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From the New York Times, some epic Brexit worry:

Will London Fall?

by Sarah Lyall

Screenshot 2017-04-11 02.29.30

Shouldn’t there be a law against making fun of the French, peace be upon them? When President Ben-Abbes is in the Elysée palace and has his finger on the nuclear button, the perfidious Albion dogs will no longer dare to emit such impudent japery. Until that blessed day, however, we will just have to content ourselves with the New York Times tut-tutting at English infidel “humor.”

Here are excerpts from the “Political Sketch” by Patrick Kidd that the NYT took such somber objection to:

POLITICAL SKETCH
February 22 2017, 12:01am, the times
Crowds hope Gallic messiah will be mightier than Le Pen
patrick kidd

Westminster had a touch of Gallic Blair about it last night as Emmanuel Macron, the young French centrist, addressed a rally of 3,500 adoring fans. … “Don’t boo or hiss at my rallies,” he said. “That is for people without hope.”

Yes, he also sees himself as the Amiens Obama. This was a trademark hopey-changey speech from a fresh-faced candidate. Lots of sunlit uplands here and brighter tomorrows there. Or that was what I could make out from the beams on the faces of his young fans. They had that glow you often see in the presence of a new political messiah.

My masters at school, I will be honest, had not properly prepared me for the task of following an hour-long speech in rapid French. Mr Macron did not ask for directions to la gare once, for example.

Nor did he invite anyone in the audience to come to une boum chez lui ce week-end. He didn’t even say “zut” or “bof”. One wondered if he was French at all.

Ten years ago he married his French teacher, who is 24 years his senior, which may explain some of these rudimentary gaps in his knowledge. Too much sitting at the back of class sighing at madame and writing poetry rather than learning such essentials as “le oiseau est dans l’arbre”. Still, he struggled by and with the help of a friendly interpreter so did I. …

“I reject accusations of political immaturity or inexperience,” he said. “Their experiences in politics are also their failures.” It was bold and ballsy and the audience loved it.

Boys who went further with their French at school than I did all had one sentence drilled into them for exams. “On ne peut pas nier que sur le plan economique, la politique de l’autruche est vouée à l’échec,” they were taught. “One cannot deny that, on an economic level, the policy of an ostrich is doomed to failure.” Useful, you’ll agree. “Say that in your oral and they’ll be dead impressed with you,” Mr Jenkinson would tell his A-level class.

I didn’t catch whether Mr Macron also deployed this phrase, since he spoke too quickly for my pen (the one belonging to my aunt) but the essence was there. He will not stick his head in the sand at this time of national crisis.

“We must build a new France or submit to our fate,” he said in a stirring conclusion. But what were his actual policies? The manifesto, he said, is coming soon. C’est magnifique, mais ce n’est pas le Blair.

 
    []
  1. dearieme says:

    Humourless? Yer Kraut? Not at all; rather, his humour is crude, earnest, simple-minded, childish, or excremental; but let no one say it is non-existent.

    Yer Frogs: quite different. A cousin of mine is a Frog. I’m not sure that he enjoys garlic any more than I do. Overheard in an English pub 15 years ago: a burly labourer saying “I could kill for some garlic bread”.

    But perish the thought that the NYT should update its stereotypes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @daniel le mouche
    'Humourless? Yer Kraut? Not at all; rather, his humour is crude, earnest, simple-minded, childish, or excremental; but let no one say it is non-existent.'

    The Germans are an earnest people. The English 'humour' is deeply rooted in sarcasm, cynicism, a jaded world view in which they are always right and always on top. This includes comments such as yours. To make fun of the French, the Germans, the Irish, Welsh, Scottish and others is perfectly acceptable to the English, and constitutes a large basis for their so-called humour. One thing they never do is deep soul searching, for they would find something there very base and ugly. Their funny self-depreciation is just lightly poking fun of their little very English quirks, which they in fact deeply love in themselves and consider to be a part of their overall superiority to everyone, save perhaps ther blood brothers the Scandanavians.

    , @Nico
    The French are very divided on garlic: they either love or loathe it.
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  2. NickG says:

    OT – Pure iSteve bait….

    Astonishingly on BBC Radio 4 – Toby Young. The rise and fall of Meritocracy 28 mins.

    With an appearance by Charles Murray and Oliver James in the Stephen Jay Gould role.

    It’s pretty good.

    I am close to sure Toby Young is an iSteve reader.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    Oliver James is a real piece of work, Etonian type arrogance but not justified by knowledge or intelligence. When he got into a BTL debate with a real geneticist on a Guardian piece he got caned and responded with ad hominems. Not a gentleman.
  3. NickG says:

    by Sarah Lyall

    One can practically see the sour lemon face……I don’t think she’s getting much, or that that she is getting, isn’t quite up to snuff…

    Here she is on British Men

    Read More
    • Replies: @daniel le mouche
    An American aristocrat, Philips Exeter graduate, complete with stretch face and botox lips. Doesn't say in wiki if she's Jewish. Very unoriginal and dated comments on British men--then again, perhaps not as she likely only rubs shoulders with 'toffs'.
    , @Bill Jones
    I wouldn't touch her with yours, as they say in Liverpool.
  4. George says:

    Macron(age 39) is married to Brigitte Trogneux(age 63), who is 24 years older[73] than him and was his teacher in La Providence high school, Amiens.[74][75] The pair first met when he was a student in her class, aged 15, but were only officially a couple once he was 18.[76]

    His parents initially attempted to split the couple by sending him away to Paris to finish the final year of his schooling, as they felt his youth made this relationship inappropriate,[7][76] but the couple stayed together after he graduated, and were married in 2007.

    The couple live with Trogneux’s three children from her previous marriage.

    Je ne approvee pas – As Buggs Bunny might say.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    That is just weird.
    , @Ray P
    "Here's to you Mrs. Robinson" Although Hoffman and Ann Bancroft were only a few years apart. I always thought The Graduate should have been directed by a Frenchman.
    , @Nico
    There were rumors that the marriage was a ruse and that Macron is secretly gay, but I have friends who looked into it, even going so far as to make contacts (not of the sodomous kind) on the Parisian gay bar/app circuit but no one could find anything on it. By all accounts the two are in fact very much in love, and yes, there is a serious beta complex about a boy who goes for that and never grows up to care that he's effectively killed off his lineage. This mindset cannot be unrelated to his constant fapping off to the wonderful colored masses of "diversity" and his open desire to import even more of them into France, which he claims to love. (What do you mean by "France"?)
    , @Eric Rasmusen
    Pourquoi pas?
    , @Buffalo Joe
    George, I am only speaking for myself, but at 15 my hormones were raging. A 15 year old boy and a 39 year old teacher screams Inappropriate! Some guys in my HS were being hit on by teachers when we were 15 , but I went to an all boys Catholic school and our teachers were priests, and we all know how that turned out. Now we see young female teacher-teenage student love frequently, so there must be something in the water.
  5. Ray P says:

    Britain was taken into the European community by Europhile Tory prime minister Edward Heath who, while well-travelled on the continent, butchered French every time he tried speaking it. His predecessor, Labour PM Harold Wilson, never spoke a word, barely visited the place (he preferred Moscow and the Scilly isles ), had also sought UK membership.

    Read More
  6. I can’t quite tell what Steve’s opinion is here, i.e. is he ironically pro- or anti-French, but I love this line:
    ‘Shouldn’t there be a law against making fun of the French, peace be upon them? When President Ben-Abbes is in the Elysée palace and has his finger on the nuclear button, the perfidious Albion dogs will no longer dare to emit such impudent japery.’

    Read More
  7. @George
    Macron(age 39) is married to Brigitte Trogneux(age 63), who is 24 years older[73] than him and was his teacher in La Providence high school, Amiens.[74][75] The pair first met when he was a student in her class, aged 15, but were only officially a couple once he was 18.[76]

    His parents initially attempted to split the couple by sending him away to Paris to finish the final year of his schooling, as they felt his youth made this relationship inappropriate,[7][76] but the couple stayed together after he graduated, and were married in 2007.

    The couple live with Trogneux's three children from her previous marriage.

    Je ne approvee pas - As Buggs Bunny might say.

    That is just weird.

    Read More
    • Agree: Frau Katze
    • Replies: @BB753
    Indeed. Serious mommy issues, enough to disqualify an adult man from office. I hope Le Pen makes continuous fun of his betatitude, to coin a frenchy word.
  8. @dearieme
    Humourless? Yer Kraut? Not at all; rather, his humour is crude, earnest, simple-minded, childish, or excremental; but let no one say it is non-existent.

    Yer Frogs: quite different. A cousin of mine is a Frog. I'm not sure that he enjoys garlic any more than I do. Overheard in an English pub 15 years ago: a burly labourer saying "I could kill for some garlic bread".

    But perish the thought that the NYT should update its stereotypes.

    ‘Humourless? Yer Kraut? Not at all; rather, his humour is crude, earnest, simple-minded, childish, or excremental; but let no one say it is non-existent.’

    The Germans are an earnest people. The English ‘humour’ is deeply rooted in sarcasm, cynicism, a jaded world view in which they are always right and always on top. This includes comments such as yours. To make fun of the French, the Germans, the Irish, Welsh, Scottish and others is perfectly acceptable to the English, and constitutes a large basis for their so-called humour. One thing they never do is deep soul searching, for they would find something there very base and ugly. Their funny self-depreciation is just lightly poking fun of their little very English quirks, which they in fact deeply love in themselves and consider to be a part of their overall superiority to everyone, save perhaps ther blood brothers the Scandanavians.

    Read More
    • Agree: utu, Fredrik
    • Replies: @jim jones
    As Cecil Rhodes said "Remember that you are an Englishman, and have consequently won first prize in the lottery of life."
    , @This Is Our Home

    Their funny self-depreciation is just lightly poking fun of their little very English quirks, which they in fact deeply love in themselves and consider to be a part of their overall superiority to everyone,
     
    But are they wrong?
    , @dearieme
    If I were English I would point out that you are spouting rubbish: in fact I'll point it out anyway.

    "To make fun of the French, the Germans, the Irish, Welsh, Scottish and others is perfectly acceptable to the English, and constitutes a large basis for their so-called humour."

    It makes up a negligible part of their humour, though the sort of humourless prat who doesn't usually recognise when a joke has been made might notice only that sort of remark.

    , @Eric Rasmusen
    A thousand Swedes
    Crept through the weeds
    Pursued by one Norwegian.
    , @Olorin
    German humor comes via things like observing the inferior engineering of your system/object/philosophy.

    Many years ago I was in rural hinterlands occupied by German ancestry centennial livestock farmers. Two cattle guys I knew pretty well, both of completely German ancestry themselves, and I were on a field walk at another German ancestry guy's place.

    The two of them suddenly stopped, both pointed at some electrified perimeter fence, and started laughing themselves scarlet and gaggy. They were leaning on each other, pointing and laughing. I'm standing there looking at the fencing, at them, at the posts, at them.

    Finally they caught their breath. I asked what was so funny.

    One pointed and said, barely able to talk for laughing, "He connected copper to steel here!"

    The other, also still laughing, said, "It'll impede current big time!"

    The first said, "He'll be restringing this in a year."

    Electrolysis, I said. They both nodded, and said, more or less simultaneously, "WHAT WAS HE THINKING!?" And they collapsed in laughter again.

    I told someone this story. They said something about guys being competitive, but I don't think it was that. They seemed to find it genuinely hilarious that someone had deviated from the ideal in engineering a complex system like electrified livestock fencing. They didn't make fun of the farmer, they laughed at his flawed system.

    There's something endearing about that. I.e., what works, practically speaking, and how digressing from that is funny. It's not a mindset that comes from being easily defeated in the material world. It's a highly engineering mindset, and I've seen a similar sense of humor in many Germanic-ancestry engineers I've known.

    The Scots/Anglos/Celts seemed to laugh more often at the bad stuff that results when something goes wrong. They wouldn't laugh at the fencing, they'd laugh when it shocked someone unexpectedly, or electrolysis led the cows to escape.

    The Scandinavians I knew would just sigh and reach for the tools to fix it, maybe tell some ancient Ole and Lena/Oivo and Toivo jokes at the tap room later. ("...Naw, Toivo, those nails go on the OTHER side of the roof, dumbass!" "But Ole, how do we know we get the same boat next time?")

    My favorite humorist, H.L. Mencken, got a lot of his humor from a similar source methinks. In his mind there was an ideal way to engineer society/human interaction. He found great humor in how reality didn't measure up. At the flaws in the system.

    Just onionbelting out loud here.
    , @celt darnell
    And, assuming you are as French as your moniker, you know your people call us "les rosbifs"

    That translates literally as "the roastbeefs" but a more accurate translation is "the meatheads."

    Fair enough. Everyone on this earth makes fun of foreigners. Don't let it get to you, mon ami!

    And Vive Le Pen!

  9. Marine Le Pen will Make France Proud Again by defeating the banker boy Macron. The corporate media keeps saying that Macron is a centrist and Le Pen is far-right. Marine Le Pen has pointed out that she is a patriot who loves France. Marine Le Pen’s advisers have crafted a message that Macron can’t do battle with. Le Pen says that the new battle of our time is the fight between Globalizers and Patriots. Between national sovereignty and submission to national dissolution.

    Marine Le Pen has the courage and strength to confront the entirety of the French ruling class on the question of nation-wrecking mass immigration and multicultural mayhem. The French voters will not forget the Islamic terrorist attacks made possible by mass immigration. Macron is a puppet of globalizer bankers who will gladly allow the French torch of liberty to be extinguished by globalization and mass immigration.

    Read More
  10. @NickG

    by Sarah Lyall
     
    One can practically see the sour lemon face......I don't think she's getting much, or that that she is getting, isn't quite up to snuff...

    Here she is on British Men

    An American aristocrat, Philips Exeter graduate, complete with stretch face and botox lips. Doesn’t say in wiki if she’s Jewish. Very unoriginal and dated comments on British men–then again, perhaps not as she likely only rubs shoulders with ‘toffs’.

    Read More
    • Replies: @NickG

    stretch face and botox lips.
     
    Come to think of it she does have that lips like a baboon in oestrus's vagina look, redolent of a botox job.

    I'd wager she has not done much socialising outside of London's orbital motorway/ freeway - the M25. And of course London is no longer a British city being just north of 40% native British and falling and thus is atypical of England and the UK. A bit like generalising about the States from life in the Beltway.

    She has a number of Big Think videos on YouTube where she gobs off about Blighty and the Brits. I saw 3 of them in a pique of prurient masochism. Today she has an article in the NYT about Brexit in which she commits many sins of omission.

    It's clear she is a boilerplate bien pensant metropolitan globalist ostentatious 'liberal' to the level of self parody.

  11. peterike says:

    It must be exhausting spending all your time looking for things to be outraged about.

    As for Ms. Lyall: “Raised in New York City, Lyall attended the Chapin School and is a graduate of Philips Exeter Academy, class of 1981, and of Yale University.”

    Well with that pedigree, she is certainly entitled to tell deplorables like us right from wrong.

    Read More
  12. Show of hands, who got the reference “….for my pen ( the one belonging to my aunt)”. I found it in the deep recesses of my mind and surprised myself and my wife.

    Read More
    • Agree: MBlanc46
    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    Zut alors! Sacre nom d'un pipe!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_plume_de_ma_tante_%28linguistics%29
  13. Barnard says:

    OT: https://www.wsj.com/articles/peggy-noonan-wins-2017-pulitzer-prize-for-commentary-1491860551

    Ahead of most others, she foresaw Trump’s rise and his appeal to Americans who were frustrated by the leaders of both major political parties.

    So all you have to do to win a Pulitzer now is write, “I talked to a Trump supporter I know and understand where they are coming from.” We really need new elites.

    Read More
    • Replies: @snorlax
    Noonan's been decent. I was genuinely surprised she won.
    , @Forbes
    Her reward for having been on the Obama bandwagon...
  14. Humor and humour are both forbidden by political correctness.

    (Apparently by Islam, too)

    Read More
  15. BB753 says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic
    That is just weird.

    Indeed. Serious mommy issues, enough to disqualify an adult man from office. I hope Le Pen makes continuous fun of his betatitude, to coin a frenchy word.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The problem is that half the electorate consists of women over 40 who will find this relationship endearing rather than ridiculous.
  16. a reader says:

    … deriding the European Union as an impenetrable, out-of-control bureaucracy sucking up British money and imposing risible, onerous laws on an unwitting populace.

    The most [in]famous of those laws being the one banning kettles and toasters to save the planet.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Fredrik
    Only that they weren't proposing to banning kettles and toasters at all. Maybe UK and US industry is incapable of adjusting but other countries manufactureres are not.

    Lots of people want to be outraged and the English press helps them.
  17. Randal says:

    “many people around Britain, particularly from older generations, have lamented that they no longer recognise the country of their childhoods”

    Fascists and Nazis clearly. Re-education camps too good for them – hard labour at least is required, if not a bullet in the back of the head and be done with them.

    Shouldn’t there be a law against making fun of the French, peace be upon them?

    Clearly not, as the French are still predominantly white and Christian/post-Christian.

    we will just have to content ourselves with the New York Times tut-tutting at English infidel “humor.”

    I imagine NYT writers don’t watch the likes of Blackadder:

    Blackadder’s best insults by nationality!

    Read More
  18. Orthodox says:

    If it wasn’t before, the NYTimes is now officially foreign media. No American would ever write that.

    Read More
  19. jim jones says:
    @daniel le mouche
    'Humourless? Yer Kraut? Not at all; rather, his humour is crude, earnest, simple-minded, childish, or excremental; but let no one say it is non-existent.'

    The Germans are an earnest people. The English 'humour' is deeply rooted in sarcasm, cynicism, a jaded world view in which they are always right and always on top. This includes comments such as yours. To make fun of the French, the Germans, the Irish, Welsh, Scottish and others is perfectly acceptable to the English, and constitutes a large basis for their so-called humour. One thing they never do is deep soul searching, for they would find something there very base and ugly. Their funny self-depreciation is just lightly poking fun of their little very English quirks, which they in fact deeply love in themselves and consider to be a part of their overall superiority to everyone, save perhaps ther blood brothers the Scandanavians.

    As Cecil Rhodes said “Remember that you are an Englishman, and have consequently won first prize in the lottery of life.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @daniel le mouche
    Well, Rhodes figures prominently in the book The Anglo American Conspiracy, available online, which thoroughly outlines the familial connections between the rulers of these great nations. Incidentally (well, perhaps not), the author was Bill Clinton's favorite professor at Georgetown. Does this book explain the power dynamic of our modern world? (It begins in the 1890s with a very exclusive club not named but referred to as Milner's Kindergarten, among other names. It lays out British prerogatives of control of the worldwide masses, e.g. controlling education, religion, the media.) I don't recall it even mentioning the Jews. Perhaps it's yet another blind alley, placed there to confuse and ultimately make apathetic?
  20. Macron and his wife were once the same age. Then Macron was kidnapped by alien bankers, went on a relativistic trip around for 24 Standard years, and he came back still in love with the same woman, and married her. True fact.

    Read More
  21. WIlkey says:

    “Macron(age 39) is married to Brigitte Trogneux(age 63), who is 24 years older than him and was his teacher in La Providence high school, Amiens. The pair first met when he was a student in her class, aged 15, but were only officially a couple once he was 18.”

    I can see having a crush on a woman that much older than you. I had one or two such crushes at that age. But unless they’re a wealthy heiress or great intellect (for the few of us whose requirements extend beyond “perky boobs”) you just plain damn don’t marry them, and you certainly don’t introduce them to your mother. Marrying such women is for cucks. I’m guessing that a high school teacher was neither a great intellect nor wealthy heiress.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    The only possible advantage in marrying a much older woman is that you don't get to see your mother-in-law for many years. (one hopes!)
    , @Forbes
    I dunno. Being a teen and having a crush (or other description) on a teacher who's more than a few years older than oneself is positively bizarre. Mommy issues.

    Also, what's it say about the judgment of a teacher who preys on a student in her charge?
  22. snorlax says:
    @Barnard
    OT: https://www.wsj.com/articles/peggy-noonan-wins-2017-pulitzer-prize-for-commentary-1491860551

    Ahead of most others, she foresaw Trump's rise and his appeal to Americans who were frustrated by the leaders of both major political parties.
     
    So all you have to do to win a Pulitzer now is write, "I talked to a Trump supporter I know and understand where they are coming from." We really need new elites.

    Noonan’s been decent. I was genuinely surprised she won.

    Read More
  23. Ray P says:
    @George
    Macron(age 39) is married to Brigitte Trogneux(age 63), who is 24 years older[73] than him and was his teacher in La Providence high school, Amiens.[74][75] The pair first met when he was a student in her class, aged 15, but were only officially a couple once he was 18.[76]

    His parents initially attempted to split the couple by sending him away to Paris to finish the final year of his schooling, as they felt his youth made this relationship inappropriate,[7][76] but the couple stayed together after he graduated, and were married in 2007.

    The couple live with Trogneux's three children from her previous marriage.

    Je ne approvee pas - As Buggs Bunny might say.

    “Here’s to you Mrs. Robinson” Although Hoffman and Ann Bancroft were only a few years apart. I always thought The Graduate should have been directed by a Frenchman.

    Read More
  24. okie says:

    The first article notes that there are over 250k french in London. that a number greater than many a midlands city , has moved in with their old citizenship intact and being courted politically in their old language, is a just and appropriate target for mockery. That the mockery was of the French language and Macron’s odd domestics rather than the Blairite “Elect a new nation” that allowed them in that shows that the PC claws are deep even on the British right. The mocked french are so much more assimilate-able than the Bengalis and Nigerians that are so much more of London.

    I think A lot of commentators here overplay Brexit’s sign as a wake up call to that invasion, as so much of the third world invasion is contained in London and big cities, which were already lost to Labor. A lot of it was these French bakers, the Spanish cooks, the Polish plumbers, who were able to complete directly with a York native’s son without having to break up with their old country, and without that job as a apprentice plumber or a cooks assistant, the Brit goes on the dole and no marriage and no grand-kids. Same thing in the USA with So much of the Cooking and Constructions trades.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    The huge number of French in London is a consequence of Hollande's taxation of high earners, which drove many of the French banking classes across the Channel. These are not poor people (unlike, say, London's Spanish community who all seem to live in cheap Bloomsbury hotels (maybe they work in them)).
    , @celt darnell

    I think A lot of commentators here overplay Brexit’s sign as a wake up call to that invasion, as so much of the third world invasion is contained in London and big cities, which were already lost to Labor.
     
    Well, that and Trump's election are the only wake up calls we've seen thus far. And now that Trump's decided to go full neocon on us...
  25. HBD Guy says:

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/04/170410095847.htm

    Higher wages linked to immigrant diversity

    Posted: 10 Apr 2017 06:58 AM PDT
    Diverse immigrant populations do more than enrich a city’s cultural fabric. According to geographers, they also boost wages — by as much as 21 percent.

    Read More
    • Replies: @celt darnell
    Yet another social science study that can’t be replicated because it’s bullshit. Yawn.
  26. DWB says: • Website

    I have to say, straight out of the gate, that the editors at The Times are slipping. How did they let through “le oiseau” in an article poking fun at the French?

    Seriously, however. France is really in for some more rough sledding. Macron is a popinjay – there is far less to him in a sense than there was to Obama in 2008, and at the same time, far more sinister clockwork running behind the curtain.

    As others have said, Macron is a tool of the global banks – hell, he IS a banker. He has virtually no experience, having risen quickly despite accomplishing practically nothing but giving nice speeches. (Some in the French press are impressed because he can casually toss in lines from Shakespeare in his speeches). He glommed on to the Socialists just long enough to put his mitts on a couple of ideas that, to the rest of the world, seemed obvious, in an attempt to get the moribund economy going. Then, he bolted the party before too much of the stain of the failures of the cartoonishly incompetent Francois Hollande could stick to him.

    And here he is – at this stage, he is almost surely going to be the next president of France, following the spectacular flame out of Francois Fillon (aside: it is incredibly convenient that it was “discovered” by Le Canard Enchainé that his wife had for years taken a no-work job at hundreds of thousands of Euros just weeks after he got the nomination for Les Républicains).

    Le Pen is just not going to win. She will face off with Macron (unless by some miracle the French mail themselves the equivalent of a letter bomb and put Jean-Luc Melenchon into the final), where, because of the way France votes, he is going to defeat her easily.

    So, that will put into the presidency of France a man with practically no idea what he’s doing, with no allies in either the French assembly or Senate, with enemies on both sides.

    He will get nothing done for five years….

    Read More
    • Replies: @celt darnell
    Word has it that Le Pen actually believes the next presidential election is her best shot. She won't be too old and things will have got a lot worse by then (Macron will see to that).

    Alas, I tend to agree with your analysis...
  27. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    OT: Rice U. does away with ‘master’ term, cites ‘negative historical connotation’

    https://www.thecollegefix.com/post/32087/

    Read More
  28. IBC says:

    That was an entertaining and informative piece by Patrick Kidd. The style is a little reminiscent of Jerome K. Jerome, à la Three Men in a Boat. Lyall should be taking notes instead of criticizing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Paul Walker Most beautiful man ever...
    "That was an entertaining and informative piece by Patrick Kidd."
    That there is some good writin' fer sure.
  29. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    The Rupert Murdoch-owned Times of London, which is not a fan of the European Union…
    …given that Mr. Murdoch’s papers and the rest of the country’s right-leaning news media have spent decades nurturing an ancient anti-Europe narrative…

    Are these statements even true? If I may be pardoned for not automatically trusting the paper of record.

    N.B. the “ancient” part — here picturing Boadicea inveighing against the Romans

    Read More
  30. AndrewR says:

    It is pretty absurd that a major London newspaper would have no journalists who spoke French well, but Lyall’s characterization of the article is dishonest.

    Read More
  31. SF says:

    I was arguing with my boss once that the word handicapped should be considered standard English, not derogatory. One of the things I said was that the French have always said, “handicapé.” He replied, “Well, I don’t care what those frogs say, I’m not going to use a word that offends people.”

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  32. Nico says:
    @dearieme
    Humourless? Yer Kraut? Not at all; rather, his humour is crude, earnest, simple-minded, childish, or excremental; but let no one say it is non-existent.

    Yer Frogs: quite different. A cousin of mine is a Frog. I'm not sure that he enjoys garlic any more than I do. Overheard in an English pub 15 years ago: a burly labourer saying "I could kill for some garlic bread".

    But perish the thought that the NYT should update its stereotypes.

    The French are very divided on garlic: they either love or loathe it.

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  33. @daniel le mouche
    'Humourless? Yer Kraut? Not at all; rather, his humour is crude, earnest, simple-minded, childish, or excremental; but let no one say it is non-existent.'

    The Germans are an earnest people. The English 'humour' is deeply rooted in sarcasm, cynicism, a jaded world view in which they are always right and always on top. This includes comments such as yours. To make fun of the French, the Germans, the Irish, Welsh, Scottish and others is perfectly acceptable to the English, and constitutes a large basis for their so-called humour. One thing they never do is deep soul searching, for they would find something there very base and ugly. Their funny self-depreciation is just lightly poking fun of their little very English quirks, which they in fact deeply love in themselves and consider to be a part of their overall superiority to everyone, save perhaps ther blood brothers the Scandanavians.

    Their funny self-depreciation is just lightly poking fun of their little very English quirks, which they in fact deeply love in themselves and consider to be a part of their overall superiority to everyone,

    But are they wrong?

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  34. hyperbola says:

    Macron is a Goldman Sachs/Rothschild lackey. Someone should look into whether his “marriage” is about jewish power families – especially given the rumors about “gay”.

    Sarah Lyall seems to be a totally useless shill. Probably this is more about “publicity” for the bankers candidate than anything else – in which case the article should just be stupid smoke and mirrors (fits, no?).

    A much better article about the French elections would be this one.

    Big Stakes in the French Presidential Election: Governance Versus the People

    http://www.counterpunch.org/2017/03/31/big-stakes-in-the-french-presidential-election-governance-versus-the-people/

    The 2017 French Presidential election is no joke. It is shaping up as a highly significant encounter between two profoundly opposing conceptions of political life. On one side, governance, meaning the joint management of society by a co-opted elite, on the model of business corporations. On the other side, the traditional system called “democracy”, meaning the people’s choice of leaders by free and fair elections….

    And a good description of Macron personally is this one.
    “Emmanuel Macron, un político judío de Rothschild para sustituir a su amigo Manuel Valls y hacer frente a Marine Le Pen. Traerá 20.000 agentes mossad disfrazados de científicos”.

    https://eladiofernandez.wordpress.com/2017/02/07/emmanuel-macron-un-politico-judio-de-rothschild-para-sustituir-a-su-amigo-manuel-valls-y-hacer-frente-a-marine-le-pen-traera-20000-agentes-mossad-disfrazados-de-cientificos/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Nico
    Counterpunch, of course, overstates things for a number of reasons, but in general, it is not clear to me that elections are at all significant by themselves except in the case of 1) massive landslide ( > 60%) margins of victory with high turnout, or 2) dramatic and unawaited upsets. It is highly doubtful that the current French election will be either of these. Trust me when I say that the French social and political landscape has not undergone any huge paradigm shifts over the last five years, though admittedly it has become much more fragile. That is why significant changes are unlikely.

    Probably the only thing that would make a difference is if Marine Le Pen pulled off a dramatic upset as in, winning over 50% and eliminating all her rivals on the first round, and even then, it is not clear that that would make a significant difference for the simple reason that, as with Donald Trump, it is not clear whether she is as prepared to actually govern as she thinks (or, more to the point, would like the electorate to think) she is. (Not that any of her rivals are much better and in fact all of them except François Fillon are very significantly worse. Same as with Trump, both in the primary and in the general.)
  35. Nico says:
    @George
    Macron(age 39) is married to Brigitte Trogneux(age 63), who is 24 years older[73] than him and was his teacher in La Providence high school, Amiens.[74][75] The pair first met when he was a student in her class, aged 15, but were only officially a couple once he was 18.[76]

    His parents initially attempted to split the couple by sending him away to Paris to finish the final year of his schooling, as they felt his youth made this relationship inappropriate,[7][76] but the couple stayed together after he graduated, and were married in 2007.

    The couple live with Trogneux's three children from her previous marriage.

    Je ne approvee pas - As Buggs Bunny might say.

    There were rumors that the marriage was a ruse and that Macron is secretly gay, but I have friends who looked into it, even going so far as to make contacts (not of the sodomous kind) on the Parisian gay bar/app circuit but no one could find anything on it. By all accounts the two are in fact very much in love, and yes, there is a serious beta complex about a boy who goes for that and never grows up to care that he’s effectively killed off his lineage. This mindset cannot be unrelated to his constant fapping off to the wonderful colored masses of “diversity” and his open desire to import even more of them into France, which he claims to love. (What do you mean by “France”?)

    Read More
  36. Anonym says:
    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    More from the DM:

    "Suh (pictured with her fiance) is a law student and studies Critical Race Studies at UCLA School of Law, according to her Facebook page"

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4392494/Woman-denied-Airbnb-snowstorm-Asian.html

    So basically this woman expects to con someone into allowing her to leave her two dogs in someone's house for $50/night, along with 2 extra guests and if she doesn't get what she wants she will use her weaponized law degree and media savvy Critical Race Studies training to call down the might of the PC establishment when she does not get her way, provided her mark is foolish enough to call a spade a spade.

    , @Nigel

    OT: The airBNB-ocaust.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2017/04/07/one-word-says-it-all-asian-airbnb-host-reportedly-leaves-guest-stranded-because-of-her-race/?utm_term=.94b03b74065e

    Because semi-cute Asian girls deserve to pull a bait and switch on the stupid round eyes!
     
    At first, I thought you had posted an actual example of indisputable, unjustifiable racism. Then it was noted in the article that the "victim" was studying Critical Race Theory. ahhhhh.... makes more sense now.
  37. NickG says:
    @daniel le mouche
    An American aristocrat, Philips Exeter graduate, complete with stretch face and botox lips. Doesn't say in wiki if she's Jewish. Very unoriginal and dated comments on British men--then again, perhaps not as she likely only rubs shoulders with 'toffs'.

    stretch face and botox lips.

    Come to think of it she does have that lips like a baboon in oestrus’s vagina look, redolent of a botox job.

    I’d wager she has not done much socialising outside of London’s orbital motorway/ freeway – the M25. And of course London is no longer a British city being just north of 40% native British and falling and thus is atypical of England and the UK. A bit like generalising about the States from life in the Beltway.

    She has a number of Big Think videos on YouTube where she gobs off about Blighty and the Brits. I saw 3 of them in a pique of prurient masochism. Today she has an article in the NYT about Brexit in which she commits many sins of omission.

    It’s clear she is a boilerplate bien pensant metropolitan globalist ostentatious ‘liberal’ to the level of self parody.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    Sarah Lyall and Sabrina Rubin Erdely have two things in common: Stating the expected - and bad writing.

    Extremely well adjusted, "critical", and somehow exhausted.

    Reminds me of the NYT correspondent, a woman too, who wrote about Denmark a few weeks ago. Steve Sailer wrote about her - : She was so wrong about everything concerned with the questions of labour and migration and the EU she wrote about, that you could not believe that this was the NYT.

    , @Nico
    The morons who fawn over "cosmopolitan London" enjoy its "diversity" mainly in the form of white British and other Europeans plus a few token patrician East Asians, Africans and Subcontinentals in the city center. When citing an example of how diversity has been good for London they only rarely point to the Paki or Carib ghettos. Frankly 80% of London's POCs could vanish without a trace and no one in the chattering classes would notice the city had become less diverse or think it less cosmopolitan.
  38. Matra says:

    To make fun of the French, the Germans, the Irish, Welsh, Scottish and others is perfectly acceptable to the English, and constitutes a large basis for their so-called humour.

    The Irish, Welsh, Scottish, and English have a mostly shared sense of humour. The non-English Brits give as good as they get and are probably less restrained by PC.

    One thing they never do is deep soul searching, for they would find something there very base and ugly. Their funny self-depreciation is just lightly poking fun of their little very English quirks, which they in fact deeply love in themselves and consider to be a part of their overall superiority to everyone

    If it makes you feel any better that type of Englishmen is much harder on his fellow English who are from the wrong class, or read the wrong newspapers, or come from other regions than they are on any foreigners.

    I can see having a crush on a woman that much older than you. I had one or two such crushes at that age. But unless they’re a wealthy heiress or great intellect (for the few of us whose requirements extend beyond “perky boobs”) you just plain damn don’t marry them, and you certainly don’t introduce them to your mother.

    I think everyone just assumes Macron is homosexual.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Nico

    If it makes you feel any better that type of Englishmen is much harder on his fellow English who are from the wrong class, or read the wrong newspapers, or come from other regions than they are on any foreigners.
     
    Nowadays "that kind" of Englishman is basically extinct, and in his place is usually one of two things. The first is a metrosexual yuppy snob who disdains any "non-Enlightened" Englishman and pines for the approval of Irishmen, Scots and Continentals as well as other (non-American) foreigners. Nick Clegg is this kind of Englishman.

    The second is a reactionary dandy snob LARPing at Chesterton or Belloc and who actually believes that by ignoring the POCs they will just go away and they can pretend that it's still the grand Georgian imperial day.

    Mind you, these types aren't exclusive to England by any means but it is in England that I've noticed the highest concentrations of the most extreme type of either.


    I think everyone just assumes Macron is homosexual.
     
    As per my earlier post, this has been a widespread rumor in France but I know people who have launched very gory investigations into the matter and turned up zilch.
    , @IBC
    Prince Charles loved Spike Milligan and Milligan strongly identified as Irish.
  39. Anonym says:
    @Anonym
    OT: The airBNB-ocaust.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2017/04/07/one-word-says-it-all-asian-airbnb-host-reportedly-leaves-guest-stranded-because-of-her-race/?utm_term=.94b03b74065e

    Because semi-cute Asian girls deserve to pull a bait and switch on the stupid round eyes!

    More from the DM:

    “Suh (pictured with her fiance) is a law student and studies Critical Race Studies at UCLA School of Law, according to her Facebook page”

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4392494/Woman-denied-Airbnb-snowstorm-Asian.html

    So basically this woman expects to con someone into allowing her to leave her two dogs in someone’s house for $50/night, along with 2 extra guests and if she doesn’t get what she wants she will use her weaponized law degree and media savvy Critical Race Studies training to call down the might of the PC establishment when she does not get her way, provided her mark is foolish enough to call a spade a spade.

    Read More
    • Replies: @candid_observer
    I find this story just baffling as reported.

    Supposedly, the Asian woman claimed that she texted the proprietor in advance to see if she could bring along the additional two friends and two "puppies", and that the proprietor responded that it was OK. But then, apropos of nothing in the reported story that I could see, the same proprietor suddenly told the Asian woman that, no, she couldn't bring these extra people and two dogs and that it was crazy for her to think she should be able to do so. At that point, the proprietor brings up the Asian thing.

    The Asian woman claimed that she had screen shots of the texts verifying that the proprietor had told her it was OK to bring the extra people and pets.

    Did the journalists reporting this see those screen shots? Did anyone but the Asian woman herself in any way confirm any of this? Or did the Asian woman just go with her friends and pets and expect that the proprietor would just have to deal with it?

    There are parts of the story that don't make a lot of sense as reported: Why did the proprietor change her mind so suddenly? If she was such a bigot about Asians, why did she rent out the room to her in the first place?

    Some years ago, there used to be a profession whose job it was to get to the bottom of such things, and would report it to the public. They were called journalists.

    What a service they could do us now!
  40. HBD Guy says:

    Ayn Rand:

    The Age of Envy

    A culture, like an individual, has a sense of life or, rather, the equivalent of a sense of life—an emotional atmosphere created by its dominant philosophy, by its view of man and of existence. This emotional atmosphere represents a culture’s dominant values and serves as the leitmotif of a given age, setting its trends and its style.
    Thus Western civilization had an Age of Reason and an Age of Enlightenment. In those periods, the quest for reason and enlightenment was the dominant intellectual drive and created a corresponding emotional atmosphere that fostered these values.
    Today, we live in the Age of Envy.
    “Envy” is not the emotion I have in mind, but it is the clearest manifestation of an emotion that has remained nameless; it is the only element of a complex emotional sum that men have permitted themselves to identify.

    [MORE]

    Envy is regarded by most people as a petty, superficial emotion and, therefore, it serves as a semihuman cover for so inhuman an emotion that those who feel it seldom dare admit it even to themselves. Mankind has lived with it, has observed its manifestations and, to various extents, has been ravaged by it for countless centuries, yet has failed to grasp its meaning and to rebel against its exponents.
    Today, that emotion is the leitmotif, the sense of life of our culture. It is all around us, we are drowning in it, it is almost explicitly confessed by its more brazen exponents—yet men continue to evade its existence and are peculiarly afraid to name it, as primitive people were once afraid to pronounce the name of the devil.
    That emotion is: hatred of the good for being the good.
    This hatred is not resentment against some prescribed view of the good with which one does not agree. For instance, if a child resents some conventional type of obedient boy who is constantly held up to him as an ideal to emulate, this is not hatred of the good: the child does not regard that boy as good, and his resentment is the product of a clash between his values and those of his elders (though he is too young to grasp the issue in such terms). Similarly, if an adult does not regard altruism as good and resents the adulation bestowed upon some “humanitarian,” this is a clash between his values and those of others, not hatred of the good.
    Hatred of the good for being the good means hatred of that which one regards as good by one’s own (conscious or subconscious) judgment. It means hatred of a person for possessing a value or virtue one regards as desirable.
    If a child wants to get good grades in school, but is unable or unwilling to achieve them and begins to hate the children who do, that is hatred of the good. If a man regards intelligence as a value, but is troubled by self-doubt and begins to hate the men he judges to be intelligent, that is hatred of the good.
    The nature of the particular values a man chooses to hold is not the primary factor in this issue (although irrational values may contribute a great deal to the formation of that emotion). The primary factor and distinguishing characteristic is an emotional mechanism set in reverse: a response of hatred, not toward human vices, but toward human virtues.
    To be exact, the emotional mechanism is not set in reverse, but is set one way: its exponents do not experience love for evil men; their emotional range is limited to hatred or indifference. It is impossible to experience love, which is a response to values, when one’s automatized response to values is hatred.
    In any specific instance, this type of hatred is heavily enmeshed in rationalizations. The most common one is: “I don’t hate him for his intelligence, but for his conceit!” More often than not, if one asks the speaker to name the evidence of the victim’s conceit, he exhausts such generalities as: “He’s insolent … he’s stubborn … he’s selfish,” and ends up with some indeterminate accusation which amounts to: “He’s intelligent and he knows it.” Well, why shouldn’t he know it? Blank out. Should he hide it? Blank out. From whom should he hide it? The implicit, but never stated, answer is: “From people like me.”
    Yet such haters accept and even seem to admire the spectacle of conceit put on for their benefit by a man who shows off, boasting about his own alleged virtues or achievements, blatantly confessing a lack of self-confidence. This, of course, is a clue to the nature of the hatred. The haters seem unable to differentiate conceptually between “conceit” and a deserved pride, yet they seem to know the difference “instinctively,” i.e., by means of their automatized sense of life.
    Since very few men have fully consistent characters, it is often hard to tell, in a specific instance, whether a given man is hated for his virtues or for his actual flaws. In regard to one’s own feelings, only a rigorously conscientious habit of introspection can enable one to be certain of the nature and causes of one’s emotional responses. But introspection is the mental process most fiercely avoided by the haters, which permits them a virtually unlimited choice of rationalizations. In regard to judging the emotional responses of others, it is extremely difficult to tell their reasons in a specific case, particularly if it involves complex personal relationships. It is, therefore, in the broad, impersonal field of responses to strangers, to casual acquaintances, to public figures or to events that have no direct bearing on the haters’ own lives that one can observe the hatred of the good in a pure, unmistakable form.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief

    That emotion is: hatred of the good for being the good.
     
    cf. Arthur Schopenhauer - Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life

    "Envy is natural for humans: Even though it is a debauchment and an infidelity at once. Somebodys envy shows, just how unhappy he is; how much his mind is absorbed with the actions of others, and how very bored he is. Look upon such an envious person as the enemy of our luck and a bad Demon, which we should try to suffocate. "

    cf. Bob Dylan It's Alright Ma (I'm only bleeding) -

    (...) Bent out of shape from society's pliers/
    Cares not to come up any higher/
    But rather get you down in the hole/
    That he's in

  41. dearieme says:
    @daniel le mouche
    'Humourless? Yer Kraut? Not at all; rather, his humour is crude, earnest, simple-minded, childish, or excremental; but let no one say it is non-existent.'

    The Germans are an earnest people. The English 'humour' is deeply rooted in sarcasm, cynicism, a jaded world view in which they are always right and always on top. This includes comments such as yours. To make fun of the French, the Germans, the Irish, Welsh, Scottish and others is perfectly acceptable to the English, and constitutes a large basis for their so-called humour. One thing they never do is deep soul searching, for they would find something there very base and ugly. Their funny self-depreciation is just lightly poking fun of their little very English quirks, which they in fact deeply love in themselves and consider to be a part of their overall superiority to everyone, save perhaps ther blood brothers the Scandanavians.

    If I were English I would point out that you are spouting rubbish: in fact I’ll point it out anyway.

    “To make fun of the French, the Germans, the Irish, Welsh, Scottish and others is perfectly acceptable to the English, and constitutes a large basis for their so-called humour.”

    It makes up a negligible part of their humour, though the sort of humourless prat who doesn’t usually recognise when a joke has been made might notice only that sort of remark.

    Read More
    • Replies: @daniel le mouche
    there's no need to call me humorless, or a prat.
    i'm not quite sure what a prat is.
    but humorless, no! just because i make a truthful remark, an observation, which you feel insults you, you call me humorless.
  42. Nico says:
    @Matra
    To make fun of the French, the Germans, the Irish, Welsh, Scottish and others is perfectly acceptable to the English, and constitutes a large basis for their so-called humour.

    The Irish, Welsh, Scottish, and English have a mostly shared sense of humour. The non-English Brits give as good as they get and are probably less restrained by PC.

    One thing they never do is deep soul searching, for they would find something there very base and ugly. Their funny self-depreciation is just lightly poking fun of their little very English quirks, which they in fact deeply love in themselves and consider to be a part of their overall superiority to everyone

    If it makes you feel any better that type of Englishmen is much harder on his fellow English who are from the wrong class, or read the wrong newspapers, or come from other regions than they are on any foreigners.

    I can see having a crush on a woman that much older than you. I had one or two such crushes at that age. But unless they’re a wealthy heiress or great intellect (for the few of us whose requirements extend beyond “perky boobs”) you just plain damn don’t marry them, and you certainly don’t introduce them to your mother.

    I think everyone just assumes Macron is homosexual.

    If it makes you feel any better that type of Englishmen is much harder on his fellow English who are from the wrong class, or read the wrong newspapers, or come from other regions than they are on any foreigners.

    Nowadays “that kind” of Englishman is basically extinct, and in his place is usually one of two things. The first is a metrosexual yuppy snob who disdains any “non-Enlightened” Englishman and pines for the approval of Irishmen, Scots and Continentals as well as other (non-American) foreigners. Nick Clegg is this kind of Englishman.

    The second is a reactionary dandy snob LARPing at Chesterton or Belloc and who actually believes that by ignoring the POCs they will just go away and they can pretend that it’s still the grand Georgian imperial day.

    Mind you, these types aren’t exclusive to England by any means but it is in England that I’ve noticed the highest concentrations of the most extreme type of either.

    I think everyone just assumes Macron is homosexual.

    As per my earlier post, this has been a widespread rumor in France but I know people who have launched very gory investigations into the matter and turned up zilch.

    Read More
    • Replies: @celt darnell

    Nowadays “that kind” of Englishman is basically extinct, and in his place is usually one of two things. The first is a metrosexual yuppy snob who disdains any “non-Enlightened” Englishman and pines for the approval of Irishmen, Scots and Continentals as well as other (non-American) foreigners. Nick Clegg is this kind of Englishman.
     
    Not outside of London we're not.

    Come to think of it, I know a fair few Londoners like this, too.

    But no, you won't be seeing us on the BBC.
  43. A claim could be made that the English who were pushed out of London by high real estate prices and multicultural mayhem were the exact voters who gave the EU exit side the 52-48 victory. East Anglia, the Celtic periphery, the South coast, Yorkshire, the Midlands and English refugees from London won the day for English sovereignty by voting to leave the EU. London can be won back when the time comes, and demographic problems caused by mass immigration can be solved.

    The Economist Magazine kept saying that high real estate prices in parts of England could be fixed by a massive new construction boom. The Economist Magazine wanted to build on the green belts surrounding towns and cities. The Economist Magazine is a glossy rag that always prints what will benefit bankers.

    The answer to high real estate prices is to stop all immigration and deport many of the foreigners in England. England is one of the most densely populated parts of Europe, they would be better off with 10 million fewer residents. Foreigners first, and then Tony Blair and his crowd should be made to walk the plank.

    Voters listened to Farage and voted to leave the EU in order to take back control of immigration policy from the EU. The English ruling class had always had control of immigration policy, but it was better to tell the peasants in England that the bureaucrat wogs in the EU were the ones to blame.

    English patriots must make a collective political Viking raid on London. The foreigners can be made to leave, and the English can get London back. Just as Americans should not give up the state of New York or California, the English should not allow London to be taken from them by foreigners.

    Read More
  44. BB753 says:
    @WIlkey
    "Macron(age 39) is married to Brigitte Trogneux(age 63), who is 24 years older than him and was his teacher in La Providence high school, Amiens. The pair first met when he was a student in her class, aged 15, but were only officially a couple once he was 18."

    I can see having a crush on a woman that much older than you. I had one or two such crushes at that age. But unless they're a wealthy heiress or great intellect (for the few of us whose requirements extend beyond "perky boobs") you just plain damn don't marry them, and you certainly don't introduce them to your mother. Marrying such women is for cucks. I'm guessing that a high school teacher was neither a great intellect nor wealthy heiress.

    The only possible advantage in marrying a much older woman is that you don’t get to see your mother-in-law for many years. (one hopes!)

    Read More
    • Replies: @celt darnell

    The only possible advantage in marrying a much older woman is that you don’t get to see your mother-in-law for many years. (one hopes!)
     
    Er yes, but haven't you effectively married your mother-in-law?
  45. black sea says:

    “A sense of humor is a serious business; and it isn’t funny, not having one. Watch the humorless closely: the cocked and furtive way they monitor all conversation, their flashes of panic as irony or exaggeration eludes them, the relief with which they submit to the meaningless babble of unanimous laughter.”
    –Martin Amis

    Read More
    • Replies: @daniel le mouche
    “A sense of humor is a serious business; and it isn’t funny, not having one. Watch the humorless closely: the cocked and furtive way they monitor all conversation, their flashes of panic as irony or exaggeration eludes them, the relief with which they submit to the meaningless babble of unanimous laughter.”
    –Martin Amis

    Maybe they're just insecure. And telling them they're not funny only worsens it. But there's no need to abuse such people, it seems to me.
    , @Steve Sailer
    I feel a similar sense of panic when the rest of the audience starts clapping along in rhythm to the music.
  46. @NickG

    by Sarah Lyall
     
    One can practically see the sour lemon face......I don't think she's getting much, or that that she is getting, isn't quite up to snuff...

    Here she is on British Men

    I wouldn’t touch her with yours, as they say in Liverpool.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    Well someone has, she's got kids. In fact her husband had a stroke two months after marrying her, coincidence I suppose.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_McCrum
  47. @NickG

    stretch face and botox lips.
     
    Come to think of it she does have that lips like a baboon in oestrus's vagina look, redolent of a botox job.

    I'd wager she has not done much socialising outside of London's orbital motorway/ freeway - the M25. And of course London is no longer a British city being just north of 40% native British and falling and thus is atypical of England and the UK. A bit like generalising about the States from life in the Beltway.

    She has a number of Big Think videos on YouTube where she gobs off about Blighty and the Brits. I saw 3 of them in a pique of prurient masochism. Today she has an article in the NYT about Brexit in which she commits many sins of omission.

    It's clear she is a boilerplate bien pensant metropolitan globalist ostentatious 'liberal' to the level of self parody.

    Sarah Lyall and Sabrina Rubin Erdely have two things in common: Stating the expected – and bad writing.

    Extremely well adjusted, “critical”, and somehow exhausted.

    Reminds me of the NYT correspondent, a woman too, who wrote about Denmark a few weeks ago. Steve Sailer wrote about her – : She was so wrong about everything concerned with the questions of labour and migration and the EU she wrote about, that you could not believe that this was the NYT.

    Read More
  48. @Front toward enemy
    Show of hands, who got the reference "....for my pen ( the one belonging to my aunt)". I found it in the deep recesses of my mind and surprised myself and my wife.
    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Oh, dear, our postilion has been struck by lightning.
  49. @okie
    The first article notes that there are over 250k french in London. that a number greater than many a midlands city , has moved in with their old citizenship intact and being courted politically in their old language, is a just and appropriate target for mockery. That the mockery was of the French language and Macron's odd domestics rather than the Blairite "Elect a new nation" that allowed them in that shows that the PC claws are deep even on the British right. The mocked french are so much more assimilate-able than the Bengalis and Nigerians that are so much more of London.

    I think A lot of commentators here overplay Brexit's sign as a wake up call to that invasion, as so much of the third world invasion is contained in London and big cities, which were already lost to Labor. A lot of it was these French bakers, the Spanish cooks, the Polish plumbers, who were able to complete directly with a York native's son without having to break up with their old country, and without that job as a apprentice plumber or a cooks assistant, the Brit goes on the dole and no marriage and no grand-kids. Same thing in the USA with So much of the Cooking and Constructions trades.

    The huge number of French in London is a consequence of Hollande’s taxation of high earners, which drove many of the French banking classes across the Channel. These are not poor people (unlike, say, London’s Spanish community who all seem to live in cheap Bloomsbury hotels (maybe they work in them)).

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    • Replies: @okie
    i typed in Banker, but replaced it with Baker, as that class didn't fit my analogy, However, the french unemployment rate is over double the UK (10 to 5) and probably leads to lots of french bakers, butchers, and for all i know artisinal candlestick makers to drift over the channel. Back when i was a youth that sort of disparity led of flows of folk to the lower state and the old "last one out of ____ turn out the lights" bumper stickers, but US states are not nations even tho Brussels would love to reduce them to that level.
  50. Fredrik says:
    @a reader
    ... deriding the European Union as an impenetrable, out-of-control bureaucracy sucking up British money and imposing risible, onerous laws on an unwitting populace.

    The most [in]famous of those laws being the one banning kettles and toasters to save the planet.

    Only that they weren’t proposing to banning kettles and toasters at all. Maybe UK and US industry is incapable of adjusting but other countries manufactureres are not.

    Lots of people want to be outraged and the English press helps them.

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  51. Nico says:
    @NickG

    stretch face and botox lips.
     
    Come to think of it she does have that lips like a baboon in oestrus's vagina look, redolent of a botox job.

    I'd wager she has not done much socialising outside of London's orbital motorway/ freeway - the M25. And of course London is no longer a British city being just north of 40% native British and falling and thus is atypical of England and the UK. A bit like generalising about the States from life in the Beltway.

    She has a number of Big Think videos on YouTube where she gobs off about Blighty and the Brits. I saw 3 of them in a pique of prurient masochism. Today she has an article in the NYT about Brexit in which she commits many sins of omission.

    It's clear she is a boilerplate bien pensant metropolitan globalist ostentatious 'liberal' to the level of self parody.

    The morons who fawn over “cosmopolitan London” enjoy its “diversity” mainly in the form of white British and other Europeans plus a few token patrician East Asians, Africans and Subcontinentals in the city center. When citing an example of how diversity has been good for London they only rarely point to the Paki or Carib ghettos. Frankly 80% of London’s POCs could vanish without a trace and no one in the chattering classes would notice the city had become less diverse or think it less cosmopolitan.

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    • Replies: @daniel le mouche
    The only parts of London I have enjoyed have been the areas with a greater mixture of peoples, like the East End/Hackney. It at least makes it seem A LITTLE BIT interesting. I've seen little to nothing of 'Paki or Carib ghettos', as you call them. For a real ghetto, try Philadelphia, Detroit, the south side of Chicago, DC, New York, New Orleans, to name a few. London has nothing to compare.
  52. Boomstick says:

    What Sarah Lyall did seems to be a common bank shot in polite society these days. What Patrick Kidd wrote was objectively funny. “Mr Macron did not ask for directions to la gare once, for example.” Ha ha! “Donde está la biblioteca” was a staple back when I was taking Spanish during middle school, despite the superior utility of “Dos cervezas, por favor.”

    But writing something like “Kidd wrote a funny article and here are some of the jokes” is unacceptable because Kidd is pro-Brexit and is therefore a racist xenophobic hater. You can’t say people you disagree with are funny or clever! So what Lyall did instead was cluck about how Kidd was a hater who says mean things about the French. And the proof that he is so mean is that he told these jokes. Which are funny. But now Lyall can repeat the jokes without admitting that they’re funny, or that Kidd is a funny guy and a good writer.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The kicker is that those jokes aren't even Francophobic, but rather in the ancient 700 hundred year-old (it's in the Cantebury Tales) English tradition of making fun of their own bad French.

    Wiki bio says she's been over there for 20 years--can she really not tell the difference between "hauteur," as she puts it, and silly self-deprecation?
  53. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @BB753
    Indeed. Serious mommy issues, enough to disqualify an adult man from office. I hope Le Pen makes continuous fun of his betatitude, to coin a frenchy word.

    The problem is that half the electorate consists of women over 40 who will find this relationship endearing rather than ridiculous.

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  54. @NickG
    OT - Pure iSteve bait....

    Astonishingly on BBC Radio 4 - Toby Young. The rise and fall of Meritocracy 28 mins.

    With an appearance by Charles Murray and Oliver James in the Stephen Jay Gould role.

    It's pretty good.

    I am close to sure Toby Young is an iSteve reader.

    Oliver James is a real piece of work, Etonian type arrogance but not justified by knowledge or intelligence. When he got into a BTL debate with a real geneticist on a Guardian piece he got caned and responded with ad hominems. Not a gentleman.

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  55. My guess is that Ms. Lyall never heard the sentence “The wogs begin at Calais.”

    With the “s” in Calais pronounced deliberately in full English sibilance.

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  56. @George
    Macron(age 39) is married to Brigitte Trogneux(age 63), who is 24 years older[73] than him and was his teacher in La Providence high school, Amiens.[74][75] The pair first met when he was a student in her class, aged 15, but were only officially a couple once he was 18.[76]

    His parents initially attempted to split the couple by sending him away to Paris to finish the final year of his schooling, as they felt his youth made this relationship inappropriate,[7][76] but the couple stayed together after he graduated, and were married in 2007.

    The couple live with Trogneux's three children from her previous marriage.

    Je ne approvee pas - As Buggs Bunny might say.

    Pourquoi pas?

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  57. @Auntie Analogue
    My guess is that Ms. Lyall never heard the sentence "The wogs begin at Calais."

    With the "s" in Calais pronounced deliberately in full English sibilance.

    You got it slightly wrong “Wogs begin at Calais”.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    You got it slightly wrong “Wogs begin at Calais”.
     
    Calais, Maine, too.

    Though not many, yet.

    , @Auntie Analogue
    My dear Eric Rasmusen, Google what you wrote in your reply to my post and you will find exactly what I wrote in my post. Absent the definite article "The," the declarative statement is ambiguous, because without that article it does not specify peoples foreign to England, and it could also mean that its plural subject wogs begin to journey to anyplace from Calais.
  58. @daniel le mouche
    'Humourless? Yer Kraut? Not at all; rather, his humour is crude, earnest, simple-minded, childish, or excremental; but let no one say it is non-existent.'

    The Germans are an earnest people. The English 'humour' is deeply rooted in sarcasm, cynicism, a jaded world view in which they are always right and always on top. This includes comments such as yours. To make fun of the French, the Germans, the Irish, Welsh, Scottish and others is perfectly acceptable to the English, and constitutes a large basis for their so-called humour. One thing they never do is deep soul searching, for they would find something there very base and ugly. Their funny self-depreciation is just lightly poking fun of their little very English quirks, which they in fact deeply love in themselves and consider to be a part of their overall superiority to everyone, save perhaps ther blood brothers the Scandanavians.

    A thousand Swedes
    Crept through the weeds
    Pursued by one Norwegian.

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    • Replies: @daniel le mouche
    The only other place I've heard that was by an old math teacher, who said, 'A thousand Swedes running through the weeds chased by one Norwegian.' What it has to do with what I said I don't know.
    , @Cortes
    Lutefisk.
    , @Anonymous Nephew

    Not that the Swedes possess no sense of humor.

    “What does Norway have that Sweden doesn't?"
    “Good neighbors.”

    I heard that joke several times.
     

    PJ O'Rourke in Eat The Rich.
  59. @HBD Guy
    Ayn Rand:

    The Age of Envy

    A culture, like an individual, has a sense of life or, rather, the equivalent of a sense of life—an emotional atmosphere created by its dominant philosophy, by its view of man and of existence. This emotional atmosphere represents a culture’s dominant values and serves as the leitmotif of a given age, setting its trends and its style.
    Thus Western civilization had an Age of Reason and an Age of Enlightenment. In those periods, the quest for reason and enlightenment was the dominant intellectual drive and created a corresponding emotional atmosphere that fostered these values.
    Today, we live in the Age of Envy.
    “Envy” is not the emotion I have in mind, but it is the clearest manifestation of an emotion that has remained nameless; it is the only element of a complex emotional sum that men have permitted themselves to identify.



    Envy is regarded by most people as a petty, superficial emotion and, therefore, it serves as a semihuman cover for so inhuman an emotion that those who feel it seldom dare admit it even to themselves. Mankind has lived with it, has observed its manifestations and, to various extents, has been ravaged by it for countless centuries, yet has failed to grasp its meaning and to rebel against its exponents.
    Today, that emotion is the leitmotif, the sense of life of our culture. It is all around us, we are drowning in it, it is almost explicitly confessed by its more brazen exponents—yet men continue to evade its existence and are peculiarly afraid to name it, as primitive people were once afraid to pronounce the name of the devil.
    That emotion is: hatred of the good for being the good.
    This hatred is not resentment against some prescribed view of the good with which one does not agree. For instance, if a child resents some conventional type of obedient boy who is constantly held up to him as an ideal to emulate, this is not hatred of the good: the child does not regard that boy as good, and his resentment is the product of a clash between his values and those of his elders (though he is too young to grasp the issue in such terms). Similarly, if an adult does not regard altruism as good and resents the adulation bestowed upon some “humanitarian,” this is a clash between his values and those of others, not hatred of the good.
    Hatred of the good for being the good means hatred of that which one regards as good by one’s own (conscious or subconscious) judgment. It means hatred of a person for possessing a value or virtue one regards as desirable.
    If a child wants to get good grades in school, but is unable or unwilling to achieve them and begins to hate the children who do, that is hatred of the good. If a man regards intelligence as a value, but is troubled by self-doubt and begins to hate the men he judges to be intelligent, that is hatred of the good.
    The nature of the particular values a man chooses to hold is not the primary factor in this issue (although irrational values may contribute a great deal to the formation of that emotion). The primary factor and distinguishing characteristic is an emotional mechanism set in reverse: a response of hatred, not toward human vices, but toward human virtues.
    To be exact, the emotional mechanism is not set in reverse, but is set one way: its exponents do not experience love for evil men; their emotional range is limited to hatred or indifference. It is impossible to experience love, which is a response to values, when one’s automatized response to values is hatred.
    In any specific instance, this type of hatred is heavily enmeshed in rationalizations. The most common one is: “I don’t hate him for his intelligence, but for his conceit!” More often than not, if one asks the speaker to name the evidence of the victim’s conceit, he exhausts such generalities as: “He’s insolent ... he’s stubborn ... he’s selfish,” and ends up with some indeterminate accusation which amounts to: “He’s intelligent and he knows it.” Well, why shouldn’t he know it? Blank out. Should he hide it? Blank out. From whom should he hide it? The implicit, but never stated, answer is: “From people like me.”
    Yet such haters accept and even seem to admire the spectacle of conceit put on for their benefit by a man who shows off, boasting about his own alleged virtues or achievements, blatantly confessing a lack of self-confidence. This, of course, is a clue to the nature of the hatred. The haters seem unable to differentiate conceptually between “conceit” and a deserved pride, yet they seem to know the difference “instinctively,” i.e., by means of their automatized sense of life.
    Since very few men have fully consistent characters, it is often hard to tell, in a specific instance, whether a given man is hated for his virtues or for his actual flaws. In regard to one’s own feelings, only a rigorously conscientious habit of introspection can enable one to be certain of the nature and causes of one’s emotional responses. But introspection is the mental process most fiercely avoided by the haters, which permits them a virtually unlimited choice of rationalizations. In regard to judging the emotional responses of others, it is extremely difficult to tell their reasons in a specific case, particularly if it involves complex personal relationships. It is, therefore, in the broad, impersonal field of responses to strangers, to casual acquaintances, to public figures or to events that have no direct bearing on the haters’ own lives that one can observe the hatred of the good in a pure, unmistakable form.

    That emotion is: hatred of the good for being the good.

    cf. Arthur Schopenhauer – Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life

    “Envy is natural for humans: Even though it is a debauchment and an infidelity at once. Somebodys envy shows, just how unhappy he is; how much his mind is absorbed with the actions of others, and how very bored he is. Look upon such an envious person as the enemy of our luck and a bad Demon, which we should try to suffocate. ”

    cf. Bob Dylan It’s Alright Ma (I’m only bleeding)

    (…) Bent out of shape from society’s pliers/
    Cares not to come up any higher/
    But rather get you down in the hole/
    That he’s in

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  60. @George
    Macron(age 39) is married to Brigitte Trogneux(age 63), who is 24 years older[73] than him and was his teacher in La Providence high school, Amiens.[74][75] The pair first met when he was a student in her class, aged 15, but were only officially a couple once he was 18.[76]

    His parents initially attempted to split the couple by sending him away to Paris to finish the final year of his schooling, as they felt his youth made this relationship inappropriate,[7][76] but the couple stayed together after he graduated, and were married in 2007.

    The couple live with Trogneux's three children from her previous marriage.

    Je ne approvee pas - As Buggs Bunny might say.

    George, I am only speaking for myself, but at 15 my hormones were raging. A 15 year old boy and a 39 year old teacher screams Inappropriate! Some guys in my HS were being hit on by teachers when we were 15 , but I went to an all boys Catholic school and our teachers were priests, and we all know how that turned out. Now we see young female teacher-teenage student love frequently, so there must be something in the water.

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    • Replies: @Brutusale
    May God forgive me, but I entertained many an impure thought about my 7th/8th grade science teacher, Sister Anne. The full fig of the Sisters of Charity couldn't hide her feminine treasures from the boys in her classes.
  61. @Bill Jones
    I wouldn't touch her with yours, as they say in Liverpool.

    Well someone has, she’s got kids. In fact her husband had a stroke two months after marrying her, coincidence I suppose.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_McCrum

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  62. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    And here in America, black millionaires are allowed to make fun of white homeless people on the street, and post the fun on their Facebook page:

    https://www.liveleak.com/view?i=819_1491673253

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  63. @jim jones
    As Cecil Rhodes said "Remember that you are an Englishman, and have consequently won first prize in the lottery of life."

    Well, Rhodes figures prominently in the book The Anglo American Conspiracy, available online, which thoroughly outlines the familial connections between the rulers of these great nations. Incidentally (well, perhaps not), the author was Bill Clinton’s favorite professor at Georgetown. Does this book explain the power dynamic of our modern world? (It begins in the 1890s with a very exclusive club not named but referred to as Milner’s Kindergarten, among other names. It lays out British prerogatives of control of the worldwide masses, e.g. controlling education, religion, the media.) I don’t recall it even mentioning the Jews. Perhaps it’s yet another blind alley, placed there to confuse and ultimately make apathetic?

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    • Replies: @donut
    "Hidden History: The Secret Origins of the First World War" by Gerry Docherty discusses Milner's group and their part in starting ww1 .

    Here is a lecture he gave on the "Commission for the Relief of Belgium" .

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Udhq5YocJvE
  64. @Eric Rasmusen
    You got it slightly wrong "Wogs begin at Calais".

    You got it slightly wrong “Wogs begin at Calais”.

    Calais, Maine, too.

    Though not many, yet.

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  65. @IBC
    That was an entertaining and informative piece by Patrick Kidd. The style is a little reminiscent of Jerome K. Jerome, à la Three Men in a Boat. Lyall should be taking notes instead of criticizing.

    “That was an entertaining and informative piece by Patrick Kidd.”
    That there is some good writin’ fer sure.

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    • Replies: @IBC
    Huh? Are you defending Sarah Lyall or just trying to get a rise from me? Kidd's piece was very entertaining but also got some facts out there, though maybe they weren't all entirely relevant. I didn't find it to be especially sarcastic. Sarcasm is easy to do but difficult to carry off without sounding like a jerk. Kidd's piece didn't have that tone, but it's a common element in a lot of writing these days and especially online.

    Jerome K. Jerome actually made almost the exact same observation as Kidd about the French taught in British schools. He also said something similar about things like asking where the train station is, except I think the example he gave was in German. Incidentally, I recently re-read some of his writing and it actually reminded me of both Seinfeld's stand-up and the early silent movies and cartoons. His writing definitely had a big influence on later comedy. Maybe Jerry Seinfeld was even named after him? Probably not, but it's certainly possible unless he's said otherwise. I think Jerome is mainly a Christian name so it might not have been an obvious choice for his parents.
  66. Kidd’s piece is apparently a parliamentary sketch – a traditionally sarcastic, even surreal take on the House of Commons or related areas. The NYT seems to have bizarrely assumed it was a serious news article. Two nations divided by a common language.

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    • Replies: @dearieme
    And to think that some people stereotype American journalists as earnest, literalist, ignorant, parochial nincompoops, eh?
  67. Although explicit ethnocentrism is verboten, the cuckservative right in the UK does tolerate soft bigotry towards white sub-races. Hence, you have Daily Telegraph-reading Brits who go on about the irrationality of the French, the corruption and incompetence of Italians, the dishonesty of Greeks, the crudeness of Russians etc. This is especially true when whites of other cultures engage in nepotism or other practices there are heretical to upper middle-class English values.

    I don’t particularly mind this that much as long as they acknowledge areas where Continentals are often superior, like town planning, manufacturing, running train services, and drinking alcohol.

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  68. Nico says:
    @hyperbola
    Macron is a Goldman Sachs/Rothschild lackey. Someone should look into whether his "marriage" is about jewish power families - especially given the rumors about "gay".

    Sarah Lyall seems to be a totally useless shill. Probably this is more about "publicity" for the bankers candidate than anything else - in which case the article should just be stupid smoke and mirrors (fits, no?).

    A much better article about the French elections would be this one.

    Big Stakes in the French Presidential Election: Governance Versus the People
    http://www.counterpunch.org/2017/03/31/big-stakes-in-the-french-presidential-election-governance-versus-the-people/
    The 2017 French Presidential election is no joke. It is shaping up as a highly significant encounter between two profoundly opposing conceptions of political life. On one side, governance, meaning the joint management of society by a co-opted elite, on the model of business corporations. On the other side, the traditional system called “democracy”, meaning the people’s choice of leaders by free and fair elections....


    And a good description of Macron personally is this one.
    “Emmanuel Macron, un político judío de Rothschild para sustituir a su amigo Manuel Valls y hacer frente a Marine Le Pen. Traerá 20.000 agentes mossad disfrazados de científicos”.
    https://eladiofernandez.wordpress.com/2017/02/07/emmanuel-macron-un-politico-judio-de-rothschild-para-sustituir-a-su-amigo-manuel-valls-y-hacer-frente-a-marine-le-pen-traera-20000-agentes-mossad-disfrazados-de-cientificos/

    Counterpunch, of course, overstates things for a number of reasons, but in general, it is not clear to me that elections are at all significant by themselves except in the case of 1) massive landslide ( > 60%) margins of victory with high turnout, or 2) dramatic and unawaited upsets. It is highly doubtful that the current French election will be either of these. Trust me when I say that the French social and political landscape has not undergone any huge paradigm shifts over the last five years, though admittedly it has become much more fragile. That is why significant changes are unlikely.

    Probably the only thing that would make a difference is if Marine Le Pen pulled off a dramatic upset as in, winning over 50% and eliminating all her rivals on the first round, and even then, it is not clear that that would make a significant difference for the simple reason that, as with Donald Trump, it is not clear whether she is as prepared to actually govern as she thinks (or, more to the point, would like the electorate to think) she is. (Not that any of her rivals are much better and in fact all of them except François Fillon are very significantly worse. Same as with Trump, both in the primary and in the general.)

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  69. okie says:
    @Anonymous Nephew
    The huge number of French in London is a consequence of Hollande's taxation of high earners, which drove many of the French banking classes across the Channel. These are not poor people (unlike, say, London's Spanish community who all seem to live in cheap Bloomsbury hotels (maybe they work in them)).

    i typed in Banker, but replaced it with Baker, as that class didn’t fit my analogy, However, the french unemployment rate is over double the UK (10 to 5) and probably leads to lots of french bakers, butchers, and for all i know artisinal candlestick makers to drift over the channel. Back when i was a youth that sort of disparity led of flows of folk to the lower state and the old “last one out of ____ turn out the lights” bumper stickers, but US states are not nations even tho Brussels would love to reduce them to that level.

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  70. @Eric Rasmusen
    A thousand Swedes
    Crept through the weeds
    Pursued by one Norwegian.

    The only other place I’ve heard that was by an old math teacher, who said, ‘A thousand Swedes running through the weeds chased by one Norwegian.’ What it has to do with what I said I don’t know.

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  71. Olorin says:
    @daniel le mouche
    'Humourless? Yer Kraut? Not at all; rather, his humour is crude, earnest, simple-minded, childish, or excremental; but let no one say it is non-existent.'

    The Germans are an earnest people. The English 'humour' is deeply rooted in sarcasm, cynicism, a jaded world view in which they are always right and always on top. This includes comments such as yours. To make fun of the French, the Germans, the Irish, Welsh, Scottish and others is perfectly acceptable to the English, and constitutes a large basis for their so-called humour. One thing they never do is deep soul searching, for they would find something there very base and ugly. Their funny self-depreciation is just lightly poking fun of their little very English quirks, which they in fact deeply love in themselves and consider to be a part of their overall superiority to everyone, save perhaps ther blood brothers the Scandanavians.

    German humor comes via things like observing the inferior engineering of your system/object/philosophy.

    Many years ago I was in rural hinterlands occupied by German ancestry centennial livestock farmers. Two cattle guys I knew pretty well, both of completely German ancestry themselves, and I were on a field walk at another German ancestry guy’s place.

    The two of them suddenly stopped, both pointed at some electrified perimeter fence, and started laughing themselves scarlet and gaggy. They were leaning on each other, pointing and laughing. I’m standing there looking at the fencing, at them, at the posts, at them.

    Finally they caught their breath. I asked what was so funny.

    One pointed and said, barely able to talk for laughing, “He connected copper to steel here!”

    The other, also still laughing, said, “It’ll impede current big time!”

    The first said, “He’ll be restringing this in a year.”

    Electrolysis, I said. They both nodded, and said, more or less simultaneously, “WHAT WAS HE THINKING!?” And they collapsed in laughter again.

    I told someone this story. They said something about guys being competitive, but I don’t think it was that. They seemed to find it genuinely hilarious that someone had deviated from the ideal in engineering a complex system like electrified livestock fencing. They didn’t make fun of the farmer, they laughed at his flawed system.

    There’s something endearing about that. I.e., what works, practically speaking, and how digressing from that is funny. It’s not a mindset that comes from being easily defeated in the material world. It’s a highly engineering mindset, and I’ve seen a similar sense of humor in many Germanic-ancestry engineers I’ve known.

    The Scots/Anglos/Celts seemed to laugh more often at the bad stuff that results when something goes wrong. They wouldn’t laugh at the fencing, they’d laugh when it shocked someone unexpectedly, or electrolysis led the cows to escape.

    The Scandinavians I knew would just sigh and reach for the tools to fix it, maybe tell some ancient Ole and Lena/Oivo and Toivo jokes at the tap room later. (“…Naw, Toivo, those nails go on the OTHER side of the roof, dumbass!” “But Ole, how do we know we get the same boat next time?”)

    My favorite humorist, H.L. Mencken, got a lot of his humor from a similar source methinks. In his mind there was an ideal way to engineer society/human interaction. He found great humor in how reality didn’t measure up. At the flaws in the system.

    Just onionbelting out loud here.

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    • Replies: @IBC

    There’s something endearing about that. I.e., what works, practically speaking, and how digressing from that is funny.

     

    They must be rolling on the floor these days at Volkswagen then.

    I would guess that those people were actually laughing at the person who put up that fence or that they'd been drinking, smoking, etc.

    It would be interesting to know if silent films like the Keystone Cops were ever popular in Germany. I know Donald Duck is fairly popular over there and even more so in the Scandinavian countries --though Donald Duck is more than just slapstick. I think this notion of a logical German "engineering mindset" is overplayed, but it's actually one of the few national stereotypes of that nature that's still acceptable for public dissemination; probably because it helps sell cars and fancy vacuums. The Baron Munchausen stories are German, the cartoonist Thomas Nast was German born and so was the creator of the Katzenjammer Kids comic strip. Maybe you are fluent in German and have had a lot of exposure to German culture, but I think a lot of humor out there, is actually cross-cultural, and is mostly overlooked due to language issues and lack of exposure.
  72. dearieme says:
    @Damocles, of Sword Fame
    Kidd's piece is apparently a parliamentary sketch - a traditionally sarcastic, even surreal take on the House of Commons or related areas. The NYT seems to have bizarrely assumed it was a serious news article. Two nations divided by a common language.

    And to think that some people stereotype American journalists as earnest, literalist, ignorant, parochial nincompoops, eh?

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  73. @Eric Rasmusen
    You got it slightly wrong "Wogs begin at Calais".

    My dear Eric Rasmusen, Google what you wrote in your reply to my post and you will find exactly what I wrote in my post. Absent the definite article “The,” the declarative statement is ambiguous, because without that article it does not specify peoples foreign to England, and it could also mean that its plural subject wogs begin to journey to anyplace from Calais.

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  74. @Nico
    The morons who fawn over "cosmopolitan London" enjoy its "diversity" mainly in the form of white British and other Europeans plus a few token patrician East Asians, Africans and Subcontinentals in the city center. When citing an example of how diversity has been good for London they only rarely point to the Paki or Carib ghettos. Frankly 80% of London's POCs could vanish without a trace and no one in the chattering classes would notice the city had become less diverse or think it less cosmopolitan.

    The only parts of London I have enjoyed have been the areas with a greater mixture of peoples, like the East End/Hackney. It at least makes it seem A LITTLE BIT interesting. I’ve seen little to nothing of ‘Paki or Carib ghettos’, as you call them. For a real ghetto, try Philadelphia, Detroit, the south side of Chicago, DC, New York, New Orleans, to name a few. London has nothing to compare.

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    • Replies: @snorlax
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_England_riots
    , @Chrisnonymous

    It at least makes it seem A LITTLE BIT interesting.
     
    That's pathetic. Rather than talking down, you ought to be embarrassed that you can't find one the world's most historically significant cities interesting without a bit of darkie spice.
    , @Nico
    My appraisal:

    The morons who fawn over “cosmopolitan London” enjoy its “diversity” mainly in the form of white British and other Europeans plus a few token patrician East Asians, Africans and Subcontinentals in the city center. When citing an example of how diversity has been good for London they only rarely point to the Paki or Carib ghettos.
     
    Your testimonial:

    The only parts of London I have enjoyed have been the areas with a greater mixture of peoples, like the East End/Hackney... I’ve seen little to nothing of ‘Paki or Carib ghettos’, as you call them.
     
    I'm not sure whether you realize how perfectly you have just illustrated my point, but I rest my case.
  75. @dearieme
    If I were English I would point out that you are spouting rubbish: in fact I'll point it out anyway.

    "To make fun of the French, the Germans, the Irish, Welsh, Scottish and others is perfectly acceptable to the English, and constitutes a large basis for their so-called humour."

    It makes up a negligible part of their humour, though the sort of humourless prat who doesn't usually recognise when a joke has been made might notice only that sort of remark.

    there’s no need to call me humorless, or a prat.
    i’m not quite sure what a prat is.
    but humorless, no! just because i make a truthful remark, an observation, which you feel insults you, you call me humorless.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cortes
    Prat:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Karloff
    , @fen Tiger
    There's a good discussion of what a prat is here.
  76. Cortes says:

    My favourite non PC joke (needs appropriate gestures for the punchline)

    Q. What was Bruce Lee’s best ever Christmas present?

    A. A TOI!!!

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  77. @black sea
    “A sense of humor is a serious business; and it isn't funny, not having one. Watch the humorless closely: the cocked and furtive way they monitor all conversation, their flashes of panic as irony or exaggeration eludes them, the relief with which they submit to the meaningless babble of unanimous laughter."
    --Martin Amis

    “A sense of humor is a serious business; and it isn’t funny, not having one. Watch the humorless closely: the cocked and furtive way they monitor all conversation, their flashes of panic as irony or exaggeration eludes them, the relief with which they submit to the meaningless babble of unanimous laughter.”
    –Martin Amis

    Maybe they’re just insecure. And telling them they’re not funny only worsens it. But there’s no need to abuse such people, it seems to me.

    Read More
  78. MBlanc46 says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    Marine Le Pen will Make France Proud Again by defeating the banker boy Macron. The corporate media keeps saying that Macron is a centrist and Le Pen is far-right. Marine Le Pen has pointed out that she is a patriot who loves France. Marine Le Pen's advisers have crafted a message that Macron can't do battle with. Le Pen says that the new battle of our time is the fight between Globalizers and Patriots. Between national sovereignty and submission to national dissolution.

    Marine Le Pen has the courage and strength to confront the entirety of the French ruling class on the question of nation-wrecking mass immigration and multicultural mayhem. The French voters will not forget the Islamic terrorist attacks made possible by mass immigration. Macron is a puppet of globalizer bankers who will gladly allow the French torch of liberty to be extinguished by globalization and mass immigration.

    Vive Marine!

    Read More
  79. Cortes says:
    @daniel le mouche
    there's no need to call me humorless, or a prat.
    i'm not quite sure what a prat is.
    but humorless, no! just because i make a truthful remark, an observation, which you feel insults you, you call me humorless.
    Read More
  80. donut says:
    @daniel le mouche
    Well, Rhodes figures prominently in the book The Anglo American Conspiracy, available online, which thoroughly outlines the familial connections between the rulers of these great nations. Incidentally (well, perhaps not), the author was Bill Clinton's favorite professor at Georgetown. Does this book explain the power dynamic of our modern world? (It begins in the 1890s with a very exclusive club not named but referred to as Milner's Kindergarten, among other names. It lays out British prerogatives of control of the worldwide masses, e.g. controlling education, religion, the media.) I don't recall it even mentioning the Jews. Perhaps it's yet another blind alley, placed there to confuse and ultimately make apathetic?

    “Hidden History: The Secret Origins of the First World War” by Gerry Docherty discusses Milner’s group and their part in starting ww1 .

    Here is a lecture he gave on the “Commission for the Relief of Belgium” .

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  81. gruff says:

    OT: The concept of race creeps in (without being named) this article on the origins of the Amerindians.

    http://www.dispatch.com/news/20170402/archaeology-dna-research-helps-understand-how-americas-were-first-populated

    [quote]Mulligan and Szathmary suggest we stop using the word “migration” to describe a process that involved “occupation over several millennia of a consolidated Asian-American land mass, where people differentiated from their source populations, evolving the molecular genetic markers that identify their descendants today as ‘American.’ ”[/quote]

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  82. Marty T says:

    It’s not weird to want to get with your 40 year old teacher when you’re a teenager. It’s really, really weird to marry her ten years later. Seems like psychological scarring from her molesting him.

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  83. IBC says:
    @Paul Walker Most beautiful man ever...
    "That was an entertaining and informative piece by Patrick Kidd."
    That there is some good writin' fer sure.

    Huh? Are you defending Sarah Lyall or just trying to get a rise from me? Kidd’s piece was very entertaining but also got some facts out there, though maybe they weren’t all entirely relevant. I didn’t find it to be especially sarcastic. Sarcasm is easy to do but difficult to carry off without sounding like a jerk. Kidd’s piece didn’t have that tone, but it’s a common element in a lot of writing these days and especially online.

    Jerome K. Jerome actually made almost the exact same observation as Kidd about the French taught in British schools. He also said something similar about things like asking where the train station is, except I think the example he gave was in German. Incidentally, I recently re-read some of his writing and it actually reminded me of both Seinfeld’s stand-up and the early silent movies and cartoons. His writing definitely had a big influence on later comedy. Maybe Jerry Seinfeld was even named after him? Probably not, but it’s certainly possible unless he’s said otherwise. I think Jerome is mainly a Christian name so it might not have been an obvious choice for his parents.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog) is the funniest book title I've ever encountered.

    A distant second is Eating People Is Wrong.

  84. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Boomstick
    What Sarah Lyall did seems to be a common bank shot in polite society these days. What Patrick Kidd wrote was objectively funny. "Mr Macron did not ask for directions to la gare once, for example." Ha ha! "Donde está la biblioteca" was a staple back when I was taking Spanish during middle school, despite the superior utility of "Dos cervezas, por favor."

    But writing something like "Kidd wrote a funny article and here are some of the jokes" is unacceptable because Kidd is pro-Brexit and is therefore a racist xenophobic hater. You can't say people you disagree with are funny or clever! So what Lyall did instead was cluck about how Kidd was a hater who says mean things about the French. And the proof that he is so mean is that he told these jokes. Which are funny. But now Lyall can repeat the jokes without admitting that they're funny, or that Kidd is a funny guy and a good writer.

    The kicker is that those jokes aren’t even Francophobic, but rather in the ancient 700 hundred year-old (it’s in the Cantebury Tales) English tradition of making fun of their own bad French.

    Wiki bio says she’s been over there for 20 years–can she really not tell the difference between “hauteur,” as she puts it, and silly self-deprecation?

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  85. When I was a kid growing up in England in the 50′s and 60′s we always made fun of foreigners like French, Germans, Spaniards, Italians, Welsh, Scots, Irish, because they were funny. Scotsmen were mean, the Irish were drunks, Germans were always saying things like “Achtung, Fritz! Kill the Englander schweinhund”, the French rode bicycles with strings of onions and danced the can-can, Italians were greasy, the Lord said unto Moses all Jews shall have big noses, Indians were like Peter Sellers, Aussies either lived in the outback with kangaroos or they lived in the Earls Court area of London, Chinamen wore pigtails, American were all cowboys and carried six-shooters, and so on.

    There was no harm in it and I assumed that they would make fun of us too. Of course all these stereotypes have proved with time to be incorrect, except the one about Americans.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Americans = fat people with guns
    , @Cortes
    You're just begging for your secret wish:

    http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english//le-vice-anglais
  86. Forbes says:
    @Barnard
    OT: https://www.wsj.com/articles/peggy-noonan-wins-2017-pulitzer-prize-for-commentary-1491860551

    Ahead of most others, she foresaw Trump's rise and his appeal to Americans who were frustrated by the leaders of both major political parties.
     
    So all you have to do to win a Pulitzer now is write, "I talked to a Trump supporter I know and understand where they are coming from." We really need new elites.

    Her reward for having been on the Obama bandwagon…

    Read More
  87. Forbes says:
    @WIlkey
    "Macron(age 39) is married to Brigitte Trogneux(age 63), who is 24 years older than him and was his teacher in La Providence high school, Amiens. The pair first met when he was a student in her class, aged 15, but were only officially a couple once he was 18."

    I can see having a crush on a woman that much older than you. I had one or two such crushes at that age. But unless they're a wealthy heiress or great intellect (for the few of us whose requirements extend beyond "perky boobs") you just plain damn don't marry them, and you certainly don't introduce them to your mother. Marrying such women is for cucks. I'm guessing that a high school teacher was neither a great intellect nor wealthy heiress.

    I dunno. Being a teen and having a crush (or other description) on a teacher who’s more than a few years older than oneself is positively bizarre. Mommy issues.

    Also, what’s it say about the judgment of a teacher who preys on a student in her charge?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    I dunno. Being a teen and having a crush (or other description) on a teacher who’s more than a few years older than oneself is positively bizarre. Mommy issues. Also, what’s it say about the judgment of a teacher who preys on a student in her charge?

    Mommy issues? Not necessarily. There are plenty of sexy 35-40 year-old women out there. Thank God for that, since I am now married to one (yes, she's younger than me, not older). When you're a horny 16-year-old a sexy older woman who's also a bit experienced can be a huge turn on. And believe me, the ones I found attractive looked absolutely nothing like my mother.
  88. IBC says:
    @Olorin
    German humor comes via things like observing the inferior engineering of your system/object/philosophy.

    Many years ago I was in rural hinterlands occupied by German ancestry centennial livestock farmers. Two cattle guys I knew pretty well, both of completely German ancestry themselves, and I were on a field walk at another German ancestry guy's place.

    The two of them suddenly stopped, both pointed at some electrified perimeter fence, and started laughing themselves scarlet and gaggy. They were leaning on each other, pointing and laughing. I'm standing there looking at the fencing, at them, at the posts, at them.

    Finally they caught their breath. I asked what was so funny.

    One pointed and said, barely able to talk for laughing, "He connected copper to steel here!"

    The other, also still laughing, said, "It'll impede current big time!"

    The first said, "He'll be restringing this in a year."

    Electrolysis, I said. They both nodded, and said, more or less simultaneously, "WHAT WAS HE THINKING!?" And they collapsed in laughter again.

    I told someone this story. They said something about guys being competitive, but I don't think it was that. They seemed to find it genuinely hilarious that someone had deviated from the ideal in engineering a complex system like electrified livestock fencing. They didn't make fun of the farmer, they laughed at his flawed system.

    There's something endearing about that. I.e., what works, practically speaking, and how digressing from that is funny. It's not a mindset that comes from being easily defeated in the material world. It's a highly engineering mindset, and I've seen a similar sense of humor in many Germanic-ancestry engineers I've known.

    The Scots/Anglos/Celts seemed to laugh more often at the bad stuff that results when something goes wrong. They wouldn't laugh at the fencing, they'd laugh when it shocked someone unexpectedly, or electrolysis led the cows to escape.

    The Scandinavians I knew would just sigh and reach for the tools to fix it, maybe tell some ancient Ole and Lena/Oivo and Toivo jokes at the tap room later. ("...Naw, Toivo, those nails go on the OTHER side of the roof, dumbass!" "But Ole, how do we know we get the same boat next time?")

    My favorite humorist, H.L. Mencken, got a lot of his humor from a similar source methinks. In his mind there was an ideal way to engineer society/human interaction. He found great humor in how reality didn't measure up. At the flaws in the system.

    Just onionbelting out loud here.

    There’s something endearing about that. I.e., what works, practically speaking, and how digressing from that is funny.

    They must be rolling on the floor these days at Volkswagen then.

    I would guess that those people were actually laughing at the person who put up that fence or that they’d been drinking, smoking, etc.

    It would be interesting to know if silent films like the Keystone Cops were ever popular in Germany. I know Donald Duck is fairly popular over there and even more so in the Scandinavian countries –though Donald Duck is more than just slapstick. I think this notion of a logical German “engineering mindset” is overplayed, but it’s actually one of the few national stereotypes of that nature that’s still acceptable for public dissemination; probably because it helps sell cars and fancy vacuums. The Baron Munchausen stories are German, the cartoonist Thomas Nast was German born and so was the creator of the Katzenjammer Kids comic strip. Maybe you are fluent in German and have had a lot of exposure to German culture, but I think a lot of humor out there, is actually cross-cultural, and is mostly overlooked due to language issues and lack of exposure.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief

    I think a lot of humor out there, is actually cross-cultural, and is mostly overlooked due to language issues and lack of exposure
     
    There is a serious language issue concerning humor.

    The second best german prose writer after the WW II is never mentioned by a foreign correspondent. Even though he had quite a few bestsellers (Eckhard Henscheid).

    None of the New Franfurt School cartoonists and/or authors is even translated. All of them are really funny, and Henscheid is the funniest of them. The satirical monthly TITANIC (cofounded by Henscheid) at least was very funny for years and years. I never met an Englishman or a French person who liked it.

    Never ever did I find an article about a comic genius like the bavarian Gerhard Polt in any foreign paper. I guess, those foreign correspondents just don't grab what's at stake. And indeed - role-prose for example is quite hard to decipher if you are not very good in a foreign language and deeply rooted in it's culture a n d everyday habits, and lots of German comedy is just that: Role-prose (Gerd Dudenhöfer, Rolf Miller, the above mentioned part-time genius, really, Gerhard Polt).


    And have a look at the foreign language-departments: You'll have a hard time to find somebody there in America who points a the simple fact, that there is no Goethe-Faust without humor. Even though Mephisto is one of the two main characters in Faust and - you can't understand him at all if you don't understand his fast and witty (= dirty, cynical, funny....) mind.

    Not to mention Jean Paul Friedrich Richter. A genius if ever there was one, and very funny lots of times - to hardly any effect at all abroad (Franzen once mentioned him, Mdm. de Stael wrote a little bit about him, but as far as I can see, that was almost it - during rougly 200 years).

  89. snorlax says:
    @daniel le mouche
    The only parts of London I have enjoyed have been the areas with a greater mixture of peoples, like the East End/Hackney. It at least makes it seem A LITTLE BIT interesting. I've seen little to nothing of 'Paki or Carib ghettos', as you call them. For a real ghetto, try Philadelphia, Detroit, the south side of Chicago, DC, New York, New Orleans, to name a few. London has nothing to compare.
    Read More
  90. @daniel le mouche
    'Humourless? Yer Kraut? Not at all; rather, his humour is crude, earnest, simple-minded, childish, or excremental; but let no one say it is non-existent.'

    The Germans are an earnest people. The English 'humour' is deeply rooted in sarcasm, cynicism, a jaded world view in which they are always right and always on top. This includes comments such as yours. To make fun of the French, the Germans, the Irish, Welsh, Scottish and others is perfectly acceptable to the English, and constitutes a large basis for their so-called humour. One thing they never do is deep soul searching, for they would find something there very base and ugly. Their funny self-depreciation is just lightly poking fun of their little very English quirks, which they in fact deeply love in themselves and consider to be a part of their overall superiority to everyone, save perhaps ther blood brothers the Scandanavians.

    And, assuming you are as French as your moniker, you know your people call us “les rosbifs”

    That translates literally as “the roastbeefs” but a more accurate translation is “the meatheads.”

    Fair enough. Everyone on this earth makes fun of foreigners. Don’t let it get to you, mon ami!

    And Vive Le Pen!

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  91. @okie
    The first article notes that there are over 250k french in London. that a number greater than many a midlands city , has moved in with their old citizenship intact and being courted politically in their old language, is a just and appropriate target for mockery. That the mockery was of the French language and Macron's odd domestics rather than the Blairite "Elect a new nation" that allowed them in that shows that the PC claws are deep even on the British right. The mocked french are so much more assimilate-able than the Bengalis and Nigerians that are so much more of London.

    I think A lot of commentators here overplay Brexit's sign as a wake up call to that invasion, as so much of the third world invasion is contained in London and big cities, which were already lost to Labor. A lot of it was these French bakers, the Spanish cooks, the Polish plumbers, who were able to complete directly with a York native's son without having to break up with their old country, and without that job as a apprentice plumber or a cooks assistant, the Brit goes on the dole and no marriage and no grand-kids. Same thing in the USA with So much of the Cooking and Constructions trades.

    I think A lot of commentators here overplay Brexit’s sign as a wake up call to that invasion, as so much of the third world invasion is contained in London and big cities, which were already lost to Labor.

    Well, that and Trump’s election are the only wake up calls we’ve seen thus far. And now that Trump’s decided to go full neocon on us…

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  92. @DWB
    I have to say, straight out of the gate, that the editors at The Times are slipping. How did they let through "le oiseau" in an article poking fun at the French?

    Seriously, however. France is really in for some more rough sledding. Macron is a popinjay - there is far less to him in a sense than there was to Obama in 2008, and at the same time, far more sinister clockwork running behind the curtain.

    As others have said, Macron is a tool of the global banks - hell, he IS a banker. He has virtually no experience, having risen quickly despite accomplishing practically nothing but giving nice speeches. (Some in the French press are impressed because he can casually toss in lines from Shakespeare in his speeches). He glommed on to the Socialists just long enough to put his mitts on a couple of ideas that, to the rest of the world, seemed obvious, in an attempt to get the moribund economy going. Then, he bolted the party before too much of the stain of the failures of the cartoonishly incompetent Francois Hollande could stick to him.

    And here he is - at this stage, he is almost surely going to be the next president of France, following the spectacular flame out of Francois Fillon (aside: it is incredibly convenient that it was "discovered" by Le Canard Enchainé that his wife had for years taken a no-work job at hundreds of thousands of Euros just weeks after he got the nomination for Les Républicains).

    Le Pen is just not going to win. She will face off with Macron (unless by some miracle the French mail themselves the equivalent of a letter bomb and put Jean-Luc Melenchon into the final), where, because of the way France votes, he is going to defeat her easily.

    So, that will put into the presidency of France a man with practically no idea what he's doing, with no allies in either the French assembly or Senate, with enemies on both sides.

    He will get nothing done for five years....

    Word has it that Le Pen actually believes the next presidential election is her best shot. She won’t be too old and things will have got a lot worse by then (Macron will see to that).

    Alas, I tend to agree with your analysis…

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  93. @HBD Guy
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/04/170410095847.htm

    Higher wages linked to immigrant diversity

    Posted: 10 Apr 2017 06:58 AM PDT
    Diverse immigrant populations do more than enrich a city’s cultural fabric. According to geographers, they also boost wages -- by as much as 21 percent.

    Yet another social science study that can’t be replicated because it’s bullshit. Yawn.

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  94. @Nico

    If it makes you feel any better that type of Englishmen is much harder on his fellow English who are from the wrong class, or read the wrong newspapers, or come from other regions than they are on any foreigners.
     
    Nowadays "that kind" of Englishman is basically extinct, and in his place is usually one of two things. The first is a metrosexual yuppy snob who disdains any "non-Enlightened" Englishman and pines for the approval of Irishmen, Scots and Continentals as well as other (non-American) foreigners. Nick Clegg is this kind of Englishman.

    The second is a reactionary dandy snob LARPing at Chesterton or Belloc and who actually believes that by ignoring the POCs they will just go away and they can pretend that it's still the grand Georgian imperial day.

    Mind you, these types aren't exclusive to England by any means but it is in England that I've noticed the highest concentrations of the most extreme type of either.


    I think everyone just assumes Macron is homosexual.
     
    As per my earlier post, this has been a widespread rumor in France but I know people who have launched very gory investigations into the matter and turned up zilch.

    Nowadays “that kind” of Englishman is basically extinct, and in his place is usually one of two things. The first is a metrosexual yuppy snob who disdains any “non-Enlightened” Englishman and pines for the approval of Irishmen, Scots and Continentals as well as other (non-American) foreigners. Nick Clegg is this kind of Englishman.

    Not outside of London we’re not.

    Come to think of it, I know a fair few Londoners like this, too.

    But no, you won’t be seeing us on the BBC.

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    • Replies: @Nico
    I didn't say ALL Englishmen were like that, only the disdainful chattering classes. That's what I meant by "that kind" of Englishman. And there is a delicious irony to it in that the Nick Cleggs claim to be "skeptical" about the "entrenched" class system in Britain when he himself is the epitome of the 21st-century Londonian bourgeois cosmo liberal snob.
  95. @BB753
    The only possible advantage in marrying a much older woman is that you don't get to see your mother-in-law for many years. (one hopes!)

    The only possible advantage in marrying a much older woman is that you don’t get to see your mother-in-law for many years. (one hopes!)

    Er yes, but haven’t you effectively married your mother-in-law?

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  96. @daniel le mouche
    The only parts of London I have enjoyed have been the areas with a greater mixture of peoples, like the East End/Hackney. It at least makes it seem A LITTLE BIT interesting. I've seen little to nothing of 'Paki or Carib ghettos', as you call them. For a real ghetto, try Philadelphia, Detroit, the south side of Chicago, DC, New York, New Orleans, to name a few. London has nothing to compare.

    It at least makes it seem A LITTLE BIT interesting.

    That’s pathetic. Rather than talking down, you ought to be embarrassed that you can’t find one the world’s most historically significant cities interesting without a bit of darkie spice.

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    • Replies: @daniel le mouche
    'That’s pathetic. Rather than talking down, you ought to be embarrassed that you can’t find one the world’s most historically significant cities interesting without a bit of darkie spice.'

    And yet it's true. Don't get me wrong, though, the museums are great. And the people are fine, if a bit dull.

  97. @Anonymous Nephew
    Zut alors! Sacre nom d'un pipe!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_plume_de_ma_tante_%28linguistics%29

    Oh, dear, our postilion has been struck by lightning.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    Wiki has it again.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_postillion_has_been_struck_by_lightning

    My father served in India during WW2, and we have his Hindi phrasebook, full of stuff like "he is a great drunkard". He was working on radar installation, lots of delicate valves, and inside the front covers he's put the most useful phrases.

    "Leave it alone!"

    "Don't touch it!"

    "Go away!"

    etc


    Nico - odd to think that Nick Clegg and Shane MacGowan of the Pogues were in the same year at Westminster School.

  98. @black sea
    “A sense of humor is a serious business; and it isn't funny, not having one. Watch the humorless closely: the cocked and furtive way they monitor all conversation, their flashes of panic as irony or exaggeration eludes them, the relief with which they submit to the meaningless babble of unanimous laughter."
    --Martin Amis

    I feel a similar sense of panic when the rest of the audience starts clapping along in rhythm to the music.

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    • Replies: @Lurker

    the audience starts clapping along in rhythm to the music.
     
    Or, just as likely, not in rhythm.
  99. guest says:
    @IBC
    Huh? Are you defending Sarah Lyall or just trying to get a rise from me? Kidd's piece was very entertaining but also got some facts out there, though maybe they weren't all entirely relevant. I didn't find it to be especially sarcastic. Sarcasm is easy to do but difficult to carry off without sounding like a jerk. Kidd's piece didn't have that tone, but it's a common element in a lot of writing these days and especially online.

    Jerome K. Jerome actually made almost the exact same observation as Kidd about the French taught in British schools. He also said something similar about things like asking where the train station is, except I think the example he gave was in German. Incidentally, I recently re-read some of his writing and it actually reminded me of both Seinfeld's stand-up and the early silent movies and cartoons. His writing definitely had a big influence on later comedy. Maybe Jerry Seinfeld was even named after him? Probably not, but it's certainly possible unless he's said otherwise. I think Jerome is mainly a Christian name so it might not have been an obvious choice for his parents.

    Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog) is the funniest book title I’ve ever encountered.

    A distant second is Eating People Is Wrong.

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  100. @Eric Rasmusen
    A thousand Swedes
    Crept through the weeds
    Pursued by one Norwegian.

    Not that the Swedes possess no sense of humor.

    “What does Norway have that Sweden doesn’t?”
    “Good neighbors.”

    I heard that joke several times.

    PJ O’Rourke in Eat The Rich.

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  101. @IBC

    There’s something endearing about that. I.e., what works, practically speaking, and how digressing from that is funny.

     

    They must be rolling on the floor these days at Volkswagen then.

    I would guess that those people were actually laughing at the person who put up that fence or that they'd been drinking, smoking, etc.

    It would be interesting to know if silent films like the Keystone Cops were ever popular in Germany. I know Donald Duck is fairly popular over there and even more so in the Scandinavian countries --though Donald Duck is more than just slapstick. I think this notion of a logical German "engineering mindset" is overplayed, but it's actually one of the few national stereotypes of that nature that's still acceptable for public dissemination; probably because it helps sell cars and fancy vacuums. The Baron Munchausen stories are German, the cartoonist Thomas Nast was German born and so was the creator of the Katzenjammer Kids comic strip. Maybe you are fluent in German and have had a lot of exposure to German culture, but I think a lot of humor out there, is actually cross-cultural, and is mostly overlooked due to language issues and lack of exposure.

    I think a lot of humor out there, is actually cross-cultural, and is mostly overlooked due to language issues and lack of exposure

    There is a serious language issue concerning humor.

    The second best german prose writer after the WW II is never mentioned by a foreign correspondent. Even though he had quite a few bestsellers (Eckhard Henscheid).

    None of the New Franfurt School cartoonists and/or authors is even translated. All of them are really funny, and Henscheid is the funniest of them. The satirical monthly TITANIC (cofounded by Henscheid) at least was very funny for years and years. I never met an Englishman or a French person who liked it.

    Never ever did I find an article about a comic genius like the bavarian Gerhard Polt in any foreign paper. I guess, those foreign correspondents just don’t grab what’s at stake. And indeed – role-prose for example is quite hard to decipher if you are not very good in a foreign language and deeply rooted in it’s culture a n d everyday habits, and lots of German comedy is just that: Role-prose (Gerd Dudenhöfer, Rolf Miller, the above mentioned part-time genius, really, Gerhard Polt).

    And have a look at the foreign language-departments: You’ll have a hard time to find somebody there in America who points a the simple fact, that there is no Goethe-Faust without humor. Even though Mephisto is one of the two main characters in Faust and – you can’t understand him at all if you don’t understand his fast and witty (= dirty, cynical, funny….) mind.

    Not to mention Jean Paul Friedrich Richter. A genius if ever there was one, and very funny lots of times – to hardly any effect at all abroad (Franzen once mentioned him, Mdm. de Stael wrote a little bit about him, but as far as I can see, that was almost it – during rougly 200 years).

    Read More
    • Replies: @IBC
    Thanks for the response. A lot of people are working from small sample sizes.

    Also, I think Martin Luther was actually known to be pretty funny at times and Gutenberg's earlier invention of the printing press must have done a lot to spread the idea of political cartoons and popular satirical humor.
  102. Nico says:
    @celt darnell

    Nowadays “that kind” of Englishman is basically extinct, and in his place is usually one of two things. The first is a metrosexual yuppy snob who disdains any “non-Enlightened” Englishman and pines for the approval of Irishmen, Scots and Continentals as well as other (non-American) foreigners. Nick Clegg is this kind of Englishman.
     
    Not outside of London we're not.

    Come to think of it, I know a fair few Londoners like this, too.

    But no, you won't be seeing us on the BBC.

    I didn’t say ALL Englishmen were like that, only the disdainful chattering classes. That’s what I meant by “that kind” of Englishman. And there is a delicious irony to it in that the Nick Cleggs claim to be “skeptical” about the “entrenched” class system in Britain when he himself is the epitome of the 21st-century Londonian bourgeois cosmo liberal snob.

    Read More
    • Replies: @celt darnell
    Fair enough.
    , @Old Palo Altan
    Nick Clegg is even worse than you think. I am sure you know that he is half-Dutch, but if you only read his own and other peoples' puff-pieces about him, all you know is that his mother was born in the Dutch East Indies and was a school teacher. Might be lower-middle class at best you think? You would be wrong: her father was the head of Holland's biggest bank, and her mother is a scion of Holland's first gun-powder manufacturing family (all those little revolts in Indonesia to put down, after all). In sum, Clegg descends from or is connected to just about all of the historically important industrial families of old Holland. That, and that alone, is what has made him a person of interest to the One-Worlders.
    He's their man, or was - Brexit has put a halt to quite a few careers. Thus the anger.
  103. Nico says:
    @daniel le mouche
    The only parts of London I have enjoyed have been the areas with a greater mixture of peoples, like the East End/Hackney. It at least makes it seem A LITTLE BIT interesting. I've seen little to nothing of 'Paki or Carib ghettos', as you call them. For a real ghetto, try Philadelphia, Detroit, the south side of Chicago, DC, New York, New Orleans, to name a few. London has nothing to compare.

    My appraisal:

    The morons who fawn over “cosmopolitan London” enjoy its “diversity” mainly in the form of white British and other Europeans plus a few token patrician East Asians, Africans and Subcontinentals in the city center. When citing an example of how diversity has been good for London they only rarely point to the Paki or Carib ghettos.

    Your testimonial:

    The only parts of London I have enjoyed have been the areas with a greater mixture of peoples, like the East End/Hackney… I’ve seen little to nothing of ‘Paki or Carib ghettos’, as you call them.

    I’m not sure whether you realize how perfectly you have just illustrated my point, but I rest my case.

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    • Replies: @daniel le mouche
    'I’m not sure whether you realize how perfectly you have just illustrated my point, but I rest my case.'

    Not quite, my point was just that I can't recall any particularly dangerous Paki or Carib ghettos. Many of the most dangerous situations I've witnessed in London have been due to the sometimes quite scary local whites. There are certainly black areas that have their violence, Peckham comes to mind, especially on a weekend night when the clubs are full throttle. There were obviously the recent riots, as someone else pointed out. But nothing in London compares to pretty much any mid-size to large American city for black ghetto violence. You can walk right through these black neighborhoods in London and not be accosted even once!--absolutely impossible in south Chicago, north Philly, much of DC, etc.
    Finally, I don't think diversity has made for a wonderful cosmopolitan London. I think London is a pretty awful place, depressing as hell--when not in the turisty center. The endless blocks of dreary flats, the a-hole bus drivers--yes, many of them black. Etc. I don't get that fuzzy feeling when I think of the place.

  104. @Steve Sailer
    Oh, dear, our postilion has been struck by lightning.

    Wiki has it again.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_postillion_has_been_struck_by_lightning

    My father served in India during WW2, and we have his Hindi phrasebook, full of stuff like “he is a great drunkard”. He was working on radar installation, lots of delicate valves, and inside the front covers he’s put the most useful phrases.

    “Leave it alone!”

    “Don’t touch it!”

    “Go away!”

    etc

    Nico – odd to think that Nick Clegg and Shane MacGowan of the Pogues were in the same year at Westminster School.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Shane MacGowan ... not dead yet!

    While poor Kirsty MacColl got run over by a Mexican billionaire's speedboat in 2000.

    , @black sea
    Shance McGowan and Nick Clegg were born 10 years apart ('57, '67). Which is to say nothing of the relative mileage on each.
  105. @Anonymous Nephew
    Wiki has it again.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_postillion_has_been_struck_by_lightning

    My father served in India during WW2, and we have his Hindi phrasebook, full of stuff like "he is a great drunkard". He was working on radar installation, lots of delicate valves, and inside the front covers he's put the most useful phrases.

    "Leave it alone!"

    "Don't touch it!"

    "Go away!"

    etc


    Nico - odd to think that Nick Clegg and Shane MacGowan of the Pogues were in the same year at Westminster School.

    Shane MacGowan … not dead yet!

    While poor Kirsty MacColl got run over by a Mexican billionaire’s speedboat in 2000.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ray P
    I attended her penultimate stage performance a few weeks before her untimely death. It was a shock having seen her very much alive (if lyrically forgetful) so recently.
  106. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Jonathan Mason
    When I was a kid growing up in England in the 50's and 60's we always made fun of foreigners like French, Germans, Spaniards, Italians, Welsh, Scots, Irish, because they were funny. Scotsmen were mean, the Irish were drunks, Germans were always saying things like "Achtung, Fritz! Kill the Englander schweinhund", the French rode bicycles with strings of onions and danced the can-can, Italians were greasy, the Lord said unto Moses all Jews shall have big noses, Indians were like Peter Sellers, Aussies either lived in the outback with kangaroos or they lived in the Earls Court area of London, Chinamen wore pigtails, American were all cowboys and carried six-shooters, and so on.

    There was no harm in it and I assumed that they would make fun of us too. Of course all these stereotypes have proved with time to be incorrect, except the one about Americans.

    Americans = fat people with guns

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  107. Bill B. says:

    The Times can’t get anywhere near the level of mockery Macron gets in his own country.

    Here his vacuous statements are interspersed by that of a comedian who – uncannily – prefigured Macron’s political program of frank indecision and fluidity.

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  108. BB753 says:
    @celt darnell

    The only possible advantage in marrying a much older woman is that you don’t get to see your mother-in-law for many years. (one hopes!)
     
    Er yes, but haven't you effectively married your mother-in-law?

    Shudder!!

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  109. Ray P says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Shane MacGowan ... not dead yet!

    While poor Kirsty MacColl got run over by a Mexican billionaire's speedboat in 2000.

    I attended her penultimate stage performance a few weeks before her untimely death. It was a shock having seen her very much alive (if lyrically forgetful) so recently.

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  110. @donut
    "Hidden History: The Secret Origins of the First World War" by Gerry Docherty discusses Milner's group and their part in starting ww1 .

    Here is a lecture he gave on the "Commission for the Relief of Belgium" .

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Udhq5YocJvE

    Thanks, I’ll try to watch it soon.

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  111. Nigel says:
    @Anonym
    OT: The airBNB-ocaust.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2017/04/07/one-word-says-it-all-asian-airbnb-host-reportedly-leaves-guest-stranded-because-of-her-race/?utm_term=.94b03b74065e

    Because semi-cute Asian girls deserve to pull a bait and switch on the stupid round eyes!

    OT: The airBNB-ocaust.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2017/04/07/one-word-says-it-all-asian-airbnb-host-reportedly-leaves-guest-stranded-because-of-her-race/?utm_term=.94b03b74065e

    Because semi-cute Asian girls deserve to pull a bait and switch on the stupid round eyes!

    At first, I thought you had posted an actual example of indisputable, unjustifiable racism. Then it was noted in the article that the “victim” was studying Critical Race Theory. ahhhhh…. makes more sense now.

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  112. @Chrisnonymous

    It at least makes it seem A LITTLE BIT interesting.
     
    That's pathetic. Rather than talking down, you ought to be embarrassed that you can't find one the world's most historically significant cities interesting without a bit of darkie spice.

    ‘That’s pathetic. Rather than talking down, you ought to be embarrassed that you can’t find one the world’s most historically significant cities interesting without a bit of darkie spice.’

    And yet it’s true. Don’t get me wrong, though, the museums are great. And the people are fine, if a bit dull.

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  113. Wilkey says:
    @Forbes
    I dunno. Being a teen and having a crush (or other description) on a teacher who's more than a few years older than oneself is positively bizarre. Mommy issues.

    Also, what's it say about the judgment of a teacher who preys on a student in her charge?

    I dunno. Being a teen and having a crush (or other description) on a teacher who’s more than a few years older than oneself is positively bizarre. Mommy issues. Also, what’s it say about the judgment of a teacher who preys on a student in her charge?

    Mommy issues? Not necessarily. There are plenty of sexy 35-40 year-old women out there. Thank God for that, since I am now married to one (yes, she’s younger than me, not older). When you’re a horny 16-year-old a sexy older woman who’s also a bit experienced can be a huge turn on. And believe me, the ones I found attractive looked absolutely nothing like my mother.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lurker
    When I was at school at @16 we had super hot English teacher South African Mrs [redacted], mid-30s I would think. If we thought there had been the remotest chance she had wanted to molest any of us boys there would have been a line a mile long.
  114. @Nico
    My appraisal:

    The morons who fawn over “cosmopolitan London” enjoy its “diversity” mainly in the form of white British and other Europeans plus a few token patrician East Asians, Africans and Subcontinentals in the city center. When citing an example of how diversity has been good for London they only rarely point to the Paki or Carib ghettos.
     
    Your testimonial:

    The only parts of London I have enjoyed have been the areas with a greater mixture of peoples, like the East End/Hackney... I’ve seen little to nothing of ‘Paki or Carib ghettos’, as you call them.
     
    I'm not sure whether you realize how perfectly you have just illustrated my point, but I rest my case.

    ‘I’m not sure whether you realize how perfectly you have just illustrated my point, but I rest my case.’

    Not quite, my point was just that I can’t recall any particularly dangerous Paki or Carib ghettos. Many of the most dangerous situations I’ve witnessed in London have been due to the sometimes quite scary local whites. There are certainly black areas that have their violence, Peckham comes to mind, especially on a weekend night when the clubs are full throttle. There were obviously the recent riots, as someone else pointed out. But nothing in London compares to pretty much any mid-size to large American city for black ghetto violence. You can walk right through these black neighborhoods in London and not be accosted even once!–absolutely impossible in south Chicago, north Philly, much of DC, etc.
    Finally, I don’t think diversity has made for a wonderful cosmopolitan London. I think London is a pretty awful place, depressing as hell–when not in the turisty center. The endless blocks of dreary flats, the a-hole bus drivers–yes, many of them black. Etc. I don’t get that fuzzy feeling when I think of the place.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Nico

    There are certainly black areas that have their violence, Peckham comes to mind, especially on a weekend night when the clubs are full throttle. There were obviously the recent riots, as someone else pointed out. But nothing in London compares to pretty much any mid-size to large American city for black ghetto violence.
     
    This, I don't disagree with. However, with few exceptions (the northern and eastern suburbs of Paris for examples) neighborhood fabric in Western Europe simply isn't on a scale even approaching anything one would normally be afraid of in the Western Hemisphere. Probably "ghetto" was too strong a word for my appraisal of the absence of cultural enrichment from certain population mixes:

    I don’t think diversity has made for a wonderful cosmopolitan London. I think London is a pretty awful place, depressing as hell–when not in the turisty center. The endless blocks of dreary flats, the a-hole bus drivers–yes, many of them black. Etc. I don’t get that fuzzy feeling when I think of the place.
     
    Bingo.
  115. fen Tiger says:
    @daniel le mouche
    there's no need to call me humorless, or a prat.
    i'm not quite sure what a prat is.
    but humorless, no! just because i make a truthful remark, an observation, which you feel insults you, you call me humorless.

    There’s a good discussion of what a prat is here.

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  116. @Nico
    I didn't say ALL Englishmen were like that, only the disdainful chattering classes. That's what I meant by "that kind" of Englishman. And there is a delicious irony to it in that the Nick Cleggs claim to be "skeptical" about the "entrenched" class system in Britain when he himself is the epitome of the 21st-century Londonian bourgeois cosmo liberal snob.

    Fair enough.

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  117. DWB says: • Website
    @Bill Jones
    Americans have to be the dumbest fuckers on the face of the planet

    http://ericpetersautos.com/2017/03/29/taxing-antiquing-off-road/

    I guess my 70 year old MG is done for.

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  118. black sea says:
    @Anonymous Nephew
    Wiki has it again.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_postillion_has_been_struck_by_lightning

    My father served in India during WW2, and we have his Hindi phrasebook, full of stuff like "he is a great drunkard". He was working on radar installation, lots of delicate valves, and inside the front covers he's put the most useful phrases.

    "Leave it alone!"

    "Don't touch it!"

    "Go away!"

    etc


    Nico - odd to think that Nick Clegg and Shane MacGowan of the Pogues were in the same year at Westminster School.

    Shance McGowan and Nick Clegg were born 10 years apart (’57, ’67). Which is to say nothing of the relative mileage on each.

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  119. You’re all prolly aware that I have a kind of intellectual Tourette’s Syndrome online. I always get the urge to say the most inappropriate things to any particular aidience. I can assire you there is one sainted group above others you get more blowback about than any others, and it isn’t (((who))) uou think it is in terms of power and influence. There seems to be an inverse relation between a group’s value to society and its SJW Proected Snowflake Class status.

    The First Rule of MSM is you must not insult Blacks
    The S…

    The Simpsons is a comedy and most characters are caricatures. Irish – Barney, Myor Quimby, most police officer thugs. J -Krusty, his dad, Kent Brockman. Slavs – Moe. Italians – Pizza Guy, Fat Tony & mafia pals. Scots – Groundskeeper Willy. WASPS – Principal Skinner. Germans – Reiner Wolfcastle, Otto. Actual Scots-Irish – Homer, Bart, Cleetus. Indians – Apu & family. Hispanics – Incompetent Dr Nick, Bumblebee Man.

    And ofc when one thinks of Blacks, the atereotype is… Competent doctors, engineers like Dr Hibbert and Lenny / Carl (can never tell them apart but I know the idiot is a White & the the genius is black – jist like IRL).

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    • Replies: @DWB
    To be fair, Dr Hibbert is portrayed as a sort of buffoonish clown. He is a doctor, yes. But he laughs moronically at inappropriate things.

    I think he is supposed to be a caricature of the Bill Cosby character from the old 80's-era "Cosby" show.
  120. IBC says:
    @Dieter Kief

    I think a lot of humor out there, is actually cross-cultural, and is mostly overlooked due to language issues and lack of exposure
     
    There is a serious language issue concerning humor.

    The second best german prose writer after the WW II is never mentioned by a foreign correspondent. Even though he had quite a few bestsellers (Eckhard Henscheid).

    None of the New Franfurt School cartoonists and/or authors is even translated. All of them are really funny, and Henscheid is the funniest of them. The satirical monthly TITANIC (cofounded by Henscheid) at least was very funny for years and years. I never met an Englishman or a French person who liked it.

    Never ever did I find an article about a comic genius like the bavarian Gerhard Polt in any foreign paper. I guess, those foreign correspondents just don't grab what's at stake. And indeed - role-prose for example is quite hard to decipher if you are not very good in a foreign language and deeply rooted in it's culture a n d everyday habits, and lots of German comedy is just that: Role-prose (Gerd Dudenhöfer, Rolf Miller, the above mentioned part-time genius, really, Gerhard Polt).


    And have a look at the foreign language-departments: You'll have a hard time to find somebody there in America who points a the simple fact, that there is no Goethe-Faust without humor. Even though Mephisto is one of the two main characters in Faust and - you can't understand him at all if you don't understand his fast and witty (= dirty, cynical, funny....) mind.

    Not to mention Jean Paul Friedrich Richter. A genius if ever there was one, and very funny lots of times - to hardly any effect at all abroad (Franzen once mentioned him, Mdm. de Stael wrote a little bit about him, but as far as I can see, that was almost it - during rougly 200 years).

    Thanks for the response. A lot of people are working from small sample sizes.

    Also, I think Martin Luther was actually known to be pretty funny at times and Gutenberg’s earlier invention of the printing press must have done a lot to spread the idea of political cartoons and popular satirical humor.

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  121. IBC says:
    @Matra
    To make fun of the French, the Germans, the Irish, Welsh, Scottish and others is perfectly acceptable to the English, and constitutes a large basis for their so-called humour.

    The Irish, Welsh, Scottish, and English have a mostly shared sense of humour. The non-English Brits give as good as they get and are probably less restrained by PC.

    One thing they never do is deep soul searching, for they would find something there very base and ugly. Their funny self-depreciation is just lightly poking fun of their little very English quirks, which they in fact deeply love in themselves and consider to be a part of their overall superiority to everyone

    If it makes you feel any better that type of Englishmen is much harder on his fellow English who are from the wrong class, or read the wrong newspapers, or come from other regions than they are on any foreigners.

    I can see having a crush on a woman that much older than you. I had one or two such crushes at that age. But unless they’re a wealthy heiress or great intellect (for the few of us whose requirements extend beyond “perky boobs”) you just plain damn don’t marry them, and you certainly don’t introduce them to your mother.

    I think everyone just assumes Macron is homosexual.

    Prince Charles loved Spike Milligan and Milligan strongly identified as Irish.

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  122. @Anonym
    More from the DM:

    "Suh (pictured with her fiance) is a law student and studies Critical Race Studies at UCLA School of Law, according to her Facebook page"

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4392494/Woman-denied-Airbnb-snowstorm-Asian.html

    So basically this woman expects to con someone into allowing her to leave her two dogs in someone's house for $50/night, along with 2 extra guests and if she doesn't get what she wants she will use her weaponized law degree and media savvy Critical Race Studies training to call down the might of the PC establishment when she does not get her way, provided her mark is foolish enough to call a spade a spade.

    I find this story just baffling as reported.

    Supposedly, the Asian woman claimed that she texted the proprietor in advance to see if she could bring along the additional two friends and two “puppies”, and that the proprietor responded that it was OK. But then, apropos of nothing in the reported story that I could see, the same proprietor suddenly told the Asian woman that, no, she couldn’t bring these extra people and two dogs and that it was crazy for her to think she should be able to do so. At that point, the proprietor brings up the Asian thing.

    The Asian woman claimed that she had screen shots of the texts verifying that the proprietor had told her it was OK to bring the extra people and pets.

    Did the journalists reporting this see those screen shots? Did anyone but the Asian woman herself in any way confirm any of this? Or did the Asian woman just go with her friends and pets and expect that the proprietor would just have to deal with it?

    There are parts of the story that don’t make a lot of sense as reported: Why did the proprietor change her mind so suddenly? If she was such a bigot about Asians, why did she rent out the room to her in the first place?

    Some years ago, there used to be a profession whose job it was to get to the bottom of such things, and would report it to the public. They were called journalists.

    What a service they could do us now!

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  123. @Nico
    I didn't say ALL Englishmen were like that, only the disdainful chattering classes. That's what I meant by "that kind" of Englishman. And there is a delicious irony to it in that the Nick Cleggs claim to be "skeptical" about the "entrenched" class system in Britain when he himself is the epitome of the 21st-century Londonian bourgeois cosmo liberal snob.

    Nick Clegg is even worse than you think. I am sure you know that he is half-Dutch, but if you only read his own and other peoples’ puff-pieces about him, all you know is that his mother was born in the Dutch East Indies and was a school teacher. Might be lower-middle class at best you think? You would be wrong: her father was the head of Holland’s biggest bank, and her mother is a scion of Holland’s first gun-powder manufacturing family (all those little revolts in Indonesia to put down, after all). In sum, Clegg descends from or is connected to just about all of the historically important industrial families of old Holland. That, and that alone, is what has made him a person of interest to the One-Worlders.
    He’s their man, or was – Brexit has put a halt to quite a few careers. Thus the anger.

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  124. Lurker says:
    @Steve Sailer
    I feel a similar sense of panic when the rest of the audience starts clapping along in rhythm to the music.

    the audience starts clapping along in rhythm to the music.

    Or, just as likely, not in rhythm.

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  125. Lurker says:
    @Wilkey
    I dunno. Being a teen and having a crush (or other description) on a teacher who’s more than a few years older than oneself is positively bizarre. Mommy issues. Also, what’s it say about the judgment of a teacher who preys on a student in her charge?

    Mommy issues? Not necessarily. There are plenty of sexy 35-40 year-old women out there. Thank God for that, since I am now married to one (yes, she's younger than me, not older). When you're a horny 16-year-old a sexy older woman who's also a bit experienced can be a huge turn on. And believe me, the ones I found attractive looked absolutely nothing like my mother.

    When I was at school at @16 we had super hot English teacher South African Mrs [redacted], mid-30s I would think. If we thought there had been the remotest chance she had wanted to molest any of us boys there would have been a line a mile long.

    Read More
  126. Cortes says:
    @Jonathan Mason
    When I was a kid growing up in England in the 50's and 60's we always made fun of foreigners like French, Germans, Spaniards, Italians, Welsh, Scots, Irish, because they were funny. Scotsmen were mean, the Irish were drunks, Germans were always saying things like "Achtung, Fritz! Kill the Englander schweinhund", the French rode bicycles with strings of onions and danced the can-can, Italians were greasy, the Lord said unto Moses all Jews shall have big noses, Indians were like Peter Sellers, Aussies either lived in the outback with kangaroos or they lived in the Earls Court area of London, Chinamen wore pigtails, American were all cowboys and carried six-shooters, and so on.

    There was no harm in it and I assumed that they would make fun of us too. Of course all these stereotypes have proved with time to be incorrect, except the one about Americans.
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  127. Nico says:
    @daniel le mouche
    'I’m not sure whether you realize how perfectly you have just illustrated my point, but I rest my case.'

    Not quite, my point was just that I can't recall any particularly dangerous Paki or Carib ghettos. Many of the most dangerous situations I've witnessed in London have been due to the sometimes quite scary local whites. There are certainly black areas that have their violence, Peckham comes to mind, especially on a weekend night when the clubs are full throttle. There were obviously the recent riots, as someone else pointed out. But nothing in London compares to pretty much any mid-size to large American city for black ghetto violence. You can walk right through these black neighborhoods in London and not be accosted even once!--absolutely impossible in south Chicago, north Philly, much of DC, etc.
    Finally, I don't think diversity has made for a wonderful cosmopolitan London. I think London is a pretty awful place, depressing as hell--when not in the turisty center. The endless blocks of dreary flats, the a-hole bus drivers--yes, many of them black. Etc. I don't get that fuzzy feeling when I think of the place.

    There are certainly black areas that have their violence, Peckham comes to mind, especially on a weekend night when the clubs are full throttle. There were obviously the recent riots, as someone else pointed out. But nothing in London compares to pretty much any mid-size to large American city for black ghetto violence.

    This, I don’t disagree with. However, with few exceptions (the northern and eastern suburbs of Paris for examples) neighborhood fabric in Western Europe simply isn’t on a scale even approaching anything one would normally be afraid of in the Western Hemisphere. Probably “ghetto” was too strong a word for my appraisal of the absence of cultural enrichment from certain population mixes:

    I don’t think diversity has made for a wonderful cosmopolitan London. I think London is a pretty awful place, depressing as hell–when not in the turisty center. The endless blocks of dreary flats, the a-hole bus drivers–yes, many of them black. Etc. I don’t get that fuzzy feeling when I think of the place.

    Bingo.

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  128. Brutusale says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    George, I am only speaking for myself, but at 15 my hormones were raging. A 15 year old boy and a 39 year old teacher screams Inappropriate! Some guys in my HS were being hit on by teachers when we were 15 , but I went to an all boys Catholic school and our teachers were priests, and we all know how that turned out. Now we see young female teacher-teenage student love frequently, so there must be something in the water.

    May God forgive me, but I entertained many an impure thought about my 7th/8th grade science teacher, Sister Anne. The full fig of the Sisters of Charity couldn’t hide her feminine treasures from the boys in her classes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Brutus, move over my friend and make room for me on the hot seat. I too had " impure thoughts" about my eight grade teacher, Sister Katherine. What was under that full Sisters of St. Joseph black habit that went with that cherubic face?
    , @Formerly CARealist
    You're making me think boys shouldn't have female teachers.

    Actually, I already thought that, you're just confirming what I thought.

    Same goes for girls and male teachers. Girls don't lust, but they get titanic crushes.

    How do the education experts of today not remember their own experiences and try to learn from them?
  129. @Brutusale
    May God forgive me, but I entertained many an impure thought about my 7th/8th grade science teacher, Sister Anne. The full fig of the Sisters of Charity couldn't hide her feminine treasures from the boys in her classes.

    Brutus, move over my friend and make room for me on the hot seat. I too had ” impure thoughts” about my eight grade teacher, Sister Katherine. What was under that full Sisters of St. Joseph black habit that went with that cherubic face?

    Read More
  130. DWB says: • Website
    @Mr Curious
    You're all prolly aware that I have a kind of intellectual Tourette's Syndrome online. I always get the urge to say the most inappropriate things to any particular aidience. I can assire you there is one sainted group above others you get more blowback about than any others, and it isn't (((who))) uou think it is in terms of power and influence. There seems to be an inverse relation between a group's value to society and its SJW Proected Snowflake Class status.

    The First Rule of MSM is you must not insult Blacks
    The S...

    The Simpsons is a comedy and most characters are caricatures. Irish - Barney, Myor Quimby, most police officer thugs. J -Krusty, his dad, Kent Brockman. Slavs - Moe. Italians - Pizza Guy, Fat Tony & mafia pals. Scots - Groundskeeper Willy. WASPS - Principal Skinner. Germans - Reiner Wolfcastle, Otto. Actual Scots-Irish - Homer, Bart, Cleetus. Indians - Apu & family. Hispanics - Incompetent Dr Nick, Bumblebee Man.

    And ofc when one thinks of Blacks, the atereotype is... Competent doctors, engineers like Dr Hibbert and Lenny / Carl (can never tell them apart but I know the idiot is a White & the the genius is black - jist like IRL).

    To be fair, Dr Hibbert is portrayed as a sort of buffoonish clown. He is a doctor, yes. But he laughs moronically at inappropriate things.

    I think he is supposed to be a caricature of the Bill Cosby character from the old 80′s-era “Cosby” show.

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  131. @Brutusale
    May God forgive me, but I entertained many an impure thought about my 7th/8th grade science teacher, Sister Anne. The full fig of the Sisters of Charity couldn't hide her feminine treasures from the boys in her classes.

    You’re making me think boys shouldn’t have female teachers.

    Actually, I already thought that, you’re just confirming what I thought.

    Same goes for girls and male teachers. Girls don’t lust, but they get titanic crushes.

    How do the education experts of today not remember their own experiences and try to learn from them?

    Read More
    • Replies: @dfordoom

    How do the education experts of today not remember their own experiences and try to learn from them?
     
    But isn't learning from experience basically racist? And sexist? Learning from experience is a patriarchal concept which has thankfully been outlawed.
  132. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Formerly CARealist
    You're making me think boys shouldn't have female teachers.

    Actually, I already thought that, you're just confirming what I thought.

    Same goes for girls and male teachers. Girls don't lust, but they get titanic crushes.

    How do the education experts of today not remember their own experiences and try to learn from them?

    How do the education experts of today not remember their own experiences and try to learn from them?

    But isn’t learning from experience basically racist? And sexist? Learning from experience is a patriarchal concept which has thankfully been outlawed.

    Read More
  133. BB753 says:
    @Anonymous
    The problem is that half the electorate consists of women over 40 who will find this relationship endearing rather than ridiculous.

    You’re right, we’re doomed!

    Read More

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