mercury, but they did a great job with the makeup - prosthetic nose, prosthetic teeth, hair, etc.

    https://s1.r29static.com//bin/entry/64c/680x816,85/2097805/image.webp

    Jack, Protruding teeth were Mercury’s most notable facial feature, so yes they are prosthetics. Did not know about the nose but hair is easily done. Better make up was Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill in “Darkest Hour.”

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    Mercury is yet another example of men who get into music because they can't get laid otherwise. He was an ugly weird-looking dude with those buck teeth, and his South Asian foreignness didn't have exotic appeal to get him some dates.
  61. @Wilkey
    "Children naturally worry that their widowed parents’ remarriage will endanger their inheritance."

    Because they get shafted - a lot. And maybe not even intentionally. One parent dies; other parent remarries, then dies. Even if the new step-parent is a decent sort and has a good relationship with them they may stick around and hang on to the money, property and mementos for an extra decade or three. They may blow all the money, or just keep it even if they don't need it (old people often feel very financially insecure, even when they clearly have far more money than they'll ever need). If step-parents have children of their own then all bets are off.

    My brother-in-law's step-mother spent almost all his dad's money traveling the world until her health finally failed her. My two cousins saw their mother remarry just a few years before she was diagnosed with cancer and died. Her husband wouldn't even part with mementos that meant nothing to him. They disappeared somewhere, given to his own children or sold off at a yard sale, for all they know.

    I have other cousins currently in a different situation. Their father and his mother (our grandmother) are both probably going to die soon. If grandma goes first, the their dad dies, then their stepmother (a good woman, to be sure) gets all their share of our grandparents money. If dad goes first, then grandma, then they will get the inheritance. Two of the three of them have young families and could really benefit from the extra money. Our grandmother refuses to rewrite the will, mostly because she doesn't want to acknowledge that my uncle is probably going to die. They are great children to their father, so it's sad that they almost have to wish for their dad to die first in order to get what should go to them anyway, no matter which order they die in.

    (old people often feel very financially insecure, even when they clearly have far more money than they’ll ever need)

    How much would that be? If you have a stroke, and need managed home care, it’ll cost you plenty. I have a relative who is elderly, worth about $2M, and is suffering from Alzheimer’s. His in-home care is $17K a month, on top of all his other bills. If he lingers on the next 10 years, it’ll be a financial white knuckler to the finish line for his family.

    When you’re crippled by a stroke, or suffering from Alzheimer’s, you don’t want to end up a ward of the state. Competent privately paid health care givers are almost impossible to find. Would you like to hand your crippled ass to a STATE paid health worker? Do you believe in Magic?

    Old people with common sense sock away money for good reason. Dying is a shitty enough process without having to endure the wrath of an underpaid Somoan who hates you at 2 in the morning.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    I hope I have the nerve to eat a bullet if I get an Alzheimers diagnosis. Trebly confirmed of course.
    , @Anonymous

    When you’re crippled by a stroke, or suffering from Alzheimer’s, you don’t want to end up a ward of the state. Competent privately paid health care givers are almost impossible to find. Would you like to hand your crippled ass to a STATE paid health worker? Do you believe in Magic?
     
    State-funded care is undesirable. It's impossible to find private care. What is the answer?
  62. @Wilkey
    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    Artistically I'm not sure that will ever come around. True "artists" will always insist that the original is sacrosanct. Given what we've seen with the bowdlerization of the original Star Wars trilogy, Tom & Jerry cartoons, etc., I think that's a hill worth dying on, even when the change just involves colorization. Besides, a good quality restored black and white version on a good quality TV isnt too hard on the eyes.

    Which brings up the elephant not in the room at this year's Oscars: Peter Jackson's by all reports astounding WW1 documentary "They Shall Not Grow Old." It is original footage of actual WW1 soldiers on the front lines. Not only is it colorized, but they brought in professional lip readers to figure out what the soldiers were saying. It's not up for a Best Documentary since it wasn't released in the proper theatres in time, but a year from now it should be making some noise. If it isn't then you can tell the Oscars are ruined.

    A film as great as this (and it is prodigiously great) would only be debased by the attentions of the moral and artistic pygmies who now infest Hollywood.

  63. Why is my comment still “awaiting moderation” yet comments follow mine that were posted at later times…It wasnt written in Yiddish.!!

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Why is my comment still “awaiting moderation” yet comments follow mine that were posted at later times…It wasnt written in Yiddish.!!
     
    You've answered your own question. Your comment wasn't in Yiddish.
  64. @International Jew
    OT but could someone experienced write a primer on how to become a Twitter troll? No, seriously. Almost everywhere I go now, I read stupid stuff but the disappearance of comment sections frustrates my natural impulse to stick something in the author's eye.

    I see the Twitter logo, but I don't understand some basics. Like, who will see my tweet? It seems the Twitter logo takes you to a general-purpose forum devoted to the publication as a whole, not to the specific article.

    I see Steve tweets, and famous people respond to him. Is that because Steve himself is (semi-)famous? Or would my eye-poking also be felt, even a little?

    Hopefully someone more knowledgeable than I am will respond, but here are some basics.

    who will see my tweet?

    Your followers and the followers of anyone who retweets it. Plus anyone who looks for it directly (say through a blog post link).

    Is that because Steve himself is (semi-)famous?

    I would say yes. First, people have to see the tweet. Second, people have to feel the tweet is worth retweeting or responding to (or requires a response).

    Or would my eye-poking also be felt, even a little?

    The issue is who would feel it. If you tweet under your own name then people you know in real life (most likely to be early followers) would see it. Which may be good or bad, depending.

    If you tweet under a pseudonym it is probably harder to gain early followers.

    Beyond that, much depends on your ability to make trenchant observations which other people find worthwhile enough to retweet. iSteve is good at this which helps get his ideas passed along and in turn makes him more “famous” (a nice virtuous cycle).

    P.S. In depth background: https://blog.hootsuite.com/twitter-algorithm/

  65. @Wilkey
    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    Artistically I'm not sure that will ever come around. True "artists" will always insist that the original is sacrosanct. Given what we've seen with the bowdlerization of the original Star Wars trilogy, Tom & Jerry cartoons, etc., I think that's a hill worth dying on, even when the change just involves colorization. Besides, a good quality restored black and white version on a good quality TV isnt too hard on the eyes.

    Which brings up the elephant not in the room at this year's Oscars: Peter Jackson's by all reports astounding WW1 documentary "They Shall Not Grow Old." It is original footage of actual WW1 soldiers on the front lines. Not only is it colorized, but they brought in professional lip readers to figure out what the soldiers were saying. It's not up for a Best Documentary since it wasn't released in the proper theatres in time, but a year from now it should be making some noise. If it isn't then you can tell the Oscars are ruined.

    Which brings up the elephant not in the room at this year’s Oscars: Peter Jackson’s by all reports astounding WW1 documentary “They Shall Not Grow Old.” It is original footage of actual WW1 soldiers on the front lines. Not only is it colorized, but they brought in professional lip readers to figure out what the soldiers were saying. It’s not up for a Best Documentary since it wasn’t released in the proper theatres in time, but a year from now it should be making some noise. If it isn’t then you can tell the Oscars are ruined.

    I saw that movie at the Cinerama Dome, in hi def 3D. IMO, it has about 15 minutes of what they advertised, which is a perfectly restored, colorized 3D experience like no other to make you feel as if you’re walking crouched in a foxhole with the other soldiers. It was just as good as I was hoping. Just astounding. The majority, while interesting, wasn’t as distinctly restored with the same precision. It was colorized, but less dynamic.

    Jackson spent over 3 years on the project. I suspect it was very time-intensive. The footage they had to work with had all kinds of problems going in. What likely happened was they had to get the film released, and did the best they could by vamping a lot, and introducing the best of what they had within the colorized contest.

    The best of what they had was top-notch. The viewer will feel like he’s standing next to other soldiers in a WWI foxhole. They apparently didn’t have the time to make it happen throughout the film. If you can see it in hi def 3D, it’s certainly worth going out to the theater to catch it. It’s still quite an achievement, and should be supported. I’d love to see another one.

  66. @Wilkey
    "Children naturally worry that their widowed parents’ remarriage will endanger their inheritance."

    Because they get shafted - a lot. And maybe not even intentionally. One parent dies; other parent remarries, then dies. Even if the new step-parent is a decent sort and has a good relationship with them they may stick around and hang on to the money, property and mementos for an extra decade or three. They may blow all the money, or just keep it even if they don't need it (old people often feel very financially insecure, even when they clearly have far more money than they'll ever need). If step-parents have children of their own then all bets are off.

    My brother-in-law's step-mother spent almost all his dad's money traveling the world until her health finally failed her. My two cousins saw their mother remarry just a few years before she was diagnosed with cancer and died. Her husband wouldn't even part with mementos that meant nothing to him. They disappeared somewhere, given to his own children or sold off at a yard sale, for all they know.

    I have other cousins currently in a different situation. Their father and his mother (our grandmother) are both probably going to die soon. If grandma goes first, the their dad dies, then their stepmother (a good woman, to be sure) gets all their share of our grandparents money. If dad goes first, then grandma, then they will get the inheritance. Two of the three of them have young families and could really benefit from the extra money. Our grandmother refuses to rewrite the will, mostly because she doesn't want to acknowledge that my uncle is probably going to die. They are great children to their father, so it's sad that they almost have to wish for their dad to die first in order to get what should go to them anyway, no matter which order they die in.

    Remembering reading that in researching old wills from the 16th and 17th century, when people died early a lot, that the parents went to great extents to ensure their money went to their biological offspring, not someone else’s if the surviving spouse remarried, as they often did.

  67. @Jack D
    IRL, Malek doesn't look that much like Mercury, but they did a great job with the makeup - prosthetic nose, prosthetic teeth, hair, etc.

    https://s1.r29static.com//bin/entry/64c/680x816,85/2097805/image.webp

    The prosthetic teeth were terrible. When Mercury sang he unselfconsciously pulled back his lips so you could see his teeth. When the actor sang, his mouth was not expressive, but frozen like a horse with botoxed lips. It came across as if the character was ashamed of his teeth, but it was probably just that the actor didn’t want to show the bad prosthetics,

  68. @Buffalo Joe
    Jack, Protruding teeth were Mercury's most notable facial feature, so yes they are prosthetics. Did not know about the nose but hair is easily done. Better make up was Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill in "Darkest Hour."

    Mercury is yet another example of men who get into music because they can’t get laid otherwise. He was an ugly weird-looking dude with those buck teeth, and his South Asian foreignness didn’t have exotic appeal to get him some dates.

  69. Steve Sailer… Un-famous.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Steve Sailer… Un-famous.

     

    Look who's talking. As an amateur geographic psephologist, I know the names of hundreds of counties, in several countries. Important ones. I have been unaware of a Bruce County until now. Had to look it up.

    It's the left half of this thing, separating Georgian Bay from the rest of Lake Huron:


    http://www.sauble-szewczyk.com/images/Grey_Bruce.gif


    I can imagine the city slickers of Penetanguishene, Goderich, and Orillia view you as hicks.


    "Bruce County" sounds like a gay parody of Opus the Penguine.
  70. @The Alarmist
    Wow, I wouldn't have even known, much less cared, that it was Oscar Sunday if you hadn't mentioned it. Ignorance was bliss. Now my day is shot.

    Wow, I wouldn’t have even known, much less cared, that it was Oscar Sunday if you hadn’t mentioned it. Ignorance was bliss. Now my day is shot.

    Is the Academy on the lunar calendar? I always thought this came a little later, closer to Easter rather than before Ash Wednesday. (Not that any of these people fast, except perhaps the vegans.)

    That shows just how much attention I pay to the whole thing.

    I do suspect that, like with the Grammys and Wikipedia, the attention-getting categories are a joke, but the lesser-known, particularly technical, ones are the domain of people who know something and can mostly be trusted. A form of Conquest’s Law.

  71. doctor of astrophysics Dr. Brian May, Queen’s guitarist,

    I’d read decades ago that Dr May was the real talent to watch in Queen, but I was surprised to learn that he wrote a couple of their most annoying hits. I’m familiar with all of their hits and none of their albums.

    Not surprising you at first confused him with ass-trophysicist Bryan Singer. According to Wikipedia:

    His compositions for the band include “We Will Rock You”, “Tie Your Mother Down”, “I Want It All”, “Fat Bottomed Girls”, “Flash”…

    Does anyone else find it hard to predict which of the four wrote an individual song? Lennon and McCartney were usually easy to tell apart, even with a third-party singer.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    I think everyone in Queen wrote songs and more importantly - commercially successful songs.
  72. @Buffalo Joe
    I usually wait for movies to come to TV, so I can watch them in closed captioning and pause them for a snack break. We watched "Bohemian Rhapsody" and I will watch it again. Never a great fan of any rock band but a big fan of some songs, in this case the title song. The Freddy Mercury actor could be his clone. Enjoyable movie but I don't think it wins anything.

    We watched “Bohemian Rhapsody” and I will watch it again.

    Why would you spend any time on this at all when you could be learning something?

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    "Anonymous, Well thank you for the sage advice, but at 73 years old I've probably forgotten more than you now know. We can still be friends.
  73. @Wilkey
    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    Artistically I'm not sure that will ever come around. True "artists" will always insist that the original is sacrosanct. Given what we've seen with the bowdlerization of the original Star Wars trilogy, Tom & Jerry cartoons, etc., I think that's a hill worth dying on, even when the change just involves colorization. Besides, a good quality restored black and white version on a good quality TV isnt too hard on the eyes.

    Which brings up the elephant not in the room at this year's Oscars: Peter Jackson's by all reports astounding WW1 documentary "They Shall Not Grow Old." It is original footage of actual WW1 soldiers on the front lines. Not only is it colorized, but they brought in professional lip readers to figure out what the soldiers were saying. It's not up for a Best Documentary since it wasn't released in the proper theatres in time, but a year from now it should be making some noise. If it isn't then you can tell the Oscars are ruined.

    Believe the reports, it’s extraordinary. I’m keeping my fingers crossed that he might work his magic on some Great War aviation and naval footage as well.

  74. @Kildare

    (old people often feel very financially insecure, even when they clearly have far more money than they’ll ever need)
     
    How much would that be? If you have a stroke, and need managed home care, it'll cost you plenty. I have a relative who is elderly, worth about $2M, and is suffering from Alzheimer’s. His in-home care is $17K a month, on top of all his other bills. If he lingers on the next 10 years, it'll be a financial white knuckler to the finish line for his family.

    When you’re crippled by a stroke, or suffering from Alzheimer's, you don’t want to end up a ward of the state. Competent privately paid health care givers are almost impossible to find. Would you like to hand your crippled ass to a STATE paid health worker? Do you believe in Magic?

    Old people with common sense sock away money for good reason. Dying is a shitty enough process without having to endure the wrath of an underpaid Somoan who hates you at 2 in the morning.

    I hope I have the nerve to eat a bullet if I get an Alzheimers diagnosis. Trebly confirmed of course.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    I hope I have the nerve to eat a bullet if I get an Alzheimers diagnosis. Trebly confirmed of course.

    But if you actually do have Alzheimer's, each time it's confirmed you'll think it's the first.

  75. Anonymous[376] • Disclaimer says:
    @International Jew
    OT but could someone experienced write a primer on how to become a Twitter troll? No, seriously. Almost everywhere I go now, I read stupid stuff but the disappearance of comment sections frustrates my natural impulse to stick something in the author's eye.

    I see the Twitter logo, but I don't understand some basics. Like, who will see my tweet? It seems the Twitter logo takes you to a general-purpose forum devoted to the publication as a whole, not to the specific article.

    I see Steve tweets, and famous people respond to him. Is that because Steve himself is (semi-)famous? Or would my eye-poking also be felt, even a little?

    I see Steve tweets, and famous people respond to him. Is that because Steve himself is (semi-)famous? Or would my eye-poking also be felt, even a little?

    Go to the twitter feeds of famous people you wish to interact with, and reply to the tweet in question. Eye poking will likely be felt if they don’t have an avalanche of replies to a particular tweet and they haven’t muted or blocked you. Many, especially journalists, pundits, academics, and activists, read the replies to their own tweets.

    • Replies: @Lurker

    Many, especially journalists, pundits, academics, and activists, read the replies to their own tweets.
     
    Then they block you!
  76. @R.G. Camara
    Queen wrote crowd-pleasers at a time when the big name bands were being artsy-fartsy and shooting for esoteric crap. Queen were lambasted during their day---the libelists at Rolling Stone famously called them "fascis rock" (????)----but Mike Myers helped revive them by putting them on the soundtrack to Wayne's World and making them a sing along in the opening scene, which reminded people (1) how much fun Queen was; and (2) how they really were worthy of being worshiped rock stars:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thyJOnasHVE

    R.G., Thank you for the reply. As I searched a bit about Queen online I found a new favorite song…”Fat Bottom Girls.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    R.G., Thank you for the reply. As I searched a bit about Queen online I found a new favorite song…”Fat Bottom Girls.”

     

    Coming from a queer singer, that isn't as flattering as you might think. However, Mercury does deserve a lot of credit for leaving so much to his old girlfriend.
  77. @Bruce County
    Steve Sailer... Un-famous.

    Steve Sailer… Un-famous.

    Look who’s talking. As an amateur geographic psephologist, I know the names of hundreds of counties, in several countries. Important ones. I have been unaware of a Bruce County until now. Had to look it up.

    It’s the left half of this thing, separating Georgian Bay from the rest of Lake Huron:

    I can imagine the city slickers of Penetanguishene, Goderich, and Orillia view you as hicks.

    “Bruce County” sounds like a gay parody of Opus the Penguine.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Bruce is Jayne/Wayne's little brother/sister.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jayne_County
    , @Bruce County
    The answer is in the reply.. As an "amateur" geographic psephologist.
    I was picking on Sailer because some of my comments weret getting posted..Og course you in your amatuer wisdom thought you should open your pie hole..
    I dont know you and you sure AF dont know me. Lets keep it that way.
  78. Anonymous[376] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kildare

    (old people often feel very financially insecure, even when they clearly have far more money than they’ll ever need)
     
    How much would that be? If you have a stroke, and need managed home care, it'll cost you plenty. I have a relative who is elderly, worth about $2M, and is suffering from Alzheimer’s. His in-home care is $17K a month, on top of all his other bills. If he lingers on the next 10 years, it'll be a financial white knuckler to the finish line for his family.

    When you’re crippled by a stroke, or suffering from Alzheimer's, you don’t want to end up a ward of the state. Competent privately paid health care givers are almost impossible to find. Would you like to hand your crippled ass to a STATE paid health worker? Do you believe in Magic?

    Old people with common sense sock away money for good reason. Dying is a shitty enough process without having to endure the wrath of an underpaid Somoan who hates you at 2 in the morning.

    When you’re crippled by a stroke, or suffering from Alzheimer’s, you don’t want to end up a ward of the state. Competent privately paid health care givers are almost impossible to find. Would you like to hand your crippled ass to a STATE paid health worker? Do you believe in Magic?

    State-funded care is undesirable. It’s impossible to find private care. What is the answer?

    • Replies: @Kildare

    State-funded care is undesirable. It’s impossible to find private care. What is the answer?
     
    I said almost impossible. Your chances of good care increase with how much money you’re willing to put up. Base price is $17K a month. If you paid double that a month, you’re likely to find good care.

    Less than $17K?

    No.

    Speaking of which, we're about to have a large wave of Alzheimer’s patients. The Boomer generation is just about ripe for it. Most have led lifestyles that solicit it. Might be a reason Trump has kept the foreign visa door open. At some point in the future, we’re gonna need a LOT of "affordable" health care workers to service Alzheimer’s patients. I think the media will register the surge as a growing problem by the middle of Trump's second term.
    , @PSR
    That’s going to become a potent political issue over the next decade or so.
  79. @Bruce County
    Why is my comment still "awaiting moderation" yet comments follow mine that were posted at later times...It wasnt written in Yiddish.!!

    Why is my comment still “awaiting moderation” yet comments follow mine that were posted at later times…It wasnt written in Yiddish.!!

    You’ve answered your own question. Your comment wasn’t in Yiddish.

  80. @Buffalo Joe
    R.G., Thank you for the reply. As I searched a bit about Queen online I found a new favorite song..."Fat Bottom Girls."

    R.G., Thank you for the reply. As I searched a bit about Queen online I found a new favorite song…”Fat Bottom Girls.”

    Coming from a queer singer, that isn’t as flattering as you might think. However, Mercury does deserve a lot of credit for leaving so much to his old girlfriend.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    However, Mercury does deserve a lot of credit for leaving so much to his old girlfriend.
     
    I just used my Agree button but you are right. Freddie seemed to be a honorable guy in the end.
  81. The movies are horrible and have been for quite some time. Can we quit pretending? It’s pretty much a waste of time.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    The movies are horrible and have been for quite some time. Can we quit pretending? It’s pretty much a waste of time.
     
    Maybe they've always been a waste of time.
  82. @FozzieT
    Edit:The director of Bohemian Rhapsody was Bryan Singer, not Brian May.

    Bryan May controlled a lot of the song rights and thus, with the drummer, had a lot of influence in shaping the movie to be less Woke than you’d expect.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    You need some sleep, Steve. Misspelling BRIAN May's name is bad enough, but to demean Roger Taylor as "the drummer" is just wrong!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Taylor_(Queen_drummer)
    , @Wilkey
    Director Brian May got #MeTooed partway through

    I think the point is that the original director was *Bryan Singer*. Again, he wasn't #MeTooed during the production. He was #MeTooed long before the production, when Hollywood chose not to give a shit.

    Rumor has it that his erratic behavior during the filming was due to stress from his awareness of a new investigation, which only broke long after he was fired by the studio.

    Steve, you're just doing this to puss off those of us who have forgotten to mail in our annual contribution. I promise to correct that oversight this week.
  83. @anonymous
    I still don’t understand why my comments often swirl around in moderation as others pile up.

    I asked the same thing.. I thought maybe i was writing in Ebonics or Swahili..

  84. @Anonymous
    The movies are horrible and have been for quite some time. Can we quit pretending? It’s pretty much a waste of time.

    The movies are horrible and have been for quite some time. Can we quit pretending? It’s pretty much a waste of time.

    Maybe they’ve always been a waste of time.

  85. @AnotherDad

    “Can You Ever Forgive Me” was too homosexual-cultish for my taste, although Richard E. Grant, who isn’t Jewish, was wonderful.
     
    I can never understand all this homo-crap in the media? Ok, I understand it's creation, I can never understand who the hell watches it.

    I didn't allow my kids to watch TV growing up. So I was out of "current year" media loop a bit for 20 years, but when I peaked back in in retirement a few years back, wow, fags everywhere! What normal person wants to see any of that? I see that crap coming--click. I'm just a normal guy, with normal healthy disgust reflex. I can't be the only one.

    I look forward to the day when medical science figures this out and we can be done with it. Future generations will look back on this age--fags, fats+tats--and want to barf. (What the hell was wrong with those primitives!)

    I hate to break it to you but “medical science” is often at the forefront of this nonsense.

  86. My wife has the red carpet ABC show on the big, black, Korean monolith in the living room.

    So far all I’ve caught sight of is black, black, blackety black, oriental woman, homosexual black, bald black congressman presenter, fat lesbian, black interviewer, lesbian presenter, Jew, homosexual Jew, black, black, oriental, and black.

    Needs more cowbell.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    My wife has the red carpet ABC show on the big, black, Korean monolith in the living room.
     
    You invited Twinkie over?
  87. @Reg Cæsar

    Steve Sailer… Un-famous.

     

    Look who's talking. As an amateur geographic psephologist, I know the names of hundreds of counties, in several countries. Important ones. I have been unaware of a Bruce County until now. Had to look it up.

    It's the left half of this thing, separating Georgian Bay from the rest of Lake Huron:


    http://www.sauble-szewczyk.com/images/Grey_Bruce.gif


    I can imagine the city slickers of Penetanguishene, Goderich, and Orillia view you as hicks.


    "Bruce County" sounds like a gay parody of Opus the Penguine.

    Bruce is Jayne/Wayne’s little brother/sister.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jayne_County

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    Jayne is a shoo-in for the County Music Association awards.
  88. @Anonymous

    I see Steve tweets, and famous people respond to him. Is that because Steve himself is (semi-)famous? Or would my eye-poking also be felt, even a little?
     
    Go to the twitter feeds of famous people you wish to interact with, and reply to the tweet in question. Eye poking will likely be felt if they don't have an avalanche of replies to a particular tweet and they haven't muted or blocked you. Many, especially journalists, pundits, academics, and activists, read the replies to their own tweets.

    Many, especially journalists, pundits, academics, and activists, read the replies to their own tweets.

    Then they block you!

  89. @Steve Sailer
    Bryan May controlled a lot of the song rights and thus, with the drummer, had a lot of influence in shaping the movie to be less Woke than you'd expect.

    You need some sleep, Steve. Misspelling BRIAN May’s name is bad enough, but to demean Roger Taylor as “the drummer” is just wrong!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Taylor_(Queen_drummer)

  90. If that opening number is any indication, this year’s show promises to be a laugh a minute.

  91. @Reg Cæsar

    doctor of astrophysics Dr. Brian May, Queen’s guitarist,
     
    I'd read decades ago that Dr May was the real talent to watch in Queen, but I was surprised to learn that he wrote a couple of their most annoying hits. I'm familiar with all of their hits and none of their albums.

    Not surprising you at first confused him with ass-trophysicist Bryan Singer. According to Wikipedia:


    His compositions for the band include "We Will Rock You", "Tie Your Mother Down", "I Want It All", "Fat Bottomed Girls", "Flash"...

     

    Does anyone else find it hard to predict which of the four wrote an individual song? Lennon and McCartney were usually easy to tell apart, even with a third-party singer.

    I think everyone in Queen wrote songs and more importantly – commercially successful songs.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    That's what I said. But are they stylistically distinguishable? The Kinks had two sounds, the noisy and the literate folky, but it was usually Ray Davies doing both.

    Queen likewise had a noisy, thrashy, rappish sound and an operatic one. But those two don't line up with the individual composers. They're almost perpendicular.
    , @Prof. Woland
    They were all good backup singers too.
  92. @GRANDPA BARSOAP
    The Ruskies know what's up with the Oscars.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NgMJJWHyE8

    FWIW, the subtitles are of remarkably high quality.

  93. @Anonymous

    We watched “Bohemian Rhapsody” and I will watch it again.
     
    Why would you spend any time on this at all when you could be learning something?

    “Anonymous, Well thank you for the sage advice, but at 73 years old I’ve probably forgotten more than you now know. We can still be friends.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    You're the same age as Debbie Harry then. She hit the linen before the bomb hit Japan.
    , @The preferred nomenclature is...
    Perfect comment. That's why you are the tops around here.
  94. @Anon

    Justin Hurwitz’s score for First Man is fine, but Moon movie scores have to compete against the two Strausses of 2001. The only outer space movie to top 2001 in scoring was von Trier’s Melancholia, which used Wagner’s epochal prelude to Tristan und Isolde.
     
    Long term, a movie is better off having a great original score, rather than a classical chestnut.

    Not every director has the bandwidth to, along with everything else he has to do, work with a score composer. Ennio Morricone has a sort of informal autobiography coming out in which he bitches about being ignored by directors, or dealing with mercurial directors, or being micromanaged.

    http://global.oup.com/academic/covers/uk/pop-up/9780190681012

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2019/feb/23/ennio-morricone-composer-film-makers-directors-cliches-music

    Sergio Leone comes off pretty well in the book.

    By the way, the Danish National Symphony Orchestra's performance of Morricone's Leone themes included a guy in a noose hanging from the right balcony. They're touring with this repertory. I wonder if any U.S. appearances will have the noose.

    https://youtu.be/KkM71JPHfjk?t=123

    Sergio Leone and Ennio Morricone were a match made in heaven. Each benefited greatly from the artistry of the other in those first three westerns.

    I was surprised to learn that Morricone had scored 450 films, as I only was conscious of a few. His music for Leone’s not-very-memorable “Once Upon a Time in America” was also not very memorable.

  95. It took 30 years for Jusstice to prevail:

    • Replies: @Bruce County
    In December 1987, over one thousand people, including Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, marched through the streets of Newburgh, New York, in support of Brawley.
    It really is a war against whitey. The nogs believe all the black chilluns, brutha's and sista's are innocent. How dare we question their integrity.
    It was awesome that Black Panther didnt get the nod. But they opted for a mixed race moivie Green Book.
    Spike Lee was livid. It doesnt matter... there will never come a time that we will ever calm the savage black beast. They think we owe them every thing.
  96. @Buffalo Joe
    "Anonymous, Well thank you for the sage advice, but at 73 years old I've probably forgotten more than you now know. We can still be friends.

    You’re the same age as Debbie Harry then. She hit the linen before the bomb hit Japan.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Anonymous, I know who Debbie "Blondie" Harry is but what does "She hit the linen before the bomb hit Japan" mean?
  97. @Lurker
    I think everyone in Queen wrote songs and more importantly - commercially successful songs.

    That’s what I said. But are they stylistically distinguishable? The Kinks had two sounds, the noisy and the literate folky, but it was usually Ray Davies doing both.

    Queen likewise had a noisy, thrashy, rappish sound and an operatic one. But those two don’t line up with the individual composers. They’re almost perpendicular.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    I wasn't disagreeing!
  98. @R.G. Camara
    If/when Black Panther wins best picture I'm going to die laughing. Not only will it exonerate The Greatest Show on Earth as the worst Best Picture of all time, no one in Hollywood will ever be able to admit it was horrible, because race. They will have permanently trapped themselves in their religious wokeness. Hollywood will truly have reached a new level of stupid.

    The phrase/concept “Jump the Shark” is a pretty dated reference by now.

    Black Panther may symbolize a conceptual fusion of “Jumping the Shark,” in the classic entertainment-biz/culture sense, with what people meant by “Affirmative Action Nobel Peace Prize” when Obama got it after a few months in office in 2009.

    Maybe “Black Panther” or “Wakanda” will be transformed into a “Jump the Shark”-like idiom for the 2020s and beyond.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    I think its more along the lines of when Nero kept winning all the poetry competitions when he was emperor.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    I think “Wakanda” makes a pretty good term for black wishful thinking and fake history.
    , @Lot
    I don't think it is dated.

    You got to love a term invented online in the 90s about a TV show from the 70s set in the 50s.
    , @njguy73
    Nobody says "jump the shark" anymore.

    Now it's "nuke the fridge."
  99. @Brutusale
    Bruce is Jayne/Wayne's little brother/sister.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jayne_County

    Jayne is a shoo-in for the County Music Association awards.

  100. @Buzz Mohawk
    My wife has the red carpet ABC show on the big, black, Korean monolith in the living room.

    So far all I've caught sight of is black, black, blackety black, oriental woman, homosexual black, bald black congressman presenter, fat lesbian, black interviewer, lesbian presenter, Jew, homosexual Jew, black, black, oriental, and black.

    Needs more cowbell.

    My wife has the red carpet ABC show on the big, black, Korean monolith in the living room.

    You invited Twinkie over?

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    Angry face! Tlinkie not big! Tlinkie little!
  101. @Lot
    "Roma, acquits Oscar voters on artistic grounds: foreign-language, black and white"

    I find it hard to watch movies in black in white.

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    I find it hard to watch movies in black in white.

    Do they still sell those special glasses in the back of comic books?

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    Because some underpaid West Hollywood hack is up to the level of Jean Renoir, James Wong Howe, and Nestor Almendros. Yeah, right.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    "Because some underpaid West Hollywood hack is up to the level of Jean Renoir, James Wong Howe, and Nestor Almendros. Yeah, right."

    Or Karl Struss, John Alton, and Robert Krasker. Or Russell Boyd, John A. Alonzo, and F. A. Young. Robert Burks.
  102. @Hail
    The phrase/concept "Jump the Shark" is a pretty dated reference by now.

    Black Panther may symbolize a conceptual fusion of "Jumping the Shark," in the classic entertainment-biz/culture sense, with what people meant by "Affirmative Action Nobel Peace Prize" when Obama got it after a few months in office in 2009.

    Maybe "Black Panther" or "Wakanda" will be transformed into a "Jump the Shark"-like idiom for the 2020s and beyond.

    I think its more along the lines of when Nero kept winning all the poetry competitions when he was emperor.

  103. @donut
    If you could go back in time would you strangle the infant Jack Dorsey in his crib ?

    If you could go back in time would you strangle the infant Jack Dorsey in his crib ?

    No, if I could go back to 1976, I’d buy 100 shares of Walmart, place a bet on Seattle Slew to win the Triple Crown, and pitch a story to Hollywood about a teenage girl who falls in love with a vampire.

  104. @JMcG
    I hope I have the nerve to eat a bullet if I get an Alzheimers diagnosis. Trebly confirmed of course.

    I hope I have the nerve to eat a bullet if I get an Alzheimers diagnosis. Trebly confirmed of course.

    But if you actually do have Alzheimer’s, each time it’s confirmed you’ll think it’s the first.

    • LOL: donut, Mr McKenna
    • Replies: @donut
    Alzheimer’s pts. are escape artists nonpareil . No matter how secure you may think their restraints are they will get out of them in a surprisingly short amount of time .
  105. @Hail
    The phrase/concept "Jump the Shark" is a pretty dated reference by now.

    Black Panther may symbolize a conceptual fusion of "Jumping the Shark," in the classic entertainment-biz/culture sense, with what people meant by "Affirmative Action Nobel Peace Prize" when Obama got it after a few months in office in 2009.

    Maybe "Black Panther" or "Wakanda" will be transformed into a "Jump the Shark"-like idiom for the 2020s and beyond.

    I think “Wakanda” makes a pretty good term for black wishful thinking and fake history.

    • Replies: @Hail
    How about:

    To Wakandize [something], (verb).

    "The filmmaker's tired and wakandized fare features an opening scene in which a group of quietly heroic Black scientists intervene to stop a rampaging White gang on a rape spree."

    ___________

    Slim pickings on Google for "wakandize." It has gotten scattered use, more often used unironically than ironically:

    A United States of Africa will Wakandize ALL of Africa ...
     
  106. Every year the Oscars go further downhill.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    I can't believe any self-respecting person watches them.
  107. I actually went and watched “Cold War” in the theater today (along with a total of six other patrons). Very good soundtrack mixing Chopin, small combo jazz, and some moving Polish folk ensemble sobs, plus a Stalin tribute song that had just the right level of creepiness.

    Pawed Pawlikowski’s slow pace featured lots of smoking, drinking, long pauses, and even longer gazes into the middle distance.

    He made smart use of black and white photography – postwar Poland came off even more pathetically bleak and depressing than I had imagined. Although Paris of the 1950’s doesn’t seem exuberant as I might have guessed either, so maybe I need to watch more foreign films coming out of the Eastern Bloc and from France to have a better sense of life in the 1940’s and ‘50’s.

    The plot is simple – will the younger, free-spirited blonde decide whether her musical director/arranger/accompanist/lover is someone with whom she can be happy, or not?

    Honestly, the heroine was too flighty and vacuous for me, but our hero obviously had the hots for her. He would have been better off if he’d watched the end of of “Gone With The Wind” – he should have left her behind and walked away.

    But that would have made for a much shorter movie.

  108. @prime noticer
    "Not a good year for movies"

    movies are over, very plainly. their peak is in the rear view mirror now. it took longer, because you have to be older to make good movies, versus music, where only men between 20 and 40 can make any music of value. european and jewish men up to 60 can still make a movie of any value. but those guys are almost all done now. once nolan is done, there won't be a single movie of any value ever made again. it's all comic book movies from now on, plus a unending supply of sundry non-comic book stuff of zero value, largely informed by cultural marxist doctrine.

    again, i ask my usual question. how does steve watch this detritus?

    but more than that now. movies suck. so it's more than just watching people who hate you and hate your country. now you're watching something more like a cable television version of movies.

    everywhere i go now, the background music is stuff from the 70s to the 90s, and very little from after 2000. movies are turning into the same thing. half the 'new' movies now are remakes or sequels of stuff from the peak of the movie era. their only other source of new material is from books or comic books. they have defaulted to converting books into movies.

    european and jewish men up to 60 can still make a movie of any value.

    Eastwood made good movies in his late seventies, and even his pushing ninety movies are above average

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Spielberg's still got his chops in his 70s: his quickie movie about the Washington Post was very well done from the standpoint of directorial competence. What's harder to do when you are old is come up with something new within yourself that you haven't done before.

    Eastwood makes a ridiculous number of movies, and he makes them without expending all that much effort, but "American Sniper" was extremely well done.

    , @prime noticer
    "Eastwood made good movies in his late seventies, and even his pushing ninety movies are above average"

    yes, but we don't measure the output of a field by the few outliers. i'm sure a few good movies were made by guys under 30, but 30 to 60 is about the age range for making anything of note. a master director gets about 25 years, give or take, then his window is closed. even then, he's often coasting on what some other writer in his prime has written for a script.

    must human endeavor has an age range, and an HBD range too. measuring the rise, peak, and decline of some field is not complete guesswork if you know the demographics and birth rates of the primary heavy lifters.

    "Spielberg’s still got his chops in his 70s"

    no. hasn't made anything of note after 2000. can he still make a movie. sure. anything important? nah. same as the other old masters.

    the new avatars should be about it for cameron.

  109. @Hail
    The phrase/concept "Jump the Shark" is a pretty dated reference by now.

    Black Panther may symbolize a conceptual fusion of "Jumping the Shark," in the classic entertainment-biz/culture sense, with what people meant by "Affirmative Action Nobel Peace Prize" when Obama got it after a few months in office in 2009.

    Maybe "Black Panther" or "Wakanda" will be transformed into a "Jump the Shark"-like idiom for the 2020s and beyond.

    I don’t think it is dated.

    You got to love a term invented online in the 90s about a TV show from the 70s set in the 50s.

  110. @Wilkey
    "Children naturally worry that their widowed parents’ remarriage will endanger their inheritance."

    Because they get shafted - a lot. And maybe not even intentionally. One parent dies; other parent remarries, then dies. Even if the new step-parent is a decent sort and has a good relationship with them they may stick around and hang on to the money, property and mementos for an extra decade or three. They may blow all the money, or just keep it even if they don't need it (old people often feel very financially insecure, even when they clearly have far more money than they'll ever need). If step-parents have children of their own then all bets are off.

    My brother-in-law's step-mother spent almost all his dad's money traveling the world until her health finally failed her. My two cousins saw their mother remarry just a few years before she was diagnosed with cancer and died. Her husband wouldn't even part with mementos that meant nothing to him. They disappeared somewhere, given to his own children or sold off at a yard sale, for all they know.

    I have other cousins currently in a different situation. Their father and his mother (our grandmother) are both probably going to die soon. If grandma goes first, the their dad dies, then their stepmother (a good woman, to be sure) gets all their share of our grandparents money. If dad goes first, then grandma, then they will get the inheritance. Two of the three of them have young families and could really benefit from the extra money. Our grandmother refuses to rewrite the will, mostly because she doesn't want to acknowledge that my uncle is probably going to die. They are great children to their father, so it's sad that they almost have to wish for their dad to die first in order to get what should go to them anyway, no matter which order they die in.

    My CPA practice has a heavy focus in the estate and trust area. In my experience, mixed families always in end in a dispute after the wealth creator dies.

    Best suggestion, if you want your money to go to your biological children, have a very well-written trust instrument, have the step-spouse (the one without the money) have their own separate independent counsel review the document. Then have the non-money spouse sign off on the document in conjunction with their counsel and their children that are not from the moneyed spouse. And do all this while in good health. I’d also renew those signatures annually if the pot is big enough.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    In my experience, mixed families always in end in a dispute after the wealth creator dies.
     
    What about interracial families?
  111. @danand

    "I didn’t allow my kids to watch TV growing up. So I was out of “current year” media loop a bit for 20 years, but when I peaked back in in retirement a few years back, wow, fags everywhere! What normal person wants to see any of that? I see that crap coming–click. I’m just a normal guy, with normal healthy disgust reflex. I can’t be the only one."
     
    AnoutherDad,

    Occasionally I have the boob tube running in the background while performing chores around the house during the day. The current running's of the "old time" game shows, specifically Let's Make a Deal, The Price is Right, and their ilk are littered with overtly gay contestants. I'd put it roughly in the 1 out of 3 or 4 range. I have to think their advocacy groups have made it a mission/priority to target these shows; to promote "normalcy".

    "I look forward to the day when medical science figures this out and we can be done with it. Future generations will look back on this age–fags, fats+tats–and want to barf. (What the hell was wrong with those primitives!)"
     

    The only upside I can see to "gays" being out in the open, is that fewer may feel the need for "beards", and will be not passing on their genes on thru to future generations. But then again, soon there's a fair chance CRISPR will make the traditional method of passing on genes irrelevant?

    I bet homosexuality is mostly random rare mutations like schizophrenia, combined with pre-natal environmental events. So CRISPR isn’t going to do anything about it.

    However, embryo screening and selection of the least mutated embryos I’d guess would reduce the risk of homosexuality in people who use it to select the fittest embryo by 10%-20%, depending on how many embryos are screened.

    A test of this theory would be if high materal and paternal age increases homosexuality like they do schizophrenia and autism.

  112. I just could not have lived another minute if there was not an Oscar Nomination about the Holocaust.

    Life would just not be worth living without it.

  113. @Altai

    In comparison to BlackKkKlansman’s incompetence, Black Panther is the second coming of The Maltese Falcon.
     
    That may be but at least BlackKKKlansman is actual Oscar Bait. It's like having a competition for best in breed for German Shepard's and pointing out how much more you like a nice Persian cat to a particularly sickly German Shepard, it's a contest for best German Shepard. (You don't even have to agree with the terms of best breed like disgusting back deformations or even like German Shepard)

    Black Panther is probably the only best picture nominee to not have any accompanying nominations for acting, cinematography or directing. It just has some for costumes and soundtrack. (Because of the novelty of hip hop soundtrack that is actually a pretty bad hip hop soundtrack.)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQbjS0_ZfJ0

    This is up for best song. I don't get it, it seems like a bad mashup of a lot of better songs, very forgettable. But it was the 'Black Panther song' so therefore it 'had significance to the black community'.

    You don't have to agree with the pretentious of Oscar considerations to find Black Panther the more objectionable nomination, even if it is a better and more interesting film. (That's hardly what the Oscars is about!) At least BlackKKKlansman pretends to be a 'serious' film.

    The novelty of a hip-hop soundtrackfoe the Oscars? Ia this another clever witticism inime with Mr. Sailer’s motif that its always fifty years ago? Like the need for a Negro president to show racism and lynchings can maybe, finally, become a thing of the past?

    But maybe the Oscar didn’t count because it was won by a white guy who is better at hip-hop than most any black person, and the soundtrack he created is actually compelling and integral to the film, instead of politically correct, SJW propoganda dressed up as mostly bad music?

    Actually, it’s even worse, since the folm and the music both emphasised overcoming horrible circumstances no fault of one’d own by perseverence, self-reliance, and responsibility for loved ones unable to care for themselves. No mention of looking to The Man for salvation (although prayers to God are there – yikes!).

    But it won an Oscar, perplexing and pissing off Barbra Streisand to no end. That was a different eon, only about twenty years back. A couple decades earlier still, some actress with no business singing butchered a piece called “Take a Look at Me Now,” apparently because the geriatric academy had never heard of the affable, hardworking British guy who wrote and sang it himself.

    The academy just likes being clueless even when they’ve a clue; it’s how they roll. I haven’t watched an awards show in more than twenty years. I think most of us with lives reach a point when we haven’t heard if half the people or works involved in these things and just ignore them, as the heady days when as teenagers with the time for it we knew all the details and excitedly watched the whole thing waiting for out favourites to perform. They’venalso suffered from dilution: The BET Awards; The Video Music Awards; The MTV Movie Awards; the Golden Globes; the People’s Choice (which sounds hilariously communist, or like the sibriquet of a corny wrestler); the American Music Awards, the stalwart Emmys, Grammys, Tonys, and Oscars; the Espys; the Academy of Country Music Awards, and on and on. I’m pretty aure at this point Dickie’s Barbecue & That Blonde Girl At The Safeway have an annual awards show carried on primetime television. Yeesh.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The funniest Best Song oscar was when the Academy had Antonio Banderas and Carlos Santana perform the nominated song from some Che Guevara biopic. But they gave a terrible rendition and the song didn't appear to have any melody. So, when the South American composer was called up on stage to get his Oscar, instead of giving a speech, he just sang a capella the nicest part of his song for 20 seconds in Spanish so everybody could hear that it really did deserve to win and then walked off.
  114. I see that ‘Bohemian Rhaphsody’ won for sound mixing and sound editing, which makes sense.

    I saw Queen perform a couple of years ago, fronted by Adam Lambert, who’s good, but who doesn’t sound quite like Freddie Mercury.

    So for the film they mixed the sound of Freddie’s old recordings with tracks from a singer named Marc Martel. He’s a pretty unlikely candidate for the job, as he’s a Canadian who fronted a Christian contemporary band. But he sounds just like Freddie:

    By chance, I also saw Marc Martel perform live last year, doing mostly Queen songs; he was tremendous.

  115. @Buffalo Joe
    "Anonymous, Well thank you for the sage advice, but at 73 years old I've probably forgotten more than you now know. We can still be friends.

    Perfect comment. That’s why you are the tops around here.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    The Preferred, Thank You, he said as accepting his award and then I thank everyone all the way to the nuns in grammar school.
  116. I couldn’t believe Chappaquiddick got no nominations. It was very good and apolitical. Probably why.

    I am just stunned at how little Hollywood history matters anymore. Either Richard Grant or Sam Elliott would have been shooins in earlier eras. Just like Peter O’Toole should have–my god, I still can’t believe they ignored him for fricking Forrest Whittaker, who I basically like, but how could the Academy deny O’Toole a competitive Oscar after his 8 nominations? Assholes.

    I haven’t watched them since.

  117. @Kevin O'Keeffe
    I'm a big movie buff, one who goes to the cinema 2-3 times per month at least, and among the Best Picture nominees, I have only seen THE FAVORITE (which was a pretty good movie, albeit overly degenerate, and not really Best Picture-level quality). I could imagine seeing GREEN BOOK. I probably never will, but the mix of an artsy Black homosexual who puts on aristocratic airs, the segregated Deep South, and a "wise guy" bodyguard, sounds kinda funny. I'd probably want to see it...if it were made 10-20 years ago. But these days it may be just a little too woke for yours truly.

    Other than for VICE (which I skipped based on your review), the other films seem, well..."uninteresting" would almost be a compliment. I don't see how the recent trend of nominating a bunch of shitty movies every year for Best Picture really works out for Hollywood, but I guess we'll all be finding out.

    Since you are a movie buff, let me ask you if you saw Liam Neesom’s latest whose title escapes me right now. I liked the Taken series.

    • Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Since you are a movie buff, let me ask you if you saw Liam Neesom’s latest whose title escapes me right now. I liked the Taken series.
     
    I haven't seen it, but my wife and I had been planning to go. You have to be fast to catch any non-blockbuster these days. They're gone from the theaters in a week or two. I suspect we'll wind up catching this one at the local discount cinema.
  118. @Reg Cæsar

    R.G., Thank you for the reply. As I searched a bit about Queen online I found a new favorite song…”Fat Bottom Girls.”

     

    Coming from a queer singer, that isn't as flattering as you might think. However, Mercury does deserve a lot of credit for leaving so much to his old girlfriend.

    However, Mercury does deserve a lot of credit for leaving so much to his old girlfriend.

    I just used my Agree button but you are right. Freddie seemed to be a honorable guy in the end.

  119. @Autochthon
    The novelty of a hip-hop soundtrackfoe the Oscars? Ia this another clever witticism inime with Mr. Sailer's motif that its always fifty years ago? Like the need for a Negro president to show racism and lynchings can maybe, finally, become a thing of the past?

    But maybe the Oscar didn't count because it was won by a white guy who is better at hip-hop than most any black person, and the soundtrack he created is actually compelling and integral to the film, instead of politically correct, SJW propoganda dressed up as mostly bad music?

    Actually, it's even worse, since the folm and the music both emphasised overcoming horrible circumstances no fault of one'd own by perseverence, self-reliance, and responsibility for loved ones unable to care for themselves. No mention of looking to The Man for salvation (although prayers to God are there – yikes!).

    https://youtu.be/gQalFjdOKIs

    https://youtu.be/O2_PAW_8fos

    But it won an Oscar, perplexing and pissing off Barbra Streisand to no end. That was a different eon, only about twenty years back. A couple decades earlier still, some actress with no business singing butchered a piece called "Take a Look at Me Now," apparently because the geriatric academy had never heard of the affable, hardworking British guy who wrote and sang it himself.

    The academy just likes being clueless even when they've a clue; it's how they roll. I haven't watched an awards show in more than twenty years. I think most of us with lives reach a point when we haven't heard if half the people or works involved in these things and just ignore them, as the heady days when as teenagers with the time for it we knew all the details and excitedly watched the whole thing waiting for out favourites to perform. They'venalso suffered from dilution: The BET Awards; The Video Music Awards; The MTV Movie Awards; the Golden Globes; the People's Choice (which sounds hilariously communist, or like the sibriquet of a corny wrestler); the American Music Awards, the stalwart Emmys, Grammys, Tonys, and Oscars; the Espys; the Academy of Country Music Awards, and on and on. I'm pretty aure at this point Dickie's Barbecue & That Blonde Girl At The Safeway have an annual awards show carried on primetime television. Yeesh.

    The funniest Best Song oscar was when the Academy had Antonio Banderas and Carlos Santana perform the nominated song from some Che Guevara biopic. But they gave a terrible rendition and the song didn’t appear to have any melody. So, when the South American composer was called up on stage to get his Oscar, instead of giving a speech, he just sang a capella the nicest part of his song for 20 seconds in Spanish so everybody could hear that it really did deserve to win and then walked off.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Good for him; the best artists don't take this shit too seriously anyway. I once met an amazing woman marathoner who kept winning races everywhere I encountered her. I pointed out I'd been noticing how fast she was and congratulated her on winning so many races that season. She just laughed and said nobody does all that for a medal, her point being she was just doing what she'd do anyway even if there were no formal races.

    Phil Collins told Johnny Carson a little later he thought if he'd been allowed to perform they'd have made him do some cheesy, overproduced number with dancers anyway, and he later did perform for the idiots at the Oscars and he accepted his Oscar for Tarzan gracefully.

    Eminem didn't even go to the event because he spent the day playing and watching cartoons with his daughter then fell asleep, tired. Priorities a lot of people in Hollywoo could learn from.

    A big problem for most people, famous or not, nowadays is their choice to be childless: for those who have children, even one, barring evil and psychopathy in the parent, that child or those children become so important and beloved, and time with them so precious, there simply isn't any left to fabricate elaborate hoaxes, march in the streets bemoaning penises every other week, etc.
  120. @Anon

    Justin Hurwitz’s score for First Man is fine, but Moon movie scores have to compete against the two Strausses of 2001. The only outer space movie to top 2001 in scoring was von Trier’s Melancholia, which used Wagner’s epochal prelude to Tristan und Isolde.
     
    Long term, a movie is better off having a great original score, rather than a classical chestnut.

    Not every director has the bandwidth to, along with everything else he has to do, work with a score composer. Ennio Morricone has a sort of informal autobiography coming out in which he bitches about being ignored by directors, or dealing with mercurial directors, or being micromanaged.

    http://global.oup.com/academic/covers/uk/pop-up/9780190681012

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2019/feb/23/ennio-morricone-composer-film-makers-directors-cliches-music

    Sergio Leone comes off pretty well in the book.

    By the way, the Danish National Symphony Orchestra's performance of Morricone's Leone themes included a guy in a noose hanging from the right balcony. They're touring with this repertory. I wonder if any U.S. appearances will have the noose.

    https://youtu.be/KkM71JPHfjk?t=123

    I’ve always loved this theme and watch this youtube. Did you catch the guns as earrings in the “wah, wah” singer’s ears? Nice touch.

  121. @Harry Baldwin
    I think “Wakanda” makes a pretty good term for black wishful thinking and fake history.

    How about:

    To Wakandize [something], (verb).

    “The filmmaker’s tired and wakandized fare features an opening scene in which a group of quietly heroic Black scientists intervene to stop a rampaging White gang on a rape spree.”

    ___________

    Slim pickings on Google for “wakandize.” It has gotten scattered use, more often used unironically than ironically:

    A United States of Africa will Wakandize ALL of Africa …

  122. And the most menopaused moment of the Hackademy Reparations for 2019 goes to:

    Period.

  123. @Kaganovitch
    european and jewish men up to 60 can still make a movie of any value.

    Eastwood made good movies in his late seventies, and even his pushing ninety movies are above average

    Spielberg’s still got his chops in his 70s: his quickie movie about the Washington Post was very well done from the standpoint of directorial competence. What’s harder to do when you are old is come up with something new within yourself that you haven’t done before.

    Eastwood makes a ridiculous number of movies, and he makes them without expending all that much effort, but “American Sniper” was extremely well done.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    Eastwood learned Woody Allen's trick: so long as keep methodically and regularly making movies and don't let the quality slip, you'll eventually get into pattern where one will be great.

    In fact, Allen and Eastwood have likely (though inadvertently) "moneyballed" their careers, where they just keep on trucking the same way that's gotten them decent praise and eventually hit one out of the park on the regular.

    That, and they have niches that no one else can exploit. Allen does Boomer-Jew-NYC-romanticized schtick that no one else is around to do anymore, and Eastwood does white masculine movies that no one knows how to do anymore because everyone else is a feminist/racist who hates white men.
    , @Dtbb
    I was watching the Pebble Beach tournament and Faldo was ribbing Eastwood about f stops and filters he would use to photogragh the course. Eastwood seemed serious when he said he knew zilch about photography. I was a little shocked. Maybe he was being humble but it didn't seem that way to me.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Steve, Eastwood is a rarity in that he has written, produced, directed and scored movies.
  124. Steve,

    Gran Torino was nothing to sneeze at, either, and the crash parts of Sully were so well done that you could ignore the rest of it. I agree with you about Spielberg. I like Bridge of Spies quite a bit, and while I didn’t think the story of The Post had much to recommend it, it was a fun watch. I didn’t like Lincoln, but I’m in a minority there.

    • Replies: @Corn
    “Gran Torino was nothing to sneeze at, either”

    Am I the only one who thinks Gran Torino is overrated?
  125. @Steve Sailer
    Spielberg's still got his chops in his 70s: his quickie movie about the Washington Post was very well done from the standpoint of directorial competence. What's harder to do when you are old is come up with something new within yourself that you haven't done before.

    Eastwood makes a ridiculous number of movies, and he makes them without expending all that much effort, but "American Sniper" was extremely well done.

    Eastwood learned Woody Allen’s trick: so long as keep methodically and regularly making movies and don’t let the quality slip, you’ll eventually get into pattern where one will be great.

    In fact, Allen and Eastwood have likely (though inadvertently) “moneyballed” their careers, where they just keep on trucking the same way that’s gotten them decent praise and eventually hit one out of the park on the regular.

    That, and they have niches that no one else can exploit. Allen does Boomer-Jew-NYC-romanticized schtick that no one else is around to do anymore, and Eastwood does white masculine movies that no one knows how to do anymore because everyone else is a feminist/racist who hates white men.

    • Agree: Ghost of Bull Moose
    • Replies: @restless94110

    Allen does Boomer-Jew-NYC-romanticized schtick that no one else is around to do anymore
     
    Allen's recent films--about 6 of them--made in Europe, have nary a thing to do with Boomer-Jew-NYC anything. All the leads in those films made in England, Spain, France and Italy are Gen-X and there is no Jewish story lines to any of them. Moreover they had no NYC in them.

    Most of them were fine fine films using the best of up and coming actors. Several of them led to Academy Awards for the actors involved.

    You theory is nonsense. I think you meant to say that Allen does great films one after the other that are just small, hand-made, well-made films that few in the film "industry" can make today.

    The fact is that if a filmmaker (like Allen or Eastwood) can make a small film that makes its money back and a bit of profit then that filmmaker can continue to make films forever.

    That is the "secret" of Allen and Eastwood: their films almost always turn profit even if small profit. It has nothing to do with stupid Boomer-Jew-NYC theory nonsense.
  126. The year not good for the Jews, eh?

  127. What do you think Spike Lee thought of Black Panther?

  128. @International Jew
    OT but could someone experienced write a primer on how to become a Twitter troll? No, seriously. Almost everywhere I go now, I read stupid stuff but the disappearance of comment sections frustrates my natural impulse to stick something in the author's eye.

    I see the Twitter logo, but I don't understand some basics. Like, who will see my tweet? It seems the Twitter logo takes you to a general-purpose forum devoted to the publication as a whole, not to the specific article.

    I see Steve tweets, and famous people respond to him. Is that because Steve himself is (semi-)famous? Or would my eye-poking also be felt, even a little?

    I was on Twitter, but they ‘temporarily’ banned me when Roseanne retweeted one of my trolly tweets. She got in some trouble IRL as a result, but me they just suspended my sock puppet account. Twitter wanted ‘more contact information’ in order to reactivate me, but by then I was bored of Twitter so I didn’t bother.

    People will engage you. The key is not to be too nasty or crazy or use profanity, because they will (understandably) block you. Michael Ian Black and I used to go back and forth quite a bit, but again, you can’t just attack them. I had some random followers, Roger Stone(until he was banned), a couple of comics, a couple of NYTimes writers, some NYC media people and local politics people, because I’d tweet about local politics. Bill de Blasio’s idiot spokesperson would @ me at 3 in the morning while I was asleep, he was probably drunk.

    The easiest people to troll are folks like the lady Steve posted about, who was complaining of Russian trolls. Think HuffPo writers or Teen Vogue think-piece authors. These (usually) ladies get very stroppy very easily, but they’re not so good with the persiflage.

    There’s a thing called ‘ratio-ing’ where packs of someone’s fans fill your responses, giving you a bad ‘ratio’ or something. This is what the Chapo Trap House fans like to do, and they’ve swarmed a couple of conservative-leaning writers I know. But they are just extremely dumb pothead leftist mosquitos, and you get to decide who you want to respond to as well.

    If you’re gonna be a twitter troll, have fun with it and keep it light. It can be mildly amusing, in the way that playing that Candy Crush game presumably is. It’s a time suck, and I promise you no one has ever spent an hour and a half snarking at some antiFa dipshit on Twitter and afterwards thought, ‘That was great, what a great use of my precious and finite time on earth.’

    One thing to know, iSteve will ‘like’ virtually anything you send to him, because he’s a nice guy, and also he knows what Italian men know about compliments, that a ‘like’ costs you nothing so why be stingy.

    • Replies: @Lari

    It’s a time suck, and I promise you no one has ever spent an hour and a half snarking at some antiFa dipshit on Twitter and afterwards thought, ‘That was great, what a great use of my precious and finite time on earth.’
     
    Admittedly, it’s the first thing that crossed my mind when you mentioned engaging in a twitter conversation with Michael Ian Schwartz.
    , @International Jew

    I promise you no one has ever spent an hour and a half snarking at some antiFa dipshit on Twitter and afterwards thought, ‘That was great, what a great use of my precious and finite time on earth.’
     
    LOL. Thanks for the great answers to my question, everybody!
    , @Mr McKenna

    The key is not to be too nasty or crazy or use profanity, because they will (understandably) block you.
     
    True dat! Block you or give you a blue checkmark

    https://sfcmac.files.wordpress.com/2017/10/keith-olbermann-moonbat.png
  129. @Anonymous

    When you’re crippled by a stroke, or suffering from Alzheimer’s, you don’t want to end up a ward of the state. Competent privately paid health care givers are almost impossible to find. Would you like to hand your crippled ass to a STATE paid health worker? Do you believe in Magic?
     
    State-funded care is undesirable. It's impossible to find private care. What is the answer?

    State-funded care is undesirable. It’s impossible to find private care. What is the answer?

    I said almost impossible. Your chances of good care increase with how much money you’re willing to put up. Base price is $17K a month. If you paid double that a month, you’re likely to find good care.

    Less than $17K?

    No.

    Speaking of which, we’re about to have a large wave of Alzheimer’s patients. The Boomer generation is just about ripe for it. Most have led lifestyles that solicit it. Might be a reason Trump has kept the foreign visa door open. At some point in the future, we’re gonna need a LOT of “affordable” health care workers to service Alzheimer’s patients. I think the media will register the surge as a growing problem by the middle of Trump’s second term.

  130. @Reg Cæsar
    That's what I said. But are they stylistically distinguishable? The Kinks had two sounds, the noisy and the literate folky, but it was usually Ray Davies doing both.

    Queen likewise had a noisy, thrashy, rappish sound and an operatic one. But those two don't line up with the individual composers. They're almost perpendicular.

    I wasn’t disagreeing!

  131. @El Dato
    Woke and broke: Oscars resort to purging rather than risking going off script

    The organizers now live in a such a state of fear of causing offence that it’s going ahead without a host this year. Comedian Kevin Hart was going to take on the low-reward, high-risk gig, but someone unearthed homophobic tweets he’d sent back in 2010, so that was the end of that, and he stepped down.

    In some ways, I was impressed how ahead of his time Hart was. There can’t have been many people who had spotted Twitter’s potential for bigotry all the way back in 2010!

    Personally, I’m waiting for a remake of ‘Back to the Future’ where, after being sacked over an inappropriate photograph taken decades earlier, Marty McFly takes his DeLorean back in time to burn all the copies of his high-school yearbook and assassinate the inventors of Twitter. Now THAT would be a film deserving of an Oscar.

    Anyway, I digress. The response from the organizers of the Oscar committee over Hart’s decision to step down in the face of the now-familiar public outrage was not to replace him, but to have no host at all. That is a reaction in the best traditions of freedom of expression; if you can’t find someone to say the right thing just purge the position altogether. It’s an authoritarian tactic that has always worked so well in the past.

    Instead we’ll be treated to a string of actors presenting individual awards in a way they do best, reading the words from a script. That’s the official script, not the unwritten one which everyone is expected to know off by heart so as not to offend.
     

    Public figures should hire PR companies to do all their social media posts. Seriously, nobody cares what Jennifer Lawrence thinks about Jussie Smollett or Brett Kavanaugh. Men want to see her anatomy, and women want to see what designer dress she’s wearing. Why alienate potential fans?

  132. @Reg Cæsar

    I find it hard to watch movies in black in white.
     
    Do they still sell those special glasses in the back of comic books?

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.
     
    Because some underpaid West Hollywood hack is up to the level of Jean Renoir, James Wong Howe, and Nestor Almendros. Yeah, right.

    “Because some underpaid West Hollywood hack is up to the level of Jean Renoir, James Wong Howe, and Nestor Almendros. Yeah, right.”

    Or Karl Struss, John Alton, and Robert Krasker. Or Russell Boyd, John A. Alonzo, and F. A. Young. Robert Burks.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    https://youtu.be/YKfRkSaqTxg
  133. Oscars 2019:

    Blackity, blackity, blackity…Green

  134. @Trevor H.
    Part of the problem is that (according to the precepts of the Woke Stack) a black man may only be replaced with a black woman. This leaves fairly few options if they want anyone to watch at all.

    Something similar happened when our schools supervisor--a black man for whom we had to pay mightily--moved on to a political sinecure. Since his performance had been mediocre at best, it made little sense to boost the salary even further for diminishing results.

    So we cut the salary by 50% (essentially back to where it had been before our little experiment) and hired a white male who's doing a great job and actually moving us closer to our goals.

    No one's daring to talk about any of the implications, but the good thing is that we've demonstrated our racial-cultural bona fides for the time being, and can actually get down to work for awhile.

    Isn’t that how NFL head coaching works?

  135. @Hail
    The phrase/concept "Jump the Shark" is a pretty dated reference by now.

    Black Panther may symbolize a conceptual fusion of "Jumping the Shark," in the classic entertainment-biz/culture sense, with what people meant by "Affirmative Action Nobel Peace Prize" when Obama got it after a few months in office in 2009.

    Maybe "Black Panther" or "Wakanda" will be transformed into a "Jump the Shark"-like idiom for the 2020s and beyond.

    Nobody says “jump the shark” anymore.

    Now it’s “nuke the fridge.”

  136. “…The word today is irony; the date, the 24th; the month, February, which also happens to be the shortest month of the year, which also happens to be Black History Month; the year, 2019; the year, 1619.

    History, herstory. 1619, 2019.

    Four hundred years, our ancestors were stolen from Africa and enslaved.

    They worked the land from morning to night.”

    “Before the world tonight I give praise to my ancestors who built our country, along with the genocide of our native people,” he continued.

    “We all connect with ancestors, to regain our humanity.

    It will be a powerful moment.”

    https://variety.com/2019/film/news/spike-lee-wins-oscar-academy-awards-blackkklansman-1203147948/

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    bored, reread that comment twice. So Lee is praising the genocide of the Native Peoples?
  137. @Harry Baldwin
    I hope I have the nerve to eat a bullet if I get an Alzheimers diagnosis. Trebly confirmed of course.

    But if you actually do have Alzheimer's, each time it's confirmed you'll think it's the first.

    Alzheimer’s pts. are escape artists nonpareil . No matter how secure you may think their restraints are they will get out of them in a surprisingly short amount of time .

  138. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    I was on Twitter, but they 'temporarily' banned me when Roseanne retweeted one of my trolly tweets. She got in some trouble IRL as a result, but me they just suspended my sock puppet account. Twitter wanted 'more contact information' in order to reactivate me, but by then I was bored of Twitter so I didn't bother.

    People will engage you. The key is not to be too nasty or crazy or use profanity, because they will (understandably) block you. Michael Ian Black and I used to go back and forth quite a bit, but again, you can't just attack them. I had some random followers, Roger Stone(until he was banned), a couple of comics, a couple of NYTimes writers, some NYC media people and local politics people, because I'd tweet about local politics. Bill de Blasio's idiot spokesperson would @ me at 3 in the morning while I was asleep, he was probably drunk.

    The easiest people to troll are folks like the lady Steve posted about, who was complaining of Russian trolls. Think HuffPo writers or Teen Vogue think-piece authors. These (usually) ladies get very stroppy very easily, but they're not so good with the persiflage.

    There's a thing called 'ratio-ing' where packs of someone's fans fill your responses, giving you a bad 'ratio' or something. This is what the Chapo Trap House fans like to do, and they've swarmed a couple of conservative-leaning writers I know. But they are just extremely dumb pothead leftist mosquitos, and you get to decide who you want to respond to as well.

    If you're gonna be a twitter troll, have fun with it and keep it light. It can be mildly amusing, in the way that playing that Candy Crush game presumably is. It's a time suck, and I promise you no one has ever spent an hour and a half snarking at some antiFa dipshit on Twitter and afterwards thought, 'That was great, what a great use of my precious and finite time on earth.'

    One thing to know, iSteve will 'like' virtually anything you send to him, because he's a nice guy, and also he knows what Italian men know about compliments, that a 'like' costs you nothing so why be stingy.

    It’s a time suck, and I promise you no one has ever spent an hour and a half snarking at some antiFa dipshit on Twitter and afterwards thought, ‘That was great, what a great use of my precious and finite time on earth.’

    Admittedly, it’s the first thing that crossed my mind when you mentioned engaging in a twitter conversation with Michael Ian Schwartz.

    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Right. MIB is at least civil and will joke around with you. J Pod gives you one answer and then tells you to go F yourself.
  139. @Kylie
    "Because some underpaid West Hollywood hack is up to the level of Jean Renoir, James Wong Howe, and Nestor Almendros. Yeah, right."

    Or Karl Struss, John Alton, and Robert Krasker. Or Russell Boyd, John A. Alonzo, and F. A. Young. Robert Burks.

    • Replies: @Lari
    Took a while for the newer Scots to assimilate.
    , @Kylie
    Barney Google was a staple of my childhood, thanks to my father's fondness for him.
  140. @Steve Sailer
    Spielberg's still got his chops in his 70s: his quickie movie about the Washington Post was very well done from the standpoint of directorial competence. What's harder to do when you are old is come up with something new within yourself that you haven't done before.

    Eastwood makes a ridiculous number of movies, and he makes them without expending all that much effort, but "American Sniper" was extremely well done.

    I was watching the Pebble Beach tournament and Faldo was ribbing Eastwood about f stops and filters he would use to photogragh the course. Eastwood seemed serious when he said he knew zilch about photography. I was a little shocked. Maybe he was being humble but it didn’t seem that way to me.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Eastwood famously films one or two takes for most scenes when directing.

    He's just not interested in hoighty-toighty technical minutiae or filming ten takes to get everything just so; he knows one can always fuss that little bit more and never be completely satisfied, so he wisely avoids such so-called analysis-paralysis altogether. Knows what he wants, gets it, moves on.

    A man's man and an actor's director.
    , @restless94110
    A director does not need to deal with or care about f-stops. That's what the Director of Photography is for. Why would Eastwood care or know about that stuff? He has his DP to do all of that. For years, Eastwood used Bruce Surtees, whose "look" was very dark (Don Seigel used Bruce too, see "Escape from Alcatraz").

    Faldo was ignorant in "ribbing" Eastwood about stuff that has nothing to do with direction.
  141. @Steve Sailer
    Bryan May controlled a lot of the song rights and thus, with the drummer, had a lot of influence in shaping the movie to be less Woke than you'd expect.

    Director Brian May got #MeTooed partway through

    I think the point is that the original director was *Bryan Singer*. Again, he wasn’t #MeTooed during the production. He was #MeTooed long before the production, when Hollywood chose not to give a shit.

    Rumor has it that his erratic behavior during the filming was due to stress from his awareness of a new investigation, which only broke long after he was fired by the studio.

    Steve, you’re just doing this to puss off those of us who have forgotten to mail in our annual contribution. I promise to correct that oversight this week.

  142. @Reg Cæsar
    https://youtu.be/YKfRkSaqTxg

    Took a while for the newer Scots to assimilate.

  143. @Lurker
    I think everyone in Queen wrote songs and more importantly - commercially successful songs.

    They were all good backup singers too.

  144. @Kaganovitch
    european and jewish men up to 60 can still make a movie of any value.

    Eastwood made good movies in his late seventies, and even his pushing ninety movies are above average

    “Eastwood made good movies in his late seventies, and even his pushing ninety movies are above average”

    yes, but we don’t measure the output of a field by the few outliers. i’m sure a few good movies were made by guys under 30, but 30 to 60 is about the age range for making anything of note. a master director gets about 25 years, give or take, then his window is closed. even then, he’s often coasting on what some other writer in his prime has written for a script.

    must human endeavor has an age range, and an HBD range too. measuring the rise, peak, and decline of some field is not complete guesswork if you know the demographics and birth rates of the primary heavy lifters.

    “Spielberg’s still got his chops in his 70s”

    no. hasn’t made anything of note after 2000. can he still make a movie. sure. anything important? nah. same as the other old masters.

    the new avatars should be about it for cameron.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Spielberg put out two fine movies in 2002 alone: Minority Report and Catch Me If You Can.

    His problem is that when you get to make as many movies as Spielberg has made and they make huge amounts of money and get huge amounts of attention, there aren't that many underexposed parts of your unique personality left to display. But Spielberg remains highly competent. He's just unlikely to surprise us again, the way, say, "Duel" surprised me when I saw it as a Saturday Night TV movie in 1971 when I was 12. Who is this guy who made this really cool movie? What's he going to do next?

    , @Mr. Anon

    the new avatars should be about it for cameron.
     
    The last cameron movie I thought was anygood was T2. Truth is, he isn't very good. I think his ex-wife is a much better director than he is.
  145. Jim Crow South beat Wakanda. Woo hoo!

  146. @Anonymous

    When you’re crippled by a stroke, or suffering from Alzheimer’s, you don’t want to end up a ward of the state. Competent privately paid health care givers are almost impossible to find. Would you like to hand your crippled ass to a STATE paid health worker? Do you believe in Magic?
     
    State-funded care is undesirable. It's impossible to find private care. What is the answer?

    That’s going to become a potent political issue over the next decade or so.

  147. @prime noticer
    "Eastwood made good movies in his late seventies, and even his pushing ninety movies are above average"

    yes, but we don't measure the output of a field by the few outliers. i'm sure a few good movies were made by guys under 30, but 30 to 60 is about the age range for making anything of note. a master director gets about 25 years, give or take, then his window is closed. even then, he's often coasting on what some other writer in his prime has written for a script.

    must human endeavor has an age range, and an HBD range too. measuring the rise, peak, and decline of some field is not complete guesswork if you know the demographics and birth rates of the primary heavy lifters.

    "Spielberg’s still got his chops in his 70s"

    no. hasn't made anything of note after 2000. can he still make a movie. sure. anything important? nah. same as the other old masters.

    the new avatars should be about it for cameron.

    Spielberg put out two fine movies in 2002 alone: Minority Report and Catch Me If You Can.

    His problem is that when you get to make as many movies as Spielberg has made and they make huge amounts of money and get huge amounts of attention, there aren’t that many underexposed parts of your unique personality left to display. But Spielberg remains highly competent. He’s just unlikely to surprise us again, the way, say, “Duel” surprised me when I saw it as a Saturday Night TV movie in 1971 when I was 12. Who is this guy who made this really cool movie? What’s he going to do next?

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Spielberg put out two fine movies in 2002 alone: Minority Report and Catch Me If You Can.
     
    Those weren't bad. The best Spielberg movie I've seen since 2002 was Warhorse. I liked that one quite alot.
  148. Topher Grace’s paternal grandmother was Jewish. She was from the Wollman family. Kate Wollman, a relative of Topher, donated the money to build the famous Wollman ice skating rink in New York.

  149. Deadline Hollywood:

    Spike Lee Pulls A Kanye When ‘Green Book’ Takes Best Picture Oscar

    While he didn’t take the stage like Kanye West did years ago on the MTV Video Music Awards when Taylor Swift won an award that he felt should have gone to Beyonce, BlacKkKlansman director Spike Lee did the next best thing when the Best Picture Oscar was won by Green Book. Our Pete Hammond, reporting from the Dolby Theatre, reported that Lee was clearly furious, got up and walked toward the back of the auditorium in a huff. He then turned back and appeared to get into an intense conversation with Jordan Peele, who was behind him. Lee paced the aisle and stormed to the back of the auditorium. When he came back, he turned his back to the stage during the speech.

    On a recent appearance he made on CBS Sunday Morning to promote his Best Picture candidate, Lee recalled the time that Do The Right Thing didn’t get a Best Picture nomination in 1989, the year that Driving Miss Daisy won. At that time, he said he wasn’t commenting on Green Book, but might have something to say if that film won. Don’t be surprised if microphones follow him everywhere. Awkward moment for Universal, which released Green Book, and whose Focus Features released BlacKkKlansman.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    Deadline Hollywood:

    Spike Lee On ‘BlacKkKlansman’ Losing Best Pic To ‘Green Book’: ‘Every Time Somebody Is Driving Somebody, I Lose’

    The backstage press corps here at the Oscars had questions for Spike Lee after his reaction to Green Book winning Best Picture tonight.

    Asked if his Adapted Screenplay win for BlacKkKlansman makes up for Do the Right Thing loss at the 1990 Oscars and the Academy overlooking it for a Best Picture nomination, Lee quipped making referencing to that year’s Driving Miss Daisy Best Picture win, “I’m snake bit. Every time somebody is driving somebody, I lose – but they chanted the seating arrangement!”

    Pressed again about his sore loser response in the Dolby Theater, Lee responded, “Oh wait a minute, what reaction did you see? What did I do?” he continued. “No, I thought I was court side at the [Madison Square] Garden. The ref made a bad call.”

    Still, while Lee didn’t win out in the Best Picture category this year, he finally found himself in that category, which he was happy to acknowledge. In an Oscar night bringing forth multiple historic wins for the African-American community, Lee knows who he has to thank for his own win, in the category of Best Adapted Screenplay.

    “Here’s the thing: Without April Reign, #OscarsSoWhite and the former President of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, I wouldn’t be here tonight. [The Academy’s] more diverse. That wouldn’t have happened without Cheryl Boone Isaacs,” Lee told the press. “Facts.”
     
  150. @Lari

    It’s a time suck, and I promise you no one has ever spent an hour and a half snarking at some antiFa dipshit on Twitter and afterwards thought, ‘That was great, what a great use of my precious and finite time on earth.’
     
    Admittedly, it’s the first thing that crossed my mind when you mentioned engaging in a twitter conversation with Michael Ian Schwartz.

    Right. MIB is at least civil and will joke around with you. J Pod gives you one answer and then tells you to go F yourself.

  151. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    I was on Twitter, but they 'temporarily' banned me when Roseanne retweeted one of my trolly tweets. She got in some trouble IRL as a result, but me they just suspended my sock puppet account. Twitter wanted 'more contact information' in order to reactivate me, but by then I was bored of Twitter so I didn't bother.

    People will engage you. The key is not to be too nasty or crazy or use profanity, because they will (understandably) block you. Michael Ian Black and I used to go back and forth quite a bit, but again, you can't just attack them. I had some random followers, Roger Stone(until he was banned), a couple of comics, a couple of NYTimes writers, some NYC media people and local politics people, because I'd tweet about local politics. Bill de Blasio's idiot spokesperson would @ me at 3 in the morning while I was asleep, he was probably drunk.

    The easiest people to troll are folks like the lady Steve posted about, who was complaining of Russian trolls. Think HuffPo writers or Teen Vogue think-piece authors. These (usually) ladies get very stroppy very easily, but they're not so good with the persiflage.

    There's a thing called 'ratio-ing' where packs of someone's fans fill your responses, giving you a bad 'ratio' or something. This is what the Chapo Trap House fans like to do, and they've swarmed a couple of conservative-leaning writers I know. But they are just extremely dumb pothead leftist mosquitos, and you get to decide who you want to respond to as well.

    If you're gonna be a twitter troll, have fun with it and keep it light. It can be mildly amusing, in the way that playing that Candy Crush game presumably is. It's a time suck, and I promise you no one has ever spent an hour and a half snarking at some antiFa dipshit on Twitter and afterwards thought, 'That was great, what a great use of my precious and finite time on earth.'

    One thing to know, iSteve will 'like' virtually anything you send to him, because he's a nice guy, and also he knows what Italian men know about compliments, that a 'like' costs you nothing so why be stingy.

    I promise you no one has ever spent an hour and a half snarking at some antiFa dipshit on Twitter and afterwards thought, ‘That was great, what a great use of my precious and finite time on earth.’

    LOL. Thanks for the great answers to my question, everybody!

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    I promise you no one has ever spent an hour and a half snarking at some antiFa dipshit on Twitter and afterwards thought, ‘That was great, what a great use of my precious and finite time on earth.’
     
    But if you can get engagement with a reply to someone with influence, either from that person or because your reply gets picked up by others and liked or retweeted, would it be?

    IJ, judging by the quality of your posts here, I bet you could eventually get a follow from Ann Coulter. She follows and regularly retweets dissident accounts. She has 2M followers herself, so if you get a retweet it could have some marginal impact.
  152. @The preferred nomenclature is...
    My CPA practice has a heavy focus in the estate and trust area. In my experience, mixed families always in end in a dispute after the wealth creator dies.

    Best suggestion, if you want your money to go to your biological children, have a very well-written trust instrument, have the step-spouse (the one without the money) have their own separate independent counsel review the document. Then have the non-money spouse sign off on the document in conjunction with their counsel and their children that are not from the moneyed spouse. And do all this while in good health. I'd also renew those signatures annually if the pot is big enough.

    In my experience, mixed families always in end in a dispute after the wealth creator dies.

    What about interracial families?

  153. @Lot
    "Roma, acquits Oscar voters on artistic grounds: foreign-language, black and white"

    I find it hard to watch movies in black in white.

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    “Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.”

    Anyone colorizing anything originally produced in black and white has the wrong idea and has the wrong idea in every way the idea can be wrong.

    Destroys the history

    Destroys the clarity

    Fractures the reality

  154. @Steve Sailer
    The funniest Best Song oscar was when the Academy had Antonio Banderas and Carlos Santana perform the nominated song from some Che Guevara biopic. But they gave a terrible rendition and the song didn't appear to have any melody. So, when the South American composer was called up on stage to get his Oscar, instead of giving a speech, he just sang a capella the nicest part of his song for 20 seconds in Spanish so everybody could hear that it really did deserve to win and then walked off.

    Good for him; the best artists don’t take this shit too seriously anyway. I once met an amazing woman marathoner who kept winning races everywhere I encountered her. I pointed out I’d been noticing how fast she was and congratulated her on winning so many races that season. She just laughed and said nobody does all that for a medal, her point being she was just doing what she’d do anyway even if there were no formal races.

    Phil Collins told Johnny Carson a little later he thought if he’d been allowed to perform they’d have made him do some cheesy, overproduced number with dancers anyway, and he later did perform for the idiots at the Oscars and he accepted his Oscar for Tarzan gracefully.

    Eminem didn’t even go to the event because he spent the day playing and watching cartoons with his daughter then fell asleep, tired. Priorities a lot of people in Hollywoo could learn from.

    A big problem for most people, famous or not, nowadays is their choice to be childless: for those who have children, even one, barring evil and psychopathy in the parent, that child or those children become so important and beloved, and time with them so precious, there simply isn’t any left to fabricate elaborate hoaxes, march in the streets bemoaning penises every other week, etc.

    • Replies: @RVBlake
    Excellent comment. Your last paragraph reminds me of my undying loathing of political marchers who drag their children to their street activities, making the tykes hold up idiotic signs.
  155. Anonymous[534] • Disclaimer says:
    @International Jew

    I promise you no one has ever spent an hour and a half snarking at some antiFa dipshit on Twitter and afterwards thought, ‘That was great, what a great use of my precious and finite time on earth.’
     
    LOL. Thanks for the great answers to my question, everybody!

    I promise you no one has ever spent an hour and a half snarking at some antiFa dipshit on Twitter and afterwards thought, ‘That was great, what a great use of my precious and finite time on earth.’

    But if you can get engagement with a reply to someone with influence, either from that person or because your reply gets picked up by others and liked or retweeted, would it be?

    IJ, judging by the quality of your posts here, I bet you could eventually get a follow from Ann Coulter. She follows and regularly retweets dissident accounts. She has 2M followers herself, so if you get a retweet it could have some marginal impact.

    • Replies: @International Jew

    IJ, judging by the quality of your posts here, I bet you could eventually get a follow from Ann Coulter.
     
    Wow, thanks!
  156. I really enjoy film. And while I have not been as enamoured as I once was about the Oscars, there have always been years of ebb and flow of what might be considered “a year of fantastic films” just don’t materialize.

    I remain jaded since 2003. And since the election, Hollywood appears to be as unhinged as the democratic, socialist and communist parties.

    But I can be interrupted to watch the “In Memoriam” tributes. I am sure I may come around with time. But its hard to be excited about a community that would just as soon hand me from the nearest lamp post for being a conservative.

    Note: There have been some very good films this year.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    I really enjoy film.
     
    Why do you think that is?

    Note: There have been some very good films this year.
     
    Such as? What makes a film "very good"?
  157. @MEH 0910
    Deadline Hollywood:

    Spike Lee Pulls A Kanye When ‘Green Book’ Takes Best Picture Oscar

    While he didn’t take the stage like Kanye West did years ago on the MTV Video Music Awards when Taylor Swift won an award that he felt should have gone to Beyonce, BlacKkKlansman director Spike Lee did the next best thing when the Best Picture Oscar was won by Green Book. Our Pete Hammond, reporting from the Dolby Theatre, reported that Lee was clearly furious, got up and walked toward the back of the auditorium in a huff. He then turned back and appeared to get into an intense conversation with Jordan Peele, who was behind him. Lee paced the aisle and stormed to the back of the auditorium. When he came back, he turned his back to the stage during the speech.

    On a recent appearance he made on CBS Sunday Morning to promote his Best Picture candidate, Lee recalled the time that Do The Right Thing didn’t get a Best Picture nomination in 1989, the year that Driving Miss Daisy won. At that time, he said he wasn’t commenting on Green Book, but might have something to say if that film won. Don’t be surprised if microphones follow him everywhere. Awkward moment for Universal, which released Green Book, and whose Focus Features released BlacKkKlansman.
     

    Deadline Hollywood:

    Spike Lee On ‘BlacKkKlansman’ Losing Best Pic To ‘Green Book’: ‘Every Time Somebody Is Driving Somebody, I Lose’

    The backstage press corps here at the Oscars had questions for Spike Lee after his reaction to Green Book winning Best Picture tonight.

    Asked if his Adapted Screenplay win for BlacKkKlansman makes up for Do the Right Thing loss at the 1990 Oscars and the Academy overlooking it for a Best Picture nomination, Lee quipped making referencing to that year’s Driving Miss Daisy Best Picture win, “I’m snake bit. Every time somebody is driving somebody, I lose – but they chanted the seating arrangement!”

    Pressed again about his sore loser response in the Dolby Theater, Lee responded, “Oh wait a minute, what reaction did you see? What did I do?” he continued. “No, I thought I was court side at the [Madison Square] Garden. The ref made a bad call.”

    Still, while Lee didn’t win out in the Best Picture category this year, he finally found himself in that category, which he was happy to acknowledge. In an Oscar night bringing forth multiple historic wins for the African-American community, Lee knows who he has to thank for his own win, in the category of Best Adapted Screenplay.

    “Here’s the thing: Without April Reign, #OscarsSoWhite and the former President of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, I wouldn’t be here tonight. [The Academy’s] more diverse. That wouldn’t have happened without Cheryl Boone Isaacs,” Lee told the press. “Facts.”

  158. @Dtbb
    I was watching the Pebble Beach tournament and Faldo was ribbing Eastwood about f stops and filters he would use to photogragh the course. Eastwood seemed serious when he said he knew zilch about photography. I was a little shocked. Maybe he was being humble but it didn't seem that way to me.

    Eastwood famously films one or two takes for most scenes when directing.

    He’s just not interested in hoighty-toighty technical minutiae or filming ten takes to get everything just so; he knows one can always fuss that little bit more and never be completely satisfied, so he wisely avoids such so-called analysis-paralysis altogether. Knows what he wants, gets it, moves on.

    A man’s man and an actor’s director.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    On the other hand, a lot of Eastwood's recent movies have been mediocre. I'm not sure why American Sniper was so much better than his previous several movies, but a lot of filmmaking is like that -- sometimes, it all comes together.
  159. @Lot
    "Roma, acquits Oscar voters on artistic grounds: foreign-language, black and white"

    I find it hard to watch movies in black in white.

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "Some Like It Hot" would be a good movie to colorize. Everybody involved wanted it to be in color (Marilyn Monroe had it in her contract that it had to be in color), but the makeup on Lemmon and Curtis looked terrible in color.

    I'm not in favor of colorizing classic noir films that were carefully crafted to look best in B&W, but colorizing comedies and adventure films like "Gunga Din" seems reasonable. Young people have a hard time watching black and white movies, so why not colorize the ones that would have been done in color back then if budgets had allowed?

  160. @Lot
    "Roma, acquits Oscar voters on artistic grounds: foreign-language, black and white"

    I find it hard to watch movies in black in white.

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    I am on the tail end of watching an entire weekend of Burn’s and Allen, to colorize that series would be to demolish history, in the same way colorizing WWI and WWII documentary films wrecks so much more than the films themselves —

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Where did you find the Burns and Allen shows?
  161. @Wilkey
    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.

    Artistically I'm not sure that will ever come around. True "artists" will always insist that the original is sacrosanct. Given what we've seen with the bowdlerization of the original Star Wars trilogy, Tom & Jerry cartoons, etc., I think that's a hill worth dying on, even when the change just involves colorization. Besides, a good quality restored black and white version on a good quality TV isnt too hard on the eyes.

    Which brings up the elephant not in the room at this year's Oscars: Peter Jackson's by all reports astounding WW1 documentary "They Shall Not Grow Old." It is original footage of actual WW1 soldiers on the front lines. Not only is it colorized, but they brought in professional lip readers to figure out what the soldiers were saying. It's not up for a Best Documentary since it wasn't released in the proper theatres in time, but a year from now it should be making some noise. If it isn't then you can tell the Oscars are ruined.

    For all his faults, in many ways Jackson is the cloesest thing going nowadays tk an Orson Welles: a talented guy doing what he wants to do, often attracted to his material and driven by that material precisely because it presents challenges never before adressed adequately, then working to overcome those challenges by creating his own solutions and spending his own money. We’ve seen this with Weta, Meet the Feebles, and now this latest film. He’s pretty globo-homo, but at least he is not a hack at his craft.

  162. @Steve Sailer
    Spielberg put out two fine movies in 2002 alone: Minority Report and Catch Me If You Can.

    His problem is that when you get to make as many movies as Spielberg has made and they make huge amounts of money and get huge amounts of attention, there aren't that many underexposed parts of your unique personality left to display. But Spielberg remains highly competent. He's just unlikely to surprise us again, the way, say, "Duel" surprised me when I saw it as a Saturday Night TV movie in 1971 when I was 12. Who is this guy who made this really cool movie? What's he going to do next?

    Spielberg put out two fine movies in 2002 alone: Minority Report and Catch Me If You Can.

    Those weren’t bad. The best Spielberg movie I’ve seen since 2002 was Warhorse. I liked that one quite alot.

  163. @Reg Cæsar
    https://youtu.be/YKfRkSaqTxg

    Barney Google was a staple of my childhood, thanks to my father’s fondness for him.

  164. @prime noticer
    "Eastwood made good movies in his late seventies, and even his pushing ninety movies are above average"

    yes, but we don't measure the output of a field by the few outliers. i'm sure a few good movies were made by guys under 30, but 30 to 60 is about the age range for making anything of note. a master director gets about 25 years, give or take, then his window is closed. even then, he's often coasting on what some other writer in his prime has written for a script.

    must human endeavor has an age range, and an HBD range too. measuring the rise, peak, and decline of some field is not complete guesswork if you know the demographics and birth rates of the primary heavy lifters.

    "Spielberg’s still got his chops in his 70s"

    no. hasn't made anything of note after 2000. can he still make a movie. sure. anything important? nah. same as the other old masters.

    the new avatars should be about it for cameron.

    the new avatars should be about it for cameron.

    The last cameron movie I thought was anygood was T2. Truth is, he isn’t very good. I think his ex-wife is a much better director than he is.

  165. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    I was on Twitter, but they 'temporarily' banned me when Roseanne retweeted one of my trolly tweets. She got in some trouble IRL as a result, but me they just suspended my sock puppet account. Twitter wanted 'more contact information' in order to reactivate me, but by then I was bored of Twitter so I didn't bother.

    People will engage you. The key is not to be too nasty or crazy or use profanity, because they will (understandably) block you. Michael Ian Black and I used to go back and forth quite a bit, but again, you can't just attack them. I had some random followers, Roger Stone(until he was banned), a couple of comics, a couple of NYTimes writers, some NYC media people and local politics people, because I'd tweet about local politics. Bill de Blasio's idiot spokesperson would @ me at 3 in the morning while I was asleep, he was probably drunk.

    The easiest people to troll are folks like the lady Steve posted about, who was complaining of Russian trolls. Think HuffPo writers or Teen Vogue think-piece authors. These (usually) ladies get very stroppy very easily, but they're not so good with the persiflage.

    There's a thing called 'ratio-ing' where packs of someone's fans fill your responses, giving you a bad 'ratio' or something. This is what the Chapo Trap House fans like to do, and they've swarmed a couple of conservative-leaning writers I know. But they are just extremely dumb pothead leftist mosquitos, and you get to decide who you want to respond to as well.

    If you're gonna be a twitter troll, have fun with it and keep it light. It can be mildly amusing, in the way that playing that Candy Crush game presumably is. It's a time suck, and I promise you no one has ever spent an hour and a half snarking at some antiFa dipshit on Twitter and afterwards thought, 'That was great, what a great use of my precious and finite time on earth.'

    One thing to know, iSteve will 'like' virtually anything you send to him, because he's a nice guy, and also he knows what Italian men know about compliments, that a 'like' costs you nothing so why be stingy.

    The key is not to be too nasty or crazy or use profanity, because they will (understandably) block you.

    True dat! Block you or give you a blue checkmark

  166. @Reg Cæsar

    My wife has the red carpet ABC show on the big, black, Korean monolith in the living room.
     
    You invited Twinkie over?

    Angry face! Tlinkie not big! Tlinkie little!

  167. @Peripatetic Commenter
    Every year the Oscars go further downhill.

    I can’t believe any self-respecting person watches them.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    I can’t believe any self-respecting person watches them.
     
    Yet self respecting people watch movies produced by Hollywood and Spike Lee.
  168. @Autochthon

    Ted Turner colorizing old movies had the right idea.
     
    https://youtu.be/L4NsQYlmvZM

    “Some Like It Hot” would be a good movie to colorize. Everybody involved wanted it to be in color (Marilyn Monroe had it in her contract that it had to be in color), but the makeup on Lemmon and Curtis looked terrible in color.

    I’m not in favor of colorizing classic noir films that were carefully crafted to look best in B&W, but colorizing comedies and adventure films like “Gunga Din” seems reasonable. Young people have a hard time watching black and white movies, so why not colorize the ones that would have been done in color back then if budgets had allowed?

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    'Roman Holiday', maybe?

    That movie, as great as it is, might be even better if it were brighter and more colorful.

    , @Pericles

    “Some Like It Hot” would be a good movie to colorize. Everybody involved wanted it to be in color (Marilyn Monroe had it in her contract that it had to be in color), but the makeup on Lemmon and Curtis looked terrible in color.

     

    The life of the tranny was difficult back then too.
    , @Old Palo Altan
    Colour distracts.

    Take a film like Eisenstein's Alexander Nevsky: each frame is composed as by a Rembrandt, each closeup shows a face and reveals its character through sharply contrasted shadow and light, each landscape is low shot and thus big-skyed and brooding.

    Don't believe me? Then watch the coloured (captured Agfa film from the retreating Germans) portions of his Ivan the Terrible. You will remember the colour and little else, while the black and white scenes are etched in your memory forever, in every detail.

    Colour is for the superficial; thus the acceptability of colourising mere bagatelles like the works of Chaplin or even Laurel and Hardy. This is even truer for still photography: Emerson's Norfolk broads scenes or Stieglitz's of old New York are enduring masterpieces which, if colourised, would be no more than bad paintings.
  169. @Autochthon
    Eastwood famously films one or two takes for most scenes when directing.

    He's just not interested in hoighty-toighty technical minutiae or filming ten takes to get everything just so; he knows one can always fuss that little bit more and never be completely satisfied, so he wisely avoids such so-called analysis-paralysis altogether. Knows what he wants, gets it, moves on.

    A man's man and an actor's director.

    On the other hand, a lot of Eastwood’s recent movies have been mediocre. I’m not sure why American Sniper was so much better than his previous several movies, but a lot of filmmaking is like that — sometimes, it all comes together.

    • Replies: @Kaganovitch
    I always thought Eastwood's movies had an intimacy almost like plays, little panorama, heavy on character etc. He also shows a remarkable lack of vanity for a Hollywood icon. I'll miss him when he's gone.
  170. @Dtbb
    I was watching the Pebble Beach tournament and Faldo was ribbing Eastwood about f stops and filters he would use to photogragh the course. Eastwood seemed serious when he said he knew zilch about photography. I was a little shocked. Maybe he was being humble but it didn't seem that way to me.

    A director does not need to deal with or care about f-stops. That’s what the Director of Photography is for. Why would Eastwood care or know about that stuff? He has his DP to do all of that. For years, Eastwood used Bruce Surtees, whose “look” was very dark (Don Seigel used Bruce too, see “Escape from Alcatraz”).

    Faldo was ignorant in “ribbing” Eastwood about stuff that has nothing to do with direction.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Dtbb
    The point was he said he knew nothing about photography. I would think a director would at least know enough about it, and other jobs on the set, to at least be able to stumble through them in a severe pinch. Isn't that the director's job?
  171. @Jim Don Bob
    Since you are a movie buff, let me ask you if you saw Liam Neesom's latest whose title escapes me right now. I liked the Taken series.

    Since you are a movie buff, let me ask you if you saw Liam Neesom’s latest whose title escapes me right now. I liked the Taken series.

    I haven’t seen it, but my wife and I had been planning to go. You have to be fast to catch any non-blockbuster these days. They’re gone from the theaters in a week or two. I suspect we’ll wind up catching this one at the local discount cinema.

    • Replies: @Jack D

    catching this one at the local discount cinema.
     
    And then you could go to the malt shop afterwards for a root beer float.

    Do you live in some kind of time warp zone? Where I live, not only are discount theaters long gone, so are their replacements, the video rental store. Do they not have Netflix where you live?
  172. @Anon

    Justin Hurwitz’s score for First Man is fine, but Moon movie scores have to compete against the two Strausses of 2001. The only outer space movie to top 2001 in scoring was von Trier’s Melancholia, which used Wagner’s epochal prelude to Tristan und Isolde.
     
    Long term, a movie is better off having a great original score, rather than a classical chestnut.

    Not every director has the bandwidth to, along with everything else he has to do, work with a score composer. Ennio Morricone has a sort of informal autobiography coming out in which he bitches about being ignored by directors, or dealing with mercurial directors, or being micromanaged.

    http://global.oup.com/academic/covers/uk/pop-up/9780190681012

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2019/feb/23/ennio-morricone-composer-film-makers-directors-cliches-music

    Sergio Leone comes off pretty well in the book.

    By the way, the Danish National Symphony Orchestra's performance of Morricone's Leone themes included a guy in a noose hanging from the right balcony. They're touring with this repertory. I wonder if any U.S. appearances will have the noose.

    https://youtu.be/KkM71JPHfjk?t=123

    At a glance, and in this context, I thought that the typographically styled caption on the left of that frame was Hollywood’s latest pronouncement on the pretty white gal on the right.

  173. @Steve Sailer
    "Some Like It Hot" would be a good movie to colorize. Everybody involved wanted it to be in color (Marilyn Monroe had it in her contract that it had to be in color), but the makeup on Lemmon and Curtis looked terrible in color.

    I'm not in favor of colorizing classic noir films that were carefully crafted to look best in B&W, but colorizing comedies and adventure films like "Gunga Din" seems reasonable. Young people have a hard time watching black and white movies, so why not colorize the ones that would have been done in color back then if budgets had allowed?

    ‘Roman Holiday’, maybe?

    That movie, as great as it is, might be even better if it were brighter and more colorful.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I think I started to watch "Roman Holiday" a few years ago, discovered it was in rather dingy black and white and changed the channel.

    What's the best black and white cinematography ever? (Probably not "Roma.")

  174. @Steve Sailer
    "Some Like It Hot" would be a good movie to colorize. Everybody involved wanted it to be in color (Marilyn Monroe had it in her contract that it had to be in color), but the makeup on Lemmon and Curtis looked terrible in color.

    I'm not in favor of colorizing classic noir films that were carefully crafted to look best in B&W, but colorizing comedies and adventure films like "Gunga Din" seems reasonable. Young people have a hard time watching black and white movies, so why not colorize the ones that would have been done in color back then if budgets had allowed?

    “Some Like It Hot” would be a good movie to colorize. Everybody involved wanted it to be in color (Marilyn Monroe had it in her contract that it had to be in color), but the makeup on Lemmon and Curtis looked terrible in color.

    The life of the tranny was difficult back then too.

  175. @Autochthon
    Good for him; the best artists don't take this shit too seriously anyway. I once met an amazing woman marathoner who kept winning races everywhere I encountered her. I pointed out I'd been noticing how fast she was and congratulated her on winning so many races that season. She just laughed and said nobody does all that for a medal, her point being she was just doing what she'd do anyway even if there were no formal races.

    Phil Collins told Johnny Carson a little later he thought if he'd been allowed to perform they'd have made him do some cheesy, overproduced number with dancers anyway, and he later did perform for the idiots at the Oscars and he accepted his Oscar for Tarzan gracefully.

    Eminem didn't even go to the event because he spent the day playing and watching cartoons with his daughter then fell asleep, tired. Priorities a lot of people in Hollywoo could learn from.

    A big problem for most people, famous or not, nowadays is their choice to be childless: for those who have children, even one, barring evil and psychopathy in the parent, that child or those children become so important and beloved, and time with them so precious, there simply isn't any left to fabricate elaborate hoaxes, march in the streets bemoaning penises every other week, etc.

    Excellent comment. Your last paragraph reminds me of my undying loathing of political marchers who drag their children to their street activities, making the tykes hold up idiotic signs.

  176. suspect we’ll wind up catching this one at the local discount cinema.

    Also known as The Pirate Bay

  177. @EliteCommInc.
    I am on the tail end of watching an entire weekend of Burn's and Allen, to colorize that series would be to demolish history, in the same way colorizing WWI and WWII documentary films wrecks so much more than the films themselves ---

    Where did you find the Burns and Allen shows?

    • Replies: @Lot
    Youtube seems to have thousands of complete episodes of 50s-80s TV shows, especially if there is no money being potentially lost from syndication.
  178. @The Last Real Calvinist
    'Roman Holiday', maybe?

    That movie, as great as it is, might be even better if it were brighter and more colorful.

    I think I started to watch “Roman Holiday” a few years ago, discovered it was in rather dingy black and white and changed the channel.

    What’s the best black and white cinematography ever? (Probably not “Roma.”)

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "What's the best b/w cinematography ever?"

    The Bergman/Sven Nyqvist collaborations of the 1950s/1960s.
    , @Autochthon
    Any number of Welles' or Hitchcock's pictures are contenders (Touch if Evil and Rebecca especially come to mind), or perhaps The Maltest Falcon. Hell, Nosferatu is a contender.

    It's another example why the idea of the single best in art quily becomes impossible to deal with, as each of several examples are doing quite different things with its own magic and its own shortcomings....

    I must investigate the Germ Theory's recommendations.
    , @Anonymous
    Of color-era movies I've seen I'd have to say Michael Chapman/"Raging Bull"* or
    Stefan Czapsky/"Ed Wood." Though an interesting choice for "American History X" the monochrome feels a bit too artificial and not suited for the subject, or vice versa. Jim Jarmusch's "Dead Man" (Robby Müller) though a boring flick at least looks great, has a nifty soundtrack by Neil Young too.

    (*I gather Raging Bull wasn't actually shot all on B&W stock)
    , @MidMo
    3:10 to Yuma (1957).
    , @kimchilover
    The Third Man has my vote.

    Peter Bogdonovich described The Third Man as the greatest non-auteur film ever made and I'm inclined to agree. Everything about that flick is pretty flawless, including the amazing zither score.
    , @Known Fact
    People often just think of "stark" and "edgy" for b&w cinematography, but Arthur Edeson went the other way with Casablanca, giving it a memorably rich, smooth, creamy look.

    Conrad Hall did amazing b&w work on a shoestring in 1963 for TV's Outer Limits, though his notable movie career was mainly in color
  179. @Steve Sailer
    I think I started to watch "Roman Holiday" a few years ago, discovered it was in rather dingy black and white and changed the channel.

    What's the best black and white cinematography ever? (Probably not "Roma.")

    “What’s the best b/w cinematography ever?”

    The Bergman/Sven Nyqvist collaborations of the 1950s/1960s.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Germ, Fellini or Kurosawa
  180. @Steve Sailer
    I think I started to watch "Roman Holiday" a few years ago, discovered it was in rather dingy black and white and changed the channel.

    What's the best black and white cinematography ever? (Probably not "Roma.")

    Any number of Welles’ or Hitchcock’s pictures are contenders (Touch if Evil and Rebecca especially come to mind), or perhaps The Maltest Falcon. Hell, Nosferatu is a contender.

    It’s another example why the idea of the single best in art quily becomes impossible to deal with, as each of several examples are doing quite different things with its own magic and its own shortcomings….

    I must investigate the Germ Theory’s recommendations.

  181. @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Since you are a movie buff, let me ask you if you saw Liam Neesom’s latest whose title escapes me right now. I liked the Taken series.
     
    I haven't seen it, but my wife and I had been planning to go. You have to be fast to catch any non-blockbuster these days. They're gone from the theaters in a week or two. I suspect we'll wind up catching this one at the local discount cinema.

    catching this one at the local discount cinema.

    And then you could go to the malt shop afterwards for a root beer float.

    Do you live in some kind of time warp zone? Where I live, not only are discount theaters long gone, so are their replacements, the video rental store. Do they not have Netflix where you live?

    • Replies: @Corn
    Don’t you live in one of the metropolises on the east coast?

    Discount cinemas aren’t as numerous as they were 20 or even 10 years ago but they can still be found in flyover country.
  182. Anonymous[243] • Disclaimer says:

    I’ll admit to not understanding the preferential ballot system, but is it faintly possible that National Wokeview’s Internet screech factory tipped the contest toward “Triumph of the Green Book?” They published two excoriating reviews before Thanksgiving, not really unusual in themselves, but the SEO-blessed reviews from Vox et al. came along a bit later:

    http://www.nationalreview.com/2018/11/movie-review-green-book-trite-corny-obvious/

    http://www.nationalreview.com/2018/11/movie-review-green-book-self-congratulatory-race-play/

    Maybe these or the derivative white-liberal-intern putdowns were collectively Facebooked just enough via Russian bots to impress a stray middle-aged Academy voter or two, who then thought, “Hmmm, if fancy Ivy League golfocaust Republicans [voter has obviously never heard of Armond White–or maybe has] and/or ironically-dressed hipster Bernie Bros hate it– then it must be all right”

  183. @Steve Sailer
    On the other hand, a lot of Eastwood's recent movies have been mediocre. I'm not sure why American Sniper was so much better than his previous several movies, but a lot of filmmaking is like that -- sometimes, it all comes together.

    I always thought Eastwood’s movies had an intimacy almost like plays, little panorama, heavy on character etc. He also shows a remarkable lack of vanity for a Hollywood icon. I’ll miss him when he’s gone.

  184. @EliteCommInc.
    I really enjoy film. And while I have not been as enamoured as I once was about the Oscars, there have always been years of ebb and flow of what might be considered "a year of fantastic films" just don't materialize.

    I remain jaded since 2003. And since the election, Hollywood appears to be as unhinged as the democratic, socialist and communist parties.

    But I can be interrupted to watch the "In Memoriam" tributes. I am sure I may come around with time. But its hard to be excited about a community that would just as soon hand me from the nearest lamp post for being a conservative.

    Note: There have been some very good films this year.

    I really enjoy film.

    Why do you think that is?

    Note: There have been some very good films this year.

    Such as? What makes a film “very good”?

    • Replies: @EliteCommInc.
    Because I enjoy the communication medium's:


    ability to persuade
    ability to tell a good story
    ability to simply entertain
    ability to cross boundaries
    ability to connect the human experience
    ability to engage and exploit a myriad of methods to cause one to consider themselves in relation to others

    It doesn't mean that there is not objectionable material

    I have shared my views on most of the films I saw this year on Mr. Sailors article on film from earlier this month or the end of January. This year, in response to your question I will note:

    "Can You Ever Forgive ME"


    Even as a conservative, I found the performances compelling about an interesting topic and interesting people ------ despite the offensive nonsense about same sex relations. As an understated story, it was full of value about the human condition. Aside from what I noted, I also enjoyed it because I was pleasantly surprised.

  185. Anonymous[243] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    I think I started to watch "Roman Holiday" a few years ago, discovered it was in rather dingy black and white and changed the channel.

    What's the best black and white cinematography ever? (Probably not "Roma.")

    Of color-era movies I’ve seen I’d have to say Michael Chapman/”Raging Bull”* or
    Stefan Czapsky/”Ed Wood.” Though an interesting choice for “American History X” the monochrome feels a bit too artificial and not suited for the subject, or vice versa. Jim Jarmusch’s “Dead Man” (Robby Müller) though a boring flick at least looks great, has a nifty soundtrack by Neil Young too.

    (*I gather Raging Bull wasn’t actually shot all on B&W stock)

  186. @Mr McKenna
    I can't believe any self-respecting person watches them.

    I can’t believe any self-respecting person watches them.

    Yet self respecting people watch movies produced by Hollywood and Spike Lee.

  187. Uncle Sailer would like to know “what’s the best black and white cinematography ever”?

    Assumingly that “ever” includes the “Current Year” as well, bored identity’s conclusion is that
    “Triumph of the Will “(1935) would beat up “Schindler’s List ” (1993 ) on any given day.

    Why?

    Because Belfast Safari is not the same thing as Photo Safari in Sudan.

    Because, while Schindler was in a cold pursuit, gripping a cosh and hunting random blacks to feed his killing desire, Frau Riefenstahl was generously using her crafty aperture and depth of field for the maximum exposure and celebration of Black Panther bodies:

    and here:

    and here:

    …That Guy:

  188. @Steve Sailer
    I think I started to watch "Roman Holiday" a few years ago, discovered it was in rather dingy black and white and changed the channel.

    What's the best black and white cinematography ever? (Probably not "Roma.")

    3:10 to Yuma (1957).

  189. @bored identity
    It took 30 years for Jusstice to prevail:

    https://i.postimg.cc/Ls5NHVDR/AKS-THEM-NICE-AND-HOAKSAR-IS-YOURS.jpg

    In December 1987, over one thousand people, including Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, marched through the streets of Newburgh, New York, in support of Brawley.
    It really is a war against whitey. The nogs believe all the black chilluns, brutha’s and sista’s are innocent. How dare we question their integrity.
    It was awesome that Black Panther didnt get the nod. But they opted for a mixed race moivie Green Book.
    Spike Lee was livid. It doesnt matter… there will never come a time that we will ever calm the savage black beast. They think we owe them every thing.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    In December 1987, over one thousand people, including Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, marched through the streets of Newburgh, New York, in support of Brawley.
     
    I find it unusual that none of the No Justice No Peace morons were out in support of Jussie recently. Makes me think that even the brothers didn't believe him.
  190. @Reg Cæsar

    Steve Sailer… Un-famous.

     

    Look who's talking. As an amateur geographic psephologist, I know the names of hundreds of counties, in several countries. Important ones. I have been unaware of a Bruce County until now. Had to look it up.

    It's the left half of this thing, separating Georgian Bay from the rest of Lake Huron:


    http://www.sauble-szewczyk.com/images/Grey_Bruce.gif


    I can imagine the city slickers of Penetanguishene, Goderich, and Orillia view you as hicks.


    "Bruce County" sounds like a gay parody of Opus the Penguine.

    The answer is in the reply.. As an “amateur” geographic psephologist.
    I was picking on Sailer because some of my comments weret getting posted..Og course you in your amatuer wisdom thought you should open your pie hole..
    I dont know you and you sure AF dont know me. Lets keep it that way.

  191. @education realist
    Steve,

    Gran Torino was nothing to sneeze at, either, and the crash parts of Sully were so well done that you could ignore the rest of it. I agree with you about Spielberg. I like Bridge of Spies quite a bit, and while I didn't think the story of The Post had much to recommend it, it was a fun watch. I didn't like Lincoln, but I'm in a minority there.

    “Gran Torino was nothing to sneeze at, either”

    Am I the only one who thinks Gran Torino is overrated?

  192. I only watched the first 5-10 minutes of the Oscars. I watched the first music number and then halfway through Fey and Poehler’s little bit I changed the channel.

    The media is always telling us how funny they are but they just give me a misery in the bowels.

  193. @Jack D

    catching this one at the local discount cinema.
     
    And then you could go to the malt shop afterwards for a root beer float.

    Do you live in some kind of time warp zone? Where I live, not only are discount theaters long gone, so are their replacements, the video rental store. Do they not have Netflix where you live?

    Don’t you live in one of the metropolises on the east coast?

    Discount cinemas aren’t as numerous as they were 20 or even 10 years ago but they can still be found in flyover country.

  194. @AnotherDad

    “Can You Ever Forgive Me” was too homosexual-cultish for my taste, although Richard E. Grant, who isn’t Jewish, was wonderful.
     
    I can never understand all this homo-crap in the media? Ok, I understand it's creation, I can never understand who the hell watches it.

    I didn't allow my kids to watch TV growing up. So I was out of "current year" media loop a bit for 20 years, but when I peaked back in in retirement a few years back, wow, fags everywhere! What normal person wants to see any of that? I see that crap coming--click. I'm just a normal guy, with normal healthy disgust reflex. I can't be the only one.

    I look forward to the day when medical science figures this out and we can be done with it. Future generations will look back on this age--fags, fats+tats--and want to barf. (What the hell was wrong with those primitives!)

    Yeah. When ever the effete weather”man”comes on channel 6, I flip to 8 to watch the fat lady. Much preferable. Channel 7 is out of Boston, so the weather is a bit irrelevant, but the sweet young cheesecake in the dress is balm to the eyes.

  195. @Steve Sailer
    I think I started to watch "Roman Holiday" a few years ago, discovered it was in rather dingy black and white and changed the channel.

    What's the best black and white cinematography ever? (Probably not "Roma.")

    The Third Man has my vote.

    Peter Bogdonovich described The Third Man as the greatest non-auteur film ever made and I’m inclined to agree. Everything about that flick is pretty flawless, including the amazing zither score.

  196. Is it just me, or did Spike Lee last night look and dress exactly like Samuel L. Jackson’s character from “Kingsman”?

  197. @Jim Don Bob
    Where did you find the Burns and Allen shows?

    Youtube seems to have thousands of complete episodes of 50s-80s TV shows, especially if there is no money being potentially lost from syndication.

  198. How about Michelle Yeoh saying on the red carpet “…we shouldn’t nominate people based on gender or diversity…” Think her Hollywood career is over? How long before they make her publicly apologize?

  199. @Steve Sailer
    "Some Like It Hot" would be a good movie to colorize. Everybody involved wanted it to be in color (Marilyn Monroe had it in her contract that it had to be in color), but the makeup on Lemmon and Curtis looked terrible in color.

    I'm not in favor of colorizing classic noir films that were carefully crafted to look best in B&W, but colorizing comedies and adventure films like "Gunga Din" seems reasonable. Young people have a hard time watching black and white movies, so why not colorize the ones that would have been done in color back then if budgets had allowed?

    Colour distracts.

    Take a film like Eisenstein’s Alexander Nevsky: each frame is composed as by a Rembrandt, each closeup shows a face and reveals its character through sharply contrasted shadow and light, each landscape is low shot and thus big-skyed and brooding.

    Don’t believe me? Then watch the coloured (captured Agfa film from the retreating Germans) portions of his Ivan the Terrible. You will remember the colour and little else, while the black and white scenes are etched in your memory forever, in every detail.

    Colour is for the superficial; thus the acceptability of colourising mere bagatelles like the works of Chaplin or even Laurel and Hardy. This is even truer for still photography: Emerson’s Norfolk broads scenes or Stieglitz’s of old New York are enduring masterpieces which, if colourised, would be no more than bad paintings.

  200. Do you live in some kind of time warp zone? Where I live, not only are discount theaters long gone, so are their replacements, the video rental store. Do they not have Netflix where you live?

    Yeah, Netflix (and other forms of television viewing) do exist. Last time I checked, watching TV is still just watching TV. If you wanna watch TV, knock yourself out. I’ve never lived anywhere that didn’t have discount theaters. The places I used to live in, they also still have them. Post your ZIP code, and we’ll probably discover there’s one not that far from you too.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    I'm in the Philadelphia area ( 190xx and 191xx zips). I don't think we've had a 2nd run movie house for decades. I don't know of any within 50 miles of here or more, but if you know of any, let me know. There are some non-profit type theaters that play art films but that's not the same thing as a discount or 2nd run theater.
  201. @Aardvark
    I was disappointed that smollett wasn’t up for best hate hoax until I realized we have to wait until this time next year since his production was in 2019. He could win multiple categories:
    Best Director of a hate hoax
    Best actor in a hate hoax
    Best post production denial of your production
    Etc.

    I was disappointed that smollett wasn’t up for best hate hoax until I realized we have to wait until this time next year since his production was in 2019

    But it wasn’t caught on camera! It will have to wait for the Tonys.

  202. @IHTG
    Jared talks the talk, Stephen walks the walk, Part Two:

    https://twitter.com/JessicaV_CIS/status/1099624855299899393

  203. @Anonymous
    You're the same age as Debbie Harry then. She hit the linen before the bomb hit Japan.

    Anonymous, I know who Debbie “Blondie” Harry is but what does “She hit the linen before the bomb hit Japan” mean?

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debbie_Harry

    Deborah Ann Harry (born Angela Trimble; July 1, 1945)
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Boy

    "Little Boy" was the code name for the type of atomic bomb dropped on the Japanese city of Hiroshima on 6 August 1945
     
    , @Jack D
    This means that she was born in July of 1945, just before the bombing of Hiroshima.
  204. @restless94110
    A director does not need to deal with or care about f-stops. That's what the Director of Photography is for. Why would Eastwood care or know about that stuff? He has his DP to do all of that. For years, Eastwood used Bruce Surtees, whose "look" was very dark (Don Seigel used Bruce too, see "Escape from Alcatraz").

    Faldo was ignorant in "ribbing" Eastwood about stuff that has nothing to do with direction.

    The point was he said he knew nothing about photography. I would think a director would at least know enough about it, and other jobs on the set, to at least be able to stumble through them in a severe pinch. Isn’t that the director’s job?

    • Replies: @restless94110
    And you would think wrong.

    With the extremely rare exception (such as Stephen Soderburgh, who has several times not only served as DP but has also manned the camera as operator) no director needs to know jack about the camera. It's not his job. Filmmaking is a collaborative art and has been since the first days of its inception.

    Why would a director need to stumble through the technology? You talk like you think that a film crew is on a desert island and the all of the crew just died of typhus--except for the actors and the director.

    In reality, you just hire anotehr DP, and carry on filming. The director has better things to do than to decide which f-stop to use on a golf course while he's trying to enjoy himself and some idiot thinks he knows what he's talking about and thinks "ribbing" a director about nonsense is interesting or funny.
  205. @The preferred nomenclature is...
    Perfect comment. That's why you are the tops around here.

    The Preferred, Thank You, he said as accepting his award and then I thank everyone all the way to the nuns in grammar school.

  206. @Steve Sailer
    Spielberg's still got his chops in his 70s: his quickie movie about the Washington Post was very well done from the standpoint of directorial competence. What's harder to do when you are old is come up with something new within yourself that you haven't done before.

    Eastwood makes a ridiculous number of movies, and he makes them without expending all that much effort, but "American Sniper" was extremely well done.

    Steve, Eastwood is a rarity in that he has written, produced, directed and scored movies.

  207. @bored identity



    “...The word today is irony; the date, the 24th; the month, February, which also happens to be the shortest month of the year, which also happens to be Black History Month; the year, 2019; the year, 1619.

    History, herstory. 1619, 2019.

    Four hundred years, our ancestors were stolen from Africa and enslaved.

    They worked the land from morning to night.”

    “Before the world tonight I give praise to my ancestors who built our country, along with the genocide of our native people,” he continued.

    “We all connect with ancestors, to regain our humanity.

    It will be a powerful moment.”



    https://variety.com/2019/film/news/spike-lee-wins-oscar-academy-awards-blackkklansman-1203147948/

     

    https://i.postimg.cc/FFjrgt5f/Reparation-H.jpg

    bored, reread that comment twice. So Lee is praising the genocide of the Native Peoples?

  208. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "What's the best b/w cinematography ever?"

    The Bergman/Sven Nyqvist collaborations of the 1950s/1960s.

    Germ, Fellini or Kurosawa

  209. @Buffalo Joe
    Anonymous, I know who Debbie "Blondie" Harry is but what does "She hit the linen before the bomb hit Japan" mean?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debbie_Harry

    Deborah Ann Harry (born Angela Trimble; July 1, 1945)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Boy

    “Little Boy” was the code name for the type of atomic bomb dropped on the Japanese city of Hiroshima on 6 August 1945

  210. @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Do you live in some kind of time warp zone? Where I live, not only are discount theaters long gone, so are their replacements, the video rental store. Do they not have Netflix where you live?
     
    Yeah, Netflix (and other forms of television viewing) do exist. Last time I checked, watching TV is still just watching TV. If you wanna watch TV, knock yourself out. I've never lived anywhere that didn't have discount theaters. The places I used to live in, they also still have them. Post your ZIP code, and we'll probably discover there's one not that far from you too.

    I’m in the Philadelphia area ( 190xx and 191xx zips). I don’t think we’ve had a 2nd run movie house for decades. I don’t know of any within 50 miles of here or more, but if you know of any, let me know. There are some non-profit type theaters that play art films but that’s not the same thing as a discount or 2nd run theater.

    • Replies: @Lot
    The discount second-run movie theater where I had one of my first 6th grade dates in the 1990s is still alive and running. Price has gone from $1.50 to $3.00, but they have promos going below $2.

    In the midwest at least the first set of multiplexes with 5 or 6 screens often became discount ones when the 12 and 18 screen theaters with fancy seats started opening up.
    , @Kevin O'Keeffe

    I’m in the Philadelphia area....
     
    Wow, there are a LOT of cinemas in Philadelphia.

    This is a link that will take you to a listing for all the theaters in the 19093 ZIP code (and it can obviously be used to search other ZIP codes as well):

    https://www.imdb.com/showtimes/US/19093
  211. @Anonymous

    I really enjoy film.
     
    Why do you think that is?

    Note: There have been some very good films this year.
     
    Such as? What makes a film "very good"?

    Because I enjoy the communication medium’s:

    ability to persuade
    ability to tell a good story
    ability to simply entertain
    ability to cross boundaries
    ability to connect the human experience
    ability to engage and exploit a myriad of methods to cause one to consider themselves in relation to others

    It doesn’t mean that there is not objectionable material

    I have shared my views on most of the films I saw this year on Mr. Sailors article on film from earlier this month or the end of January. This year, in response to your question I will note:

    “Can You Ever Forgive ME”

    Even as a conservative, I found the performances compelling about an interesting topic and interesting people —— despite the offensive nonsense about same sex relations. As an understated story, it was full of value about the human condition. Aside from what I noted, I also enjoyed it because I was pleasantly surprised.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Thank you.

    ability to persuade
     
    How is it able to persuade. Any examples?
  212. @Buffalo Joe
    Anonymous, I know who Debbie "Blondie" Harry is but what does "She hit the linen before the bomb hit Japan" mean?

    This means that she was born in July of 1945, just before the bombing of Hiroshima.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I'm astonished anyone had trouble with that one. Harry was born 1 July 45, Little Boy was dropped 6 August, but the pioneering Trinity Site test bomb was detonated 0n 16 July, two weeks after Harry's birth. She was born into a time when no nuclear explosion had occurred on earth, at least in Western mempry. (The Vedic sagas speak of detonations that sound like nuclearbombs, but that is not verifiable history: hence Oppenheimer's declaration that

    We knew the world would not be the same. A few people laughed, a few people cried. Most people were silent. I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad Gita; Vishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and, to impress him, takes on his multi-armed form and says, "Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds." I suppose we all thought that, one way or another.
     
    Being born before the Bomb was not unusual among first and second generation rock and rollers-all the Stones except Ronnie Wood, for instance-but D didn't become a real star until she was almost 35, and had a #1 pop hit in 1998/99 , I heard it on the background music at a place I was eating today. Blondie were a third to maybe fourth gen band.
  213. Lee quipped making referencing to that year’s Driving Miss Daisy Best Picture win :

    “Every time somebody is driving somebody, I lose – but they changed the seating arrangements.”

    There’s 1991 cult movie packed with “somebody is driving somebody”scenes that wouldn’t do so well with The Hackademy Reparations Committee.

    Ebony & Ivory… drivin’ in perfect harmony:

  214. @International Jew
    OT but could someone experienced write a primer on how to become a Twitter troll? No, seriously. Almost everywhere I go now, I read stupid stuff but the disappearance of comment sections frustrates my natural impulse to stick something in the author's eye.

    I see the Twitter logo, but I don't understand some basics. Like, who will see my tweet? It seems the Twitter logo takes you to a general-purpose forum devoted to the publication as a whole, not to the specific article.

    I see Steve tweets, and famous people respond to him. Is that because Steve himself is (semi-)famous? Or would my eye-poking also be felt, even a little?

    Check my comment history on getting an AI made avatar and no-phone-number gmail account.

    Your troll will get 5x the followers if the avitar is of an attractive woman.

    Good luck and report back.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    Thanks. I'm inclined to use my real name. I don't intend to say anything I wouldn't want to be associated with. Same goes for what I say here. I use a pseudonym on unz.com not because I don't want to be associated with my opinions, but rather because I don't want to be associated with unz.com (or even, truth be told, with Steve).
  215. @EliteCommInc.
    Because I enjoy the communication medium's:


    ability to persuade
    ability to tell a good story
    ability to simply entertain
    ability to cross boundaries
    ability to connect the human experience
    ability to engage and exploit a myriad of methods to cause one to consider themselves in relation to others

    It doesn't mean that there is not objectionable material

    I have shared my views on most of the films I saw this year on Mr. Sailors article on film from earlier this month or the end of January. This year, in response to your question I will note:

    "Can You Ever Forgive ME"


    Even as a conservative, I found the performances compelling about an interesting topic and interesting people ------ despite the offensive nonsense about same sex relations. As an understated story, it was full of value about the human condition. Aside from what I noted, I also enjoyed it because I was pleasantly surprised.

    Thank you.

    ability to persuade

    How is it able to persuade. Any examples?

  216. @Dtbb
    The point was he said he knew nothing about photography. I would think a director would at least know enough about it, and other jobs on the set, to at least be able to stumble through them in a severe pinch. Isn't that the director's job?

    And you would think wrong.

    With the extremely rare exception (such as Stephen Soderburgh, who has several times not only served as DP but has also manned the camera as operator) no director needs to know jack about the camera. It’s not his job. Filmmaking is a collaborative art and has been since the first days of its inception.

    Why would a director need to stumble through the technology? You talk like you think that a film crew is on a desert island and the all of the crew just died of typhus–except for the actors and the director.

    In reality, you just hire anotehr DP, and carry on filming. The director has better things to do than to decide which f-stop to use on a golf course while he’s trying to enjoy himself and some idiot thinks he knows what he’s talking about and thinks “ribbing” a director about nonsense is interesting or funny.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910

    With the extremely rare exception (such as Stephen Soderburgh, who has several times not only served as DP but has also manned the camera as operator)
     
    https://twitter.com/MatthewACherry/status/1098708565039054848
  217. @R.G. Camara
    Eastwood learned Woody Allen's trick: so long as keep methodically and regularly making movies and don't let the quality slip, you'll eventually get into pattern where one will be great.

    In fact, Allen and Eastwood have likely (though inadvertently) "moneyballed" their careers, where they just keep on trucking the same way that's gotten them decent praise and eventually hit one out of the park on the regular.

    That, and they have niches that no one else can exploit. Allen does Boomer-Jew-NYC-romanticized schtick that no one else is around to do anymore, and Eastwood does white masculine movies that no one knows how to do anymore because everyone else is a feminist/racist who hates white men.

    Allen does Boomer-Jew-NYC-romanticized schtick that no one else is around to do anymore

    Allen’s recent films–about 6 of them–made in Europe, have nary a thing to do with Boomer-Jew-NYC anything. All the leads in those films made in England, Spain, France and Italy are Gen-X and there is no Jewish story lines to any of them. Moreover they had no NYC in them.

    Most of them were fine fine films using the best of up and coming actors. Several of them led to Academy Awards for the actors involved.

    You theory is nonsense. I think you meant to say that Allen does great films one after the other that are just small, hand-made, well-made films that few in the film “industry” can make today.

    The fact is that if a filmmaker (like Allen or Eastwood) can make a small film that makes its money back and a bit of profit then that filmmaker can continue to make films forever.

    That is the “secret” of Allen and Eastwood: their films almost always turn profit even if small profit. It has nothing to do with stupid Boomer-Jew-NYC theory nonsense.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Woody Allen films in the first decade of the 2000s generally didn't return a profit to investors, but Allen is very organized and economical, so their losses were within acceptable limits for the privilege of telling your friends you are helping finance a Woody Allen movie.

    When he discovered European tax breaks around 2010, his movies may have benefitted from getting out of his NYC rut. E.g., Midnight in Paris is very pleasant. It's not exactly a new look at Paris -- it's what a cultured American tourist in 1960 would have hoped that Paris looks like.

    Woody could have had a lucrative career making TV commercials for tourist bureaus. He's great at making cities look great. He's like Trump in that he played a big role in NYC's comeback after the 1970s. His 1979 "Manhattan" helped revive New York's image as glamorous and romantic and old-fashioned, just what affluent tourists wanted.

    , @Jack D
    The critics panned Allen's latest movie (Wonder Wheel - like little Alvy Singer in Annie Hall, the family lives under the Coney Island ferris wheel. Except this time he doesn't play it for laughs, he plays it as 3rd rate Tennessee Williams melodrama (Tennessee Williams himself was 2nd rate so IMITATION TW is by definition 3rd rate).

    And instead of beautiful European scenery we have a digital recreation of Coney Island past. This has some nostalgic value as it sure looks better than Coney Island present.
  218. @restless94110

    Allen does Boomer-Jew-NYC-romanticized schtick that no one else is around to do anymore
     
    Allen's recent films--about 6 of them--made in Europe, have nary a thing to do with Boomer-Jew-NYC anything. All the leads in those films made in England, Spain, France and Italy are Gen-X and there is no Jewish story lines to any of them. Moreover they had no NYC in them.

    Most of them were fine fine films using the best of up and coming actors. Several of them led to Academy Awards for the actors involved.

    You theory is nonsense. I think you meant to say that Allen does great films one after the other that are just small, hand-made, well-made films that few in the film "industry" can make today.

    The fact is that if a filmmaker (like Allen or Eastwood) can make a small film that makes its money back and a bit of profit then that filmmaker can continue to make films forever.

    That is the "secret" of Allen and Eastwood: their films almost always turn profit even if small profit. It has nothing to do with stupid Boomer-Jew-NYC theory nonsense.

    Woody Allen films in the first decade of the 2000s generally didn’t return a profit to investors, but Allen is very organized and economical, so their losses were within acceptable limits for the privilege of telling your friends you are helping finance a Woody Allen movie.

    When he discovered European tax breaks around 2010, his movies may have benefitted from getting out of his NYC rut. E.g., Midnight in Paris is very pleasant. It’s not exactly a new look at Paris — it’s what a cultured American tourist in 1960 would have hoped that Paris looks like.

    Woody could have had a lucrative career making TV commercials for tourist bureaus. He’s great at making cities look great. He’s like Trump in that he played a big role in NYC’s comeback after the 1970s. His 1979 “Manhattan” helped revive New York’s image as glamorous and romantic and old-fashioned, just what affluent tourists wanted.

    • Replies: @restless94110
    All of Allen's movies in the 21st century turned profit eventually with the exceptions of Wonder Wheel and Sweet and Lowdown. It's the internastional box office that has been golden for him for most of his career.

    I think you and many others miss the style point that is a near constant in his films. You call it some kind of travelogue look, as if that's a bad thing, whereas I've heard others call it a bourgeois thing (as if that's a bad thing), but the look of his films is so that the backgrounds are interesting enough but don't interfere with the characterizations and the story. NYC does have a great look to it, as do London, Paris, Barcelona and all of Woody's other sets, and why shouldn't they be shown in their best light?

    And though Midnight in Paris was the most popular of his European sojourn, his work with Scarlett (Match Point, Scoop, and Vicky Christina Barcelona) was outstanding as was You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger and To Rome with Love. And once back in the states, Blue Jasmine is another stand out.

    I've always looked at Woody's films as plays that are filmed as he writes and directs and you can see cleearly the play-like effect of that. To many that is a turn off and they put it down. But if you look at them all as very elaborate (becuase it's film and thus better backdrops and more movement) plays you start to enjoy the films for what they are.

    The main flaw in some of his films is miscasting, as is especially clear in Wonder Wheel (mis-cast: Jim Belushi and Justin Timberlake; perfect casting: the thugs--from The Sopranos, and Juno Temple).
  219. @Lot
    Check my comment history on getting an AI made avatar and no-phone-number gmail account.

    Your troll will get 5x the followers if the avitar is of an attractive woman.

    Good luck and report back.

    Thanks. I’m inclined to use my real name. I don’t intend to say anything I wouldn’t want to be associated with. Same goes for what I say here. I use a pseudonym on unz.com not because I don’t want to be associated with my opinions, but rather because I don’t want to be associated with unz.com (or even, truth be told, with Steve).

    • Replies: @Lot
    Are you retired or independently wealthy? If not, please don't use your real name on twitter.
    , @EliteCommInc.
    Homecoming


    Brubaker


    China Syndrome

    Black Beauty


    Kramer vs Kramer


    Elephant Man


    Bambi


    Old Yeller


    Patton


    Beloved


    Color Purple -- never saw it -- but apparently reinforces the old trope of seasoning


    The Best Man


    Dr. Strangelove


    Patch of Blue


    and a boat load of others . . .


    Now I don't subscribe to many these arguments made by all of these films -- but it's hard not to contend they made a persuasive case for their point of view. Few of them are conservative.

    None of the film references I note suggest any bend in my own conservative perspectives -- Hollywood and my politics are as a fire and water.

  220. http://www.unz.com/isteve/oscar-sunday/#comment-3061753

    The Velvet Mailman clumsily spiked his semantics because retconnecting to ancestors would eventually result in sweet Guberment-Tax-Free-Ganja-Depository contracts for all the Gibs Brothers.

    The Green Book New Deal DOW index will rely heavily on P&G conglomerate-Pothead & Gamble that is.

  221. @International Jew
    Thanks. I'm inclined to use my real name. I don't intend to say anything I wouldn't want to be associated with. Same goes for what I say here. I use a pseudonym on unz.com not because I don't want to be associated with my opinions, but rather because I don't want to be associated with unz.com (or even, truth be told, with Steve).

    Are you retired or independently wealthy? If not, please don’t use your real name on twitter.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    If he is looking to mix it up with academics, journalists, and pundits, he would probably get more engagement and more followers using a real name.
  222. @restless94110

    Allen does Boomer-Jew-NYC-romanticized schtick that no one else is around to do anymore
     
    Allen's recent films--about 6 of them--made in Europe, have nary a thing to do with Boomer-Jew-NYC anything. All the leads in those films made in England, Spain, France and Italy are Gen-X and there is no Jewish story lines to any of them. Moreover they had no NYC in them.

    Most of them were fine fine films using the best of up and coming actors. Several of them led to Academy Awards for the actors involved.

    You theory is nonsense. I think you meant to say that Allen does great films one after the other that are just small, hand-made, well-made films that few in the film "industry" can make today.

    The fact is that if a filmmaker (like Allen or Eastwood) can make a small film that makes its money back and a bit of profit then that filmmaker can continue to make films forever.

    That is the "secret" of Allen and Eastwood: their films almost always turn profit even if small profit. It has nothing to do with stupid Boomer-Jew-NYC theory nonsense.

    The critics panned Allen’s latest movie (Wonder Wheel – like little Alvy Singer in Annie Hall, the family lives under the Coney Island ferris wheel. Except this time he doesn’t play it for laughs, he plays it as 3rd rate Tennessee Williams melodrama (Tennessee Williams himself was 2nd rate so IMITATION TW is by definition 3rd rate).

    And instead of beautiful European scenery we have a digital recreation of Coney Island past. This has some nostalgic value as it sure looks better than Coney Island present.

    • Replies: @restless94110
    Both Jim Belushi and Justin Timberlake were mis-cast for Wonder Wheel, and it ruined the film.

    Yes, the sets were great and you're not the first to criticize the writing (one critic I normally like felt that it was Woody, upper class Jew, trying to write for lower class whites, what he thought they would feel, say and think that was the problem), but I felt it was a straight up play that had a lot going for it, except that neither of the male leads could play the emotions and gravity that the script called for.

    I don't know what you are talking about in regard to Tennessee Williams. His work pushed boundaries of the time and were breakthrough originals, influencing countless other writers and actors. Woody has done the same thing in this era, but it's considerably harder and thus a higher acheivement to write, direct, star in and produce.

    That film was made under contract to Amazon Studios and now that Allen has been MeToo'ed for no reason, Amazon is holding off on releasing or having him make more on the contract. He's sueing but this last bit of outrageous nonsense may do his career in, something Mia has been trying for for ages now.

    Woody makes small, hand-made films, and it's remarkable that he's been able to be so prolific.
  223. @Jack D
    I'm in the Philadelphia area ( 190xx and 191xx zips). I don't think we've had a 2nd run movie house for decades. I don't know of any within 50 miles of here or more, but if you know of any, let me know. There are some non-profit type theaters that play art films but that's not the same thing as a discount or 2nd run theater.

    The discount second-run movie theater where I had one of my first 6th grade dates in the 1990s is still alive and running. Price has gone from $1.50 to $3.00, but they have promos going below $2.

    In the midwest at least the first set of multiplexes with 5 or 6 screens often became discount ones when the 12 and 18 screen theaters with fancy seats started opening up.

  224. @International Jew
    Thanks. I'm inclined to use my real name. I don't intend to say anything I wouldn't want to be associated with. Same goes for what I say here. I use a pseudonym on unz.com not because I don't want to be associated with my opinions, but rather because I don't want to be associated with unz.com (or even, truth be told, with Steve).

    Homecoming

    Brubaker

    China Syndrome

    Black Beauty

    Kramer vs Kramer

    Elephant Man

    Bambi

    Old Yeller

    Patton

    Beloved

    Color Purple — never saw it — but apparently reinforces the old trope of seasoning

    The Best Man

    Dr. Strangelove

    Patch of Blue

    and a boat load of others . . .

    Now I don’t subscribe to many these arguments made by all of these films — but it’s hard not to contend they made a persuasive case for their point of view. Few of them are conservative.

    None of the film references I note suggest any bend in my own conservative perspectives — Hollywood and my politics are as a fire and water.

  225. @Steve Sailer
    I think I started to watch "Roman Holiday" a few years ago, discovered it was in rather dingy black and white and changed the channel.

    What's the best black and white cinematography ever? (Probably not "Roma.")

    People often just think of “stark” and “edgy” for b&w cinematography, but Arthur Edeson went the other way with Casablanca, giving it a memorably rich, smooth, creamy look.

    Conrad Hall did amazing b&w work on a shoestring in 1963 for TV’s Outer Limits, though his notable movie career was mainly in color

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I think the film stock available had a lot to do with this.

    In the early eighties, I shot a lot of 35mm still on Double and 4X cine stock, because short ends of it were cheaply available, and then I got a Blad with the undervalued 70mm back and had access to various cine stock for that. The look was a little different than what you got on conventional Tri-X stock (which then was ubiquitous) and it often had a sort of 50s look, however you want to describe it.

    The old stuff is no more and the new stuff is different. The spectral response of the film and any filters make a big difference and it is a little bit of a lost art today, I'm sure.

    Simply taking a color image and making it monochrome is usually a disaster. The best example is to watch a color neo-noir ( Union City is ideal for this; look at Pat Benatar's makeup!) on a monochrome monitor, if you still have access to one.
  226. @restless94110
    And you would think wrong.

    With the extremely rare exception (such as Stephen Soderburgh, who has several times not only served as DP but has also manned the camera as operator) no director needs to know jack about the camera. It's not his job. Filmmaking is a collaborative art and has been since the first days of its inception.

    Why would a director need to stumble through the technology? You talk like you think that a film crew is on a desert island and the all of the crew just died of typhus--except for the actors and the director.

    In reality, you just hire anotehr DP, and carry on filming. The director has better things to do than to decide which f-stop to use on a golf course while he's trying to enjoy himself and some idiot thinks he knows what he's talking about and thinks "ribbing" a director about nonsense is interesting or funny.

    With the extremely rare exception (such as Stephen Soderburgh, who has several times not only served as DP but has also manned the camera as operator)

    • Replies: @restless94110
    You do realize that this proves my post, don't you? Soderbergh is the exception. The norm is a director directs, a director of photography frames and lights, an operator shoots the footage.

    Thanks for verifying things (to yourself, I guess).
  227. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Known Fact
    People often just think of "stark" and "edgy" for b&w cinematography, but Arthur Edeson went the other way with Casablanca, giving it a memorably rich, smooth, creamy look.

    Conrad Hall did amazing b&w work on a shoestring in 1963 for TV's Outer Limits, though his notable movie career was mainly in color

    I think the film stock available had a lot to do with this.

    In the early eighties, I shot a lot of 35mm still on Double and 4X cine stock, because short ends of it were cheaply available, and then I got a Blad with the undervalued 70mm back and had access to various cine stock for that. The look was a little different than what you got on conventional Tri-X stock (which then was ubiquitous) and it often had a sort of 50s look, however you want to describe it.

    The old stuff is no more and the new stuff is different. The spectral response of the film and any filters make a big difference and it is a little bit of a lost art today, I’m sure.

    Simply taking a color image and making it monochrome is usually a disaster. The best example is to watch a color neo-noir ( Union City is ideal for this; look at Pat Benatar’s makeup!) on a monochrome monitor, if you still have access to one.

  228. @Bruce County
    In December 1987, over one thousand people, including Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, marched through the streets of Newburgh, New York, in support of Brawley.
    It really is a war against whitey. The nogs believe all the black chilluns, brutha's and sista's are innocent. How dare we question their integrity.
    It was awesome that Black Panther didnt get the nod. But they opted for a mixed race moivie Green Book.
    Spike Lee was livid. It doesnt matter... there will never come a time that we will ever calm the savage black beast. They think we owe them every thing.

    In December 1987, over one thousand people, including Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, marched through the streets of Newburgh, New York, in support of Brawley.

    I find it unusual that none of the No Justice No Peace morons were out in support of Jussie recently. Makes me think that even the brothers didn’t believe him.

  229. @Lot
    Are you retired or independently wealthy? If not, please don't use your real name on twitter.

    If he is looking to mix it up with academics, journalists, and pundits, he would probably get more engagement and more followers using a real name.

  230. @Steve Sailer
    Woody Allen films in the first decade of the 2000s generally didn't return a profit to investors, but Allen is very organized and economical, so their losses were within acceptable limits for the privilege of telling your friends you are helping finance a Woody Allen movie.

    When he discovered European tax breaks around 2010, his movies may have benefitted from getting out of his NYC rut. E.g., Midnight in Paris is very pleasant. It's not exactly a new look at Paris -- it's what a cultured American tourist in 1960 would have hoped that Paris looks like.

    Woody could have had a lucrative career making TV commercials for tourist bureaus. He's great at making cities look great. He's like Trump in that he played a big role in NYC's comeback after the 1970s. His 1979 "Manhattan" helped revive New York's image as glamorous and romantic and old-fashioned, just what affluent tourists wanted.

    All of Allen’s movies in the 21st century turned profit eventually with the exceptions of Wonder Wheel and Sweet and Lowdown. It’s the internastional box office that has been golden for him for most of his career.

    I think you and many others miss the style point that is a near constant in his films. You call it some kind of travelogue look, as if that’s a bad thing, whereas I’ve heard others call it a bourgeois thing (as if that’s a bad thing), but the look of his films is so that the backgrounds are interesting enough but don’t interfere with the characterizations and the story. NYC does have a great look to it, as do London, Paris, Barcelona and all of Woody’s other sets, and why shouldn’t they be shown in their best light?

    And though Midnight in Paris was the most popular of his European sojourn, his work with Scarlett (Match Point, Scoop, and Vicky Christina Barcelona) was outstanding as was You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger and To Rome with Love. And once back in the states, Blue Jasmine is another stand out.

    I’ve always looked at Woody’s films as plays that are filmed as he writes and directs and you can see cleearly the play-like effect of that. To many that is a turn off and they put it down. But if you look at them all as very elaborate (becuase it’s film and thus better backdrops and more movement) plays you start to enjoy the films for what they are.

    The main flaw in some of his films is miscasting, as is especially clear in Wonder Wheel (mis-cast: Jim Belushi and Justin Timberlake; perfect casting: the thugs–from The Sopranos, and Juno Temple).

    • Replies: @Jack D
    When Allen thought he was a comedy writer, he was 1st rate - he was as good as anyone. His vain
    cowardly schlemiel character was like an updated, Jewish Bob Hope (he acknowledges the debt). But later in his career he fancied himself to be an American Bergman or the Eugene O'Neill of film and he isn't - he is a 2nd rate imitation of those guys. He has no ear for dramatic dialog, especially involving anyone who is not a Jew from Brooklyn. His characters don't sound like actual humans, at least not any that I have ever met. But for some reason he felt that writing jokes was a lesser calling and that he could earn intellectual respectability by being an auteur.

    His films don't cost a lot to make (by Hollywood standards). It's such an honor to be in a Woody Allen film that he only has to pay the actors union scale (this was very convenient when Allen got MeTooed and they all decided to donate their "entire" salaries to abused women charities. The films don't require a lot of CGI or stunts or costly sets, etc. As you say, they are basically filmed plays (which is BTW usually a bad idea - a play is not a film). And he has (or had) a devoted core audience of people like you, so he was able to keep his films in the black.

    His top grossing film in this century is Midnight in Paris (around $60 million), which was more marketable than most of his movies. After that, Match Point grossed under $30 million adjusted for inflation. Top grossing movies today gross over $1 BILLION so $30 million or even $60 doesn't even cover the publicity budget.
  231. @Jack D
    The critics panned Allen's latest movie (Wonder Wheel - like little Alvy Singer in Annie Hall, the family lives under the Coney Island ferris wheel. Except this time he doesn't play it for laughs, he plays it as 3rd rate Tennessee Williams melodrama (Tennessee Williams himself was 2nd rate so IMITATION TW is by definition 3rd rate).

    And instead of beautiful European scenery we have a digital recreation of Coney Island past. This has some nostalgic value as it sure looks better than Coney Island present.

    Both Jim Belushi and Justin Timberlake were mis-cast for Wonder Wheel, and it ruined the film.

    Yes, the sets were great and you’re not the first to criticize the writing (one critic I normally like felt that it was Woody, upper class Jew, trying to write for lower class whites, what he thought they would feel, say and think that was the problem), but I felt it was a straight up play that had a lot going for it, except that neither of the male leads could play the emotions and gravity that the script called for.

    I don’t know what you are talking about in regard to Tennessee Williams. His work pushed boundaries of the time and were breakthrough originals, influencing countless other writers and actors. Woody has done the same thing in this era, but it’s considerably harder and thus a higher acheivement to write, direct, star in and produce.

    That film was made under contract to Amazon Studios and now that Allen has been MeToo’ed for no reason, Amazon is holding off on releasing or having him make more on the contract. He’s sueing but this last bit of outrageous nonsense may do his career in, something Mia has been trying for for ages now.

    Woody makes small, hand-made films, and it’s remarkable that he’s been able to be so prolific.

  232. @restless94110
    All of Allen's movies in the 21st century turned profit eventually with the exceptions of Wonder Wheel and Sweet and Lowdown. It's the internastional box office that has been golden for him for most of his career.

    I think you and many others miss the style point that is a near constant in his films. You call it some kind of travelogue look, as if that's a bad thing, whereas I've heard others call it a bourgeois thing (as if that's a bad thing), but the look of his films is so that the backgrounds are interesting enough but don't interfere with the characterizations and the story. NYC does have a great look to it, as do London, Paris, Barcelona and all of Woody's other sets, and why shouldn't they be shown in their best light?

    And though Midnight in Paris was the most popular of his European sojourn, his work with Scarlett (Match Point, Scoop, and Vicky Christina Barcelona) was outstanding as was You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger and To Rome with Love. And once back in the states, Blue Jasmine is another stand out.

    I've always looked at Woody's films as plays that are filmed as he writes and directs and you can see cleearly the play-like effect of that. To many that is a turn off and they put it down. But if you look at them all as very elaborate (becuase it's film and thus better backdrops and more movement) plays you start to enjoy the films for what they are.

    The main flaw in some of his films is miscasting, as is especially clear in Wonder Wheel (mis-cast: Jim Belushi and Justin Timberlake; perfect casting: the thugs--from The Sopranos, and Juno Temple).

    When Allen thought he was a comedy writer, he was 1st rate – he was as good as anyone. His vain
    cowardly schlemiel character was like an updated, Jewish Bob Hope (he acknowledges the debt). But later in his career he fancied himself to be an American Bergman or the Eugene O’Neill of film and he isn’t – he is a 2nd rate imitation of those guys. He has no ear for dramatic dialog, especially involving anyone who is not a Jew from Brooklyn. His characters don’t sound like actual humans, at least not any that I have ever met. But for some reason he felt that writing jokes was a lesser calling and that he could earn intellectual respectability by being an auteur.

    His films don’t cost a lot to make (by Hollywood standards). It’s such an honor to be in a Woody Allen film that he only has to pay the actors union scale (this was very convenient when Allen got MeTooed and they all decided to donate their “entire” salaries to abused women charities. The films don’t require a lot of CGI or stunts or costly sets, etc. As you say, they are basically filmed plays (which is BTW usually a bad idea – a play is not a film). And he has (or had) a devoted core audience of people like you, so he was able to keep his films in the black.

    His top grossing film in this century is Midnight in Paris (around $60 million), which was more marketable than most of his movies. After that, Match Point grossed under $30 million adjusted for inflation. Top grossing movies today gross over $1 BILLION so $30 million or even $60 doesn’t even cover the publicity budget.

    • Replies: @restless94110
    Midnight has grossed 150 million worldwide, but the grosses don't really matter because as you acknowledge hs films don't cost all that much and he has such prestige that actors will work for scale. While doing research for my comments I came upon a 2001 article detailing the split that Woody had with his financier all through the 90s and it had many details on his films of that decade. She (backed by her billionaire husband) gave Allen carte blanche: make a film, we'll finance it. The problem became that she and her husband didn't do their accounting and stubbornly refused to after many many requests. A terrible development, and Woody was forced to look elsewhere for financing after that. Luckily, his international box office allowed him to make the films he has made over the past 20 years, ending with him returning to the US under an Amazon Studios deal (which now appears dead and Allen is sueing for breach for 60 million).

    You are right: I like Allen's films specifically because they are filmed plays. That's his style. He writes plays and films them. I understand that so-called purists will claim that this is not film. It is film. It's just not film that purists condone. It's the Woody Allen style and it's original. And it is filmic.

    As for Allen's pretensions? If you acheived comic gold while still very young, and you admired Bergman and O'Neill, why not shoot for other aspects of the art of playwriting and film? I really think you are being a snob. Saying that Williams was 2nd rate? How dare you. He was dynamic and original in the 50s. Allen is dynamic and original over the last 30 years. Match Point is a beautiful dynamic play/story of class, romantic love, duty, etc. Small Time Crooks, Midnight in Paris, it goes on and on and on, each a gem of contemporary life in the late 20th-early 21st century.

    Woody Allen's pretensions are simply an artist taking his own original path inspired by the writers/playrights/filmmakers of the past. There is nothing wrong about that, and you have no reason to lord it over an artist who follows in the footsteps of his mentors and creates something just as great over and over again.

    P.S., the actors who donated their fees due to the false MeToo witch hunt are despicable cowards and useful idiots who do not deserve any stature at all. For me, their performances are garbage now that I see how yellow they are. Sickening. Mark my words: history will not look kindly on them. Most mysteriously of all: many of those that caved to the witch hunt are old, established, and wealthy beyond belief. Why on earth would someone that independent cave in to the idiocy of the MeToo bullshit? It boggles the mind. Michael Caine is near dead. What possible reason could he have for being a sad coward at the end of such a long and illustrious career? It is maddening to see.
  233. @El Dato
    Woke and broke: Oscars resort to purging rather than risking going off script

    The organizers now live in a such a state of fear of causing offence that it’s going ahead without a host this year. Comedian Kevin Hart was going to take on the low-reward, high-risk gig, but someone unearthed homophobic tweets he’d sent back in 2010, so that was the end of that, and he stepped down.

    In some ways, I was impressed how ahead of his time Hart was. There can’t have been many people who had spotted Twitter’s potential for bigotry all the way back in 2010!

    Personally, I’m waiting for a remake of ‘Back to the Future’ where, after being sacked over an inappropriate photograph taken decades earlier, Marty McFly takes his DeLorean back in time to burn all the copies of his high-school yearbook and assassinate the inventors of Twitter. Now THAT would be a film deserving of an Oscar.

    Anyway, I digress. The response from the organizers of the Oscar committee over Hart’s decision to step down in the face of the now-familiar public outrage was not to replace him, but to have no host at all. That is a reaction in the best traditions of freedom of expression; if you can’t find someone to say the right thing just purge the position altogether. It’s an authoritarian tactic that has always worked so well in the past.

    Instead we’ll be treated to a string of actors presenting individual awards in a way they do best, reading the words from a script. That’s the official script, not the unwritten one which everyone is expected to know off by heart so as not to offend.
     

    “Roma ” was good, but very art house. Not for everyone. Stick with it, the ending is moving. “Green Book” was enjoyable, but pretty clichéd and predictable. “Bohemian Rhapsody” was entertaining. “First Man” was extremely good. “Black Klansman” is Spike Lee informing us the Klan is very bad. Thanks Spike, I didn’t know that. Spike thought “Green Book” was racist and threw a tantrum. It’s not easy being purple. Olivia Coleman is always wonderful, of course.

  234. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    This means that she was born in July of 1945, just before the bombing of Hiroshima.

    I’m astonished anyone had trouble with that one. Harry was born 1 July 45, Little Boy was dropped 6 August, but the pioneering Trinity Site test bomb was detonated 0n 16 July, two weeks after Harry’s birth. She was born into a time when no nuclear explosion had occurred on earth, at least in Western mempry. (The Vedic sagas speak of detonations that sound like nuclearbombs, but that is not verifiable history: hence Oppenheimer’s declaration that

    We knew the world would not be the same. A few people laughed, a few people cried. Most people were silent. I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad Gita; Vishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and, to impress him, takes on his multi-armed form and says, “Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.” I suppose we all thought that, one way or another.

    Being born before the Bomb was not unusual among first and second generation rock and rollers-all the Stones except Ronnie Wood, for instance-but D didn’t become a real star until she was almost 35, and had a #1 pop hit in 1998/99 , I heard it on the background music at a place I was eating today. Blondie were a third to maybe fourth gen band.

  235. @Jack D
    When Allen thought he was a comedy writer, he was 1st rate - he was as good as anyone. His vain
    cowardly schlemiel character was like an updated, Jewish Bob Hope (he acknowledges the debt). But later in his career he fancied himself to be an American Bergman or the Eugene O'Neill of film and he isn't - he is a 2nd rate imitation of those guys. He has no ear for dramatic dialog, especially involving anyone who is not a Jew from Brooklyn. His characters don't sound like actual humans, at least not any that I have ever met. But for some reason he felt that writing jokes was a lesser calling and that he could earn intellectual respectability by being an auteur.

    His films don't cost a lot to make (by Hollywood standards). It's such an honor to be in a Woody Allen film that he only has to pay the actors union scale (this was very convenient when Allen got MeTooed and they all decided to donate their "entire" salaries to abused women charities. The films don't require a lot of CGI or stunts or costly sets, etc. As you say, they are basically filmed plays (which is BTW usually a bad idea - a play is not a film). And he has (or had) a devoted core audience of people like you, so he was able to keep his films in the black.

    His top grossing film in this century is Midnight in Paris (around $60 million), which was more marketable than most of his movies. After that, Match Point grossed under $30 million adjusted for inflation. Top grossing movies today gross over $1 BILLION so $30 million or even $60 doesn't even cover the publicity budget.

    Midnight has grossed 150 million worldwide, but the grosses don’t really matter because as you acknowledge hs films don’t cost all that much and he has such prestige that actors will work for scale. While doing research for my comments I came upon a 2001 article detailing the split that Woody had with his financier all through the 90s and it had many details on his films of that decade. She (backed by her billionaire husband) gave Allen carte blanche: make a film, we’ll finance it. The problem became that she and her husband didn’t do their accounting and stubbornly refused to after many many requests. A terrible development, and Woody was forced to look elsewhere for financing after that. Luckily, his international box office allowed him to make the films he has made over the past 20 years, ending with him returning to the US under an Amazon Studios deal (which now appears dead and Allen is sueing for breach for 60 million).

    You are right: I like Allen’s films specifically because they are filmed plays. That’s his style. He writes plays and films them. I understand that so-called purists will claim that this is not film. It is film. It’s just not film that purists condone. It’s the Woody Allen style and it’s original. And it is filmic.

    As for Allen’s pretensions? If you acheived comic gold while still very young, and you admired Bergman and O’Neill, why not shoot for other aspects of the art of playwriting and film? I really think you are being a snob. Saying that Williams was 2nd rate? How dare you. He was dynamic and original in the 50s. Allen is dynamic and original over the last 30 years. Match Point is a beautiful dynamic play/story of class, romantic love, duty, etc. Small Time Crooks, Midnight in Paris, it goes on and on and on, each a gem of contemporary life in the late 20th-early 21st century.

    Woody Allen’s pretensions are simply an artist taking his own original path inspired by the writers/playrights/filmmakers of the past. There is nothing wrong about that, and you have no reason to lord it over an artist who follows in the footsteps of his mentors and creates something just as great over and over again.

    P.S., the actors who donated their fees due to the false MeToo witch hunt are despicable cowards and useful idiots who do not deserve any stature at all. For me, their performances are garbage now that I see how yellow they are. Sickening. Mark my words: history will not look kindly on them. Most mysteriously of all: many of those that caved to the witch hunt are old, established, and wealthy beyond belief. Why on earth would someone that independent cave in to the idiocy of the MeToo bullshit? It boggles the mind. Michael Caine is near dead. What possible reason could he have for being a sad coward at the end of such a long and illustrious career? It is maddening to see.

  236. @MEH 0910

    With the extremely rare exception (such as Stephen Soderburgh, who has several times not only served as DP but has also manned the camera as operator)
     
    https://twitter.com/MatthewACherry/status/1098708565039054848

    You do realize that this proves my post, don’t you? Soderbergh is the exception. The norm is a director directs, a director of photography frames and lights, an operator shoots the footage.

    Thanks for verifying things (to yourself, I guess).

    • Agree: MEH 0910
  237. @Jack D
    I'm in the Philadelphia area ( 190xx and 191xx zips). I don't think we've had a 2nd run movie house for decades. I don't know of any within 50 miles of here or more, but if you know of any, let me know. There are some non-profit type theaters that play art films but that's not the same thing as a discount or 2nd run theater.

    I’m in the Philadelphia area….

    Wow, there are a LOT of cinemas in Philadelphia.

    This is a link that will take you to a listing for all the theaters in the 19093 ZIP code (and it can obviously be used to search other ZIP codes as well):

    https://www.imdb.com/showtimes/US/19093

  238. @Anonymous

    I promise you no one has ever spent an hour and a half snarking at some antiFa dipshit on Twitter and afterwards thought, ‘That was great, what a great use of my precious and finite time on earth.’
     
    But if you can get engagement with a reply to someone with influence, either from that person or because your reply gets picked up by others and liked or retweeted, would it be?

    IJ, judging by the quality of your posts here, I bet you could eventually get a follow from Ann Coulter. She follows and regularly retweets dissident accounts. She has 2M followers herself, so if you get a retweet it could have some marginal impact.

    IJ, judging by the quality of your posts here, I bet you could eventually get a follow from Ann Coulter.

    Wow, thanks!

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