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Obama's Official Portrait Painter Outsources the Painting Part to China
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Much like the recent gargantuan Chinese-made MLK statue erected on the National Mall that looks like a cross between Mike Tyson and Chairman Mao (because the Chinese firm that carved it mostly does Mao statues), the new official portrait of a six-fingered President Obama is from the studio of gay black self-promoter Kehinde Wiley who outsources much of his actual boring work to the Chinese.

From New York Magazine in 2012:

How to Make It in the Art World: 6. Outsource to China

While riffing on the Western canon. Kehinde Wiley’s global reach.
By Christopher Beam
Published Apr 22, 2012

Kehinde Wiley in his Beijing studio.

In a soaring studio on the outskirts of Beijing, where Kehinde Wiley came in 2006 to set up the first of his several global production outposts, the 35-year-old painter is showing off his women. …

But one already stands out: a tall, elegant black woman in a long blue dress—the canvas is enormous, eight feet by ten feet—calmly staring down the viewer. In one hand, she holds a knife. In the other, a cleanly severed brunette female head. “It’s sort of a play on the ‘kill whitey’ thing,” Wiley says.

Subtle, I think. Not that Wiley’s work ever seems that subtle at first. Best known for his oversize portraits of young African-American men he finds on the street—“the boys,” he calls them—against florid wallpaperlike backdrops in poses lifted from old portraits of European gentry, Wiley has in a mere decade built a monster career around bright colors, big ideas, and a canvas the size of Earth itself, every person in every nation a potential subject. His series “The World Stage” makes that promise literal, as he globetrots from the favelas of Rio to the slums of Delhi, pulling charismatic-looking men into the studio for Renaissance-style tribute. …

That unabashed bombast has made Wiley a walking superlative: the most successful black artist since Basquiat, possibly the wealthiest painter of his generation, certainly the one who made his name earliest (he was 26 for his first major solo show), a gay man who has become the great painter of machismo for the swag era, a bootstrapper from South Central who talks like a Yale professor (much of the time), a genius self-­promoter who’s managed to have it both ways in an art world that loves having its critical cake and eating the spectacle of it, too, and a crossover phenomenon who is at once the hip-hop world’s favorite fine artist (Spike Lee and LL Cool J own pieces) and the gallery world’s most popular hip-hop ambassador. Not to mention an all-around positive guy.

Perhaps the critic has some medical implication in mind for his term “positive?”

… Which brings us back to the lady with the severed head. … Her pose is a riff on classical depictions by Caravaggio and Gentileschi, of the biblical story of Judith beheading Holofernes. And the severed head? “She’s one of my assistants.”

There’s nothing new about artists using assistants—everyone from Michelangelo to Jeff Koons has employed teams of helpers, with varying degrees of irony and pride—but Wiley gets uncomfortable discussing the subject. “I’m sensitive to it,” he says. When I first arrived at his Beijing studio, the assistants had left, and he made me delete the iPhone snapshots I’d taken of the empty space. It’s not that he wants people to believe every brushstroke is his, he says. That they aren’t is public ­knowledge. It’s just a question of boundaries. “I don’t want you to know every aspect of where my hand starts and ends, or how many layers go underneath the skin, or how I got that glow to happen,” he says. “It’s the secret sauce! Get out of my kitchen!”

Producing work in China cuts costs, but not as much as it used to, Wiley says. These days in Beijing he employs anywhere from four to ten workers, depending on the urgency, plus a studio manager, the American artist Ain Cocke. …

And working in Beijing gives him a little space to breathe. “It’s distracting,” he says of my natural interest in finding out who did what. “I want the illusion of a fully formed object without seeing the mechanisms going on behind the curtain. That’s show business.” …

… Wiley isn’t merely many things to many people. He’s whatever you want him to be. Even if all you want is a big, badass military-style portrait to hang next to your gold records. …

Back in the studio, they leaf through art-history books, and the subject gets to decide which old-style work he wants to be portrayed as. He poses for photos, and the photos become templates for full-size paintings, which Wiley produces with his assistants in New York, Dakar, and Beijing.

Or not. In many cases, Wiley acknowledges, none of that official process—the street casting, the selection of poses from art books, the painting based on those ­poses—happens at all. “The clothing, sometimes completely made up,” he says. “The models themselves, brought in from a fashion agency.” And in at least one case, the “boy” is in fact a girl. “Oftentimes, if there’s a show of ten paintings, four of them will be complete frauds.”

Wiley’s family history is much like Obama’s: his father was from Africa and abandoned his mother immediately. He eventually went to Nigeria and found him heading the architecture department at a college:

It was awkward. “He didn’t understand my intention at first. He probably thought I was there to shake him down,” Wiley says. His father had recently married and hadn’t told his wife about his far-flung progeny. “I fell into this deep depression afterward.”

 
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  1. Those portraits are hideous. Why weren’t they more afraid of the public’s reaction? It’s not as bad as “spirit cooking,” but it’s quite obviously outside the taste of Normal Americans.

    These are Official Portraits, right? The kind that go in history books? Not a good time to let the mask slip.

    Or is it? I suppose this the way a “community organizer” would commission a painting: for purposes of agit-prop.

    At long last, have they left no sense of decency?

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    "Those portraits are hideous."

    Hey now, it's at least as good as a late Picasso or Pierre Brassau.

    The Chinese help did a good job on the floral background.

    , @Mr. Blank
    I liked the one of Barack at first, but finding out the artist outsourced the actual work ruined it for me. Now it just seems like a darkly comic unintentional metaphor.

    I mean come on. There are actual black American painters capable of doing perfectly acceptable portrait work, and doing all the work themselves — I’ve seen them; I know they’re out there. Why not hire one of them?

    So they’re not big-shot art world celebrities whose work has hip hop cachet — all the more reason to give a brother a break, right? Obama’s choice says a lot more about him than he is probably aware.

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  2. Blacks are so creative. They make up their own rules as they go along.

    So, the Chinese guys did the drawing but the black guy made the gestures to own it.

    No wonder the paintings were so staid and dull. Chinese drones done it.

    Neil Degrasse Tyson is pretty much a faker. Others do the science, he acts like he’s done the stuff and owns it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @oddsbodkins

    Neil Degrasse Tyson is pretty much a faker. Others do the science, he acts like he’s done the stuff and owns it.
     
    He's a science popularizer and communicator. Describing other people's work is his job. He did serious research until the mid-90s and can reasonably refer to himself as part of "we scientists".
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  3. Barack Obama’s portrait looks horrible. He looks old, worn out, and slightly depressed.

    Read More
    • Replies: @CCZ
    The official portrait of Mrs. Obama was painted by Baltimore (black) artist Amy Sherald. Some examples of her work:

    http://www.creativealliance.org/sites/default/files/events/2014/08/Untitled-2_19.jpg

    https://nmwa.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/It-Made-Sense...Mostly-in-Her-Mind-Amy-Sherald.png

    https://static1.squarespace.com/static/57c9d3f9d1758e59f1acf5ae/57c9d628e6f2e1332a48b64d/57d5765bb3db2b1e5a144334/1484675210258/Freeing+herself+was+one+thing+taking+ownership+of+that+freed+self+was+another.jpg

    The below is a link comparing the work of Amy Sherald on the left and Kehinde Wiley on the right.

    https://www.theartleague.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/amy-shepard-kehinde-wiley.jpg
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  4. Kehinde Wiley vs John Singer Sargent……not much of a contest…..

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux
    A Gilbert Stuart portrait of George Washington


    https://theredlist.com/media/database/fine_arts/arthistory/painting/xix/academies/gilbert-stuart/001-gilbert-stuart-theredlist.jpg
    , @Alfa158
    Theodore Roosevelt vs Barack Obama.......not much of a contest.......
    , @Anonymous
    Dont confuse John Singer Sargent with Whistler. There are huge Sargent paintings flanking the grand staircase in Widener Library at Harvard celebrating WW I doughboys with hovering angels.
    , @International Jew
    Barack Obama, for all his faults, is not an unsophisticated man. I'm sure that, in his soul, it hurts him to see that where Teddy Roosevelt got painted by a real artist, he the Great O, the change "we" waited for, gets done in a style barely one notch up from the velvet cowboys for sale at the flea market.
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  5. To be fair, Obama has aged badly.

    Of course, nobody has aged worse than Clinton.

    Trump looks decent for 71. Hopefully he lives at least 20 more years.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Clinton had quadruple bypass and then a couple of stents put in in a subsequent surgery, and became a vegan. My guess is the veganism is why he looks like crap.

    Trump has much better genes than Clinton. I watched the press conference by his White House physician and Trump is healthy as a horse. And remember, his father lived to 91 and his mother lived to 88, despite receiving a vicious beating in her late 70s that probably shortened her life.
    , @Anon
    Bill Clinton's paternal grandparents died at the ages of 51 (grandfather) and 53 (grandmother). His maternal grandparents died at the ages of 59 and 67.

    Clinton's got lousy genes for longevity. Of course, eating like Elvis for many years didn't help.
    , @Anon
    Obama has smoker's face, which makes you look prematurely aged. He also shows signs of long-term fatigue, which is a common facial expression you see on presidents right after they leave office. His grandparents lived normal-length lifespans.
    , @anon
    Agree Trump looks good for his age, but let's be real-- Trump goes to Hollywood-level extremes in appearance management. Same with Vince McMahon.

    Plastic surgery, hair transplant, bronzer or tanning. And most important of all: hGH and exogenous testosterone... that's SOP.
    , @Barnard
    It is normal for Presidents to age beyond what a normal person would while in office. It is not normal for them to age as badly as Bill Clinton has after leaving office.
    , @Jim Bob Lassiter
    I'd say it's more like tertiary stage syphilis (Bill and Hill) and total Coke burnout.
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  6. “It’s sort of a play on…” is the death knell of art.

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    • Replies: @jamie b.
    “It’s sort of a play on the ‘kill whitey’ thing,” How is depicting someone killing whitey a 'play on' killing whitey?
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  7. @syonredux
    Kehinde Wiley vs John Singer Sargent......not much of a contest.....


    http://www.johnsingersargent.net/John%20Singer%20Sargent%20Theodore%20Roosevelt.jpg

    A Gilbert Stuart portrait of George Washington

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux
    Henry Ulke did a nice one of Grant


    https://mowryjournal.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/grant-ulysses-presidential-portrait.jpeg
    , @bomag
    Ahh, the good old days.
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  8. Given that our country is clearly run by lunatics and criminals (plus one ignorant buffoon-cuck in the White House), I think humanity is facing a race against time…

    Will we blow up the world, and destroy human civilization?

    Or will we just in the nick of time, place very lazy and corrupt black transsexuals at the very top of our military hierarchy. If so, they’ll surely “out-source” control of our strategic nuclear weapons arsenal to low-cost (and very rational) contract-workers from Russia and China, who’ll naturally grow hard of hearing when they’re ordered to push the button…

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag
    "An nescis, mi fili, quantilla prudentia mundus regatur."
    , @bob sykes
    Actually, Trump is the only sane, intelligent person in Washington. And he's hardly a cuck. I'd reserve that for the neocons.
    , @stillCARealist
    Don't tell me you're writing movie scripts now! Oh boy, I can't wait for the first Unz motion picture. I'll write the music for it... I have a fondness for slow cello sonatas.
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  9. Wiley’s way of working sounds like the “no hands” art Tom Wolf describes in Back to Blood. It’s entirely possible he does none of the actual painting himself.

    A.A. [Art Advisor] said, “No cutting-edge artist touches materials anymore, or instruments.”

    “What do you mean, instruments, A.A.?” said Fleischmann.

    “Oh, you know,” she said, “paintbrushes, clay, shaping knives, chisels … all that’s from the Manual Age. Remember painting? That seems so 1950s now. Remember Schnabel and Fischl and Salle and all that bunch? They all seem so 1950s now, even though their 15 minutes came in the 1970s. The new artists, like Doggs, look at all those people like they’re from another century, which they were, when you get right down to it. They were still using their hands to do little visual tricks on canvas that were either pretty and pleasant and pleased people or ugly and baffling and ‘challenged’ people. Challenged … Ohmygod—” She broke into a smile and shook her head, as if to say, “Can you believe the way it used to be?!”

    “Then how does Doggs do it?” said Fleischmann. “I guess I never really asked.”

    “It’s actually fascinating,” said A.A. “He got hold of, Doggs did, this call girl, Daphne Deauville, the one who cost the governor of New Jersey his job?—and on the strength of that she gets a job as a columnist for the New York City Light? I couldn’t believe it! So, anyway, Doggs gets a photographer to take some pictures of him … well, fucking her brains out”—lately it had become daringly chic for women to use fucking in conversation—“and doing this and that … and sent the photographs off to Dalique, and Dalique got their elves to reproduce the photographs in three dimensions in Dalique glass, but Doggs never touched the figurines—never. He had no hand at all in making them. And if he touched the photographs, it was just to put them in an envelope and FedEx them to Dalique, although I’m sure he has an assistant to do things like that. No Hands—that’s an important concept now. It’s not some artist using his so-called ‘skills’ to deceive people. It’s not a sleight of hand. It’s no hands at all.

    Read More
    • Replies: @International Jew
    Heh, Tom Wolfe, who has ever written about fraudulent art more eloquently? Thanks for reminding me of that great scene from _Back to Blood_!
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  10. Jeff Sessions went full-on racist today.

    After hearing the word “Anglo” spoken in a positive context, I started crying and retreated to my safe space.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    sheriff (n.)
    late Old English scirgerefa "representative of royal authority in a shire," from scir (see shire) + gerefa "chief, official, reeve" (see reeve). As an American county official, attested from 1660s
     

    reeve (n.)
    "steward," Old English gerefa "king's officer," of unknown origin and with no known cognates. Not connected to German Graf (see margrave). An Anglo-Saxon official of high rank, having local jurisdiction under a king. Compare sheriff.
     

    shire (n.)
    Old English scir "administrative office, jurisdiction, stewardship, authority," also in particular use "district, province, country," from Proto-Germanic *skizo (source also of Old High German scira "care, official charge"). Ousted since 14c. by Anglo-French county.
     
    , @guest
    He at most went full English Supremacy (but not really).

    I know this is fake outrage, but must they make themselves sound so stupid? It's as if they don't know there are different kinds of white people.

    , @anonymous
    Since “science” proves that Cheddar Man was Black and Mary Beard teaches us the Britain was always and forever a rainbow coalition isn’t Anglo a good thing?
    , @Dennis Dale
    The "Anglo American legal tradition" was a Thing long before pc. The phrase has been out there a long time, only now it's instantly triggering. That just shows how far things have degraded.
    , @Doghouse Riley
    We all remember similar outrage when when President Obama (PBUH) used exactly the same phrase to mean exactly the same thing. Oh! Wait!
    , @Pericles
    A product of Detroit, Tariq Nasheed would, however, prefer to be addressed as K-Flex or perhaps King Flex.


    Tariq Nasheed, also known as Tariq Elite,[1] King Flex,[2] and K-Flex,[3] is an American film producer and media personality.

    Nasheed's books on dating and finding women include The Mack Within, The Elite Way, and The Art of Mackin'.[4][5][3] Nasheed has also authored two advice books for female readers: Play or Be Played: What Every Female Should Know About Men, Dating, and Relationships[4][6] and The Art of Gold Digging.[7]

     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tariq_Nasheed
    , @denjae
    Tucker Carlson flipped it back on them last evening by running a clip of Obama using the term ANGLO-AMERICAN in a parallel context.

    Henceforth, anyone who uses the term 'African-American' on me is likely to be asked,

    WHICH IS IT? AFRICAN? OR AMERICAN?

    And a harsh lesson on bro-nashi*t's deeply unappreciative way of non-being may likely follow.
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  11. @guest
    Those portraits are hideous. Why weren't they more afraid of the public's reaction? It's not as bad as "spirit cooking," but it's quite obviously outside the taste of Normal Americans.

    These are Official Portraits, right? The kind that go in history books? Not a good time to let the mask slip.

    Or is it? I suppose this the way a "community organizer" would commission a painting: for purposes of agit-prop.

    At long last, have they left no sense of decency?

    “Those portraits are hideous.”

    Hey now, it’s at least as good as a late Picasso or Pierre Brassau.

    The Chinese help did a good job on the floral background.

    Read More
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  12. This artist sounds like a visual art version of Sean Combs.

    Read More
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  13. So sad for Beijing artists. I used to visit the galleries there, and there was a lot of good stuff. Even golf art that Steve would have liked.

    Now they are reduced to ghost-painting portraits for American frauds with delusions of grandeur.

    That’s what happens when you tear down the hutongs and replace them with shiny imitation Hong Kong towers.

    Wrecking old Beijing was a cultural crime the CCP should answer for.

    Read More
    • Replies: @JimB
    “Wrecking old Beijing was a cultural crime the CCP should answer for.”

    To whom? The Chinese people? Chinese have the government they deserve, just as we do. If lunatics and imbeciles blow up the world, then it was mean to be. Fortunately, the Andromeda galaxy will remain unaffected.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    They have both: there's an artist colony near Shenzhen that does more original work, and then there's a district within Shenzhen that does soulless copywork to spec. The latter produces much more, much faster for obvious work.
    , @International Jew
    Don't worry, I'm sure a schlock factory like this doesn't prevent Chinese from producing more authentic art. In fact, steady part-time employment producing schlock could pay the bills that give the staff artists the means to support themselves to do their own art. Moreover, experience gained using paints and other materials, even in the production of schlock, is surely helpful for producing real art.

    Think of such schlock art operations as a branch of China's plastic-crap-for-Walmart economy.
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  14. @syonredux
    A Gilbert Stuart portrait of George Washington


    https://theredlist.com/media/database/fine_arts/arthistory/painting/xix/academies/gilbert-stuart/001-gilbert-stuart-theredlist.jpg

    Henry Ulke did a nice one of Grant

    Read More
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  15. @JohnnyWalker123
    Jeff Sessions went full-on racist today.

    https://twitter.com/tariqnasheed/status/963118275776282624

    After hearing the word "Anglo" spoken in a positive context, I started crying and retreated to my safe space.

    sheriff (n.)
    late Old English scirgerefa “representative of royal authority in a shire,” from scir (see shire) + gerefa “chief, official, reeve” (see reeve). As an American county official, attested from 1660s

    reeve (n.)
    “steward,” Old English gerefa “king’s officer,” of unknown origin and with no known cognates. Not connected to German Graf (see margrave). An Anglo-Saxon official of high rank, having local jurisdiction under a king. Compare sheriff.

    shire (n.)
    Old English scir “administrative office, jurisdiction, stewardship, authority,” also in particular use “district, province, country,” from Proto-Germanic *skizo (source also of Old High German scira “care, official charge”). Ousted since 14c. by Anglo-French county.

    Read More
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  16. @JohnnyWalker123
    To be fair, Obama has aged badly.

    https://twitter.com/TIME/status/687276701739515904

    Of course, nobody has aged worse than Clinton.

    https://twitter.com/YoungDems4Trump/status/954976460145491970

    Trump looks decent for 71. Hopefully he lives at least 20 more years.

    Clinton had quadruple bypass and then a couple of stents put in in a subsequent surgery, and became a vegan. My guess is the veganism is why he looks like crap.

    Trump has much better genes than Clinton. I watched the press conference by his White House physician and Trump is healthy as a horse. And remember, his father lived to 91 and his mother lived to 88, despite receiving a vicious beating in her late 70s that probably shortened her life.

    Read More
    • Agree: DCThrowback
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  17. Read More
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  18. “The only way to save human civilization is to quickly put black transsexuals in charge, as they’ll lazily out-source control to the competent hands of the Russians and Chinese.”

    Why didn’t I think of that?

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  19. Regarding the MLK statue, here is something hilarious from the Wikipedia link. The King family wanted their cut, and they have gotten some:

    Fees to King family
    In 2001, the foundation’s efforts to build the memorial were stalled because Intellectual Properties Management Inc., an organization operated by King’s family, wanted the foundation to pay licensing fees to use his name and likeness in marketing campaigns.

    The memorial’s foundation, beset by delays and a languid pace of donations, stated that “the last thing it needs is to pay an onerous fee to the King family.” Joseph Lowery, past president of the King-founded Southern Christian Leadership Conference stated in The Washington Post, “If nobody’s going to make money off of it, why should anyone get a fee?”

    Cambridge University historian David Garrow, who won a Pulitzer Prize for Bearing the Cross, his biography of King, said of King’s family’s behavior, “One would think any family would be so thrilled to have their forefather celebrated and memorialized in D.C. that it would never dawn on them to ask for a penny.” He added that King would have been “absolutely scandalized by the profiteering behavior of his children.” The family pledged that any money derived would go back to the King Center’s charitable efforts.

    The foundation has paid various fees to the King family’s Intellectual Properties Management Inc., including a management fee of $71,700 in 2003. In 2009, the Associated Press revealed that the King family had negotiated an $800,000 licensing deal with the foundation for the use of King’s words and image in fundraising materials for the memorial.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    He added that King would have been “absolutely scandalized by the profiteering behavior of his children.”

    You'd hope so, but people impute a lot of views to MLK despite evidence to the contrary, like that he'd have opposed reparations and race-based quotas.
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  20. @Anon
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KQiQUaJqNQ

    Blacks are so creative. They make up their own rules as they go along.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdVaeTLORPY

    So, the Chinese guys did the drawing but the black guy made the gestures to own it.

    No wonder the paintings were so staid and dull. Chinese drones done it.

    Neil Degrasse Tyson is pretty much a faker. Others do the science, he acts like he's done the stuff and owns it.

    Neil Degrasse Tyson is pretty much a faker. Others do the science, he acts like he’s done the stuff and owns it.

    He’s a science popularizer and communicator. Describing other people’s work is his job. He did serious research until the mid-90s and can reasonably refer to himself as part of “we scientists”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    No, he can't.

    Here's what Don Barry, astronomer at Cornell, said about Neil deGrasse Tyson when asked, “Has Tyson done any real science? He seems to be a media celebrity, but when I look in the Smithsonian/NASA ADS, I can find no record of scholarly work in science, except for popular books and social commentary. Is he in fact a practicing astrophysicist?”

    Barry replied:

    “Not since graduate school (he did not successfully progress towards a degree at UT/Austin, and convinced Columbia to give him a second try). Aside from the obligatory papers describing his dissertation, he’s got a paper on how to take dome flats, a bizarre paper speculating about an asteroid hitting Uranus, and courtesy mentions *very* late in the author lists of a few big projects in which it is unclear what, if anything, of substance he contributed. No first author papers of any real significance whatsoever. Nor is there any evidence that he has been awarded any telescope time on significant instruments as PI since grad school, despite the incredibly inflated claims in his published CVs. He cozied up to Bush and pushed Bush’s version of man to the Moon, Mars, and Beyond, and now gets appointed to just about every high level political advisory board. To an actual astronomer, this is almost beyond inconceivable. It’s just bizarre. To answer Delong’s question, no: he is not a practicing astrophysicist.”
     
    , @Stephen Paul Foster
    "Neil Degrasse Tyson is pretty much a faker. Others do the science, he acts like he’s done the stuff and owns it."

    A few years ago he did a speaking gig at a mid-west university where I worked (his fees would probably cover annual tuition for 10 students). He talks about science, but with the left-wing political slant -- how stupid and primitive white conservatives are. Arrogant, condescending, self-important, 10 minutes of him is about how long it takes to realize what a phony, bullshit artist the guy is.
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  21. @JohnnyWalker123
    Jeff Sessions went full-on racist today.

    https://twitter.com/tariqnasheed/status/963118275776282624

    After hearing the word "Anglo" spoken in a positive context, I started crying and retreated to my safe space.

    He at most went full English Supremacy (but not really).

    I know this is fake outrage, but must they make themselves sound so stupid? It’s as if they don’t know there are different kinds of white people.

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  22. I love it how Obama only associates with and serves elites but he gets some ooga booga witch doctor to paint his portrait and that’s enough to cement his legacy as the hip-hop preznit for black Americans. Most gullible demographic in world history…

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Blank
    ...except it’s NOT actually “some ooga booga witch doctor” — it’s another international elite-class grifter who just PRETENDS to be a witch doctor for fun and profit. That’s the real joke.
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  23. I’m awaiting with keen anticipation the official portrait for Jerry Brown’s second term as California governor. Can he outdo his first portrait?

    Actually, it’s strange looking at it now, so many years later. It doesn’t seem as weird as I remembered it. It’s kind of like listening to Devo or the Talking Heads or the Sex Pistols now, and it all sounds like normal pop or rock by this point.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chris Marsk
    From Jerry Brown's comments at the unveiling of the Arnold Schwarzenegger official portrait, quoting Brown's father, also a California governor:

    When my father saw my portrait [laughter in audience], he was angry, and he said, "You'll never be elected to another office again." Well, it did take me 28 years to get back.
     
    I guess he doesn't count the unfortunate mayoralty of the blighted city of Oakland.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HryQey-OKpQ

    On Schwarzenegger's portrait, notice the left lapel, which doesn't have the same matte light reflection. It came with his ex-wife's face on a lapel badge, and Schwarzenegger crudely scraped it off. A restorer had to be called in to paint over it, but left the area a little shinier than the rest of the painting.

    , @Anon
    It actually does look like Brown, in a caricaturing-type of way.
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  24. @JohnnyWalker123
    Barack Obama's portrait looks horrible. He looks old, worn out, and slightly depressed.

    https://twitter.com/CNN/status/963202755371372544

    The official portrait of Mrs. Obama was painted by Baltimore (black) artist Amy Sherald. Some examples of her work:

    The below is a link comparing the work of Amy Sherald on the left and Kehinde Wiley on the right.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Disordered
    I'd have to say I prefer Miss Garald better. She might be just updating the "grey somber black seriousness face" style that has been done forever since the Harlem Renaissance with lots of color and postmodern themes. But at least she isn't making some Chinese do derivative collages for her.
    Either way, there's definitely better black American artists than both of those. But the Obamas, as always, style over substance.
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  25. @JohnnyWalker123
    To be fair, Obama has aged badly.

    https://twitter.com/TIME/status/687276701739515904

    Of course, nobody has aged worse than Clinton.

    https://twitter.com/YoungDems4Trump/status/954976460145491970

    Trump looks decent for 71. Hopefully he lives at least 20 more years.

    Bill Clinton’s paternal grandparents died at the ages of 51 (grandfather) and 53 (grandmother). His maternal grandparents died at the ages of 59 and 67.

    Clinton’s got lousy genes for longevity. Of course, eating like Elvis for many years didn’t help.

    Read More
    • Replies: @International Jew
    Maybe all his grandparents ate like Elvis too.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Clinton’s got lousy genes for longevity. Of course, eating like Elvis for many years didn’t help
     
    Nor did rutting like Kennedy.
    , @SteveRogers42
    A lifetime of cocaine will slow ya down, too.
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  26. @syonredux
    Kehinde Wiley vs John Singer Sargent......not much of a contest.....


    http://www.johnsingersargent.net/John%20Singer%20Sargent%20Theodore%20Roosevelt.jpg

    Theodore Roosevelt vs Barack Obama…….not much of a contest…….

    Read More
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  27. @Chris Marsk
    I'm awaiting with keen anticipation the official portrait for Jerry Brown's second term as California governor. Can he outdo his first portrait?

    https://a.scpr.org/i/d294c8038731798a83c9b1cf83aea90a/96508-full.jpg

    Actually, it's strange looking at it now, so many years later. It doesn't seem as weird as I remembered it. It's kind of like listening to Devo or the Talking Heads or the Sex Pistols now, and it all sounds like normal pop or rock by this point.

    From Jerry Brown’s comments at the unveiling of the Arnold Schwarzenegger official portrait, quoting Brown’s father, also a California governor:

    When my father saw my portrait [laughter in audience], he was angry, and he said, “You’ll never be elected to another office again.” Well, it did take me 28 years to get back.

    I guess he doesn’t count the unfortunate mayoralty of the blighted city of Oakland.

    On Schwarzenegger’s portrait, notice the left lapel, which doesn’t have the same matte light reflection. It came with his ex-wife’s face on a lapel badge, and Schwarzenegger crudely scraped it off. A restorer had to be called in to paint over it, but left the area a little shinier than the rest of the painting.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    https://cbsradioalice.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/arnold01.jpg?w=1500
    , @Steve Sailer
    https://cbsradioalice.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/arnold01.jpg?w=1500
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  28. @JohnnyWalker123
    To be fair, Obama has aged badly.

    https://twitter.com/TIME/status/687276701739515904

    Of course, nobody has aged worse than Clinton.

    https://twitter.com/YoungDems4Trump/status/954976460145491970

    Trump looks decent for 71. Hopefully he lives at least 20 more years.

    Obama has smoker’s face, which makes you look prematurely aged. He also shows signs of long-term fatigue, which is a common facial expression you see on presidents right after they leave office. His grandparents lived normal-length lifespans.

    Read More
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  29. Do you mean that Chinese people mostly have 6 fingers*, Steve, as that would explain the artist’s error in that one painting? Or, is it just a function of the well-known Chinese Q/A problems?

    * That whole 90-deg-offset female genetalia thing has been completely debunked, BTW. I was on the research team. The science is settled.

    Read More
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  30. @Chris Marsk
    I'm awaiting with keen anticipation the official portrait for Jerry Brown's second term as California governor. Can he outdo his first portrait?

    https://a.scpr.org/i/d294c8038731798a83c9b1cf83aea90a/96508-full.jpg

    Actually, it's strange looking at it now, so many years later. It doesn't seem as weird as I remembered it. It's kind of like listening to Devo or the Talking Heads or the Sex Pistols now, and it all sounds like normal pop or rock by this point.

    It actually does look like Brown, in a caricaturing-type of way.

    Read More
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  31. @JohnnyWalker123
    To be fair, Obama has aged badly.

    https://twitter.com/TIME/status/687276701739515904

    Of course, nobody has aged worse than Clinton.

    https://twitter.com/YoungDems4Trump/status/954976460145491970

    Trump looks decent for 71. Hopefully he lives at least 20 more years.

    Agree Trump looks good for his age, but let’s be real– Trump goes to Hollywood-level extremes in appearance management. Same with Vince McMahon.

    Plastic surgery, hair transplant, bronzer or tanning. And most important of all: hGH and exogenous testosterone… that’s SOP.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    He's not on HGH or TRT, per the White House physician/Navy admiral Trump authorized to disclose all of his current prescriptions (he's only on two: one a common cholesterol lowering drug, and a topical cream to counter male pattern baldness).
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  32. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @oddsbodkins

    Neil Degrasse Tyson is pretty much a faker. Others do the science, he acts like he’s done the stuff and owns it.
     
    He's a science popularizer and communicator. Describing other people's work is his job. He did serious research until the mid-90s and can reasonably refer to himself as part of "we scientists".

    No, he can’t.

    Here’s what Don Barry, astronomer at Cornell, said about Neil deGrasse Tyson when asked, “Has Tyson done any real science? He seems to be a media celebrity, but when I look in the Smithsonian/NASA ADS, I can find no record of scholarly work in science, except for popular books and social commentary. Is he in fact a practicing astrophysicist?”

    Barry replied:

    “Not since graduate school (he did not successfully progress towards a degree at UT/Austin, and convinced Columbia to give him a second try). Aside from the obligatory papers describing his dissertation, he’s got a paper on how to take dome flats, a bizarre paper speculating about an asteroid hitting Uranus, and courtesy mentions *very* late in the author lists of a few big projects in which it is unclear what, if anything, of substance he contributed. No first author papers of any real significance whatsoever. Nor is there any evidence that he has been awarded any telescope time on significant instruments as PI since grad school, despite the incredibly inflated claims in his published CVs. He cozied up to Bush and pushed Bush’s version of man to the Moon, Mars, and Beyond, and now gets appointed to just about every high level political advisory board. To an actual astronomer, this is almost beyond inconceivable. It’s just bizarre. To answer Delong’s question, no: he is not a practicing astrophysicist.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    One of our commenters here was a fellow grad student with Neil deGrasse Tyson and says he was a fine lecturer and that he was proud to get two-thirds as many students to attend his lectures as Tyson's highly entertaining ones.
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  33. @Chris Marsk
    From Jerry Brown's comments at the unveiling of the Arnold Schwarzenegger official portrait, quoting Brown's father, also a California governor:

    When my father saw my portrait [laughter in audience], he was angry, and he said, "You'll never be elected to another office again." Well, it did take me 28 years to get back.
     
    I guess he doesn't count the unfortunate mayoralty of the blighted city of Oakland.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HryQey-OKpQ

    On Schwarzenegger's portrait, notice the left lapel, which doesn't have the same matte light reflection. It came with his ex-wife's face on a lapel badge, and Schwarzenegger crudely scraped it off. A restorer had to be called in to paint over it, but left the area a little shinier than the rest of the painting.

    Read More
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  34. @Chris Marsk
    From Jerry Brown's comments at the unveiling of the Arnold Schwarzenegger official portrait, quoting Brown's father, also a California governor:

    When my father saw my portrait [laughter in audience], he was angry, and he said, "You'll never be elected to another office again." Well, it did take me 28 years to get back.
     
    I guess he doesn't count the unfortunate mayoralty of the blighted city of Oakland.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HryQey-OKpQ

    On Schwarzenegger's portrait, notice the left lapel, which doesn't have the same matte light reflection. It came with his ex-wife's face on a lapel badge, and Schwarzenegger crudely scraped it off. A restorer had to be called in to paint over it, but left the area a little shinier than the rest of the painting.

    Read More
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  35. @syonredux
    A Gilbert Stuart portrait of George Washington


    https://theredlist.com/media/database/fine_arts/arthistory/painting/xix/academies/gilbert-stuart/001-gilbert-stuart-theredlist.jpg

    Ahh, the good old days.

    Read More
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  36. @Anonymous
    No, he can't.

    Here's what Don Barry, astronomer at Cornell, said about Neil deGrasse Tyson when asked, “Has Tyson done any real science? He seems to be a media celebrity, but when I look in the Smithsonian/NASA ADS, I can find no record of scholarly work in science, except for popular books and social commentary. Is he in fact a practicing astrophysicist?”

    Barry replied:

    “Not since graduate school (he did not successfully progress towards a degree at UT/Austin, and convinced Columbia to give him a second try). Aside from the obligatory papers describing his dissertation, he’s got a paper on how to take dome flats, a bizarre paper speculating about an asteroid hitting Uranus, and courtesy mentions *very* late in the author lists of a few big projects in which it is unclear what, if anything, of substance he contributed. No first author papers of any real significance whatsoever. Nor is there any evidence that he has been awarded any telescope time on significant instruments as PI since grad school, despite the incredibly inflated claims in his published CVs. He cozied up to Bush and pushed Bush’s version of man to the Moon, Mars, and Beyond, and now gets appointed to just about every high level political advisory board. To an actual astronomer, this is almost beyond inconceivable. It’s just bizarre. To answer Delong’s question, no: he is not a practicing astrophysicist.”
     

    One of our commenters here was a fellow grad student with Neil deGrasse Tyson and says he was a fine lecturer and that he was proud to get two-thirds as many students to attend his lectures as Tyson’s highly entertaining ones.

    Read More
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  37. Einstein used them — Gedankenexperimente — die können ebenso unterhaltsam sein.

    Read More
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  38. @anon
    Agree Trump looks good for his age, but let's be real-- Trump goes to Hollywood-level extremes in appearance management. Same with Vince McMahon.

    Plastic surgery, hair transplant, bronzer or tanning. And most important of all: hGH and exogenous testosterone... that's SOP.

    He’s not on HGH or TRT, per the White House physician/Navy admiral Trump authorized to disclose all of his current prescriptions (he’s only on two: one a common cholesterol lowering drug, and a topical cream to counter male pattern baldness).

    Read More
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  39. @JohnnyWalker123
    Jeff Sessions went full-on racist today.

    https://twitter.com/tariqnasheed/status/963118275776282624

    After hearing the word "Anglo" spoken in a positive context, I started crying and retreated to my safe space.

    Since “science” proves that Cheddar Man was Black and Mary Beard teaches us the Britain was always and forever a rainbow coalition isn’t Anglo a good thing?

    Read More
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  40. Read More
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  41. @Ron Unz
    Given that our country is clearly run by lunatics and criminals (plus one ignorant buffoon-cuck in the White House), I think humanity is facing a race against time...

    Will we blow up the world, and destroy human civilization?

    Or will we just in the nick of time, place very lazy and corrupt black transsexuals at the very top of our military hierarchy. If so, they'll surely "out-source" control of our strategic nuclear weapons arsenal to low-cost (and very rational) contract-workers from Russia and China, who'll naturally grow hard of hearing when they're ordered to push the button...

    “An nescis, mi fili, quantilla prudentia mundus regatur.”

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  42. Why is Obama man-spreading like that?

    He almost looks to be squatting.

    Could it be the Chinese artists modeled it on the traditional Chinese way of squatting to poo?

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  43. @JohnnyWalker123
    Jeff Sessions went full-on racist today.

    https://twitter.com/tariqnasheed/status/963118275776282624

    After hearing the word "Anglo" spoken in a positive context, I started crying and retreated to my safe space.

    The “Anglo American legal tradition” was a Thing long before pc. The phrase has been out there a long time, only now it’s instantly triggering. That just shows how far things have degraded.

    Read More
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  44. @JohnnyWalker123
    Jeff Sessions went full-on racist today.

    https://twitter.com/tariqnasheed/status/963118275776282624

    After hearing the word "Anglo" spoken in a positive context, I started crying and retreated to my safe space.

    We all remember similar outrage when when President Obama (PBUH) used exactly the same phrase to mean exactly the same thing. Oh! Wait!

    Read More
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  45. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    What I don’t get is this. Obama is rather tall, so why didn’t the portrait emphasize verticality? Instead, Obama looks squashed like a dwarf. I recall Pastor Manning used to call him ‘long-legged mack daddy’, but Obama looks like a squatting idiot.

     

    Oh, man. You just don't GET it, do you? Let's turn to that Vulture.com review that Meretricious linked upthread for the Woke explanation:

    Seating the president lower this way, enmeshing him in an overabundant, highly colorful natural setting, sustains a much more mysteriously human presence, brooding, reconciling, not merely knowing, separate, but kindled with fiery curiosity, a simple inner elevation that brings us to the border of the ordinary and the extraordinary. It’s exactly the metaphysical place Obama embodied as president of all America. The pose and enclosing him this way will irk many who will see Obama being made too normal, small, not central, not in grandeur, not an imperial god. I think the picture is true to the way Obama carries himself. He’s clearly the central subject but not entirely central; there’s a lot going on around him to contend with, negotiate; he’s open to his surroundings, part of them, bigger than they are but not the only thing present. He’s still fighting for space.
     
    That is some virtuoso butt-kissing BS.

    For myself, being able to see Obama not as 'an imperial god' allows me to aspire to dare to dream to be granted the opportunity to try my very utmost-est best to emulate BO's 'much more mysteriously human presence' in my own life.

    , @Anonym
    https://youtu.be/zcSlcNfThUA

    Turdeau is going to have to work hard to one-up that one.
    , @Anonymous
    I’d say Obama’s portrait possesses a certain, uh, vibrancy that the others appear to lack.
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  46. @guest
    Those portraits are hideous. Why weren't they more afraid of the public's reaction? It's not as bad as "spirit cooking," but it's quite obviously outside the taste of Normal Americans.

    These are Official Portraits, right? The kind that go in history books? Not a good time to let the mask slip.

    Or is it? I suppose this the way a "community organizer" would commission a painting: for purposes of agit-prop.

    At long last, have they left no sense of decency?

    I liked the one of Barack at first, but finding out the artist outsourced the actual work ruined it for me. Now it just seems like a darkly comic unintentional metaphor.

    I mean come on. There are actual black American painters capable of doing perfectly acceptable portrait work, and doing all the work themselves — I’ve seen them; I know they’re out there. Why not hire one of them?

    So they’re not big-shot art world celebrities whose work has hip hop cachet — all the more reason to give a brother a break, right? Obama’s choice says a lot more about him than he is probably aware.

    Read More
    • Replies: @CAL2
    If I were Trump, I would discretely find a talented black portrait artist and commission a good portrait of Obama. There has to be a few good pictures out of the tens of thousands taken that could be used for the portrait.

    I don't like the man but that portrait is an embarrassment to the country.
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  47. @Anonymous
    I love it how Obama only associates with and serves elites but he gets some ooga booga witch doctor to paint his portrait and that's enough to cement his legacy as the hip-hop preznit for black Americans. Most gullible demographic in world history...

    …except it’s NOT actually “some ooga booga witch doctor” — it’s another international elite-class grifter who just PRETENDS to be a witch doctor for fun and profit. That’s the real joke.

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  48. And working in Beijing gives him a little space to breathe.

    Apparently he’s the only one, based on the pictures I’ve seen of Beijing.

    Read More
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  49. @Anon
    https://twitter.com/AndrewWMullins/status/963197773645598720

    Just about sums it up.

    What I don't get is this. Obama is rather tall, so why didn't the portrait emphasize verticality? Instead, Obama looks squashed like a dwarf. I recall Pastor Manning used to call him 'long-legged mack daddy', but Obama looks like a squatting idiot.

    And what happened to perspective? The chair doesn't even look 3-dimensional. And the leaves look out of place or Obama looks out of place among them and looks photo-shopped.

    I think Obama is kicking himself. Buyer's remorse. He will quietly have someone else do another portrait. This one is too embarrassing.

    What I don’t get is this. Obama is rather tall, so why didn’t the portrait emphasize verticality? Instead, Obama looks squashed like a dwarf. I recall Pastor Manning used to call him ‘long-legged mack daddy’, but Obama looks like a squatting idiot.

    Oh, man. You just don’t GET it, do you? Let’s turn to that Vulture.com review that Meretricious linked upthread for the Woke explanation:

    Seating the president lower this way, enmeshing him in an overabundant, highly colorful natural setting, sustains a much more mysteriously human presence, brooding, reconciling, not merely knowing, separate, but kindled with fiery curiosity, a simple inner elevation that brings us to the border of the ordinary and the extraordinary. It’s exactly the metaphysical place Obama embodied as president of all America. The pose and enclosing him this way will irk many who will see Obama being made too normal, small, not central, not in grandeur, not an imperial god. I think the picture is true to the way Obama carries himself. He’s clearly the central subject but not entirely central; there’s a lot going on around him to contend with, negotiate; he’s open to his surroundings, part of them, bigger than they are but not the only thing present. He’s still fighting for space.

    That is some virtuoso butt-kissing BS.

    For myself, being able to see Obama not as ‘an imperial god’ allows me to aspire to dare to dream to be granted the opportunity to try my very utmost-est best to emulate BO’s ‘much more mysteriously human presence’ in my own life.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Seating the president lower this way, enmeshing him in an overabundant, highly colorful natural setting, sustains a much more mysteriously human presence, brooding, reconciling, not merely knowing, separate, but kindled with fiery curiosity, a simple inner elevation that brings us to the border of the ordinary and the extraordinary.

    Okay, so he's in his element. Like this one:

    https://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/08/69/56/54/allen-forest-zoo.jpg
    , @guest
    Why specify "president of *all* America?" (a.k.a. Obama-nation.) Aren't all presidents president of all America? Was Bush the Younger only president of Texas, or something?

    Or is it like the thing with Michelle saying she could be a part of or proud of her country, or whatever, for the first time. He was the first president for people who didn't feel American before. Namely, black people. Who never even voted or served in the military or saluted a flag or anything before Obama dreamed his way into Washington, dontcha know.

    , @Anon
    enmeshing him in an overabundant, highly colorful natural setting, sustains a much more mysteriously human presence, brooding, reconciling, not merely knowing, separate, but kindled with fiery curiosity, a simple inner elevation that brings us to the border of the ordinary and the extraordinary.

    https://youtu.be/wf6DpIKgtJ0?t=4m22s

    Interesting. That kind of post-modernist yammering about art developed for purposes of deconstruction. It was meant to de-legitimize ideas, objects, and symbols that we took for granted as normal or valid. It was meant to be the opposite of the gushing official or canonical pronouncements about great men or great things.

    But it's come full circle. The pomo yammerer is using decon lingo to prop up Obama as a holy icon. It's like using satire to praise the king. From deconstruction to Iconstruction.

    Another thing. I think most people are now keen as to how the Art World operates now. The trick is salesmanship, the pitch, than the thing itself. So, if a work is remarkable but comes without a clever pitch combining hipster faddishness with 'social consciousness', it goes ignored. But if a work is total nonsense but comes with a pitch that sparks interest, it has a chance. It seems the main ambition of 'artists' is to have a pitch to garner attention so that superrich will bid up their arts for investment purposes. It's less about pictures than pitchers.

    So, the best thing an artist can do is hire someone from the English Department or Advertising. It's like WOLF OF WALL STREET. If you can talk people into believing that something has value, it does... at least for awhile, at least for inside players who bid up the price as long as the item is hot.
    That would make a funny comedy. A cynical hack artist gets together with a clever 'art critic' who comes up with bogus but clever rationale for the 'artworks', and they gain fame and fortune. And then, when they're finally exposed, they say the fraud itself was meant to be an artistic performance.

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  50. @CCZ
    The official portrait of Mrs. Obama was painted by Baltimore (black) artist Amy Sherald. Some examples of her work:

    http://www.creativealliance.org/sites/default/files/events/2014/08/Untitled-2_19.jpg

    https://nmwa.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/It-Made-Sense...Mostly-in-Her-Mind-Amy-Sherald.png

    https://static1.squarespace.com/static/57c9d3f9d1758e59f1acf5ae/57c9d628e6f2e1332a48b64d/57d5765bb3db2b1e5a144334/1484675210258/Freeing+herself+was+one+thing+taking+ownership+of+that+freed+self+was+another.jpg

    The below is a link comparing the work of Amy Sherald on the left and Kehinde Wiley on the right.

    https://www.theartleague.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/amy-shepard-kehinde-wiley.jpg

    I’d have to say I prefer Miss Garald better. She might be just updating the “grey somber black seriousness face” style that has been done forever since the Harlem Renaissance with lots of color and postmodern themes. But at least she isn’t making some Chinese do derivative collages for her.
    Either way, there’s definitely better black American artists than both of those. But the Obamas, as always, style over substance.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bill B.
    Genuine question. Is that really portrait painting though or are they basically retouched or worked up photographs?

    I suspect the requirements or Big Art and speed (not to mention the tedious need for talent and extreme patience) encourage the latter approach.
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  51. @Anon
    https://twitter.com/AndrewWMullins/status/963197773645598720

    Just about sums it up.

    What I don't get is this. Obama is rather tall, so why didn't the portrait emphasize verticality? Instead, Obama looks squashed like a dwarf. I recall Pastor Manning used to call him 'long-legged mack daddy', but Obama looks like a squatting idiot.

    And what happened to perspective? The chair doesn't even look 3-dimensional. And the leaves look out of place or Obama looks out of place among them and looks photo-shopped.

    I think Obama is kicking himself. Buyer's remorse. He will quietly have someone else do another portrait. This one is too embarrassing.

    Turdeau is going to have to work hard to one-up that one.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    My friends and I used to be mildly freaked out by Tony Tim when we were young.
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  52. But one already stands out: a tall, elegant black woman in a long blue dress—the canvas is enormous, eight feet by ten feet—calmly staring down the viewer. In one hand, she holds a knife. In the other, a cleanly severed brunette female head. “It’s sort of a play on the ‘kill whitey’ thing,” Wiley says.

    And Democrats wonder why white women voted for Trump.

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  53. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    What I don’t get is this. Obama is rather tall, so why didn’t the portrait emphasize verticality? Instead, Obama looks squashed like a dwarf. I recall Pastor Manning used to call him ‘long-legged mack daddy’, but Obama looks like a squatting idiot.

     

    Oh, man. You just don't GET it, do you? Let's turn to that Vulture.com review that Meretricious linked upthread for the Woke explanation:

    Seating the president lower this way, enmeshing him in an overabundant, highly colorful natural setting, sustains a much more mysteriously human presence, brooding, reconciling, not merely knowing, separate, but kindled with fiery curiosity, a simple inner elevation that brings us to the border of the ordinary and the extraordinary. It’s exactly the metaphysical place Obama embodied as president of all America. The pose and enclosing him this way will irk many who will see Obama being made too normal, small, not central, not in grandeur, not an imperial god. I think the picture is true to the way Obama carries himself. He’s clearly the central subject but not entirely central; there’s a lot going on around him to contend with, negotiate; he’s open to his surroundings, part of them, bigger than they are but not the only thing present. He’s still fighting for space.
     
    That is some virtuoso butt-kissing BS.

    For myself, being able to see Obama not as 'an imperial god' allows me to aspire to dare to dream to be granted the opportunity to try my very utmost-est best to emulate BO's 'much more mysteriously human presence' in my own life.

    Seating the president lower this way, enmeshing him in an overabundant, highly colorful natural setting, sustains a much more mysteriously human presence, brooding, reconciling, not merely knowing, separate, but kindled with fiery curiosity, a simple inner elevation that brings us to the border of the ordinary and the extraordinary.

    Okay, so he’s in his element. Like this one:

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  54. @The Last Real Calvinist

    What I don’t get is this. Obama is rather tall, so why didn’t the portrait emphasize verticality? Instead, Obama looks squashed like a dwarf. I recall Pastor Manning used to call him ‘long-legged mack daddy’, but Obama looks like a squatting idiot.

     

    Oh, man. You just don't GET it, do you? Let's turn to that Vulture.com review that Meretricious linked upthread for the Woke explanation:

    Seating the president lower this way, enmeshing him in an overabundant, highly colorful natural setting, sustains a much more mysteriously human presence, brooding, reconciling, not merely knowing, separate, but kindled with fiery curiosity, a simple inner elevation that brings us to the border of the ordinary and the extraordinary. It’s exactly the metaphysical place Obama embodied as president of all America. The pose and enclosing him this way will irk many who will see Obama being made too normal, small, not central, not in grandeur, not an imperial god. I think the picture is true to the way Obama carries himself. He’s clearly the central subject but not entirely central; there’s a lot going on around him to contend with, negotiate; he’s open to his surroundings, part of them, bigger than they are but not the only thing present. He’s still fighting for space.
     
    That is some virtuoso butt-kissing BS.

    For myself, being able to see Obama not as 'an imperial god' allows me to aspire to dare to dream to be granted the opportunity to try my very utmost-est best to emulate BO's 'much more mysteriously human presence' in my own life.

    Why specify “president of *all* America?” (a.k.a. Obama-nation.) Aren’t all presidents president of all America? Was Bush the Younger only president of Texas, or something?

    Or is it like the thing with Michelle saying she could be a part of or proud of her country, or whatever, for the first time. He was the first president for people who didn’t feel American before. Namely, black people. Who never even voted or served in the military or saluted a flag or anything before Obama dreamed his way into Washington, dontcha know.

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  55. Connoisseurs such as we can’t say which
    Is more risible: he or his bitch.
    Affirmative action
    Don’t give satisfaction
    When Wakanda hires Han to make kitsch.

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  56. @syonredux
    Kehinde Wiley vs John Singer Sargent......not much of a contest.....


    http://www.johnsingersargent.net/John%20Singer%20Sargent%20Theodore%20Roosevelt.jpg

    Dont confuse John Singer Sargent with Whistler. There are huge Sargent paintings flanking the grand staircase in Widener Library at Harvard celebrating WW I doughboys with hovering angels.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Dont confuse John Singer Sargent with Whistler.
     
    Why would I confuse Sargent with Whistler?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portraits_of_Presidents_of_the_United_States#Theodore_Roosevelt
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  57. @oddsbodkins

    Neil Degrasse Tyson is pretty much a faker. Others do the science, he acts like he’s done the stuff and owns it.
     
    He's a science popularizer and communicator. Describing other people's work is his job. He did serious research until the mid-90s and can reasonably refer to himself as part of "we scientists".

    “Neil Degrasse Tyson is pretty much a faker. Others do the science, he acts like he’s done the stuff and owns it.”

    A few years ago he did a speaking gig at a mid-west university where I worked (his fees would probably cover annual tuition for 10 students). He talks about science, but with the left-wing political slant — how stupid and primitive white conservatives are. Arrogant, condescending, self-important, 10 minutes of him is about how long it takes to realize what a phony, bullshit artist the guy is.

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  58. Kehinde Wiley is some operator! I like how he snagged Obama’s White House portrait. The big shot black Hollywood producers trend gay including Oprah Winfrey. Gay Blacks make things happen! They know how to put it all together, like this African-American cum Chinese schemer/artist/operator Kehinde Wiley.

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    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    Yeah, I think it is pretty obvious what is actually going on here.

    the new official portrait of a six-fingered President Obama is from the studio of gay black self-promoter Kehinde Wiley who outsources much of his actual boring work to the Chinese.

    From New York Magazine in 2012:


    ... Best known for his oversize portraits of young African-American men he finds on the street—“the boys,” he calls them—against florid wallpaperlike backdrops in poses lifted from old portraits of European gentry, ... he globetrots from the favelas of Rio to the slums of Delhi, pulling charismatic-looking men into the studio for Renaissance-style tribute.
     

     
    So basically, this homo guy cruises the world for gay sex and then has a bunch of underpaid Oompa Loompas paint his butt-buddies for the contemporary art arbiters (i.e., talentless, shameless word-vomiters) to adore.

    This "artist" fits Obama to a T, it turns out.

    Place on the Civilization Degeneracy Scale? Near maximum. Next stage? Collapse.

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  59. @Ron Unz
    Given that our country is clearly run by lunatics and criminals (plus one ignorant buffoon-cuck in the White House), I think humanity is facing a race against time...

    Will we blow up the world, and destroy human civilization?

    Or will we just in the nick of time, place very lazy and corrupt black transsexuals at the very top of our military hierarchy. If so, they'll surely "out-source" control of our strategic nuclear weapons arsenal to low-cost (and very rational) contract-workers from Russia and China, who'll naturally grow hard of hearing when they're ordered to push the button...

    Actually, Trump is the only sane, intelligent person in Washington. And he’s hardly a cuck. I’d reserve that for the neocons.

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    • Replies: @Abe

    Actually, Trump is the only sane, intelligent person in Washington. And he’s hardly a cuck. I’d reserve that for the neocons.
     
    Seriously. What would Mitt Romney, the epitome of serious, mature, non-'buffoon' Republicanism have done if Dick Durbin threw him that line about 'chain-migration' being offensive to African Americans because Triangle Trade? Probably cried, then crushed Durbin in a desperately remorseful hug all the while KNOWING the line was [email protected]!t.

    How much better shape would America now be in had this 'cuck' and 'buffoon' been in the White House in 2001 to immediately institute a no-fuss, no-muss Muslim travel ban instead of the neocon's $5 Trillion Triple Bankshot, on the one hand, and the 'Syrian freedom fighter refugees who-eat-their-fallen-enemey's-hearts-but-not-kidneys-are-the-real-Americans' insanity of the Democrats on the other.
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  60. Adam Carolla had him on a podcast and the fawning the two jews on the show had for DeGrasse the bs’ing genius was incredible. Gina Grad and David Wilde were throwing ‘genius’ around liberally. The tribe sure do fawn over the POC.

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  61. @Mr. Blank
    I liked the one of Barack at first, but finding out the artist outsourced the actual work ruined it for me. Now it just seems like a darkly comic unintentional metaphor.

    I mean come on. There are actual black American painters capable of doing perfectly acceptable portrait work, and doing all the work themselves — I’ve seen them; I know they’re out there. Why not hire one of them?

    So they’re not big-shot art world celebrities whose work has hip hop cachet — all the more reason to give a brother a break, right? Obama’s choice says a lot more about him than he is probably aware.

    If I were Trump, I would discretely find a talented black portrait artist and commission a good portrait of Obama. There has to be a few good pictures out of the tens of thousands taken that could be used for the portrait.

    I don’t like the man but that portrait is an embarrassment to the country.

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    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    It will look great on the wall of his cell in Gitmo.
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  62. @JohnnyWalker123
    To be fair, Obama has aged badly.

    https://twitter.com/TIME/status/687276701739515904

    Of course, nobody has aged worse than Clinton.

    https://twitter.com/YoungDems4Trump/status/954976460145491970

    Trump looks decent for 71. Hopefully he lives at least 20 more years.

    It is normal for Presidents to age beyond what a normal person would while in office. It is not normal for them to age as badly as Bill Clinton has after leaving office.

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Most presidents between the end of the Civil War and around about 1973 had abbreviated life spans after leaving office. Since that time, longevity has been the order of the day.

    Clinton is actually the longest lived male among his first and second degree relatives. The record holder among that set is a paternal side aunt who lived to be 82. His sister is still alive at age 76.

    He looks as old as Gary Hart (10 years his senior) and older than Michael Dukakis (13 years his senior). The condition of his face isn't quite as weathered as the 90 year old Walter Mondale's. Yet.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    It is normal for Presidents to age beyond what a normal person would while in office. It is not normal for them to age as badly as Bill Clinton has after leaving office.

     

    Other presidents weren't married to Hillary.


    Still, Warren Harding and David Lloyd George were also married to Methodist harridans, and were also serial cheaters. Lloyd George even told his wife that was the source of his discontent.
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  63. @Clyde
    Kehinde Wiley is some operator! I like how he snagged Obama's White House portrait. The big shot black Hollywood producers trend gay including Oprah Winfrey. Gay Blacks make things happen! They know how to put it all together, like this African-American cum Chinese schemer/artist/operator Kehinde Wiley.

    Yeah, I think it is pretty obvious what is actually going on here.

    the new official portrait of a six-fingered President Obama is from the studio of gay black self-promoter Kehinde Wiley who outsources much of his actual boring work to the Chinese.

    From New York Magazine in 2012:

    … Best known for his oversize portraits of young African-American men he finds on the street—“the boys,” he calls them—against florid wallpaperlike backdrops in poses lifted from old portraits of European gentry, … he globetrots from the favelas of Rio to the slums of Delhi, pulling charismatic-looking men into the studio for Renaissance-style tribute.

    So basically, this homo guy cruises the world for gay sex and then has a bunch of underpaid Oompa Loompas paint his butt-buddies for the contemporary art arbiters (i.e., talentless, shameless word-vomiters) to adore.

    This “artist” fits Obama to a T, it turns out.

    Place on the Civilization Degeneracy Scale? Near maximum. Next stage? Collapse.

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    • Agree: Abe, International Jew
    • Replies: @Clyde

    So basically, this homo guy cruises the world for gay sex and then has a bunch of underpaid Oompa Loompas paint his butt-buddies for the contemporary art arbiters (i.e., talentless, shameless word-vomiters) to adore.
     
    You have that right! And out of the zillions of artists in the world Obama picks Kehinde Wiley to do his portrait. By doing this Obama is making a statement, virtue signaling that gay is in in in and forcing gay-made onto the White House for future visitors to gawk at. How many Chinese tea boys does Kehinde Wiley have? If one or two of his boyfriend situations blow up the Communist Chinese might boot him out.
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  64. @Barnard
    It is normal for Presidents to age beyond what a normal person would while in office. It is not normal for them to age as badly as Bill Clinton has after leaving office.

    Most presidents between the end of the Civil War and around about 1973 had abbreviated life spans after leaving office. Since that time, longevity has been the order of the day.

    Clinton is actually the longest lived male among his first and second degree relatives. The record holder among that set is a paternal side aunt who lived to be 82. His sister is still alive at age 76.

    He looks as old as Gary Hart (10 years his senior) and older than Michael Dukakis (13 years his senior). The condition of his face isn’t quite as weathered as the 90 year old Walter Mondale’s. Yet.

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    • Replies: @anonymous
    When you say “most presidents” I assume you’re using the new “Fat Math” where one half of 95% is “most” right?
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  65. “I fell into a deep depression afterwards.” That’s OK, man. It’s all whitey’s fault.

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  66. @Art Deco
    Most presidents between the end of the Civil War and around about 1973 had abbreviated life spans after leaving office. Since that time, longevity has been the order of the day.

    Clinton is actually the longest lived male among his first and second degree relatives. The record holder among that set is a paternal side aunt who lived to be 82. His sister is still alive at age 76.

    He looks as old as Gary Hart (10 years his senior) and older than Michael Dukakis (13 years his senior). The condition of his face isn't quite as weathered as the 90 year old Walter Mondale's. Yet.

    When you say “most presidents” I assume you’re using the new “Fat Math” where one half of 95% is “most” right?

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    I assume you're an emotional juvenile and I can't be bothered with you.
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  67. @Buzz Mohawk
    Regarding the MLK statue, here is something hilarious from the Wikipedia link. The King family wanted their cut, and they have gotten some:

    Fees to King family
    In 2001, the foundation's efforts to build the memorial were stalled because Intellectual Properties Management Inc., an organization operated by King's family, wanted the foundation to pay licensing fees to use his name and likeness in marketing campaigns.

    The memorial's foundation, beset by delays and a languid pace of donations, stated that "the last thing it needs is to pay an onerous fee to the King family." Joseph Lowery, past president of the King-founded Southern Christian Leadership Conference stated in The Washington Post, "If nobody's going to make money off of it, why should anyone get a fee?"

    Cambridge University historian David Garrow, who won a Pulitzer Prize for Bearing the Cross, his biography of King, said of King's family's behavior, "One would think any family would be so thrilled to have their forefather celebrated and memorialized in D.C. that it would never dawn on them to ask for a penny." He added that King would have been "absolutely scandalized by the profiteering behavior of his children." The family pledged that any money derived would go back to the King Center's charitable efforts.

    The foundation has paid various fees to the King family's Intellectual Properties Management Inc., including a management fee of $71,700 in 2003. In 2009, the Associated Press revealed that the King family had negotiated an $800,000 licensing deal with the foundation for the use of King's words and image in fundraising materials for the memorial.

    He added that King would have been “absolutely scandalized by the profiteering behavior of his children.”

    You’d hope so, but people impute a lot of views to MLK despite evidence to the contrary, like that he’d have opposed reparations and race-based quotas.

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  68. A prominent artist in Santo Domingo was doing this schtick around 1990 — “I imagine black women in exotic historic European surroundings.” Unfortunately, when I went to one of his shows, the women were all very comely and the settings were rather generic, so the effect was more like “Mistresses of New Orleans.” The artist himself looked roughly like Rumours-era Lindsay Buckingham. Wiley has the right look, and he knows he’s got to hit people over the head (or cut their heads off) for them to get it.

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  69. Trump as Reinhard von Lohengramm was one of my favorite memes. It would be so hilarious to see that as his presidential portrait. It wouldn’t be any more ridiculous than Obama’s.

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  70. There are 1.4 billion Chinese people in the world, great at math.

    This guy hires the ones who can’t count to five?

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    • LOL: jim jones, Kylie
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  71. @bob sykes
    Actually, Trump is the only sane, intelligent person in Washington. And he's hardly a cuck. I'd reserve that for the neocons.

    Actually, Trump is the only sane, intelligent person in Washington. And he’s hardly a cuck. I’d reserve that for the neocons.

    Seriously. What would Mitt Romney, the epitome of serious, mature, non-’buffoon’ Republicanism have done if Dick Durbin threw him that line about ‘chain-migration’ being offensive to African Americans because Triangle Trade? Probably cried, then crushed Durbin in a desperately remorseful hug all the while KNOWING the line was [email protected]!t.

    How much better shape would America now be in had this ‘cuck’ and ‘buffoon’ been in the White House in 2001 to immediately institute a no-fuss, no-muss Muslim travel ban instead of the neocon’s $5 Trillion Triple Bankshot, on the one hand, and the ‘Syrian freedom fighter refugees who-eat-their-fallen-enemey’s-hearts-but-not-kidneys-are-the-real-Americans’ insanity of the Democrats on the other.

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  72. Peace and love, but don’t come home crying when the Panda bites.

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  73. @JohnnyWalker123
    Jeff Sessions went full-on racist today.

    https://twitter.com/tariqnasheed/status/963118275776282624

    After hearing the word "Anglo" spoken in a positive context, I started crying and retreated to my safe space.

    A product of Detroit, Tariq Nasheed would, however, prefer to be addressed as K-Flex or perhaps King Flex.

    Tariq Nasheed, also known as Tariq Elite,[1] King Flex,[2] and K-Flex,[3] is an American film producer and media personality.

    Nasheed’s books on dating and finding women include The Mack Within, The Elite Way, and The Art of Mackin’.[4][5][3] Nasheed has also authored two advice books for female readers: Play or Be Played: What Every Female Should Know About Men, Dating, and Relationships[4][6] and The Art of Gold Digging.[7]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tariq_Nasheed

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  74. So, has everybody retweeted, whatsapped or emailed the relevant memes/links to EVERYONE they know? Thanks!

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  75. @guest
    "It's sort of a play on..." is the death knell of art.

    “It’s sort of a play on the ‘kill whitey’ thing,” How is depicting someone killing whitey a ‘play on’ killing whitey?

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  76. @Anonymous
    Dont confuse John Singer Sargent with Whistler. There are huge Sargent paintings flanking the grand staircase in Widener Library at Harvard celebrating WW I doughboys with hovering angels.

    Dont confuse John Singer Sargent with Whistler.

    Why would I confuse Sargent with Whistler?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portraits_of_Presidents_of_the_United_States#Theodore_Roosevelt

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Because Whistler was good and Sargent was bad.
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  77. @Bill P
    So sad for Beijing artists. I used to visit the galleries there, and there was a lot of good stuff. Even golf art that Steve would have liked.

    Now they are reduced to ghost-painting portraits for American frauds with delusions of grandeur.

    That's what happens when you tear down the hutongs and replace them with shiny imitation Hong Kong towers.

    Wrecking old Beijing was a cultural crime the CCP should answer for.

    “Wrecking old Beijing was a cultural crime the CCP should answer for.”

    To whom? The Chinese people? Chinese have the government they deserve, just as we do. If lunatics and imbeciles blow up the world, then it was mean to be. Fortunately, the Andromeda galaxy will remain unaffected.

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  78. @Bill P
    So sad for Beijing artists. I used to visit the galleries there, and there was a lot of good stuff. Even golf art that Steve would have liked.

    Now they are reduced to ghost-painting portraits for American frauds with delusions of grandeur.

    That's what happens when you tear down the hutongs and replace them with shiny imitation Hong Kong towers.

    Wrecking old Beijing was a cultural crime the CCP should answer for.

    They have both: there’s an artist colony near Shenzhen that does more original work, and then there’s a district within Shenzhen that does soulless copywork to spec. The latter produces much more, much faster for obvious work.

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  79. @syonredux

    Dont confuse John Singer Sargent with Whistler.
     
    Why would I confuse Sargent with Whistler?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portraits_of_Presidents_of_the_United_States#Theodore_Roosevelt

    Because Whistler was good and Sargent was bad.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Because Whistler was good and Sargent was bad.
     
    I think that they were both quite good:


    https://www.irishtimes.com/polopoly_fs/1.3023829.1490381072!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_620_330/image.jpg


    https://trouver.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/john-singer-sargent-lady-agnew.jpg
    , @peterike

    Because Whistler was good and Sargent was bad.

     

    You go to the back of the class.
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  80. Are all fortunes today built on cheap labor? Clearly this crappy artiste is getting rich off a cheap labor gimmick.

    In a related question, why is it that back in the 70s there were only a handful of billionaires — Getty and Hughes are the only that come to mind — but now there are hundreds of them on every continent. California now seems to be a mostly immigrant economy where profits are the result of immigrant businessmen exploiting immigrant cheap labor.

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    • Replies: @Clyde

    In a related question, why is it that back in the 70s there were only a handful of billionaires — Getty and Hughes are the only that come to mind — but now there are hundreds of them on every continent.
     
    Because a billion dollars ain't what it used to be? Besides the greater concentration of wealth since the 1970s.
    , @Art Deco
    Nominal income per capita has increased about 11 fold since the early 1970s, so a threshold of $90 million. then would be of similar significance to a billion dollars today. John D. Rockefeller at his death in 1937 had a higher proportion of the country's asset value than does Bill Gates today.
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  81. @Anon
    https://twitter.com/AndrewWMullins/status/963197773645598720

    Just about sums it up.

    What I don't get is this. Obama is rather tall, so why didn't the portrait emphasize verticality? Instead, Obama looks squashed like a dwarf. I recall Pastor Manning used to call him 'long-legged mack daddy', but Obama looks like a squatting idiot.

    And what happened to perspective? The chair doesn't even look 3-dimensional. And the leaves look out of place or Obama looks out of place among them and looks photo-shopped.

    I think Obama is kicking himself. Buyer's remorse. He will quietly have someone else do another portrait. This one is too embarrassing.

    I’d say Obama’s portrait possesses a certain, uh, vibrancy that the others appear to lack.

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  82. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Rather ugly stuff. The Obama posture looks strange. But then it’s done by a homosexual with all his mental distortions and features another fellow gay (although closeted). Just hype marketing of a brand name. What you’re seeing isn’t really an eyesore and let us explain why it’s really great stuff because blah blah blah. Little bit of flim-flam with this “outsourcing” routine?

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    QUOTE: The Obama posture looks strange.

    Er, what was Obama sitting on in the original photograph that the painting is based on?

    Yet another sly little FU from our former CIC?

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  83. @Anonym
    https://youtu.be/zcSlcNfThUA

    Turdeau is going to have to work hard to one-up that one.

    My friends and I used to be mildly freaked out by Tony Tim when we were young.

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  84. @Ron Unz
    Given that our country is clearly run by lunatics and criminals (plus one ignorant buffoon-cuck in the White House), I think humanity is facing a race against time...

    Will we blow up the world, and destroy human civilization?

    Or will we just in the nick of time, place very lazy and corrupt black transsexuals at the very top of our military hierarchy. If so, they'll surely "out-source" control of our strategic nuclear weapons arsenal to low-cost (and very rational) contract-workers from Russia and China, who'll naturally grow hard of hearing when they're ordered to push the button...

    Don’t tell me you’re writing movie scripts now! Oh boy, I can’t wait for the first Unz motion picture. I’ll write the music for it… I have a fondness for slow cello sonatas.

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  85. He’s a science popularizer and communicator. Describing other people’s work is his job. He did serious research until the mid-90s and can reasonably refer to himself as part of “we scientists”.

    He’s not very good at thinking. Alternatively, he just tweets “science” without thinking. He’s tweeted a couple of whoppers on “Climate Change” where I just had to go in and tear him to pieces.

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  86. @JohnnyWalker123
    To be fair, Obama has aged badly.

    https://twitter.com/TIME/status/687276701739515904

    Of course, nobody has aged worse than Clinton.

    https://twitter.com/YoungDems4Trump/status/954976460145491970

    Trump looks decent for 71. Hopefully he lives at least 20 more years.

    I’d say it’s more like tertiary stage syphilis (Bill and Hill) and total Coke burnout.

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  87. @Anonymous
    Because Whistler was good and Sargent was bad.

    Because Whistler was good and Sargent was bad.

    I think that they were both quite good:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    I fear that your choice of paintings proves Anonymous's point for him.
    Sargent had talent - and prostituted it for financial and social success. He understood this very well himself, and tried his best to make amends in later life, but with only limited success.

    Whistler was the greatest painter America has produced; probably the only one worthy of that over-worked word "genius". His adventurous and usually entirely successful creativity is astonishing and humbling.

    Take Google images and alternate "Whistler paintings" with "Sargent paintings".

    Turner and Velasquez on the one hand; chocolate box on the other.

    And Q.E.D.
    , @Ali Choudhury
    I have seen the original Sargent portrait in Edinburgh, quite striking.
    , @Roderick Spode
    As do I. My favourite:

    https://images.metmuseum.org/CRDImages/ap/original/DT91.jpg
    , @Kylie
    I like Sargent's portrait of the Master.
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  88. @JohnnyWalker123
    Jeff Sessions went full-on racist today.

    https://twitter.com/tariqnasheed/status/963118275776282624

    After hearing the word "Anglo" spoken in a positive context, I started crying and retreated to my safe space.

    Tucker Carlson flipped it back on them last evening by running a clip of Obama using the term ANGLO-AMERICAN in a parallel context.

    Henceforth, anyone who uses the term ‘African-American’ on me is likely to be asked,

    WHICH IS IT? AFRICAN? OR AMERICAN?

    And a harsh lesson on bro-nashi*t’s deeply unappreciative way of non-being may likely follow.

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  89. @anonymous
    Rather ugly stuff. The Obama posture looks strange. But then it's done by a homosexual with all his mental distortions and features another fellow gay (although closeted). Just hype marketing of a brand name. What you're seeing isn't really an eyesore and let us explain why it's really great stuff because blah blah blah. Little bit of flim-flam with this "outsourcing" routine?

    QUOTE: The Obama posture looks strange.

    Er, what was Obama sitting on in the original photograph that the painting is based on?

    Yet another sly little FU from our former CIC?

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  90. Affirmative Action Token Negro. Dime a Dozen.
    Media willing to talk about nothing else. Chapter 13.

    Doing the Work in China and destroying The American Century for black egotism. PRICELESS.

    We Welcome Our New Chinese Overlords. What’s in your Global Hegemony?

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  91. @Anonymous
    Because Whistler was good and Sargent was bad.

    Because Whistler was good and Sargent was bad.

    You go to the back of the class.

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    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Someone who would say "Singer was bad" is not qualified to have an opinion.
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  92. Read More
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  93. @Almost Missouri
    Yeah, I think it is pretty obvious what is actually going on here.

    the new official portrait of a six-fingered President Obama is from the studio of gay black self-promoter Kehinde Wiley who outsources much of his actual boring work to the Chinese.

    From New York Magazine in 2012:


    ... Best known for his oversize portraits of young African-American men he finds on the street—“the boys,” he calls them—against florid wallpaperlike backdrops in poses lifted from old portraits of European gentry, ... he globetrots from the favelas of Rio to the slums of Delhi, pulling charismatic-looking men into the studio for Renaissance-style tribute.
     

     
    So basically, this homo guy cruises the world for gay sex and then has a bunch of underpaid Oompa Loompas paint his butt-buddies for the contemporary art arbiters (i.e., talentless, shameless word-vomiters) to adore.

    This "artist" fits Obama to a T, it turns out.

    Place on the Civilization Degeneracy Scale? Near maximum. Next stage? Collapse.

    So basically, this homo guy cruises the world for gay sex and then has a bunch of underpaid Oompa Loompas paint his butt-buddies for the contemporary art arbiters (i.e., talentless, shameless word-vomiters) to adore.

    You have that right! And out of the zillions of artists in the world Obama picks Kehinde Wiley to do his portrait. By doing this Obama is making a statement, virtue signaling that gay is in in in and forcing gay-made onto the White House for future visitors to gawk at. How many Chinese tea boys does Kehinde Wiley have? If one or two of his boyfriend situations blow up the Communist Chinese might boot him out.

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  94. @JimB
    Are all fortunes today built on cheap labor? Clearly this crappy artiste is getting rich off a cheap labor gimmick.

    In a related question, why is it that back in the 70s there were only a handful of billionaires — Getty and Hughes are the only that come to mind — but now there are hundreds of them on every continent. California now seems to be a mostly immigrant economy where profits are the result of immigrant businessmen exploiting immigrant cheap labor.

    In a related question, why is it that back in the 70s there were only a handful of billionaires — Getty and Hughes are the only that come to mind — but now there are hundreds of them on every continent.

    Because a billion dollars ain’t what it used to be? Besides the greater concentration of wealth since the 1970s.

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  95. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    Ghttps://images.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftse4.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DOIP.kmU2zj2vEb1tYF52CiADJQHaIg%26pid%3D15.1&f=1

    Painting by ain cocke, Wiley’s Beijing “studio manager”. Ain’s treatment of the figures are the same as Wiley. Ain takes the photos of the models For Wiley too. A photo is then projected on the canvas where it is traced. After that’s it’s paint by number filling in the color. That’s where the Chinese craftsmen come in, although I have seen publicity photos where Wiley is doing his own paint by number work.

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  96. What Gateway Pundit says:

    Alinskyite Obama’s Final Eff-You to America – His Trendy Leafage Portrait
    It was his final disgrace.
    After Years of failed policies and anti-American speeches it should come as no surprise that this would be his farewell to the White House.
    Obama opened his administration with an apologetic speech to Muslims in Cairo.
    He ended it with his trendy jungle portrait.

    Eff you America.

    Pamela Geller said it best: Barack Obama’s last act disgraces the office of the President, again. I love how the Democrats and enemedia insist Donald Trump is unfit. He’s a true blue patriot who loves this country, our military & our allies. Barack Hussein Obama’s portrait and his presidency were an attack on the institution.

    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2018/02/alinskyite-obamas-final-f-america-trendy-leafage-portrait/

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    • Replies: @Louis Renault
    He was just trying to make sure he's the first and last Black president.
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  97. @syonredux

    Because Whistler was good and Sargent was bad.
     
    I think that they were both quite good:


    https://www.irishtimes.com/polopoly_fs/1.3023829.1490381072!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_620_330/image.jpg


    https://trouver.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/john-singer-sargent-lady-agnew.jpg

    I fear that your choice of paintings proves Anonymous’s point for him.
    Sargent had talent – and prostituted it for financial and social success. He understood this very well himself, and tried his best to make amends in later life, but with only limited success.

    Whistler was the greatest painter America has produced; probably the only one worthy of that over-worked word “genius”. His adventurous and usually entirely successful creativity is astonishing and humbling.

    Take Google images and alternate “Whistler paintings” with “Sargent paintings”.

    Turner and Velasquez on the one hand; chocolate box on the other.

    And Q.E.D.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    I fear that your choice of paintings proves Anonymous’s point for him.
    Sargent had talent – and prostituted it for financial and social success. He understood this very well himself, and tried his best to make amends in later life, but with only limited success.
     
    Dunno. His assertion is that Sargent was bad....which is definitely wrong. Even Sargent's biggest, Marxian detractors concede his enormous technical skill. Take, for example, his watercolors

    https://d1lfxha3ugu3d4.cloudfront.net/exhibitions/images/2013_Sargent_Watercolors_09.838_PS6_428H.jpg

    Every artist that I've ever known has been awed by his mastery of the form.

    As for the charge of prostituting his talent for financial and social success, that one could be leveled against nearly every portrait painter.....

    Whistler was the greatest painter America has produced; probably the only one worthy of that over-worked word “genius”. His adventurous and usually entirely successful creativity is astonishing and humbling.
     
    I admire Whistler, but I wouldn't give him the crown. For my money, both Eakins and Hopper were greater:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9c/EakinsTheGrossClinic.jpg

    https://www.edwardhopper.net/images/paintings/newyork-movie.jpg
    , @guest
    If that's the product of prostituting talent, Lord, give us more prostitutes.
    , @guest
    By the way, you have missed or deliberately distorted the above poster's point. They didn't say Whistler was better than Sargent. They said Sargent was bad.

    There's no possible way to interpret syonredux's post as proving Sargent was bad. I don't care if the portrait was commissioned by Satan and paid for in blood money, which, after giving minimal aesthetic effort, Sargent used to buy a vacation with his mistress while his entire family died from cancer.

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  98. @Harry Baldwin
    Wiley's way of working sounds like the "no hands" art Tom Wolf describes in Back to Blood. It's entirely possible he does none of the actual painting himself.

    A.A. [Art Advisor] said, “No cutting-edge artist touches materials anymore, or instruments.”

    “What do you mean, instruments, A.A.?” said Fleischmann.

    “Oh, you know,” she said, “paintbrushes, clay, shaping knives, chisels … all that’s from the Manual Age. Remember painting? That seems so 1950s now. Remember Schnabel and Fischl and Salle and all that bunch? They all seem so 1950s now, even though their 15 minutes came in the 1970s. The new artists, like Doggs, look at all those people like they’re from another century, which they were, when you get right down to it. They were still using their hands to do little visual tricks on canvas that were either pretty and pleasant and pleased people or ugly and baffling and ‘challenged’ people. Challenged … Ohmygod—” She broke into a smile and shook her head, as if to say, “Can you believe the way it used to be?!”

    “Then how does Doggs do it?” said Fleischmann. “I guess I never really asked.”

    “It’s actually fascinating,” said A.A. “He got hold of, Doggs did, this call girl, Daphne Deauville, the one who cost the governor of New Jersey his job?—and on the strength of that she gets a job as a columnist for the New York City Light? I couldn’t believe it! So, anyway, Doggs gets a photographer to take some pictures of him … well, fucking her brains out”—lately it had become daringly chic for women to use fucking in conversation—“and doing this and that … and sent the photographs off to Dalique, and Dalique got their elves to reproduce the photographs in three dimensions in Dalique glass, but Doggs never touched the figurines—never. He had no hand at all in making them. And if he touched the photographs, it was just to put them in an envelope and FedEx them to Dalique, although I’m sure he has an assistant to do things like that. No Hands—that’s an important concept now. It’s not some artist using his so-called ‘skills’ to deceive people. It’s not a sleight of hand. It’s no hands at all.
     

    Heh, Tom Wolfe, who has ever written about fraudulent art more eloquently? Thanks for reminding me of that great scene from _Back to Blood_!

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  99. @Bill P
    So sad for Beijing artists. I used to visit the galleries there, and there was a lot of good stuff. Even golf art that Steve would have liked.

    Now they are reduced to ghost-painting portraits for American frauds with delusions of grandeur.

    That's what happens when you tear down the hutongs and replace them with shiny imitation Hong Kong towers.

    Wrecking old Beijing was a cultural crime the CCP should answer for.

    Don’t worry, I’m sure a schlock factory like this doesn’t prevent Chinese from producing more authentic art. In fact, steady part-time employment producing schlock could pay the bills that give the staff artists the means to support themselves to do their own art. Moreover, experience gained using paints and other materials, even in the production of schlock, is surely helpful for producing real art.

    Think of such schlock art operations as a branch of China’s plastic-crap-for-Walmart economy.

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    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    I posted this before, but basically its as you think. To be specific:

    https://qz.com/1172433/why-is-china-creating-utopian-art-cities-in-its-former-wastelands/

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  100. @syonredux

    Because Whistler was good and Sargent was bad.
     
    I think that they were both quite good:


    https://www.irishtimes.com/polopoly_fs/1.3023829.1490381072!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_620_330/image.jpg


    https://trouver.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/john-singer-sargent-lady-agnew.jpg

    I have seen the original Sargent portrait in Edinburgh, quite striking.

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  101. @syonredux
    Kehinde Wiley vs John Singer Sargent......not much of a contest.....


    http://www.johnsingersargent.net/John%20Singer%20Sargent%20Theodore%20Roosevelt.jpg

    Barack Obama, for all his faults, is not an unsophisticated man. I’m sure that, in his soul, it hurts him to see that where Teddy Roosevelt got painted by a real artist, he the Great O, the change “we” waited for, gets done in a style barely one notch up from the velvet cowboys for sale at the flea market.

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    • Replies: @Nico

    Barack Obama, for all his faults, is not an unsophisticated man.
     
    Only if you redefine “sophisticated” to mean “successfully educated to be a sophist” can your assertion have any semblance of truth. Seriously, it is a horrific indictment of the Current Year that a low-energy nerd who needs a live smartphone speed prompter to speak properly (Obama) can be hailed an elegant communicator and a shallow and nervous word-eater (Macron) can be hailed a confident and well-cultured communicator.
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  102. @International Jew
    Don't worry, I'm sure a schlock factory like this doesn't prevent Chinese from producing more authentic art. In fact, steady part-time employment producing schlock could pay the bills that give the staff artists the means to support themselves to do their own art. Moreover, experience gained using paints and other materials, even in the production of schlock, is surely helpful for producing real art.

    Think of such schlock art operations as a branch of China's plastic-crap-for-Walmart economy.

    I posted this before, but basically its as you think. To be specific:

    https://qz.com/1172433/why-is-china-creating-utopian-art-cities-in-its-former-wastelands/

    Read More
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  103. @Old Palo Altan
    I fear that your choice of paintings proves Anonymous's point for him.
    Sargent had talent - and prostituted it for financial and social success. He understood this very well himself, and tried his best to make amends in later life, but with only limited success.

    Whistler was the greatest painter America has produced; probably the only one worthy of that over-worked word "genius". His adventurous and usually entirely successful creativity is astonishing and humbling.

    Take Google images and alternate "Whistler paintings" with "Sargent paintings".

    Turner and Velasquez on the one hand; chocolate box on the other.

    And Q.E.D.

    I fear that your choice of paintings proves Anonymous’s point for him.
    Sargent had talent – and prostituted it for financial and social success. He understood this very well himself, and tried his best to make amends in later life, but with only limited success.

    Dunno. His assertion is that Sargent was bad….which is definitely wrong. Even Sargent’s biggest, Marxian detractors concede his enormous technical skill. Take, for example, his watercolors

    Every artist that I’ve ever known has been awed by his mastery of the form.

    As for the charge of prostituting his talent for financial and social success, that one could be leveled against nearly every portrait painter…..

    Whistler was the greatest painter America has produced; probably the only one worthy of that over-worked word “genius”. His adventurous and usually entirely successful creativity is astonishing and humbling.

    I admire Whistler, but I wouldn’t give him the crown. For my money, both Eakins and Hopper were greater:

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    • Replies: @JMcG
    I once took a date to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. As we contemplated Eakins’ “The Gross Clinic”, she saw fit to mention that the subject of the painting was her great grandfather. Now, what would have been a good reply to that? Cause I sure couldn’t think of anything.
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  104. @Anon
    Bill Clinton's paternal grandparents died at the ages of 51 (grandfather) and 53 (grandmother). His maternal grandparents died at the ages of 59 and 67.

    Clinton's got lousy genes for longevity. Of course, eating like Elvis for many years didn't help.

    Maybe all his grandparents ate like Elvis too.

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  105. @JimB
    Are all fortunes today built on cheap labor? Clearly this crappy artiste is getting rich off a cheap labor gimmick.

    In a related question, why is it that back in the 70s there were only a handful of billionaires — Getty and Hughes are the only that come to mind — but now there are hundreds of them on every continent. California now seems to be a mostly immigrant economy where profits are the result of immigrant businessmen exploiting immigrant cheap labor.

    Nominal income per capita has increased about 11 fold since the early 1970s, so a threshold of $90 million. then would be of similar significance to a billion dollars today. John D. Rockefeller at his death in 1937 had a higher proportion of the country’s asset value than does Bill Gates today.

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  106. @anonymous
    When you say “most presidents” I assume you’re using the new “Fat Math” where one half of 95% is “most” right?

    I assume you’re an emotional juvenile and I can’t be bothered with you.

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  107. @syonredux

    Because Whistler was good and Sargent was bad.
     
    I think that they were both quite good:


    https://www.irishtimes.com/polopoly_fs/1.3023829.1490381072!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_620_330/image.jpg


    https://trouver.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/john-singer-sargent-lady-agnew.jpg

    As do I. My favourite:

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  108. @International Jew
    Barack Obama, for all his faults, is not an unsophisticated man. I'm sure that, in his soul, it hurts him to see that where Teddy Roosevelt got painted by a real artist, he the Great O, the change "we" waited for, gets done in a style barely one notch up from the velvet cowboys for sale at the flea market.

    Barack Obama, for all his faults, is not an unsophisticated man.

    Only if you redefine “sophisticated” to mean “successfully educated to be a sophist” can your assertion have any semblance of truth. Seriously, it is a horrific indictment of the Current Year that a low-energy nerd who needs a live smartphone speed prompter to speak properly (Obama) can be hailed an elegant communicator and a shallow and nervous word-eater (Macron) can be hailed a confident and well-cultured communicator.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Only if you redefine “sophisticated” to mean “successfully educated to be a sophist”
     
    That's not redefinition, that's originalism:

    http://www.worldwidewords.org/topicalwords/tw-sop1.htm
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  109. There was a “block-buster” exhibition of Sargent’s work at the Tate back in 1998. I attended it with eager expectation, but left with a shaking head.

    The man had tremendous technical ability, yes, but very little artistic inspiration. He knew this, and it troubled him. By the end of his swagger portrait career his work is sloppy and turned out without a scintilla of excitement. He knew that too, and turned to the water colours you rightly praise. But they too in the end leave one disappointed. He had everything but that indefinable but recognisable touch we call genius.

    By the way, I suspect that Sargent was depressed too when de Laszlo came on the scene and beat him hollow at his own game.

    But the British and we their cousins have no truly great artists, not in painting, not in music (well maybe one, Purcell, and possibly also Britten), perhaps in architecture with Wren and (again possibly) Lutyens. No, for that we all know that we must look to Italy above all, our sacred seedbed, and then to its offspring, the last of which was Germany, where it all finally ended with Richard Strauss. Perhaps Holy Russia will redeem us, but not yet.

    What do you look for in a painting? Whatever it is I look for I find most perfectly in Velasquez, who handled his medium in a way which can only be described as miraculous. One must go to the Prado to see his best creations, but the royal portraits in Munich and Vienna are enough to prove my point.

    But we cannot live with geniuses only, and I will admit that Sargent can give feelings of delight of which we need not be ashamed.

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    • Replies: @guest
    I see you mention painting, music, and architecture, but conspicuously leave out literature.

    There is no maybe with Purcell.

    I don't think I need to go through all the great English and American painters. I can only interpret the denial of their existence as some sort of ruse or unfortunate delusion.

    Also, music ends with Wagner, not Strauss.

    Oh, we don't need to be ashamed of Sargent? How gracious of you.

    If anyone actually was ashamed to like Sargent, it could only he because they have one of those "false consciousnesses" I've heard about.
    , @stillCARealist
    Purcell and Britten? No. Edward Elgar, okay.

    But your point stands. Britain is not the place for the nurture of musical genius. That's primarily for the Germans and the Russians and the Italians. But mostly the Germans.
    , @syonredux

    But the British and we their cousins have no truly great artists, not in painting, not in music (well maybe one, Purcell, and possibly also Britten),
     
    By truly great, I assume that you mean on the Bach-Beethoven-Mozart level for music, and Rembrandt-Raphael-Velasquez for painting? I would concur. And Purcell and Britten, to my mind, are not exceptions.

    Anglo genius in the arts seems to find its strongest expression in literature: Milton, Shakespeare, Donne, Pope, Melville, Henry James, Jane Austen, etc

    What do you look for in a painting?

     

    Something that cannot be expressed in words, only in form.....
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  110. gay black self-promoter Kehinde Wiley who outsources much of his actual boring work to the Chinese

    As another gay black self-promoter did for eight years. Oh, that was our work, not his– which was carried out mostly on US links.

    Some unemployed American robot could have used the business.

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  111. @Anon
    Bill Clinton's paternal grandparents died at the ages of 51 (grandfather) and 53 (grandmother). His maternal grandparents died at the ages of 59 and 67.

    Clinton's got lousy genes for longevity. Of course, eating like Elvis for many years didn't help.

    Clinton’s got lousy genes for longevity. Of course, eating like Elvis for many years didn’t help

    Nor did rutting like Kennedy.

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  112. @Barnard
    It is normal for Presidents to age beyond what a normal person would while in office. It is not normal for them to age as badly as Bill Clinton has after leaving office.

    It is normal for Presidents to age beyond what a normal person would while in office. It is not normal for them to age as badly as Bill Clinton has after leaving office.

    Other presidents weren’t married to Hillary.

    Still, Warren Harding and David Lloyd George were also married to Methodist harridans, and were also serial cheaters. Lloyd George even told his wife that was the source of his discontent.

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  113. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    What I don’t get is this. Obama is rather tall, so why didn’t the portrait emphasize verticality? Instead, Obama looks squashed like a dwarf. I recall Pastor Manning used to call him ‘long-legged mack daddy’, but Obama looks like a squatting idiot.

     

    Oh, man. You just don't GET it, do you? Let's turn to that Vulture.com review that Meretricious linked upthread for the Woke explanation:

    Seating the president lower this way, enmeshing him in an overabundant, highly colorful natural setting, sustains a much more mysteriously human presence, brooding, reconciling, not merely knowing, separate, but kindled with fiery curiosity, a simple inner elevation that brings us to the border of the ordinary and the extraordinary. It’s exactly the metaphysical place Obama embodied as president of all America. The pose and enclosing him this way will irk many who will see Obama being made too normal, small, not central, not in grandeur, not an imperial god. I think the picture is true to the way Obama carries himself. He’s clearly the central subject but not entirely central; there’s a lot going on around him to contend with, negotiate; he’s open to his surroundings, part of them, bigger than they are but not the only thing present. He’s still fighting for space.
     
    That is some virtuoso butt-kissing BS.

    For myself, being able to see Obama not as 'an imperial god' allows me to aspire to dare to dream to be granted the opportunity to try my very utmost-est best to emulate BO's 'much more mysteriously human presence' in my own life.

    enmeshing him in an overabundant, highly colorful natural setting, sustains a much more mysteriously human presence, brooding, reconciling, not merely knowing, separate, but kindled with fiery curiosity, a simple inner elevation that brings us to the border of the ordinary and the extraordinary.

    Interesting. That kind of post-modernist yammering about art developed for purposes of deconstruction. It was meant to de-legitimize ideas, objects, and symbols that we took for granted as normal or valid. It was meant to be the opposite of the gushing official or canonical pronouncements about great men or great things.

    But it’s come full circle. The pomo yammerer is using decon lingo to prop up Obama as a holy icon. It’s like using satire to praise the king. From deconstruction to Iconstruction.

    Another thing. I think most people are now keen as to how the Art World operates now. The trick is salesmanship, the pitch, than the thing itself. So, if a work is remarkable but comes without a clever pitch combining hipster faddishness with ‘social consciousness’, it goes ignored. But if a work is total nonsense but comes with a pitch that sparks interest, it has a chance. It seems the main ambition of ‘artists’ is to have a pitch to garner attention so that superrich will bid up their arts for investment purposes. It’s less about pictures than pitchers.

    So, the best thing an artist can do is hire someone from the English Department or Advertising. It’s like WOLF OF WALL STREET. If you can talk people into believing that something has value, it does… at least for awhile, at least for inside players who bid up the price as long as the item is hot.
    That would make a funny comedy. A cynical hack artist gets together with a clever ‘art critic’ who comes up with bogus but clever rationale for the ‘artworks’, and they gain fame and fortune. And then, when they’re finally exposed, they say the fraud itself was meant to be an artistic performance.

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    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    It’s less about pictures than pitchers.

     

    That's an excellent summary.

    I also like your comedy pitch: being an artist is being a performance artist, no matter the medium.
    , @guest
    It's still deconstruction, however. Because even if Obama was kang, he was only kang for a moment. Now look who's in charge. The revolution continues.

    Even when they're in charge they're not in charge. Obama had only 8 years to deconstruct hundreds of years of Whitey.

    Western Civilization persists, and there are still conventions to be overturned and normies to be befuddled.

    Did you know, after decades of pomo and an actual communist revolutionary in the White House, people still have families, go to work, spend money, believe in God, and all that? The Merry Pranksters can never really be the Man so long as that stuff remains normal.

    At least that's what they think.

    , @guest
    I don't know about your premise in particular, but there are some decent satirical movies about the art world.

    For instance: Art School Confidential and Boogie Woogie.
    , @bored identity
    Dear Uncle Sailer, please put on hold your whimy-whamy instincts, and allow bored identity to be reprllently blunt and tortuous - because that's who we are :



    "...By collapsing history and style into a unique contemporary vision, Wiley interrogates the notion of master painter, “making it at once critical and complicit.”

    Vividly colorful and often adorned with ornate gilded frames, Wiley’s large-scale figurative paintings, which are illuminated with a barrage of baroque or rococo decorative patterns, posit young black men, fashioned in urban attire, within the field of power reminiscent of Renaissance artists such as Tiepolo and Titian. "

    http://www.npg.si.edu/exhibit/recognize/paintings.html#

    Also:

    Wiley says the reaction at the opening of his show in Paris last month was profound.

    “I’ve never had so many museum guards walk up to me like they did in Paris, where they said, ‘Oh my God, I’ve never seen this many black bodies in a public space,’” says Wiley.

    (...)

    Wiley acknowledges that this is a delicate time for his work to be exhibited in France.
    Far-right politicians there have seen a surge in support because of concerns that too many refugees and immigrants are coming into the country.

    “I think that it’s obviously something that we see here in America,” he says. “We see it in the Brexit. We also see it in France.

    And all of those black and brown bodies that are in places [like the recently dismantled migrant camp in Calais] called the Jungle … [those places] have to be remembered as places that were once places of refuge for Eastern Europeans, Jews and homosexuals.”

    Wiley’s conclusion? “Europe has been a place of refuge.

    Why should it stop with black and brown bodies?”

    https://www.pri.org/stories/2016-11-02/kehinde-wiley-reimagines-old-portraits-because-if-black-lives-matter-they-deserve

     

    Not a single MOMAfudging , echo-chambering, and Weimerica's l'fart pour l'fart worshiping Shulamite would have ever considered Kehinde Wiley to be The Artist, if Kehinde weren't :

    A.) Blackity Black Painther Coollapsing Wakanda's Blackorateral Wallpaper Damage into Cultural Fabric of Western Society,

    and

    B.) Willing to bleed white & dry on his circumcised last name which conveniently belongs to the above-mentioned Shulamites;


    http://www.npg.si.edu/exhibit/recognize/images/02-03_full.jpg

    02-03_full.jpg (JPEG Image, 435 × 600 pixels)
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  114. Truly, this portrait captures the amateur essence of Obama’s presidency.

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  115. @Old Palo Altan
    I fear that your choice of paintings proves Anonymous's point for him.
    Sargent had talent - and prostituted it for financial and social success. He understood this very well himself, and tried his best to make amends in later life, but with only limited success.

    Whistler was the greatest painter America has produced; probably the only one worthy of that over-worked word "genius". His adventurous and usually entirely successful creativity is astonishing and humbling.

    Take Google images and alternate "Whistler paintings" with "Sargent paintings".

    Turner and Velasquez on the one hand; chocolate box on the other.

    And Q.E.D.

    If that’s the product of prostituting talent, Lord, give us more prostitutes.

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  116. @Old Palo Altan
    I fear that your choice of paintings proves Anonymous's point for him.
    Sargent had talent - and prostituted it for financial and social success. He understood this very well himself, and tried his best to make amends in later life, but with only limited success.

    Whistler was the greatest painter America has produced; probably the only one worthy of that over-worked word "genius". His adventurous and usually entirely successful creativity is astonishing and humbling.

    Take Google images and alternate "Whistler paintings" with "Sargent paintings".

    Turner and Velasquez on the one hand; chocolate box on the other.

    And Q.E.D.

    By the way, you have missed or deliberately distorted the above poster’s point. They didn’t say Whistler was better than Sargent. They said Sargent was bad.

    There’s no possible way to interpret syonredux’s post as proving Sargent was bad. I don’t care if the portrait was commissioned by Satan and paid for in blood money, which, after giving minimal aesthetic effort, Sargent used to buy a vacation with his mistress while his entire family died from cancer.

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  117. @Clyde
    What Gateway Pundit says:

    Alinskyite Obama’s Final Eff-You to America – His Trendy Leafage Portrait
    It was his final disgrace.
    After Years of failed policies and anti-American speeches it should come as no surprise that this would be his farewell to the White House.
    Obama opened his administration with an apologetic speech to Muslims in Cairo.
    He ended it with his trendy jungle portrait.

    Eff you America.

    Pamela Geller said it best: Barack Obama’s last act disgraces the office of the President, again. I love how the Democrats and enemedia insist Donald Trump is unfit. He’s a true blue patriot who loves this country, our military & our allies. Barack Hussein Obama’s portrait and his presidency were an attack on the institution.
    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2018/02/alinskyite-obamas-final-f-america-trendy-leafage-portrait/

    He was just trying to make sure he’s the first and last Black president.

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  118. @Old Palo Altan
    There was a "block-buster" exhibition of Sargent's work at the Tate back in 1998. I attended it with eager expectation, but left with a shaking head.

    The man had tremendous technical ability, yes, but very little artistic inspiration. He knew this, and it troubled him. By the end of his swagger portrait career his work is sloppy and turned out without a scintilla of excitement. He knew that too, and turned to the water colours you rightly praise. But they too in the end leave one disappointed. He had everything but that indefinable but recognisable touch we call genius.

    By the way, I suspect that Sargent was depressed too when de Laszlo came on the scene and beat him hollow at his own game.

    But the British and we their cousins have no truly great artists, not in painting, not in music (well maybe one, Purcell, and possibly also Britten), perhaps in architecture with Wren and (again possibly) Lutyens. No, for that we all know that we must look to Italy above all, our sacred seedbed, and then to its offspring, the last of which was Germany, where it all finally ended with Richard Strauss. Perhaps Holy Russia will redeem us, but not yet.

    What do you look for in a painting? Whatever it is I look for I find most perfectly in Velasquez, who handled his medium in a way which can only be described as miraculous. One must go to the Prado to see his best creations, but the royal portraits in Munich and Vienna are enough to prove my point.

    But we cannot live with geniuses only, and I will admit that Sargent can give feelings of delight of which we need not be ashamed.

    I see you mention painting, music, and architecture, but conspicuously leave out literature.

    There is no maybe with Purcell.

    I don’t think I need to go through all the great English and American painters. I can only interpret the denial of their existence as some sort of ruse or unfortunate delusion.

    Also, music ends with Wagner, not Strauss.

    Oh, we don’t need to be ashamed of Sargent? How gracious of you.

    If anyone actually was ashamed to like Sargent, it could only he because they have one of those “false consciousnesses” I’ve heard about.

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    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    I agree that there is no maybe about Purcell, and I am surprised that nobody has complained that I failed to mention the Renaissance greats like Byrd and Tallis.

    Music may well culminate with Wagner, but it certainly didn't end with him.

    There are many good English, Scottish and American painters, but there are no great ones. Maybe we just define "great" differently.
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  119. @Old Palo Altan
    There was a "block-buster" exhibition of Sargent's work at the Tate back in 1998. I attended it with eager expectation, but left with a shaking head.

    The man had tremendous technical ability, yes, but very little artistic inspiration. He knew this, and it troubled him. By the end of his swagger portrait career his work is sloppy and turned out without a scintilla of excitement. He knew that too, and turned to the water colours you rightly praise. But they too in the end leave one disappointed. He had everything but that indefinable but recognisable touch we call genius.

    By the way, I suspect that Sargent was depressed too when de Laszlo came on the scene and beat him hollow at his own game.

    But the British and we their cousins have no truly great artists, not in painting, not in music (well maybe one, Purcell, and possibly also Britten), perhaps in architecture with Wren and (again possibly) Lutyens. No, for that we all know that we must look to Italy above all, our sacred seedbed, and then to its offspring, the last of which was Germany, where it all finally ended with Richard Strauss. Perhaps Holy Russia will redeem us, but not yet.

    What do you look for in a painting? Whatever it is I look for I find most perfectly in Velasquez, who handled his medium in a way which can only be described as miraculous. One must go to the Prado to see his best creations, but the royal portraits in Munich and Vienna are enough to prove my point.

    But we cannot live with geniuses only, and I will admit that Sargent can give feelings of delight of which we need not be ashamed.

    Purcell and Britten? No. Edward Elgar, okay.

    But your point stands. Britain is not the place for the nurture of musical genius. That’s primarily for the Germans and the Russians and the Italians. But mostly the Germans.

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    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    Purcell is at least England's greatest, with Byrd and Tallis and a few others of their period very close behind.
    Britten can be exquisite, but of course he is not of European wide significance.
    Elgar was and remains hugely popular, but the other English composers of his own day rather despised his work. I prefer Parry myself.
    God bless the old Germany, and may He destroy Merkel and her ilk so that something of that blessed Volk might survive, flourish, inspire and instruct us.
    , @Luke
    Ralph Vaughn williams
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  120. @Old Palo Altan
    There was a "block-buster" exhibition of Sargent's work at the Tate back in 1998. I attended it with eager expectation, but left with a shaking head.

    The man had tremendous technical ability, yes, but very little artistic inspiration. He knew this, and it troubled him. By the end of his swagger portrait career his work is sloppy and turned out without a scintilla of excitement. He knew that too, and turned to the water colours you rightly praise. But they too in the end leave one disappointed. He had everything but that indefinable but recognisable touch we call genius.

    By the way, I suspect that Sargent was depressed too when de Laszlo came on the scene and beat him hollow at his own game.

    But the British and we their cousins have no truly great artists, not in painting, not in music (well maybe one, Purcell, and possibly also Britten), perhaps in architecture with Wren and (again possibly) Lutyens. No, for that we all know that we must look to Italy above all, our sacred seedbed, and then to its offspring, the last of which was Germany, where it all finally ended with Richard Strauss. Perhaps Holy Russia will redeem us, but not yet.

    What do you look for in a painting? Whatever it is I look for I find most perfectly in Velasquez, who handled his medium in a way which can only be described as miraculous. One must go to the Prado to see his best creations, but the royal portraits in Munich and Vienna are enough to prove my point.

    But we cannot live with geniuses only, and I will admit that Sargent can give feelings of delight of which we need not be ashamed.

    But the British and we their cousins have no truly great artists, not in painting, not in music (well maybe one, Purcell, and possibly also Britten),

    By truly great, I assume that you mean on the Bach-Beethoven-Mozart level for music, and Rembrandt-Raphael-Velasquez for painting? I would concur. And Purcell and Britten, to my mind, are not exceptions.

    Anglo genius in the arts seems to find its strongest expression in literature: Milton, Shakespeare, Donne, Pope, Melville, Henry James, Jane Austen, etc

    What do you look for in a painting?

    Something that cannot be expressed in words, only in form…..

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    • Replies: @3g4me
    @113 syonredux: "Anglo genius in the arts seems to find its strongest expression in literature: Milton, Shakespeare, Donne, Pope, Melville, Henry James, Jane Austen, etc"

    I also like Sargent, concur with your opinion on Britten and Purcell, but to include Melville on a list with Shakespeare and Milton? Travesty.
    , @guest
    If we're talking the tippy-top level, then my top ten might be all Germans. But why are we on such lofty heights?

    This tangent started with the difference between Sargent and Whistler (Whistler the alleged superior). But Purcell is easily superior in music to Whistler in painting, in my opinion.

    Bringing Velasquez into it muddied the waters, I think. Because he's on a whole other level. Though perhaps we value him too much for anticipating modern taste, which is fickle. Much like Vermeer. Whom I also love, don't get me wrong. But there's an element of fashion involved.

    Speaking of which, wide swaths of art history are deeply unfashionable, for no good reason. Especially the 19th century, during which British painting was strong, in my opinion. But names from that era aren't taught or otherwise promoted, and therefore can't become household names.

    Not that they're as good as Velasquez, but again why are we talking on his level?

    Listen to Dido's death scene and tell me Purcell's not a genius. It sounds fresh hundreds of years after the fact. It's not Beethoven, but what is?

    , @guest
    Form is not the right term, I don't think. That's what an abstractionist might say. But great painting has not only form but content. Representational content and the dreaded (by modernists) "literary" content. But also symbolic content, which can be veeery intricate.

    In any case, not being expressible in words is something you can say about every artform that isn't literature. And at least one artform with words: drama. There must be something more specific about painting, though I-don't-know-what.

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  121. “Something that cannot be expressed in words, only in form …”

    Agreed.

    And you are right to mention our literary genius. That we do have, and the best language for it.

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  122. People are complaining about Hussein’s choice of style and artist, but take a glass half-full view: maybe it’s his way of admitting he neither measures up, nor fits in.

    Painting by ain cocke, Wiley’s Beijing “studio manager”. Ain’s treatment of the figures are the same as Wiley. Ain takes the photos of the models For Wiley too. A photo is then projected on the canvas where it is traced. After that’s it’s paint by number filling in the color. That’s where the Chinese craftsmen come in, although I have seen publicity photos where Wiley is doing his own paint by number work.

    A lot of the old masters worked this way. Many used grids or some kind of weird renaissance “projector” (camera obscura?). Many also had their students do their underpaintings, backgrounds, etc.

    First thing you learn in art school is the product is what matters, not the process, though many students refuse to learn the fact.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    To this point Teller of Penn & Teller fame sponsored a documentary demonstrating that Renaissance masters were much more methodical and technically-oriented than is commonly understood (I think they focus on Rembrandt).
    , @Anon
    Wow the great svigor was an art student? Isteve is truely the athens of our time.

    Of course the great masters used assistants but the master was responsible for the overall composition. Vermeer and Canaletto supposedly used camera obscura, but unlike Wiley they had a ‘feel’ for composition and obviously adjusted the image as they went. Wiley is visually tone deaf. He just does not see what he cannot see. Because he can’t see he assumes no one else can. And mostly he is right.
    , @guest
    The use of grids is neither here nor there.

    Assistants doing the work is a real issue, and that's why it's often so difficult to determine what was produced by the known master and what by his underlings.

    But at least when those guys actually painted, they painted as experts in their craft. Which you can see in the product.

    Yes, you're right, the product is what matters. Which is why this looks like mass-produced, assembly line, cut-and-paste garbage.

    Which might have been the intent, but that doesn't make it better.

    , @guest
    "some kind of weird renaissance 'projector' (camera obscura?)"

    This is a total myth. I'm not saying painters didn't look into cameras to get inspiration, but the idea that they projected images onto walls and traced in the modern manner? No. Didn't happen.

    Wouldn't have worked, because the technology wasn't right they didn't do it outside, and in a room dark enough to make the tracing viable (if it ever could be), there wouldn't have been enough light for the camera.

    There are countless other technical shortcomings that would have made doing it freehand infinitely preferable. If but you know how.

    Oh, but learning is hard. It'd be easier to believe the Stale, Pale Males of painting didn't dedicate their lives to hard labor in learning the craft. If they used science tricks instead, so can you.

    Not that they didn't have tricks, but they also learned to use their hands.

    Most importantly, there's no record of them using projection. They didn't put it in their diaries or hand it down to students, and there are no witnesses.

    Which could be a conspiracy, but we know how they did it. They handed down the actual techniques.

    This "weird renaissance 'projector'" myth is promoted by people like Hockney, who has no skill and assumes the Old Masters didn't either. I've seen his demonstration of the projector tracing method, and they look like crap.

    , @guest
    To clarify, I'm not saying no Old Master ever experimented with a camera obscura or camera lucida. But they are inferior to traditional methods and were by no means a regular thing.

    Unlike now, when tracing is common.
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  123. @peterike

    Because Whistler was good and Sargent was bad.

     

    You go to the back of the class.

    Someone who would say “Singer was bad” is not qualified to have an opinion.

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  124. @syonredux

    Because Whistler was good and Sargent was bad.
     
    I think that they were both quite good:


    https://www.irishtimes.com/polopoly_fs/1.3023829.1490381072!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_620_330/image.jpg


    https://trouver.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/john-singer-sargent-lady-agnew.jpg

    I like Sargent’s portrait of the Master.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    I like Sargent’s portrait of the Master.

     

    Henry James would agree. He loved how Sargent portrayed him as “all large and luscious rotundity":


    http://www.jssgallery.org/Paintings/HenryJames.jpg
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  125. @syonredux

    I fear that your choice of paintings proves Anonymous’s point for him.
    Sargent had talent – and prostituted it for financial and social success. He understood this very well himself, and tried his best to make amends in later life, but with only limited success.
     
    Dunno. His assertion is that Sargent was bad....which is definitely wrong. Even Sargent's biggest, Marxian detractors concede his enormous technical skill. Take, for example, his watercolors

    https://d1lfxha3ugu3d4.cloudfront.net/exhibitions/images/2013_Sargent_Watercolors_09.838_PS6_428H.jpg

    Every artist that I've ever known has been awed by his mastery of the form.

    As for the charge of prostituting his talent for financial and social success, that one could be leveled against nearly every portrait painter.....

    Whistler was the greatest painter America has produced; probably the only one worthy of that over-worked word “genius”. His adventurous and usually entirely successful creativity is astonishing and humbling.
     
    I admire Whistler, but I wouldn't give him the crown. For my money, both Eakins and Hopper were greater:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9c/EakinsTheGrossClinic.jpg

    https://www.edwardhopper.net/images/paintings/newyork-movie.jpg

    I once took a date to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. As we contemplated Eakins’ “The Gross Clinic”, she saw fit to mention that the subject of the painting was her great grandfather. Now, what would have been a good reply to that? Cause I sure couldn’t think of anything.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    I once took a date to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. As we contemplated Eakins’ “The Gross Clinic”, she saw fit to mention that the subject of the painting was her great grandfather. Now, what would have been a good reply to that? Cause I sure couldn’t think of anything.
     
    A perfect question for Heartiste.
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  126. @syonredux

    But the British and we their cousins have no truly great artists, not in painting, not in music (well maybe one, Purcell, and possibly also Britten),
     
    By truly great, I assume that you mean on the Bach-Beethoven-Mozart level for music, and Rembrandt-Raphael-Velasquez for painting? I would concur. And Purcell and Britten, to my mind, are not exceptions.

    Anglo genius in the arts seems to find its strongest expression in literature: Milton, Shakespeare, Donne, Pope, Melville, Henry James, Jane Austen, etc

    What do you look for in a painting?

     

    Something that cannot be expressed in words, only in form.....

    @113 syonredux: “Anglo genius in the arts seems to find its strongest expression in literature: Milton, Shakespeare, Donne, Pope, Melville, Henry James, Jane Austen, etc”

    I also like Sargent, concur with your opinion on Britten and Purcell, but to include Melville on a list with Shakespeare and Milton? Travesty.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    I also like Sargent, concur with your opinion on Britten and Purcell, but to include Melville on a list with Shakespeare and Milton? Travesty.
     
    Melville has moments where he approaches the Miltonic:

    Towards thee I roll, thou all-destroying but unconquering whale; to the last I grapple with thee; from hell's heart I stab at thee; for hate's sake I spit my last breath at thee.
     
    And the Shakespeareian:

    All visible objects, man, are but as pasteboard masks. But in each event — in the living act, the undoubted deed — there, some unknown but still reasoning thing puts forth the mouldings of its features from behind the unreasoning mask. If man will strike, strike through the mask! How can the prisoner reach outside except by thrusting through the wall? To me, the white whale is that wall, shoved near to me. Sometimes I think there's naught beyond. But 'tis enough. He tasks me; he heaps me; I see in him outrageous strength, with an inscrutable malice sinewing it. That inscrutable thing is chiefly what I hate; and be the white whale agent, or be the white whale principal, I will wreak that hate upon him. Talk not to me of blasphemy, man; I'd strike the sun if it insulted me. For could the sun do that, then could I do the other; since there is ever a sort of fair play herein, jealousy presiding over all creations. But not my master, man, is even that fair play. Who's over me? Truth hath no confines.
     
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  127. @Kylie
    I like Sargent's portrait of the Master.

    I like Sargent’s portrait of the Master.

    Henry James would agree. He loved how Sargent portrayed him as “all large and luscious rotundity”:

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  128. @Nico

    Barack Obama, for all his faults, is not an unsophisticated man.
     
    Only if you redefine “sophisticated” to mean “successfully educated to be a sophist” can your assertion have any semblance of truth. Seriously, it is a horrific indictment of the Current Year that a low-energy nerd who needs a live smartphone speed prompter to speak properly (Obama) can be hailed an elegant communicator and a shallow and nervous word-eater (Macron) can be hailed a confident and well-cultured communicator.

    Only if you redefine “sophisticated” to mean “successfully educated to be a sophist”

    That’s not redefinition, that’s originalism:

    http://www.worldwidewords.org/topicalwords/tw-sop1.htm

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  129. Obama portrait is like a magic-meme-generator.

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  130. @3g4me
    @113 syonredux: "Anglo genius in the arts seems to find its strongest expression in literature: Milton, Shakespeare, Donne, Pope, Melville, Henry James, Jane Austen, etc"

    I also like Sargent, concur with your opinion on Britten and Purcell, but to include Melville on a list with Shakespeare and Milton? Travesty.

    I also like Sargent, concur with your opinion on Britten and Purcell, but to include Melville on a list with Shakespeare and Milton? Travesty.

    Melville has moments where he approaches the Miltonic:

    Towards thee I roll, thou all-destroying but unconquering whale; to the last I grapple with thee; from hell’s heart I stab at thee; for hate’s sake I spit my last breath at thee.

    And the Shakespeareian:

    All visible objects, man, are but as pasteboard masks. But in each event — in the living act, the undoubted deed — there, some unknown but still reasoning thing puts forth the mouldings of its features from behind the unreasoning mask. If man will strike, strike through the mask! How can the prisoner reach outside except by thrusting through the wall? To me, the white whale is that wall, shoved near to me. Sometimes I think there’s naught beyond. But ’tis enough. He tasks me; he heaps me; I see in him outrageous strength, with an inscrutable malice sinewing it. That inscrutable thing is chiefly what I hate; and be the white whale agent, or be the white whale principal, I will wreak that hate upon him. Talk not to me of blasphemy, man; I’d strike the sun if it insulted me. For could the sun do that, then could I do the other; since there is ever a sort of fair play herein, jealousy presiding over all creations. But not my master, man, is even that fair play. Who’s over me? Truth hath no confines.

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    • Replies: @guest
    But Melville also wrote Pierre and the Confidence-Man. You can't put someone in the first rank who wrote utter crap.
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  131. @JMcG
    I once took a date to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. As we contemplated Eakins’ “The Gross Clinic”, she saw fit to mention that the subject of the painting was her great grandfather. Now, what would have been a good reply to that? Cause I sure couldn’t think of anything.

    I once took a date to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. As we contemplated Eakins’ “The Gross Clinic”, she saw fit to mention that the subject of the painting was her great grandfather. Now, what would have been a good reply to that? Cause I sure couldn’t think of anything.

    A perfect question for Heartiste.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Deliberately puerile voice but without too much fake disgust: "Gross."
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  132. I suppose some will make a BFD out of a Chinese artist actually doing the art part of this, but art isn’t about talent. Look at Picasso. If you dare. Art is about the pretentious social climbers that do it for the status and the fine parties. Without the pretension and the parties, its just popular. And nothing is more racist than popular.
    In the 1980s, they had “authentic black African art”. It was Made in Japan. Those Japanese make great TVs, but their “authentic black African art” is one of those things that are unknown and underrated. Real black artifacts are for Witch Doctors and magic. You cannot get that unless you are a Juju wizard. “Authentic black art” is the hidden industry that supplies pretentious status seekers the decor at their wine and cheese soire.

    Great Britain may no longer be great and The Sun finally set on The British Empire, but even though the English could never approach Da Vinci or the Continentals in Pure Artistry, they still had the pretentious attitude that made The Gilded Age look better than the Brass of Today’s Philistines.

    In Truth, Class is a matter of prestige. Prestige comes from POWER. Without Power, its just not worth more than the booze and gold-diggers. The Nouveau Riche and the black affletes just do not have the Prestige for anyone not being paid to Really Care.

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  133. @Anon
    enmeshing him in an overabundant, highly colorful natural setting, sustains a much more mysteriously human presence, brooding, reconciling, not merely knowing, separate, but kindled with fiery curiosity, a simple inner elevation that brings us to the border of the ordinary and the extraordinary.

    https://youtu.be/wf6DpIKgtJ0?t=4m22s

    Interesting. That kind of post-modernist yammering about art developed for purposes of deconstruction. It was meant to de-legitimize ideas, objects, and symbols that we took for granted as normal or valid. It was meant to be the opposite of the gushing official or canonical pronouncements about great men or great things.

    But it's come full circle. The pomo yammerer is using decon lingo to prop up Obama as a holy icon. It's like using satire to praise the king. From deconstruction to Iconstruction.

    Another thing. I think most people are now keen as to how the Art World operates now. The trick is salesmanship, the pitch, than the thing itself. So, if a work is remarkable but comes without a clever pitch combining hipster faddishness with 'social consciousness', it goes ignored. But if a work is total nonsense but comes with a pitch that sparks interest, it has a chance. It seems the main ambition of 'artists' is to have a pitch to garner attention so that superrich will bid up their arts for investment purposes. It's less about pictures than pitchers.

    So, the best thing an artist can do is hire someone from the English Department or Advertising. It's like WOLF OF WALL STREET. If you can talk people into believing that something has value, it does... at least for awhile, at least for inside players who bid up the price as long as the item is hot.
    That would make a funny comedy. A cynical hack artist gets together with a clever 'art critic' who comes up with bogus but clever rationale for the 'artworks', and they gain fame and fortune. And then, when they're finally exposed, they say the fraud itself was meant to be an artistic performance.

    It’s less about pictures than pitchers.

    That’s an excellent summary.

    I also like your comedy pitch: being an artist is being a performance artist, no matter the medium.

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  134. The China connection is even more intriguing given the comments by poorly educated children at The New Yorker:

    “Obama’s truest political gift, perhaps, was the ability to let a thousand flowers of expectation, born of history, bloom.”

    Apparently Vinson Cunningham is unaware of the origin of this trope, which I read about in Edgar Snow’s mash note to Mao, Red Star Over China. In 1956, Mao encouraged criticism, saying “let a hundred flowers bloom, let a hundred schools of thought contend”.

    After waiting for everyone to speak, he relentlessly persecuted his enemies. That’s how to deal with contradictions among the people, Mao-style.

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    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    The present iteration of the Educated Twit class doesn't really know anything about anything. I just spoke with two college students who will shortly be matriculating with $160K debt apiece. Neither had ever heard of the Open Door Policy re: China.

    Others at the same fine institution cannot identify MacArthur or Eisenhower (although one, from Colorado, has "been through his tunnel").

    I could go on.
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  135. @syonredux

    I once took a date to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. As we contemplated Eakins’ “The Gross Clinic”, she saw fit to mention that the subject of the painting was her great grandfather. Now, what would have been a good reply to that? Cause I sure couldn’t think of anything.
     
    A perfect question for Heartiste.

    Deliberately puerile voice but without too much fake disgust: “Gross.”

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  136. @Svigor
    People are complaining about Hussein's choice of style and artist, but take a glass half-full view: maybe it's his way of admitting he neither measures up, nor fits in.

    Painting by ain cocke, Wiley’s Beijing “studio manager”. Ain’s treatment of the figures are the same as Wiley. Ain takes the photos of the models For Wiley too. A photo is then projected on the canvas where it is traced. After that’s it’s paint by number filling in the color. That’s where the Chinese craftsmen come in, although I have seen publicity photos where Wiley is doing his own paint by number work.
     
    A lot of the old masters worked this way. Many used grids or some kind of weird renaissance "projector" (camera obscura?). Many also had their students do their underpaintings, backgrounds, etc.

    First thing you learn in art school is the product is what matters, not the process, though many students refuse to learn the fact.

    To this point Teller of Penn & Teller fame sponsored a documentary demonstrating that Renaissance masters were much more methodical and technically-oriented than is commonly understood (I think they focus on Rembrandt).

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    • Replies: @guest
    I would put Rembrandt in the Baroque era rather than the Renaissance, but that's not important.

    What is people's idea of the Old Masters, if not methodical and technically oriented? Drunk and waiting for inspiration to fling themselves at a canvas, like Pollack?
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  137. Hey, just checking.

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  138. @Anon
    Bill Clinton's paternal grandparents died at the ages of 51 (grandfather) and 53 (grandmother). His maternal grandparents died at the ages of 59 and 67.

    Clinton's got lousy genes for longevity. Of course, eating like Elvis for many years didn't help.

    A lifetime of cocaine will slow ya down, too.

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  139. @CAL2
    If I were Trump, I would discretely find a talented black portrait artist and commission a good portrait of Obama. There has to be a few good pictures out of the tens of thousands taken that could be used for the portrait.

    I don't like the man but that portrait is an embarrassment to the country.

    It will look great on the wall of his cell in Gitmo.

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  140. This outsourcing reminds me of an EC comics story. A comic book artist would draw the margins. He hired other people to write the stories, pencil, ink and color it. He kept it a secret so that each collaborator thought they were the only ones on the project. All the guy did was draw margins. These guys find out and they chase after him. I think he falls into a river.
    It was possessively based on Bob (Batman) Kane.

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    • Replies: @syonredux
    Ah, good old Bob Kane...who got all the credit while Bill Finger was ignored....


    https://pm1.narvii.com/5877/051e3db24590baacf6f3e81315912766b2d3511c_hq.jpg
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  141. @Anon7
    The China connection is even more intriguing given the comments by poorly educated children at The New Yorker:

    “Obama’s truest political gift, perhaps, was the ability to let a thousand flowers of expectation, born of history, bloom.”

    Apparently Vinson Cunningham is unaware of the origin of this trope, which I read about in Edgar Snow’s mash note to Mao, Red Star Over China. In 1956, Mao encouraged criticism, saying “let a hundred flowers bloom, let a hundred schools of thought contend”.

    After waiting for everyone to speak, he relentlessly persecuted his enemies. That’s how to deal with contradictions among the people, Mao-style.

    The present iteration of the Educated Twit class doesn’t really know anything about anything. I just spoke with two college students who will shortly be matriculating with $160K debt apiece. Neither had ever heard of the Open Door Policy re: China.

    Others at the same fine institution cannot identify MacArthur or Eisenhower (although one, from Colorado, has “been through his tunnel”).

    I could go on.

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  142. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Svigor
    People are complaining about Hussein's choice of style and artist, but take a glass half-full view: maybe it's his way of admitting he neither measures up, nor fits in.

    Painting by ain cocke, Wiley’s Beijing “studio manager”. Ain’s treatment of the figures are the same as Wiley. Ain takes the photos of the models For Wiley too. A photo is then projected on the canvas where it is traced. After that’s it’s paint by number filling in the color. That’s where the Chinese craftsmen come in, although I have seen publicity photos where Wiley is doing his own paint by number work.
     
    A lot of the old masters worked this way. Many used grids or some kind of weird renaissance "projector" (camera obscura?). Many also had their students do their underpaintings, backgrounds, etc.

    First thing you learn in art school is the product is what matters, not the process, though many students refuse to learn the fact.

    Wow the great svigor was an art student? Isteve is truely the athens of our time.

    Of course the great masters used assistants but the master was responsible for the overall composition. Vermeer and Canaletto supposedly used camera obscura, but unlike Wiley they had a ‘feel’ for composition and obviously adjusted the image as they went. Wiley is visually tone deaf. He just does not see what he cannot see. Because he can’t see he assumes no one else can. And mostly he is right.

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  143. @Disordered
    I'd have to say I prefer Miss Garald better. She might be just updating the "grey somber black seriousness face" style that has been done forever since the Harlem Renaissance with lots of color and postmodern themes. But at least she isn't making some Chinese do derivative collages for her.
    Either way, there's definitely better black American artists than both of those. But the Obamas, as always, style over substance.

    Genuine question. Is that really portrait painting though or are they basically retouched or worked up photographs?

    I suspect the requirements or Big Art and speed (not to mention the tedious need for talent and extreme patience) encourage the latter approach.

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  144. @Anon
    enmeshing him in an overabundant, highly colorful natural setting, sustains a much more mysteriously human presence, brooding, reconciling, not merely knowing, separate, but kindled with fiery curiosity, a simple inner elevation that brings us to the border of the ordinary and the extraordinary.

    https://youtu.be/wf6DpIKgtJ0?t=4m22s

    Interesting. That kind of post-modernist yammering about art developed for purposes of deconstruction. It was meant to de-legitimize ideas, objects, and symbols that we took for granted as normal or valid. It was meant to be the opposite of the gushing official or canonical pronouncements about great men or great things.

    But it's come full circle. The pomo yammerer is using decon lingo to prop up Obama as a holy icon. It's like using satire to praise the king. From deconstruction to Iconstruction.

    Another thing. I think most people are now keen as to how the Art World operates now. The trick is salesmanship, the pitch, than the thing itself. So, if a work is remarkable but comes without a clever pitch combining hipster faddishness with 'social consciousness', it goes ignored. But if a work is total nonsense but comes with a pitch that sparks interest, it has a chance. It seems the main ambition of 'artists' is to have a pitch to garner attention so that superrich will bid up their arts for investment purposes. It's less about pictures than pitchers.

    So, the best thing an artist can do is hire someone from the English Department or Advertising. It's like WOLF OF WALL STREET. If you can talk people into believing that something has value, it does... at least for awhile, at least for inside players who bid up the price as long as the item is hot.
    That would make a funny comedy. A cynical hack artist gets together with a clever 'art critic' who comes up with bogus but clever rationale for the 'artworks', and they gain fame and fortune. And then, when they're finally exposed, they say the fraud itself was meant to be an artistic performance.

    It’s still deconstruction, however. Because even if Obama was kang, he was only kang for a moment. Now look who’s in charge. The revolution continues.

    Even when they’re in charge they’re not in charge. Obama had only 8 years to deconstruct hundreds of years of Whitey.

    Western Civilization persists, and there are still conventions to be overturned and normies to be befuddled.

    Did you know, after decades of pomo and an actual communist revolutionary in the White House, people still have families, go to work, spend money, believe in God, and all that? The Merry Pranksters can never really be the Man so long as that stuff remains normal.

    At least that’s what they think.

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  145. @Anon
    enmeshing him in an overabundant, highly colorful natural setting, sustains a much more mysteriously human presence, brooding, reconciling, not merely knowing, separate, but kindled with fiery curiosity, a simple inner elevation that brings us to the border of the ordinary and the extraordinary.

    https://youtu.be/wf6DpIKgtJ0?t=4m22s

    Interesting. That kind of post-modernist yammering about art developed for purposes of deconstruction. It was meant to de-legitimize ideas, objects, and symbols that we took for granted as normal or valid. It was meant to be the opposite of the gushing official or canonical pronouncements about great men or great things.

    But it's come full circle. The pomo yammerer is using decon lingo to prop up Obama as a holy icon. It's like using satire to praise the king. From deconstruction to Iconstruction.

    Another thing. I think most people are now keen as to how the Art World operates now. The trick is salesmanship, the pitch, than the thing itself. So, if a work is remarkable but comes without a clever pitch combining hipster faddishness with 'social consciousness', it goes ignored. But if a work is total nonsense but comes with a pitch that sparks interest, it has a chance. It seems the main ambition of 'artists' is to have a pitch to garner attention so that superrich will bid up their arts for investment purposes. It's less about pictures than pitchers.

    So, the best thing an artist can do is hire someone from the English Department or Advertising. It's like WOLF OF WALL STREET. If you can talk people into believing that something has value, it does... at least for awhile, at least for inside players who bid up the price as long as the item is hot.
    That would make a funny comedy. A cynical hack artist gets together with a clever 'art critic' who comes up with bogus but clever rationale for the 'artworks', and they gain fame and fortune. And then, when they're finally exposed, they say the fraud itself was meant to be an artistic performance.

    I don’t know about your premise in particular, but there are some decent satirical movies about the art world.

    For instance: Art School Confidential and Boogie Woogie.

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  146. @syonredux

    I also like Sargent, concur with your opinion on Britten and Purcell, but to include Melville on a list with Shakespeare and Milton? Travesty.
     
    Melville has moments where he approaches the Miltonic:

    Towards thee I roll, thou all-destroying but unconquering whale; to the last I grapple with thee; from hell's heart I stab at thee; for hate's sake I spit my last breath at thee.
     
    And the Shakespeareian:

    All visible objects, man, are but as pasteboard masks. But in each event — in the living act, the undoubted deed — there, some unknown but still reasoning thing puts forth the mouldings of its features from behind the unreasoning mask. If man will strike, strike through the mask! How can the prisoner reach outside except by thrusting through the wall? To me, the white whale is that wall, shoved near to me. Sometimes I think there's naught beyond. But 'tis enough. He tasks me; he heaps me; I see in him outrageous strength, with an inscrutable malice sinewing it. That inscrutable thing is chiefly what I hate; and be the white whale agent, or be the white whale principal, I will wreak that hate upon him. Talk not to me of blasphemy, man; I'd strike the sun if it insulted me. For could the sun do that, then could I do the other; since there is ever a sort of fair play herein, jealousy presiding over all creations. But not my master, man, is even that fair play. Who's over me? Truth hath no confines.
     

    But Melville also wrote Pierre and the Confidence-Man. You can’t put someone in the first rank who wrote utter crap.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    But Melville also wrote Pierre and the Confidence-Man. You can’t put someone in the first rank who wrote utter crap.
     
    Sure you can. Homer nods; Shakespeare wrote Titus Andronicus; and Howard Hawks directed Land of the Pharaohs.

    One masterpiece outweighs a dozen failures.So, in Melville's case, he's got Moby-Dick, Benito Cereno, Billy Budd,and "Bartleby, the Scrivener." Those are great enough to cover sludge like The Confidence-Man.


    Might also add that Melville has some good middle-tier fiction to his credit as well:Redburn, White-Jacket, and Israel Potter (I particularly like the parts in Israel Potter involving Benjamin Franklin).

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  147. @syonredux

    But the British and we their cousins have no truly great artists, not in painting, not in music (well maybe one, Purcell, and possibly also Britten),
     
    By truly great, I assume that you mean on the Bach-Beethoven-Mozart level for music, and Rembrandt-Raphael-Velasquez for painting? I would concur. And Purcell and Britten, to my mind, are not exceptions.

    Anglo genius in the arts seems to find its strongest expression in literature: Milton, Shakespeare, Donne, Pope, Melville, Henry James, Jane Austen, etc

    What do you look for in a painting?

     

    Something that cannot be expressed in words, only in form.....

    If we’re talking the tippy-top level, then my top ten might be all Germans. But why are we on such lofty heights?

    This tangent started with the difference between Sargent and Whistler (Whistler the alleged superior). But Purcell is easily superior in music to Whistler in painting, in my opinion.

    Bringing Velasquez into it muddied the waters, I think. Because he’s on a whole other level. Though perhaps we value him too much for anticipating modern taste, which is fickle. Much like Vermeer. Whom I also love, don’t get me wrong. But there’s an element of fashion involved.

    Speaking of which, wide swaths of art history are deeply unfashionable, for no good reason. Especially the 19th century, during which British painting was strong, in my opinion. But names from that era aren’t taught or otherwise promoted, and therefore can’t become household names.

    Not that they’re as good as Velasquez, but again why are we talking on his level?

    Listen to Dido’s death scene and tell me Purcell’s not a genius. It sounds fresh hundreds of years after the fact. It’s not Beethoven, but what is?

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  148. @syonredux

    But the British and we their cousins have no truly great artists, not in painting, not in music (well maybe one, Purcell, and possibly also Britten),
     
    By truly great, I assume that you mean on the Bach-Beethoven-Mozart level for music, and Rembrandt-Raphael-Velasquez for painting? I would concur. And Purcell and Britten, to my mind, are not exceptions.

    Anglo genius in the arts seems to find its strongest expression in literature: Milton, Shakespeare, Donne, Pope, Melville, Henry James, Jane Austen, etc

    What do you look for in a painting?

     

    Something that cannot be expressed in words, only in form.....

    Form is not the right term, I don’t think. That’s what an abstractionist might say. But great painting has not only form but content. Representational content and the dreaded (by modernists) “literary” content. But also symbolic content, which can be veeery intricate.

    In any case, not being expressible in words is something you can say about every artform that isn’t literature. And at least one artform with words: drama. There must be something more specific about painting, though I-don’t-know-what.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Form is not the right term, I don’t think. That’s what an abstractionist might say. But great painting has not only form but content. Representational content and the dreaded (by modernists) “literary” content. But also symbolic content, which can be veeery intricate.
     
    Sure, but the content is expressed in terms of form, not words.
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  149. @Svigor
    People are complaining about Hussein's choice of style and artist, but take a glass half-full view: maybe it's his way of admitting he neither measures up, nor fits in.

    Painting by ain cocke, Wiley’s Beijing “studio manager”. Ain’s treatment of the figures are the same as Wiley. Ain takes the photos of the models For Wiley too. A photo is then projected on the canvas where it is traced. After that’s it’s paint by number filling in the color. That’s where the Chinese craftsmen come in, although I have seen publicity photos where Wiley is doing his own paint by number work.
     
    A lot of the old masters worked this way. Many used grids or some kind of weird renaissance "projector" (camera obscura?). Many also had their students do their underpaintings, backgrounds, etc.

    First thing you learn in art school is the product is what matters, not the process, though many students refuse to learn the fact.

    The use of grids is neither here nor there.

    Assistants doing the work is a real issue, and that’s why it’s often so difficult to determine what was produced by the known master and what by his underlings.

    But at least when those guys actually painted, they painted as experts in their craft. Which you can see in the product.

    Yes, you’re right, the product is what matters. Which is why this looks like mass-produced, assembly line, cut-and-paste garbage.

    Which might have been the intent, but that doesn’t make it better.

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  150. @Svigor
    People are complaining about Hussein's choice of style and artist, but take a glass half-full view: maybe it's his way of admitting he neither measures up, nor fits in.

    Painting by ain cocke, Wiley’s Beijing “studio manager”. Ain’s treatment of the figures are the same as Wiley. Ain takes the photos of the models For Wiley too. A photo is then projected on the canvas where it is traced. After that’s it’s paint by number filling in the color. That’s where the Chinese craftsmen come in, although I have seen publicity photos where Wiley is doing his own paint by number work.
     
    A lot of the old masters worked this way. Many used grids or some kind of weird renaissance "projector" (camera obscura?). Many also had their students do their underpaintings, backgrounds, etc.

    First thing you learn in art school is the product is what matters, not the process, though many students refuse to learn the fact.

    “some kind of weird renaissance ‘projector’ (camera obscura?)”

    This is a total myth. I’m not saying painters didn’t look into cameras to get inspiration, but the idea that they projected images onto walls and traced in the modern manner? No. Didn’t happen.

    Wouldn’t have worked, because the technology wasn’t right they didn’t do it outside, and in a room dark enough to make the tracing viable (if it ever could be), there wouldn’t have been enough light for the camera.

    There are countless other technical shortcomings that would have made doing it freehand infinitely preferable. If but you know how.

    Oh, but learning is hard. It’d be easier to believe the Stale, Pale Males of painting didn’t dedicate their lives to hard labor in learning the craft. If they used science tricks instead, so can you.

    Not that they didn’t have tricks, but they also learned to use their hands.

    Most importantly, there’s no record of them using projection. They didn’t put it in their diaries or hand it down to students, and there are no witnesses.

    Which could be a conspiracy, but we know how they did it. They handed down the actual techniques.

    This “weird renaissance ‘projector’” myth is promoted by people like Hockney, who has no skill and assumes the Old Masters didn’t either. I’ve seen his demonstration of the projector tracing method, and they look like crap.

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  151. @guest
    I see you mention painting, music, and architecture, but conspicuously leave out literature.

    There is no maybe with Purcell.

    I don't think I need to go through all the great English and American painters. I can only interpret the denial of their existence as some sort of ruse or unfortunate delusion.

    Also, music ends with Wagner, not Strauss.

    Oh, we don't need to be ashamed of Sargent? How gracious of you.

    If anyone actually was ashamed to like Sargent, it could only he because they have one of those "false consciousnesses" I've heard about.

    I agree that there is no maybe about Purcell, and I am surprised that nobody has complained that I failed to mention the Renaissance greats like Byrd and Tallis.

    Music may well culminate with Wagner, but it certainly didn’t end with him.

    There are many good English, Scottish and American painters, but there are no great ones. Maybe we just define “great” differently.

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    • Replies: @guest
    You're right about Wagner, nothing "new" was great after him, but there were great composers doing the Late Romantic thing into the 20th century. For instance Rachmaninoff.

    I just don't like Strauss, is the thing.

    People probably don't mention Byrd or Tallis because pre-Bach isn't very popular. It took me a long time to discover earlier stuff. A mere five or so years ago was I finally blown away by Monteverdi.

    England was unfortunate in the long run to peak before the eras that tickle we moderns. Also, the best music written on or about that island probably was written by Germans: Handel, J.C. Bach (the London Bach), and Poppa Haydn.

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  152. @stillCARealist
    Purcell and Britten? No. Edward Elgar, okay.

    But your point stands. Britain is not the place for the nurture of musical genius. That's primarily for the Germans and the Russians and the Italians. But mostly the Germans.

    Purcell is at least England’s greatest, with Byrd and Tallis and a few others of their period very close behind.
    Britten can be exquisite, but of course he is not of European wide significance.
    Elgar was and remains hugely popular, but the other English composers of his own day rather despised his work. I prefer Parry myself.
    God bless the old Germany, and may He destroy Merkel and her ilk so that something of that blessed Volk might survive, flourish, inspire and instruct us.

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  153. @J.Ross
    To this point Teller of Penn & Teller fame sponsored a documentary demonstrating that Renaissance masters were much more methodical and technically-oriented than is commonly understood (I think they focus on Rembrandt).

    I would put Rembrandt in the Baroque era rather than the Renaissance, but that’s not important.

    What is people’s idea of the Old Masters, if not methodical and technically oriented? Drunk and waiting for inspiration to fling themselves at a canvas, like Pollack?

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  154. @Old Palo Altan
    I agree that there is no maybe about Purcell, and I am surprised that nobody has complained that I failed to mention the Renaissance greats like Byrd and Tallis.

    Music may well culminate with Wagner, but it certainly didn't end with him.

    There are many good English, Scottish and American painters, but there are no great ones. Maybe we just define "great" differently.

    You’re right about Wagner, nothing “new” was great after him, but there were great composers doing the Late Romantic thing into the 20th century. For instance Rachmaninoff.

    I just don’t like Strauss, is the thing.

    People probably don’t mention Byrd or Tallis because pre-Bach isn’t very popular. It took me a long time to discover earlier stuff. A mere five or so years ago was I finally blown away by Monteverdi.

    England was unfortunate in the long run to peak before the eras that tickle we moderns. Also, the best music written on or about that island probably was written by Germans: Handel, J.C. Bach (the London Bach), and Poppa Haydn.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    England had a German royal family so it tended to import German composers, which discouraged native talent from specializing in high end composition.

    The great astronomer Herschel started out as a German immigrant composer to England, who switched to astronomy.

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  155. @Svigor
    People are complaining about Hussein's choice of style and artist, but take a glass half-full view: maybe it's his way of admitting he neither measures up, nor fits in.

    Painting by ain cocke, Wiley’s Beijing “studio manager”. Ain’s treatment of the figures are the same as Wiley. Ain takes the photos of the models For Wiley too. A photo is then projected on the canvas where it is traced. After that’s it’s paint by number filling in the color. That’s where the Chinese craftsmen come in, although I have seen publicity photos where Wiley is doing his own paint by number work.
     
    A lot of the old masters worked this way. Many used grids or some kind of weird renaissance "projector" (camera obscura?). Many also had their students do their underpaintings, backgrounds, etc.

    First thing you learn in art school is the product is what matters, not the process, though many students refuse to learn the fact.

    To clarify, I’m not saying no Old Master ever experimented with a camera obscura or camera lucida. But they are inferior to traditional methods and were by no means a regular thing.

    Unlike now, when tracing is common.

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  156. @flyingtiger
    This outsourcing reminds me of an EC comics story. A comic book artist would draw the margins. He hired other people to write the stories, pencil, ink and color it. He kept it a secret so that each collaborator thought they were the only ones on the project. All the guy did was draw margins. These guys find out and they chase after him. I think he falls into a river.
    It was possessively based on Bob (Batman) Kane.

    Ah, good old Bob Kane…who got all the credit while Bill Finger was ignored….

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  157. “There’s nothing new about artists using assistants—everyone from Michelangelo to Jeff Koons has employed teams of helpers, with varying degrees of irony and pride—but Wiley gets uncomfortable discussing the subject.”

    Note the disingenuous shitlib nod to Michelangelo, and the fraudulent comparison of Mikey’s methods with this hack’s. The false implication is that because Michelangelo made very minor and limited use of assistants, that somehow makes it okay that this untalented, virtue signalling, PC fraud outsources the actual painting to others.

    There may be “nothing new” about artists using assistants, but there is something new about the assistants doing virtually ALL the actual “art” part of the equation for your shyster self – even if what they produce is a hideous, kitschy mess either way.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The Michelangelo reference is odd. Was Michelangelo famous for sitting on the floor of Sistine Chapel in a big easy chair, sipping chianti with the Pope, while his staff was painting away 60 feet above their heads?

    No, M. was famous for doing the hard stuff himself.

    There are a lot of other great painters (and M. was barely a painter by avocation, hardly ever painting portraits) who ran big studios. For example, Rubens had a young fellow working for him named Van Dyke.

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  158. @bolton
    “There’s nothing new about artists using assistants—everyone from Michelangelo to Jeff Koons has employed teams of helpers, with varying degrees of irony and pride—but Wiley gets uncomfortable discussing the subject.”

    Note the disingenuous shitlib nod to Michelangelo, and the fraudulent comparison of Mikey’s methods with this hack’s. The false implication is that because Michelangelo made very minor and limited use of assistants, that somehow makes it okay that this untalented, virtue signalling, PC fraud outsources the actual painting to others.

    There may be “nothing new” about artists using assistants, but there is something new about the assistants doing virtually ALL the actual “art” part of the equation for your shyster self - even if what they produce is a hideous, kitschy mess either way.

    The Michelangelo reference is odd. Was Michelangelo famous for sitting on the floor of Sistine Chapel in a big easy chair, sipping chianti with the Pope, while his staff was painting away 60 feet above their heads?

    No, M. was famous for doing the hard stuff himself.

    There are a lot of other great painters (and M. was barely a painter by avocation, hardly ever painting portraits) who ran big studios. For example, Rubens had a young fellow working for him named Van Dyke.

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  159. @guest
    You're right about Wagner, nothing "new" was great after him, but there were great composers doing the Late Romantic thing into the 20th century. For instance Rachmaninoff.

    I just don't like Strauss, is the thing.

    People probably don't mention Byrd or Tallis because pre-Bach isn't very popular. It took me a long time to discover earlier stuff. A mere five or so years ago was I finally blown away by Monteverdi.

    England was unfortunate in the long run to peak before the eras that tickle we moderns. Also, the best music written on or about that island probably was written by Germans: Handel, J.C. Bach (the London Bach), and Poppa Haydn.

    England had a German royal family so it tended to import German composers, which discouraged native talent from specializing in high end composition.

    The great astronomer Herschel started out as a German immigrant composer to England, who switched to astronomy.

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  160. @guest
    Form is not the right term, I don't think. That's what an abstractionist might say. But great painting has not only form but content. Representational content and the dreaded (by modernists) "literary" content. But also symbolic content, which can be veeery intricate.

    In any case, not being expressible in words is something you can say about every artform that isn't literature. And at least one artform with words: drama. There must be something more specific about painting, though I-don't-know-what.

    Form is not the right term, I don’t think. That’s what an abstractionist might say. But great painting has not only form but content. Representational content and the dreaded (by modernists) “literary” content. But also symbolic content, which can be veeery intricate.

    Sure, but the content is expressed in terms of form, not words.

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  161. @guest
    But Melville also wrote Pierre and the Confidence-Man. You can't put someone in the first rank who wrote utter crap.

    But Melville also wrote Pierre and the Confidence-Man. You can’t put someone in the first rank who wrote utter crap.

    Sure you can. Homer nods; Shakespeare wrote Titus Andronicus; and Howard Hawks directed Land of the Pharaohs.

    One masterpiece outweighs a dozen failures.So, in Melville’s case, he’s got Moby-Dick, Benito Cereno, Billy Budd,and “Bartleby, the Scrivener.” Those are great enough to cover sludge like The Confidence-Man.

    Might also add that Melville has some good middle-tier fiction to his credit as well:Redburn, White-Jacket, and Israel Potter (I particularly like the parts in Israel Potter involving Benjamin Franklin).

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    • Replies: @guest
    Masterpieces can be written by less than top-tier writers, I believe. And I don't think they cancel out he failures, necessarily. Not if they're bad enough.

    Possibly you don't think Pierre or Con-Man are as bad as I.

    I've always been split on Melville. Interestingly, you mention all my favorites as great (or great-enough). Except Moby Dick, which I personally don't care for, though I recognize its official place.

    I like Titus, by the way. It's not top-tier Shakespeare, but it could easily play these hundreds of years later without Shakespeare's name attached. (With the understanding that it was archaic, of course.)

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  162. @stillCARealist
    Purcell and Britten? No. Edward Elgar, okay.

    But your point stands. Britain is not the place for the nurture of musical genius. That's primarily for the Germans and the Russians and the Italians. But mostly the Germans.

    Ralph Vaughn williams

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  163. @syonredux

    But Melville also wrote Pierre and the Confidence-Man. You can’t put someone in the first rank who wrote utter crap.
     
    Sure you can. Homer nods; Shakespeare wrote Titus Andronicus; and Howard Hawks directed Land of the Pharaohs.

    One masterpiece outweighs a dozen failures.So, in Melville's case, he's got Moby-Dick, Benito Cereno, Billy Budd,and "Bartleby, the Scrivener." Those are great enough to cover sludge like The Confidence-Man.


    Might also add that Melville has some good middle-tier fiction to his credit as well:Redburn, White-Jacket, and Israel Potter (I particularly like the parts in Israel Potter involving Benjamin Franklin).

    Masterpieces can be written by less than top-tier writers, I believe. And I don’t think they cancel out he failures, necessarily. Not if they’re bad enough.

    Possibly you don’t think Pierre or Con-Man are as bad as I.

    I’ve always been split on Melville. Interestingly, you mention all my favorites as great (or great-enough). Except Moby Dick, which I personally don’t care for, though I recognize its official place.

    I like Titus, by the way. It’s not top-tier Shakespeare, but it could easily play these hundreds of years later without Shakespeare’s name attached. (With the understanding that it was archaic, of course.)

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Masterpieces can be written by less than top-tier writers, I believe.
     
    Sure. The one-hit wonder is definitely a thing: Jane Eyre , Wuthering Heights, etc. But top-tier authors can do the trick more than once. And Melville did it several times.

    And I don’t think they cancel out he failures, necessarily. Not if they’re bad enough.
     
    If you've only got one masterpiece and dozens of failures, sure. In Melville's case, however, he's got a string of top-tier masterworks.

    Possibly you don’t think Pierre or Con-Man are as bad as I.
     
    No, I agree that they are absolutely terrible, pure sludge.

    I like Titus, by the way. It’s not top-tier Shakespeare, but it could easily play these hundreds of years later without Shakespeare’s name attached. (With the understanding that it was archaic, of course.)

     

    It's not unreadable/unwatchable.
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  164. @Anon
    enmeshing him in an overabundant, highly colorful natural setting, sustains a much more mysteriously human presence, brooding, reconciling, not merely knowing, separate, but kindled with fiery curiosity, a simple inner elevation that brings us to the border of the ordinary and the extraordinary.

    https://youtu.be/wf6DpIKgtJ0?t=4m22s

    Interesting. That kind of post-modernist yammering about art developed for purposes of deconstruction. It was meant to de-legitimize ideas, objects, and symbols that we took for granted as normal or valid. It was meant to be the opposite of the gushing official or canonical pronouncements about great men or great things.

    But it's come full circle. The pomo yammerer is using decon lingo to prop up Obama as a holy icon. It's like using satire to praise the king. From deconstruction to Iconstruction.

    Another thing. I think most people are now keen as to how the Art World operates now. The trick is salesmanship, the pitch, than the thing itself. So, if a work is remarkable but comes without a clever pitch combining hipster faddishness with 'social consciousness', it goes ignored. But if a work is total nonsense but comes with a pitch that sparks interest, it has a chance. It seems the main ambition of 'artists' is to have a pitch to garner attention so that superrich will bid up their arts for investment purposes. It's less about pictures than pitchers.

    So, the best thing an artist can do is hire someone from the English Department or Advertising. It's like WOLF OF WALL STREET. If you can talk people into believing that something has value, it does... at least for awhile, at least for inside players who bid up the price as long as the item is hot.
    That would make a funny comedy. A cynical hack artist gets together with a clever 'art critic' who comes up with bogus but clever rationale for the 'artworks', and they gain fame and fortune. And then, when they're finally exposed, they say the fraud itself was meant to be an artistic performance.

    Dear Uncle Sailer, please put on hold your whimy-whamy instincts, and allow bored identity to be reprllently blunt and tortuous – because that’s who we are :

    “…By collapsing history and style into a unique contemporary vision, Wiley interrogates the notion of master painter, “making it at once critical and complicit.”

    Vividly colorful and often adorned with ornate gilded frames, Wiley’s large-scale figurative paintings, which are illuminated with a barrage of baroque or rococo decorative patterns, posit young black men, fashioned in urban attire, within the field of power reminiscent of Renaissance artists such as Tiepolo and Titian. ”

    http://www.npg.si.edu/exhibit/recognize/paintings.html#

    Also:

    Wiley says the reaction at the opening of his show in Paris last month was profound.

    “I’ve never had so many museum guards walk up to me like they did in Paris, where they said, ‘Oh my God, I’ve never seen this many black bodies in a public space,’” says Wiley.

    (…)

    Wiley acknowledges that this is a delicate time for his work to be exhibited in France.
    Far-right politicians there have seen a surge in support because of concerns that too many refugees and immigrants are coming into the country.

    “I think that it’s obviously something that we see here in America,” he says. “We see it in the Brexit. We also see it in France.

    And all of those black and brown bodies that are in places [like the recently dismantled migrant camp in Calais] called the Jungle … [those places] have to be remembered as places that were once places of refuge for Eastern Europeans, Jews and homosexuals.”

    Wiley’s conclusion? “Europe has been a place of refuge.

    Why should it stop with black and brown bodies?”

    https://www.pri.org/stories/2016-11-02/kehinde-wiley-reimagines-old-portraits-because-if-black-lives-matter-they-deserve

    Not a single MOMAfudging , echo-chambering, and Weimerica’s l’fart pour l’fart worshiping Shulamite would have ever considered Kehinde Wiley to be The Artist, if Kehinde weren’t :

    A.) Blackity Black Painther Coollapsing Wakanda’s Blackorateral Wallpaper Damage into Cultural Fabric of Western Society,

    and

    B.) Willing to bleed white & dry on his circumcised last name which conveniently belongs to the above-mentioned Shulamites;

    02-03_full.jpg (JPEG Image, 435 × 600 pixels)

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "“I’ve never had so many museum guards walk up to me like they did in Paris, where they said, ‘Oh my God, I’ve never seen this many black bodies in a public space,’” says Wiley."

    Ta-Nehisi Coates is evidently big among museum guards in Paris.

    Doesn't all this "black bodies" rhetoric sound a little ... dehumanizing?

    Twenty years from now when the average woke CEO has learned to refer to "black bodies" in speeches, then the black studies majors will switch to "black souls" like W.E.B. Dubois used and shame Whitey once again for his racism in referring to blacks as bodies without a spark of spirit in them.

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  165. @bored identity
    Dear Uncle Sailer, please put on hold your whimy-whamy instincts, and allow bored identity to be reprllently blunt and tortuous - because that's who we are :



    "...By collapsing history and style into a unique contemporary vision, Wiley interrogates the notion of master painter, “making it at once critical and complicit.”

    Vividly colorful and often adorned with ornate gilded frames, Wiley’s large-scale figurative paintings, which are illuminated with a barrage of baroque or rococo decorative patterns, posit young black men, fashioned in urban attire, within the field of power reminiscent of Renaissance artists such as Tiepolo and Titian. "

    http://www.npg.si.edu/exhibit/recognize/paintings.html#

    Also:

    Wiley says the reaction at the opening of his show in Paris last month was profound.

    “I’ve never had so many museum guards walk up to me like they did in Paris, where they said, ‘Oh my God, I’ve never seen this many black bodies in a public space,’” says Wiley.

    (...)

    Wiley acknowledges that this is a delicate time for his work to be exhibited in France.
    Far-right politicians there have seen a surge in support because of concerns that too many refugees and immigrants are coming into the country.

    “I think that it’s obviously something that we see here in America,” he says. “We see it in the Brexit. We also see it in France.

    And all of those black and brown bodies that are in places [like the recently dismantled migrant camp in Calais] called the Jungle … [those places] have to be remembered as places that were once places of refuge for Eastern Europeans, Jews and homosexuals.”

    Wiley’s conclusion? “Europe has been a place of refuge.

    Why should it stop with black and brown bodies?”

    https://www.pri.org/stories/2016-11-02/kehinde-wiley-reimagines-old-portraits-because-if-black-lives-matter-they-deserve

     

    Not a single MOMAfudging , echo-chambering, and Weimerica's l'fart pour l'fart worshiping Shulamite would have ever considered Kehinde Wiley to be The Artist, if Kehinde weren't :

    A.) Blackity Black Painther Coollapsing Wakanda's Blackorateral Wallpaper Damage into Cultural Fabric of Western Society,

    and

    B.) Willing to bleed white & dry on his circumcised last name which conveniently belongs to the above-mentioned Shulamites;


    http://www.npg.si.edu/exhibit/recognize/images/02-03_full.jpg

    02-03_full.jpg (JPEG Image, 435 × 600 pixels)

    ““I’ve never had so many museum guards walk up to me like they did in Paris, where they said, ‘Oh my God, I’ve never seen this many black bodies in a public space,’” says Wiley.”

    Ta-Nehisi Coates is evidently big among museum guards in Paris.

    Doesn’t all this “black bodies” rhetoric sound a little … dehumanizing?

    Twenty years from now when the average woke CEO has learned to refer to “black bodies” in speeches, then the black studies majors will switch to “black souls” like W.E.B. Dubois used and shame Whitey once again for his racism in referring to blacks as bodies without a spark of spirit in them.

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    • Replies: @bored identity



    "Twenty years from now when the average woke CEO..."

     

    bored identity is afraid that twenty years from now the whole concept of body and soul , not to mention black body & soul, will transcend into something that only the wokest transhumans in the room ( such as Sailer's old acquaintance and America's highest-paid female CEO in 2013 ) will be able to swallow and digest.

    Can you even imagine Ta-Nehisi's blackity-bodyless AU (Artificial Unintelligence ) screaming at you from its pickle jar at Smithsonian?

    The only thing bored identity is sure about is that, according to Moore's Law, Whoopi G's Black Body Mass Index will vigintuple by 2038 :

    https://youtu.be/j1vB7OHe4EA?t=2m13s


    *************************************************************************************************************************

    Also, with friends & dealers like these, who needs bored identity's vitriol ? :



    "...Veteran Chicago dealer Rhona Hoffman wouldn’t abide my discreet misgivings as I commented on the artist’s travel schedule and vivacious social presence en route to Deitch’s lavish dinner for a few hundred at the Alhambra Ballroom, around the corner from the museum.


    “Kehinde is in the studio,” she told me, “working his butt off, all the time.

    He will not stop.”

    I commended her for her support, even though it was Jeffrey’s night to bank checks.

    “I’m getting India,” she said, referring to one of the countries soon to feature on Wiley’s “World Stage.”

    https://www.artforum.com/app.php/diary/william-pym-on-kehinde-wiley-at-the-studio-museum-20786

     

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  166. @Steve Sailer
    "“I’ve never had so many museum guards walk up to me like they did in Paris, where they said, ‘Oh my God, I’ve never seen this many black bodies in a public space,’” says Wiley."

    Ta-Nehisi Coates is evidently big among museum guards in Paris.

    Doesn't all this "black bodies" rhetoric sound a little ... dehumanizing?

    Twenty years from now when the average woke CEO has learned to refer to "black bodies" in speeches, then the black studies majors will switch to "black souls" like W.E.B. Dubois used and shame Whitey once again for his racism in referring to blacks as bodies without a spark of spirit in them.

    “Twenty years from now when the average woke CEO…”

    bored identity is afraid that twenty years from now the whole concept of body and soul , not to mention black body & soul, will transcend into something that only the wokest transhumans in the room ( such as Sailer’s old acquaintance and America’s highest-paid female CEO in 2013 ) will be able to swallow and digest.

    Can you even imagine Ta-Nehisi’s blackity-bodyless AU (Artificial Unintelligence ) screaming at you from its pickle jar at Smithsonian?

    The only thing bored identity is sure about is that, according to Moore’s Law, Whoopi G’s Black Body Mass Index will vigintuple by 2038 :

    *************************************************************************************************************************

    Also, with friends & dealers like these, who needs bored identity’s vitriol ? :

    “…Veteran Chicago dealer Rhona Hoffman wouldn’t abide my discreet misgivings as I commented on the artist’s travel schedule and vivacious social presence en route to Deitch’s lavish dinner for a few hundred at the Alhambra Ballroom, around the corner from the museum.

    “Kehinde is in the studio,” she told me, “working his butt off, all the time.

    He will not stop.”

    I commended her for her support, even though it was Jeffrey’s night to bank checks.

    “I’m getting India,” she said, referring to one of the countries soon to feature on Wiley’s “World Stage.”

    https://www.artforum.com/app.php/diary/william-pym-on-kehinde-wiley-at-the-studio-museum-20786

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  167. @guest
    Masterpieces can be written by less than top-tier writers, I believe. And I don't think they cancel out he failures, necessarily. Not if they're bad enough.

    Possibly you don't think Pierre or Con-Man are as bad as I.

    I've always been split on Melville. Interestingly, you mention all my favorites as great (or great-enough). Except Moby Dick, which I personally don't care for, though I recognize its official place.

    I like Titus, by the way. It's not top-tier Shakespeare, but it could easily play these hundreds of years later without Shakespeare's name attached. (With the understanding that it was archaic, of course.)

    Masterpieces can be written by less than top-tier writers, I believe.

    Sure. The one-hit wonder is definitely a thing: Jane Eyre , Wuthering Heights, etc. But top-tier authors can do the trick more than once. And Melville did it several times.

    And I don’t think they cancel out he failures, necessarily. Not if they’re bad enough.

    If you’ve only got one masterpiece and dozens of failures, sure. In Melville’s case, however, he’s got a string of top-tier masterworks.

    Possibly you don’t think Pierre or Con-Man are as bad as I.

    No, I agree that they are absolutely terrible, pure sludge.

    I like Titus, by the way. It’s not top-tier Shakespeare, but it could easily play these hundreds of years later without Shakespeare’s name attached. (With the understanding that it was archaic, of course.)

    It’s not unreadable/unwatchable.

    Read More
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