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From the New York Times news pages:

Dangerous Moment’ for Europe, as Fear and Resentment Grow
By STEVEN ERLANGER and KATRIN BENNHOLD JAN. 7, 2015

LONDON — The sophisticated, military-style strike Wednesday on a French newspaper known for satirizing Islam staggered a continent already seething with anti-immigrant sentiments in some quarters, feeding far-right nationalist parties like France’s National Front.

“This is a dangerous moment for European societies,” said Peter Neumann, director of the International Center for the Study of Radicalization at King’s College London. “With increasing radicalization among supporters of jihadist organizations and the white working class increasingly feeling disenfranchised and uncoupled from elites, things are coming to a head.”

Olivier Roy, a French scholar of Islam and radicalism, called the Paris assault — the most deadly terrorist attack on French soil since the Algerian war — “a quantitative and therefore qualitative turning point,” noting the target and the number of victims. “This was a maximum-impact attack,” he said. “They did this to shock the public, and in that sense they succeeded.”

Anti-immigrant attitudes have been on the rise in recent years in Europe, propelled in part by a moribund economy and high unemployment, as well as increasing immigration and more porous borders.

But not, of course, propelled by any bad behavior on the part of immigrant ethnicities.

The growing resentments have lifted the fortunes of established parties like the U.K. Independence Party in Britain and the National Front, as well as lesser-known groups, like Patriotic Europeans Against Islamization of the West, which assembled 18,000 marchers in Dresden, Germany, on Monday.

In Sweden, where there have been three recent attacks on mosques, the anti-immigrant, anti-Islamist Sweden Democrats party has been getting about 15 percent support in recent public opinion polls.

Paris was traumatized by the attack, with widespread fears of another. “We feel less and less safe,” said Didier Cantat, 34, standing outside the police barriers at the scene. “If it happened today, it will happen again, maybe even worse.”

Mr. Cantat spoke for many when he said the attacks could fuel greater anti-immigrant sentiment. “We are told Islam is for God, for peace,” he said. “But when you see this other Islam, with the jihadists, I don’t see peace, I see hatred. So people can’t tell which is the real Islam.”

… The mood among Parisians near the scene of the attack Wednesday on the newspaper Charlie Hebdo was apprehensive and angry. “There’s no respect for human life,” said Annette Gerhard.

“Politically, the official left in France has been in denial of the conflict between France and the Arab world,” Professor Hussey said. “But the French in general sense it.”

The attack left some Muslims fearing a backlash. “Some people when they think terrorism, think Muslims,” said Arnaud N’Goma, 26, as he took a cigarette break outside the bank where he works.

Samir Elatrassi, 27, concurred, saying that “Islamophobia is going to increase more and more.”

“When some people see these kinds of terrorists, they conflate them with other Muslims,” he said. “And it’s the extreme right that’s going to benefit from this.”

The German interior minister, Thomas de Mazière, told reporters on Wednesday: “The situation is serious. There is reason for worry, and for precautions, but not for panic.”

With each terrorist attack, however, the acceptability of anti-immigrant policies seems to reach deeper into the mainstream. In Britain, for example, which also has a large Muslim population, the U.K. Independence Party has called for a British exit from the European Union and sharp controls on immigration, emphasizing what it sees as dangers to British values and identity. The mainstream parties have competed in promising more controls on immigration, too.

“Large parts of the European public are latently anti-Muslim, and increasing mobilization of these forces is now reaching into the center of society,” Mr. Neumann said. “If we see more of these incidents, and I think we will, we will see a further polarization of these European societies in the years to come.”

Those who will suffer the most from such a backlash, he said, are the Muslim populations of Europe, “the ordinary normal Muslims who are trying to live their lives in Europe.” …

The mood of failure and paralysis is widespread in France. The Charlie Hebdo attack came on the publication day of a contentious new novel, “Submission,” by Michel Houellebecq, which describes the victory of Islam in France and the gradual collaboration of the society with its new rulers from within. Mr. Houellebecq, like the well-known caricaturists and editors who were killed at Charlie Hebdo, has been a symbol of French artistic liberty and license, and his publishers, Flammarion, were reported to be concerned that he and they could be another target.

But the atmosphere has been heightened by the rise of the National Front and its leader, Marine Le Pen, who runs ahead of the Socialist Party in the polls, campaigning on the threat Islam poses to French values and nationhood.

There was much recent attention to another best-selling book by a conservative social critic, Éric Zemmour, called “The French Suicide,” attacking the left and the state for being powerless to defend France against Americanization, globalization, immigration and, of course, Islam. Another new novel, by another well-known French writer, Jean Rolin, called “The Events,” envisions a broken France policed by a United Nations peacekeeping force after a civil war.

“This attack is double honey for the National Front,” said Camille Grand, director of the French Foundation for Strategic Research. “Le Pen says everywhere that Islam is a massive threat, and that France should not support attacks in Iraq and instead defend the homeland and not create threats by going abroad, so they can naturally take advantage of it.”

What kind of wacko extremist doubts the prudence of a grand strategy of invade-the-world / invite-the-world?

… When journalists are killed for expressing their views, it is one step away from burning books, said Annette Gerhard, 60.

Actually, it’s worse. But at least this allows the NYT to sum up with a closing sentence implying that the murderers are more like Nazis than are the people objecting to the murderers:

“It’s like Kristallnacht,” Ms. Gerhard said, noting that her family had died in Nazi deportations. “There’s no respect for human life.”

So I guess that’s a brave dogwhistle to put it last.

 
• Tags: Charlie Hebdo 
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  1. Paris attack backlash now yeilds 3,200,000 hits on Google News.

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  2. At the NY Times the Nazis are always just around the corner just waiting for an excuse to pounce.

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  3. Immigrant communities afraid of unlimited chain migration being cut off … that was never a stated reason for any of them wanting to come in the first place… rather strange for anybody to bring that up now.

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  4. “When journalists are killed for expressing their views, it is one step away from burning books,”

    Yep. Once terrorists start murdering writers in Paris, it’s only a matter of time before someone burns a book. (But not a Koran!)

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    • Replies: @Anon
    I read through this article and didn't quite catch how wonky this statement is !

    I suppose we can take some small comfort that no copies of Charlie Hebdo were actually BURNED!!!

    A small but very telling example of how Jewish imagery/narrative has become central in western countries
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  5. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    “When journalists are killed for expressing their views, it is one step away from burning books, said Annette Gerhard, 60.”

    Well, fining and imprisoning people for the ‘wrong views’ or ‘hate speech’(or whatever) sort of paves the way for tyranny too.
    But such is the norm all across the EU.

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    • Replies: @gzu
    This is why I find the whole "THIS IS AN ATTACK ON FREE SPEECH" laughable.
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  6. WhatEvvs [AKA "Bemused"] says:

    They’ve found the suspects.

    One of them is mentioned in a 2005 article:

    http://triblive.com/mobile/1496488-96/regional-the-battleground-terrorism-french-muslims-france-boubaker-ollivier-paris

    Attorney Vincent Ollivier said his client, Cherif Kouachi, was having second thoughts and was relieved to be arrested, even grateful.

    Kouachi, 22, lived his entire life in France and was not particularly religious, Ollivier said. He drank, smoked pot, slept with his girlfriend and delivered pizzas for a living. His parents, Algerian immigrants, are dead.

    This lawyer, Ollivier, sounds like a character out of a Houellebecq novel:

    Ollivier decorates his office with art he makes from painted plywood and found objects. In one piece, black plastic crocodiles creep out of a pond and advance on a crucifix. It represents the end of Western Civilization and Christianity, he said.

    “I’m like everybody else,” Ollivier said. “I’m worrying about it and waiting for it, for Armageddon. But … we can’t avoid all our democratic laws. The way we are fighting terrorists is very dangerous because we are forgetting all our rules.”

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  7. A Brandeis professor is holding out hope that the killers are blond.

    “For the most part I do not see an immediate backlash,” said Jytte Klausen, a professor at Brandeis University who has written on domestic terrorism and the intersection of politics and religion in Western Europe. “Security forces know that these attacks are often the work of converts. We may well be looking for blonde killers,” she added in a phone interview.

    http://www.ibtimes.com/after-charlie-hebdo-attack-being-muslim-france-may-have-become-much-harder-1776482

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    A Brandeis professor is holding out hope that the killers are blond.

     

    Is that a sing-songy Swedo-Norwegian Jytte Klausen, or a gargly Danish Jytte Klausen? Is she blond herself?

    Either way, she's rolling the brandice.
    , @Peter Akuleyev

    “Security forces know that these attacks are often the work of converts. We may well be looking for blonde killers,” she added in a phone interview.
     
    But if Muslim converts are the killers, that actually strengthens the case that Islamic ideology is the real threat. The danger in that case would not be the immigrants themselves, some of whom are surely very nice people, it would be the pernicious influence they are having on French society, which makes immigration even more dangerous, if you follow Ms. Klausen's logic to the end. It is odd how supposedly "tolerant leftists" seem to believe Islam is just the religion of oppressed brown people. If that were true Islam would present about the same threat to the West that Kwanzaa celebrations do.
    , @reiner Tor

    these attacks are often the work of converts
     
    Often?
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  8. > “With increasing radicalization among supporters of jihadist organizations and the white working class increasingly feeling disenfranchised and uncoupled from elites, things are coming to a head.”<

    they are voters no? you 'elected' a partial 'new polity'. eff the ruining class.

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  9. I’m going to go out on a limb and predict that the long-anticipated, never-seen backlash will happen in France. I think the French are far tougher than their freedom-fries/surrender-monkey image in the US. In spit of their elites’ best efforts, the Fr

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    • Replies: @Busby
    I agree. The French were particularly brutal when it came to suppressing the Secret Army Organization after DeGaulle came back into power. They'll do some pretty horrible things and then let the intellectuals agonize over it.
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  10. @Bemused

    “delivered pizzas for a living”

    Reminds me of the “Fort Dix Six” from 2006. Another story the media and elites would like us to forget.

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  11. The French still have a nation, and I think they will defend it. (Cut off by Twitter)

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    • Replies: @unpc downunder
    They still have a nation, minus Marseille and half of Paris. However, they've been in this situation before, so there's no reason they can't survive a partial occupation.
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  12. When journalists are killed for expressing their views, it is one step away from burning books

    People still read books? You learn something new every day.

    A more accurate modern assessment would be “When journalists are killed for expressing their views, it is one step away from shutting off YouTube.”

    NOW you’ll get people’s attention.

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  13. off topic

    http://www.economist.com/news/middle-east-and-africa/21637396-rolling-power-cuts-are-fraying-tempers-unplugged

    South Africa’s electricity crisis
    Unplugged

    Rolling power cuts are fraying tempers
    Jan 3rd 2015 | JOHANNESBURG | From the print edition

    THE people of South Africa are learning to live in the dark. Their beleaguered power utility, Eskom, is unable to meet electricity demand and in November reintroduced a tortuous schedule of rolling blackouts known as “load shedding”. South Africans now check electricity reports that read like weather forecasts: “There is a medium probability of load shedding today and tomorrow, with a higher probability on Thursday and Friday,” said a recent Eskom tweet. Newspapers print survival tips and “load shedder recipes” for food you can prepare without electricity. And there are bleak jokes aplenty. “Q: What did South Africa use before candles? A: Electricity.”

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    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    Once there was a nuclear power, where the lights were on, the trains ran on time. All while fighting a Soviet-backed insurgency, and Soviet-backed Angola.

    Then the American conservatives got called wasis, and it all fell apart...
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  14. It’s only been about 70 years since the Nazis have last been in power…

    Those who can only look backward at history are condemned.

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  15. I’m going to go out on a limb and predict that the long-anticipated, never-seen backlash will happen in France. I think the French are far tougher than their freedom-fries/surrender-monkey image in the US. In spit of their elites’ best efforts, the Fr

    I hope so, but I doubt it. I am seeing the ubiquitous ‘candlelight vigil’ that now surrounds events like this. At this point in the game seeing a mob with torches and pitchforks would be a better indicator of whether or not the French still have a pulse. I hate candlelight vigils.

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    • Replies: @Gallo-Roman

    "I hate candlelight vigils."
     
    Gad, so do I. Nothing says "emasculated society" like a candlelight vigil. Still, I have hope for the French. They're not the people some glib Anglospheroids like to think they are.
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  16. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:

    http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/paris-magazine-attack/confusion-french-hunt-magazine-attack-suspects-n281761

    “They want to scare French citizens and prohibit any criticism of religion, so here we are to remind them that religion can be freely criticized,” said Sasha Reingewirtz, 28, president of the Jewish Students Union.

    There seems to be a pattern here, but I can’t quite put my finger on it.

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  17. Ahh the old double down when you’re losing your rear end strategy. It’s so predictable out of the NYT it’s not even funny. Whether it’s Ferguson, de Blasio’s attacks on the police and now what happened at Hedbo’s offices.

    These people can’t help themselves. All they have is the “narrative” and when reality diverts from the “narrative” they frontlash or double down with full speed ahead.

    And who do they think they are fooling? Even New Yorkers know where this paper is coming from and has zero traction outside of the establishment kool-aid drinkers.

    Bunch of sorry a** lemmings.

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  18. It seems that there is no provocation by Muslims or other protected classes that the Megaphone would consider a legitimate cause for backlash. I’m certain that even a nuclear weapon or bio attack by “extremists” would not even qualify.

    At the same time, the slightest current microaggression or ancient deed, no matter how fictitious, by a forebear of the traditional host nation stock is worthy of onerous laws/persecutions/moral panics/blood libels supported 100% by TPTB.

    Had this tyranny been prognosticated 30 years ago, the reasonable person would have predicted a violent revolution well in advance of the current state. But still, people say that a counterreaction is inevitable.

    I’m not so sure. Oppressive institutions, e.g, serfdom, have demonstrated centuries-long staying power.

    The eternal boot in the face is now. And one can’t even advise “get used to it” since everyone already seems quite accustomed to living under this regime, albeit with a little anonymous Internet grumbling to let off steam.

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    • Replies: @Lovernios X
    I'm sure you are right. One has to remember that 9/11 was intended to topple those buildings while full, around 50,000 people. It was just "bad luck" (from al Qaeda's perspective) that the buildings stood for so long and allowed most of the intended victims to escape. In that sense, it was an attack with weapon's of mass destruction. Backlash worries commenced before the rubble pile cooled.
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  19. I’ll bet these guys have banged lots of white girls.

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    • Replies: @thisisaknife
    @ Goth, yeah the terrorists probably have banged some white grrrls, feminists getting off rejecting daddy. Or the Muslims DIDN'T get luv from a French girl and this frustration fueled their violent fantasies of revenge.
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  20. @Watching from Japan
    A Brandeis professor is holding out hope that the killers are blond.


    “For the most part I do not see an immediate backlash,” said Jytte Klausen, a professor at Brandeis University who has written on domestic terrorism and the intersection of politics and religion in Western Europe. “Security forces know that these attacks are often the work of converts. We may well be looking for blonde killers,” she added in a phone interview.
     
    http://www.ibtimes.com/after-charlie-hebdo-attack-being-muslim-france-may-have-become-much-harder-1776482

    A Brandeis professor is holding out hope that the killers are blond.

    Is that a sing-songy Swedo-Norwegian Jytte Klausen, or a gargly Danish Jytte Klausen? Is she blond herself?

    Either way, she’s rolling the brandice.

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  21. ““This is a dangerous moment for European societies,” said Peter Neumann, director of the International Center for the Study of Radicalization at King’s College London. “With increasing radicalization among supporters of jihadist organizations and the white working class increasingly feeling disenfranchised and uncoupled from elites, things are coming to a head.””

    Imagine the effrontery the white working class – feeling uncoupled from the elites? Don’t they realize how much the elites have done for them? If they aren’t careful, the elites may just go out and get themselves a new working class.

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  22. As usual, while actual dead infidels are somewhat unfortunate, the true danger we must all be worried about is a hypothetical Muslim who might suffer a subsequent backlash.

    Perhaps the kindly folks on Le Metro can start their own “Je Voyagerais Avec Toi” program to reassure Muslims that they’re as beloved as ever.

    Because, as everyone knows, “Allahu Akbar” is Arabic for “Islam is a religion of peace, and I’m a lone wolf.”

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  23. @Chris Anderson
    I'm going to go out on a limb and predict that the long-anticipated, never-seen backlash will happen in France. I think the French are far tougher than their freedom-fries/surrender-monkey image in the US. In spit of their elites' best efforts, the Fr

    I agree. The French were particularly brutal when it came to suppressing the Secret Army Organization after DeGaulle came back into power. They’ll do some pretty horrible things and then let the intellectuals agonize over it.

    Read More
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  24. “it is one step away from burning books”

    how do you burn ebooks?

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  25. @jo s'more
    off topic

    http://www.economist.com/news/middle-east-and-africa/21637396-rolling-power-cuts-are-fraying-tempers-unplugged

    South Africa’s electricity crisis
    Unplugged

    Rolling power cuts are fraying tempers
    Jan 3rd 2015 | JOHANNESBURG | From the print edition

    THE people of South Africa are learning to live in the dark. Their beleaguered power utility, Eskom, is unable to meet electricity demand and in November reintroduced a tortuous schedule of rolling blackouts known as “load shedding”. South Africans now check electricity reports that read like weather forecasts: “There is a medium probability of load shedding today and tomorrow, with a higher probability on Thursday and Friday,” said a recent Eskom tweet. Newspapers print survival tips and “load shedder recipes” for food you can prepare without electricity. And there are bleak jokes aplenty. “Q: What did South Africa use before candles? A: Electricity.”

    Once there was a nuclear power, where the lights were on, the trains ran on time. All while fighting a Soviet-backed insurgency, and Soviet-backed Angola.

    Then the American conservatives got called wasis, and it all fell apart…

    Read More
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  26. WhatEvvs [AKA "Bemused"] says:

    One of the dead was an economist with a specialization in Keynes, and wrote about the economic aspects of Houellebecq’s work:

    http://www.latimes.com/world/europe/la-fg-charlie-hedbo-attack-live-updates-20150107-htmlstory.html

    Maris’ many interests also included the novels of the controversial French author Michel Houellebecq, on which he recently published a book exploring the economic dimensions of the novelist’s body of work.

    “Capitalism is a system based on immaturity and it can’t last forever,” Maris told the Nouvel Observateur last year. “It’s only been 200 years, after all. That’s nothing on the timeline of mankind.”

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  27. If instead of a sophisticated, military-style strike Wednesday on a French newspaper known for satirizing Islam, it was a strike on the Islam-enabling New York Times, and ten of its staff were murdered, would the surviving members of the editorial board take the same stance they do here? Is there a point at which the NYT could entertain the thought that perhaps Muslims don’t make good additions to Western societies?

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    • Replies: @Frau Katze

    Is there a point at which the NYT could entertain the thought that perhaps Muslims don’t make good additions to Western societies?
     
    I don't think so. They were in New York for 9/11 and it had no impact on their mindset.
    , @ben tillman

    If instead of a sophisticated, military-style strike Wednesday on a French newspaper known for satirizing Islam, it was a strike on the Islam-enabling New York Times, and ten of its staff were murdered, would the surviving members of the editorial board take the same stance they do here? Is there a point at which the NYT could entertain the thought that perhaps Muslims don’t make good additions to Western societies?
     
    Let's think about Matt Yglesias for a moment.

    Now, can we agree the answer is no?
    , @Martin
    "..would the surviving members of the editorial board take the same stance.."

    Yes, and they'd place the blame squarely on the right.
    , @Jonathan Silber

    If instead of a sophisticated, military-style strike Wednesday on a French newspaper known for satirizing Islam, it was a strike on the Islam-enabling New York Times, and ten of its staff were murdered, would the surviving members of the editorial board take the same stance they do here?
     
    I don't know the answer, but count on me for the candlelight vigil and put me down for one "I-Am-Maureen" tee.
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  28. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    It will be interesting to see how the French respond. Recall how they dealt with the annoyance of Greenpeace some years ago. However, with a large entrenched community and banlieus where the police fear to tread, this may get quite ugly. Others can learn from the French lesson, should that transpire. Of course, I’m probably just a bigoted racist (according to Ben Affleck)

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  29. These “journalists” seem not to grasp just how much the common man has come to hate the Elites, both in Europe and in this country. Instead, they’d rather talk of hatred of immigrants. They_d0_not_yet_understand.

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    • Replies: @The most deplorable one
    Oh, they understand. They just think that a kinder-gentler military and police state force full of women will be able to protect them.
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  30. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @e
    These "journalists" seem not to grasp just how much the common man has come to hate the Elites, both in Europe and in this country. Instead, they'd rather talk of hatred of immigrants. They_d0_not_yet_understand.

    Oh, they understand. They just think that a kinder-gentler military and police state force full of women will be able to protect them.

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  31. This evening I spoke with a friend in France. He told me that the last cartoon published by one of the cartoonists executed today showed him talking to an Islamic terrorist. The cartoonist asks him, “What’s the matter with you guys? You haven’t committed any terrorism to celebrate the New Year.”

    The terrorist answers, “Don’t worry–we have until the end of the month.”

    I wonder when people will really begin to comprehend what we’re dealing with?

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  32. At the NY Times the Nazis are always just around the corner just waiting for an excuse to pounce.

    Funny that, considering how soft and appeasing the NYT was toward actual Nazis before WWII.

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  33. What’s the danger of a “backlash”? Does anyone honest-to-God believe that the French are going to start slaughtering Muslims by the score?

    What would a backlash consist of? Ending future Muslim immigration and kicking out those who aren’t yet citizens. Follwoing that, maybe they’d put on the hurt by doing things that indirectly reduced Muslim birthrates, such as cutting off welfare. Finally, if all else failed, perhaps they’d deport Muslim citizens.

    If Muslims don’t really want to live in a Western country, with all its freedoms, then they shouldn’t move to one – and the West is under no obligation to accept them.

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    • Replies: @gzu
    I agree with you. All of these steps would easily stop the hurt pretty quickly. But no, it has to be violence.

    Muslims would self deport, if bribed witha little money.
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  34. @Harry Baldwin
    If instead of a sophisticated, military-style strike Wednesday on a French newspaper known for satirizing Islam, it was a strike on the Islam-enabling New York Times, and ten of its staff were murdered, would the surviving members of the editorial board take the same stance they do here? Is there a point at which the NYT could entertain the thought that perhaps Muslims don't make good additions to Western societies?

    Is there a point at which the NYT could entertain the thought that perhaps Muslims don’t make good additions to Western societies?

    I don’t think so. They were in New York for 9/11 and it had no impact on their mindset.

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  35. Marcel Bigeard, Jean de Lattre de Tassigny, Paul Aussaresses. Are there any Frenchmen like these left? If men like these were in charge, the game would be over.

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    • Replies: @Hhsiii
    Or this guy (I think based on Yves Godard):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJfI3KnmSHc
    , @colm
    Oh, that Bigeard who sabotaged the French Commander at Dien Bien Phu and helped the 'Congs take over it? Forgetaboutit.
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  36. The number of dead in Paris is similar to that in your own Fort Hood workplace insensitivity incident – and how much did that move the needle?

    I foresee compulsory sensitivity training for the survivors, together with a push for real diversity in the world of satirical journalism.

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    • Replies: @Wilkey
    "The number of dead in Paris is similar to that in your own Fort Hood workplace insensitivity incident – and how much did that move the needle?"

    Mitt Romney didn't mention Ft. Hood much during his 2012 campaign. He may have not even mentioned it once. He certainly didn't make it a central issue of his campaign, and by God he didn't run any commercials about it, and not in a billion years would he have tied it to the issue of immigration - an issue he all but dropped after his (alleged) opposition to illegal immigration help him win the nomination.

    The death toll doesn't have to be especially large for an act of violence to move the populace. Willie Horton helped George H. W. Bush win the 1988 election, and Horton only killed one person.

    France has a leading party that's willing to make Islamic thuggery and mass immigration a campaign issue. That party is already leading in the polls. Unlike Ft. Hood, the Charlie Hebdo attack was not a lone wolf operation. Unlike Ft. Hood, there is video of the event that has gotten out to the public.

    Yesterday's terrorist attack will affect the French elections, and probably those in several other EU countries, starting with the UK.
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  37. “Is there a point at which the NYT could entertain the thought that perhaps Muslims don’t make good additions to Western societies?”

    And this my friends, is the prime example of why there is no backlash in the offing. As 9/11 happened, I was certain that the immigration idiocy would finally stop. But we know now it didn’t and actually ramped up.

    There is no incident, and I mean none, that will provoke the masses to effecting meaningful change until widespread hardship/poverty – freedom coming from nothing left to lose – is rampant among the native stock. Rotherham? Your daughters raped on a widespread basis abetted by the authorities? Crickets.

    There is perhaps some glimmer of hope in that another program of the elites is inflicting poverty on the middle class, but there is still a great deal of ruin left there, at least decades or a generation or two.

    Get used to it, there will be no collective action anytime soon. The only rational/productive response is on the individual level, such as developing income situations that leave one less at the mercy of things like AA/doxing, expatriation to ignored areas, homeschooling (to include firearms training) for offspring, that sort of thing. If there is going to any change, it will be among our progeny, not us.

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  38. “A Brandeis professor is holding out hope that the killers are blond.

    “For the most part I do not see an immediate backlash,” said Jytte Klausen, a professor at Brandeis University who has written on domestic terrorism and the intersection of politics and religion in Western Europe. “Security forces know that these attacks are often the work of converts. We may well be looking for blonde killers,” she added in a phone interview.

    http://www.ibtimes.com/after-charlie-hebdo-attack-being-muslim-france-may-have-become-much-harder-1776482&#8243;

    Hahahahaha at the professor hoping that Muslim terrorists in France turn out to be blond. The majority of Muslims in France are from North Africa. Most North Africans are not even blond during childhood, let alone blond during adulthood.

    You see more blonds among Melanesians than you do among North Africans.

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  39. “What’s the danger of a “backlash”? Does anyone honest-to-God believe that the French are going to start slaughtering Muslims by the score?”

    Perhaps we ought to heed the advice of Brett Stevens–[Europeans must return to its roots--monarchy-] the form of leadership that puts people of noble character and high intelligence into leadership positions and lets them act organically. It is supported by an aristocracy that breeds the best of humanity and puts them in position to assume rule, working their way up from local government to the national level. This cannot exist without a strong national identity, which requires the triad of culture, heritage and values. This is a method of leadership more than a system of government. Government to my mind implies an institution which acts to manage the lives of its citizens, which monarchy does not do. Monarchy leads a nation and wages war against its problems both internal and external. It does not apply the babysitter-cum-disciplinarian role that government takes on. It has basically one punishment, which is that people who do not fit or transgress are sent away. As a result, all punishment is severe and thus rarer. Most modern problems would not exist after 90 days in a monarchy.

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    • Replies: @SFG
    Monarchy? Persons of high character and breeding? Like the king of Spain with half the expected number of great-great-grandparents who couldn't clean up after himself?

    The other thing I find funny about neoreactionaries is their belief that their chosen monarch wouldn't put *them* in jail if he found them a threat.

    All the world's greatest mass murderers--Hitler, Stalin, Mao--have all been dictators. No thank you.
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  40. @Harry Baldwin
    If instead of a sophisticated, military-style strike Wednesday on a French newspaper known for satirizing Islam, it was a strike on the Islam-enabling New York Times, and ten of its staff were murdered, would the surviving members of the editorial board take the same stance they do here? Is there a point at which the NYT could entertain the thought that perhaps Muslims don't make good additions to Western societies?

    If instead of a sophisticated, military-style strike Wednesday on a French newspaper known for satirizing Islam, it was a strike on the Islam-enabling New York Times, and ten of its staff were murdered, would the surviving members of the editorial board take the same stance they do here? Is there a point at which the NYT could entertain the thought that perhaps Muslims don’t make good additions to Western societies?

    Let’s think about Matt Yglesias for a moment.

    Now, can we agree the answer is no?

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  41. With each terrorist attack, however, the acceptability of anti-immigrant policies seems to reach deeper into the mainstream.

    It’s like the public is learning from experience or something. It’s mysterious.

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  42. Picture something like this (scene, White House press room):

    “Mr. Press Secretary, what do you say about the recent disturbances in Europe?”

    “Well, we are aware that a French woman recently walked through a heavily Muslim quarter of Paris unveiled and wearing a skirt, and obviously, we have questions about the judgment of doing something like that. We know the value that Islam places on female modesty, and acts like this will be deeply offensive to many and have the potential to be inflammatory. But we’ve spoken repeatedly about the importance of upholding women’s freedom to dress and act as they choose in a free society.

    In other words, we don’t question the right of a woman to wear something like this; we just question the judgment behind the decision to do it. And I think that that’s our view about the video of Ms. Shoshana Roberts’ walk through Dearborn, Michigan that has caused so much offense in the Muslim world.

    Now, it has to be said, and I’ll say it again, that no matter how offensive something like this is, it is not in any way justification for threats, beatings, gang rape, or acid-throwing — not in any way justification for violence. Now, we have been staying in close touch with the French government as well as other governments around the world, and we appreciate the statements of support by French government officials over the past week, denouncing the violence against women in America and our female citizens overseas.”

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  43. Priss Factor [AKA "gub"] says:

    Isn’t the hipster like a cross between a bohemian and a nerd?

    I think Steve Jobs led the way in this. He was a tech guy who also added some color and flair to Silicon Valley. By bohemianizing nerdism, he made it somewhat cool.
    Gates in contrast is pure nerd.

    A hipster tries to look ‘different’ and stylish. But he is so tech-savvy. He’s not a maverick or rebel or exile or outcast. He’s a good boy, even a nerd, with a beard and cool glasses. And an iPhone.

    Once upon a time, all high-tech stuff seemed geeky. But Apple design made it all cool.

    So, in a way, everyone with an iPad or iPod has been partly nerdized.

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  44. “… When journalists are killed for expressing their views, it is one step away from burning books, said Annette Gerhard, 60.”

    To paraphrase Heinrich Heine: Where people are burned, there will books one day be burned too.

    And, after all, that is the real horror of mass-murder, isn’t it – that it might lead to the destruction of books.

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  45. “When journalists are killed for expressing their views, it is one step away from burning books, said Annette Gerhard, 60.”

    Only a left-liberal humanist could come up with a statement this stupid, arrogant or sanctimonious (take your pick). Massacre the journalists if you have to, but please don’t burn my Foucault and Rousseau.

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  46. “Frau Katze says:

    “”Is there a point at which the NYT could entertain the thought that perhaps Muslims don’t make good additions to Western societies?””

    I don’t think so. They were in New York for 9/11 and it had no impact on their mindset.”

    I agree. If 9/11 didn’t induce western elites to wise up about muslim immigration, it’s hard to see how anything would.

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  47. @Chris Anderson
    The French still have a nation, and I think they will defend it. (Cut off by Twitter)

    They still have a nation, minus Marseille and half of Paris. However, they’ve been in this situation before, so there’s no reason they can’t survive a partial occupation.

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  48. I read up a bit on Charlie Hebdo and, well, they were really pushing it to the limit. Many of the cartoons are flat out obscene, such as depictions of Jesus sodomizing God, Marine Le Pen with a Hitler mustache for pubes, Mahomet presenting his anus for sodomy, etc. Additionally, their “serious” content was so far left it might as well have been an outhouse book for the New Republic crowd.

    “Coco” (Corinne Rey), the woman who let the assassins in the office when they threatened her, had repeatedly lampooned French police as losers with some phallic inadequacy. I wonder how she feels now that two of them were murdered on the street for protecting her.

    The Muslims chose a pretty unsympathetic target, which was strategically a savvy move. Just about the only thing I can say for publications editor Stephane “Charb” Charbonnier is that he was no coward, and he was an equal opportunity debaser of all things sacred. Given Charlie Hebdo’s persistent violation of taboos, including those concerning speaking ill of the dead (they were briefly banned in 1970 for mocking the death of Charles de Gaulle), these guys are fair game for criticism despite having just been slaughtered. I mean, what is the point of provocation except to provoke?

    In comparison to his ideological fellow travelers, Charb was exceptional for not being a hypocrite, as those on the left are typically the most censorious of all these days when it comes to their own sacred cows. Charlie Hebdo was really an old-school counterculture magazine that is out of place in the contemporary Orwellian leftist atmosphere.

    In a sense, one could say that the leftist mantra that “we cannot tolerate intolerance” is partially responsible for these killings. Not only do certain groups – egged on by white anti-racists – now feel legally entitled to respect, anyone with a grievance can now justify retaliation based on what they personally feel slighted by. Say, for example, someone in the US were murdered for portraying MLK taking it up the butt. Does anyone seriously believe that the victim would be held up by leftists as a martyr for free speech? And MLK is sacred only to about 0.03 times as many people as Mahomet.

    That being the case, doesn’t it follow that Muslims would feel justified in taking action against those who offend them?

    Maybe in the long run these guys at Charlie Hebdo did us all a favor by pushing the cult of the profane to the point of absurdity so that we can see it all the more clearly for what it was. Too bad Charb isn’t around anymore to draw a parody of his and his staff’s grisly demise — that would be a proper epitaph for the bygone era that gave rise to Charlie Hebdo. And I mean that in a sincerely nostalgic, if ambivalent, way.

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    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    Well said. It's a shame they were gunned down, but my objection is more on general principles. People shouldn't just be gunned down in our streets. They were hard left, anti religion, pro mass immigration, anti French nationalism. 68ers to a man.

    I am not Charlie.
    , @Jim
    It might be interesting to compare this magazine with Der Stuermer.
    , @Horzabky
    One of the people who were killed was Charlie Hebdo's boss, nicknamed Charb, a satirical cartoonist whose companion was Jeannette Bougrab, a French citizen of Algerian origin, who has been a junior minister in a right-wing government while Sarkozy was president. He also knew François Hollande personally, and had managed to persuade Hollande to support Charlie Hebdo financially. I guess he considered himself a left-wing rebel and dissenter.

    Charlie Hebdo former director, Philippe Val, who was always proud of his far left opinions was appointed director of a national radio station by Sarkozy, who claimed to be a right-wing president. Basically Charlie Hebdo is his presidential majesty's satirical magazine, whoever is the president.

    Caroline Fourest, a lesbian journalist who is rabidly anti-catholic and anti-muslim, also worked for Charlie Hebdo, while Val was director. Under Val, the magazine, which had always been anti-catholic in a very vulgar, obscene manner, also became anti-islamic, in the same vulgar, obscene manner. But angry muslims are much more dangerous than angry catholics, as they eventually realized.

    Caroline Fourest regularly exchanges text messages with François Hollande (she said so in her last book) and she actively supports the Femen, those crazy topless feminists who desecrate churches.

    As a French citizen, I find it mind-boggling how our so-called elite runs this country, and what they are. They sleep with each other, their right wing / left wing persuasions are for the show, and they hate and despise everything white, French and catholic. They are immigrationist, pro-Israeli, anti-Islam (but also anti-racist) atlanticists. All of them, including Sarkozy and Hollande, and all the foul-mouthed satirists of Charlie-Hebdo. I don't know if Sarkozy secretly loathes catholicism, but Hollande certainly does. He made sure that Charlie-Hebdo got public funds to stay alive.

    The more I know about Charlie Hebdo and those who ran it, the more I think that, well... What a bunch of a**holes they were.

    The killers look like run-of-the-mill banlieue youth: North African or Black African origin, pizza delivery jobs, social housing in drab tower blocks, juvenile delinquency, rap music, and eventually radical Islam as a means of salvation. They are from Gennevilliers and Grigny, two of the most depressing suburban French ghetto towns I know.

    A**holes killed a**holes. Move on, folks, nothing to see here.

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  49. As horrific as this tragedy was, if our diversity becomes a casualty, I think that’s worse.

    Frontlash with General Casey.

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    • Replies: @Forbes

    Frontlash with General Casey.
     
    He was (unfortunately) an example of the Peter Principal at work in the Army. As vice Chief of Staff of the Army, he volunteered to take command of the Iraq War after the initial stage, then the whole theatre fell apart, and had to be rescued by Patraeus and the surge. Casey was then promoted to Army Chief of Staff, i.e. kicked upstairs.
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  50. […] Source: Steve Sailer […]

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  51. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    In other words, the NYT bemoans the fact that the European political class might lose the ability to impose even more of its cataclysmic and disaster heading policy on Europe, and stick its head deeper into the sand about the eventualmand inevitable denouement as the third workers attain numerical majority in France and elsewhere.

    As an aside, I must remind the NYT that Jews will be the biggest victims of a Muslim and third world dominated France.

    As another aside, I know it will win me no friends here, but as a man, I have to admit that I found the sheer professionalism, bravery and efficiency of execution of that attack admirable. Not that I agree with murder – even if it is of a bunch pro immigration lefties.

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    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
    "As an aside, I must remind the NYT that Jews will be the biggest victims of a Muslim and third world dominated France."

    For the Zionists, this is a feature, not a bug. An integral part of their narrative is that Israel is the only place in the world that is truly safe for Jews. So Jews better hurry up and move to Israel pronto.

    Granted, the overwhelming majority of Jews do not see it this way and have no more desire to see themselves or their brethren slaughtered than you or I would. But the Sheldon Adelsons of the world who sit behind their gated walls could care less if some of their overseas co-ethnics get massacred, as long as it serves the higher purpose.
    , @Ivy
    Don't you mean that French people will be the biggest losers, instead of trying to make it all about Jews?

    French outnumber tribals by orders of magnitude.
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  52. “But when you see this other Islam, with the jihadists, I don’t see peace, I see hatred. So people can’t tell which is the real Islam.”

    It’s two mints in one. They’re both “real.” In essence, a billion Muslims are running a Good Cop/Bad Cop routine on the world. The Good Islamic Cop (like all “enlightened,” “non-bigoted” people) tells us that Muslims are mostly peaceful, that we have nothing to fear, and we’d better listen to him, because Bad Islamic Cop is a terrorist who will only be angrier if we don’t. We should listen to Good Islamic Cop and do what he asks. It’s only rational.

    The analogy isn’t perfect, because Bad Islamic Cops have been killing lots of Good Islamic Cops from the very start. But from the point of view of non-Muslims, does that matter much? Because in the end, both cops are on the same team.

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    • Replies: @SFG
    You're implying coordination. Most religions have extreme members. The problem is that Islam's extremists are fine with killing people (Christianity's no longer are), and that political correctness keeps us from calling attention to it.
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  53. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Some posters here somehow praise the ‘bravery’ of Charlie Hebdo for publishing cartoons depicting Muslim religious figures engaged in various acts of obscenity and depravity, as if this was some sort of big deal.

    Firstly, the cartoons are no more sophisticated than what the typical guilty and curious minded 7 year old school boy conjures up guiltily in the dark recesses of his own Freudian imagination. What’s so sophisticated about that?

    No the real issue is ‘free-speech’ concerning real political discourse and real political argument and issues. Here, the French state like the British state has absolutely no qualms about prosecuting the anti immigration dissident right for having the temerity to question the ‘wisdom’ of mass third world immigration.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Charlie Hebdo is the literary equivalent of the loud-mouthed bully Scut Farkus from "A Christmas Story." They bullied all the believers on the block for years until they finally f*cked with the wrong guys. Just because you can be a pain in the a$$ doesn't mean you should.
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  54. I remember reading in a French language publication that the French government was believed to have practiced targeted assassination on suspected Basque terrorists. Maybe that group will be reconstituted.

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  55. The problem isn’t the anti-backlash articles per se — they are not unreasonable. (Although as much as anyone else I personally dislike seeing them appear so quickly — immediately, really — in the aftermath.) The problem is that there is usually little to nothing else as reaction. And they are used to implicitly equate any wider discussion as too opportunistic — even unseemly or inappropriate. That should wait for a later day. Which never comes.

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  56. Keith Vaz [AKA "Sir Charles Pipkins"] says:

    If Le Pen doesn’t win this next election, the French race is finished. All the pressure will be on her to moderate, appease, become ‘anti-waycis’. However she should take a lesson from NYT chutzpah and maintain frame. Only a nation which gives priority to civilized Europeans is a state worth living in. They need to stop importing non-Whites and offer gemrous amounts to Third Worlders willing to repatriate.

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  57. 48: Good comment, but Charlie Hebdo operated as an informer on people suspected of breaking the loi Gayssot which makes the expression of unpopular opinions on certain historical topics a criminal offence.

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  58. Remarkably enough, the publishing company founded to produce Charlie Hebdo in 1992 was called Les Éditions Kalachnikof.

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  59. Funny that, considering how soft and appeasing the NYT was toward actual Nazis before WWII.

    Hardly. The NYT was soft on the Soviets before WWII, they were actually one of the more prominent anti-Nazi voices before the war. If you think Mr. Sulzberger was going to give Nazis a pass, you’re crazy. The NYT has been a reliable voice for the German Jewish elite in America since at least the 1870s.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    The NYT did bury news of the holocaust as it was happening.
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  60. @Watching from Japan
    A Brandeis professor is holding out hope that the killers are blond.


    “For the most part I do not see an immediate backlash,” said Jytte Klausen, a professor at Brandeis University who has written on domestic terrorism and the intersection of politics and religion in Western Europe. “Security forces know that these attacks are often the work of converts. We may well be looking for blonde killers,” she added in a phone interview.
     
    http://www.ibtimes.com/after-charlie-hebdo-attack-being-muslim-france-may-have-become-much-harder-1776482

    “Security forces know that these attacks are often the work of converts. We may well be looking for blonde killers,” she added in a phone interview.

    But if Muslim converts are the killers, that actually strengthens the case that Islamic ideology is the real threat. The danger in that case would not be the immigrants themselves, some of whom are surely very nice people, it would be the pernicious influence they are having on French society, which makes immigration even more dangerous, if you follow Ms. Klausen’s logic to the end. It is odd how supposedly “tolerant leftists” seem to believe Islam is just the religion of oppressed brown people. If that were true Islam would present about the same threat to the West that Kwanzaa celebrations do.

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  61. @Peter Akuleyev

    Funny that, considering how soft and appeasing the NYT was toward actual Nazis before WWII.
     
    Hardly. The NYT was soft on the Soviets before WWII, they were actually one of the more prominent anti-Nazi voices before the war. If you think Mr. Sulzberger was going to give Nazis a pass, you're crazy. The NYT has been a reliable voice for the German Jewish elite in America since at least the 1870s.

    The NYT did bury news of the holocaust as it was happening.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The NYT did bury news of the holocaust as it was happening.

    The NYT was hardly alone. It is curious, is it not, that "news of the holocaust" didn't appear in the media and culture until decades after "it was happening."
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  62. When you read neo-con Mark Steyn’s searing commentary on this, remember that Steyn is one of those who helped bring it about:

    Steyn calls for the destruction of Europe

    In a selection of my past blog articles on Mark Steyn that I posted yesterday, I just came upon a statement by Steyn about Europe and Islam that may be the most damning thing—about himself—that he’s ever written. In Steyn’s article, written last February, he doesn’t merely express indifference to the prospect of an Islamized Europe (which he has done many times before), and he doesn’t merely express Schadenfreude at the prospect of an Islamized Europe (which he has also done many times before); no, he speaks of an Islamized Europe as a positively good thing for the United States.

    Steyn calls for the destruction of Europe

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    • Replies: @Marty
    Why are you stealing Auster?
    , @Massimo Heitor
    @Neo-Connerie, from the exact Steyn article you link:

    Bush wasn't talking about anti-Semitism in Nebraska, but about France, where for three years there's been a sustained campaign of synagogue burning and cemetery desecration, and Germany, where the Berlin police advise Jewish residents not to go out in public wearing any identifying marks of their faith.
     
    He is commenting on, but definitely not "[calling] for the destruction of Europe" as you claim. He is horrified at the destruction of western civilization and horrified at the lack of freedom for a Jew to openly walk through Berlin. Steyn didn't help bring this about at all.
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  63. Gahahaha. I love “Frontlash”. It is a perfect Sailerism.

    Honestly, I don’t know how Timesies can carry on as they do, in the light of your hilarious running critique. Have they no shame? (No – don’t answer – I already know).

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  64. @Anonymous
    In other words, the NYT bemoans the fact that the European political class might lose the ability to impose even more of its cataclysmic and disaster heading policy on Europe, and stick its head deeper into the sand about the eventualmand inevitable denouement as the third workers attain numerical majority in France and elsewhere.

    As an aside, I must remind the NYT that Jews will be the biggest victims of a Muslim and third world dominated France.

    As another aside, I know it will win me no friends here, but as a man, I have to admit that I found the sheer professionalism, bravery and efficiency of execution of that attack admirable. Not that I agree with murder - even if it is of a bunch pro immigration lefties.

    “As an aside, I must remind the NYT that Jews will be the biggest victims of a Muslim and third world dominated France.”

    For the Zionists, this is a feature, not a bug. An integral part of their narrative is that Israel is the only place in the world that is truly safe for Jews. So Jews better hurry up and move to Israel pronto.

    Granted, the overwhelming majority of Jews do not see it this way and have no more desire to see themselves or their brethren slaughtered than you or I would. But the Sheldon Adelsons of the world who sit behind their gated walls could care less if some of their overseas co-ethnics get massacred, as long as it serves the higher purpose.

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    • Replies: @IBC

    “As an aside, I must remind the NYT that Jews will be the biggest victims of a Muslim and third world dominated France.”

    For the Zionists, this is a feature, not a bug. An integral part of their narrative is that Israel is the only place in the world that is truly safe for Jews. So Jews better hurry up and move to Israel pronto.
     
    I find it a little ironic how French Jews seem to be leaving for Israel while Israeli Jews are moving to Germany. Maybe it's because a lot of French Jews these days are of North African background and they're turned off by the PC attitudes in Germany, whereas young hipster Israelis might be turned off by what they see as excessive nationalism and religious intrusion in Israel --not as much of a feature in modern Germany, especially in places like Berlin.
    , @Art Deco
    Granted, the overwhelming majority of Jews do not see it this way

    About 35% of the world's Jews live in Israel as we speak and it's a reasonable wager the size of the Jewish population in Israel will over take that in the U.S. in about 15 years time.
    , @Lurker
    Exactly!
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  65. This CBC article is a nice collection of quotes from experts worried that this massacre in Paris might fuel islamophobia and help Marine Le Pen:

    Charlie Hebdo Paris shooting may deepen ‘naturalized Islamaphobia’
    Right-wing rhetoric in France could ‘destroy’ goodwill among Muslims, experts warn

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/charlie-hebdo-paris-shooting-may-deepen-naturalized-islamaphobia-1.2893057

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  66. @Watching from Japan
    A Brandeis professor is holding out hope that the killers are blond.


    “For the most part I do not see an immediate backlash,” said Jytte Klausen, a professor at Brandeis University who has written on domestic terrorism and the intersection of politics and religion in Western Europe. “Security forces know that these attacks are often the work of converts. We may well be looking for blonde killers,” she added in a phone interview.
     
    http://www.ibtimes.com/after-charlie-hebdo-attack-being-muslim-france-may-have-become-much-harder-1776482

    these attacks are often the work of converts

    Often?

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  67. @Dave Pinsen
    The NYT did bury news of the holocaust as it was happening.

    The NYT did bury news of the holocaust as it was happening.

    The NYT was hardly alone. It is curious, is it not, that “news of the holocaust” didn’t appear in the media and culture until decades after “it was happening.”

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    It is curious, is it not, that “news of the holocaust” didn’t appear in the media and culture until decades after “it was happening.”

    "Decades after" would be the spring of 1945.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tGwjwK9pIM


    (You got yourself another loon, Steve).

    , @A non
    Strange also that Churchill didn't even mention the Holocaust in his multi-volume history of the Second World War.

    It's seen as *the* central factor NOW, but oddly enough the actual combatants didn't think so at the time.
    , @Dave Pinsen

    The NYT was hardly alone. It is curious, is it not, that “news of the holocaust” didn’t appear in the media and culture until decades after “it was happening.”
     
    The news did appear, it was just buried within the paper. It didn't get the attention of, say, one death in Ferguson, MO in 2014.

    You can see for yourself. The NYT has a search feature. Put in dates between 1939 and 1945 and search for "Jews" and "killed" or "slain". You'll get articles like this one: "10,000 KAUNAS JEWS SLAIN IN ONE NIGHT" ( http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9E01E5DE1639E033A05757C0A9679C946493D6CF ), which appeared on p.11 (doesn't say of what section), and this, "JEWS OF 5 TOWNS KILLED IN POLAND; 35,000 Persons Reported Slain in German Liquidation of Cities' Ghettos CHURCH IS 'REORGANIZED' Repressions Grow in Albania and Yugoslavia -- Belgians Kill 5 Nazi Officers and Men" ( http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9901E4D81630E53BBC4951DFB5668388659EDE ), which was p.10 news.

    Holocaust denial is special kind of idiocy. You know there were censuses of Jews in Europe before the war, and there were millions fewer of them in Europe after the war, and not as many who emigrated elsewhere. Where do you think the rest went? To Mars? What about all the mass graves? Faked? The photos the Germans took of the piles of bodies in ditches? Faked too? You might as well argue that the Civil War never happened.
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  68. To those of you here expressing doubt that a backlash could ever occur, doubt no more. It’s already here. For those of you explicitly pining for a backlash, I hope you’re happy.

    http://rt.com/news/220795-france-blast-mosque-restaurant/

    http://rt.com/news/220819-attack-mosque-france-paris/

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    • Replies: @donut
    " An explosion has been reported in a kebab shop near a mosque in Villefranche-sur-Saone, eastern France "

    Maybe the perpetrator was a food critic rather than anti immigrant.
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  69. Remarkably enough, the publishing company founded to produce Charlie Hebdo in 1992 was called Les Éditions Kalachnikof.

    -5371

    This entire affair is drenched in irony.

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  70. Olivier Roy, a French scholar of Islam and radicalism, called the Paris assault [...] “a quantitative and therefore qualitative turning point,” noting the target and the number of victims. “This was a maximum-impact attack,” he said. “They did this to shock the public, and in that sense they succeeded.”

    But isn’t this analysis obviously wrong? They didn’t do it to shock the public: they did it out of vengeance. They sought out specific victims by name in order to exact Allah’s punishment for the victims’ crimes against Islam, and they said so. The other victims–and the public’s shock, for that matter–were just collateral damage.

    In other words, the attack was religious in nature, which I guess is the truth that’s being evaded in that quote. The murderers succeeded all right–just not how Mr. Roy says (and perhaps even thinks) they did.

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  71. @PapayaSF

    “But when you see this other Islam, with the jihadists, I don’t see peace, I see hatred. So people can’t tell which is the real Islam.”
     
    It's two mints in one. They're both "real." In essence, a billion Muslims are running a Good Cop/Bad Cop routine on the world. The Good Islamic Cop (like all "enlightened," "non-bigoted" people) tells us that Muslims are mostly peaceful, that we have nothing to fear, and we'd better listen to him, because Bad Islamic Cop is a terrorist who will only be angrier if we don't. We should listen to Good Islamic Cop and do what he asks. It's only rational.

    The analogy isn't perfect, because Bad Islamic Cops have been killing lots of Good Islamic Cops from the very start. But from the point of view of non-Muslims, does that matter much? Because in the end, both cops are on the same team.

    You’re implying coordination. Most religions have extreme members. The problem is that Islam’s extremists are fine with killing people (Christianity’s no longer are), and that political correctness keeps us from calling attention to it.

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  72. @Harry Baldwin
    If instead of a sophisticated, military-style strike Wednesday on a French newspaper known for satirizing Islam, it was a strike on the Islam-enabling New York Times, and ten of its staff were murdered, would the surviving members of the editorial board take the same stance they do here? Is there a point at which the NYT could entertain the thought that perhaps Muslims don't make good additions to Western societies?

    “..would the surviving members of the editorial board take the same stance..”

    Yes, and they’d place the blame squarely on the right.

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  73. Wikipedia has a good summary of the surveys done on Muslim populations in both non-Muslim and Muslim countries in which Muslims are asked whether killing civilians in defence of Islam is justified. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muslim_attitudes_towards_terrorism

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  74. @Bill P
    I read up a bit on Charlie Hebdo and, well, they were really pushing it to the limit. Many of the cartoons are flat out obscene, such as depictions of Jesus sodomizing God, Marine Le Pen with a Hitler mustache for pubes, Mahomet presenting his anus for sodomy, etc. Additionally, their "serious" content was so far left it might as well have been an outhouse book for the New Republic crowd.

    "Coco" (Corinne Rey), the woman who let the assassins in the office when they threatened her, had repeatedly lampooned French police as losers with some phallic inadequacy. I wonder how she feels now that two of them were murdered on the street for protecting her.

    The Muslims chose a pretty unsympathetic target, which was strategically a savvy move. Just about the only thing I can say for publications editor Stephane "Charb" Charbonnier is that he was no coward, and he was an equal opportunity debaser of all things sacred. Given Charlie Hebdo's persistent violation of taboos, including those concerning speaking ill of the dead (they were briefly banned in 1970 for mocking the death of Charles de Gaulle), these guys are fair game for criticism despite having just been slaughtered. I mean, what is the point of provocation except to provoke?

    In comparison to his ideological fellow travelers, Charb was exceptional for not being a hypocrite, as those on the left are typically the most censorious of all these days when it comes to their own sacred cows. Charlie Hebdo was really an old-school counterculture magazine that is out of place in the contemporary Orwellian leftist atmosphere.

    In a sense, one could say that the leftist mantra that "we cannot tolerate intolerance" is partially responsible for these killings. Not only do certain groups - egged on by white anti-racists - now feel legally entitled to respect, anyone with a grievance can now justify retaliation based on what they personally feel slighted by. Say, for example, someone in the US were murdered for portraying MLK taking it up the butt. Does anyone seriously believe that the victim would be held up by leftists as a martyr for free speech? And MLK is sacred only to about 0.03 times as many people as Mahomet.

    That being the case, doesn't it follow that Muslims would feel justified in taking action against those who offend them?

    Maybe in the long run these guys at Charlie Hebdo did us all a favor by pushing the cult of the profane to the point of absurdity so that we can see it all the more clearly for what it was. Too bad Charb isn't around anymore to draw a parody of his and his staff's grisly demise -- that would be a proper epitaph for the bygone era that gave rise to Charlie Hebdo. And I mean that in a sincerely nostalgic, if ambivalent, way.

    Well said. It’s a shame they were gunned down, but my objection is more on general principles. People shouldn’t just be gunned down in our streets. They were hard left, anti religion, pro mass immigration, anti French nationalism. 68ers to a man.

    I am not Charlie.

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  75. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Sorry to keep banging on about the admirable martial daring of that raid, a position which I know leaves me with no friends or supporters here, but please for argument’s sake bear with me.
    Throughout recorded and unrecorded history, the chief determining factor deciding whether warfare was successful or unsuccessful has been martial daring, determination, selfless bravery, discipline and well drilled, well honed efficiency and coolness under fire. This believe it or not and not massed ranks of grunts dying and fighting in the slaughter of attrition, is the decisive factor.
    Such was known to the ancients, hence the cult of the hero and warrior common to ancient peoples all over the world. For good reason did the Greeks deify the hero into the demi-god.
    On such countless, nameless acts, fought many many times in history were empires forged, language families spread around the world, and the general pattern of y-DNA chromosomes established.
    It’s all about wolves and sheep. To the wolves go the riches, the glories, the women and the immortality of spread genes. To the sheep goes an eternity of helotry, working to death in galleys and salt mines and having your women banged every which way till doomsday by exotic dick.

    As a rather unfit, myopic middle aged male, yes I admit in indulging in war porn and a youth misspent in reading Battle, Action and the infamous War Action Picture Library series, so notorious as those little booklets in UK newsagents embossed with the SAS dagger and chock full of lantern jawed Hun killers.
    Yes, it was all about adolescent wank fodder featuring the SAS the SBS and the Royal Marine Commandoes.

    Anyway more seriously, my real point if you’ve waded this far and Steve allows it is that one why I am so contemptuous of the modern left and the ‘equalities’ agenda it’s trying to foist upon the western world, is that by legalistically imposing the superiority of women over men, it’s making western man in to the ultimate pussified sheep to be devoured by the wolves.
    The illustrious ancestors of the Algerian Hebdo killers were, of course, Barbary corsairs, the ultimate wolves, who captured and enslaved thousands of coastal dwelling white French sheep, in centuries gone by.

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    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    "Throughout recorded and unrecorded history, the chief determining factor deciding whether warfare was successful or unsuccessful has been martial daring, determination, selfless bravery, discipline and well drilled, well honed efficiency and coolness under fire. This believe it or not and not massed ranks of grunts dying and fighting in the slaughter of attrition, is the decisive factor."

    I get your point, but Grant defeated Lee because of massed ranks, masses resources, and attrition.
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  76. What I am waiting for is for a prominent European politician from any party to stand up and say the obvious: that allowing large scale Muslim immigration into Europe was a ghastly mistake, and that Europe would be vastly better off if it had never happened. Have any of them ever had the courage to use the word “mistake”? Even Le Pen and UKIP only seem to hint at this. “Mistake” is a powerful word, and I don’t think anything really positive is going to happen until people start feeling free to use it. Think there is any chance of that happening now?

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  77. Claire Berlinski, Thatcher biographer, tweeted this yesterday…

    “Let me use the words I am not allowed to use on Ricochet. You motherfuckers. We will kill you. Every one of you. Believe it.”

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  78. @Bill P
    I read up a bit on Charlie Hebdo and, well, they were really pushing it to the limit. Many of the cartoons are flat out obscene, such as depictions of Jesus sodomizing God, Marine Le Pen with a Hitler mustache for pubes, Mahomet presenting his anus for sodomy, etc. Additionally, their "serious" content was so far left it might as well have been an outhouse book for the New Republic crowd.

    "Coco" (Corinne Rey), the woman who let the assassins in the office when they threatened her, had repeatedly lampooned French police as losers with some phallic inadequacy. I wonder how she feels now that two of them were murdered on the street for protecting her.

    The Muslims chose a pretty unsympathetic target, which was strategically a savvy move. Just about the only thing I can say for publications editor Stephane "Charb" Charbonnier is that he was no coward, and he was an equal opportunity debaser of all things sacred. Given Charlie Hebdo's persistent violation of taboos, including those concerning speaking ill of the dead (they were briefly banned in 1970 for mocking the death of Charles de Gaulle), these guys are fair game for criticism despite having just been slaughtered. I mean, what is the point of provocation except to provoke?

    In comparison to his ideological fellow travelers, Charb was exceptional for not being a hypocrite, as those on the left are typically the most censorious of all these days when it comes to their own sacred cows. Charlie Hebdo was really an old-school counterculture magazine that is out of place in the contemporary Orwellian leftist atmosphere.

    In a sense, one could say that the leftist mantra that "we cannot tolerate intolerance" is partially responsible for these killings. Not only do certain groups - egged on by white anti-racists - now feel legally entitled to respect, anyone with a grievance can now justify retaliation based on what they personally feel slighted by. Say, for example, someone in the US were murdered for portraying MLK taking it up the butt. Does anyone seriously believe that the victim would be held up by leftists as a martyr for free speech? And MLK is sacred only to about 0.03 times as many people as Mahomet.

    That being the case, doesn't it follow that Muslims would feel justified in taking action against those who offend them?

    Maybe in the long run these guys at Charlie Hebdo did us all a favor by pushing the cult of the profane to the point of absurdity so that we can see it all the more clearly for what it was. Too bad Charb isn't around anymore to draw a parody of his and his staff's grisly demise -- that would be a proper epitaph for the bygone era that gave rise to Charlie Hebdo. And I mean that in a sincerely nostalgic, if ambivalent, way.

    It might be interesting to compare this magazine with Der Stuermer.

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  79. “We are told Islam is for God, for peace,” he said. “But when you see this other Islam, with the jihadists, I don’t see peace, I see hatred. So people can’t tell which is the real Islam.” –what a load o’ crap. I hope this person will, from here on out, stop listending to what he is “told” and will start believing his own lying eyes.

    Muslims have been warring against Christendom since the the time of “the Prophet” (may no peace be upon him). One’d think that after one thousand and four-hundred years, folks would have some smidgen of a clue that Islam is to peace what Madeleine Albright is to Sophia Loren. The West has been so lied to about the Crusades, holding those wars against the Catholic Church (as if She started it all), with too few modern, brainwashed Westerners thinking for one minute what the world would be like now if Christians hadn’t defended themselves against Muslim aggression (and, of course, they hear nothing at all about how Jews cooperated with Muslims to take over Spain. We’re told that the Jews got kicked out of Spain because that “virus of antisemitism” flared up. Antiobiotics were in low supply, I guess. Anyway, hence the Inquisition, one of the other of the Three Big Alleged Historical Sins held against the Catholic Church, with the Final Historical Sin being the Galileo affair, which most people don’t have a clue about either). (BTW, the Inquisition had no power whatsoever over Jews or over any other non-Catholic. It was set up mostly to find the false converts — i.e., self-described Catholics who claim to have converted to Christianity but, in fact, didn’t and were working from the inside the Church to undermine it. My understanding is that there were even false “conversos” who got ordained and were preaching the Talmud from the pulpits of Catholic churches. Obviously, something had to be done, for crying out loud. It also had an execution rate that’s on par with the modern State of Texas. Kinda shocking, isn’t it?).

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  80. @Hugh
    The number of dead in Paris is similar to that in your own Fort Hood workplace insensitivity incident - and how much did that move the needle?

    I foresee compulsory sensitivity training for the survivors, together with a push for real diversity in the world of satirical journalism.

    “The number of dead in Paris is similar to that in your own Fort Hood workplace insensitivity incident – and how much did that move the needle?”

    Mitt Romney didn’t mention Ft. Hood much during his 2012 campaign. He may have not even mentioned it once. He certainly didn’t make it a central issue of his campaign, and by God he didn’t run any commercials about it, and not in a billion years would he have tied it to the issue of immigration – an issue he all but dropped after his (alleged) opposition to illegal immigration help him win the nomination.

    The death toll doesn’t have to be especially large for an act of violence to move the populace. Willie Horton helped George H. W. Bush win the 1988 election, and Horton only killed one person.

    France has a leading party that’s willing to make Islamic thuggery and mass immigration a campaign issue. That party is already leading in the polls. Unlike Ft. Hood, the Charlie Hebdo attack was not a lone wolf operation. Unlike Ft. Hood, there is video of the event that has gotten out to the public.

    Yesterday’s terrorist attack will affect the French elections, and probably those in several other EU countries, starting with the UK.

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    The death toll doesn’t have to be especially large for an act of violence to move the populace. Willie Horton helped George H. W. Bush win the 1988 election, and Horton only killed one person.
    --
    Willie Horton was given furloughs because Michael Dukakis vetoed a measure passed by the Massachusetts legislature to end such furloughs for certain categories of felon, including those serving life. He was very discretely responsible. The Fort Hood massacre was made possible by the inability of the military to contain and expel certain of its bad apples. Much more difficult to identify the responsible parties and policies.
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  81. Daily Mail characterizes the two brother terrorists as dope-smoking, welfare receiving, rapper losers who became radicalized. Sounds pretty similar to the Boston bombers.

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  82. These man-on-the-street interviews are supposed to tell us what everyone thinks so that the wider public never really gets a say. If I lived in Paris near that magazine’s office, I’d be thinking it was really irresponsible and dangerous to allow this magazine to continue to deliberately insult and provoke with pornographic cartoons. Those cartoons aren’t the least bit clever; it sure looks like the whole point was to insult French Muslims. The cartoons about other religions are just cover.

    Whole categories of ideas are off limits nowadays. The “freedom of speech” line is a canard. Over 30 acquaintances of George Zimmerman were interviewed by the FBI to try to find something he might have said sometime that showed a contempt for black people so that the Federal government would have a pretext to prosecute him. Theres a grand jury still ongoing over it.

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  83. Still waiting on all the peaceful Muslims, whose religion of peace has been hijacked, to loudly and visibly demonstrate against these hijackers….still waiting….crickets…

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  84. WhatEvvs [AKA "Bemused"] says:

    This BBC report is good:

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-30694811

    Apparently the country has been in a hyped up state of emotion over the Houellebecq novel. Imagine a country being engaged in literature. Anyway, it’ll be interesting to see how all this plays out. Will it be another Rushdie affair? Will Soumission be translated into English? I really want to read it!

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  85. This attack wasn’t motivated by what the west is doing in the middle east unlike, so we believe, 9/11. Muslims need to be desensitized to jokes about and images of their warlord prophet or they need to be resettled.

    All together now:

    http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Battle_Hymn_of_the_Republic

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    This attack wasn’t motivated by what the west is doing in the middle east unlike, so we believe, 9/11.

    Yeah, those 6,200 American troops stationed in Saudi Arabia (in an amongst the 7-digit population of expats) were such an outrage.
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  86. @Eric Rasmusen
    "When journalists are killed for expressing their views, it is one step away from burning books,"

    Yep. Once terrorists start murdering writers in Paris, it's only a matter of time before someone burns a book. (But not a Koran!)

    I read through this article and didn’t quite catch how wonky this statement is !

    I suppose we can take some small comfort that no copies of Charlie Hebdo were actually BURNED!!!

    A small but very telling example of how Jewish imagery/narrative has become central in western countries

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  87. Fourth doorman of the apocalypse:

    “They want to scare French citizens and prohibit any criticism of religion, so here we are to remind them that religion can be freely criticized,” said Sasha Reingewirtz, 28, president of the Jewish Students Union.

    There seems to be a pattern here, but I can’t quite put my finger on it.

    It’s worse than you think because that group of buffoons the Jewish Student Union has launched legal attacks against:

    -Twitter (to obtain the identity of some users)
    -the Front National
    -nationalist news magazines
    -the author and TV celebrity Eric Zemmour

    and plenty of others for having expressed big bad thoughts about mass immigration

    They’re a lobby that constantly tries to censor whatever they consider to be ‘intolerance’ and they’re openly politically active against the only party that rejects the mass immigration of muslims. And when they can’t censor their opponents they just slander them and the media is happy to participate in the hate campaign

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  88. “5371 says:

    48: Good comment, but Charlie Hebdo operated as an informer on people suspected of breaking the loi Gayssot which makes the expression of unpopular opinions on certain historical topics a criminal offence.”

    I have also read (like most Americans, I never heard of this sordid little rag prior to yesterday) that they called for the banning of the National Front – for the suppression of an entire political party. Charlie Hebdo were not advocates and defenders of free speech, and least not for anyone with whom they disagreed.

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  89. @iSteveFan
    I’m going to go out on a limb and predict that the long-anticipated, never-seen backlash will happen in France. I think the French are far tougher than their freedom-fries/surrender-monkey image in the US. In spit of their elites’ best efforts, the Fr

    I hope so, but I doubt it. I am seeing the ubiquitous 'candlelight vigil' that now surrounds events like this. At this point in the game seeing a mob with torches and pitchforks would be a better indicator of whether or not the French still have a pulse. I hate candlelight vigils.

    “I hate candlelight vigils.”

    Gad, so do I. Nothing says “emasculated society” like a candlelight vigil. Still, I have hope for the French. They’re not the people some glib Anglospheroids like to think they are.

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  90. this is a good img to spread around and put under the noses of masochistic white liberals:

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  91. @Tregon
    When you read neo-con Mark Steyn's searing commentary on this, remember that Steyn is one of those who helped bring it about:

    Steyn calls for the destruction of Europe

    In a selection of my past blog articles on Mark Steyn that I posted yesterday, I just came upon a statement by Steyn about Europe and Islam that may be the most damning thing—about himself—that he’s ever written. In Steyn’s article, written last February, he doesn’t merely express indifference to the prospect of an Islamized Europe (which he has done many times before), and he doesn’t merely express Schadenfreude at the prospect of an Islamized Europe (which he has also done many times before); no, he speaks of an Islamized Europe as a positively good thing for the United States.

    Steyn calls for the destruction of Europe

    Why are you stealing Auster?

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  92. @Anonymous
    Some posters here somehow praise the 'bravery' of Charlie Hebdo for publishing cartoons depicting Muslim religious figures engaged in various acts of obscenity and depravity, as if this was some sort of big deal.

    Firstly, the cartoons are no more sophisticated than what the typical guilty and curious minded 7 year old school boy conjures up guiltily in the dark recesses of his own Freudian imagination. What's so sophisticated about that?

    No the real issue is 'free-speech' concerning real political discourse and real political argument and issues. Here, the French state like the British state has absolutely no qualms about prosecuting the anti immigration dissident right for having the temerity to question the 'wisdom' of mass third world immigration.

    Charlie Hebdo is the literary equivalent of the loud-mouthed bully Scut Farkus from “A Christmas Story.” They bullied all the believers on the block for years until they finally f*cked with the wrong guys. Just because you can be a pain in the a$$ doesn’t mean you should.

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Charlie Hebdo is the literary equivalent of the loud-mouthed bully Scut Farkus from “A Christmas Story.” They bullied all the believers on the block for years until they finally f*cked with the wrong guys. Just because you can be a pain in the a$$ doesn’t mean you should.

    I missed the scene in A Christmas Story where Scut Farkus and 11 of his friends were gunned down (no doubt with a Red Ryder Carbine Action 200-shot Range Model air rifle).
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  93. Well, there appears to be some backlash. I’m sure the media’s going to exploit it to its fullest.

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  94. Russian blogger El-Murid (a.k.a. Anatolii Evgenievich Nesmijan) via “Google translate”:
    *
    Marine Le Pen has offered to return the death penalty. However, rather timidly and uncertainly, she believes that “let it be; in the present circumstances it is not too much.” As of now, to call for state terror against the radicals even she does not risk.
    *
    Exactly the same thing happened a month ago in Pakistan. Pakistan is difficult to surprise by attacks, but demonstrative military shooting children in school in Peshawar was too much even for that country. After that, without any democracy they canceled moratorium on the death penalty [].
    *
    Meanwhile Europeans are not ready for adequate measures to the challenges that they themselves created. But the fact that we are talking about the possibility of failure of the highest values enshrined today’s Europe, says a lot. A stone creates an avalanche. One phrase may be followed by others, aimed at the very essence of what is happening: on the laws that allow to introduce alien cultural codes, immigration laws, toughening responsibility for the misuse of freedom of speech and other democratic values.
    *
    In the case of tightening by French state not only Islamists would be subjected, but angry minority in Europe – all sorts of gays, feminists, scoffer and other trash and dead-end development. That is why Le Pen’s opponents are not only strangers of other cultures, but their own fellow citizens, for whom boundless freedom is self-worth. You can predict that in their confrontation with Le Pen, we will observe touching unanimity between buggers and Wahhabis – these proposals from the right are a knife in the heart for both groups.
    *
    The only thing that can comfort them is the fact that the current government of France and the European officials as a whole is not only not willing to change, but they will resist by uniting with the very terrorists against which they formally call to fight. The paradox of post-industrial world – but it’s true.
    *
    In fact, the French government in essence do not care deeply for what happened. Just because the French were killed, it demonstrates concern. However, “Today we are all Charly” – these are only words. Nobody is trying to pronounce them in relation to the cut off in East Ukraine residents of Donetsk and Lugansk, terrorist attack in Grozny, where exactly the same Islamists tried to kill ordinary citizens of the city. Those events did not disturb public opinion and governments of euro-states. By the way, so it is unclear why we in Russia should be greater French than the French themselves.
    *
    Islamism is quite necessary for euro-bureaucrats as a tool with which to address economic and financial crisis. In order to arrange “force majeure”, which can justify the refusal to pay debts. One has little doubt that the global default is not far off. The Bretton Woods system, based on the fact that the dollar system must continually introduce new assets, has died. That is, it is formally still exists, but it does not have the assets, which can prolong its life. Systemic crisis of the Bretton Woods can be extended for some time, but all drugs have been exhausted – US QE stopped working, they were rejected. There are no other tools.
    *
    Years of 2015 and 2016 are referred to the point where the West will have to decide on a default, the last way to restart the failed project of global domination. The dispute is solely about scenarios of how the default will be issued – whether by running deflationary or inflationary model, and each of them has its ramifications on their sub-variants. However, the most important condition of default is to create a “force majeure”. World War II in today’s environment – too dangerous way to create such circumstances. No one is ready to WW. In this case, the Islamist radicals of the type or the same Bandera, ready to unleash a series of local conflicts or terrorist wars, become a convenient tool for the promotion of default scenarios.
    *
    That’s why no one seriously will fight the terrorists, and Marine Le Pen can say whatever she wants. As soon as she goes to action – they will quickly shorten her language, and her hands. Therefore, it is so timid and abstract.

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  95. Gyppers?

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  96. I am not aware of any backlash happening in any of such events, as far as I am aware the worst that ever happened was some graffiti on a mosque or some people marching in protest.

    It would be nice if there really was a backlash for a change, but the leftist elite have got the population so well controlled I don’t see a backlash, I seriously believe that not even a nuclear attack would change the majority from their sedation.

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  97. Idiot, derived from Old French idiote.

    Why should a jihadist massacre shock the bourgeoisie? Did the French think jihadists only parked cars and waited tables?

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  98. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Of course, such is the sheer size and scale of France’s Muslim population, not to mention the rapidity of its increase, any who really, seriously entertains the notion that France will somehow ‘repatriate’ the Muslim population, is a poor, deluded fool.
    The task is simply impossible – under any possible, conceivable scenario.
    The Muslim takeover of France is now an inevitability that cannot be avoided or denied.
    The only question is ‘how violent band bloody will it be?’

    If the French had taken action in that highly significant year of 1968, the year of the Powell speech, incidentally, then they might have had a chance of saving themselves.

    The best that can be said is that the real time, real life moral lesson of France’s self-made immigration disaster might, somehow, serve as a warning to those very very few European nations that not, as yet, embraced massive third world immigration.

    Rest assured it won’t.

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  99. Something ought to be done about the journalists at the NYT. This, I suggest.

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  100. @Tregon
    When you read neo-con Mark Steyn's searing commentary on this, remember that Steyn is one of those who helped bring it about:

    Steyn calls for the destruction of Europe

    In a selection of my past blog articles on Mark Steyn that I posted yesterday, I just came upon a statement by Steyn about Europe and Islam that may be the most damning thing—about himself—that he’s ever written. In Steyn’s article, written last February, he doesn’t merely express indifference to the prospect of an Islamized Europe (which he has done many times before), and he doesn’t merely express Schadenfreude at the prospect of an Islamized Europe (which he has also done many times before); no, he speaks of an Islamized Europe as a positively good thing for the United States.

    Steyn calls for the destruction of Europe

    @Neo-Connerie, from the exact Steyn article you link:

    Bush wasn’t talking about anti-Semitism in Nebraska, but about France, where for three years there’s been a sustained campaign of synagogue burning and cemetery desecration, and Germany, where the Berlin police advise Jewish residents not to go out in public wearing any identifying marks of their faith.

    He is commenting on, but definitely not “[calling] for the destruction of Europe” as you claim. He is horrified at the destruction of western civilization and horrified at the lack of freedom for a Jew to openly walk through Berlin. Steyn didn’t help bring this about at all.

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  101. In Israel, a Palestinian boy was killed in retaliation for the murder of three Jews. Tit for tat and the people players in the game. Universal male military service and widespread gun ownership make this possible. As people are cratures of habit.

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Universal male military service and widespread gun ownership make this possible.

    Muhammad Abu Khdeir was beaten with a wrench and set on fire, which is not ordinarily how soldiers proceed. Some of his killers were minors and had had no military training.
    , @gzu
    Children. Really?

    Do you really believe you are not occupiers over there?

    Fool.
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  102. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    As an aside, I must remind the NYT that Jews will be the biggest victims of a Muslim and third world dominated France.

    I think they are of aware of it, but they can help themselves. Evolutionary psychology. Scorpion and the frog. It is a hard-wired hatred of Christianity and Christian culture and values.

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    • Replies: @Tracy

    I think they are of aware of it, but they can help themselves. Evolutionary psychology. Scorpion and the frog. It is a hard-wired hatred of Christianity and Christian culture and values.
     
    I posted the original article at my own discussion forum (at the FishEaters website) and included this link to another thread in that same forum: http://www.fisheaters.com/forums/index.php?topic=3466683.0 Check it out. It will aggravate the Hell outta you and out of anyone who has the preservation of the West as a goal. There really is a "cutting off their nose to spite their face" thing going on big time. You've got that sort of stuff -- coupled with a "Jewish residents fleeing" headline at Drudge. The hatred must go really, really deep... (Christians might want to read the trad Catholic take on that hatred, revealed in this article, especially in the "Theological Conclusions" section: http://www.fisheaters.com/mysteryofthejewishpeople.html )

    And, ya know, it's scary, man. On the one hand, European and European-derived people ("EEDs" I call them, so as to not use the word "white" and freak anyone out, something I really encourage others to do so "the discussion" can move forward and accusations of racism can be bypassed!) -- anyway, EEDs need to know the sorts of thing Kevin MacDonald writes about. I'm scared for our future if we don't wake up to all that. On the other hand, I'm scared for the future if we do wake up to all that.

    A thought: The people who seem Hell-bent (quite possibly literally) on destroying what's left of Christendom think collectively. They think, act, and vote as groups. They're allowed to come together as groups in the first place -- are not just allowed to, but encouraged to. But EEDs are denied that and have radical individualism shoved down our throats to boot. So, in essence, we're playing a game in which it's huge monied groups of LGBTQ*$#s, Blacks, Jews, and Muslims against 1. You. And me. As individuals, unable to get together and even name ourselves publicly, let alone act collectively. We do either, and we're "racist" and will have a page dedicated to us at the SPLC website (hence my hope that folks focus on "European" and "European-derived" rather than "white."). Any such coalition gets the "far-right" and "extremist" labels from journalists, with the "wing-nut" type labels in the com-boxes. And that stops us dead in our tracks. Words. The fear of words is the single biggest thing preventing any sort of restoration.

    While I'm here (I hope you don't mind, Steve!): if there are any traditional Catholics out there, visit my website -- http://www.fisheaters.com/ -- and discussion forum (http://www.fisheaters.com/forums ), will ya? There are over 4K members at the forum, but the place needs livelying up! Or, if you're not Catholic but can be respectful about it and like to talk politics and cultural stuff, come on down! It'd be great to some more "iSteve type people" at the place!
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  103. @Pseudonymic Handle
    It seems that there is no provocation by Muslims or other protected classes that the Megaphone would consider a legitimate cause for backlash. I'm certain that even a nuclear weapon or bio attack by "extremists" would not even qualify.

    At the same time, the slightest current microaggression or ancient deed, no matter how fictitious, by a forebear of the traditional host nation stock is worthy of onerous laws/persecutions/moral panics/blood libels supported 100% by TPTB.

    Had this tyranny been prognosticated 30 years ago, the reasonable person would have predicted a violent revolution well in advance of the current state. But still, people say that a counterreaction is inevitable.

    I'm not so sure. Oppressive institutions, e.g, serfdom, have demonstrated centuries-long staying power.

    The eternal boot in the face is now. And one can't even advise "get used to it" since everyone already seems quite accustomed to living under this regime, albeit with a little anonymous Internet grumbling to let off steam.

    I’m sure you are right. One has to remember that 9/11 was intended to topple those buildings while full, around 50,000 people. It was just “bad luck” (from al Qaeda’s perspective) that the buildings stood for so long and allowed most of the intended victims to escape. In that sense, it was an attack with weapon’s of mass destruction. Backlash worries commenced before the rubble pile cooled.

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  104. ymous-1:07 pm- “marital daring of that raid”. What are you blabbering about? Those were unarmed civilians, real easy pickings. Our common bank robbers have more daring. Get off the war porn and go to the gym.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The Taliban raiders who blew up five U.S. Marine Corp jump jets at the cost of 14 out of 15 commandos dead showed some daring and organization, and even they were helped along by picking on the Tongan weak link in the perimeter.
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  105. Crassus [AKA "ergrot"] says:

    Guarding democracy from corruption and violence is a job shared by law enforcement and the press. On Tuesday, The New York Times editorial board demanded that the police take greater physical risks, proactively patrolling high-crime neighborhoods even though doing so risks a violent backlash from minority communities. Wednesday’s terroristic response to religious satire in Paris unmasked a serious double standard at the NYT. Images and phrases offensive to Muslims led to the biggest worldwide news story of the month, and yet the New York Times has so far refrained from reporting any meaningful information on what triggered the shootings in Paris. They have not published the incendiary phrases and cartoons about Islam that led to the massacre at a French newspaper week, or to the bombing of the same French newspaper 2011.

    A reader might want to know, “What kinds of things did the French newspaper print that led to their headquarters getting repeatedly bombed and shot up by Muslims?” That question is left largely unanswered. Giving few details, the NYT just tells readers that Charlie Hebdo published things offensive to Muslims, but assures readers that Charlie Hebdo was not racist.

    And yet we have become used to the NYT reporting minute details when there is any question of white bigotry — or perceived white bigotry — being the heart of a news story: “A white officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager.” We have come to expect that the judgment of what counts as racist is a nuanced thing. Readers have been asked to sift through all kinds of information to evaluate for themselves whether George Zimmerman and Owen Wilson acted with racist intent. With Charlie Hebdo, NYT readers must be content knowing little more that “satire” was often employed in this foreign-language newspaper.

    Apparently the NYT editorial board lacks bravery in the face of doing their job. They should either reprint the cartoons and offensive statements of Charlie Hebdo, or they should issue an apology for Tuesday’s editorial berating the NYPD.

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    • Replies: @Forbes

    Apparently the NYT editorial board lacks bravery in the face of doing their job. They should either reprint the cartoons and offensive statements of Charlie Hebdo, or they should issue an apology for Tuesday’s editorial berating the NYPD.
     
    For the NYTimes, it's all about The Narrative. Expecting consistency and logic from the NYTimes would be akin to expecting a snow storm on the fourth of July--ain't gonna happen.

    Consistency at the NYTimes is demonstrated by editorials that say the police should ease-up on "broken windows" enforcement, then when tickets for violations decline, the editorialists remonstrate the police, and tell them to do their jobs.

    The NYTimes isn't in the news business--they do journalism, which amounts to telling stories that reflect The Narrative about how life should be. Actual events of the day don't appear to have any impact on NYTimes journalistic product.
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  106. @Anonymous

    As an aside, I must remind the NYT that Jews will be the biggest victims of a Muslim and third world dominated France.
     
    I think they are of aware of it, but they can help themselves. Evolutionary psychology. Scorpion and the frog. It is a hard-wired hatred of Christianity and Christian culture and values.

    I think they are of aware of it, but they can help themselves. Evolutionary psychology. Scorpion and the frog. It is a hard-wired hatred of Christianity and Christian culture and values.

    I posted the original article at my own discussion forum (at the FishEaters website) and included this link to another thread in that same forum: http://www.fisheaters.com/forums/index.php?topic=3466683.0 Check it out. It will aggravate the Hell outta you and out of anyone who has the preservation of the West as a goal. There really is a “cutting off their nose to spite their face” thing going on big time. You’ve got that sort of stuff — coupled with a “Jewish residents fleeing” headline at Drudge. The hatred must go really, really deep… (Christians might want to read the trad Catholic take on that hatred, revealed in this article, especially in the “Theological Conclusions” section: http://www.fisheaters.com/mysteryofthejewishpeople.html )

    And, ya know, it’s scary, man. On the one hand, European and European-derived people (“EEDs” I call them, so as to not use the word “white” and freak anyone out, something I really encourage others to do so “the discussion” can move forward and accusations of racism can be bypassed!) — anyway, EEDs need to know the sorts of thing Kevin MacDonald writes about. I’m scared for our future if we don’t wake up to all that. On the other hand, I’m scared for the future if we do wake up to all that.

    A thought: The people who seem Hell-bent (quite possibly literally) on destroying what’s left of Christendom think collectively. They think, act, and vote as groups. They’re allowed to come together as groups in the first place — are not just allowed to, but encouraged to. But EEDs are denied that and have radical individualism shoved down our throats to boot. So, in essence, we’re playing a game in which it’s huge monied groups of LGBTQ*$#s, Blacks, Jews, and Muslims against 1. You. And me. As individuals, unable to get together and even name ourselves publicly, let alone act collectively. We do either, and we’re “racist” and will have a page dedicated to us at the SPLC website (hence my hope that folks focus on “European” and “European-derived” rather than “white.”). Any such coalition gets the “far-right” and “extremist” labels from journalists, with the “wing-nut” type labels in the com-boxes. And that stops us dead in our tracks. Words. The fear of words is the single biggest thing preventing any sort of restoration.

    While I’m here (I hope you don’t mind, Steve!): if there are any traditional Catholics out there, visit my website — http://www.fisheaters.com/ — and discussion forum (http://www.fisheaters.com/forums ), will ya? There are over 4K members at the forum, but the place needs livelying up! Or, if you’re not Catholic but can be respectful about it and like to talk politics and cultural stuff, come on down! It’d be great to some more “iSteve type people” at the place!

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  107. @102

    Sorry, can’t help themselves.

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  108. If you go for profit-ism, you can do so much but there’s so much you can’t say.

    If you go for prophet-ism, you can say anything but don’t have the means to be heard.

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  109. Nerd cool: nerdique.

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  110. Now then.

    With events such as these combined with various European nations’ citizenry who are concerned about the rising immigration numbers over the last several decades, is it any wonder why Japan continues to hold firm and resist the siren call of invite the world and willy nilly open borders? Maybe they know something about preserving their national identity that Western Europe has forgotten?

    Hold the line, island nation. You could just be the Wests best shining hope of how to maintain and preserve one’s native culture and people.

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    • Replies: @colm
    They have the Yakuza to do the dirty work the police can't. American gangs are so fractured by ethnicity that they have no equivalent.
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  111. @p s c
    Marcel Bigeard, Jean de Lattre de Tassigny, Paul Aussaresses. Are there any Frenchmen like these left? If men like these were in charge, the game would be over.

    Or this guy (I think based on Yves Godard):

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  112. @matt
    To those of you here expressing doubt that a backlash could ever occur, doubt no more. It's already here. For those of you explicitly pining for a backlash, I hope you're happy.

    http://rt.com/news/220795-france-blast-mosque-restaurant/

    http://rt.com/news/220819-attack-mosque-france-paris/

    ” An explosion has been reported in a kebab shop near a mosque in Villefranche-sur-Saone, eastern France ”

    Maybe the perpetrator was a food critic rather than anti immigrant.

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  113. There is a National “Unity” march planned for Sunday in Paris but Marine Le Pen and the Front National have been excluded from it. Muslim organizations, on the other hand, are invited to participate.

    Marine Le Pen is leading the Presidential polls with over 30% of the vote. And that was before these attacks.

    This is going to get ugly.

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  114. @Anonymous
    The NYT did bury news of the holocaust as it was happening.

    The NYT was hardly alone. It is curious, is it not, that "news of the holocaust" didn't appear in the media and culture until decades after "it was happening."

    It is curious, is it not, that “news of the holocaust” didn’t appear in the media and culture until decades after “it was happening.”

    “Decades after” would be the spring of 1945.

    (You got yourself another loon, Steve).

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    • Replies: @Udolpho
    So now you have a better half to squabble with.
    , @Hunsdon
    Why, sir, you do yourself to little credit.
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  115. @Whiskey
    In Israel, a Palestinian boy was killed in retaliation for the murder of three Jews. Tit for tat and the people players in the game. Universal male military service and widespread gun ownership make this possible. As people are cratures of habit.

    Universal male military service and widespread gun ownership make this possible.

    Muhammad Abu Khdeir was beaten with a wrench and set on fire, which is not ordinarily how soldiers proceed. Some of his killers were minors and had had no military training.

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  116. @Hapalong Cassidy
    "As an aside, I must remind the NYT that Jews will be the biggest victims of a Muslim and third world dominated France."

    For the Zionists, this is a feature, not a bug. An integral part of their narrative is that Israel is the only place in the world that is truly safe for Jews. So Jews better hurry up and move to Israel pronto.

    Granted, the overwhelming majority of Jews do not see it this way and have no more desire to see themselves or their brethren slaughtered than you or I would. But the Sheldon Adelsons of the world who sit behind their gated walls could care less if some of their overseas co-ethnics get massacred, as long as it serves the higher purpose.

    “As an aside, I must remind the NYT that Jews will be the biggest victims of a Muslim and third world dominated France.”

    For the Zionists, this is a feature, not a bug. An integral part of their narrative is that Israel is the only place in the world that is truly safe for Jews. So Jews better hurry up and move to Israel pronto.

    I find it a little ironic how French Jews seem to be leaving for Israel while Israeli Jews are moving to Germany. Maybe it’s because a lot of French Jews these days are of North African background and they’re turned off by the PC attitudes in Germany, whereas young hipster Israelis might be turned off by what they see as excessive nationalism and religious intrusion in Israel –not as much of a feature in modern Germany, especially in places like Berlin.

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  117. @Anonymous
    Charlie Hebdo is the literary equivalent of the loud-mouthed bully Scut Farkus from "A Christmas Story." They bullied all the believers on the block for years until they finally f*cked with the wrong guys. Just because you can be a pain in the a$$ doesn't mean you should.

    Charlie Hebdo is the literary equivalent of the loud-mouthed bully Scut Farkus from “A Christmas Story.” They bullied all the believers on the block for years until they finally f*cked with the wrong guys. Just because you can be a pain in the a$$ doesn’t mean you should.

    I missed the scene in A Christmas Story where Scut Farkus and 11 of his friends were gunned down (no doubt with a Red Ryder Carbine Action 200-shot Range Model air rifle).

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  118. @David
    This attack wasn't motivated by what the west is doing in the middle east unlike, so we believe, 9/11. Muslims need to be desensitized to jokes about and images of their warlord prophet or they need to be resettled.

    All together now:

    http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Battle_Hymn_of_the_Republic

    This attack wasn’t motivated by what the west is doing in the middle east unlike, so we believe, 9/11.

    Yeah, those 6,200 American troops stationed in Saudi Arabia (in an amongst the 7-digit population of expats) were such an outrage.

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    • Replies: @Udolpho
    You really don't get why people would object to a foreign country's soldiers (and all the soldiershines that entails) more or less permanently based in your country as an advance force, do you? You must be similarly puzzled why the Japs routinely express unhappiness about the American military presence there. You're just plain not bright.

    You know, instapundit.com might be more your speed.
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  119. @Wilkey
    "The number of dead in Paris is similar to that in your own Fort Hood workplace insensitivity incident – and how much did that move the needle?"

    Mitt Romney didn't mention Ft. Hood much during his 2012 campaign. He may have not even mentioned it once. He certainly didn't make it a central issue of his campaign, and by God he didn't run any commercials about it, and not in a billion years would he have tied it to the issue of immigration - an issue he all but dropped after his (alleged) opposition to illegal immigration help him win the nomination.

    The death toll doesn't have to be especially large for an act of violence to move the populace. Willie Horton helped George H. W. Bush win the 1988 election, and Horton only killed one person.

    France has a leading party that's willing to make Islamic thuggery and mass immigration a campaign issue. That party is already leading in the polls. Unlike Ft. Hood, the Charlie Hebdo attack was not a lone wolf operation. Unlike Ft. Hood, there is video of the event that has gotten out to the public.

    Yesterday's terrorist attack will affect the French elections, and probably those in several other EU countries, starting with the UK.

    The death toll doesn’t have to be especially large for an act of violence to move the populace. Willie Horton helped George H. W. Bush win the 1988 election, and Horton only killed one person.

    Willie Horton was given furloughs because Michael Dukakis vetoed a measure passed by the Massachusetts legislature to end such furloughs for certain categories of felon, including those serving life. He was very discretely responsible. The Fort Hood massacre was made possible by the inability of the military to contain and expel certain of its bad apples. Much more difficult to identify the responsible parties and policies.

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  120. Liberal hypocrisy over free speech is starting to back fire for them. Basically, they’re allowed to insult Islam (rightly or wrongly) and offend Muslim religious sensibilities, but right wingers can’t say anything remotely bad about Muslims or Muslim immigration. I notice for example, that liberals have nothing negative to say about the Lebanese American porn star who is currently raising hackles in the Middle East for gettin’ it on in Islamic head gear.

    However, the result of this double standard is that fundamentalist Muslims are attacking liberals, while ignoring the the censored nationalists who can quietly go about building up their support base. It’s a bit like how the western left supported Stalin while he was busy knocking off Jews and other liberal Russians who were getting in the way of his drive to nationalise communism.

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  121. @Hapalong Cassidy
    "As an aside, I must remind the NYT that Jews will be the biggest victims of a Muslim and third world dominated France."

    For the Zionists, this is a feature, not a bug. An integral part of their narrative is that Israel is the only place in the world that is truly safe for Jews. So Jews better hurry up and move to Israel pronto.

    Granted, the overwhelming majority of Jews do not see it this way and have no more desire to see themselves or their brethren slaughtered than you or I would. But the Sheldon Adelsons of the world who sit behind their gated walls could care less if some of their overseas co-ethnics get massacred, as long as it serves the higher purpose.

    Granted, the overwhelming majority of Jews do not see it this way

    About 35% of the world’s Jews live in Israel as we speak and it’s a reasonable wager the size of the Jewish population in Israel will over take that in the U.S. in about 15 years time.

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    • Replies: @HA
    About 35% of the world’s Jews live in Israel as we speak and it’s a reasonable wager the size of the Jewish population in Israel will over take that in the U.S. in about 15 years time.

    If you have no problem extrapolating population trends out into the future, then you should probably reconsider the “They’re-only-6%-of-the-population” line you keep pushing with respect to Europe’s Muslims.

    By the way, how’s that 6% working out for you as of Wednesday?

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  122. @Anonymous
    Sorry to keep banging on about the admirable martial daring of that raid, a position which I know leaves me with no friends or supporters here, but please for argument's sake bear with me.
    Throughout recorded and unrecorded history, the chief determining factor deciding whether warfare was successful or unsuccessful has been martial daring, determination, selfless bravery, discipline and well drilled, well honed efficiency and coolness under fire. This believe it or not and not massed ranks of grunts dying and fighting in the slaughter of attrition, is the decisive factor.
    Such was known to the ancients, hence the cult of the hero and warrior common to ancient peoples all over the world. For good reason did the Greeks deify the hero into the demi-god.
    On such countless, nameless acts, fought many many times in history were empires forged, language families spread around the world, and the general pattern of y-DNA chromosomes established.
    It's all about wolves and sheep. To the wolves go the riches, the glories, the women and the immortality of spread genes. To the sheep goes an eternity of helotry, working to death in galleys and salt mines and having your women banged every which way till doomsday by exotic dick.

    As a rather unfit, myopic middle aged male, yes I admit in indulging in war porn and a youth misspent in reading Battle, Action and the infamous War Action Picture Library series, so notorious as those little booklets in UK newsagents embossed with the SAS dagger and chock full of lantern jawed Hun killers.
    Yes, it was all about adolescent wank fodder featuring the SAS the SBS and the Royal Marine Commandoes.

    Anyway more seriously, my real point if you've waded this far and Steve allows it is that one why I am so contemptuous of the modern left and the 'equalities' agenda it's trying to foist upon the western world, is that by legalistically imposing the superiority of women over men, it's making western man in to the ultimate pussified sheep to be devoured by the wolves.
    The illustrious ancestors of the Algerian Hebdo killers were, of course, Barbary corsairs, the ultimate wolves, who captured and enslaved thousands of coastal dwelling white French sheep, in centuries gone by.

    “Throughout recorded and unrecorded history, the chief determining factor deciding whether warfare was successful or unsuccessful has been martial daring, determination, selfless bravery, discipline and well drilled, well honed efficiency and coolness under fire. This believe it or not and not massed ranks of grunts dying and fighting in the slaughter of attrition, is the decisive factor.”

    I get your point, but Grant defeated Lee because of massed ranks, masses resources, and attrition.

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  123. The growing resentments

    toward…

    supporters of jihadist organizations

    are…

    propelled in part by a moribund economy and high unemployment, as well as increasing immigration and more porous borders.

    So the jihadist organizations are the cause of a moribund economy, high unemployment, etc., and this growing resentment hasn’t been triggered by anything more specific?

    Wasn’t there something in the news on Wednesday? Hmm…

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  124. The debate has not changed for the last two decades. The mainstream right in the US makes noises about standing for freedom of speech. No mention of immigration restriction. They will not say anything that might jeopardize their funders’ access to cheap foreign labor. The left is concerned with Islamophobia and the rise of “far right” parties.

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  125. “I am not aware of any backlash happening in any of such events, as far as I am aware the worst that ever happened was some graffiti on a mosque or some people marching in protest.

    It would be nice if there really was a backlash for a change, but the leftist elite have got the population so well controlled I don’t see a backlash, I seriously believe that not even a nuclear attack would change the majority from their sedation.”

    Too bad Europeans do not have a zero tolerance policy in regards to Muslim Chimp Outs like they do in Israel, China, and Burma/Myanmar. European Goyims need to grow a spine in regards to standing up to Muslim extremists in Europe.

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  126. Read More
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  127. @Hapalong Cassidy
    "As an aside, I must remind the NYT that Jews will be the biggest victims of a Muslim and third world dominated France."

    For the Zionists, this is a feature, not a bug. An integral part of their narrative is that Israel is the only place in the world that is truly safe for Jews. So Jews better hurry up and move to Israel pronto.

    Granted, the overwhelming majority of Jews do not see it this way and have no more desire to see themselves or their brethren slaughtered than you or I would. But the Sheldon Adelsons of the world who sit behind their gated walls could care less if some of their overseas co-ethnics get massacred, as long as it serves the higher purpose.

    Exactly!

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  128. @Anonymous
    The NYT did bury news of the holocaust as it was happening.

    The NYT was hardly alone. It is curious, is it not, that "news of the holocaust" didn't appear in the media and culture until decades after "it was happening."

    Strange also that Churchill didn’t even mention the Holocaust in his multi-volume history of the Second World War.

    It’s seen as *the* central factor NOW, but oddly enough the actual combatants didn’t think so at the time.

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    • Replies: @WhatEvvs
    I admit that I don't own all six volumes and even if I did, I wouldn't go looking for the reference, but....in October 1942 he said:

    The systematic cruelties to which the Jewish people, men, women and children, have been exposed under the Nazi regime are among the most terrible events of history. Free men and women denounce these vile crimes and when this world struggle ends with the enthronement of human rights, racial persecution will be ended.
     
    http://www.winstonchurchill.org/support/the-churchill-centre/publications/churchill-proceedings/596-churchill-and-the-holocaust-the-possible-and-impossible
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  129. I must admit, my initial take on the “frontlash” when (as far as I know) the word first hoved into view on this blog a couple of weeks ago was that it was the initial atrocity itself, rather than a pre-emption of the almost invariably non-existant “backlash”. I’m fine with it being used to denote the pre-emption – which does need a name – but am just sayin’.

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    • Replies: @ben tillman

    I must admit, my initial take on the “frontlash” when (as far as I know) the word first hoved into view on this blog a couple of weeks ago was that it was the initial atrocity itself, rather than a pre-emption of the almost invariably non-existant “backlash”. I’m fine with it being used to denote the pre-emption – which does need a name – but am just sayin’.
     
    I would say the initial action and the media's post-hoc apologia combine to constitute the "frontlash".
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  130. With the victims of this attack being countercultural far-leftists, I am put in mind of the scene in “Aliens” where the xenomorph kills Carter Burke, who cynically allowed ordinary people to be infiltrated and annihilated by the fearsome beasts, but reckoned that he himself was above meeting such a sticky end.

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  131. @Corvinus
    "What’s the danger of a “backlash”? Does anyone honest-to-God believe that the French are going to start slaughtering Muslims by the score?"

    Perhaps we ought to heed the advice of Brett Stevens--[Europeans must return to its roots--monarchy-] the form of leadership that puts people of noble character and high intelligence into leadership positions and lets them act organically. It is supported by an aristocracy that breeds the best of humanity and puts them in position to assume rule, working their way up from local government to the national level. This cannot exist without a strong national identity, which requires the triad of culture, heritage and values. This is a method of leadership more than a system of government. Government to my mind implies an institution which acts to manage the lives of its citizens, which monarchy does not do. Monarchy leads a nation and wages war against its problems both internal and external. It does not apply the babysitter-cum-disciplinarian role that government takes on. It has basically one punishment, which is that people who do not fit or transgress are sent away. As a result, all punishment is severe and thus rarer. Most modern problems would not exist after 90 days in a monarchy.

    Monarchy? Persons of high character and breeding? Like the king of Spain with half the expected number of great-great-grandparents who couldn’t clean up after himself?

    The other thing I find funny about neoreactionaries is their belief that their chosen monarch wouldn’t put *them* in jail if he found them a threat.

    All the world’s greatest mass murderers–Hitler, Stalin, Mao–have all been dictators. No thank you.

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  132. I actually think a backlash would be healthy.

    Occurring in an organic, grass roots manner, backlashes would be healthy in a number of places, against a number of groups, not only this one.

    An aggressive approach may be the only thing zoological enemies understand and respect.

    But this will not happen, and I will not advocate it, because it would just turn into another colossal cluster*uck.

    The European Homo Sapien Race is too good for that, and thus it is doomed, here on this planet full of dumb wolves.

    (If anyone questions how one can honestly feel this way, they should go to a slaughterhouse and see how the delicious meat they eat is produced. Life is not all pretty. We live because we successfully compete against other life. This is nature. We thrived until now. If you are a vegetarian, well, you are already further down the road to extinction than the rest of us.)

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  133. @anonymous
    @Anonymous-1:07 pm- "marital daring of that raid". What are you blabbering about? Those were unarmed civilians, real easy pickings. Our common bank robbers have more daring. Get off the war porn and go to the gym.

    The Taliban raiders who blew up five U.S. Marine Corp jump jets at the cost of 14 out of 15 commandos dead showed some daring and organization, and even they were helped along by picking on the Tongan weak link in the perimeter.

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    • Replies: @Sean
    The NYT writers are just too clever for us. I'll say it: they are superior.
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  134. @Art Deco
    Granted, the overwhelming majority of Jews do not see it this way

    About 35% of the world's Jews live in Israel as we speak and it's a reasonable wager the size of the Jewish population in Israel will over take that in the U.S. in about 15 years time.

    About 35% of the world’s Jews live in Israel as we speak and it’s a reasonable wager the size of the Jewish population in Israel will over take that in the U.S. in about 15 years time.

    If you have no problem extrapolating population trends out into the future, then you should probably reconsider the “They’re-only-6%-of-the-population” line you keep pushing with respect to Europe’s Muslims.

    By the way, how’s that 6% working out for you as of Wednesday?

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  135. @Jay
    As horrific as this tragedy was, if our diversity becomes a casualty, I think that’s worse.

    Frontlash with General Casey.

    Frontlash with General Casey.

    He was (unfortunately) an example of the Peter Principal at work in the Army. As vice Chief of Staff of the Army, he volunteered to take command of the Iraq War after the initial stage, then the whole theatre fell apart, and had to be rescued by Patraeus and the surge. Casey was then promoted to Army Chief of Staff, i.e. kicked upstairs.

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  136. @p s c
    Marcel Bigeard, Jean de Lattre de Tassigny, Paul Aussaresses. Are there any Frenchmen like these left? If men like these were in charge, the game would be over.

    Oh, that Bigeard who sabotaged the French Commander at Dien Bien Phu and helped the ‘Congs take over it? Forgetaboutit.

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    • Replies: @Hard Line Realist
    Well, there was plenty of blame to go around.

    Failure to secure the hills around them was an obvious problem, and perhaps being unaware that the Chinese captured lots of US 105mm howitzers in Korea was another.
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  137. The much looked forward to final and total extinguishing of European nations is shaping up nicely: immigration and aggressive Frontlash carrying all before it. The ‘far right’ in France and elsewhere is a brocken spectre as shown by them having a grand total of 2 MPs, they would need 200 for power (ditto Ukip). In the last round of the 2002 Presidential vote Le Pen was defeated, because ALL the other parties backed Chirac. Sweden has just did something similar. If it looked like the FN, was going to win big, the rest of the white vote in the left – pro immigrant and the economic right parties would effectively be in coalition with the immigrant vote. the likelihood is that an ostensibly secular- left but actually pro-Islamist party (similar to Britain’s “Respect”) could get into power as part of an anti-FN coalition.

    Ireland has many unemployed and is letting in more immigrants now than ever before. So is Denmark, which some bad jokers will tell you has shown a modern Western economy run on democratic lines can stop the inexorable increase in Third World immigration. Germany currently has immigration at the highest in 20 years yet the anti immigration marchers are being outnumbered by pro immigrant protesters.

    The people who are being hurt by immigration, don’t actually run the countries in which they are the majority. It is higher social class people who steer society and that social class is where the behavioural predispositions necessary for creating the public’s opinions are heavily concentrated.

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    • Replies: @gzu
    "Germany currently has immigration at the highest in 20 years yet the anti immigration marchers are being outnumbered by pro immigrant protesters."

    But most of that immigration is from Europe. The protesters oppose muslim immigration.
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  138. @Steve Sailer
    The Taliban raiders who blew up five U.S. Marine Corp jump jets at the cost of 14 out of 15 commandos dead showed some daring and organization, and even they were helped along by picking on the Tongan weak link in the perimeter.

    The NYT writers are just too clever for us. I’ll say it: they are superior.

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  139. @colm
    Oh, that Bigeard who sabotaged the French Commander at Dien Bien Phu and helped the 'Congs take over it? Forgetaboutit.

    Well, there was plenty of blame to go around.

    Failure to secure the hills around them was an obvious problem, and perhaps being unaware that the Chinese captured lots of US 105mm howitzers in Korea was another.

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  140. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Now then.

    With events such as these combined with various European nations' citizenry who are concerned about the rising immigration numbers over the last several decades, is it any wonder why Japan continues to hold firm and resist the siren call of invite the world and willy nilly open borders? Maybe they know something about preserving their national identity that Western Europe has forgotten?

    Hold the line, island nation. You could just be the Wests best shining hope of how to maintain and preserve one's native culture and people.

    They have the Yakuza to do the dirty work the police can’t. American gangs are so fractured by ethnicity that they have no equivalent.

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  141. SFG: but not monarchs. That said, I’m not thrilled about the idea of kings, either. Maybe something informed by feudal structure, though.

    This CBC article is a nice collection of quotes from experts worried that this massacre in Paris might fuel islamophobia and help Marine Le Pen:

    Charlie Hebdo Paris shooting may deepen ‘naturalized Islamaphobia’
    Right-wing rhetoric in France could ‘destroy’ goodwill among Muslims, experts warn<

    I doubt the right-wingers with the rhetoric mind much if they help turn up the heat. No, the point here is not to get the right-wingers to stop doing anything. It’s to mobilize the left-wingers against them. Create a “backlash,” if you will.

    To those of you here expressing doubt that a backlash could ever occur, doubt no more. It’s already here. For those of you explicitly pining for a backlash, I hope you’re happy.

    Doesn’t make up for 12 bodies, now does it. Happy’s for when they’re all repatriated to their homelands (or wherever), never to be oppressed or harmed or lashed by YT again.

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  142. ymous at 1:07

    Antiracism is just the same old warrior cult in new clothes. Antiracism is about releasing white women from old structures and let them play the “i choose the strongest” game harder then anytime before. Humans, like many animals, have a reproduction system which is based on female choice and male competition. In more conservative societies men have found ways to break the power of women to choose. Men invented the marriage, so that more men could have the possibility to reproduce and not only one alpha reproduced by keeping all the women to himself. Also conservative societies tend to be closed, there is not much migration, thus not much new competition among men.

    Now what antiracists do is enabling migration – which is mainly a thing males do – and let women have much bigger pool of potential men. Women get a better market position, men a worse market position. Also races do differ, especially regarding male attractiveness. Of course male attractiveness is just another word for physical strength, testosterone, aggression. So antiracists encourage women to choose from men of all races, leading of course to imbalances, as the races differ. Because of that antiracism resembles social darwinism. Antiracist want that only the strongest, most fertile do exist anymore. They do not like any barriers which the weaker ones have builded to protect their little share of life from the winner who shall take it all. Such barriers are nation borders, institutions like marriage and so on.

    When antiracists play the game of mercy and seem to care for the weakest they actually don´t do so. They only care for the strongest. But like Siegfried in the Nibelung saga or Achilles every hero has a weakness. The gigantic, strong football player may be not very good in reading or calculating. The race of warriors might not be very good in building nice infrastructures. But in the eyes of antiracists those weaknesses are irrelevant compared to the glory of the strength of the hero. And for them the most precious thing to do is helping are true hero overcome the obstacles he might face. Obstacles like the lack of residency permits or separated living areas which hinder their hero reaching his maximum reproductive power.
    Antiracism is a very human thing…

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    • Replies: @Keith Vaz
    Female sexuality is notoriously mallable. Most reasonable people would agree that Africans are way uglier than Euros and Asians. They look primitive, unrefined and animalistic. But vecause of Frankfurt School propaganda (which is 90% targetted at gullible little White princesses) they have managed to give the most uncivil and ugly race an appearance of 'cool'. Think about Will Smith, Denzel Washington and Morgan Freeman.
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  143. @Art Deco
    It is curious, is it not, that “news of the holocaust” didn’t appear in the media and culture until decades after “it was happening.”

    "Decades after" would be the spring of 1945.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tGwjwK9pIM


    (You got yourself another loon, Steve).

    So now you have a better half to squabble with.

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  144. I hope so, but I doubt it. I am seeing the ubiquitous ‘candlelight vigil’ that now surrounds events like this. At this point in the game seeing a mob with torches and pitchforks would be a better indicator of whether or not the French still have a pulse. I hate candlelight vigils.

    All it’s gonna take is a bomb at one of those candlelight vigils. I don’t think the Muzzies are smart enough to resist, ultimately.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    "All it’s gonna take is a bomb at one of those candlelight vigils."

    Why bother when you are winning? Let them pretend not to surrender, let them feel good about themselves for an hour or two ... because they KNOW they (and we) have sustained a total and unmitigated defeat.

    The only possible way to say "Je Suis Charlie" and actually mean it is to publish en masse the most offensive of the cartoons, for European governments to put the cartoons on billboards all over Europe, including areas with high Muslim population, explaining that while the cartoons are obscene and distasteful, freedom of expression is non-negotiable - and then use State power aggressively and harshly against any non-peaceful expressions of loathing of the cartoons, from petty vandalism to major rioting.

    There's no way our rulers are prepared to do this - after all, the ship sailed a long time ago with the Danish cartoons, and so "lessons will be learned" - i.e don't piss off Islam, because you'll get killed.

    You should see the Guardian and Telegraph cartoons and editorials on the subject - absolutely pathetic.
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  145. @Art Deco
    This attack wasn’t motivated by what the west is doing in the middle east unlike, so we believe, 9/11.

    Yeah, those 6,200 American troops stationed in Saudi Arabia (in an amongst the 7-digit population of expats) were such an outrage.

    You really don’t get why people would object to a foreign country’s soldiers (and all the soldiershines that entails) more or less permanently based in your country as an advance force, do you? You must be similarly puzzled why the Japs routinely express unhappiness about the American military presence there. You’re just plain not bright.

    You know, instapundit.com might be more your speed.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    I think Japanese unhappiness with US military presence is related to the occasional alleged rapes of local women by US servicemen.
    , @Art Deco
    You really don’t get why people would object to a foreign country’s soldiers (and all the soldiershines that entails) more or less permanently based in your country as an advance force, do you?
    --
    No, I do not, because I'm not innumerate. A population of 6,200 troops would be sufficient to occupy a city of about 800,000. The population of Saudi Arabia in 1995 was 19 million, and the country was and is teeming with foreigners (by some accounts 30% of the residents as we speak). The troops were there for 12 years, they were there with the consent of that country's government, and the complainer in chief was a man disowned by his family who'd lived in Afghanistan for 20 years.

    As for Instapundit, he's an accomplished law professor. "More my speed"?. Yes, I had figured out quite a few of you are addled by your conceits.
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  146. @A non
    Strange also that Churchill didn't even mention the Holocaust in his multi-volume history of the Second World War.

    It's seen as *the* central factor NOW, but oddly enough the actual combatants didn't think so at the time.

    I admit that I don’t own all six volumes and even if I did, I wouldn’t go looking for the reference, but….in October 1942 he said:

    The systematic cruelties to which the Jewish people, men, women and children, have been exposed under the Nazi regime are among the most terrible events of history. Free men and women denounce these vile crimes and when this world struggle ends with the enthronement of human rights, racial persecution will be ended.

    http://www.winstonchurchill.org/support/the-churchill-centre/publications/churchill-proceedings/596-churchill-and-the-holocaust-the-possible-and-impossible

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  147. The Muslims should take a page out of the book of Mormon. The Mormons advertised in the playbill of The Book of Mormon:

    http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865561906/LDS-Church-buys-ad-space-in-Book-of-Mormon-musical-playbill.html?pg=all

    The Mormons are such cheerful people. I guess when you are living in your promised land, you are happy.

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  148. @Anonymous
    The NYT did bury news of the holocaust as it was happening.

    The NYT was hardly alone. It is curious, is it not, that "news of the holocaust" didn't appear in the media and culture until decades after "it was happening."

    The NYT was hardly alone. It is curious, is it not, that “news of the holocaust” didn’t appear in the media and culture until decades after “it was happening.”

    The news did appear, it was just buried within the paper. It didn’t get the attention of, say, one death in Ferguson, MO in 2014.

    You can see for yourself. The NYT has a search feature. Put in dates between 1939 and 1945 and search for “Jews” and “killed” or “slain”. You’ll get articles like this one: “10,000 KAUNAS JEWS SLAIN IN ONE NIGHT” ( http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9E01E5DE1639E033A05757C0A9679C946493D6CF ), which appeared on p.11 (doesn’t say of what section), and this, “JEWS OF 5 TOWNS KILLED IN POLAND; 35,000 Persons Reported Slain in German Liquidation of Cities’ Ghettos CHURCH IS ‘REORGANIZED’ Repressions Grow in Albania and Yugoslavia — Belgians Kill 5 Nazi Officers and Men” ( http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9901E4D81630E53BBC4951DFB5668388659EDE ), which was p.10 news.

    Holocaust denial is special kind of idiocy. You know there were censuses of Jews in Europe before the war, and there were millions fewer of them in Europe after the war, and not as many who emigrated elsewhere. Where do you think the rest went? To Mars? What about all the mass graves? Faked? The photos the Germans took of the piles of bodies in ditches? Faked too? You might as well argue that the Civil War never happened.

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    I tend to think holocaust denial is more widespread than it would be in the absence of holocaust denial laws. I personally think at the back of the minds of people pushing for these laws this might have been one of the reasons to do so: to actually push over to denial some conspiracy minded people who would otherwise more or less believe the factuality of the holocaust. If I were leading hasbara operations, I would actively promote 911 truthism and holocaust denial, because the more deranged the most prominent anti-Jewish or anti-Israel opinions seem to be, the less likely that any anti-Jewish or anti-Israel opinions will be accepted by normal people.

    There are of course other reasons for pushing for holocaust denial laws. One reason is that it makes the holocaust a kind of religious taboo, making Holocaustianity the dominant religion of our culture. Also, holocaust denial laws usually outlaw holocaust "relativization" (when you don't revere the holocaust enough or something), cf. what happened to Jean-Marie Le Pen, who never actually denied the holocaust. Another reason is that once free speech has been outlawed in one topic, it's easier to move on to other topics like hate speech or criticizing immigrants.
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  149. @Udolpho
    You really don't get why people would object to a foreign country's soldiers (and all the soldiershines that entails) more or less permanently based in your country as an advance force, do you? You must be similarly puzzled why the Japs routinely express unhappiness about the American military presence there. You're just plain not bright.

    You know, instapundit.com might be more your speed.

    I think Japanese unhappiness with US military presence is related to the occasional alleged rapes of local women by US servicemen.

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  150. @Crassus
    Guarding democracy from corruption and violence is a job shared by law enforcement and the press. On Tuesday, The New York Times editorial board demanded that the police take greater physical risks, proactively patrolling high-crime neighborhoods even though doing so risks a violent backlash from minority communities. Wednesday's terroristic response to religious satire in Paris unmasked a serious double standard at the NYT. Images and phrases offensive to Muslims led to the biggest worldwide news story of the month, and yet the New York Times has so far refrained from reporting any meaningful information on what triggered the shootings in Paris. They have not published the incendiary phrases and cartoons about Islam that led to the massacre at a French newspaper week, or to the bombing of the same French newspaper 2011.

    A reader might want to know, "What kinds of things did the French newspaper print that led to their headquarters getting repeatedly bombed and shot up by Muslims?" That question is left largely unanswered. Giving few details, the NYT just tells readers that Charlie Hebdo published things offensive to Muslims, but assures readers that Charlie Hebdo was not racist.

    And yet we have become used to the NYT reporting minute details when there is any question of white bigotry -- or perceived white bigotry -- being the heart of a news story: "A white officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager." We have come to expect that the judgment of what counts as racist is a nuanced thing. Readers have been asked to sift through all kinds of information to evaluate for themselves whether George Zimmerman and Owen Wilson acted with racist intent. With Charlie Hebdo, NYT readers must be content knowing little more that "satire" was often employed in this foreign-language newspaper.

    Apparently the NYT editorial board lacks bravery in the face of doing their job. They should either reprint the cartoons and offensive statements of Charlie Hebdo, or they should issue an apology for Tuesday's editorial berating the NYPD.

    Apparently the NYT editorial board lacks bravery in the face of doing their job. They should either reprint the cartoons and offensive statements of Charlie Hebdo, or they should issue an apology for Tuesday’s editorial berating the NYPD.

    For the NYTimes, it’s all about The Narrative. Expecting consistency and logic from the NYTimes would be akin to expecting a snow storm on the fourth of July–ain’t gonna happen.

    Consistency at the NYTimes is demonstrated by editorials that say the police should ease-up on “broken windows” enforcement, then when tickets for violations decline, the editorialists remonstrate the police, and tell them to do their jobs.

    The NYTimes isn’t in the news business–they do journalism, which amounts to telling stories that reflect The Narrative about how life should be. Actual events of the day don’t appear to have any impact on NYTimes journalistic product.

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  151. @Dave Pinsen

    The NYT was hardly alone. It is curious, is it not, that “news of the holocaust” didn’t appear in the media and culture until decades after “it was happening.”
     
    The news did appear, it was just buried within the paper. It didn't get the attention of, say, one death in Ferguson, MO in 2014.

    You can see for yourself. The NYT has a search feature. Put in dates between 1939 and 1945 and search for "Jews" and "killed" or "slain". You'll get articles like this one: "10,000 KAUNAS JEWS SLAIN IN ONE NIGHT" ( http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9E01E5DE1639E033A05757C0A9679C946493D6CF ), which appeared on p.11 (doesn't say of what section), and this, "JEWS OF 5 TOWNS KILLED IN POLAND; 35,000 Persons Reported Slain in German Liquidation of Cities' Ghettos CHURCH IS 'REORGANIZED' Repressions Grow in Albania and Yugoslavia -- Belgians Kill 5 Nazi Officers and Men" ( http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9901E4D81630E53BBC4951DFB5668388659EDE ), which was p.10 news.

    Holocaust denial is special kind of idiocy. You know there were censuses of Jews in Europe before the war, and there were millions fewer of them in Europe after the war, and not as many who emigrated elsewhere. Where do you think the rest went? To Mars? What about all the mass graves? Faked? The photos the Germans took of the piles of bodies in ditches? Faked too? You might as well argue that the Civil War never happened.

    I tend to think holocaust denial is more widespread than it would be in the absence of holocaust denial laws. I personally think at the back of the minds of people pushing for these laws this might have been one of the reasons to do so: to actually push over to denial some conspiracy minded people who would otherwise more or less believe the factuality of the holocaust. If I were leading hasbara operations, I would actively promote 911 truthism and holocaust denial, because the more deranged the most prominent anti-Jewish or anti-Israel opinions seem to be, the less likely that any anti-Jewish or anti-Israel opinions will be accepted by normal people.

    There are of course other reasons for pushing for holocaust denial laws. One reason is that it makes the holocaust a kind of religious taboo, making Holocaustianity the dominant religion of our culture. Also, holocaust denial laws usually outlaw holocaust “relativization” (when you don’t revere the holocaust enough or something), cf. what happened to Jean-Marie Le Pen, who never actually denied the holocaust. Another reason is that once free speech has been outlawed in one topic, it’s easier to move on to other topics like hate speech or criticizing immigrants.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    There aren't any laws about holocaust denial in the US, are there? I don't think they're a great idea either, but I can understand why Germany, for example, enacted them. They have a history of lies being used to lay the groundwork for genocide, so they're wary of that happening again. Their choice.
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  152. “The Muslims should take a page out of the book of Mormon. The Mormons advertised in the playbill of The Book of Mormon:

    http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865561906/LDS-Church-buys-ad-space-in-Book-of-Mormon-musical-playbill.html?pg=all

    The Mormons are such cheerful people. I guess when you are living in your promised land, you are happy.

    The fact that very few Mormons are Arab or Black, also explains their cheerful peaceful nonviolent nature. Mormons on average are Amish level type of nice people.

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  153. @reiner Tor
    I tend to think holocaust denial is more widespread than it would be in the absence of holocaust denial laws. I personally think at the back of the minds of people pushing for these laws this might have been one of the reasons to do so: to actually push over to denial some conspiracy minded people who would otherwise more or less believe the factuality of the holocaust. If I were leading hasbara operations, I would actively promote 911 truthism and holocaust denial, because the more deranged the most prominent anti-Jewish or anti-Israel opinions seem to be, the less likely that any anti-Jewish or anti-Israel opinions will be accepted by normal people.

    There are of course other reasons for pushing for holocaust denial laws. One reason is that it makes the holocaust a kind of religious taboo, making Holocaustianity the dominant religion of our culture. Also, holocaust denial laws usually outlaw holocaust "relativization" (when you don't revere the holocaust enough or something), cf. what happened to Jean-Marie Le Pen, who never actually denied the holocaust. Another reason is that once free speech has been outlawed in one topic, it's easier to move on to other topics like hate speech or criticizing immigrants.

    There aren’t any laws about holocaust denial in the US, are there? I don’t think they’re a great idea either, but I can understand why Germany, for example, enacted them. They have a history of lies being used to lay the groundwork for genocide, so they’re wary of that happening again. Their choice.

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    • Replies: @fnn
    BRD/FRG has been a US puppet state from the beginning. They don't need any specific local laws to keep them subservient and docile. Plus almost every country in Europe now has laws against Holocaust Denial.
    , @reiner Tor

    There aren’t any laws about holocaust denial in the US, are there?
     
    Nobody stated the opposite.

    I can understand why Germany, for example, enacted them. They have a history of lies being used to lay the groundwork for genocide
     
    A history of that, like it happened over and over until they decided to outlaw holocaust denial? Or what?

    It is based on one case. No matter what you consider to be the lies that were used to "lay the groundwork for genocide", their nature was quite a bit different, and also they were told by a totalitarian government which came to power for entirely different reasons. There's no reason whatsoever for making the discussion of an historical topic officially taboo under threat of prison.

    And of course it's not like there is or ever was an open debate in Germany about that. So no, it's not their "choice".
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  154. @tsotha

    I hope so, but I doubt it. I am seeing the ubiquitous ‘candlelight vigil’ that now surrounds events like this. At this point in the game seeing a mob with torches and pitchforks would be a better indicator of whether or not the French still have a pulse. I hate candlelight vigils.
     
    All it's gonna take is a bomb at one of those candlelight vigils. I don't think the Muzzies are smart enough to resist, ultimately.

    “All it’s gonna take is a bomb at one of those candlelight vigils.”

    Why bother when you are winning? Let them pretend not to surrender, let them feel good about themselves for an hour or two … because they KNOW they (and we) have sustained a total and unmitigated defeat.

    The only possible way to say “Je Suis Charlie” and actually mean it is to publish en masse the most offensive of the cartoons, for European governments to put the cartoons on billboards all over Europe, including areas with high Muslim population, explaining that while the cartoons are obscene and distasteful, freedom of expression is non-negotiable – and then use State power aggressively and harshly against any non-peaceful expressions of loathing of the cartoons, from petty vandalism to major rioting.

    There’s no way our rulers are prepared to do this – after all, the ship sailed a long time ago with the Danish cartoons, and so “lessons will be learned” – i.e don’t piss off Islam, because you’ll get killed.

    You should see the Guardian and Telegraph cartoons and editorials on the subject – absolutely pathetic.

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    • Replies: @gzu
    Except, in Europe, freedom of speech isn't non negotiable. It is nothing.
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  155. Try prosecuting a murder with no body. Or rather, try prosecuting a murder with no evidence other than the fact that a person’s missing. You’ll be laughed out of court.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    Try prosecuting a murder with no body. Or rather, try prosecuting a murder with no evidence other than the fact that a person’s missing. You’ll be laughed out of court.
     
    Not necessarily. This case comes to mind: http://www.nytimes.com/2000/10/25/nyregion/surgeon-convicted-of-murdering-wife.html
    , @reiner Tor
    Actually, I heard about a serial killer who put his victims into barrels of slaked lime. Some small pieces of half-dissolved teeth, parts of a bracelet and similar items were found only, plus a lot of circumstantial evidence (he was seen with the victims the last time anybody saw them, he inexplicably regularly cleaned his car and some parts of his house with unusual thoroughness, using chemicals which clean blood stains, he had many tools which could be used for murder) and they were found to be sufficient evidence in court.

    Of course there are many other facts other than the Jews' absence. There are many individual documented cases of mass murder committed by German security troops and by others (like Hungarian collaborationists). There are many reports by German officers of mass murder, mostly from 1941, and they survive in copies sent to German government ministries. There are many documents that can be used as circumstantial evidence, for example transport of prisoners, some cases of trainloads of prisoners sent from a small camp to a death camp and the official casually asking for their clothes to be returned immediately. It doesn't prove all the small details with equal force, but if you put together all pieces of evidence, you can hardly doubt that mass murder did indeed take place. If you accept that mass murder did indeed take place and that millions of Jews are missing, then... well, the most plausible argument is that they all were victims of that mass murder.

    There is also apparently a motive. I know it's hard for you to swallow, but Hitler was so irrational that he actually believed Jews had some actual influence on US and maybe also on British foreign policy, i.e. the policy leading to war between named powers and the German Reich. I'm sure you don't think Jews were that influential (I'm sure you know that they were absolutely powerless victims always and everywhere, and in the US they also weren't accepted in country clubs), but this Hitler guy was just that irrational. I know it sounds crazy but it seems he also believed that Jews did care a lot for their European brethren. Hence his open threats that if there was going to be a second world war, then the result would be the destruction of the European Jewry. Such an irrational guy might have hoped that Jews would not want to push for war against him knowing that he has millions of European Jews as hostages. And once the war happened what exactly would have prevented him from fulfilling his threats and killing the hostages? I mean, what motivation would he have had not to do that?

    I don't believe Hitler was the Antichrist, but when conquering Poland, a thousand-year-old European nation, he abolished all secondary and higher education. Some tens of thousands of Poles were murdered by him (although it appears that Stalin killed more Poles until 1941 than Hitler - most of Hitler's body count came after 1941, anyway), and he didn't even consider Poles his primary enemies.

    Hitler also probably knew by late 1941 that his war effort was either lost or at least hanging by a thread. In September 1941 he already mentioned in a speech how he would never capitulate. In December 1941 he told leaders of the Germany steel industry that unless they could triple their production the war would be lost.

    So Hitler felt after 1941 that he was forced into a war he never wanted (with the UK and the US) and which he couldn't win or at least would be very difficult for him to win, then why exactly wouldn't he start killing his hostages, knowing he had nothing to lose? And if he started, what would have prevented him from being largely successful?
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  156. I actually think a backlash would be healthy.

    Me too. There was an excellent comment on Auster’s site years ago that I wish I could find, pointing out that the reason various ethnic groups assimilated well into American society pre-WWII was due to intolerance. Their ethnic quirks were ridiculed and the “Way of the WASP” held up as the model to aspire to. You are not going to have assimilation in a society that prides itself on diversity über alles.

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  157. “Hold the line, island nation. You could just be the Wests best shining hope of how to maintain and preserve one’s native culture and people.”

    It seems the best gift I’ve given my offspring is marrying a Japanese woman which then conferred Japanese citizenship upon them. And then moving to Japan for their primary schooling so that they have some clue about functioning in this society, especially as haafus.

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  158. Read More
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  159. ‘Backlash’ by whom against whom? This was an attack on the 68er Left, and the dead journalists have powerful friends in the government/media/academy. Any ‘backlash’ will be in the form of increased state repression of Muslims, and this will have nothing to do with Le Pen and the FN.

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  160. Those terrorists somehow managed to leave their ID’s at the scene of the crime? I hope that’s just the usual inept reporting.

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  161. @Anon
    "When journalists are killed for expressing their views, it is one step away from burning books, said Annette Gerhard, 60."

    Well, fining and imprisoning people for the 'wrong views' or 'hate speech'(or whatever) sort of paves the way for tyranny too.
    But such is the norm all across the EU.

    This is why I find the whole “THIS IS AN ATTACK ON FREE SPEECH” laughable.

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  162. @Rob
    I must admit, my initial take on the "frontlash" when (as far as I know) the word first hoved into view on this blog a couple of weeks ago was that it was the initial atrocity itself, rather than a pre-emption of the almost invariably non-existant "backlash". I'm fine with it being used to denote the pre-emption - which does need a name - but am just sayin'.

    I must admit, my initial take on the “frontlash” when (as far as I know) the word first hoved into view on this blog a couple of weeks ago was that it was the initial atrocity itself, rather than a pre-emption of the almost invariably non-existant “backlash”. I’m fine with it being used to denote the pre-emption – which does need a name – but am just sayin’.

    I would say the initial action and the media’s post-hoc apologia combine to constitute the “frontlash”.

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  163. @Dave Pinsen
    There aren't any laws about holocaust denial in the US, are there? I don't think they're a great idea either, but I can understand why Germany, for example, enacted them. They have a history of lies being used to lay the groundwork for genocide, so they're wary of that happening again. Their choice.

    BRD/FRG has been a US puppet state from the beginning. They don’t need any specific local laws to keep them subservient and docile. Plus almost every country in Europe now has laws against Holocaust Denial.

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    BRD/FRG has been a US puppet state from the beginning.
    --
    Yeah, a country with a population of 80 million, the world's 5th largest economy, and the world's 8th most well-endowed military is a 'US puppet state'.
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  164. @Wilkey
    What's the danger of a "backlash"? Does anyone honest-to-God believe that the French are going to start slaughtering Muslims by the score?

    What would a backlash consist of? Ending future Muslim immigration and kicking out those who aren't yet citizens. Follwoing that, maybe they'd put on the hurt by doing things that indirectly reduced Muslim birthrates, such as cutting off welfare. Finally, if all else failed, perhaps they'd deport Muslim citizens.

    If Muslims don't really want to live in a Western country, with all its freedoms, then they shouldn't move to one - and the West is under no obligation to accept them.

    I agree with you. All of these steps would easily stop the hurt pretty quickly. But no, it has to be violence.

    Muslims would self deport, if bribed witha little money.

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  165. @Anonymous Nephew
    "All it’s gonna take is a bomb at one of those candlelight vigils."

    Why bother when you are winning? Let them pretend not to surrender, let them feel good about themselves for an hour or two ... because they KNOW they (and we) have sustained a total and unmitigated defeat.

    The only possible way to say "Je Suis Charlie" and actually mean it is to publish en masse the most offensive of the cartoons, for European governments to put the cartoons on billboards all over Europe, including areas with high Muslim population, explaining that while the cartoons are obscene and distasteful, freedom of expression is non-negotiable - and then use State power aggressively and harshly against any non-peaceful expressions of loathing of the cartoons, from petty vandalism to major rioting.

    There's no way our rulers are prepared to do this - after all, the ship sailed a long time ago with the Danish cartoons, and so "lessons will be learned" - i.e don't piss off Islam, because you'll get killed.

    You should see the Guardian and Telegraph cartoons and editorials on the subject - absolutely pathetic.

    Except, in Europe, freedom of speech isn’t non negotiable. It is nothing.

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  166. @Sean
    The much looked forward to final and total extinguishing of European nations is shaping up nicely: immigration and aggressive Frontlash carrying all before it. The 'far right' in France and elsewhere is a brocken spectre as shown by them having a grand total of 2 MPs, they would need 200 for power (ditto Ukip). In the last round of the 2002 Presidential vote Le Pen was defeated, because ALL the other parties backed Chirac. Sweden has just did something similar. If it looked like the FN, was going to win big, the rest of the white vote in the left – pro immigrant and the economic right parties would effectively be in coalition with the immigrant vote. the likelihood is that an ostensibly secular- left but actually pro-Islamist party (similar to Britain's "Respect") could get into power as part of an anti-FN coalition.

    Ireland has many unemployed and is letting in more immigrants now than ever before. So is Denmark, which some bad jokers will tell you has shown a modern Western economy run on democratic lines can stop the inexorable increase in Third World immigration. Germany currently has immigration at the highest in 20 years yet the anti immigration marchers are being outnumbered by pro immigrant protesters.

    The people who are being hurt by immigration, don’t actually run the countries in which they are the majority. It is higher social class people who steer society and that social class is where the behavioural predispositions necessary for creating the public's opinions are heavily concentrated.

    “Germany currently has immigration at the highest in 20 years yet the anti immigration marchers are being outnumbered by pro immigrant protesters.”

    But most of that immigration is from Europe. The protesters oppose muslim immigration.

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  167. @Svigor
    Try prosecuting a murder with no body. Or rather, try prosecuting a murder with no evidence other than the fact that a person's missing. You'll be laughed out of court.

    Try prosecuting a murder with no body. Or rather, try prosecuting a murder with no evidence other than the fact that a person’s missing. You’ll be laughed out of court.

    Not necessarily. This case comes to mind: http://www.nytimes.com/2000/10/25/nyregion/surgeon-convicted-of-murdering-wife.html

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Try prosecuting a murder with no body. Or rather, try prosecuting a murder with no evidence other than the fact that a person’s missing. You’ll be laughed out of court.

    Not necessarily. This case comes to mind: http://www.nytimes.com/2000/10/25/nyregion/surgeon-convicted-of-murdering-wife.html
     

    Conviction for murder in the absence of a body is possible. Historically cases of this type have been hard to prove, forcing the prosecution to rely on other kinds of evidence, usually circumstantial. Modern developments in forensic science have made it less likely that such an act will go unpunished.[1]
     

    The rule in English common law that a body is necessary to prove murder is said to have arisen from the "Campden Wonder" case which occurred in the 1660s. A local official vanished and after interrogation, which possibly included torture, three individuals were hanged for his murder. Shortly afterwards, the supposed victim appeared alive and well, telling a story of having been abducted and enslaved in Turkey. The "no body, no murder" rule persisted into the twentieth century.[2]

    In 1937, a young girl called Mona Tinsley disappeared, and Frederick Nodder was suspected of having killed her. He claimed that she had been alive when he last saw her, and on the basis of the rule was prosecuted only for abduction. Tinsley's body was found some time later and Nodder was then prosecuted for her murder. His defence was that he had already been acquitted of this charge, but this plea was rejected and he was hanged.[3]

    The idea that a body was required to prove murder was mistakenly believed by John George Haigh. Already a convicted fraudster, he believed that dissolving a body in acid would make a conviction for murder impossible. In 1949, the remains of his last victim, Mrs Durand-Deacon, were found to contain part of her dentures. From this, her dentist was able to identify the remains, and Haigh was hanged.[4] Haigh had misinterpreted the Latin legal phrase corpus delicti (referring to the body of evidence which establish a crime) to mean an actual human body. This was one of the first instances of forensic science being used in such cases.[5]

     


    The rule was finally abolished for practical purposes in the UK with the 1954 case of Michail Onufrejczyk. He and a fellow Pole, Stanislaw Sykut, had stayed in the United Kingdom after the Second World War and ran a farm together in Wales. Sykut disappeared and Onufrejczyk claimed that he had returned to Poland. Bone fragments and blood spatters were found in the farm kitchen, although forensic technology was then insufficiently advanced to identify them. Charged with Sykut's murder, Onufrejczyk claimed that the remains were those of rabbits he had killed, but the jury disbelieved him and he was sentenced to death, but reprieved.[6] He appealed,[7] but this was dismissed by the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Goddard, saying that "things had moved on since the days of the Campden Wonder"[2] and also

    "… it is equally clear that the fact of death, like any other fact, can be proved by circumstantial evidence, that is to say, evidence of facts which lead to one conclusion, provided that the jury are satisfied and are warned that it must lead to one conclusion only."[8]

    The United States case of People v. Scott[9] held that "circumstantial evidence, when sufficient to exclude every other reasonable hypothesis, may prove the death of a missing person, the existence of a homicide and the guilt of the accused".[10]
     

    Circumstantial evidence was originally deemed sufficient to obtain a murder conviction in the Australian "Dingo baby case", and in others such as Bradley John Murdoch and the murder of Thomas and Jackie Hawks.

    In 1996, Thomas Capano was convicted of the murder of Anne Marie Fahey, his former lover. Investigators did not have a murder weapon or body, nor any evidence that Capano had purchased a gun. He was convicted of first-degree murder in part due to the evidence given by his brother Gerry, who had admitted to helping Capano dump Fahey’s body in the Atlantic Ocean.

    In June 2001, Essex teenager Danielle Jones went missing and despite a body never being found, the required circumstantial evidence was provided by forensic analysis of text messages sent by the accused, her uncle Stuart Campbell, who was charged with her murder in November 2001 and convicted a year later. Police determined that Campbell had sent text messages from Danielle's mobile phone to his own after she disappeared, to make it appear that she was still alive, and noted that the spelling of some words in the text messages sent from Danielle's mobile phone had changed after she was reporting missing.

    In the Australian no-body murder of Keith William Allan, evidence from forensic accountants established a motive for his murder. The chance police finding of one perpetrator driving Allan's car and the conduct of all perpetrators, in particular mobile telephone records, were also important factors in their conviction.[11]

    In 2008, Hans Reiser was convicted of first degree murder of his wife, Nina Reiser. After conviction and before sentencing, Reiser plead guilty to the lesser charge of second degree murder in exchange for disclosing the location of his wife's body.[12]

    The possibility of the supposed victim turning up alive remains. In 2003, Leonard Fraser, having allegedly confessed to the murder of teenager Natasha Ryan, was on trial for this, and other murders, when she reappeared after having been missing for four years.[13]

    In 2012, in Scotland the prosecution twice won a conviction without a body in the murder of Suzanne Pilley and the murder of Arlene Fraser.

    In May 2013, Mark Bridger was convicted of the murder of April Jones, a five-year-old girl from Machynlleth, Powys, Wales, who disappeared on 1 October 2012. At his trial, Bridger claimed to have run her down in his car and killed her by accident, and to have no memory of what he did with her body after drinking heavily. The jury rejected his version of events, as bone fragments and blood discovered in Bridger's house within days of her disappearance were matched to the DNA of April Jones. The body of April Jones was not found despite the largest missing person search in UK history. Bridger claimed in court that April's DNA was found in his house as he had held her body there before disposing of it.[14]
     
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  168. @Anonymous
    In other words, the NYT bemoans the fact that the European political class might lose the ability to impose even more of its cataclysmic and disaster heading policy on Europe, and stick its head deeper into the sand about the eventualmand inevitable denouement as the third workers attain numerical majority in France and elsewhere.

    As an aside, I must remind the NYT that Jews will be the biggest victims of a Muslim and third world dominated France.

    As another aside, I know it will win me no friends here, but as a man, I have to admit that I found the sheer professionalism, bravery and efficiency of execution of that attack admirable. Not that I agree with murder - even if it is of a bunch pro immigration lefties.

    Don’t you mean that French people will be the biggest losers, instead of trying to make it all about Jews?

    French outnumber tribals by orders of magnitude.

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  169. I think Steve’s popularizing of the terms, “frontlash” and “retconning” is a good idea. The left can be made to play defense with these tools, if honestly used, and self consciously explain themselves and some of their gnat-and-camel false equivocations (like that son-of-gun on MSNBC that compared the Parisian massacre to Jerry Falwell suing Hustler in the 1980′s yesterday).

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  170. @Whiskey
    In Israel, a Palestinian boy was killed in retaliation for the murder of three Jews. Tit for tat and the people players in the game. Universal male military service and widespread gun ownership make this possible. As people are cratures of habit.

    Children. Really?

    Do you really believe you are not occupiers over there?

    Fool.

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  171. @fnn
    BRD/FRG has been a US puppet state from the beginning. They don't need any specific local laws to keep them subservient and docile. Plus almost every country in Europe now has laws against Holocaust Denial.

    BRD/FRG has been a US puppet state from the beginning.

    Yeah, a country with a population of 80 million, the world’s 5th largest economy, and the world’s 8th most well-endowed military is a ‘US puppet state’.

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  172. @Udolpho
    You really don't get why people would object to a foreign country's soldiers (and all the soldiershines that entails) more or less permanently based in your country as an advance force, do you? You must be similarly puzzled why the Japs routinely express unhappiness about the American military presence there. You're just plain not bright.

    You know, instapundit.com might be more your speed.

    You really don’t get why people would object to a foreign country’s soldiers (and all the soldiershines that entails) more or less permanently based in your country as an advance force, do you?

    No, I do not, because I’m not innumerate. A population of 6,200 troops would be sufficient to occupy a city of about 800,000. The population of Saudi Arabia in 1995 was 19 million, and the country was and is teeming with foreigners (by some accounts 30% of the residents as we speak). The troops were there for 12 years, they were there with the consent of that country’s government, and the complainer in chief was a man disowned by his family who’d lived in Afghanistan for 20 years.

    As for Instapundit, he’s an accomplished law professor. “More my speed”?. Yes, I had figured out quite a few of you are addled by your conceits.

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    lmao at "accomplished law professor"...your kind never disappoints
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  173. It’s not much, but there was a genuine and reasonably famous backlash a few years ago:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2005_Cronulla_riots

    So it can happen. But I guess 2005 is already a long time ago, and it hasn’t really been repeated since.

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  174. @Dave Pinsen

    Try prosecuting a murder with no body. Or rather, try prosecuting a murder with no evidence other than the fact that a person’s missing. You’ll be laughed out of court.
     
    Not necessarily. This case comes to mind: http://www.nytimes.com/2000/10/25/nyregion/surgeon-convicted-of-murdering-wife.html

    Try prosecuting a murder with no body. Or rather, try prosecuting a murder with no evidence other than the fact that a person’s missing. You’ll be laughed out of court.

    Not necessarily. This case comes to mind: http://www.nytimes.com/2000/10/25/nyregion/surgeon-convicted-of-murdering-wife.html

    Conviction for murder in the absence of a body is possible. Historically cases of this type have been hard to prove, forcing the prosecution to rely on other kinds of evidence, usually circumstantial. Modern developments in forensic science have made it less likely that such an act will go unpunished.[1]

    The rule in English common law that a body is necessary to prove murder is said to have arisen from the “Campden Wonder” case which occurred in the 1660s. A local official vanished and after interrogation, which possibly included torture, three individuals were hanged for his murder. Shortly afterwards, the supposed victim appeared alive and well, telling a story of having been abducted and enslaved in Turkey. The “no body, no murder” rule persisted into the twentieth century.[2]

    In 1937, a young girl called Mona Tinsley disappeared, and Frederick Nodder was suspected of having killed her. He claimed that she had been alive when he last saw her, and on the basis of the rule was prosecuted only for abduction. Tinsley’s body was found some time later and Nodder was then prosecuted for her murder. His defence was that he had already been acquitted of this charge, but this plea was rejected and he was hanged.[3]

    The idea that a body was required to prove murder was mistakenly believed by John George Haigh. Already a convicted fraudster, he believed that dissolving a body in acid would make a conviction for murder impossible. In 1949, the remains of his last victim, Mrs Durand-Deacon, were found to contain part of her dentures. From this, her dentist was able to identify the remains, and Haigh was hanged.[4] Haigh had misinterpreted the Latin legal phrase corpus delicti (referring to the body of evidence which establish a crime) to mean an actual human body. This was one of the first instances of forensic science being used in such cases.[5]

    The rule was finally abolished for practical purposes in the UK with the 1954 case of Michail Onufrejczyk. He and a fellow Pole, Stanislaw Sykut, had stayed in the United Kingdom after the Second World War and ran a farm together in Wales. Sykut disappeared and Onufrejczyk claimed that he had returned to Poland. Bone fragments and blood spatters were found in the farm kitchen, although forensic technology was then insufficiently advanced to identify them. Charged with Sykut’s murder, Onufrejczyk claimed that the remains were those of rabbits he had killed, but the jury disbelieved him and he was sentenced to death, but reprieved.[6] He appealed,[7] but this was dismissed by the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Goddard, saying that “things had moved on since the days of the Campden Wonder”[2] and also

    “… it is equally clear that the fact of death, like any other fact, can be proved by circumstantial evidence, that is to say, evidence of facts which lead to one conclusion, provided that the jury are satisfied and are warned that it must lead to one conclusion only.”[8]

    The United States case of People v. Scott[9] held that “circumstantial evidence, when sufficient to exclude every other reasonable hypothesis, may prove the death of a missing person, the existence of a homicide and the guilt of the accused”.[10]

    Circumstantial evidence was originally deemed sufficient to obtain a murder conviction in the Australian “Dingo baby case”, and in others such as Bradley John Murdoch and the murder of Thomas and Jackie Hawks.

    In 1996, Thomas Capano was convicted of the murder of Anne Marie Fahey, his former lover. Investigators did not have a murder weapon or body, nor any evidence that Capano had purchased a gun. He was convicted of first-degree murder in part due to the evidence given by his brother Gerry, who had admitted to helping Capano dump Fahey’s body in the Atlantic Ocean.

    In June 2001, Essex teenager Danielle Jones went missing and despite a body never being found, the required circumstantial evidence was provided by forensic analysis of text messages sent by the accused, her uncle Stuart Campbell, who was charged with her murder in November 2001 and convicted a year later. Police determined that Campbell had sent text messages from Danielle’s mobile phone to his own after she disappeared, to make it appear that she was still alive, and noted that the spelling of some words in the text messages sent from Danielle’s mobile phone had changed after she was reporting missing.

    In the Australian no-body murder of Keith William Allan, evidence from forensic accountants established a motive for his murder. The chance police finding of one perpetrator driving Allan’s car and the conduct of all perpetrators, in particular mobile telephone records, were also important factors in their conviction.[11]

    In 2008, Hans Reiser was convicted of first degree murder of his wife, Nina Reiser. After conviction and before sentencing, Reiser plead guilty to the lesser charge of second degree murder in exchange for disclosing the location of his wife’s body.[12]

    The possibility of the supposed victim turning up alive remains. In 2003, Leonard Fraser, having allegedly confessed to the murder of teenager Natasha Ryan, was on trial for this, and other murders, when she reappeared after having been missing for four years.[13]

    In 2012, in Scotland the prosecution twice won a conviction without a body in the murder of Suzanne Pilley and the murder of Arlene Fraser.

    In May 2013, Mark Bridger was convicted of the murder of April Jones, a five-year-old girl from Machynlleth, Powys, Wales, who disappeared on 1 October 2012. At his trial, Bridger claimed to have run her down in his car and killed her by accident, and to have no memory of what he did with her body after drinking heavily. The jury rejected his version of events, as bone fragments and blood discovered in Bridger’s house within days of her disappearance were matched to the DNA of April Jones. The body of April Jones was not found despite the largest missing person search in UK history. Bridger claimed in court that April’s DNA was found in his house as he had held her body there before disposing of it.[14]

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  175. @Art Deco
    It is curious, is it not, that “news of the holocaust” didn’t appear in the media and culture until decades after “it was happening.”

    "Decades after" would be the spring of 1945.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tGwjwK9pIM


    (You got yourself another loon, Steve).

    Why, sir, you do yourself to little credit.

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  176. in inferno, Dante has Muhammad in hell, not as an infidel, but as a heretic…. Medeviel Christians believed Islam was a heresy, not a separate religion, anyway, I wonder how long it will take for the divine comedy to become a source of anger

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    Wrong. He considers it a Schism.
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  177. @Anonymous
    I'll bet these guys have banged lots of white girls.

    @ Goth, yeah the terrorists probably have banged some white grrrls, feminists getting off rejecting daddy. Or the Muslims DIDN’T get luv from a French girl and this frustration fueled their violent fantasies of revenge.

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  178. @Me
    in inferno, Dante has Muhammad in hell, not as an infidel, but as a heretic.... Medeviel Christians believed Islam was a heresy, not a separate religion, anyway, I wonder how long it will take for the divine comedy to become a source of anger

    Wrong. He considers it a Schism.

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  179. @Dave Pinsen
    There aren't any laws about holocaust denial in the US, are there? I don't think they're a great idea either, but I can understand why Germany, for example, enacted them. They have a history of lies being used to lay the groundwork for genocide, so they're wary of that happening again. Their choice.

    There aren’t any laws about holocaust denial in the US, are there?

    Nobody stated the opposite.

    I can understand why Germany, for example, enacted them. They have a history of lies being used to lay the groundwork for genocide

    A history of that, like it happened over and over until they decided to outlaw holocaust denial? Or what?

    It is based on one case. No matter what you consider to be the lies that were used to “lay the groundwork for genocide”, their nature was quite a bit different, and also they were told by a totalitarian government which came to power for entirely different reasons. There’s no reason whatsoever for making the discussion of an historical topic officially taboo under threat of prison.

    And of course it’s not like there is or ever was an open debate in Germany about that. So no, it’s not their “choice”.

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  180. Keith Vaz [AKA "Nancy Pelosi"] says:
    @Erik Sieven
    @Anonymous at 1:07

    Antiracism is just the same old warrior cult in new clothes. Antiracism is about releasing white women from old structures and let them play the "i choose the strongest" game harder then anytime before. Humans, like many animals, have a reproduction system which is based on female choice and male competition. In more conservative societies men have found ways to break the power of women to choose. Men invented the marriage, so that more men could have the possibility to reproduce and not only one alpha reproduced by keeping all the women to himself. Also conservative societies tend to be closed, there is not much migration, thus not much new competition among men.

    Now what antiracists do is enabling migration - which is mainly a thing males do - and let women have much bigger pool of potential men. Women get a better market position, men a worse market position. Also races do differ, especially regarding male attractiveness. Of course male attractiveness is just another word for physical strength, testosterone, aggression. So antiracists encourage women to choose from men of all races, leading of course to imbalances, as the races differ. Because of that antiracism resembles social darwinism. Antiracist want that only the strongest, most fertile do exist anymore. They do not like any barriers which the weaker ones have builded to protect their little share of life from the winner who shall take it all. Such barriers are nation borders, institutions like marriage and so on.

    When antiracists play the game of mercy and seem to care for the weakest they actually don´t do so. They only care for the strongest. But like Siegfried in the Nibelung saga or Achilles every hero has a weakness. The gigantic, strong football player may be not very good in reading or calculating. The race of warriors might not be very good in building nice infrastructures. But in the eyes of antiracists those weaknesses are irrelevant compared to the glory of the strength of the hero. And for them the most precious thing to do is helping are true hero overcome the obstacles he might face. Obstacles like the lack of residency permits or separated living areas which hinder their hero reaching his maximum reproductive power.
    Antiracism is a very human thing...

    Female sexuality is notoriously mallable. Most reasonable people would agree that Africans are way uglier than Euros and Asians. They look primitive, unrefined and animalistic. But vecause of Frankfurt School propaganda (which is 90% targetted at gullible little White princesses) they have managed to give the most uncivil and ugly race an appearance of ‘cool’. Think about Will Smith, Denzel Washington and Morgan Freeman.

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  181. @Svigor
    Try prosecuting a murder with no body. Or rather, try prosecuting a murder with no evidence other than the fact that a person's missing. You'll be laughed out of court.

    Actually, I heard about a serial killer who put his victims into barrels of slaked lime. Some small pieces of half-dissolved teeth, parts of a bracelet and similar items were found only, plus a lot of circumstantial evidence (he was seen with the victims the last time anybody saw them, he inexplicably regularly cleaned his car and some parts of his house with unusual thoroughness, using chemicals which clean blood stains, he had many tools which could be used for murder) and they were found to be sufficient evidence in court.

    Of course there are many other facts other than the Jews’ absence. There are many individual documented cases of mass murder committed by German security troops and by others (like Hungarian collaborationists). There are many reports by German officers of mass murder, mostly from 1941, and they survive in copies sent to German government ministries. There are many documents that can be used as circumstantial evidence, for example transport of prisoners, some cases of trainloads of prisoners sent from a small camp to a death camp and the official casually asking for their clothes to be returned immediately. It doesn’t prove all the small details with equal force, but if you put together all pieces of evidence, you can hardly doubt that mass murder did indeed take place. If you accept that mass murder did indeed take place and that millions of Jews are missing, then… well, the most plausible argument is that they all were victims of that mass murder.

    There is also apparently a motive. I know it’s hard for you to swallow, but Hitler was so irrational that he actually believed Jews had some actual influence on US and maybe also on British foreign policy, i.e. the policy leading to war between named powers and the German Reich. I’m sure you don’t think Jews were that influential (I’m sure you know that they were absolutely powerless victims always and everywhere, and in the US they also weren’t accepted in country clubs), but this Hitler guy was just that irrational. I know it sounds crazy but it seems he also believed that Jews did care a lot for their European brethren. Hence his open threats that if there was going to be a second world war, then the result would be the destruction of the European Jewry. Such an irrational guy might have hoped that Jews would not want to push for war against him knowing that he has millions of European Jews as hostages. And once the war happened what exactly would have prevented him from fulfilling his threats and killing the hostages? I mean, what motivation would he have had not to do that?

    I don’t believe Hitler was the Antichrist, but when conquering Poland, a thousand-year-old European nation, he abolished all secondary and higher education. Some tens of thousands of Poles were murdered by him (although it appears that Stalin killed more Poles until 1941 than Hitler – most of Hitler’s body count came after 1941, anyway), and he didn’t even consider Poles his primary enemies.

    Hitler also probably knew by late 1941 that his war effort was either lost or at least hanging by a thread. In September 1941 he already mentioned in a speech how he would never capitulate. In December 1941 he told leaders of the Germany steel industry that unless they could triple their production the war would be lost.

    So Hitler felt after 1941 that he was forced into a war he never wanted (with the UK and the US) and which he couldn’t win or at least would be very difficult for him to win, then why exactly wouldn’t he start killing his hostages, knowing he had nothing to lose? And if he started, what would have prevented him from being largely successful?

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  182. If the French were ever to forsake their tradition of candlelight vigils, then the terrorists will have won.

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  183. @Harry Baldwin
    If instead of a sophisticated, military-style strike Wednesday on a French newspaper known for satirizing Islam, it was a strike on the Islam-enabling New York Times, and ten of its staff were murdered, would the surviving members of the editorial board take the same stance they do here? Is there a point at which the NYT could entertain the thought that perhaps Muslims don't make good additions to Western societies?

    If instead of a sophisticated, military-style strike Wednesday on a French newspaper known for satirizing Islam, it was a strike on the Islam-enabling New York Times, and ten of its staff were murdered, would the surviving members of the editorial board take the same stance they do here?

    I don’t know the answer, but count on me for the candlelight vigil and put me down for one “I-Am-Maureen” tee.

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  184. Here they go again they’re so anal about pushing The Narrative that they quietly edit their articles:

    New York Times Reports On Muslim Proselytizing During Charlie Hebdo Attack, Then Deletes It

    http://dailycaller.com/2015/01/08/new-york-times-reports-on-muslim-proselytizing-during-charlie-hebdo-attack-then-deletes-it/

    “So, imagine yourself as an NYT editor for a moment, if you can withstand the nausea. (…) Your reporter hastily left that inconvenient truth in her story by accident, so you airbrushed it out, without any acknowledgment, to preserve the narrative.”

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  185. Read More
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  186. Just saw this:

    By DYLAN BYERS | 1/9/15 4:19 PM EST
    New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet called an associate professor at the USC Annenberg School an “asshole” on Facebook today after the professor took a shot at Baquet for not running Charlie Hebdo’s Muhammed cartoons.

    http://www.politico.com/blogs/media/2015/01/dean-baquet-calls-ny-times-critic-ahole-200860.html

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  187. @Bill P
    I read up a bit on Charlie Hebdo and, well, they were really pushing it to the limit. Many of the cartoons are flat out obscene, such as depictions of Jesus sodomizing God, Marine Le Pen with a Hitler mustache for pubes, Mahomet presenting his anus for sodomy, etc. Additionally, their "serious" content was so far left it might as well have been an outhouse book for the New Republic crowd.

    "Coco" (Corinne Rey), the woman who let the assassins in the office when they threatened her, had repeatedly lampooned French police as losers with some phallic inadequacy. I wonder how she feels now that two of them were murdered on the street for protecting her.

    The Muslims chose a pretty unsympathetic target, which was strategically a savvy move. Just about the only thing I can say for publications editor Stephane "Charb" Charbonnier is that he was no coward, and he was an equal opportunity debaser of all things sacred. Given Charlie Hebdo's persistent violation of taboos, including those concerning speaking ill of the dead (they were briefly banned in 1970 for mocking the death of Charles de Gaulle), these guys are fair game for criticism despite having just been slaughtered. I mean, what is the point of provocation except to provoke?

    In comparison to his ideological fellow travelers, Charb was exceptional for not being a hypocrite, as those on the left are typically the most censorious of all these days when it comes to their own sacred cows. Charlie Hebdo was really an old-school counterculture magazine that is out of place in the contemporary Orwellian leftist atmosphere.

    In a sense, one could say that the leftist mantra that "we cannot tolerate intolerance" is partially responsible for these killings. Not only do certain groups - egged on by white anti-racists - now feel legally entitled to respect, anyone with a grievance can now justify retaliation based on what they personally feel slighted by. Say, for example, someone in the US were murdered for portraying MLK taking it up the butt. Does anyone seriously believe that the victim would be held up by leftists as a martyr for free speech? And MLK is sacred only to about 0.03 times as many people as Mahomet.

    That being the case, doesn't it follow that Muslims would feel justified in taking action against those who offend them?

    Maybe in the long run these guys at Charlie Hebdo did us all a favor by pushing the cult of the profane to the point of absurdity so that we can see it all the more clearly for what it was. Too bad Charb isn't around anymore to draw a parody of his and his staff's grisly demise -- that would be a proper epitaph for the bygone era that gave rise to Charlie Hebdo. And I mean that in a sincerely nostalgic, if ambivalent, way.

    One of the people who were killed was Charlie Hebdo’s boss, nicknamed Charb, a satirical cartoonist whose companion was Jeannette Bougrab, a French citizen of Algerian origin, who has been a junior minister in a right-wing government while Sarkozy was president. He also knew François Hollande personally, and had managed to persuade Hollande to support Charlie Hebdo financially. I guess he considered himself a left-wing rebel and dissenter.

    Charlie Hebdo former director, Philippe Val, who was always proud of his far left opinions was appointed director of a national radio station by Sarkozy, who claimed to be a right-wing president. Basically Charlie Hebdo is his presidential majesty’s satirical magazine, whoever is the president.

    Caroline Fourest, a lesbian journalist who is rabidly anti-catholic and anti-muslim, also worked for Charlie Hebdo, while Val was director. Under Val, the magazine, which had always been anti-catholic in a very vulgar, obscene manner, also became anti-islamic, in the same vulgar, obscene manner. But angry muslims are much more dangerous than angry catholics, as they eventually realized.

    Caroline Fourest regularly exchanges text messages with François Hollande (she said so in her last book) and she actively supports the Femen, those crazy topless feminists who desecrate churches.

    As a French citizen, I find it mind-boggling how our so-called elite runs this country, and what they are. They sleep with each other, their right wing / left wing persuasions are for the show, and they hate and despise everything white, French and catholic. They are immigrationist, pro-Israeli, anti-Islam (but also anti-racist) atlanticists. All of them, including Sarkozy and Hollande, and all the foul-mouthed satirists of Charlie-Hebdo. I don’t know if Sarkozy secretly loathes catholicism, but Hollande certainly does. He made sure that Charlie-Hebdo got public funds to stay alive.

    The more I know about Charlie Hebdo and those who ran it, the more I think that, well… What a bunch of a**holes they were.

    The killers look like run-of-the-mill banlieue youth: North African or Black African origin, pizza delivery jobs, social housing in drab tower blocks, juvenile delinquency, rap music, and eventually radical Islam as a means of salvation. They are from Gennevilliers and Grigny, two of the most depressing suburban French ghetto towns I know.

    A**holes killed a**holes. Move on, folks, nothing to see here.

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  188. @Art Deco
    You really don’t get why people would object to a foreign country’s soldiers (and all the soldiershines that entails) more or less permanently based in your country as an advance force, do you?
    --
    No, I do not, because I'm not innumerate. A population of 6,200 troops would be sufficient to occupy a city of about 800,000. The population of Saudi Arabia in 1995 was 19 million, and the country was and is teeming with foreigners (by some accounts 30% of the residents as we speak). The troops were there for 12 years, they were there with the consent of that country's government, and the complainer in chief was a man disowned by his family who'd lived in Afghanistan for 20 years.

    As for Instapundit, he's an accomplished law professor. "More my speed"?. Yes, I had figured out quite a few of you are addled by your conceits.

    lmao at “accomplished law professor”…your kind never disappoints

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  189. 189: +1

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  190. “Art Deco says:

    No, I do not, because I’m not innumerate. A population of 6,200 troops would be sufficient to occupy a city of about 800,000. The population of Saudi Arabia in 1995 was 19 million, and the country was and is teeming with foreigners (by some accounts 30% of the residents as we speak). The troops were there for 12 years, they were there with the consent of that country’s government, and the complainer in chief was a man disowned by his family who’d lived in Afghanistan for 20 years.”

    Just because you can quote numbers you have googled does not make you numerate. Cortez held the Aztec king hostage in his own palace, in his own capital city with only about 120 men. It depends what you occupy. That wasn’t our aim of course, but to a lot of people, any number of foreign soldiers on one’s own soil is a provacation. And your invocation of the “consent of that country’s government” is ridiculous. It is not as if the Saudi monarchy – a monarchy, mind – is necessarily that popular with the people.

    “As for Instapundit, he’s an accomplished law professor. “More my speed”?. Yes, I had figured out quite a few of you are addled by your conceits.”

    A law professor – a profession virtually synonymous with the term “douche-bag” being more your speed. Yes, I have no problem believing that. That is indeed your proper millieu.

    If it hasn’t dawned on you yet, Art Deco, your repellent personality hasn’t really caught on hereabouts. Why don’t you concentrate on your own website, where you can really develop your patented brand of mendacity and smug pomposity.

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