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From the New York Times:

Red and Blue Economies Are Heading in Sharply Different Directions
On the surface, there seems to be parity between Democratic-leaning and Republican-leaning metro areas, but take a closer look.

By Jed Kolko
Nov. 13, 2019

At a quick glance, red and blue metropolitan areas are performing equally well on average in the most watched indicators of labor market health.

Employment growth in the year ending in the first quarter of 2019 was 1.4 percent in both Democratic-leaning and Republican-leaning metro areas, and the unemployment rate in both types of places is roughly equivalent.

Silicon Valley (blue) is booming. So is Provo, Utah (red).

But below the surface, red and blue local economies are worlds apart on enduring, fundamental measures that determine their future prospects and their biggest economic challenges.

The correlations between deeper economic measures and how the contrasting metro areas voted in 2016 are striking.

In bluer metros, more residents have college degrees: The 10 large metros with the highest educational attainment each voted for Hillary Clinton by at least a 10-point margin. Median household incomes are higher in bluer metros even after adjusting for the cost of living, which is higher in bluer metros as well. (Metro area is a better measure for a local labor market than a neighborhood, city, county or state.)

This is stuff I figured out in late 2004– early 2005.

… Home values have risen more in bluer metros than in redder ones. And blue metros have a higher prime-age employment-population ratio, even though the unemployment rate varies little by partisanship. That’s because red metros have a higher share of prime-age adults who are not in the labor force and therefore aren’t counted in the unemployment rate.

That would be bad if you were out of the labor force because you are a junkie, but it would be good if you were out of the labor force because you have 3 small children and your husband makes enough that you can stay home with them.

But there are a few places that vote differently than you’d expect from their local economic fundamentals. Colorado Springs and the Provo-Orem area, for instance, have education levels and an occupation mix more typical of blue metros but voted for Donald J. Trump in 2016 by a wide margin. On the flip side, Stockton, Calif., and El Paso look more like red metros economically but voted for Mrs. Clinton.

Why do some metros vote differently than their economics might suggest they would? Race, ethnicity and religion. Metros that vote Democratic despite having lower education and a job mix more typical of redder metros tend to have large Hispanic populations, including many in inland California and on the Texas border. Metros that vote more Republican despite having higher education and a blue-metro job mix tend to be whiter. (Colorado Springs also has a large evangelical population, and Provo-Orem a large Mormon one.) …

Jed Kolko is the chief economist at Indeed.com. You can follow him on Twitter at @JedKolko.

 
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  1. J says: • Website

    isteve, you are great! Enjoyed the irony.

  2. Charon says:

    I says to myself: Hey! Another NYT article! How long until they attribute everything bad to white people and racism!

    In this one regard, the NYT seldom disappoints. Bonus points for those playing along at home: Hillary mentions.

    Super bonus points: text string “immig” Results 0

  3. Moses says:

    Oh! Oh! Let me guess!

    If you search for “immigr” in that NYT article there are zero hits.

    Hang on doing it now…

    Oh! There IS one word containing “immigr”. Here it is in context:

    Even if the economy takes a back seat in the 2020 election to health care, immigration and President Trump’s record, these economic differences won’t be far from the surface.

    No matter. Just slip into sweet unconsciousness. It will all be over soon.

    • Replies: @Moses
    , @Lugash
  4. Moses says:
    @Moses

    Metros that vote Democratic despite having lower education and a job mix more typical of redder metros tend to have large Hispanic populations, including many in inland California and on the Texas border.

    It’s a total mystery how those metros came to have large numbers of Hispanics. We may never know how it happened…

    Oceania has always been at war with Eurasia.

  5. Steve, please manage your breathing, don’t get the bends on your way up from the oceanic depths of discreditation.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  6. RouterAl says:

    Jed Kolko is the chief economist at Indeed.com.

    Which sounds like a firm founded by Ned Flanders. Though Ned wouldn’t swallow their product.

    Shall we swallow Jed’s?

    Come listen to a story ’bout a man named Jed
    He’s gonna psychoanalyze the blue states and the red
    It’s gonna come to nuthin’ ’cause it’s all too plain to see
    People cast their ballots by their dermatology…

    Skin, that is…
    Black and blue,
    Pink, red
    I’m

    Actually, I’m fed up with this trendy color inversion. Trump states should be depicted in orange, like Indeed’s wall. We don’t know who his opponent’ll be, but a nice fecal brown would fit most of the contenders well. Heidi Van Tassel can be the color consultant:

    Homeless man threw huge bucket of hot diarrhea all over woman’s face

  7. Jed Kolko is the chief economist at Indeed.com.

    Which sounds like a firm founded by Ned Flanders. Though Ned wouldn’t swallow their product.

    Shall we swallow Jed’s?

    Come listen to a story ’bout a man named Jed
    He’s gonna psychoanalyze the blue states and the red
    It’s gonna come to nuthin’ ’cause it’s all too plain to see
    People cast their ballots by their dermatology…

    Skin, that is…
    Black and blue,
    Pink, red

    Actually, I’m fed up with this trendy color inversion. Trump states should be depicted in orange, like Indeed’s wall. We don’t know who his opponent’ll be, but a nice fecal brown would fit most of the contenders well. Heidi Van Tassel can be the color consultant:

    Homeless man threw huge bucket of hot diarrhea all over woman’s face

  8. anonymous[911] • Disclaimer says:

    Anti-Whiteism 101:

    Blacks nations. Asian nations. White ‘diversity’?

    Why are the “privileges” of diversity, open borders, mass immigration given to White peoples of the world Only?

    Diversity means finding something White and Chasing Them Down until they’re acceptably non-White.

    Whites are a mere 10% of the world’s population and shrinking. And yet, they are uniquely not allowed homelands or borders anywhere in this world.

    It’s G-

    • Agree: Mr McKenna
    • Troll: AndrewR
  9. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Reg Cæsar

    Luke Ford mentioned the diarrhea story on his show. What is a society supposed to do with a person who dumps a bucket of his diarrhea on a stranger? Somehow, psychiatry seems an inadequate response, and a long prison sentence seems like a waste of money.

    Maybe the solution, given the newfound opposition on the left to the prison system, is exile to some sort of reservation structured on the left’s principles. The U.S. government has plenty of land. Carve out a swathe of it for people the left doesn’t want in prison and the rest of us don’t want on the street, and let them dump diarrhea on each other to their hearts’ content.

  10. Why do some metros vote differently than their economics might suggest they would? Race, ethnicity and religion.

    Maybe “Blue Metro Areas” have better Democratic Party machines that are more adept at deep sixing any Republican votes that might be cast, beyond allowing a reasonable number to keep the election from looking like it might have looked if held in the East Bloc in the 1970s, and finding more “Democrat” votes in the streets just to make sure.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  11. @Dave Pinsen

    What is a society supposed to do with a person who dumps a bucket of his diarrhea on a stranger?

    Fill a cell with diarrhoea and toss him in.

    The U.S. government has plenty of land. Carve out a swathe of it for people the left doesn’t want in prison and the rest of us don’t want on the street, and let them dump diarrhea on each other to their hearts’ content.

    Cities like SF are exactly where these people need to be.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  12. @Dave Pinsen

    What is a society supposed to do with a person who dumps a bucket of his diarrhea on a stranger?

    Surely there’s some sort of public office appropriate to his skills.

    After all, the act is perfectly symbolic of what’s being done to our society.

  13. Hail says: • Website

    This is stuff I figured out in late 2004– early 2005.

    Any good predictions today for what will be current in the discourse in 2034?

  14. George says:

    World Socialist Web Site objects to the NYT’s racialist explanation for Popeye’s fried chicken sandwich when, as any Trotskyist knows, Popeye’s fried chicken sandwich can only be explained by class consciousness.

    The New York Times’ obsession with race expands to its food commentary

    “I had to read this twice to make sure it wasn’t parody. Firstly, the stereotypical, monolithic take on black people …”

    https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2019/11/09/nypo-n09.html

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  15. Ano says:

    Meanwhile at the DNC, people are opening up the Maps app on their phones to find out where Colorado Springs and Provo Orem are- with all those white Trump voters….and start planning a refugee resettlement program.

    Meanwhile in refugee camps across the third world, people are opening up the Maps app on their phones to find out where Colorado Springs and Provo-Orem are…with all those jobs Americans just won’t do- and start planning to marry their brother.

    Meanwhile at the RNC, zzzzzzzzzzz.

    • Replies: @Barnard
  16. From the graphic, the term “magnitude of correlation” isn’t wrong per se, but it sounds off. I would use measure or level or degree.

  17. So when does the NYT have a cat lady tell us affordable family formation is un-American.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  18. anonotron says:

    It’s interesting that liberals also live in areas with more inequality. I wonder what the causality is there. Is it that higher inequality causes people to favor more redistributionist policies? Or is that highly inequal societies attract the same sort of people who favor redistributionist policies?

  19. Anon[388] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    I hope the homeless guy walks. The woman he poured warm diarrhea on is a typical AWFL (affluent white female liberal). Here’s her twitter account: https://twitter.com/heidisabrina

    By the way, apparently this warm diarrhea attack happened in March of this year? She describes it in a tweet then.
    https://mobile.twitter.com/heidisabrina/status/1106644670589923328

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Jim Christian
  20. …and I suppose there will be more domesticated females with three children in Provo because of the Mormons.

  21. @Dave Pinsen

    “What is a society supposed to do with a person who dumps a bucket of his diarrhea on a stranger?”

    Give him a bucket of virtue signalling and make him Governor of California.

  22. @Neil Templeton

    Steve’s where he’s always been.

    It’s polite company that may (or may not) be on their way up from the depths of delusion/fecklessness.

  23. anon[349] • Disclaimer says:

    The word “children” and the word “Immigration” do not appear in the article. Should I be surprised? Plus where is the near-obligatory quote from Richard Florida? Time was, any article about urban areas simply had to have his words of wisdom, with “infill housing” and ‘arts district” included.

    Something changed? Golly.

  24. @RouterAl

    I could not enter both [AGREE] and [LOL], Al, Reg, or whoever-the-hell-you are.

    I AGREE on the red/blue purposeful confusion, and LOL on your Jed Clampett/Flatt & Scruggs reference.

  25. @anonotron

    It’s interesting that liberals also live in areas with more inequality. I wonder what the causality is there.

    Empirically, it’s because the urban areas where liberals live are a mix of childless white professionals and ghetto minorities.

    As to causation, the high end of the inequality spectrum seems to be caused by white professionals aggregating in one area. I think this develops from a feedback loop between employers who want to be in a place with lots of talent in their field (law, finance, technology, etc), and the professionals who want to live where the high paying jobs are. This concentration of demand sends the real estate prices sky high – at least in the neighborhoods “acceptable” to white professionals.

    Meanwhile, the other end of the inequality spectrum is caused by having poor, minority neighborhoods nearby. These neighborhoods are somewhat cheaper because whites won’t live there. (Despite their allegedly liberal values.) And the jobs of providing services to the white professionals (housekeepers, cashiers, etc.) pay just enough to cover the (still high) rent. People in these poor neighborhoods send their kids to public school, though, which craters the test scores and makes the schools unacceptable to the white professionals.

    Whites who want to raise a family in these inequality zones have to pay sky-high mortgages plus sky-high private school tuition. (Plus sky-high taxes to pay for all the public services for the nearby poor people). This can’t be done on one middle class salary. So these white people bail out to the exurbs to raise children in places with cheap land and good public schools.

    Those remaining in the urban zones are childless high-income whites, super-rich whites with kids in private school, and an underclass of poor minorities sending their kids to public schools.

    • Agree: ic1000
    • Replies: @BB753
    , @Moses
  26. BB753 says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    “Those remaining in the urban zones are childless high-income whites, super-rich whites with kids in private school, and an underclass of poor minorities sending their kids to public schools.”

    That is, pretty much the Third World.

  27. Lugash says:
    @Moses

    Oh! Oh! Let me guess!

    If you search for “immigr” in that NYT article there are zero hits.

    Hang on doing it now…

    Oh! There IS one word containing “immigr”. Here it is in context

    It’s an extremely rare instance of the Sailer Test being triggered.

    Does the article pass the second part of the test: Mentioning the downsides of immigration without declaring those who notice the downsides as Evil People?

    No.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  28. @RouterAl

    I’m getting somebody else’s name in my box. More disturbing, I’m getting somebody else’s e-mail address in my other box. Which means somebody else may be getting mine– or yours.

    This is a serious security lapse.

    FWIW, this has only happened so far on our Kindle Fire, using the Surf browser. It has not happened (yet) on our laptop or notebook, or at the library, with the IE, Chrome, Mozilla or Brave browsers. But if it’s a problem with the Stalinist autocorrect (DIAF, Jeff!), that should only be entering wrong information.

    It should not be entering another commenter’s correct information.

  29. @Redneck farmer

    So when does the NYT have a cat lady tell us affordable family formation is un-American.

    How many cats does Heidi Beirich have? Or Heidi Van Tassel?

    The original Heidi had a goat, which she milked for health reasons.

  30. Moses says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    Empirically, it’s because the urban areas where liberals live are a mix of childless white professionals and ghetto minorities.

    I think you mean “ghetto non-Whites.”

    Whites are already a “minority” in CA and most major American cities.

    Using the word “minority” perpetuates the idea that Whites are dominant, “minorities” tiny and oppressed. It ain’t so.

    Use “non-White” instead. Much clearer, more accurate.

    Words matter.

  31. Barnard says:
    @Ano

    Meanwhile at the DNC, people are opening up the Maps app on their phones to find out where Colorado Springs and Provo Orem are- with all those white Trump voters….and start planning a refugee resettlement program.

    They are way ahead of you on that one. The plan to diversify 90% plus white communities with refugees has been going full steam ahead since the late 90s or early 2000s. A lot of the Mormons are on board with it as an outreach tool now.

  32. What’s interesting is left wing policies seem to make life less affordable which is then the justification for further leftism. i.e. Hugo Chavez gets repeatedly reelected in venezuala even as the store shelves are more and more bare over the years. Leftism seems to be like an escalating cycle of policies that justify more extreme versions of themselves.

    • Replies: @Den
  33. Anonymous[297] • Disclaimer says:
    @RouterAl

    Why the new name Reg? Hard to post 350 music videos and other inane gibberish a day using just one?

  34. @George

    …as any Trotskyist knows, Popeye’s fried chicken sandwich can only be explained by class consciousness.

    In Donald Trump’s second hometown, Popeye’s has avoided Martin Luther King, Jr Boulevard, the property formerly known as Illinois Avenue, and is a full block away on Atlantic and Indiana.

    https://foursquare.com/v/popeyes-louisiana-kitchen/4bcb40643740b7135b0f6265

    “Make sure to ask for napkins and condiments before heading to table, otherwise you will not get them.”

  35. Perhaps what we’re missing is that our middle class white (and probably Asian) version of “affordable family formation” presupposes a course of first a stable income, then marriage, then usually some kind of home ownership or substantial movement towards home ownership – only later culminating in children, and then following through with decent schools (public or private) and usually paying for post-secondary education.

    If you’re willing to eschew this middle class order of things and start with children, formation of some simulacrum of family by modern degenerated standards is affordable. The whole marriage, stable income, home ownership, decent schools and paying for post-secondary education needn’t be a worry – and in fact in many respects you can get third parties to foot the bill for housing, schools, and post-secondary education.

    I think the Left’s response to calls for prioritizing this middle class white version of things would be to simply emphasize that no one is stopping people from having kids if they want them (even to the point of encouraging single motherhood), and that if whites weren’t so snooty they could avail themselves of the public largess that the degenerated bottom classes do. I think they really, sincerely want to strike a fatal blow to the middle class ideal that the home is in many respects beyond their reach, and that middle class white people take pride in providing for themselves and their issue. Getting more middle class white people on the dole seems to be a primary if unstated aim of Leftists.

  36. @Anon

    AWFL (affluent white female liberal)

    The only thing liberal about her is her desire to keep the guy out of jail. A better acronym would be

    Affluent
    White
    Female
    Unz.com
    Content
    Kitchen

    To her credit, she retweeted this: “A Hollywood haunted house is an endless room of people looking at someone else behind you as they ask ‘So what are you working on?’”

    https://twitter.com/heidisabrina

    .

  37. Tiny Duck says:

    I came from a very red metro area to a very blue one. The people I left behind, friends and old classmates that I keep in touch with, are generally inferior in terms of education and skills, and I’ll be so bold as to include professionalism and work ethic, than my current neighbors.

    At this point in my career, there aren’t even any jobs in my home town appropriate for my skill set, education level, and salary expectations.

    There is a legitimate brain drain occurring that leads to this bifurcation. You see this at the international level, but obviously there are substantial barriers to labor movement. Not so within the US. You want to compete in a higher-income area, make yourself competitive.

    Nothing at all unfair about it that should cause resentment or lead people to retaliate with their voting patterns. Conservatives are always touting personal responsibility, so let me mention that you’re probably accountable for the economic opportunities you have available to you.

  38. ic1000 says:

    Why do some metros vote differently than their economics might suggest they would? Race, ethnicity and religion.

    Hey there, indeed.com and NYT sachem Jed Kolko. As Sailer points out in the title of this post, the memorable turn of phrase you’re looking for is “affordable family formation.” Why not use that?

    Well, turns out to be as toxic as it is catchy.

    Google’s top ten results for “affordable family formation”:
    1. Sailer at unz.com
    2. Sailer at unz.com
    3. Sailer at VDARE
    4. Sailer at VDARE
    5. Columbia prof Andrew “Replication Crisis” Gelman blogging about… Sailer
    6. Socialist newspaper The Militant discussing… Sailer
    7. CNBC interview with Dallas Fed president Richard Fisher discussing… Sailer
    8. A blog discussing… Sailer
    9. Sailer at The American Conservative
    10. Washington Examiner article discussing… Sailer

    Bing’s top ten:
    1. Sailer at iSteve
    2. The Militant discussing… Sailer
    3. Gelman blogging about… Sailer
    4. A blog discussing… Sailer
    5. Another blog discussing… Sailer
    6. Open Borders blog discussing… Sailer
    7. Gelman blogging about… Sailer
    8. The Institute for Family Studies interviewing Utah Sen. Mike Lee about “making family formation more affordable” — No Sailer!
    9. Propertarianism [sic] blog post on “affordable family formation” — No Sailer!
    10. Sailer at iSteve

    “Darn that rascally blogger for naming ideas before we get around to reporting on them,” laments the imitation cheese-flavored non-dairy foodstuff of American newspapers.

  39. @Anonymous

    Hey, I’m the one with the 350 music videos. Reg is more of a still-picture and word-scramble(?) guy.

  40. anon[277] • Disclaimer says:
    @Tiny Duck

    I came from a very red metro area to a very blue one.

    Fake Tiny! Fake!

  41. Rob Lee says:
    @Tiny Duck

    Whomever is writing under the dubious honorific of ‘Tiny Duck’ today is almost coherent!

    Note to the writer who has assumed ‘Tiny Duck’s’ moniker for the nonce (presumably and quite ironically for the few dollars required to pay off a young socialist intern): do a few shots of cheap brandy before you post… you’ll be much more authentic when writing as the ‘Tiny Duck’ that we’ve all come to know and look down upon.

  42. A young man must be able to outbid the economy for the fertility of his mate, in order to sustain the quality of the gene pool

  43. J.Ross says:
    @Anonymous

    >inane gibberish
    >music videos
    But Reg is the properly-done acronym guy, I don’t see how you get — unless —

    — you refer to an unsuspected third identity — one with a hole in his personality!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  44. @Tiny Duck

    What’s wrong with you? Your comment is surprisingly coherent. (Mind-numbingly inane, but coherent.)

  45. @Anonymous

    You, Anonymous, are the most frequent commenter of all, with Anon right behind you. I’m not even in the top ten.

    A Real or Fictitious Email (always hidden)

    Not anymore. That concerns everybody here.

    I’m sorry to hear you think pointing this out is “inane”. Anyone else agree?

  46. @J.Ross

    Thanks.

    Is that this year’s surprising Big Ten leader? Pasadena bound?

  47. El Dato says:
    @The Alarmist

    You could set up Greta Camps where human waste recycling is performed correctly to reach a circular, self-sustaining economy.

    • Replies: @anon
  48. El Dato says:

    Off-topic but of some interest. From Peter Woit’s blog (which I judge with high certainty to be orbiting the NYT/academic belief attractor, just saying):

    There’s an excellent new book out about Jim Simons and Renaissance Technologies, “The Man Who Solved the Market”, by Gregory Zuckerman. I recommend it enthusiastically to anyone interested in the story of how geometer Jim Simons ended up being worth $23 billion. Lots of other mathematicians and physicists have also been involved in this over the years.

    I first heard about Simons and his investment operation when I was a postdoc at Stony Brook in the mid-eighties, and have heard bits and pieces of this story from various sources over the years, sometimes clearly distorted in the retelling. It’s very satisfying to finally get a reliable explanation of what Simons and those working with him have been up to all this time. For those with more interest than me in the details of quant strategies, the book provides far and away the most information available about how Simons and RenTech have been making so much money so successfully. The author managed to get some degree of cooperation from Simons, and was thus able to get a lot of those involved with him to talk. As a result, while this isn’t an “authorized” biography, it’s written from a point of view rather sympathetic to Simons.

    One question that keeps coming up in the book is that of motivation. Why did Simons abandon a highly successful career doing research mathematics in order to focus on making as much money as possible? Part of the answer is that, from the beginning, Simons always had one foot out of the research math world, playing poker and trading commodities even when he was a graduate student working with Chern at Berkeley. Later, while working at the IDA in Princeton, he spent time working not just on government projects but on the mathematical analysis of stock market trading strategies. While I’ve often heard the story of how he was fired from IDA after publicly criticizing the Vietnam War, less well known is that a big problem was that he was quoted in Newsweek saying he planned to work on his own projects, not government ones, until the war was over.

    Unfortunately, the book has very little to say about a question I’m fascinated by: what does Simons intend to do with the $23 billion (and counting, the RenTech Medallion Fund that he has a large piece of continues to be an incredible money-making machine)? There’s very little in the book about his philanthropic activities, the most visible of which are at the Simons Foundation, which now has assets of nearly $3 billion with amounts of the order of $300 million/year coming in as income and going out as research funding. I think that on the whole Simons had made excellent choices with the math and physics that he has decided to fund, from the Simons Center for Geometry and Physics at Stony Brook to a wide array of programs funded by his foundation.

  49. @RouterAl

    Historically, this was done in the Anglosphere. The term “outlaw” didn’t mean “tough cookie iconoclast”, it literally meant “person stripped of the good faith of citizenship”. If someone did something heinous, they were declared an outlaw. At that point, the protections of the law no longer applied to them. You could steal from them, beat them etc and they had no recourse, they had been excommunicated from society by bad deeds and they no longer could claim protection by any authority. You could shoot them on sight, if you chose, and no one would fault you.
    Obviously, this put outlaws at a huge disadvantage. They either clung to the protections of kin and kith and scraped out a living hiding or, as was common, they moved to No Man’s Land, where one’s past could be hid and NO ONE had protection from Authority since there was none.
    In America, this was commonly going into the Territories and beyond. State Law peetered our into Territorial Law and then into nothingness. You had whole sections (Oklahoma Panhandle was a big one) where there were Mad Max-esque Outlaw Cities.
    I genuinely think we need to bring this back

  50. @MikeatMikedotMike

    Who’s RouterAI?

    Mark Felt? Aldrich Ames? Robert Hanssen?

    I was given his e-mail address, but erased it. Please do the same if you get mine!

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
  51. Hibernian says:
    @The Alarmist

    “beyond allowing a reasonable number to keep the election from looking like it might have looked if held in the East Bloc in the 1970s”

    In SF and DC, they don’t bother with that.

  52. anon[315] • Disclaimer says:
    @El Dato

    You could set up Greta Camps where human waste recycling is performed correctly to reach a circular, self-sustaining economy.

    Better check first with Tom Six to see if he has copyright on that idea.

  53. @Reg Cæsar

    I’ll just chalk it up to probable coincidence that you and he made identical, consecutive posts. :/

  54. @Tiny Duck

    I’m with the other three commenters: who are you, and what have you done with the Duck? The “real” TD couldn’t spell — much less use correctly — the word “bifurcation,” even if he had a paddling of secretarial ducks typing furiously for a year.

  55. MBlanc46 says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    That might work except they do not care what we want. Our wanting X is a prima facie reason to expect that they will do —X.

  56. @Anon

    Yeah, she’s a Trump-Basher. Steve will be interested in her hair. A White chick worried about her bangs, this from her twitter from your link:

    heidi s van tassell
    ‏ @heidisabrina
    Well. It’s that time of year again where I contemplate getting bangs and talk non-stop about whether or not I should get bangs and then get them and then ask everyone if I should grow out said bangs right after I say… https://www.instagram.com/p/B2LPSCPpMaW/?igshid=xanpdp4vn7g5

    Puts a hole in the ‘Hair” theme, where I thought it was only Black women sweating the hair. Turns out all women sweat their hair.

  57. @Lugash

    It’s better: The suggestion “the economy” may “take a back seat” to “immigration” contains the ridiculous assumption immigration and economics are unrelated.

    (Imagine an assertion that fracking is taking a back seat to the price of oil….)

  58. @Tiny Duck

    Bull, lots of red counties have higher paying jobs than blue ones. In fact, even the liberal Atlantic said San Francisco is doing shitty and losing thousands of jobs to Austin or more red Collins County. In fact LA pays worst than San Diego which was not blue until 2008. You lie boy, the blue counties pay shit like La. New York City while Orem Utah and San Diego pay better. Blue counties are about 20,000 below most former red counties like San Diego. San Diego median salary is56,000 and LA is a low 42,because its 50 percent Latino. San Fransio is not booming recent studies shows. it lost 20,000 jobs to Austin, Raleigh and other cities. Silcon Valley is growing so slow that even Riverside has outperformed it in job growth. and grew 3 times faster than Silicon Valley . La lost about 100.000 jobs to red counties in Texas.

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