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NYT: "Remember the Population Bomb? It’s Still Ticking"
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From the New York Times:

Remember the Population Bomb? It’s Still Ticking
By EUGENE LINDEN JUNE 15, 2017

In tiny Lesotho, a landlocked kingdom in southern Africa, about one-third of its estimated two million people spent much of the past two years in danger of starving because of the lingering effects of a drought. That is just the latest woe afflicting this cursed nation, and just one example of how fragile the future seems for Africa, large parts of which face the prospect of new famine and, in consequence, further catastrophic displacement within and among their growing populations.

More than 40 years ago, I made Lesotho the centerpiece of a book, “The Alms Race,” that explored why so many development projects kept failing. I chose it because in 1974 it received more development aid per capita than any other nation.

It could also have been voted most likely to vindicate Thomas Malthus’s warning in 1798 that human numbers would inevitably outrun the resources on which our lives depend. Today, Lesotho’s experience since the 1970s is an even stronger case study of what happens when development plans ignore the reality that such efforts can be a recipe for exploding human numbers.

The tiny kingdom’s sad history also offers an urgent, cautionary tale of how rapid population growth can nullify development efforts that might otherwise let an emerging nation endure periods of abnormal weather.

Now, as Lesotho’s story is being retold in many of the 17 other African nations suffering drought, the Trump administration in particular should pay heed to what Lesotho can teach us. Instead, it has announced that the United States will cut its annual contribution to the United Nations Population Fund, which promotes family planning.

Last year, worrying about African population growth was racist. This year, fortunately, worrying about African population growth is anti-Trumpist. So maybe the world will make some progress in getting up the nerve to suggest to Africans that it’s time for them to do what most of the rest of the world has already done: take responsibility for getting their population growth under control.

Also from the NYT:

Overpopulated and Underfed: Countries Near a Breaking Point
By BILL MARSH JUNE 15, 2017

Mass migration, starvation, civil unrest: Overpopulation unites all of these. Many nations’ threadbare economies, unable to cope with soaring births, could produce even greater waves of refugees beyond the millions already on the move to neighboring countries or the more prosperous havens of Europe. The population crisis is especially acute in Africa, as Eugene Linden writes in the accompanying article, but it spans the globe, from Central America to Asia.

A slowly unfolding catastrophe, told in five charts.

1. Dire Predictions Were Mostly Right

Humanity has grown as expected since the warnings about global overpopulation of the 1960s. Decades of United Nations projections for the year 2000 came within 3 percent of the actual total, making the U.N.’s 9.7 billion prediction for 2050 both credible and alarming.

Screenshot 2017-06-15 20.08.34

Also, it’s possible that the forecasts were actually more correct than the official 2000 count, because the U.N. didn’t discover until about 2012 that their estimates of the current population of Africa were undercounted due to incompetence by African countries’ census officials. That’s why the UN had to radically bump upwards its old forecast for African population in 2012 and then again in 2015:

This led to my jaw-dropping World’s Most Important Graph:

 
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  1. Why not add South Asia and East Asia to the graph?

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  2. The Population Bomb is not the same thing as particular groups growing too big to feed themselves. It was more like Global Warming, with unstoppable runaway population explosion everywhere.

    Periodic regional famine used to be the natural course of human events.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag
    The Population Bomb recognized that modern media made the regional global: pictures of starving children on TV led to food and space being shared worldwide until we are one big happy family on the edge of survival.
    , @Coemgen
    It's almost as if, like zombie movies, "global warming" is a metaphor for some taboo.
    , @Olorin
    This is imprecise but it has long burned in my memory like a hot wire:

    Many years ago in a bookstore in either Minneapolis or Madison or maybe Ann Arbor, I found a thick old 19th century translation of ancient I believe Sumerian or maybe Babylonian texts.

    (Jeez, am I irritated at my 22yo self that I didn't haul this treasure home with me, or notate its title/author/date.)

    In it was a translated lamentation poem/song. Lamentation poems/songs are a feature of many world literatures.

    In this one the singer was lamenting about a famine that was sweeping through his town or city or region.

    He went on in great detail about the horror of it. The suffering. The cascading failures. The proliferation of types of suffering--boils, disease, flies, animals crying.

    Then he said the part that has stayed stuck in my mind:

    Before the coming of the lugal and the warriors and the temple, we would sometimes know hunger.

    But not until we watered the sand and planted and built the granaries did we ever know famine.

    I have been combing through cuneiform text collections (these days online) for decades now, trying to find that song again. It's the voice of a brother I never knew, who lived five or six millennia ago.

    http://cdli.ucla.edu/

  3. I don’t see how this is a problem. I did a quick calculation. You could move all four billion to Sweden and each person will have 1200 square feet of land space. That means even if you didn’t build high-rise apartments, and they are all housed in single story homes, a family of four would still have a single family house on a 5000 square foot lot. They would be just like the Cleavers (Beaver not Eldridge).
    The Swedish government has obviously done the same calculation I just did, and is wholeheartedly embarked on the re-settlement project.
    Boy, these big crises sure are easy to fix after all, if you just apply my massive intellect to them.

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    • LOL: bomag
    • Replies: @newrouter
    "Boy, these big crises sure are easy to fix after all, if you just apply my massive intellect to them."

    or they could just "shelter in place"?
    , @newrouter
    How many africans do you want in your bedroom?
    , @PiltdownMan
    Here's an interesting paper from 1921 that looks at agricultural output, land, and the limits to population.

    https://www.jstor.org/stable/6313?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

    , @Triumph104
    "They would be just like the Cleavers (Beaver not Eldridge)."

    LOL!
    , @TG
    Sorry, Alfa158, but people do not run out of space. They run out of developed resources and capital. And most especially fresh water.

    It has been pointed out that you could physically fit the entire population of the world into Texas and Oklahoma, sure. But they would then need the resources of the entire rest of the world to survive!

    You can build a nice little house on an acre of tundra. I challenge you and your family to survive for a year there, with just the food that grows there, and just the water that falls as rain (no using a well! That just stores water from past rainfall over a larger area of land - not viable if all the neighboring land is also heavily populated). And no having nuclear reactor and advanced recycling systems, I think we can agree that that is not a realistic option for places like Yemen etc.
  4. Maybe we should take responsibility for getting Africa’s population under control? Not sure how but at least start thinking about possible interventions. Something in the water supply maybe that would randomly reduce but not zero-out fertility? Governments might be induced to adopt.

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  5. @Alfa158
    I don't see how this is a problem. I did a quick calculation. You could move all four billion to Sweden and each person will have 1200 square feet of land space. That means even if you didn't build high-rise apartments, and they are all housed in single story homes, a family of four would still have a single family house on a 5000 square foot lot. They would be just like the Cleavers (Beaver not Eldridge).
    The Swedish government has obviously done the same calculation I just did, and is wholeheartedly embarked on the re-settlement project.
    Boy, these big crises sure are easy to fix after all, if you just apply my massive intellect to them.

    “Boy, these big crises sure are easy to fix after all, if you just apply my massive intellect to them.”

    or they could just “shelter in place”?

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  6. The only to fix the world is for white men to be destroyed

    All nonwhite men and women agree with me

    That tells you something right there

    Read More
    • LOL: TomSchmidt
    • Troll: IHTG, German_reader
    • Replies: @fish
    "Mambo dogface to the banana patch?"


    - Leonard Pitts
  7. @Alfa158
    I don't see how this is a problem. I did a quick calculation. You could move all four billion to Sweden and each person will have 1200 square feet of land space. That means even if you didn't build high-rise apartments, and they are all housed in single story homes, a family of four would still have a single family house on a 5000 square foot lot. They would be just like the Cleavers (Beaver not Eldridge).
    The Swedish government has obviously done the same calculation I just did, and is wholeheartedly embarked on the re-settlement project.
    Boy, these big crises sure are easy to fix after all, if you just apply my massive intellect to them.

    How many africans do you want in your bedroom?

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    • Replies: @ken
    Unless newrouter lives in Sweden I assume the number is zero.
  8. It’s all about muh dick…unfortunately.

    This is going to be a tough job selling population control to them, when muh dick is central to their being….

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    We must carry them from a culture of Muh Dick to the culture of Muh Condom.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    I have a small collection of cigarette packs from other countries which require them to sport horrific and condescending warnings. Eg, Canada, the UK, Japan, Romania. Most concern the smoker's own life or the health of his children and others near him.

    Jamaica's exhibits a different priority.

    At least it doesn't have a picture of the affected part!

  9. Very simple this.

    Let’s just export a few thousand American & Euro (especially Swedish) university feminists to educate African women and tell them how important it is that they “Make PowerPoints, NOT Babies!”

    They could teach African girls to hate men, to try to have men’s lives, to talk men like Bruce Jenner into cutting off their bad, bad naughty bits, and get a real job, “just like a man.”

    They could teach the little girls to randomly shout things like “Men suck!” and “The Future is Female!” “Don’t fuck, men, fuck with ‘em.” “Better Lesbian than dead!” Oh, heck, maybe just “Better Lesbian!

    Super fun not having babies and making homes! Just look at all the great things it’s done for America & Europe!

    No babies, no people, no problems! Solves global warming too! Super fun!

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  10. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    If Africa had the social structure of India, they could easily fit the projected population into the giant continental landmass. However, I very much doubt they will be able to change their society as population density changes. Ethnic conflict is likely to become even fiercer over the course of the century.

    This is why I would be pessimistic about encouraging population control measures. In aggregate, all Africans would benefit from lower fertility rates. But woe betide any country, religion, tribe, caste or clan that falls behind in the demographic race. Their will be many pan-African calls for women’s education and birth control, etc. But self preservation will encourage their leaders to thwart any implementation amongst their own people.

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  11. Left Coast Man wrote:

    Let’s just export a few thousand American & Euro (especially Swedish) university feminists to educate African women and tell them how important it is that they “Make PowerPoints, NOT Babies!”

    Actually, SciAm had an article a year or so ago suggesting much the same thing, albeit more diplomatically.

    Apparently, there is evidence that African women actually are getting sick of churning out the babies, but, alas, this is a place where the “patriarchy” really still does rule. Many African cultures seem to arrange for the women to do both the childcare and most of the productive agricultural labor.

    Of course, all this needs to be stated very diplomatically to get a hearing in the MSM.

    Dave

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag
    The glimmer of hope is that the same social media that advertises free women and welfare in the West also informs that there are alternatives to making fifteen kids.
    , @Yak-15
    Sounds like a good deal. I sit around all day and look for new tail while my woman works to pay for my food. And she takes care of the kids as well.

    Why are we against this?
  12. What were some of the NYT articles published last year on worry about Africa’s population growth being racist? I don’t recall any, but yet again I don’t read the NYT. Anyone have some links?

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    There were a few in 2016, maybe one or two in 2015.
  13. @Alfa158
    I don't see how this is a problem. I did a quick calculation. You could move all four billion to Sweden and each person will have 1200 square feet of land space. That means even if you didn't build high-rise apartments, and they are all housed in single story homes, a family of four would still have a single family house on a 5000 square foot lot. They would be just like the Cleavers (Beaver not Eldridge).
    The Swedish government has obviously done the same calculation I just did, and is wholeheartedly embarked on the re-settlement project.
    Boy, these big crises sure are easy to fix after all, if you just apply my massive intellect to them.

    Here’s an interesting paper from 1921 that looks at agricultural output, land, and the limits to population.

    https://www.jstor.org/stable/6313?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

    Read More
  14. Joel Salatin, a “Christian libertarian environmentalist capitalist lunatic farmer”, recounts his intersectional frustrations in his latest book. Organic types scoff at his faith, and Bob Jones alums (as Salatin is) think eating food close to how the Creator created it is “cultish”.

    At one seminar of the former, a man stood up and announced, “I hate Christians!”

    “Oh, boy, here we go again,” Salatin thought.

    But, no, the man had worked in Africa, and had seen first-hand how the excess generosity of American Christians– as in food, clothes, and other basics– was actually subverting the local economies, pushing the young men into violent militias, which at least employed and fed them.

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  15. I wonder what people like Merkel, Macron etc. think about this issue in private moments (if at all). How do they reconcile this with their views on the environment? Either they stay in Africa and are desperately poor (bad), or they move to Europe which increases emissions drastically (bad), or Africa develops very quickly economically which produces a lot of emissions (bad). So basically, if you accept their views on climate change this is a no win scenario, no?

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  16. Has there been a general decline in wars in Africa or is there still about the same amount of warfare but no one reports on it?

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Africa has had few cross-border wars since independence. Lots of civil wars, but few international wars. Zambia (?) invaded Uganda to overthrow Idi Amin. Uganda helped Tutsi refugees conquer their Rwandan homeland, and then the Rwandan Tutsis went adventuring in Congo. Libya sent their tanks into Chad but were defeated by armed Toyota pickup trucks. Ethiopia and Eritrea have fought some real wars, but they are less African in culture than the rest of sub-Saharan Africa.

    In general, most African countries have lots of land so they don't see much sense in wars of territorial conquest.
  17. @Dee
    It's all about muh dick...unfortunately.

    This is going to be a tough job selling population control to them, when muh dick is central to their being....

    We must carry them from a culture of Muh Dick to the culture of Muh Condom.

    Read More
  18. @al-Gharaniq
    What were some of the NYT articles published last year on worry about Africa's population growth being racist? I don't recall any, but yet again I don't read the NYT. Anyone have some links?

    There were a few in 2016, maybe one or two in 2015.

    Read More
  19. There is indeed overpopulation problem in Africa, and it is caused by right wing religion, and American right wing politicians who pander to them.

    http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/04/16/africans-among-the-most-morally-opposed-to-contraception/

    Even Trump, who so far betrayed all of his promises, reversed the so called “Mexico City Policy” as are all God-fearing republicans supposed to do.

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/01/23/five-facts-president-trump-reinstating-mexico-city-policy-abortion/

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  20. @Dave Pinsen
    Has there been a general decline in wars in Africa or is there still about the same amount of warfare but no one reports on it?

    Africa has had few cross-border wars since independence. Lots of civil wars, but few international wars. Zambia (?) invaded Uganda to overthrow Idi Amin. Uganda helped Tutsi refugees conquer their Rwandan homeland, and then the Rwandan Tutsis went adventuring in Congo. Libya sent their tanks into Chad but were defeated by armed Toyota pickup trucks. Ethiopia and Eritrea have fought some real wars, but they are less African in culture than the rest of sub-Saharan Africa.

    In general, most African countries have lots of land so they don’t see much sense in wars of territorial conquest.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    Zambia (?) invaded Uganda to overthrow Idi Amin.
     
    Tanzania invaded. It lies between Zambia and Uganda, and separates them by about 700 miles.
    , @Hapalong Cassidy
    One of the benefits of the violence of the past is that the most violent men tended to kill each other off, thus making the next generation less violent. I wonder if this what happened in Latin America. While there is still a lot of violent narco-crime, the bloody coups and civil wars that were commonplace in the region seemed to have ground to a halt after the 1980's.
  21. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Don’t worry Steve.

    The Economist magazine will publish a leading article proudly proclaiming that those African billions will ‘save’ Europe, only if the ‘bigots’ got out of the way and let the uncountable hordes do their savey thing.

    – The European political class, reliably, will be dumb enough to take that dogshit seriously and implement it.
    Watch this space.

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  22. Bob Black

    No one should ever work.

    Work is the source of nearly all the misery in the world. Almost any evil you’d care to name comes from working or from living in a world designed for work. In order to stop suffering, we have to stop working.

    That doesn’t mean we have to stop doing things. It does mean creating a new way of life based on play; in other words, a *ludic* conviviality, commensality, and maybe even art. There is more to play than child’s play, as worthy as that is. I call for a collective adventure in generalized joy and freely interdependent exuberance. Play isn’t passive. Doubtless we all need a lot more time for sheer sloth and slack than we ever enjoy now, regardless of income or occupation, but once recovered from employment-induced exhaustion nearly all of us want to act. Oblomovism and Stakhanovism are two sides of the same debased coin.

    Do things that matter to you. The corporations died around 2007. They live on as a cable TV hoax to make you think they are gaining.

    When you think of the long and gloomy history of man, you will find that far more, and far more hideous, crimes have been committed in the name of obedience than have ever been committed in the name of rebellion.

    Public Affairs

    The sinners are saints and cops are criminals. Public stuck with debt to fund jets and whores. Next gen to be rolling in boomer bust out scam. Exploit the grandkids to keep the busted scam social security rolling. State lost billions. Senate all making $200k a year for Tony Weiner types to run offices. Shitbag suicidal mil types running what Smedley Butler called a racket. Gen. Flynn Stones and Russians. I’m with Satan. God has millions on payroll running generations into the ground. We have no payroll or debt. Twain was right. Want an empty church or a mall? With Trump it’s a bigger bust out. With more shootings avoid 5th av. Take 42nd st. He can gun them down and get NRA funds from Wayne the douchebag.

    Read More
  23. My economics professor was of relative fame and importance saw Africa as a future source of resources and a zoo (to see the animals). We have only really scratched the surface for resources, Africa is enormous, problem is the populations are moving in the wrong direction as we would need a colonial overseer class. Sad!

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    We have only really scratched the surface for resources, Africa is enormous...
     
    China's making a run for it, with a million people on the continent, purportedly more than the Europeans had in the place at the height of colonialism.

    The companies I'm familiar with look last to Africa for any resources. The cost of extraction is enormous, and you will soon be elbowing past four billion people to get at it.

    Reminds me of the adage, "amateurs think tactics, professionals think logistics."

  24. @Alfa158
    I don't see how this is a problem. I did a quick calculation. You could move all four billion to Sweden and each person will have 1200 square feet of land space. That means even if you didn't build high-rise apartments, and they are all housed in single story homes, a family of four would still have a single family house on a 5000 square foot lot. They would be just like the Cleavers (Beaver not Eldridge).
    The Swedish government has obviously done the same calculation I just did, and is wholeheartedly embarked on the re-settlement project.
    Boy, these big crises sure are easy to fix after all, if you just apply my massive intellect to them.

    “They would be just like the Cleavers (Beaver not Eldridge).”

    LOL!

    Read More
  25. I chose it because in 1974 it received more development aid per capita than any other nation. …

    Today, Lesotho’s experience since the 1970s is an even stronger case study of what happens when development plans ignore the reality that such efforts can be a recipe for exploding human numbers.

    Lesotho’s population rose from 1.122m in 1974 to 2.135m in 2015. After 1974, there was a increase in longevity from 50.29 years to a maximum 59.58 in 1993. However, AIDS seems to have taken its toll and the average lifespan in 2014 was 49.7 years, about the same as 1973. From 1974 to 2014 the total fertility rate decreased from 5.78 children per woman to 3.18.

    Instead of development aid, it would seem to me that Lesotho’s population “explosion” is due to immigration.

    Read More
  26. There was an interesting documentary on Netflix of all places that discussed how virtue signaling charity orgs are crushing small industry in Africa.

    One of the examples was “Tom’s Shoes”, which donates a pair of shoes for every pair bought. The doc underlined the fact that local cobblers can’t compete with charities that drop free shoes on potential customers.

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    There was an interesting documentary on Netflix of all places that discussed how virtue signaling charity orgs are crushing small industry in Africa.

    If you've got no scandal, you've got no documentary (except for travelogues of the National Geographic sort and travelogues of the Anthony Bourdain sort - and that's not hip if you're of a crusader bent).
    , @Alfa158
    Years ago an aid worker in Latin America trying to help impoverished peasants, wrote an open letter to American parents asking them to please stop sending their kids down there to work as summer volunteers. Apparently they were doing this as a way to feel charitable about themselves, relate to their more unfortunate fellow humans and, oh yeah, have a great resume entry for their Ivy League college applications.
    The worker said these kids were trying to do things thing like helping build schools and clinics, but they had no skills, got in the way more than anything else, and had to be taken care and kept out of danger. If the parents instead wrote a check to the charity for the five figure cost of sending their kid down there for the summer, they could have had the whole building put up by local workers.
    , @Anonymous
    I've seen it. It's excellent.
  27. NYT deserves credit for clearly advocating population growth control in Africa.

    Normal Africans are choosing to migrate in large numbers to urban slums of cities like Kinshasa. Obviously, all humans prefer better living standards than slums, but given the limited choice, large numbers of Africans are choosing to move to urban slums over traditional rural living arrangements, which suggests that the latter is simply worse.

    I don’t have data on hand, but it seems obvious that fertility rates will plummet in urban settings. The fertility rate of Haiti has dropped from 6 in 1980 to 3 today.

    I genuinely sympathize with people, especially Africans, who are clearly forced to choose between an urban slum and a rural lifestyle that is apparently much worse. I’m also sympathetic to countries like Italy that have recently been forced to accept large migrations of impoverished Africans against their own will.

    I do genuinely support genuine improvement to the well being of the global poor in addition to the legit concerns of say the current people of Italy.

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    • Replies: @bomag

    I do genuinely support genuine improvement to the well being of the global poor in addition to the legit concerns of say the current people of Italy.
     
    Nice thoughts, but currently Italy is losing and the global poor are winning.
    , @Altai

    I genuinely sympathize with people, especially Africans, who are clearly forced to choose between an urban slum and a rural lifestyle that is apparently much worse.
     
    It isn't necessary that the rural life is much worse, it's just not how you get ahead. People follow life scripts. Right now in the West young people are following a lifescript that makes them miserable, but it's how they gain status.

    My paternal grandparents migrated from as rural as you could find at the time to the city. Not because being poor in the city at that time was good, but because it was where the better jobs were and how you got ahead. Many of their friends hated it and one of my uncles was old enough that he never adjusted and went back to the countryside.

    You think living with a cohesive community of people with full night skies and clear air is worse than living in a shack on the outskirts of Beijing with no legal right to buy a proper house even if you had the money, breathing in toxic air and doing even more arduous labour is better? But it's how you get ahead and maybe your children will be high enough status to enjoy it and have a nice life. The other side is that people will try something to gain status even if there is a chance of failure. Going to the city doesn't work out for everyone either. The guys in Calais are not going to have a nice life, all that is keeping them going is hope that somehow it'll work out for them, even if we know their overall quality of life will be likely worse even if their material comforts and ease of getting it (Welfare) will be better.

    People chase status and follow their peers. Now we have a situation all too familiar to rural towns in the west of so many young people going away somewhere that their peers have to follow to continue their life at all. Most people quickly realise that money and things don't make you happy, but what makes you unhappy is being relatively poorer and less influential than your peers.

  28. @Steve Sailer
    Africa has had few cross-border wars since independence. Lots of civil wars, but few international wars. Zambia (?) invaded Uganda to overthrow Idi Amin. Uganda helped Tutsi refugees conquer their Rwandan homeland, and then the Rwandan Tutsis went adventuring in Congo. Libya sent their tanks into Chad but were defeated by armed Toyota pickup trucks. Ethiopia and Eritrea have fought some real wars, but they are less African in culture than the rest of sub-Saharan Africa.

    In general, most African countries have lots of land so they don't see much sense in wars of territorial conquest.

    Zambia (?) invaded Uganda to overthrow Idi Amin.

    Tanzania invaded. It lies between Zambia and Uganda, and separates them by about 700 miles.

    Read More
  29. @guest
    The Population Bomb is not the same thing as particular groups growing too big to feed themselves. It was more like Global Warming, with unstoppable runaway population explosion everywhere.

    Periodic regional famine used to be the natural course of human events.

    The Population Bomb recognized that modern media made the regional global: pictures of starving children on TV led to food and space being shared worldwide until we are one big happy family on the edge of survival.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Olorin
    It might have had origins before that.

    See: Norman Borlaug, Chidambaram Subramaniam, CIMMYT, Green Revolution.

    Also Henry Wallace.

    IIRC the "pictures of starving children on TV" were a good one generation downstream from the Rockefeller Foundation/USAID launching of the "green revolution."

    For instance, the dream team that went to Mexico for the cooperative wheat breeding initiative (Harrar, Borlaug, Niederhauser, Colwell, and I'd have to look up the others) was formed in 1944.

    If anything, those media campaigns were outreach campaigns in support of postwar globalist ag initiatives already well and long underway.

    That's part of what the 1960s Malthusians were trying to push back against, and why they were so strongly supportive of birth control as a balance for the Green Revolution's death control. I seem to recall that when Borlaug was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, the academy referred to the billion people whose lives were "saved" as a result of his agronomic innovations.

    More mouths to feed means more business transactions to skim profits from, remember.


    one big happy family on the edge of survival.
     
    I'd be inclined to amend that as

    one big constantly expanding elite-approved global family teetering on the constantly crumbling edge of survival.
     
  30. @PhysicistDave
    Left Coast Man wrote:

    Let’s just export a few thousand American & Euro (especially Swedish) university feminists to educate African women and tell them how important it is that they “Make PowerPoints, NOT Babies!”
     
    Actually, SciAm had an article a year or so ago suggesting much the same thing, albeit more diplomatically.

    Apparently, there is evidence that African women actually are getting sick of churning out the babies, but, alas, this is a place where the "patriarchy" really still does rule. Many African cultures seem to arrange for the women to do both the childcare and most of the productive agricultural labor.

    Of course, all this needs to be stated very diplomatically to get a hearing in the MSM.

    Dave

    The glimmer of hope is that the same social media that advertises free women and welfare in the West also informs that there are alternatives to making fifteen kids.

    Read More
  31. @LondonBob
    My economics professor was of relative fame and importance saw Africa as a future source of resources and a zoo (to see the animals). We have only really scratched the surface for resources, Africa is enormous, problem is the populations are moving in the wrong direction as we would need a colonial overseer class. Sad!

    We have only really scratched the surface for resources, Africa is enormous…

    China’s making a run for it, with a million people on the continent, purportedly more than the Europeans had in the place at the height of colonialism.

    The companies I’m familiar with look last to Africa for any resources. The cost of extraction is enormous, and you will soon be elbowing past four billion people to get at it.

    Reminds me of the adage, “amateurs think tactics, professionals think logistics.”

    Read More
  32. @Massimo Heitor
    NYT deserves credit for clearly advocating population growth control in Africa.

    Normal Africans are choosing to migrate in large numbers to urban slums of cities like Kinshasa. Obviously, all humans prefer better living standards than slums, but given the limited choice, large numbers of Africans are choosing to move to urban slums over traditional rural living arrangements, which suggests that the latter is simply worse.

    I don't have data on hand, but it seems obvious that fertility rates will plummet in urban settings. The fertility rate of Haiti has dropped from 6 in 1980 to 3 today.

    I genuinely sympathize with people, especially Africans, who are clearly forced to choose between an urban slum and a rural lifestyle that is apparently much worse. I'm also sympathetic to countries like Italy that have recently been forced to accept large migrations of impoverished Africans against their own will.

    I do genuinely support genuine improvement to the well being of the global poor in addition to the legit concerns of say the current people of Italy.

    I do genuinely support genuine improvement to the well being of the global poor in addition to the legit concerns of say the current people of Italy.

    Nice thoughts, but currently Italy is losing and the global poor are winning.

    Read More
  33. Last year, worrying about African population growth was racist. This year, fortunately, worrying about African population growth is anti-Trumpist. So maybe the world will make some progress in getting up the nerve to suggest to Africans that it’s time for them to do what most of the rest of the world has already done: take responsibility for getting their population growth under control.

    Or when horrific famines are broadcast nightly in the near future it will compel the world to do this.

    Read More
  34. All the “analyses” treat the population issue as though it were only about resources, ignoring behavior. They act as though violence and war are aberrations, not expressions of natural inclination.

    This makes their analyses useless.

    While it is true that resource shortage is one of the main drivers of war, there is more to it than that. When the coming debt storm breaks upon us in full fury there will be blood.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    They act as though violence and war are aberrations, not expressions of natural inclination.

    This country was founded in 1607. You could argue we were in a state of general mobilization for about 30 of those years. If you're looking at a small country like Switzerland, it would generally be less than that proportionately.
  35. @Alfa158
    I don't see how this is a problem. I did a quick calculation. You could move all four billion to Sweden and each person will have 1200 square feet of land space. That means even if you didn't build high-rise apartments, and they are all housed in single story homes, a family of four would still have a single family house on a 5000 square foot lot. They would be just like the Cleavers (Beaver not Eldridge).
    The Swedish government has obviously done the same calculation I just did, and is wholeheartedly embarked on the re-settlement project.
    Boy, these big crises sure are easy to fix after all, if you just apply my massive intellect to them.

    Sorry, Alfa158, but people do not run out of space. They run out of developed resources and capital. And most especially fresh water.

    It has been pointed out that you could physically fit the entire population of the world into Texas and Oklahoma, sure. But they would then need the resources of the entire rest of the world to survive!

    You can build a nice little house on an acre of tundra. I challenge you and your family to survive for a year there, with just the food that grows there, and just the water that falls as rain (no using a well! That just stores water from past rainfall over a larger area of land – not viable if all the neighboring land is also heavily populated). And no having nuclear reactor and advanced recycling systems, I think we can agree that that is not a realistic option for places like Yemen etc.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Triumph104
    In a failed attempted to grow its own food, Saudi Arabia depleted most of its underground water in just one generation. The country uses desalinization plants for drinking water but that water is too expensive for use in agriculture. The Saudis, along with other governments, hedge funds, international organization, and private individuals, have obtained huge swaths of land in Africa to grow food and other agriculture goods like flowers to ship to other continents. A land grab.

    There is no private ownership of land in Ethiopia, so the Ethiopian government has inexplicably given away huge parcels of land to foreigners, displacing villagers who once lived on the land.
  36. Malthus (and Keynes and Mills and Ma Yinchu and Benjamin Franklin etc) were right.

    They have always been right.

    When a nation’s population reaches a certain size, if people try to double and quadruple and octuple etc. their population, sooner or later chronic malnutrition and war etc. will stop them.

    That’s not bad science fiction. It’s established historical fact.

    http://globuspallidusxi.blogspot.com/2014/11/the-malthusian-holocaust-is-real-and-it.html

    But the rich like cheap labor. So we can’t talk about it. At least, not until it’s too late…

    Read More
  37. @newrouter
    How many africans do you want in your bedroom?

    Unless newrouter lives in Sweden I assume the number is zero.

    Read More
  38. It’s not ticking. The reporters and editors in question need something to fill their idle column inches, are biased in favor of narratives which provide justifications for the continuation of social service apparats, and (in some cases) have friends who work in international population control bureaucracies.

    With very few exceptions (e.g. Afghanistan) total fertility rates outside of Tropical Africa are unremarkable or notable for being too low (see south Korea). Fertility rates in Africa are declining and will decline further as labor is redeployed from agriculture to services and industry.

    also informs that there are alternatives to making fifteen kids.

    The typical African woman produces about 5 kids (excluding stillbirths). When 1/3 of all children die before they’re school age and when 40% of your male labor force is employed in agriculture, that’s not surprising.

    Life expectancy is improving and the prevalence of malnutrition declining in Tropical Africa.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    Fertility rates in Africa are declining and will decline further as labor is redeployed from agriculture to services and industry.
     
    I've been hearing this since the "70s. Yet here we are, facing The Graph.

    Africans, for better or worse, are less enthused about adopting the "work will make you free" ethos.
  39. @Jack Hanson
    There was an interesting documentary on Netflix of all places that discussed how virtue signaling charity orgs are crushing small industry in Africa.

    One of the examples was "Tom's Shoes", which donates a pair of shoes for every pair bought. The doc underlined the fact that local cobblers can't compete with charities that drop free shoes on potential customers.

    There was an interesting documentary on Netflix of all places that discussed how virtue signaling charity orgs are crushing small industry in Africa.

    If you’ve got no scandal, you’ve got no documentary (except for travelogues of the National Geographic sort and travelogues of the Anthony Bourdain sort – and that’s not hip if you’re of a crusader bent).

    Read More
  40. @Tiny Duck
    The only to fix the world is for white men to be destroyed

    All nonwhite men and women agree with me

    That tells you something right there

    “Mambo dogface to the banana patch?”

    - Leonard Pitts

    Read More
  41. @Steve Sailer
    Africa has had few cross-border wars since independence. Lots of civil wars, but few international wars. Zambia (?) invaded Uganda to overthrow Idi Amin. Uganda helped Tutsi refugees conquer their Rwandan homeland, and then the Rwandan Tutsis went adventuring in Congo. Libya sent their tanks into Chad but were defeated by armed Toyota pickup trucks. Ethiopia and Eritrea have fought some real wars, but they are less African in culture than the rest of sub-Saharan Africa.

    In general, most African countries have lots of land so they don't see much sense in wars of territorial conquest.

    One of the benefits of the violence of the past is that the most violent men tended to kill each other off, thus making the next generation less violent. I wonder if this what happened in Latin America. While there is still a lot of violent narco-crime, the bloody coups and civil wars that were commonplace in the region seemed to have ground to a halt after the 1980′s.

    Read More
  42. @Massimo Heitor
    NYT deserves credit for clearly advocating population growth control in Africa.

    Normal Africans are choosing to migrate in large numbers to urban slums of cities like Kinshasa. Obviously, all humans prefer better living standards than slums, but given the limited choice, large numbers of Africans are choosing to move to urban slums over traditional rural living arrangements, which suggests that the latter is simply worse.

    I don't have data on hand, but it seems obvious that fertility rates will plummet in urban settings. The fertility rate of Haiti has dropped from 6 in 1980 to 3 today.

    I genuinely sympathize with people, especially Africans, who are clearly forced to choose between an urban slum and a rural lifestyle that is apparently much worse. I'm also sympathetic to countries like Italy that have recently been forced to accept large migrations of impoverished Africans against their own will.

    I do genuinely support genuine improvement to the well being of the global poor in addition to the legit concerns of say the current people of Italy.

    I genuinely sympathize with people, especially Africans, who are clearly forced to choose between an urban slum and a rural lifestyle that is apparently much worse.

    It isn’t necessary that the rural life is much worse, it’s just not how you get ahead. People follow life scripts. Right now in the West young people are following a lifescript that makes them miserable, but it’s how they gain status.

    My paternal grandparents migrated from as rural as you could find at the time to the city. Not because being poor in the city at that time was good, but because it was where the better jobs were and how you got ahead. Many of their friends hated it and one of my uncles was old enough that he never adjusted and went back to the countryside.

    You think living with a cohesive community of people with full night skies and clear air is worse than living in a shack on the outskirts of Beijing with no legal right to buy a proper house even if you had the money, breathing in toxic air and doing even more arduous labour is better? But it’s how you get ahead and maybe your children will be high enough status to enjoy it and have a nice life. The other side is that people will try something to gain status even if there is a chance of failure. Going to the city doesn’t work out for everyone either. The guys in Calais are not going to have a nice life, all that is keeping them going is hope that somehow it’ll work out for them, even if we know their overall quality of life will be likely worse even if their material comforts and ease of getting it (Welfare) will be better.

    People chase status and follow their peers. Now we have a situation all too familiar to rural towns in the west of so many young people going away somewhere that their peers have to follow to continue their life at all. Most people quickly realise that money and things don’t make you happy, but what makes you unhappy is being relatively poorer and less influential than your peers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    Most people quickly realise that money and things don't make you happy, but what makes you unhappy is being relatively poorer and less influential than your peers.
     
    Now, if we had some leadership that would implement some policy to reflect this. But current leadership just keeps writing bigger checks to maintain the status quo.
    , @Massimo Heitor

    The guys in Calais are not going to have a nice life,
     


    Most people quickly realise that money and things don’t make you happy, but what makes you unhappy is being relatively poorer and less influential than your peers.

     

    You claim that money and things don't cause happiness, but the deprivation of money and things in the migrant camps of Calais cause unhappiness?

    Looking at how people vote with their feet is one of the more objective ways to compare the relative desirability of different living arrangements and life styles.

    Masses of Africans are choosing to move from a rural lifestyle to the shanty towns of Calais or failing that the the urban slums of cities like Kinshasa, and I see few people moving back in the other direction. That isn't the perfect decision, but I actually trust them to vote with their feet in their own interests unless I see specific evidence to the contrary.

    Also, if people "quickly realize" that money and things don't bring happiness happy, then why do so many people still pursue those things?
  43. @Jack Hanson
    There was an interesting documentary on Netflix of all places that discussed how virtue signaling charity orgs are crushing small industry in Africa.

    One of the examples was "Tom's Shoes", which donates a pair of shoes for every pair bought. The doc underlined the fact that local cobblers can't compete with charities that drop free shoes on potential customers.

    Years ago an aid worker in Latin America trying to help impoverished peasants, wrote an open letter to American parents asking them to please stop sending their kids down there to work as summer volunteers. Apparently they were doing this as a way to feel charitable about themselves, relate to their more unfortunate fellow humans and, oh yeah, have a great resume entry for their Ivy League college applications.
    The worker said these kids were trying to do things thing like helping build schools and clinics, but they had no skills, got in the way more than anything else, and had to be taken care and kept out of danger. If the parents instead wrote a check to the charity for the five figure cost of sending their kid down there for the summer, they could have had the whole building put up by local workers.

    Read More
    • Agree: Triumph104
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Do you really think the adolescents in question just showed up on site in Haiti or Paraguay at parental instruction? They were recruited through some conduit. The letter-writing shnook should complain to his employer.

    While we're at it, I think the Ivy League schools receive somewhat north of 300,000 undergraduate applications per year in sum. The number of persons applying is a good deal lower because aspirants apply to more than one school. When you have north of 4,000,000 people in each age cohort, people giving thought to the Ivy League are a small sliver of the whole.
    , @Almost Missouri
    Got a cite for that letter? I think many parents of high schoolers being being dragooned into these destructive "aid" junkets would love to be able to quote it to their SJW school administrators.
    , @Anonymous
    Those kids don't even wash the family cars or do laundry, yard work or anything that smacks of manual labor. They've never even seen, let alone used, a hammer, nail or saw but they are supposed to build schools in a week.

    There's a great Frazier episode where the Drs Crane attempt to help build a habitat for humanity house.
  44. Demographic change can really kick in when we consider the length of time between generations. The age at which women begin producing their children matters even if the number that they produce isn’t excessive.

    Take Woman A, who postpones children until she is 30 to pursue education and passes these cultural values on to her children. Then take Woman B, who begins bearing children when she ends her education at 18 – or earlier – and passes these cultural values on to her children. Then restrict the number of children per generation to 2 and the years between births to 2 – just to keep things equitable.

    By the time that Woman A first becomes a grandmother at 60, Woman B has 4 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren – 3 descendants for Woman A at age 60 and 14 for Woman B.

    Let’s assume that they both live into their early 80’s. By the time, she dies at 83, Woman A will have produced 2 children, who will have produced 4 grandchildren, making her descendants total 6 at her death.

    Meanwhile in this same 83 years, Woman B will have produced 2 children, 4 grandchildren, 8 great-grandchildren, and 16 great-great-grandchildren for a total of 30 descendants. Needless to say, if you lower the age at which Woman B begins her childbearing even a couple of years and raise her number of children to 3 or 4, demographic change can kick in even more quickly.

    How many third-world women wait until they are 30 to start bearing children compared to those in the West who do?

    Read More
    • Replies: @dr kill
    Maybe we could get the poor rural African women a full ride to Northern Colorado University's PhD Ed program. That should keep them out of trouble until their tubes rust.
  45. @Dee
    It's all about muh dick...unfortunately.

    This is going to be a tough job selling population control to them, when muh dick is central to their being....

    I have a small collection of cigarette packs from other countries which require them to sport horrific and condescending warnings. Eg, Canada, the UK, Japan, Romania. Most concern the smoker’s own life or the health of his children and others near him.

    Jamaica’s exhibits a different priority.

    At least it doesn’t have a picture of the affected part!

    Read More
  46. @Altai

    I genuinely sympathize with people, especially Africans, who are clearly forced to choose between an urban slum and a rural lifestyle that is apparently much worse.
     
    It isn't necessary that the rural life is much worse, it's just not how you get ahead. People follow life scripts. Right now in the West young people are following a lifescript that makes them miserable, but it's how they gain status.

    My paternal grandparents migrated from as rural as you could find at the time to the city. Not because being poor in the city at that time was good, but because it was where the better jobs were and how you got ahead. Many of their friends hated it and one of my uncles was old enough that he never adjusted and went back to the countryside.

    You think living with a cohesive community of people with full night skies and clear air is worse than living in a shack on the outskirts of Beijing with no legal right to buy a proper house even if you had the money, breathing in toxic air and doing even more arduous labour is better? But it's how you get ahead and maybe your children will be high enough status to enjoy it and have a nice life. The other side is that people will try something to gain status even if there is a chance of failure. Going to the city doesn't work out for everyone either. The guys in Calais are not going to have a nice life, all that is keeping them going is hope that somehow it'll work out for them, even if we know their overall quality of life will be likely worse even if their material comforts and ease of getting it (Welfare) will be better.

    People chase status and follow their peers. Now we have a situation all too familiar to rural towns in the west of so many young people going away somewhere that their peers have to follow to continue their life at all. Most people quickly realise that money and things don't make you happy, but what makes you unhappy is being relatively poorer and less influential than your peers.

    Most people quickly realise that money and things don’t make you happy, but what makes you unhappy is being relatively poorer and less influential than your peers.

    Now, if we had some leadership that would implement some policy to reflect this. But current leadership just keeps writing bigger checks to maintain the status quo.

    Read More
  47. @Art Deco
    It's not ticking. The reporters and editors in question need something to fill their idle column inches, are biased in favor of narratives which provide justifications for the continuation of social service apparats, and (in some cases) have friends who work in international population control bureaucracies.

    With very few exceptions (e.g. Afghanistan) total fertility rates outside of Tropical Africa are unremarkable or notable for being too low (see south Korea). Fertility rates in Africa are declining and will decline further as labor is redeployed from agriculture to services and industry.



    also informs that there are alternatives to making fifteen kids.

    The typical African woman produces about 5 kids (excluding stillbirths). When 1/3 of all children die before they're school age and when 40% of your male labor force is employed in agriculture, that's not surprising.



    Life expectancy is improving and the prevalence of malnutrition declining in Tropical Africa.

    Fertility rates in Africa are declining and will decline further as labor is redeployed from agriculture to services and industry.

    I’ve been hearing this since the “70s. Yet here we are, facing The Graph.

    Africans, for better or worse, are less enthused about adopting the “work will make you free” ethos.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Massimo Heitor

    I’ve been hearing this since the “70s. Yet here we are, facing The Graph.
     
    The fertility rate drop in Africa has been happening slower than widely predicted, but it is happening.

    Future predictions on issues like this are frequently wrong. This includes future projections in Sailer's "Worlds Most Important Graph".

    This issue is worth worrying about and investing effort into. Steve Sailer brings up excellent points.

    But future projections of this sort are usually way off. There will be lots of major changes in the world that no one can reasonably forsee the impacts of.
    , @Art Deco
    The graph of interest plots total fertility rate over time. African societies are at a low technological level as we speak. You seem to fancy they're not working. Again, 40% of adult males in Africa are peasants, a rather time-consuming occupation.
  48. @Alfa158
    Years ago an aid worker in Latin America trying to help impoverished peasants, wrote an open letter to American parents asking them to please stop sending their kids down there to work as summer volunteers. Apparently they were doing this as a way to feel charitable about themselves, relate to their more unfortunate fellow humans and, oh yeah, have a great resume entry for their Ivy League college applications.
    The worker said these kids were trying to do things thing like helping build schools and clinics, but they had no skills, got in the way more than anything else, and had to be taken care and kept out of danger. If the parents instead wrote a check to the charity for the five figure cost of sending their kid down there for the summer, they could have had the whole building put up by local workers.

    Do you really think the adolescents in question just showed up on site in Haiti or Paraguay at parental instruction? They were recruited through some conduit. The letter-writing shnook should complain to his employer.

    While we’re at it, I think the Ivy League schools receive somewhat north of 300,000 undergraduate applications per year in sum. The number of persons applying is a good deal lower because aspirants apply to more than one school. When you have north of 4,000,000 people in each age cohort, people giving thought to the Ivy League are a small sliver of the whole.

    Read More
  49. What’s the problem? The population of rabbits in my hutches is also exploding, but you won’t hear me complaining about it. I love rabbits!

    Read More
  50. @TG
    Sorry, Alfa158, but people do not run out of space. They run out of developed resources and capital. And most especially fresh water.

    It has been pointed out that you could physically fit the entire population of the world into Texas and Oklahoma, sure. But they would then need the resources of the entire rest of the world to survive!

    You can build a nice little house on an acre of tundra. I challenge you and your family to survive for a year there, with just the food that grows there, and just the water that falls as rain (no using a well! That just stores water from past rainfall over a larger area of land - not viable if all the neighboring land is also heavily populated). And no having nuclear reactor and advanced recycling systems, I think we can agree that that is not a realistic option for places like Yemen etc.

    In a failed attempted to grow its own food, Saudi Arabia depleted most of its underground water in just one generation. The country uses desalinization plants for drinking water but that water is too expensive for use in agriculture. The Saudis, along with other governments, hedge funds, international organization, and private individuals, have obtained huge swaths of land in Africa to grow food and other agriculture goods like flowers to ship to other continents. A land grab.

    There is no private ownership of land in Ethiopia, so the Ethiopian government has inexplicably given away huge parcels of land to foreigners, displacing villagers who once lived on the land.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    have obtained huge swaths of land in Africa to grow food and other agriculture goods like flowers to ship to other continents. A land grab.

    There is no private ownership of land in Ethiopia, so the Ethiopian government has inexplicably given away huge parcels of land to foreigners, displacing villagers who once lived on the land.


    Somehow, I have the impression that 'give', 'steal', 'lease', and 'sell' - which are distinct concepts in the minds of most, are not so in yours.
  51. @another fred
    All the "analyses" treat the population issue as though it were only about resources, ignoring behavior. They act as though violence and war are aberrations, not expressions of natural inclination.

    This makes their analyses useless.

    While it is true that resource shortage is one of the main drivers of war, there is more to it than that. When the coming debt storm breaks upon us in full fury there will be blood.

    They act as though violence and war are aberrations, not expressions of natural inclination.

    This country was founded in 1607. You could argue we were in a state of general mobilization for about 30 of those years. If you’re looking at a small country like Switzerland, it would generally be less than that proportionately.

    Read More
  52. @Triumph104
    In a failed attempted to grow its own food, Saudi Arabia depleted most of its underground water in just one generation. The country uses desalinization plants for drinking water but that water is too expensive for use in agriculture. The Saudis, along with other governments, hedge funds, international organization, and private individuals, have obtained huge swaths of land in Africa to grow food and other agriculture goods like flowers to ship to other continents. A land grab.

    There is no private ownership of land in Ethiopia, so the Ethiopian government has inexplicably given away huge parcels of land to foreigners, displacing villagers who once lived on the land.

    have obtained huge swaths of land in Africa to grow food and other agriculture goods like flowers to ship to other continents. A land grab.

    There is no private ownership of land in Ethiopia, so the Ethiopian government has inexplicably given away huge parcels of land to foreigners, displacing villagers who once lived on the land.

    Somehow, I have the impression that ‘give’, ‘steal’, ‘lease’, and ‘sell’ – which are distinct concepts in the minds of most, are not so in yours.

    Read More
  53. … and of course, Africa is already on the move – northwards, into Western Europe …

    Read More
  54. @bomag

    Fertility rates in Africa are declining and will decline further as labor is redeployed from agriculture to services and industry.
     
    I've been hearing this since the "70s. Yet here we are, facing The Graph.

    Africans, for better or worse, are less enthused about adopting the "work will make you free" ethos.

    I’ve been hearing this since the “70s. Yet here we are, facing The Graph.

    The fertility rate drop in Africa has been happening slower than widely predicted, but it is happening.

    Future predictions on issues like this are frequently wrong. This includes future projections in Sailer’s “Worlds Most Important Graph”.

    This issue is worth worrying about and investing effort into. Steve Sailer brings up excellent points.

    But future projections of this sort are usually way off. There will be lots of major changes in the world that no one can reasonably forsee the impacts of.

    Read More
  55. “That’s why the UN had to radically bump upwards its old forecast for African population in 2012 and then again in 2015″
    also in every projection the UN assumes that the TFR will at least START to decrease the next year. Yet this of course never happens.

    Read More
  56. @bomag

    Fertility rates in Africa are declining and will decline further as labor is redeployed from agriculture to services and industry.
     
    I've been hearing this since the "70s. Yet here we are, facing The Graph.

    Africans, for better or worse, are less enthused about adopting the "work will make you free" ethos.

    The graph of interest plots total fertility rate over time. African societies are at a low technological level as we speak. You seem to fancy they’re not working. Again, 40% of adult males in Africa are peasants, a rather time-consuming occupation.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri

    "40% of adult males in Africa are peasants, a rather time-consuming occupation...."
     
    ...for their wives.
  57. @Alfa158
    Years ago an aid worker in Latin America trying to help impoverished peasants, wrote an open letter to American parents asking them to please stop sending their kids down there to work as summer volunteers. Apparently they were doing this as a way to feel charitable about themselves, relate to their more unfortunate fellow humans and, oh yeah, have a great resume entry for their Ivy League college applications.
    The worker said these kids were trying to do things thing like helping build schools and clinics, but they had no skills, got in the way more than anything else, and had to be taken care and kept out of danger. If the parents instead wrote a check to the charity for the five figure cost of sending their kid down there for the summer, they could have had the whole building put up by local workers.

    Got a cite for that letter? I think many parents of high schoolers being being dragooned into these destructive “aid” junkets would love to be able to quote it to their SJW school administrators.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Triumph104
    Sounds like Pippa Biddle.

    http://pippabiddle.com/2014/02/18/the-problem-with-little-white-girls-and-boys/

    https://youtu.be/cyoI2ouy_l0

  58. @Art Deco
    The graph of interest plots total fertility rate over time. African societies are at a low technological level as we speak. You seem to fancy they're not working. Again, 40% of adult males in Africa are peasants, a rather time-consuming occupation.

    “40% of adult males in Africa are peasants, a rather time-consuming occupation….”

    …for their wives.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    No, there are some African countries where women are more likely to be employed in agriculture (e.g Tanzania), but the distinction in those cases is along the lines of 70% v. 60%. Most places, if there's data available, it indicates that men are more likely to be employed in cultivation than are women.
  59. @Altai

    I genuinely sympathize with people, especially Africans, who are clearly forced to choose between an urban slum and a rural lifestyle that is apparently much worse.
     
    It isn't necessary that the rural life is much worse, it's just not how you get ahead. People follow life scripts. Right now in the West young people are following a lifescript that makes them miserable, but it's how they gain status.

    My paternal grandparents migrated from as rural as you could find at the time to the city. Not because being poor in the city at that time was good, but because it was where the better jobs were and how you got ahead. Many of their friends hated it and one of my uncles was old enough that he never adjusted and went back to the countryside.

    You think living with a cohesive community of people with full night skies and clear air is worse than living in a shack on the outskirts of Beijing with no legal right to buy a proper house even if you had the money, breathing in toxic air and doing even more arduous labour is better? But it's how you get ahead and maybe your children will be high enough status to enjoy it and have a nice life. The other side is that people will try something to gain status even if there is a chance of failure. Going to the city doesn't work out for everyone either. The guys in Calais are not going to have a nice life, all that is keeping them going is hope that somehow it'll work out for them, even if we know their overall quality of life will be likely worse even if their material comforts and ease of getting it (Welfare) will be better.

    People chase status and follow their peers. Now we have a situation all too familiar to rural towns in the west of so many young people going away somewhere that their peers have to follow to continue their life at all. Most people quickly realise that money and things don't make you happy, but what makes you unhappy is being relatively poorer and less influential than your peers.

    The guys in Calais are not going to have a nice life,

    Most people quickly realise that money and things don’t make you happy, but what makes you unhappy is being relatively poorer and less influential than your peers.

    You claim that money and things don’t cause happiness, but the deprivation of money and things in the migrant camps of Calais cause unhappiness?

    Looking at how people vote with their feet is one of the more objective ways to compare the relative desirability of different living arrangements and life styles.

    Masses of Africans are choosing to move from a rural lifestyle to the shanty towns of Calais or failing that the the urban slums of cities like Kinshasa, and I see few people moving back in the other direction. That isn’t the perfect decision, but I actually trust them to vote with their feet in their own interests unless I see specific evidence to the contrary.

    Also, if people “quickly realize” that money and things don’t bring happiness happy, then why do so many people still pursue those things?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Olorin

    Also, if people “quickly realize” that money and things don’t bring happiness happy, then why do so many people still pursue those things?
     
    Some don't.

    The ones who do generally have it put in their head to do so by those for whom their frenetic movement is more lucrative than seeking happiness in the places they're already at.
    , @Art Deco
    Masses of Africans are choosing to move from a rural lifestyle to the shanty towns of Calais or failing that the the urban slums of cities like Kinshasa, and I see few people moving back in the other direction. That isn’t the perfect decision, but I actually trust them to vote with their feet in their own interests unless I see specific evidence to the contrary.

    At one time, you had a portfolio of policies in Africa which tended to promote rural outmigration by abusing the peasantry. (E.g. overvalued currencies, state monopsonies in certain cash crops &c). Not sure if that's still the case.
  60. …the U.N. didn’t discover until about 2012 that their estimates of the current population of Africa were undercounted due to incompetence by African countries’ census officials.

    Who’s counting the population in Africa anyway? I would have thought governments there would inflate the figures if anything in the hope of getting more foreign aid. It’s not easy count people if they’re scattered around in remote places hundreds of miles apart and the census takers have to risk life and limb visiting them – far easier to make up the numbers. Not that the exact figures matter a lot – what’s obvious is that there are millions more than could feed themselves if left to their own devices.

    Read More
  61. @bomag
    The Population Bomb recognized that modern media made the regional global: pictures of starving children on TV led to food and space being shared worldwide until we are one big happy family on the edge of survival.

    It might have had origins before that.

    See: Norman Borlaug, Chidambaram Subramaniam, CIMMYT, Green Revolution.

    Also Henry Wallace.

    IIRC the “pictures of starving children on TV” were a good one generation downstream from the Rockefeller Foundation/USAID launching of the “green revolution.”

    For instance, the dream team that went to Mexico for the cooperative wheat breeding initiative (Harrar, Borlaug, Niederhauser, Colwell, and I’d have to look up the others) was formed in 1944.

    If anything, those media campaigns were outreach campaigns in support of postwar globalist ag initiatives already well and long underway.

    That’s part of what the 1960s Malthusians were trying to push back against, and why they were so strongly supportive of birth control as a balance for the Green Revolution’s death control. I seem to recall that when Borlaug was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, the academy referred to the billion people whose lives were “saved” as a result of his agronomic innovations.

    More mouths to feed means more business transactions to skim profits from, remember.

    one big happy family on the edge of survival.

    I’d be inclined to amend that as

    one big constantly expanding elite-approved global family teetering on the constantly crumbling edge of survival.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    A certain other blog not long ago nominated Norman Borlaug as the most evil person ever, in what they consider the inevitable event that the African population bomb goes off and there's mass famine. The theory being that if you save a billion lives, and those lives reproduce to give us even more lives, you're on the hook for them.

    It's an interesting moral question. Benevolence is no excuse. One of the most benevolent souls in history, V.I. Lenin (he of the breaking eggs to make an omelet), was also one of the evilest.

    (As a Minnesotan I'm tempted to defend Borlaug, a distinguished alumnus of the University of Minnesota. But he's also a dirty Iowan, so my hands are clean. I'm also upset that I started reading a biography of him that's inexplicably split into three volumes, and I don't feel like buying the second or third.)

  62. @Almost Missouri
    Got a cite for that letter? I think many parents of high schoolers being being dragooned into these destructive "aid" junkets would love to be able to quote it to their SJW school administrators.
    Read More
  63. @Massimo Heitor

    The guys in Calais are not going to have a nice life,
     


    Most people quickly realise that money and things don’t make you happy, but what makes you unhappy is being relatively poorer and less influential than your peers.

     

    You claim that money and things don't cause happiness, but the deprivation of money and things in the migrant camps of Calais cause unhappiness?

    Looking at how people vote with their feet is one of the more objective ways to compare the relative desirability of different living arrangements and life styles.

    Masses of Africans are choosing to move from a rural lifestyle to the shanty towns of Calais or failing that the the urban slums of cities like Kinshasa, and I see few people moving back in the other direction. That isn't the perfect decision, but I actually trust them to vote with their feet in their own interests unless I see specific evidence to the contrary.

    Also, if people "quickly realize" that money and things don't bring happiness happy, then why do so many people still pursue those things?

    Also, if people “quickly realize” that money and things don’t bring happiness happy, then why do so many people still pursue those things?

    Some don’t.

    The ones who do generally have it put in their head to do so by those for whom their frenetic movement is more lucrative than seeking happiness in the places they’re already at.

    Read More
  64. @SWVirginian
    Demographic change can really kick in when we consider the length of time between generations. The age at which women begin producing their children matters even if the number that they produce isn’t excessive.

    Take Woman A, who postpones children until she is 30 to pursue education and passes these cultural values on to her children. Then take Woman B, who begins bearing children when she ends her education at 18 - or earlier - and passes these cultural values on to her children. Then restrict the number of children per generation to 2 and the years between births to 2 – just to keep things equitable.

    By the time that Woman A first becomes a grandmother at 60, Woman B has 4 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren - 3 descendants for Woman A at age 60 and 14 for Woman B.

    Let’s assume that they both live into their early 80’s. By the time, she dies at 83, Woman A will have produced 2 children, who will have produced 4 grandchildren, making her descendants total 6 at her death.

    Meanwhile in this same 83 years, Woman B will have produced 2 children, 4 grandchildren, 8 great-grandchildren, and 16 great-great-grandchildren for a total of 30 descendants. Needless to say, if you lower the age at which Woman B begins her childbearing even a couple of years and raise her number of children to 3 or 4, demographic change can kick in even more quickly.

    How many third-world women wait until they are 30 to start bearing children compared to those in the West who do?

    Maybe we could get the poor rural African women a full ride to Northern Colorado University’s PhD Ed program. That should keep them out of trouble until their tubes rust.

    Read More
  65. If the NYT were truly malthusian, the solution is too simply let nature take it’s course and self correct. Of course in there view, to do nothing would be genocide which of course would be the fault of White people. And you know, Bono and other concerned celebrities would have nothing to do.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    There are other "Malthusian" solutions, for instance what he called "vice," e.g. contraception. Which he didn't advocate, but neither did he advocate people starving to death. He just thought it was inevitable, is all.
  66. I’d like to take this occasion to say:
    (short pause)
    Ebola.
    (extended pause)
    Ebola.
    (extended pause)
    Ebola.
    (extended pause)
    Thank you.
    (finis)

    Read More
  67. @Olorin
    It might have had origins before that.

    See: Norman Borlaug, Chidambaram Subramaniam, CIMMYT, Green Revolution.

    Also Henry Wallace.

    IIRC the "pictures of starving children on TV" were a good one generation downstream from the Rockefeller Foundation/USAID launching of the "green revolution."

    For instance, the dream team that went to Mexico for the cooperative wheat breeding initiative (Harrar, Borlaug, Niederhauser, Colwell, and I'd have to look up the others) was formed in 1944.

    If anything, those media campaigns were outreach campaigns in support of postwar globalist ag initiatives already well and long underway.

    That's part of what the 1960s Malthusians were trying to push back against, and why they were so strongly supportive of birth control as a balance for the Green Revolution's death control. I seem to recall that when Borlaug was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, the academy referred to the billion people whose lives were "saved" as a result of his agronomic innovations.

    More mouths to feed means more business transactions to skim profits from, remember.


    one big happy family on the edge of survival.
     
    I'd be inclined to amend that as

    one big constantly expanding elite-approved global family teetering on the constantly crumbling edge of survival.
     

    A certain other blog not long ago nominated Norman Borlaug as the most evil person ever, in what they consider the inevitable event that the African population bomb goes off and there’s mass famine. The theory being that if you save a billion lives, and those lives reproduce to give us even more lives, you’re on the hook for them.

    It’s an interesting moral question. Benevolence is no excuse. One of the most benevolent souls in history, V.I. Lenin (he of the breaking eggs to make an omelet), was also one of the evilest.

    (As a Minnesotan I’m tempted to defend Borlaug, a distinguished alumnus of the University of Minnesota. But he’s also a dirty Iowan, so my hands are clean. I’m also upset that I started reading a biography of him that’s inexplicably split into three volumes, and I don’t feel like buying the second or third.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Olorin
    I can't say I ever read any benevolence in Ulyanov's writing, but I take your point.

    I've run across that argument. Borlaug himself was aware of at least some version of it, to my knowledge. I never worked up the viciousness to ask him what he thought of it. He seemed like quite a gentleman.

    I had occasion to interact with several old Green Revolution scientists and never forgot the one who was willing to talk about overpopulation.

    He said he served in Europe in WWII and got to see starving children everywhere. He said he came home with the burning mission of no child ever starving again. He said that at some level that trumped all considerations.

    I've never figured out how to turn that into a "interesting moral question." Including for myself. Having experienced hunger rather often as a child, I try to connect that up with my more abstract thoughts about ethics, morals, math, and such. The realms don't easily connect.

    I always found it interesting that people targeted Borlaug as you say, but Swaminathan, Subramaniam, and others in the Indian camp always get a pass. I presume they felt about their starving children the same way the gentleman I mentioned did.

    This is one thing that the pro-natalist types never seem to take into account--I mean, the population sustainability factor, and exactly what that means.

    To date increasing crop yields has been the primary driver of agricultural system development. So called "sustainable ag" organizations and institutions won't go near these issues with a fifty-foot pole. These days even to broach the question is to be racist and imperialist.

    I hope we can continue to develop these topics, and I thank our host for raising it here regularly. As for me, I weary of "Third World" and "black/brown" people being used as pawns in others' games of 50D global virtue chess...while demonizing anyone who tries to look ahead and construct a different game.

    Then again, I'm told that future time orientation is also racist, since only certain populations seem to have it. And since early feminists pushed for birth control and improving human genetics, both are Nazi Hitler Nazi. I dunno. It's like playing Scrabble with the tides sometimes.

  68. @George Taylor
    If the NYT were truly malthusian, the solution is too simply let nature take it's course and self correct. Of course in there view, to do nothing would be genocide which of course would be the fault of White people. And you know, Bono and other concerned celebrities would have nothing to do.

    There are other “Malthusian” solutions, for instance what he called “vice,” e.g. contraception. Which he didn’t advocate, but neither did he advocate people starving to death. He just thought it was inevitable, is all.

    Read More
  69. @guest
    The Population Bomb is not the same thing as particular groups growing too big to feed themselves. It was more like Global Warming, with unstoppable runaway population explosion everywhere.

    Periodic regional famine used to be the natural course of human events.

    It’s almost as if, like zombie movies, “global warming” is a metaphor for some taboo.

    Read More
  70. @Coemgen
    It's almost as if, like zombie movies, "global warming" is a metaphor for some taboo.

    Maybe mokita fits this metaphor better than “taboo.”

    Read More
  71. The cheapest , easiest and most effective solution to the population bomb in Africa is to let nature take it’s course . No more hypocritical and cynical do gooders making a buck with their “humane” interventions . If their goal was to reduce the suffering in the world then they have failed miserably .

    http://www.indexmundi.com/facts/ethiopia/population

    Where ever they , whether it be an NGO or some Gov’t or UN organization , stick their noses in suffering increases . Decades of failure don’t phase them , they only see the need for more of the same .

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    The cheapest , easiest and most effective solution to the population bomb in Africa is to let nature take it’s course . No more hypocritical and cynical do gooders making a buck with their “humane” interventions .

    Again, overseas development aid of all sorts (not just food aid) accounts for about 6% of a typical African country's income stream. For the more affluent countries like Nigeria, it's more on the order of 1%. It peaks into double digits in the Sahel and in loci which have suffered discrete disasters of late.
  72. @guest
    A certain other blog not long ago nominated Norman Borlaug as the most evil person ever, in what they consider the inevitable event that the African population bomb goes off and there's mass famine. The theory being that if you save a billion lives, and those lives reproduce to give us even more lives, you're on the hook for them.

    It's an interesting moral question. Benevolence is no excuse. One of the most benevolent souls in history, V.I. Lenin (he of the breaking eggs to make an omelet), was also one of the evilest.

    (As a Minnesotan I'm tempted to defend Borlaug, a distinguished alumnus of the University of Minnesota. But he's also a dirty Iowan, so my hands are clean. I'm also upset that I started reading a biography of him that's inexplicably split into three volumes, and I don't feel like buying the second or third.)

    I can’t say I ever read any benevolence in Ulyanov’s writing, but I take your point.

    I’ve run across that argument. Borlaug himself was aware of at least some version of it, to my knowledge. I never worked up the viciousness to ask him what he thought of it. He seemed like quite a gentleman.

    I had occasion to interact with several old Green Revolution scientists and never forgot the one who was willing to talk about overpopulation.

    He said he served in Europe in WWII and got to see starving children everywhere. He said he came home with the burning mission of no child ever starving again. He said that at some level that trumped all considerations.

    I’ve never figured out how to turn that into a “interesting moral question.” Including for myself. Having experienced hunger rather often as a child, I try to connect that up with my more abstract thoughts about ethics, morals, math, and such. The realms don’t easily connect.

    I always found it interesting that people targeted Borlaug as you say, but Swaminathan, Subramaniam, and others in the Indian camp always get a pass. I presume they felt about their starving children the same way the gentleman I mentioned did.

    This is one thing that the pro-natalist types never seem to take into account–I mean, the population sustainability factor, and exactly what that means.

    To date increasing crop yields has been the primary driver of agricultural system development. So called “sustainable ag” organizations and institutions won’t go near these issues with a fifty-foot pole. These days even to broach the question is to be racist and imperialist.

    I hope we can continue to develop these topics, and I thank our host for raising it here regularly. As for me, I weary of “Third World” and “black/brown” people being used as pawns in others’ games of 50D global virtue chess…while demonizing anyone who tries to look ahead and construct a different game.

    Then again, I’m told that future time orientation is also racist, since only certain populations seem to have it. And since early feminists pushed for birth control and improving human genetics, both are Nazi Hitler Nazi. I dunno. It’s like playing Scrabble with the tides sometimes.

    Read More
  73. @guest
    The Population Bomb is not the same thing as particular groups growing too big to feed themselves. It was more like Global Warming, with unstoppable runaway population explosion everywhere.

    Periodic regional famine used to be the natural course of human events.

    This is imprecise but it has long burned in my memory like a hot wire:

    Many years ago in a bookstore in either Minneapolis or Madison or maybe Ann Arbor, I found a thick old 19th century translation of ancient I believe Sumerian or maybe Babylonian texts.

    (Jeez, am I irritated at my 22yo self that I didn’t haul this treasure home with me, or notate its title/author/date.)

    In it was a translated lamentation poem/song. Lamentation poems/songs are a feature of many world literatures.

    In this one the singer was lamenting about a famine that was sweeping through his town or city or region.

    He went on in great detail about the horror of it. The suffering. The cascading failures. The proliferation of types of suffering–boils, disease, flies, animals crying.

    Then he said the part that has stayed stuck in my mind:

    Before the coming of the lugal and the warriors and the temple, we would sometimes know hunger.

    But not until we watered the sand and planted and built the granaries did we ever know famine.

    I have been combing through cuneiform text collections (these days online) for decades now, trying to find that song again. It’s the voice of a brother I never knew, who lived five or six millennia ago.

    http://cdli.ucla.edu/

    Read More
  74. @Olorin
    This is imprecise but it has long burned in my memory like a hot wire:

    Many years ago in a bookstore in either Minneapolis or Madison or maybe Ann Arbor, I found a thick old 19th century translation of ancient I believe Sumerian or maybe Babylonian texts.

    (Jeez, am I irritated at my 22yo self that I didn't haul this treasure home with me, or notate its title/author/date.)

    In it was a translated lamentation poem/song. Lamentation poems/songs are a feature of many world literatures.

    In this one the singer was lamenting about a famine that was sweeping through his town or city or region.

    He went on in great detail about the horror of it. The suffering. The cascading failures. The proliferation of types of suffering--boils, disease, flies, animals crying.

    Then he said the part that has stayed stuck in my mind:

    Before the coming of the lugal and the warriors and the temple, we would sometimes know hunger.

    But not until we watered the sand and planted and built the granaries did we ever know famine.

    I have been combing through cuneiform text collections (these days online) for decades now, trying to find that song again. It's the voice of a brother I never knew, who lived five or six millennia ago.

    http://cdli.ucla.edu/

    What does it mean?

    Read More
  75. @PhysicistDave
    Left Coast Man wrote:

    Let’s just export a few thousand American & Euro (especially Swedish) university feminists to educate African women and tell them how important it is that they “Make PowerPoints, NOT Babies!”
     
    Actually, SciAm had an article a year or so ago suggesting much the same thing, albeit more diplomatically.

    Apparently, there is evidence that African women actually are getting sick of churning out the babies, but, alas, this is a place where the "patriarchy" really still does rule. Many African cultures seem to arrange for the women to do both the childcare and most of the productive agricultural labor.

    Of course, all this needs to be stated very diplomatically to get a hearing in the MSM.

    Dave

    Sounds like a good deal. I sit around all day and look for new tail while my woman works to pay for my food. And she takes care of the kids as well.

    Why are we against this?

    Read More
  76. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Jack Hanson
    There was an interesting documentary on Netflix of all places that discussed how virtue signaling charity orgs are crushing small industry in Africa.

    One of the examples was "Tom's Shoes", which donates a pair of shoes for every pair bought. The doc underlined the fact that local cobblers can't compete with charities that drop free shoes on potential customers.

    I’ve seen it. It’s excellent.

    Read More
  77. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Alfa158
    Years ago an aid worker in Latin America trying to help impoverished peasants, wrote an open letter to American parents asking them to please stop sending their kids down there to work as summer volunteers. Apparently they were doing this as a way to feel charitable about themselves, relate to their more unfortunate fellow humans and, oh yeah, have a great resume entry for their Ivy League college applications.
    The worker said these kids were trying to do things thing like helping build schools and clinics, but they had no skills, got in the way more than anything else, and had to be taken care and kept out of danger. If the parents instead wrote a check to the charity for the five figure cost of sending their kid down there for the summer, they could have had the whole building put up by local workers.

    Those kids don’t even wash the family cars or do laundry, yard work or anything that smacks of manual labor. They’ve never even seen, let alone used, a hammer, nail or saw but they are supposed to build schools in a week.

    There’s a great Frazier episode where the Drs Crane attempt to help build a habitat for humanity house.

    Read More
  78. @Almost Missouri

    "40% of adult males in Africa are peasants, a rather time-consuming occupation...."
     
    ...for their wives.

    No, there are some African countries where women are more likely to be employed in agriculture (e.g Tanzania), but the distinction in those cases is along the lines of 70% v. 60%. Most places, if there’s data available, it indicates that men are more likely to be employed in cultivation than are women.

    Read More
  79. @donut
    The cheapest , easiest and most effective solution to the population bomb in Africa is to let nature take it's course . No more hypocritical and cynical do gooders making a buck with their "humane" interventions . If their goal was to reduce the suffering in the world then they have failed miserably .

    http://www.indexmundi.com/facts/ethiopia/population

    Where ever they , whether it be an NGO or some Gov't or UN organization , stick their noses in suffering increases . Decades of failure don't phase them , they only see the need for more of the same .

    The cheapest , easiest and most effective solution to the population bomb in Africa is to let nature take it’s course . No more hypocritical and cynical do gooders making a buck with their “humane” interventions .

    Again, overseas development aid of all sorts (not just food aid) accounts for about 6% of a typical African country’s income stream. For the more affluent countries like Nigeria, it’s more on the order of 1%. It peaks into double digits in the Sahel and in loci which have suffered discrete disasters of late.

    Read More
    • Replies: @donut
    A very reasonable and persuasive answer with numbers and all . As you must know I could never muster up a well reasoned counter argument . Really I can only say that the suffering in this world seems to increase day by day .

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0V0Vu_utUZY
  80. @Massimo Heitor

    The guys in Calais are not going to have a nice life,
     


    Most people quickly realise that money and things don’t make you happy, but what makes you unhappy is being relatively poorer and less influential than your peers.

     

    You claim that money and things don't cause happiness, but the deprivation of money and things in the migrant camps of Calais cause unhappiness?

    Looking at how people vote with their feet is one of the more objective ways to compare the relative desirability of different living arrangements and life styles.

    Masses of Africans are choosing to move from a rural lifestyle to the shanty towns of Calais or failing that the the urban slums of cities like Kinshasa, and I see few people moving back in the other direction. That isn't the perfect decision, but I actually trust them to vote with their feet in their own interests unless I see specific evidence to the contrary.

    Also, if people "quickly realize" that money and things don't bring happiness happy, then why do so many people still pursue those things?

    Masses of Africans are choosing to move from a rural lifestyle to the shanty towns of Calais or failing that the the urban slums of cities like Kinshasa, and I see few people moving back in the other direction. That isn’t the perfect decision, but I actually trust them to vote with their feet in their own interests unless I see specific evidence to the contrary.

    At one time, you had a portfolio of policies in Africa which tended to promote rural outmigration by abusing the peasantry. (E.g. overvalued currencies, state monopsonies in certain cash crops &c). Not sure if that’s still the case.

    Read More
  81. African expands its population by 30 million/year. The world expands its population by 80 million/year or 1 billion every 13 years.
    All aid must be contingent upon fertility reduction. Else nature will impose a lot of suffering.

    -Zinc

    Read More
  82. @Art Deco
    The cheapest , easiest and most effective solution to the population bomb in Africa is to let nature take it’s course . No more hypocritical and cynical do gooders making a buck with their “humane” interventions .

    Again, overseas development aid of all sorts (not just food aid) accounts for about 6% of a typical African country's income stream. For the more affluent countries like Nigeria, it's more on the order of 1%. It peaks into double digits in the Sahel and in loci which have suffered discrete disasters of late.

    A very reasonable and persuasive answer with numbers and all . As you must know I could never muster up a well reasoned counter argument . Really I can only say that the suffering in this world seems to increase day by day .

    Read More
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