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NYT: Sir James Dyson's "Antiquated and at Times Offensive Views on 'Racial Differences' and Japanese Culture"
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From the New York Times:

James Dyson: ‘The Public Wants to Buy Strange Things’

He made billions selling vacuums. Now he is backing Brexit, building an electric car — and making antiquated comments on ‘racial differences.’

By David Gelles, Dec. 5, 2018

James Dyson is unapologetically British.

… Yet in a globalized economy, Mr. Dyson remains intently focused on what he believes is Britain’s exceptional place in the world. He wistfully refers to the British Empire, and unlike most in the business community, is in favor of Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union, believing Brexit will make the country stronger economically and culturally.

In this interview, Mr. Dyson expressed antiquated and at times offensive views on “racial differences” and Japanese culture. He also referred to growth markets in Asia as the “Far East.”

You are not supposed to say “Far East” anymore? I see that the NYT has printed 3 other articles this month containing the suddenly inappropriate “Far East.”

What about “Middle East?” The New York Times has published 14 articles today alone containing the presumably problematic term “Middle East.”

Isn’t it racistly Otherizing to suggest that anyplace is “east,” when you could also get there by going west (or north or south, for that matter)?

When asked to clarify his remarks, Mr. Dyson declined to comment further. (Read a portion of his comments on Japan below.)

Q. When we met earlier in the year, you told me something about Japan.

A. We do a lot of our product launches in Tokyo. They’re technology nuts. They love artifacts. In this P.C. world, we like to not say anything interesting about people that are different from us. But the Japanese were, when I went there, very, very different. They told me I have a nose like the Eiffel Tower. The girls want to spend their whole teenage years to get their noses more like Western noses. I think racial differences are fun. And they’re sometimes funny and they’re a source of amusement between us. But of course, that’s not a very P.C. thing to say.

Whenever we went there, we thought you had to learn to behave like a Japanese person, you know, bowing. What I quickly learned is that’s not what they wanted from us at all. They wanted our eccentricity and difference. So, I carried on being an Englishman.

 
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  1. J.Ross says: • Website

    He also referred to growth markets in Asia as the “Far East.”

    This is Soviet. You’re supposed to be signalling your mental purity and reading habits through fashionable word choice (with ancien regime deep cuts equally signalling mental impurity). I still don’t see what’s wrong with “Oriental” (as in, facing the sunrise, which is how many of them rhetorically describe themselves).
    Will we see body language or handwriting analysis “proving” cryptonazism in the near future?

  2. syonredux says:

    Q. When we met earlier in the year, you told me something about Japan.

    A. We do a lot of our product launches in Tokyo. They’re technology nuts. They love artifacts. In this P.C. world, we like to not say anything interesting about people that are different from us

  3. They told me I have a nose like the Eiffel Tower.

    Was that meant as a compliment?

    • Replies: @White Guy In Japan
  4. “Far East” is offensive now?

  5. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    His vacuums really are quintessentially British machines: overpriced, over-complicated, and unreliable. Maybe the Japanese, bored with their native efficiency, find that charming.

  6. I suppose an off hand reference to Japanese culture on December 7th might be related to the anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

  7. @Dave Pinsen

    I was watching a hot rod show a few years back and they had a Roles Royce on the lift. The mechanic mentioned specifically how the hydraulic system that powered the brakes were the most illogically complicated mess he had ever seen.

    I think you’re definitely on to something.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  8. Art says:

    He also referred to growth markets in Asia as the “Far East.”

    Please – what is wrong with “Far East?”

    • Replies: @Anon
  9. “Far East” is offensive now?

    It’s only slightly east of the Middle Kingdom.

    But even the capital of that is “Peking”, or “northern capital”. North of what? What is the center of the world?

    https://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-4cbaad71ac36799beb44f059460bdfde

  10. donut says:

    It’s Pearl Harbor Day .

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  11. @Dave Pinsen

    I have a Dyson, and it hasn’t let me down once in fifteen years. Do you work for Hoover lol?

    • Agree: jim jones, Tyrion 2
    • Replies: @Sean
  12. L Woods says:

    As ever, if these cretins had a shred of self awareness, they would realize that this sort of drivel says far more about them than their putatively deplorable subject.

  13. @Dave Pinsen

    Are we talking about the same Dyson?

    We replaced our other vacuums with a Dyson Animal when we got our big longhaired dog, because the other vacuums were not doing the job . List price was a little high, but we got ours on Ebay deeply discounted.

    It is a miraculous machine for picking up the massive quantities of black hair our dog sheds. It has been in heavy use for two years now. It is bagless and very easy to clean. Zero problems. Strongly recommended.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  14. The New York Times is so middlebrow and snotty that it probably does a person harm to keep watching for the latest ripple of outrage. If you gaze into the puddle, the puddle also gazes into you.

    • Replies: @Hunsdon
  15. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Henry's Cat

    How can such smart people be so ignorant of widely reported and available facts and attestations about what China is really like?
    Because of respectability. There’s information, sure, but it’s dirty, and you’ll get dirty too if you lower yourself to touch the dirty information. And of course because if their baseless delusions turned out to be right, they’ll get rich at minimal effort.

  16. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    Early Rollers were pretty straightforward but in the 60s they adopted Citroen power hydraulics. Instead of just copying the Citroen, they adapted it as a “helper” system and cobbled one on top of the other, having two completely separate systems mechanically interfaced and including the transmission servo unit they had forever. Of course both systems used incompatible hydraulic fluids.

    The torture never stopped with those cars, between the worst of Girling and Cit hydraulics, Lucas electrics, and lots of rust inviting crannies and places for garbage and debris and salt water to get in but not out of.

    Cars were always a lark: Rolls Royce’s primary business was and is aero engines, and at that they are better than “pretty good”.

    • Replies: @jimmyriddle
  17. RW says:

    Who needs funny comedians when you’ve got PC culture to laugh at?

  18. jon says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Our Dyson is awesome. We won it in a raffle, though, so no idea what the actual price would have been or whether a high performance vacuum is where I would voluntarily sink my extra money.

  19. Hunsdon says:
    @Cagey Beast

    That’s funny right there.

    • Agree: Thea
  20. My mom needs a vacuum cleaner. After reading this interview, it looks like Santa Claus is gonna bring her a Dyson!

  21. It’s funny how there’s a kind of person who thinks it’s horrible to say that other people can be very different. Saying that foreign people can be foreign, or that the Far East is very far away to the east, is just an awful thing to say! This belief seems to be far more common amongst women than men. “To be different is to be indecent” and therefore it’s slanderous and hateful to say the Japanese are very different. You can say the Japanese are better than us, that they’re the same as us but not that they’re better in some ways, worse in others and simply different overall.

    For Dyson to say he’s happy to be an Englishman in England and that he’s happy to see the Japanese being themselves in Japan really bothers the kind of people who ruthlessly police those around them. It does seem to be a difference between a masculine and feminine understanding of what it means to coexist with others. The feminine view is dominant now.

    • Agree: Kylie
    • Replies: @a boy and his dog
    , @anon
    , @RW
  22. J.Ross says: • Website

    James Fields has been found guilty on all charges, like other alleged nazis who defended themselves when attacked by police-allowed leftist mobs. The fact that he was not allowed a change of venue suggests he will be able to appeal but long before that I expect him to be murdered in prison. If you find yourself in a traffic-stopping street mob which the police are doing nothing to control, and which starts attacking your car, kill yourself.

  23. @Anonymous

    The car and aero engine companies split in the ’70s, when the aero engine division was bailed out.

    When Rolls Royce Motors was taken over by VW, the aero engine firm, which owns the name, refused to transfer the rights.

    So, the old Rolls factory in Crewe now only makes Bentleys. BMW purchased the rights to the Rolls brand and built a new assembly plant in the South West of England.

  24. Dyson Japan’s former CEO is now working for Shark. He was on TV showing how they’d sized the vacuums down to save space in small Japanese homes, and changed the motor to get rid of the high pitched metallic whine, which Japanese consumers are sensitive to. This sort of thing is clearly racist because it implies that there are differences between Japanese consumers and other consumers.

    https://goetheweb.jp/person/slug-nc47c9d1dacab

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  25. 22pp22 says:

    Off topic.

    Steve often writes about deaths of despair.

    One of my tenants drank himself to death a few nights ago. Last night, I went to the property and found him lying face down on the carpet.

    The overwhelming emotion wasn’t disgust; it was deep, deep sadness.

    Tucker Carlson is right. It was be nice if those who dictate our lives gave a damn.

  26. I am surprised Jimmy Dyson hasn’t had more grief for his support for Brexit.

    He is now a rare breed – an independent British manufacturer. Another example is JC Bamford (JCB) who also came out for Brexit.

    Most major “British” manufacturers are now either foreign owned (eg Pilkington glass), or, like Rolls Royce and BAe, too dependent on defence contracts to risk saying the wrong thing.

  27. @donut

    donut, Thank you for remembering the historic significance of today. My Mom is now in her 102nd year, and has outlived all of her siblings, her husband and all of his siblings. Blessed with a sharp mind she can still recall Pearl Harbor and the war years. Excuse her if she refers to the “Far East” and worse yet the “Japs.” I’ll chastise her tomorrow.

    • Replies: @Simply Simon
  28. Veracitor says:

    Dyson vacuum “cleaners” suck dust up off the floor and expell it vigorously into the air, where you can choke on some of it and allow the rest to settle into your clothes and draperies and decorate the exposed surfaces of everything in the area.

    Then they break down.

    They are utter junk, sold by slick unscrupulous marketers to pitiable fools.

    • Replies: @22pp22
  29. 22pp22 says:
    @Veracitor

    I have one and it works fine. The dust ends up on the dustbin.

  30. Guys like Dyson are why there was an Empire.

    • Replies: @Anon
  31. 22pp22 says:

    I have one and it works fine. The dust ends up in the dustbin.

  32. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @a boy and his dog

    Japan of course has a huge audiophile community and Japanese preferences in speakers are very different from what Westerners prefer. The signal chains are different too. Part of the reason old Restrum Erectric theater equipment is so popular in Japan is that they, despite having better high frequency hearing on average, prefer the rolled off top end and are happy with an amplifier that is -3 to -6 dB down at 20Khz.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  33. Daniel H says:

    >>Isn’t it racistly Otherizing to suggest that anyplace is “east,” when you could also get there by going west (or north or south, for that matter)?

    “The Wogs start at Calais.”

    Good for Dyson, even if he is a toff.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
  34. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Art

    Please – what is wrong with “Far East?”

    Is it Far Right maybe?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  35. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @jimmyriddle

    Even before they split the cars never had the mechanical charm of the classic RR aero engines. I went to A&P school and we had a junk Avon we made a cutaway out of. The castings were Ferrari quality and then some, works of art. The RR car engines, at least in the V-8 era were no different from an Oldsmobile except for the ridiculous use of sidedraft (-draught, as they wrote) SU ‘carburetters’ on top.

    Not necessarily a huge fan of Jon Ward’s ICON, but he does talk about some of the inherent problems with even this era of Roller here:

    • Replies: @Lurker
  36. J.Ross says: • Website
    @22pp22

    Despair is the correct response and any time Trump or anybody feels like doing something about it they are welcome to start. All those parasites are taking for granted an almost all-white 1960s tax base to pay for all their brilliant schemes, so if we cannot do anything else, we can force them to foot their own bill. I would prefer any other alternative but I will not accept what Bloomberg, Turner, Steyer and Soros have decided would be best for me.

  37. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Redneck farmer

    Guys like Dyson are why there was an Empire.

    There still is an empire. Rule of Empire is that the weaker submits to the stronger.

    When UK was the strongest power, many parts of the world submitted to it and even took pride in being of it(despite their inferior status).

    As US became the strongest power, UK just became a part of US empire. The poodle. And as US got take over by Jewish globalist network. Wasps submitted to Jews.

    So, the Empire game is still alive and well. Ancient Greeks used to be empire-builders but lost to the Romans and then submitted to the Roman Empire and participated in its power.

    Empire is about ‘the strongest rule’. Once UK was no longer the strongest, it had no choice but to submit to the US empire. The rules are the same.
    Indeed, what do UK and Japan have in common even though UK was a victor while Japan was a loser in WWII? Both found themselves inferior in power to the US and served it like poodles. They probably thought and hoped that US would be Wasp-ruled. But things changed fast, and the Superpower is now a Superpuppet of the Globo-Homo Jewish Empire.

    The NWO is neo-imperialist, not anti-imperialist. It is, above all, about Jewish globo-homo imperial domination. Jews and Homos uber alles. As for their collaborators, there is universal elitism. Jewish imperialists are allowed to maintain national identity and pride. Israel can remain ‘motherland’ for the Jews. But all other nations are to become like brothels. Universal elitism means non-Jewish elites can no longer favor their own kind anymore. In the past, white imperialists favored even humble white folks over other peoples. But in the NWO, white elites must side with non-white elites and rule together(and together serve Jews and Homos). So, the Western elite institutions must be open to all, and hopefully, the same will be done to nations like Japan(which is now allowing permanent resident rights to skilled workers). And as Japanese are deracinated cucks who want to look white(or even black), there is likely to be much race-mixing in yrs to come, esp among the women.

  38. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @22pp22

    Not to be insensitive about this, but how much rent were you charging?

    • Replies: @22pp22
  39. 22pp22 says:
    @Anonymous

    NZ$255 a week and it was paid by the social services. Excuse me for making a living. I do not charge unreasonable rates and most of my tenants have normal jobs. My houses are warm, dry and well-maintained

    Your comment was extremely unpleasant. I don’t like you.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Svigor
  40. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Anon

    It’s old-fashioned, and that suggests that further investigation is warranted.
    In the movie Burnt By The Sun, servants of a general early in the Stalin era are throwing out the collection of imported snake oil quackery bottles prized by the pre-revolutionary household maid. There’s been no law banning them and there’s no noise in the papers suggesting they might be banned soon. But they’re French. They’re inherently bourgeois. They come from outside Bolshevism. They’re old-fashioned, one of those commonplace things that everybody had at a certain time, like that 1970s wooden hexagon.
    It’s like telling them “I’m not afraid of your god” (where the god is progress); you’re just asking for bees.

  41. istevefan says:

    How many people here tonight are itching for something big in France tomorrow?

  42. Anon[225] • Disclaimer says:

    Their marketing in Japan is brilliant. My Japanese wife wanted a Dyson vacuum, but I just couldn’t imagine paying so much. Most of the core patents have expired, so we bought a Japanese vacuum cleaner with the same bagless system. It’s six of one, a half dozen of the other. You don’t have to buy bags, but you have to clean out a very dirty, messy chamber in the vacuum cleaner. She went back to a normal machine after it broke. But my main complaint is the cost. I don’t like paying so much for those kinds of products.

    If Dyson is smart, he’ll just ignore this. But I predict a corporate crisis management response will kick in and he will be spouting all kinds of politically correct rubbish.

    “The girls want to spend their whole teenage years to get their noses more like Western noses.” I have no idea what he’s talking about here. Probably a mistranslated comment from one Japanese person, or a comment by a Japanese who can’t speak English very well. But there is a very common party costume thing that is a fake “western nose” that is big and pointy. Comedians also wear it when playing foreigners in bits.

  43. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:

    I’ve always wanted a Dyson vacuum and other Dyson products because of the funky designs, but I’ve never bought one because they’re so expensive and have a reputation for being impractical and unreliable. Another downside I’ve noticed from interacting with Dyson products in stores and showrooms is that they’re not as solidly built as you’d think for its price, but quite plasticky like ordinary vacuums. So the main difference with ordinary vacuums is the funky design and colors they have. Apple is also an expensive luxury brand with unique designs, but they’re also very solidly built compared to PCs and are more reliable and simpler.

    Another place I’ve used a Dyson product is in public bathrooms. Some of them will have Dyson hand dryers. They differ from ordinary hand dryers by having a narrow opening at the top length wise. But the air is only blasted along that narrow channel, and you have to move your hand up and down into the dryer with your palms facing you. It requires more work on your part and doesn’t dry your hands any better than ordinary hand dryers.

  44. @Cagey Beast

    The ironic thing is that Japanese get off on their racial and cultural uniqueness. Telling them otherwise is fighting words. They also love talking about the unique aspects of other cultures, peoples and countries. Dyson’s comments seem right on the money to me: clearly he has a better understanding of Japan and its people than the NY Times writer.

  45. Kylie says:
    @22pp22

    “It was[sic] be nice if those who dictate our lives gave a damn.”

    It’d be even nicer if those living lives of despair gave a damn and made a different choice.

    And yes, I believe despair is a choice as is choosing not to give into it. It was in my own life. But turning away from despair requires a sense of humility and a sense of gratitude. Those aren’t qualities as valued or as prevalent as they once were.

    • Replies: @22pp22
    , @Svigor
    , @dfordoom
  46. istevefan says:
    @J.Ross

    I still don’t see what’s wrong with “Oriental” (as in, facing the sunrise, which is how many of them rhetorically describe themselves).

    I too like to use the Orient to refer to NE Asia. I realize that the term the Orient has changed somewhat over time and place. But to me the Orient will always be that in my mind.

    Of course be prepared to take flak for using that term. On the flip side trying using the word Occident, Occidental, etc. into a conversation. They don’t know how to react.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Philip Owen
  47. @istevefan

    According to reliable people I read on Twitter, Paris is tense as hell and people think anything from an anticlimax to a Euromaidan style coup is possible.

    • Replies: @fnn
    , @Anon 2
    , @istevefan
  48. 22pp22 says:
    @Kylie

    Thank you for pointing out my grammar error. That was big of you.

    I really regret writing my post. I would delete it if I could. I though the Steve Sailer readership was better than this.

    Steve, If you are reading this, can you delete all my recent posts?

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
    , @Kylie
    , @Anonym
  49. Many, many years ago I remember reading that “Far East” was , if not offensive then certainly out of favor, in that it assumed a Eurocentric perspective (i.e., Europe is the center of everything). I also recall that it’s still considered okay to refer to Asian “things” as Oriental (such as Oriental rugs) but never to the people of Asia (but I wouldn’t stake my career on using the term in any context)!

  50. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @22pp22

    I’m not blaming you in any way. I was just wondering about the circumstances because rent is typically a significant component of people’s budgets. Presumably that wasn’t the factor here if social services was taking care of it, although that might indicate that he was struggling in general and under pressure.

    I don’t know how long he was on the carpet after he passed, but clean up can be a real challenge in these situations. I’ve dealt with trying to remove kitty litter odor that’s gotten everywhere, and it’s an absolute nightmare. It gets into the carpet, the walls, everything, and it’s very hard to get rid of. I’ve heard these situations are even worse. And there’s also the challenge of letting the property again if the market has gotten wind of it. People get squeamish and freak out about this sort of thing. Bad juju and all that.

    • Replies: @22pp22
  51. Anonymous[397] • Disclaimer says:

    Let me get this straight.

    Foreigners in their own country are not different.

    However, when they come here, suddenly they’re very different. That’s what makes them so wonderful and Diverse. We must celebrate these differences!

    But you can’t say what makes them Diverse?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  52. @Anonymous

    The hand dryers are a pain to use, but they do dry your hands better.

    • Replies: @Graham
  53. J.Ross says: • Website
    @istevefan

    I still despise anyone who insists on misspelling Before Christ and Anno Domini as CE and BCE.

    • Agree: Twinkie
    • Replies: @istevefan
    , @Joseph Doaks
  54. @Anon

    Yeah, that was a weird comment about the nose. My wife likes my nose because it is small.

    We went to Yodobashi recently to look at new vacuum cleaners–60000!! Still using the old one…

    • Replies: @Anon
  55. fnn says:
    @Cagey Beast

    I want the Foreign Legion to seize power singing Non Je Ne Regrette Rien.

    • Agree: Jack Hanson, Hunsdon
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  56. J.Ross says: • Website
    @istevefan

    France hell, this is the Arab Spring come home to roost! An anonymous commenter claiming to be a minor BBC functionary says that there is a British government gag order controlling reporting on the French situation. There’s minimal, censored reporting on it, as it’s so big and people generally already know something’s going on, but it’s closely monitored and limited, specifically because they are scared of it spreading further.
    https://postimg.cc/QVthyKsw

  57. @Anonymous

    Anonymous, ah yes the Dyson hand dryer, after a solid minute of attempting to dry your hands, you notice there is no paper towel back up, so you wipe your damp hands on your pants. Nicely designed though.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Logan
  58. @J.Ross

    Save the last bullet for yourself, as when attacked by Comanches.

  59. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    If you don’t mind the weight and the objectionable marketing prectices the Kirby is the best carpet cleaning vacuum in the business. The commercial aluminum Royals are also very good.

  60. @22pp22

    If I drink myself to death, would you have a nice funeral for me? I’m willing to pay for it.

  61. Dan Hayes says:

    Dyson has recently been heavily criticized in England for moving much of his manufacturing operations offshore.

  62. OT, but check this out. Looks like unless something dramatic happens in the next couple of months, there won’t be a Beto O’Rourke presidential campaign.

    https://www.dailycaller.com/2018/12/07/beto-campaign-funds/

    The dumb bastard should have saved himself some seed money to fight the big dogs for the prize, or to at least put him in contention for the VP slot. It’ll now be extrememly hard for him to get the money ball rolling a second time since he lost the senate seat.

    • Replies: @Simply Simon
  63. Anon 2 says:
    @Cagey Beast

    Being someone who has visited France regularly,
    I couldn’t recommend kazolias.com enough. His is the best, the
    most insightful (and therefore frequently politically incorrect)
    blog to read about the current situation in France. George
    Kazolias is an impressively well-informed journalist based in France.

    Nassim Taleb was right when he said that in the Age of the Internet
    reading newspapers (esp. the NYT) is a total waste of time. Similarly,
    watching TV or going to see movies should, with minor exceptions,
    be left to the hoi polloi – unless you wish to study how the 24/7
    indoctrination by the bicoastal chattering classes operates today.
    I read the NYT occasionally but only to renew my disgust.

    • Agree: Cagey Beast
    • Replies: @Pericles
    , @dfordoom
  64. Anon[378] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Those Dyson hand driers look like a patented Mitsubishi design from 30 years ago. They work great and are everywhere in Japan. Since the patents ran out there are other makers now. Some added heat, but you don’t need it at all. A really strong air curtain is enough to just blow off all the water.

    I think Dyson was”inspired” by these.

  65. Anon[378] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buffalo Joe

    There’s a bit of Steve Jobs “You’re holding it wrong” with respect to these kind of driers. The Japanese ones have instructions on them. If you read them and follow them the machine gets your hands more dry faster than paper towels. So … RTFM.

    Or you can carry your own tenugui around.

  66. jJay says:
    @J.Ross

    And the Mexican vagrant who murdered Kate Steinle on the San Francisco Pier was acquitted on all charges. He was stressed out or something.

    There may not be an exact moment when the Jim’s and Beckey’s come to know that they are the kulaks in this slow revolution. I am not sure I will know either. Things are still OK for me now.

    Derb likes to call this the situation the ‘cold civil war’. But it smells to me more like a revolution. Between the two , I’d prefer the former. My prayer is that the enthusiasm for a civil war or revolution will be conducted with Nerf balls, and, with some time for reflection, fade with the passing time.

    A prayer is a serious thought.

    • Replies: @Sean
    , @Ragno
  67. istevefan says:
    @Cagey Beast

    Maybe the USA can arm the rebels.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
  68. jim jones says:
    @Anon

    Koreans regard a “high bridge nose” as attractive, I assume this is what the Japanese term really meant.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    , @Anon
  69. Svigor says:
    @22pp22

    “Anon” and its variants almost always = shitbag.

    Everyone else just gets a handle.

  70. anon[166] • Disclaimer says:
    @Cagey Beast

    Yes, and differences are fundamental to the concept of diversity. Their thinking is not based in logic.

  71. @22pp22

    Sorry to hear about that.

    I’ve known quite a few coworkers who have taken their lives (physicians have very high suicide rates, surgeons are the highest rates of attempts, although anesthesiologists have the highest rates of successful attempts.)

    The thing that has struck me is that the people who take their own lives are invariably the sort of people who really seemed to care about their work, their place in society, etc. I’ve known plenty of assholes who threw instruments at scrub techs and refused to see medicaid patients or take holiday call, and they never self harm.

    Now there is a bit of bifurcation, it seems, at the other end you have people with borderline personality disorder who often make life miserable for people around them, and have very high rates of attempts, although very low rates of successful completion.

    Also worth noting, not sure how well known this is, but the vast majority of people who attempt and fail do not attempt again and in hindsight are happy that their attempt failed. Which I think makes successful suicides even sadder–an utter waste.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  72. Bill P says:
    @22pp22

    I’m sorry you had to see that. I don’t know if it will make you feel any better, but sometimes you have to accept that often people consciously choose that life, and there isn’t anything you can do to help them.

    It’s pretty depressing to think about why people make that choice, but often that’s because we tend to project our own rationales, which are usually distinctly different from what was really the case.

    So it’s best to accept that what was going on with your tenant was a matter between him and his maker, and you can do best by helping those left behind.

    I’ve put a lot of thought into this over the years, and that’s the best I can come up with in a short comment.

    • Agree: ic1000
  73. istevefan says:
    @J.Ross

    I couldn’t even read the comments. So many just focused on him being a so called nazi with no regard to the facts.

    I admit I didn’t follow the case. But from the bites I’ve seen, such as his car never exceeding 28mph, I don’t think it was deliberate on his part.

    I just chalk this up to being like the late vote counting in November. I wasn’t involved in the details, but instinctively knew which side was going to win.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  74. utu says:
    @istevefan

    The Yellow Vests should get couple books on the critical history of the August 1980 events in Poland when the Solidarity trade unions began to learn how the movement started, how it was hijacked, and how it was betrayed and about the multilevel secret police operations and that the famous leader Walesa was not who they thought he was.

  75. Anon[395] • Disclaimer says:
    @Henry's Cat

    The PRC is literally culling the expat population, in any Western country they would have passed the normal five year residency requirement and naturalized.

    Somewhat impressive foresight by the Chinese who remember the extraterritoriality of a century ago.

    But if we did the same to our 3-1 Dem voting traitorous Asian paper citizens…

  76. Veracitor says:
    @Anonymous

    Dyson hand dryers are notorious for blasting viruses and bacteria into their vicinity, 60x more than other hand dryers and 1,400x more than paper towels (link).

    Dyson vacuum cleaners are similarly obnoxious since their bagless systems only capture the coarsest particles and debris while propelling all the finer dirt into the room air, even when they are new. They are built of flimsy plastic molded into overly-complex shapes so their joints and collection cups end up poorly-sealed after a short time in service, causing leaks which emit streams of jet-propelled dirt.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Tyrion 2
  77. The comments on that NYT article are almost unanimously derisory. There is hope.

  78. AKAHorace says:
    @22pp22

    Sorry to hear this. Hope that you are well, try to do a few good things but don’t get overwhelmed by the world.

  79. J.Ross says: • Website
    @SimpleSong

    The thing that has struck me is that the people who take their own lives are invariably the sort of people who really seemed to care about their work, their place in society, etc. I’ve known plenty of assholes who threw instruments at scrub techs and refused to see medicaid patients or take holiday call, and they never self harm.

    In Going Postal Mark Ames found that people who shoot up their workplaces were detail-oriented Type A company men who cared about their jobs. Working in a factory one year I found that the machine operator who knows how to do his job is the one who gets injured — he forgets where he is for a second and jams a finger where it should not go, to adjust something just a little bit — and the fumbling loud idiotic jackass you are asking the boss to fire has a Road-Runner-like imperviousness to harm.

  80. Twinkie says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    His vacuums really are quintessentially British machines: overpriced, over-complicated, and unreliable.

    Dyson vacuum cleaners are very high on marketing and low on performance. Bagless designs are never as clean, high suction, and low emission as bag vacuums. The latest design Dysons, for example, claim to not need filters, but in fact have plastic filters built-in that cannot be replaced. Dysons also have very high repair rates. They are also known to spew dust into the air.

    Miele of Germany makes the best vacuum cleaners in the world. They are tough (crush-proof electric tubes and motors that last 20+ years), have excellent suction, have the lowest emissions (very thick, high quality bags and HEPA filter and motor filter). The negatives are very high price (the top model is around $1,000 in the U.S.) and weight. And the bags are expensive too. They are the King Tigers of the vacuum cleaner world.

    • Agree: Anonym
    • Replies: @Lurker
    , @Anne Lid
    , @MichiganMom
  81. TTSSYF says:
    @22pp22

    Don’t regret your post. I had the same feeling when the first friend I had, in first grade, and was friends with for decades, drank herself to death a few years ago…just as I felt 35 ago, when the mother of my best friend killed herself with carbon monoxide in the family garage or, two years ago, when a relative hanged himself at home. There needs to be a term for that feeling of sadness that has some measure of disgust mixed in.

  82. Twinkie says:
    @jim jones

    Koreans regard a “high bridge nose” as attractive, I assume this is what the Japanese term really meant.

    Yes, but what Koreans prefer is something in-between what a typical Korean has and what a typical European has. Most Koreans find a typical European nose too big.

    Of course, that appears to be European/American preference as well, because A LOT of high bridge-nosed Western women get plastic surgery to attain that “little button nose.”

    • Replies: @Svigor
  83. istevefan says:
    @J.Ross

    I still despise anyone who insists on misspelling Before Christ and Anno Domini as CE and BCE.

    Just repurpose CE as “Christian era”, and BCE as ” before Christian era”.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  84. J.Ross says: • Website
    @istevefan

    Brief summary:
    Police commissioner and mayor are literally antifa. Commissioner regularly attacks evil white people on his twitter feed.
    Standard practice and common sense given a potential clash is to keep ’em separated. Commissioner Antifa had the factions crammed together with no escape.
    Police blocked a road, then abandoned their post without explanation.
    Fields found himself in a dead-ended street not marked as closed on map apps, and yelling people were banging on his car. Many had guns.
    He backed up and then tried to go through them slowly, probably expecting them to get out of the way of the large automobile.
    One massively overweight woman, videoed clutching a pack of Newports, had a heart attack as a result of the excitement and died while untrained non-medical people attempted CPR on her. This was Heather Heyer, whom the lyingpress wants you to think was deliberately and fatally “hit” by Fields.
    Fields’s social media activity and his jailhouse conversations with his mother were used by the prosecution.
    BLM and antifa have been aggressively using roadblocks, sometimes losing later in court to people who drove through and immediately turned themselves in and said they were scared (which was the recommended procedure), but now legal precedent is set: in the United States you are legally allowed to block thoroughfares and attack drivers.

    • Replies: @David
    , @Chris Mallory
  85. Kylie says:
    @22pp22

    I didn’t point out a grammatical error because you didn’t make one (that I noticed). I merely added [sic] after a typo. And I only did that because I myself now make a lot of typos. My eyesight, never good, is getting worse.

    • Replies: @22pp22
  86. J.Ross says: • Website
    @istevefan

    Why should they be repurposed as anything? And exactly how would the “Christian era” start thirty years before the Wedding at Cana?! The “Christian era” should start, by any reasonable standard, with “INHOCSIGNOVINCES.” And if anything needs changing, then why not change it, instead of this filthy virtue signalling — the years are exactly the same, and as “inaccurate” as before, but don’t worry, we pasted a little label on it? I’m not objecting to the anti-Christianity, ridiculous as that is, I’m objectiving to the Orwellian thinking.

  87. Anon[225] • Disclaimer says:
    @jim jones

    Koreans regard a “high bridge nose” as attractive, I assume this is what the Japanese term really meant.

    Yes, a kind of aquiline nose is fairly common among Asians in the “Far East,” and is considered attractive.

  88. Lurker says:
    @Anonymous

    At some point weren’t RR engines actually sourced from the US?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  89. Lurker says:
    @Twinkie

    We’ve got a Dyson upright, it’s worked fine for @7 years. But we do have a Miele washing machine.

  90. Anon[225] • Disclaimer says:
    @Chrisnonymous

    We went to Yodobashi recently to look at new vacuum cleaners–60000!! Still using the old one…

    If you need to vacuum to keep the house clean, as opposed to vacuuming as relaxation therapy (common among Japanese women), then a Makita stick vacuum that runs off of rechargable power tool batteries (around JPY 10,000) is all you need. Japanese houses are just not big enough to require a vacuum with a hose. As for robo-vacuums, for the life of me I can’t understand why they are even being sold in Japan, since they are completely impractical in tiny furnished rooms.

    Dyson has a commercial in Japan for their overpriced stick vacuum cleaner that shows a housewife holding it above her head to clean a light. This is not possible. I cannot even hold it like they show, it’s so heavy. Makitas are light-weight and top-heavy and can be held that way, although cleaning the ceiling with a vacuum cleaner is stupid.

    • Replies: @Anon
  91. Anonymous[212] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Hey, I think I’ve seen her before.

  92. Veracitor says:

    Isn’t it wonderful how the New York Times talks down to us all of the time now?

    In this interview, Mr. Dyson expressed antiquated and at times offensive views on “racial differences” and Japanese culture. He also referred to growth markets in Asia as the “Far East.” [emphasis added]

    They can’t just quote the man. The NYTwits have to tell us that his views are “antiquated” and “offensive” because they fear otherwise we might not realize how repugnant Dyson’s thoughts are.

    The NYTwits do throw in a little treat for people who have already attained a high degree of political sensitivity: they state without explanation that Dyson spoke the term “the Far East.” It’s clear from the context that the NYT considers such a usage evil, but no ordinary person would know why. Any reader who does know why is given a moment to feel superior to the rubes who don’t realize that “Far East” is a hateful term because it privileges the viewpoint of white european cisgender males. Those fiends had the arrogance to think of their own home as the center of the map, from which place other places seemed to be located to the East or West or South or North. Obviously no group of people can be located to the East of any other, because that would privilege the viewpoint of the people in the Western group.

    (Contemplate this on the Tree of Woe.)

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @istevefan
    , @Svigor
  93. @Reg Cæsar

    Yes, the high noses of white people are viewed as quite attractive.

  94. Anonym says:
    @22pp22

    In honor of all those who have drunk themselves to death:

  95. vinny says:
    @J.Ross

    nah, man, if you’re going to handle two tons and 200 horsepower, which is capable of causing really grievous harm, you’re going to be responsible for it.

  96. @22pp22

    Are the rulers of NZ are as globalist and contemptuous of the natives as they are in North America and Western Europe?

    • Replies: @22pp22
  97. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @Veracitor

    So those hand dryers are even worse than I thought. I’m not surprised that they spread more germs than ordinary hand dryers. The way you use them is by moving the hands up and down, which naturally throws germs everywhere around.

    That’s what surprised me when handling Dyson products. How plasticky and flimsy they felt. I imagined they’d be heavier, more solidly built, metallic, etc. because of their price.

  98. istevefan says:
    @Veracitor

    .Any reader who does know why is given a moment to feel superior to the rubes who don’t realize that “Far East” is a hateful term because it privileges the viewpoint of white european cisgender males. Those fiends had the arrogance to think of their own home as the center of the map, from which place other places seemed to be located to the East or West or South or North.

    Doesn’t Japan refer to herself as “The Land of the Rising Sun”? Isn’t this a reference to the fact the sun rises in the east, and thus Japan is first to see the daily sun?

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    , @J.Ross
    , @Svigor
  99. @Daniel H

    “The Wogs start at Calais.”

    Or as the Polentoni from the Southern Tyrol used to say of their terroni countrymen further down the boot:

    Africa starts at [the south bank of] the Po.

    Seriously though – idiotic parochialism is funny, but it’s not smart.

  100. @jimmyriddle

    So, the old Rolls factory in Crewe now only makes Bentleys.

    However, if you want a part for an old Rolls Royce, you have to order it from Bentley at Crewe. The new BMW-owned Rolls Royce operation does not support older Rolls automobiles.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  101. @istevefan

    Doesn’t Japan refer to herself as “The Land of the Rising Sun”? Isn’t this a reference to the fact the sun rises in the east, and thus Japan is first to see the daily sun?

    Well, the sun does appear to ‘rise’ in the east, but yon Nip is not the first to lay eyes on it – not by a fair margin.

    NZ, Fiji, the Solomons (and others) see the sun well before Japan: most of the Australian eastern seabord also lies to the east of the eastern-most point of Hokkaido. (which is why all of Nip-land is in the same time zone as the central swathe of Straya).

  102. Not to sound maudlin but, does anyone remember when being culturally different was just a normal part of this world?

    Career Navy Man and went all over the place including Japan. Enjoyed my time there very much and Mr. Dyson’s opinion is in line with the way it was when I was there. They love their technology and were interested in cultural exchange. They were not interested in cultural takeover. It feels at times that I am slowly watching my country sink under the waves. Sad.

  103. J.Ross says: • Website
    @vinny

    Do you really think that driving a Dodge Charger through a crowd of people, the way a refugee would drive a Nice truck, would look like this? “I hate them so much: but it’s important to keep to the speed limit.” Were the open carriers and car-attackers responsible for anything? Would Fields be okay by this reasoning had he gone with the Neon?

  104. J.Ross says: • Website
    @istevefan

    And the Chinese didn’t call themselves the Middle Kingdom because of Goldilocks.

  105. @J.Ross

    And what can a poor boy do/ except sing for a rock and roll band/ ’cause in sleepy London town there ain’t no place/ for a street fighting man!

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  106. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lurker

    Next to the Manhattan Project, the singular manufacturing achievement of US industry was the Packard company’s production of the V-1650 aircraft engine, which was the Rolls Royce Merlin made under license. Because the license said that every part had to interchange with the appropriate Mark of Merlin, and the US had not built precision work on the order of an aircraft engine to Whitworth dimensions, Packard had to make all their own tooling-taps, dies, thread rolls, everything. Packard made Merlins that made more power, lasted longer, and in half the (wo)man-hours as Rolls Royce. (In both places the workforce was heavily female during the war).

    The Merlin had a two stage, two speed centrifugal supercharger which provided much better high altitude performance than the Allison, unless the Allison were fitted with turbochargers, which then were huge, heavy, and bulky. The use of the turbocharger also made thrust recovery from the engine exhaust stacks a non-starter. At FL 410 a P-51D with a V-1650-9 engine can generate a significant thrust from its exhaust and the expansion of the cooling air from the radiator scoop and cruise speeds of 400 ktas are entirely feasible, outrunning many jets, like the A-10 or T/A-37, Jet Provost, Vampire, and the early two man Citations amongst others. Even a T-33 isn’t more than fifty knots faster or so. (Sabres and MiGs, however, had a hundred-plus knot advantage and were best left alone in the case of the MiGs, although Korean War USAF Mustang pilots did bag a few.)

    Latin American air forces flew Mustangs into the 1960s and the US Army used one as a chase aircraft for the legendary AH-56 Cheyenne program up until perhaps 1970 or so. If the logistics of leaded avgas and the pilot skills to fly heavily loaded conventional gear airplanes were not what they are today , the Mustang could still do a hell of a job in places like Afghanistan even now. It would not be as absorbent of battle damage as the Warthog, but operating costs would be much lower and the Mustang can fly lower and slower in tight terrain. Cavalier had a damn good idea with the Enforcer; the problem was that they had to try to sell it to a service that wants to burn budget and doesn’t want the ground attack mission while the service that does is not allowed a fixed wing air arm.

  107. @vinny

    True. And if you go bragging how you scared away away the person driving the 2 ton weapon by firing a gun towards them, you usually have a court date, even in stand your ground states. But Justice, or something, in this case.

  108. Svigor says:
    @Kylie

    Despair may be genetic. E.g., it’s just not an issue for me.

    • Replies: @Kylie
  109. Svigor says:
    @Veracitor

    “NYTwits,” classic.

    😀

  110. Svigor says:
    @Twinkie

    Was talking to someone about this the other day. Truth is, big noses are normal and fine and nobody cares. Very few have those pixie noses, and only damaged people obsess over it.

    More truth, asians have big noses, horizontally.

  111. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Crawfurdmuir

    I think the old RR V-8 was used in core form by Bentley for some time, but they now use a “W12” that is more or less 2/3rds of the Veyron Bugatti engine: it’s not really a W engine, but two narrow angle V6s arranged in a vee themselves.

    I’m told the pushrod RR V8 has many, many parts that interchange with a certain Olds engine, purely a coincidence, I am certain.

  112. @Anonymous

    The Packard guys must have been sore that the P-51 was called the “Cadillac of the Skies” instead of the “Packard of the Skies.”

    • Replies: @Simply Simon
  113. @istevefan

    So Steve can ignore it in favor of the Asian Admission Crisis or the Oscars?

  114. El Dato says:

    NEIN! NEIN! NEIN! NEIN!

    Anything that is not a Jewish Paradise of cross-cultural mayhem and souk-like egalitarian horsetrading is supspect!

    A NYT interview:

    (remarks)

    “CLARIFY YOUR REMARKS!”

    (answer elided)

    “APOLOGIZE!”

  115. @jimmyriddle

    Dyson got a lot of grief for moving his manufacturing to the Far East, but he’d been banging on to the Thatcher/Major governments for years about the importance of keeping a critical mass of engineering/electronics suppliers in the UK, and no one in power took notice.

    He wrote a great Telegraph article about 15 years ago, saying that when he created his first product (a radical wheelbarrow design), he could go up to the Black Country and find, within a few miles radius, suppliers of steel tube, people who’d bend the tube, people who’d clean and powder coat it – and the UK needed that kind of supply chain in things like electric motors, plastics and high-usage switches. He moved production out of the UK when he found he was sourcing too much stuff in Japan/Singapore/Thailand.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  116. Sean says:
    @forgottenpseudonym

    Dyson is a ballbag.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballbarrow

    My bricklayer uncle became apoplectic when his wife bought one of those for the garden. I suspect Dyson is successful because women like his designs.

    The Germans were spying on him
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/retailandconsumer/11331231/Germanys-leading-vacuum-brand-is-made-in-the-UK.html
    Dyson’s factory is actually in Malaysia.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  117. @Anonymous

    The Packard guys must have been sore that the P-51 was called the “Cadillac of the Skies” instead of the “Packard of the Skies.”

  118. Twinkie says:
    @Anonymous

    the Mustang could still do a hell of a job in places like Afghanistan even now. It would not be as absorbent of battle damage as the Warthog

    I’m not an aircraft guy, but comparing the ruggedness of an A-10 to a P-51 is like comparing a heavy tank to a Jeep.

    The Mustang was a superb long range air-to-air fighter, but I think WWII pilots preferred the P-47 when attacking ground targets, especially those with a lot of AAA protection, as the P-47 was considerably more rugged than the more agile, but also more fragile P-51. After all, the A-10 was named Thunderbolt II after the P-47.

    I love the A-10 and the men who fly it.

    • Replies: @istevefan
    , @Sarah Toga
  119. Sean says:
    @jJay

    And the Mexican vagrant who murdered Kate Steinle on the San Francisco Pier was acquitted on all charges

    That is an excellent point.

  120. Anne Lid says:
    @Twinkie

    I had my heart set on a beautiful Miele. But Henry was around only £120, and it works just fine. The head’s plastic neck cracked the second day (it kept slipping off and I was a bit too forceful). Instead of getting it changed (hassle) I taped it around. It was made in England. The English guys in the shop assured me that it will run for many years to come. When I worked at a caf we had a Henry, which I suspect never had a bag in it, similarly to this one:

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  121. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Veracitor

    You’re meant to dry your hands after washing them.

  122. 22pp22 says:
    @Anonymous

    Understood, let’s move on.

  123. 22pp22 says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Our current PM is inspired by Justin Trudeau. So, yes they are.

  124. 22pp22 says:
    @Kylie

    Understood, let’s move on.

  125. @istevefan

    Yes, the Americans would come in, kill off the existing Yellow Vest leadership and put in someone who went to the Kennedy School of Government and speaks English.

  126. RW says:
    @Cagey Beast

    Yes, and the feminine view has been dominant for a good 25 or 30 years.

    • Agree: Cagey Beast
  127. @J.Ross

    “Will we see body language or handwriting analysis “proving” cryptonazism in the near future?”

    It’s already underway in Germany.

    https://jungefreiheit.de/politik/deutschland/2018/zopf-alarm-und-nazi-wahn/

  128. vinny says:

    The term “Near East” has long been unfashionable, though I am not sure why.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  129. Pericles says:
    @J.Ross

    Oh what is the BBC so afraid of? It’s not like the London arabs and blacks will rise up to throw out Mayor Khan or any of the diverse BBC presenters. Or do they fear that any of the arab potentates and princelings in Knightsbridge and Mayfair will have to winter in New York instead?

  130. Pericles says:
    @Anon 2

    I read the NYT occasionally but only to renew my disgust.

    If it wasn’t for our gracious Steve, I’d hardly know the NYT existed. Like others in the same category (Economist, etc), it’s basically just useful to see what the chattering classes should be thinking.

  131. @Twinkie

    I love my Miele. Really sturdy and well made.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  132. Graham says:
    @Chrisnonymous

    One small data point. I ski in Zermatt, Switzerland, every winter. Quite an upmarket resort, in fact one of the best in the world. The hand driers in the mountain restaurants are nearly all Dysons. He must be doing something right to sell British technology to the Swiss. The driers are too noisy, but they work well.

  133. David says:
    @J.Ross

    This was an interesting case, “Soldier acquitted in hit-and-run death; lawyer raises Alton Sterling shooting in his defense:”

    https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_rouge/news/communities/livingston_tangipahoa/article_077ca9a4-ed15-11e8-bb99-fb0637d1d1e8.html

  134. El Dato says:
    @vinny

    That would be a road accident or manslaughter, then?

    DEPLOY NAZI ASSYRIAN COMBINE HARVESTER!!!

  135. @Steve in Greensboro

    Strongly recommend the Rainbow. Uses water as a filter.

    http://rainbowsystem.com/products/rainbow-system/

    I bought a used one many years ago and it still works great. No bags, no filters to clean, no smell, and if you unexpectedly suck up a toy, you can just fish it out when you dump the water (which I do in the backyard).

  136. @YetAnotherAnon

    So what could Thatcher/Major have done to keep all the suppliers in the UK? Lesson the regulations? fight the unions? didn’t they try to do those things?

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  137. Logan says:
    @Buffalo Joe

    Often, with these electric hand dryers, there will be some sort of statement that they are more sanitary than paper towels.

    Right.

    Instead of absorbing residual bacteria into paper then discarding it in a trash can, let’s blow them up into the air so we can inhale the bacteria. Also, share them with everyone else in the room. And of course they also settle out onto all surfaces.

    The Dyson variety, being much higher velocity, are even more effective.

    I’ve never seem a study, but I suspect bacteria are more widely spread and in higher concentration on most surfaces in a Dyson restroom than in one with paper towels. Other factors kept steady.

    • Replies: @Macumazahn
  138. @Anonymous

    Japan of course has a huge audiophile community and Japanese preferences in speakers are very different from what Westerners prefer.

    Watch this Japanese guy listen to his enormous American JBL speakers. Their preferences in speakers might be different, but they sure like vintage JBLs, just as many Americans did, back in the heyday of “hifi stereo systems”, from the late 1950s to the early 1970s. Interesting bit starts at 5:01.

  139. fakaza2018 says: • Website

    Donald Trump said about Manafort being a minor player.

    Earth isn’t even flat or convex, we all live inside it like a container or a ARC like bubble, it’s not even heliocentricism, it’s called Gegenshein. The whole universe fits inside, planets are small rocks like 100-150ft wide.

  140. @J.Ross

    but now legal precedent is set: in the United States you are legally allowed to block thoroughfares and attack drivers.

    Not even close. A circuit/district court in Virginia doesn’t set precedent for any other court.

    The best Fields could have hoped for was some version of reckless/wanton endangerment.

  141. Pheasant says:
    @Anonymous

    ‘Another place I’ve used a Dyson product is in public bathrooms. Some of them will have Dyson hand dryers. They differ from ordinary hand dryers by having a narrow opening at the top length wise. But the air is only blasted along that narrow channel, and you have to move your hand up and down into the dryer with your palms facing you. It requires more work on your part and doesn’t dry your hands any better than ordinary hand dryers’

    They are meant to be cheaper to run and dry your hands faster. In fact they are vastly more unhygenic than normal hand dryers. The design makes them extremely unsanitary. The re was an investigation a little while ago.

  142. @Tiny Duck

    This is it Yrump is finished

    Im fixin to kick yrump up between yshoulder blades, to whur yll hafta unbutton ycollar to move ybowels.

  143. BB753 says:
    @J.Ross

    It’s already spreading to Belgium and Germany.

  144. BB753 says:
    @istevefan

    If the army steps in, it’s adieu to the Fifth Republic and Micron! I’d say there’s a 33 % chance of a regime change. Whatever happens, Macron is toast and the House of representatives is to be dismantled.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  145. Jack D says:

    The Chinese name for China, 中国 (zhong guo) means “central country”. The Chinese believed that their country was at the center of civilization and surrounded by barbarians on all sides. This is deeply racist. I think that the Chinese need to stop using this racist name and come up with a better, less racist name for their country. Imagine the outcry if America meant “center of the universe”.

    • Replies: @istevefan
  146. Jack D says:
    @Anonymous

    a P-51D with a V-1650-9 engine can generate a significant thrust from its exhaust

    It’s not an accident that the leading jet engine companies (e.g. GE) had expertise in building superchargers. It eventually dawned on engine designers that the reciprocating engine in the middle was superfluous. All you really need is the supercharger in the front and the exhaust blowing out the back. Instead of all those incredibly complicated pistons and valves and stuff in the middle, you just needed a big raging fire (and a little turbine to spin the supercharger).

  147. @J.Ross

    I’m inclined to believe that using “CE” and “BCE” are a Jewish inspired anti-Christian thing… does anyone know of any other reason for this usage?

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Jack D
  148. Jack D says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    overpriced, over-complicated, and unreliable.

    This is not unique to the British. In fact it is a pretty good description of modern German cars. The car with the steepest depreciation curve is the BMW 5 series – one loses over $30,000 (more than 1/2 their value) in only 3 years. A few more years and you can buy them for pocket change. You would think that this creates a bargain opportunity to buy a lightly used BMW for a lot less than new. But the market is right. Buying one is only the first step – then you have to keep it on the road and the cost of keeping this over-complicated and unreliable vehicle with overpriced parts (especially if yo take it to the stealer, I mean dealer) will completely obviate the bargain purchase price.

    • Agree: Ibound1, Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  149. when are whites going to get their own newspaper that attacks jews all day?

  150. With the huge flow of new research indirectly supporting HBD (direct support is forbidden by most research funding bodies), Dyson’s “antiquated views on race” are becoming the up-to-date research frontier views on race.

  151. @Dave Pinsen

    His vacuums really are quintessentially British machines: overpriced, over-complicated, and unreliable. Maybe the Japanese, bored with their native efficiency, find that charming.

    Thats unfair. I’ve owned a Dyson and yes they are quite complicated.

    However, I have owned a British designed and manufactured Henry vacuum cleaner for several years, and its powerful, simple and reliable – and its got a smiley face on the front!

    I have immense respect for James Dyson but you can’t go wrong with a Henry:

  152. Kylie says:
    @Svigor

    “Despair may be genetic.”

    Agreed.

    “E.g., it’s just not an issue for me.”

    It is for me, because a person who self-destructs in a state of despair nearly always twice damages the lives of those closest to him. First friends and family deal with the deleterious effects of despair, then they deal with having to clean up the mess a despairing person leaves behind. It’s ugly and dirty and doesn’t allow family and friends to grieve cleanly.*

    *I do not included assisted suicide in this even though those who choose this path may be said to be despairing. It may be a sad death but it is a welcome one for the individual and a clean one for his survivors.

  153. KunioKun says:

    I think lots of people enjoy Japanese entertainment because, for the most part, people who make it are not using it as a vehicle to destroy the people who are consuming it. People used to Western entertainment are like abused children who have no idea that their situation is not normal. You get a whiff of this when you lose your taste for Western garbage, but you really notice it if you can find something that you can enjoy that isn’t created by envious little perverts who hate you. Lots of artists in Japan are messed up people on drugs and are perverts too, but I suspect they don’t get excited at the thought of enlisting other people as messed up perverts so they are free to make entertainment that isn’t poison.

    From what I understand, Dyson got his start in Japan selling his vacuum as “the pink devil”. I have one of his vacuums. I like it, but my wife says it’s way too heavy. In addition to his vacuums he also put that huge ball thing on a wheelbarrow.

  154. istevefan says:
    @istevefan

    Apparently Russia is promoting the protests in France. Or at least that is what Max Boot is suggesting. So I guess we can dismiss them as illegitimate.

    • Replies: @BB753
  155. istevefan says:
    @Twinkie

    The Mustang was a superb long range air-to-air fighter, but I think WWII pilots preferred the P-47 when attacking ground targets, especially those with a lot of AAA protection,

    The Mustang had a liquid-cooled engine while the Thunderbolt had an air-cooled one. On low level missions the Mustang was more susceptible to AAA and even small arms fire that could damage its radiator, thus causing the engine to overheat and seize. The air-cooled radial engines could take a lot more punishment and so were better suited for low level missions.

    • Replies: @Simply Simon
  156. L Woods says:
    @Henry's Cat

    “Outsourcing the Middle Class.” Another plutocratic jerk. It’s a shame he got out with his shirt.

  157. @jimmyriddle

    What fabulous power plants Rolls produced. The American V-12 Allison engine was quickly replaced in P-51s during WWII as the Rolls version was far superior. And what fine motorcycles the British manufactured including the Brough Superior, Vincent,Triumph, Norton and many others. Britain ruled road racing for many years but failed to keep up with advancements made in other countries and their motorcycle industry slowly died. The great John Surtees abandoned Brit bikes in favor of the four cylinder Italian MV Augusta. Britain did have a four cylinder bike named the Ariel Square Four. A rather exotic machine but the “square”design did not enhance an air-cooled engine.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    , @Anonymous
  158. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sean

    My bricklayer uncle became apoplectic when his wife bought one of those for the garden. I suspect Dyson is successful because women like his designs.

    There’s probably something to this. Kind of like how automakers figured out that soccer moms will pay thousands more to run errands in SUVs rather than vans. Also note the fabulous variety and kinds of colors Dyson products come in.

  159. @istevefan

    Thee were a number of WWII Aces who flew the P-47 including Francis Gabreski who later became a Korean War Ace flying F-86 Sabres.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  160. @jimmyriddle

    By the time my client Sony stopped manufacturing TVs in the UK, the only things they could source locally were the metal chassis (from another client) and packaging materials. All the cabinetry, switches, circuit boards, cables etc came from overseas, more often than not Slovakia where they eventually relocated for the LCD screen age.

    At a Bank of England a few months ago, it was clear from discussion that there is no longer a full British supply chain in clothing. All the labour intensive bits have gone, to Bangladesh mostly.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  161. @istevefan

    An Arab called Edward Said wrote a book called Orientalism in the 1960’s. It suggested that using the term Oriental dehumanized Arabs by maing them an “other”. Thus in PC speak, Oriental, has become seen as abusive.

    • Replies: @istevefan
  162. @Anonymous

    “Latin American air forces flew Mustangs into the 1960s….”
    A very interesting and informative article indeed. In 1971 while touring several countries in South America our group landed at the El Alto Airport near La Paz, Bolivia. It also happens to be the fifth highest international at over 12,000 ft. AGL. After deplaning and instantly feeling the effects of the high altitude I noticed several P-51s parked on the ramp. I suspect those grand airplanes served no other purpose than to provide flyovers for the resident Comandante.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  163. @Simply Simon

    Japanese bikes killed off the Brit bike industry in the mid/late 60s for a good reason, their products were reliable – change the oil, grease the chain – and the engines didn’t leak oil over your boot.

    The CD175 (1967) had dubious handling and a pressed steel frame – but it just kept on going, whereas the BSA Bantam owner was forever fiddling with his bike. When the CB175 came out, with a proper frame and relatively sporty handling, BSA were doomed.

    Only when Triumph/Norton were raised from the dead by John Bloor (pbuh) did Brit bikes come back – and the modern machines are great, powerful and sporty, but the market has changed and we no longer buy many bikes as commuter transport.

    Japan did the same thing in the 1970s to British mass-market cars with models like the Datsun 120Y (B210).

    • Replies: @g2k
  164. @Anne Lid

    My Henry has not cracked. If you actually want high power vacuum cleaning this leaves Dysons in the dust. The downside is that it is clumsy to handle.

  165. @Steve Sailer

    Fabulous video! Background? Worth at least a small donation to the Sailer Fund.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    , @Steve Sailer
  166. @stillCARealist

    Not much. Stop selling oil. The petro-pound killed off a lot of low value added manufacturing. Now the UK is very good at the very top (prime movers, pharma, medical devices, food processing, mobile telephony) but there is not much of a supply chain for the components and the mid tech that Germany and France have is missing. Having Hong Kong in the family didn’t help much in retaining plastics production either.

  167. BB753 says:
    @istevefan

    You’re only supposed to root for soft CIA coups like Euromaidan and the Arab Spring. Populist democracy in the West? That’s a big no-no.

    • Replies: @istevefan
  168. @South Texas Guy

    Very revealing info that probably will not be seen in the NYT, WaPO or Austin American-Statesman.

  169. @Buffalo Joe

    I was 14 when Pearl Harbor was attacked. I well remember one man above draft age who stated, “We’ll have those Japs licked in two weeks.”

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    , @Sarah Toga
  170. istevefan says:
    @Jack D

    I think that the Chinese need to stop using this racist name and come up with a better, less racist name for their country. Imagine the outcry if America meant “center of the universe”.

    Actually the grievance mongers complain that “America” is a bad name because it implies that only we in the USA are Americans when in fact all people of North and South America are Americans.

    I’ve had people point out to me that Canada is in North America, but doesn’t take the adjective America in her name. Ditto for Mexico which is supposedly called the United Mexican States or something similar. And the same goes for the SA nations like Brazil and Argentina. These folks will say that it is arrogant of us to put America in our name as it implies only we are Americans.

    What is interesting is that the British referred to the original 13 colonies as the American colonies and did not conflate them with their holdings in Canada. So even back then our predecessors had American in their designation. It only makes sense that those 13 colonies when forming a nation choose to become the United States of America. What else where they going to be, the United States of what?

  171. istevefan says:
    @Philip Owen

    I recall that, though I never read it. But due to my age and time reference, I cannot think of Arabs as oriental. They are middle easterners to me. I will forever associate oriental with NE Asia.

  172. Anonymous[122] • Disclaimer says:
    @vinny

    “Near East” used to refer to Turkey’s European territories in the Balkans. It became defunct with the Ottoman Empire.

  173. Anonymous[122] • Disclaimer says:
    @MichiganMom

    Agree. Ours has been going for nearly 20 years and still is good, though with a few cracks and replaced parts.

  174. Anon[318] • Disclaimer says:
    @Joseph Doaks

    “Common era” means it’s not being dated from a king’s reign. According to wiki Kepler came up with that name (in astronomical tables), no idea why. Were astronomical data generally recorded based on regnal year ? That would have created an absurd mess.

    It’s mildly annoying that AD is Latin and BC is English.

    In academic usage, yeah, you’re probably right.

  175. Anonymous[247] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Leftism is really a (crazy, evil) religion more than it is a set of empirical data by which to judge reality.

  176. @Simply Simon

    Simply, Unless my math is wrong you are 91 and certainly the oldest commenter here. God bless you sir.

    • Agree: Sarah Toga
    • Replies: @Simply Simon
  177. Dave Pinsen:

    My sister has a Dyson vac and it’s been working great for years. It has advantages over other vacs and she thinks it was worth the extra price.

  178. @Logan

    There’s been just such a study, but it wasn’t limited to Dyson hand “dryers.” The comparison was air-dryer versus paper towels. Just as you suspected, the air blasts the bacteria around and the entire restroom is more unsanitary than a similar restroom with paper towels.
    I’ve now seen two different models of the Dyson. Lovely to look at, but not all that effective. I especially dislike the earlier version, because I find it difficult to avoid touching the device while inserting and removing my hands.
    On the other, uh, hand, if you’re going to go this route, there are some “traditional” designs that put out serious airflow. I’m talking leaf-blower power levels. Forget about spreading bacteria – that one will probably unroll all the paper in the stalls.

  179. @Simply Simon

    Fabulous video! Background? Worth at least a small donation to the Sailer Fund.

    The video clip is from the 1987 movie Empire of the Sun starring a young Christian Bale, and directed by Steven Spielberg, about a rich expatriate kid in Shanghai who is interned by the Japanese.

    It was one of two excellent movies released that year with that theme. John Boorman’s Hope and Glory, about a young boy in London during the Blitz, is also worth watching.

  180. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Kylie

    And yes, I believe despair is a choice as is choosing not to give into it.

    In most cases I think you’re right. It’s an unpopular view but I think that mostly depression is a choice.

    It was in my own life.

    Same here.

  181. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Anon 2

    Similarly, watching TV or going to see movies should, with minor exceptions,
    be left to the hoi polloi

    If you love movies there are plenty of old ones that are readily available.

    Although I suspect that within another decade all movies made before the 90s will be banned.

  182. @Simply Simon

    And the clip that comes before “Cadillac of the Skies” in Spielberg’s “Empire of the Sun” is even more jaw-dropping:

    • Agree: Simply Simon
    • Replies: @Simply Simon
  183. istevefan says:
    @BB753

    I don’t know how far things will go in France, but the last few weeks have led me to rethink my attitude on democracy. I’ve always been big on elections no matter how many times the GOP has let me down. And now I am coming to terms knowing there will be no wall, or reduced legal immigration levels. In fact I am coming to terms that we will get criminal justice reform and some sort of clean energy bill so says Chuck Schumer who let us know that will be the cost of any infrastructure legislation.

    So long as the GOP has mega donors who pony up $30 million per election cycle, we the voters will never get what we want unless it coincides with them. Add to that the seemingly impossible task of getting the 40 % or so of white voters to wake up and realize the democrats hate them, and it looks like an impossible task to accomplish anything through the ballot box. And of course we have the mercenary voting recruits that continue to legally arrive on our shores at over a million per year.

    Now come the yellow vests who appear on the scene supposedly over being upset at high taxes. Recall America’s revolution started under a similar complaint. So I wonder now if it is better to let things deteriorate so much that boomers, cucks, the core, or whatever you want to call them, find thinks so intolerable that they too take to the streets like the yellow vests.

    In other words is voting in a Western democracy a fools errand so long as the bulk of the population is fat, dumb and happy? Is taking to the streets the only way to get any meaningful change? If so should we be hoping for worsening conditions to cause that? Before, I would have thought not. But after seeing our legitimate victory in 2016 being sabotaged from without and within, as well as the apparent gutting of Brexit, I think I’ve changed my tune.

    • Replies: @BB753
  184. In this interview, Mr. Dyson expressed antiquated and at times offensive views on “racial differences” and Japanese culture. He also referred to growth markets in Asia as the “Far East.”

    What a linguistic atrocity!

    Imagine how silly it would sound if the NYT used a term like the “Far Right”.

  185. @BB753

    And then what?

    • Replies: @BB753
  186. @Redneck farmer

    Great song, but that album saved the best for last, with its tribute to the Salt of the Earth. It always makes me think of a particular redneck farmer from Northeast Alabama.

  187. Jack D says:
    @Philip Owen

    I think something like 99% of clothing in America is now imported. The domestic industry is gone, gone, gone. It hardly exists anymore. There are lots of thing like that, where if imports were cut off, there would be tremendous shortages at least in the short run because there are few if any domestic producers left.

    • Replies: @istevefan
    , @Anonymous
  188. Jack D says:
    @Joseph Doaks

    Kepler coined the phrase but it was indeed popularized by Jewish scholars. I don’t see this as being anti-Christian, just neutral. “A.D.” is the sectarian term, meaning “In the Year of our Lord”. Jesus ain’t “our Lord” if you are Jewish so it’s not surprising (or wrong) that Jews were reluctant to use A.D. and sought an alternative. This doesn’t make them “anti-Christian”.

  189. istevefan says:
    @Jack D

    There are lots of thing like that, where if imports were cut off, there would be tremendous shortages at least in the short run because there are few if any domestic producers left.

    Shouldn’t that be a source of concern? If too many of your industries are in a position like this, it puts you at the mercy of foreign nations.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  190. dfordoom says: • Website
    @istevefan

    There are lots of thing like that, where if imports were cut off, there would be tremendous shortages at least in the short run because there are few if any domestic producers left.

    Shouldn’t that be a source of concern? If too many of your industries are in a position like this, it puts you at the mercy of foreign nations.

    If you’re a globalist that’s a feature, not a bug.

  191. Anonymous[111] • Disclaimer says:
    @Simply Simon

    My father probably sold them parts. He worked for a company that did aircraft support for several aircraft, one being Mustangs, and they had at one point largely cornered the surplus market on several lines of spares for that type. Particularly the Aeroproducts propeller, although there was also a Hamilton Standard version. Merlins of both RR and Packard versions were common enough through about the mid-80s you saw them in boats and oddball exhibition and show car projects, pulling tractors, et al. They became valuable when warbirds increased drastically in value in the mid-80s.

  192. Anonymous[111] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    No domestic fabric production means you can’t get Grade A cotton aircraft fabric any more. Foreign mills just can’t seem to produce the fabric to FAA spec and document it right. Real AN threaded fittings and standard aircraft nuts and bolts are also almost all produced in the US, at exhorbitant prices, neither Chinese nor Russians want to make it to spec. (Neither real race cars nor ricky racers use actual aircraft fittings anymore, it’s all “Aircraft Style”. much of which does wind up in the aviation supply chain. No one wants to talk about the whole story because GA would be grounded if all unapproved parts really were pulled from the system.)

  193. Anonymous[111] • Disclaimer says:
    @Simply Simon

    The P-47 was in fact a better low level attack aircraft than the Mustang, and the AD1 Skyraider was probably the best of all the radial engine singles for ground attack. Again, either would be a usable design for counterinsurgency use today if the supply chain were there.

  194. BB753 says:
    @ben tillman

    After that, long live the sixth Republic! Vive la sixieme république! That’s how the French fix things temporarily. I still don’t trust Marine Le Pen to bring about a meaningful change.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    , @dfordoom
  195. BB753 says:
    @istevefan

    In America, a Yellow Jacket movement will quickly turn into a bloody affair.

  196. Anonymous[111] • Disclaimer says:
    @Simply Simon

    The British built the Napier Sabre sleeve valve engine used in the Tempest and Typhoon, in some ways the ultimate piston aero engine, except for the never produced Napier Nomad. They also built the beautiful Gardner diesels and the Commer Knocker, the Squariel, and bunches of other neat stuff. Nevertheless as a manufacturing power, they disappeared.

    But to say the Merlin was superior to the Allison requires explanation. As a core engine, comparing dash numbers of Allisons and Marks of Merlin, they were quite equivalent. The Merlin had a two speed, two stage supercharger that made it much more powerful at high altitude, whereas Allisons were made for aircraft not intended for high altitude or for the turbocharged P-38.

    The coda to the story is that the US, having extirpated the huge supply of Lightnings immediately after the war, needed a long range escort fighter for Korea and so built the F-82 Twin Mustang, which looks exactly like two regular Mustangs joined by stub wing and stabilizer sections. (In reality, nothing interchanges.) So they needed Merlins, but RR-under the thumb of the British government-refused to license Packard to make more, perhaps in the idea the Americans would simply buy them from RR. Packard were told by the US Government to build them anyway, but Packard refused, saying it would be dishonorable. So GM Allison essentially grafted the two stage two speed blower section of the Merlin onto the 1710 core engine and the general view was that it was a better engine even than the Merlin.

    Many American Packard fans cite this “betrayal” by the British as a key reason for the demise of Packard. I disagree, Packard were who killed Packard, their postwar cars being technically underwhelming. They made flathead straight eights long after they should have been gone and spent a lot of money on the worthless Ultramatic transmisssion. Nevertheless the British attempt to strongarm the US into buying RR made Merlins was a foolish nonstarter, in an age where unions in the US had real power: they would have been far better to work a deal for the Packard license to continue in exchange for the US licensing a jet design of real value, or some other useful bit of intellectual property.

    The British still don’t “get it”. I was offered a job in the US assisting in marketing the Edgely Optica project, which I knew would be, again, a “non-starter”, and it was. The Brits wanted too much money and the US agents had pwoduct wiability up the ass. I told the US agents to start a new company that could not be in any way construed as a personal holding corporation (which is how they “pierce the corporate veil”, or did then), finance it a la Milton Berle-i.e., just take out enough to win-and put in the corporate charter that the company is not allowed to purchase any amount of product liability insurance whatsoever. (Legal insurance yes, PL, not a cent.) Worst case scenario, Arthur Alan Wolk sues, and he maybe gets the keys to the leased hangar and maybe one airplane, no cash.

    That was perceived as not the done thing and I told them wotsa wuck and walked out of the interview. You can look up how Edgeley went if you are interested. I predicted it pretty close.

  197. Anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:

    The Skyraider was a beast. It arrived too late for WWII otherwise it would have been the heaviest single-engine aircraft of the war.

  198. @Anonymous

    Neal Stephenson’s “Cryptonomicon” has some interesting passages on why the British brilliance for technology didn’t much pay off in the 20th Century.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  199. g2k says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Not really. Purely Japanese cars were quite rare in Britain until the late 80s. Eu tariffs were high and there was a lot of anti-Japanese sentiment at that time. Ford, Vauxhall (opel-gm) and the Europeans killed off British midrange cars. The Japanese companies kind of merged with/took over the defunct native companies when they could no longer afford to develop new designs, producing rebadged Japanese cars in British factories. Eg Triumph Acclaim, 1990s rovers etc.

  200. Ragno says:
    @jJay

    My prayer is that the enthusiasm for a civil war or revolution will be conducted with Nerf balls, and, with some time for reflection, fade with the passing time.

    A prayer is a serious thought.

    Whatever a man prays for, he prays for a miracle. Every prayer reduces to this: Great God, grant me that two and two not be four. – Ivan Turgenev

  201. @Twinkie

    I love the A-10 and the men who fly it

    Martha McSally, failed candidate for US Senator from Arizona?

  202. @J.Ross

    suggests he will be able to appeal but long before that I expect him to be murdered in prison.

    IF he is not murdered in prison;
    IF he is allowed to file an appeal;
    IF the appeal is heard by a actual judge who gives a damn about law;
    he will be financially broke, anyway.
    And blackballed from any employment.
    But not eligible for any public assistance of any kind.
    Nice little predicament the Left has arranged for us Historic Americans, isn’t it?

  203. @Simply Simon

    Simply – I just now agreed with Buffalo Joe. My dad was a WWII army veteran, so just a few years older than you. Glad you are here, and glad you are commenting with us.

  204. Lots of nostalgia for WWII allied aircraft and the needed manufacturing so that the WWII pilots could go earn medals. I get it.
    My Dad enlisted for to be an Army Medic in WWII, being a devout Christian and pacifistic he requested that assignment.
    That era is long over.
    What the Axis and later the Soviets could not do, immigration has.

    I have descended to the point of knowing my YT children’s future is about to be controlled by AOC and her ilk.
    (I believe Paul Ryan conspired with the Democrats to give them the House)

    All because of the iron-legged stool of mass immigration:
    1. import democrat votes.
    2. GOP donors’ get cheap labor.
    3. Any business – GOP owned, Moslem owned, Faceless corporate owned: whatever, gets consumers.

    Trump was mere talk, no action regarding reducing or ending immigration.
    Trump is now “past tense.”
    The numbers have flipped against historic America.
    Time’s up.
    Trump has already lost in 2020.
    The next POTUS will be the worst of all worlds.
    Trump blew his hard-earned opportunity, a tragedy.
    We are doomed.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  205. @Buffalo Joe

    There’s and old saying that a man will be once a man and twice a boy. I never reached the man stage

  206. @Steve Sailer

    Your “small” donation is in the mail.

  207. @Anonymous

    Thanks for your very interesting and informative comments. Yes, the P-38 did not perform well in the European theater but quite well in the Pacific. Richard Bong, American ace with 40 kills, flew the P-38 exclusively. Not sure if this is common knowledge but a flight of P38s flew several hundred miles using only dead reckoning navigation over the water, shot down Admiral Yamamoto’s plane after our decoders discovered the flight plan.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  208. Lurker says:
    @Anonymous

    This is all great stuff. But I meant RR car engines. 😉

    I’m sure in quite recent times RR were using off-the-shelf US engines, transmissions as the basis of the car engines.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  209. @Simply Simon

    Thanks.

    My dad worked on the P-38 Lighting.

    I’m interested in why it worked well against the Japanese but not against the Germans. Did being a huge fighter with two engines give pilots more confidence to fly over open ocean? Did it not try to dogfight with the nimble Japanese zero but instead rely upon superiorities in speed and altitude? Did its big size light up German radars too soon?

  210. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    The Germans called the Lightning “the fork tailed devil” ( Der Gabelschwanz Teufel), so it was effective in the ETO.

    It was a much better combat aircraft than it was an airplane in general, because of the electric props and electrically actuated slow landing gear retract and high drag gear doors during the cycle, engine out takeoffs were a huge challenge under even ideal conditions and deadly with a full external stores, heavy, short field condition.

    Electric props were fine on either single engine or four engine airplanes, but on a twin, their slow feathering and unfeathering is a serious issue. Of course, most Curtiss electric props went on twins during WWII, the Lightning and the Martin B-26 both having killed a lot of people with this issue alone.

    Had these issues been addressed, and more work applied to compressibility issues with the speeds the airplane could achieve in a dive, the Lightning would have been a much better airplane. As it was, it was effective enough a war machine. The USAAF/USAF exterminated the type with a vengeance after the war and even had they wanted to bring them back to Korea, there weren’t survivors enough for a single squadron. An improved Lightning would have been a better airplane than the Twin Mustang for the B-29 escorts over Korea, and with a Minigun in the nose might have even been a winning COIN aircraft later on.

    For all the adulation of Kelly Johnson, there were a number of his designs that after the war were found to be amenable to substantial improvement, and Kelly wasn’t always too happy with that. He had a feud with Bill Lear for decades because Lear reworked his Lodestar into the Learstar, as did Dee Howard later. (Dee was a he, in case someone wonders: in his dotage he built a 300 mph turbocharged 1932 Pierce Arrow land speed record car.)
    https://books.google.com/books?id=KZSbG-dVT3YC&pg=PA164#v=onepage&q&f=false

    The P-38 was a good combat airplane and is a valuable warbird today, but would have and could have been a way better airplane had anyone thought a little about these things. Still, anyone who wouldn’t want to fly one now has to be missing something.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Lurker
  211. @Anonymous

    My father spent a long time working, with a whole bunch of other engineers, on a million little fixes to help make Kelly Johnson’s F-104 less lethal to its pilots.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  212. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lurker

    RR built their own V-8, similar to but not identical with a certain Olds engine, I think. Olds aftermarket intakes and some other stuff will fit with minor machining, I am told.

    Brit street rodders use them all the time with good results. The automatic transmissions were GM Hydra-Matics and Turbo Hydre-matics, with the addition of the RR servo brake module, which works very well when set up right. When they went to Cit suspension they should have went to their brakes too, but they did not. Later cars were a nightmare with two hydraulic systems with incompatible fluids.

    Of course Citroen were (being French) plenty intransigent-they defied any and all hydraulic standards, bizarre fittings, exactly WRONG color codes, no mule fitting, mediocre filters, etc, etc….maybe not adapting Citroen hydraulics would have been better.

    • Replies: @Lurker
  213. Anonymous[329] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I’m interested in why it worked well against the Japanese but not against the Germans.

    That’s much too broad a statement. P-38 units stationed in England were the ones with the problems, especially the 55th Fighter Group. The problems have been blamed on many things, especially including the fact that they operated the early model F, H and G versions of the plane, but, when they transitioned to the P-51, their old P-38s were sent off to units in Italy that flew these old air frames, typically with 600 hours on them, without any particular problems, doing essentially the same job: long range fighter escort of heavy bombers. Prior to that, in North Africa and Sicily, as well as the initial days of the Italian campaign, early-model P-38s performed well against the Germans.
    A couple examples out of many that could be mentioned:
    Maj. William Leverette led 7 P-38s against a force of 36 Ju-87s and Ju-88s and their Me-109 escorts. He sent three P-38s to occupy the 109s while he led the other three P-38s against the German bombers. They shot down 17, Leverette himself accounting for 7 Ju-87s. No P-38s were lost.
    Michael Brezas won the Silver Star for his actions while flying the P-38 in the MTO and is credited with shooting down 12 German aircraft.
    Here’s a comment about the P-38, from Frederick Arnold, who flew with the P-38 in the MTO: “The Lightning had to have been designed by an artist in love with flying…everything about the plane wanted to fly.”
    I mention him because he is the sculptor who created the bronze Lest We Forget: The Mission, which is on display at the Wings Over the Rockies Air and Space Museum in Denver.
    Incidentally, it’s always struck me as curious that, although both the P-47 and P-51 had severe problems, these have been memory-holed while the P-38s problems are never let go of.
    For example, the early examples of the P-51 had a design flaw in the wing that caused the aircraft to come apart in the air during combat missions and led to a production halt of several months while the problem was diagnosed and fixed. The P-38 never had problems as severe as that.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  214. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Dave Pinsen

    Since several of you replied to this, you can see my commenting history on Dyson here: http://www.unz.com/?s=dyson&Action=Search&ptype=all&commentsearch=only&commenter=Dave+Pinsen

    But the tl;dr is this: our Dyson wouldn’t pick up anything bigger than dust or hair. The Black & Decker we have now will pick up stuff as large as almonds.

    Also, the Dyson’s batter was attached in such a way that just holding it by the handle with one hand reduced the battery’s contact with the motor, so, you had to slap it back into place periodically. And the battery life got worse until it died after a couple of years.

  215. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Kelly never considered the obvious one until too late…”More Wing”.

    Although the U-2 started out as a long thin wing F-104 proposal, they used nothing off the shelf in it, including the much better F-104 canopy or the P-38 yoke design. Ed Heinemann, Ed Swearingen, and Bill Lear were superior to Kelly in that respect. They avoided reinventing the wheel.

    That said, the 104 was just misapplied in some cases and was bought by European air forces via bribery as you know. The Grumman Tiger would have been a way better choice. Still a 104 would be a blast to fly today (and a couple of people do) if you have enough money and a home drome with a really long runway.
    http://www.i-f-s.nl/civil-f-104s/

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  216. @Anonymous

    My father’s story is that the F-104 was invented to defend America during WWIII: to scramble to intercept inbound Soviet nuclear bombers as fast as imaginable, so little things like not getting the pilot killed if he made a mistake weren’t a high priority. But by the time they got into service, the Soviets were heading toward ICBMs, so then Lockheed spent years looking for some other role for this incredible white elephant interceptor.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Simply Simon
  217. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Jack D

    I don’t know how complicated Japanese cars are now, but the parts are hella expensive. I’ve got a 2010 Subaru with ~80k miles on it, and I think 3 out of the last 4 oil changes have been >$1k (the one before last was $3k – needed bushings replaced and some other stuff I don’t remember). I had a ‘95 Lexus before this, and I don’t remember getting hosed that much at this mileage.

  218. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    There are a hundred-plus Mustangs flying, because of the Cavalier company and the post-WWII use of the aircraft by the USAF and dozens of other militaries, whereas postwar life for the P-38 was very, very limited, they destroyed them with a vengeance. A few were used for aerial photography, but generally the few that were offered surplus were not wanted and had a tendency to be made into beer cans. Tony LeVier’s famous racer and airshow mount was a PR or Pathfinder with its two man nose chopped off and a T-33 nose grafted on.

    The Lockheed P-38 Lighting is an American two-engine fighter used by the United States Army Air Forces and other Allied air forces during World War II. Of the 10,037 planes built, 26 survive today, 22 of which are located in the United States, and 10 of which are airworthy.

    By the time the D model came out (earlier and later Mustangs are quite rare) the P-51 was pretty well sorted out. The later marks of Spitfire that could keep up with a P-51D were mostly Griffon powered Marks, the Griffon being 36 liters as opposed to the 27 of the Merlin.

    The Mustang airframe itself was much more producible than any Mark of Spitfire, and by a wide margin.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @dfordoom
  219. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    The ultimate interceptor was the YF-12, killed because McNamara was determined to make the Navy and Air Force share the same fighter, and the Blackbird was no carrier aircraft, not even close. That set the US back thirty years in aircraft technology.

  220. Anon[318] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Makitas are light-weight and top-heavy and can be held that way, although cleaning the ceiling with a vacuum cleaner is stupid.I

    If you have cobwebs in a little-used room or something it’s a fast way to get rid of them.

    But you’ve held both of them up like that, so you must know…

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  221. Lurker says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Did its big size light up German radars too soon?

    German radar, command & control was superior to the Japanese? Most battles would be happening over Germany in a radar controlled environment, less so out in the Pacific islands etc.

    German planes had better pilot protection than the Japanese. The Zero was a great plane but the pilot wouldn’t survive being shot up to the degree a Bf 109 pilot might.

  222. Lurker says:
    @Anonymous

    What about the nose mounted guns?

    Single engine prop fighters all suffered from the drawbacks of limited firepower mounted above the engine and firing through the prop. And/or the hassles of setting up the convergence of wing mounted guns which was always a bit, well, hit and miss.

    The P-38 avoided all that and any time it brought it’s guns to bear had a much greater chance of inflicting serious damage.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  223. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lurker

    That and the chance to make it home with one fan out were the strong points of the P-38: if you lost an engine at cruise you were ok, but losing one on takeoff usually meant a crash on takeoff. And engines quit on takeoff more than at any other time save enemy fire.

    Making it home in the PTO was a lot more of a life and death matter than in the ETO. If you baled out and were captured by Germans you would have a not-fun time but were likely to survive and were unlikely to be tortured or butchered as with the Japanese. (Enemy fliers were Luftwaffe property in Germany, and the Luftwaffe tended to be loyal to Germany but not necessarily Party members. Japanese captives were in for misery in any event and many more died, on purpose or of disease and malnutrition.)

    Had they put the Curtiss props on the Mustang and the Aeroproducts props on the Lightning-or just abandoned Curtiss electric props entirely and made Aeroproducts or Ham Standard universal-and cleaned up the gear cycle on the P-38, together with some obvious needed aerodynamic mods, they’d have had a far better airplane. Getting killed in combat was one thing, but getting killed in training or on a takeoff en route to the target was another entirely, and the noncombat safety record in WWII was appalling.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  224. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    On a Kirby you just take off the beater bar front and put on the hose and get out the light weight wand. Works great.

  225. @Anonymous

    How many Americans died of non-combat air crashes in WWII? Glenn Miller, Carole Lombard, etc.

    • Replies: @Lurker
  226. Anonymous[329] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    By the time the D model came out the P-51 was pretty well sorted out

    Not really. Most significantly, wheel uplock failure on high-G pull out, resulting in sudden huge drag loads that ripped the wings off, was a serious problem with the D model. It took a while to figure out what the problem was because aircraft that suffered it were destroyed over enemy territory. Since the airplane also suffered from control stick force reversal in high-speed dives, it was for some time assumed that this was causing the problem, delaying its solution. A bobweight was added to the elevator control system to fix this problem, but still wings kept ripping off in combat.
    The horizontal stabilizer and main spar on the rudder were not strong enough to to handle high-G maneuver tactics, and despite efforts to solve the problem it still persisted well into 1945, when it was experienced by 7th Air Force pilots dog fighting Japanese fighters over the home islands. In one instance in April, 1945, a P-51D got into a dogfight with a Mitsubishi Raiden. During the violent maneuvering, the Mustang first shed its tail control surfaces and then its wings were torn off. The pilot, 2Lt. James Beattie, did not get out.
    P-51Ds suffered their greatest operational loss of the war on an escort mission to Japan when 27 out of a force of 148 went down from various causes. Of course, the missions to Japan were quite harrowing for a number of reasons, so much so that only 15 were required to complete a combat tour.
    The D model also suffered a number of other lesser problems — the canopy frosting over at altitude, jamming guns — as well as more serious problems with the engine and cooling system.
    Basically, all those high-performance World War II fighters were experimental designs put into mass production, with problems that showed up under operational conditions being fixed on a sort of continuous improvement basis. The other major AAF high performance fighter, the P-47, also had lots of problems, too, as did the Marine’s F4U.
    Besides design flaws, these airplanes also suffered from what might be called operating flaws — they were not pilot-friendly. Engine, fuel system and prop management procedures were not simple and sometimes overly complex. For example, to drop the external fuel tanks on the P-38 required five separate steps that needed to be completed in order. That may be one reason why Maj. Tom McGuire (38 aerial victories) didn’t bother jettisoning his fuel tanks during his last combat, causing him to stall out in a tight turn at low altitude.

  227. Anonymous[207] • Disclaimer says:

    Twin-engine aircraft are no good at dogfighting. I assume there was less dogfighting over the Pacific (and the Mediterranean) than over Germany. Why would that be ?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  228. @Anonymous

    The Japanese Zeros were real good at dogfighting.

    Baron von Richthofen’s view was you should avoid dogfights. Get above your targets and dive down on them.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dicta_Boelcke

    There are various versions of the Dicta. One that varies somewhat from the above:

    1. Always try to secure an advantageous position before attacking. Climb before and during the approach in order to surprise the enemy from above, and dive on him swiftly from the rear when the moment to attack is at hand.

    2. Try to place yourself between the sun and the enemy. This puts the glare of the sun in the enemy’s eyes and makes it difficult to see you and impossible for him to shoot with any accuracy.

  229. @BB753

    Meaningful change (demographic change) from another source? No meaningful change? Please share your vision.

  230. dfordoom says: • Website
    @BB753

    After that, long live the sixth Republic! Vive la sixieme république!

    I’m confident it will be every bit as successful as all the others.

    France has been a menace since the late 18th century. A menace to Europe and a menace to itself. Bismarck should have annexed the place when he had the chance.

  231. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer

    Neal Stephenson’s “Cryptonomicon” has some interesting passages on why the British brilliance for technology didn’t much pay off in the 20th Century.

    There’s some interesting stuff in Correlli Barnett’s The Audit of War about Britain’s colossal incompetence as a manufacturing power in the first half of the 20th century.

    His The Collapse of British Power is also excellent.

    If you’re interested in military/political history he’s essential reading.

    • Replies: @Lurker
  232. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Sarah Toga

    Trump was mere talk, no action regarding reducing or ending immigration.

    It was always obvious that Trump was pro-immigration. He has the same mindset as the LNP in Australia – lots of talk about cracking down on illegal immigration as a cover for massive legal population replacement.

    If you vote for a politician you get a politician. Democracy corrupts everything it touches. Democracy is political prostitution.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  233. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer

    My dad worked on the P-38 Lighting.

    I’m interested in why it worked well against the Japanese but not against the Germans.

    Maybe because the Japanese were pretty much finished by the time the P-38 entered service. The superb pre-war Japanese pilots were mostly dead so the P-38s were going up against second-rate and third-rate replacement pilots.

    In early 1942 the P-38s would have been cut to pieces.

    In Europe they were going up against first-rate German pilots flying first-rate fighters.

  234. @Steve Sailer

    “White elephant interceptor.” I had to chuckle at this description which is apropos although many ex-F-104 pilot might disagree. The F-104 was one of the many fighter aircraft I flew during my Air Force career. It was designed as a straight ahead interceptor but many of the jocks thought it was a genuine dogfighter. It had an incredibly high wing loading and a landing approach speed of about 180 kts. It did carry the 20mm Vulcan machine gun which would have been deadly had the F-104 got close behind a target. I believe a number were deployed to Vietnam but I do not think any engaged Migs.
    The F-104G was called a Military Air Assistance Group (MAAG) aircraft and were bought by various countries including Canada, Germany, Italy and Greece. It had nuclear weapon delivery capability but was never used in anger like so many of other weapon systems during the cold war.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  235. @Steve Sailer

    I had heard many years ago that one of the major problems affecting the P-38 in the European theater was many of its systems were not working well in the very cold weather. This was verified by a Google search of the website History.net in an article “Why the P-38 flunked in Europe.” Sorry I did not provide the link.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  236. @Steve Sailer

    Claire Chennault of the Flying Tigers knew fighter tactics very well. When the American Volunteer Group was formed the American government would only sell the Chinese Nationalists the heavy and under powered P-47. Chennault’s advice to his pilots was to avoid Lufberry maneuvers which entailed attempting to draw lead on a Zero in a tight turn. Instead, gain altitude superiority and use the P-47s fast dive and six wing-mounted .50 calibre machine guns to best advantage. After the war I was privileged to meet a number of the AVG including RT Smith a sales rep for Lockheed and GE, Orvid Olsen who was the commander of a training base in Texas and Ed Rector who was commander of a training wing in Alabama. Col Rector who had ten confirmed kills was a bachelor who used to sit alone in the Officer’s Mess. I regret now that I did not take the opportunity to talk to him about his time in the AVG. OTOH he may not have wanted to talk to anyone, especially a junior officer.

  237. @Anonymous

    Claire Chennault of the Flying Tigers knew fighter tactics very well. When the American Volunteer Group was formed the American government would only sell the Chinese Nationalists the heavy and under powered P-47. Chennault’s advice to his pilots was to avoid Lufberry maneuvers which entailed attempting to draw lead on a Zero in a tight turn. Instead, gain altitude superiority and use the P-47s fast dive and six wing-mounted .50 calibre machine guns to best advantage. After the war I was privileged to meet a number of the AVG including RT Smith a sales rep for Lockheed and GE, Orvid Olsen who was the commander of a training base in Texas and Ed Rector who was commander of a training wing in Alabama. Col Rector who had ten confirmed kills was a bachelor who used to sit alone in the Officer’s Mess. I regret now that I did not take the opportunity to talk to him about his time in the AVG. OTOH he may not have wanted to talk to anyone, especially a junior officer.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  238. @Anonymous

    Another of your very interesting and informative posts. You point out the dangerous missions engaged in by the fighter and bomber crews during WWII. Per capita the killed and wounded in action ratio was higher than the infantry. But in this regard I’ll bet that not one of these pilots or aircrew would have traded places with an infantryman.

  239. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Simply Simon

    If you could have any of the USAF aircraft you flew operationally as a toy which would it be?

    • Replies: @Simply Simon
  240. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Simply Simon

    IIRC it was an all or mostly electric as opposed to hydraulic airplane and I know the gear retract for one was slow as molasses, and the nose door was a huge one piece panel that was extremely draggy mid-cycle. Under ideal circumstances a single engine takeoff was possible but usually there was a crash and fatality: high density altitude, heavy loads or external stores made it a near certain disaster, depending on when the engine blew. Only mitigatiing virtue was the engines were counter–rotating so left or right didn’t matter. Most propeller twins have a critical engine, a worse one to lose than the other.

    Do you have much recip twin time?

    • Replies: @Simply Simon
  241. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Basically, all those high-performance World War II fighters were experimental designs put into mass production, with problems that showed up under operational conditions being fixed on a sort of continuous improvement basis. The other major AAF high performance fighter, the P-47, also had lots of problems, too, as did the Marine’s F4U.
    Besides design flaws, these airplanes also suffered from what might be called operating flaws — they were not pilot-friendly. Engine, fuel system and prop management procedures were not simple and sometimes overly complex. For example, to drop the external fuel tanks on the P-38 required five separate steps that needed to be completed in order. That may be one reason why Maj. Tom McGuire (38 aerial victories) didn’t bother jettisoning his fuel tanks during his last combat, causing him to stall out in a tight turn at low altitude.

    Yes, the US was very good at making stuff, not as good at refining it. I worked with the late David Blanton and he maintained to his dying day he could have got another 30 knots (!) out of the B-17 on the same engines, props, fuel flow by redoing the nacelles and a few other minor changes. Certainly the P-38 and the Martin Marauder were good basic designs never properly sorted, and in the case of the B-26 the pilot skills were not there because flight instruction was primitive and wrong in so many ways (read Langewiesche, Stick and Rudder: He proved what he was saying by going from nothing but light plane experience to a stellar turn as a production test pilot on the F4U Corsair during the war).

    Bill Lear and Dee Howard drastically improved the Lockheed Ventura and Lodestar, so there was a lot of untapped potential in those basic airframes, and Cavalier did some definite but not as drastic improvements on the P-51D and H in the late fifties.

    I’ve often thought that if someone ever did build a diesel radial (Guiberson proved it was eminently doable) that would run on JP5/JP8 or regular diesel of appropriate size (i.e., to fit a 2800 Double Wasp cowl and mount with similar power and weight) several old WWII designs would be suited to use as drones or optionally piloted ground attack aircraft, at build costs much less than the modern turbine drones. ( You can pretty much build a Mustang from all new parts for about $400K minus avionics, replica guns and froufrou, and the Merlin and prop. I can’t imagine a Hellcat, Bearcat or Corsair would be much more expensive airframe wise. And, the government already owns the plans and a lot of the tooling still exists or has been rebuilt and is in use now.) Not going to happen because the entire point of modern USAF contracting is to spend money, because generals need jobs after they retire-ex post facto bribery, but it can’t be proven.

  242. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @dfordoom

    It was always obvious that Trump was pro-immigration

    Well, he likes marrying them!
    But I’m in favor of immigration as well-for the Melanias of the world that is.

    Muzzies, wuzzies and what all, not so much.

  243. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Simply Simon

    Col Rector who had ten confirmed kills was a bachelor who used to sit alone in the Officer’s Mess. I regret now that I did not take the opportunity to talk to him about his time in the AVG. OTOH he may not have wanted to talk to anyone, especially a junior officer.

    Some of the old guys were a lot of fun to talk to and some were dicks, some just quiet.

    I met Bob Hoover, great guy, and a real aviator, the best. If anyone deserved the press coverage of his funeral GHW Bush got, it was Hoover, and it was a long while after he died I even knew that he had died.

    I met several WWII pilots as a kid and a few were just flat out dicks, others were cool.
    Now they are most all gone.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  244. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    The Mustang airframe itself was much more producible than any Mark of Spitfire, and by a wide margin.

    That’s the story of British aviation. Good designs but expensive and useless for mass production. The British just couldn’t grasp the idea that suitability for cheap mass production was the one thing mattered. British industry was hopelessly inefficient.

    • Replies: @Lurker
  245. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer

    The Japanese Zeros were real good at dogfighting.

    From what I’ve read the Japanese and the Italians believed dogfighting was all-important and deigned their fighters accordingly. And trained their pilots accordingly. If you got into a dogfight with a Japanese or Italian fighter you were dog food. If you well-trained you wouldn’t even try to take them on in a dogfight.

  246. @dfordoom

    Somebody should make up a huge chart of the good and bad decisions of each WWII combatant’s and try to see if there’s any kind of a pattern: e.g., the U.S. had terrible torpedoes and the Japanese had fine ones, but I don’t know if this maps to any cultural differences. Some seem to be part of the culture: the Germans tended to have overly brilliant weapons systems, much like German cars to this day.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  247. Anonymous[355] • Disclaimer says:
    @dfordoom

    The Italians sticking with biplanes and favoring agility over speed was making a virtue out of necessity. Italy was always critically short of aviation fuel and Italian pilots could not afford to burn through it the same rate as the aviators of other nations.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  248. Anonymous[355] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Dogfighting is what happens when neither side has a height/speed advantage. If you have this advantage, you can just make repeated high speed passes at your enemy, which he will have great difficulty evading no matter how agile he is. No pilot will choose agility over speed if he’s free to choose between them.

  249. Anonymous[355] • Disclaimer says:

    I think I’ve answered the question: the reason for the success of the P-38 against the Italians and Japanese, but lack of success against the Germans, was due to the relative fuel supply situation of the combatant nations.

    The Italians and Japanese were always critically short of fuel (it was the issue that brought Japan into the war) and so their pilots and aircraft designers had to prioritise manoeuvrability over power (speed and acceleration). The Germans also had fuel problems, but were less affected due to their political domination of Romania, and so they could afford to build aircraft as powerful as the Americans.

    A powerful but unmanoverable aircraft like the P-38 could dominate Italian and Japanese aircraft due to its superior power, but when facing the Luftwaffe was forced into dogfights for which it was ill-suited, and suffered accordingly.

    • Replies: @Lurker
  250. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer

    Somebody should make up a huge chart of the good and bad decisions of each WWII combatant’s and try to see if there’s any kind of a pattern

    It would also be interesting to see whether the militaries of certain countries go on making essentially the same mistakes over and over again. In the late 50s the U.S. Air Force decided that aircraft were to fast for dogfighting to be possible so they no longer bothered making their fighters manoeuvrable, which led to some embarrassment when they discovered that the obsolete North Vietnamese MiG-17s were kinda scary because they were better dogfighters than American fighters.

    And at the same the U.S. Air Force decided that all air-to-air engagements would be fought with missiles, which led to further embarrassment in Vietnam when it turned out their missiles were shockingly unreliable.

    Marshall L.Michel’s Clashes: Air Combat over North Vietnam 1965-1972 documents the price that American pilots paid for the Air Force’s techno-fetishism. New shiny expensive technology is always better because it’s new and shiny and expensive.

  251. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    The Italians sticking with biplanes and favoring agility over speed was making a virtue out of necessity.

    Quite possible. The Italians and the Japanese also both had a lack of really powerful engines to put in their single-seat fighters. I’m not suggesting either approach was necessarily better. It’s just interesting that some nations took such different approaches.

    When the Italians put the licence-built Daimler-Benz DB601 engine in their MC200 fighter to create the Mc202 Folgore they ended up with a pretty good fighter.

  252. Lurker says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Non-combat deaths of fliers seem pretty horrendous by modern standards. Aircraft crashed a lot. As someone has pointed out in this thread, many WW2 types were really only at the experimental/prototype stage when they went into mass production or even, in some cases, ordered off the drawing board.

    Glenn Miller, possibly, was more of a friendly fire casualty. One theory is that his plane entered airspace over the English Channel designated as a bomb jettison area for bombers returning from Europe.

  253. Lurker says:
    @dfordoom

    Agree – The Audit of War is definitely worth a read. I should read it again myself. I think he’s too harsh in some respects. British military equipment was a mixed bag in WW2, not all completely awful as Barnett seems to often imply. Some of it was as good or better than that deployed by other powers. But, sadly, much effort was sunk into dead ends and mediocrity.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    , @dfordoom
  254. Lurker says:
    @dfordoom

    Sadly true. The Spitfire was like a beautiful hand built sports car while it’s main opponent, the Bf 109, was mass produced. The Spitfire may have had certain advantages but the 109 was cheaper and quicker to produce.

    If you do a search on “Guy Martin’s Spitfire” you might be able to find the British TV episode. Guy Martin works on a restoration of a Spitfire. Except it’s not really a restoration! They are literally building a Spitfire from scratch with perhaps one or two salvaged components so that it technically counts as the original aircraft.

    You will see Guy and the blokes involved bending and shaping bits of alloy to make the skin of the plane. It’s impressive, they are very skilled and accomplished, it’s certainly worthy in a restoration context. But then I had the cold realisation – this is how the Spitfire was built originally, with hand made parts!

    I’m not an engineer or anything but another thing I noticed was the making of a couple of new bolts, they appeared to be of similar dimensions but were for two different applications. In my head a voice was saying “If they are more or less the same size and do similar jobs, why not have one design of bolt that does two jobs? Why not make the production process that tiny bit simpler?”

  255. Lurker says:
    @Anonymous

    Just thinking out loud . . .

    In the period when the P-38 faced the Germans most of the air combat was taking place close to German bases, the Germans weren’t having to fly long distances so fuel was relatively less of an issue. Whereas Japanese aircraft were often flying much longer distances from base.

  256. JMcG says:
    @Anonymous

    When I started at my job back in the eighties, some of the old retired guys would come around to the Christmas party. One fellow landed with the first wave of the 1st Marine Division at Guadalcanal. Another was a Bosun’s Mate on the USS Franklin who spent hours hauling Mickey Mouse rockets out of a magazine with ropes and pitching them overboard while the ship burned around him. Another joined the RCAF before we got in the war and later transferred to USAAF. He flew unarmed photo recon P38s doing bomb damage assessment in Europe.
    He went back and flew jets in Korea, F80s I think. He said nothing could keep up with a P38 on the deck wide open. Most fun he ever had is what he told me.
    The Franklin guy, not so much.
    I have 10 minutes at the controls of one of the restored B-17s still flying. I couldn’t get over the sheer physical strength it took to roll into a turn on that airplane. I can’t imagine flying an eight hour mission in one.

  257. @Anonymous

    Twin recip time? Yes, I flew the B-25 in Advanced Training in 1950. At my first base they and several stripped down B-26s which were a delight to fly. I remember one day while tooling along two P-51a joined up on my wing and we flew formation for several minutes. I wish now I had fire-walled both throttles and props and seen how fast the bird would go. I know I could not out run the 51s but the pilots may have been surprised. I also flew the C-47, C-45, T-19 and the turboprop OV-10. I loved the OV-10 which was very maneuverable and a great acrobatic aircraft, plenty of power.

  258. @dfordoom

    It really is a subjective argument is it not? I have nothing to back up me up but I feel American aces would be the match of any Japanese or Italian pilot. In the course of WWII I do not believe our pilots were allotted enough time to engage in simulated dogfighting prior to being sent to the combat theater. It was on the job training. However, the fighter pilots in Korea were given ample training in this regard. A lot depends on individual motivation, keen eyesight, super reflexes, and a heightened sense of situational awareness and also the right aircraft. Aerial combat between the Zero and the P-47 was not really a fair fight. Place the American pilots in the Zeros and the Japanese in the P-47s and I doubt the p-47s would have been around very long.

  259. @Anonymous

    If it were one I flew operationally, jet it would be the F-86, recip the B-26. Non-operational the P-38. I loved the graceful lines and the beautiful purr of the twin Allisons.

  260. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Lurker

    British military equipment was a mixed bag in WW2, not all completely awful as Barnett seems to often imply.

    As far as aircraft are concerned he does make the point that there a few aircraft companies that knew what they were doing. I think he mentions Avro and Handley Page as being well-run. While others, such as Vickers, were a disaster.

    Some of it was as good or better than that deployed by other powers.

    True. Unfortunately even the good stuff often had problems. The Spitfire was excellent but absurdly expensive and unsuited to mass production.

    The Matilda was a fine tank in 1940 but it was designed to make it impossible to fit a heavier gun when one was needed. They replaced it with the Valentine, was a fine tank in 1941 but it was designed to make it impossible to fit a heavier gun when one was needed. They replaced the Valentine with the Churchill, which was a fine tank in 1942 but it was designed to make it impossible to fit a heavier gun when one was needed.

    They did the same with their cruiser tanks. The Cromwell was OK, more or less on par with the Sherman, but it was designed to make it impossible to fit a heavier gun when one was needed.

    At the time they entered service all these tanks were a match for their German opponents.

    And none of these tanks could match the reliability and ease of mass production of the Sherman.

  261. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Lurker

    British military equipment was a mixed bag in WW2, not all completely awful as Barnett seems to often imply. Some of it was as good or better than that deployed by other powers.

    It’s worth pointing out that the Germans, despite their reputation for efficiency, produced some astonishingly bad weapons systems. The Panther was over-complicated and tended to spontaneously burst into flames. The Germans stuck to gasoline engines so their tanks would burn very nicely. The prmiive bckward Russians preferred diesels.

    And then there was the Heinkel 177 heavy bomber which was so awful that Hitler described it as a Flying Panther.

    They wasted resources on stuff like sound guns and wind guns (which would blow enemy bombers out of the skies), and the rifle that could shoot round corners (yes, really).

    The V2 was really a waste of resources. Without nuclear warheads there wasn’t much point to it. More Me 262s would have been more useful.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  262. @dfordoom

    The US Navy is still working on getting the kinks out of the electric rail gun that the Germans were working on during WWII.

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