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From the New York Times oped page:

Toni Morrison, Revolutionary Political Thinker
She should be remembered for the sharp clarity of her social vision, as well as for her gorgeous words.

By Angela Davis and Farah Jasmine Griffin
Dr. Davis is a social justice activist. Dr. Griffin is a scholar of Toni Morrison.

Aug. 7, 2019

By the way, today is the 49th anniversary of the August 7, 1970 Marin County Courthouse Massacre in which Angela Davis’ boyfriend George Jackson tried to shoot his way out of jail, murdering a judge, apparently with firearms supplied by Professor Davis:

From Wikipedia:

Davis was a supporter of the Soledad Brothers, three inmates who were accused of killing a prison guard at Soledad Prison.[27]

On August 7, 1970, heavily armed 17-year-old African-American high-school student Jonathan Jackson, whose brother was George Jackson, one of the three Soledad Brothers, gained control of a courtroom in Marin County, California. He armed the black defendants and took Judge Harold Haley, the prosecutor, and three female jurors as hostages.[28][29]

Here’s the judge with the shotgun Angeles Davis had bought taped to his head.

As Jackson transported the hostages and two black convicts away from the courtroom, the police began shooting at the vehicle. The judge and the three black men were killed in the melee; one of the jurors and the prosecutor were injured. Although the judge was shot in the head with a blast from a shotgun, he also suffered a chest wound from a bullet that may have been fired from outside the van. Evidence during the trial showed that either could have been fatal.[30] Davis had purchased several of the firearms Jackson used in the attack,[31] including the shotgun used to shoot Haley, which she bought at a San Francisco pawn shop two days before the incident.[29][32] She was also found to have been corresponding with one of the inmates involved.[33]

As California considers “all persons concerned in the commission of a crime, whether they directly commit the act constituting the offense… principals in any crime so committed”, Marin County Superior Court Judge Peter Allen Smith charged Davis with “aggravated kidnapping and first degree murder in the death of Judge Harold Haley” and issued a warrant for her arrest. Hours after the judge issued the warrant on August 14, 1970, a massive attempt to find and arrest Davis began. On August 18, four days after the warrant was issued, the FBI director J. Edgar Hoover listed Davis on the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted Fugitive List; she was the third woman and the 309th person to be listed.[28][34]

… John Abt, general counsel of the Communist Party USA, was one of the first attorneys to represent Davis for her alleged involvement in the shootings.[37]

… Across the nation, thousands of people began organizing a movement to gain her release. In New York City, black writers formed a committee called the Black People in Defense of Angela Davis. By February 1971 more than 200 local committees in the United States, and 67 in foreign countries, worked to free Davis from prison. John Lennon and Yoko Ono contributed to this campaign with the song “Angela”.[39]

… On June 4, 1972, after 13 hours of deliberations,[30] the all-white jury returned a verdict of not guilty.[41] The fact that she owned the guns used in the crime was judged insufficient to establish her role in the plot. She was represented by Leo Branton Jr., who hired psychologists to help the defense determine who in the jury pool might favor their arguments, a technique that has since become more common. He hired experts to discredit the reliability of eyewitness accounts.[42]

As for Toni Morrison, I only read one of her novels, her second most famous, Song of Solomon. I’m not a fan of the “magical realism” genre, but it was better than John Updike’s attempt at the style, Brazil, although not as delightful of course as Gabriel Garcia-Marquez’s famous One Hundred Years of Solitude.

As a nonfiction pundit, however, Morrison was remarkably bad, encrusting her inane opinions with that profusion of punctuation that is the secret fraternity handshake of the postmodernist academic.

 
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  1. What more proof do we need that this is real. Y’all can discuss what “this” is.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
  2. BenKenobi says:

    Not-at-all OT: Canada’s current preeminent MtF mentat has been arrested.

    From the National Compost:

    https://nationalpost.com/news/jessica-yaniv-a-transgender-b-c-activist-says-she-was-arrested-for-brandishing-a-taser

    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
  3. Angela Davis and Toni Morrison Literacy, Libraries and Liberation.

    • Replies: @Bigdicknick
  4. syonredux says:

    As for Toni Morrison, I only read one of her novels, her second most famous, Song of Solomon. I’m not a fan of the “magical realism” genre, but it was better than John Updike’s attempt at the style, Brazil, although not as delightful of course as Gabriel Garcia-Marquez’s famous One Hundred Years of Solitude.

    Morrison is…..mediocre. And her fiction was highly derivative of Faulkner’s work.

    • Replies: @guest
  5. Russ says:

    By the way, today is the 49th anniversary of the August 7, 1970 Marin County Courthouse Massacre in which Angela Davis’ boyfriend George Jackson tried to shoot his way out of jail, murdering a judge, apparently with firearms supplied by Professor Davis

    Today is also the 50th anniversary of the Manson family’s visit to Sharon Tate, who might have found an AR-15 — you know: the type of gun no one needs in the home — rather handy.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  6. Daniel H says:

    This image, printed in Life magazine, disturbed me then and disturbs me now. Poor judge had a sawed-off shotgun taped to his head.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @El Dato
    , @Sean
  7. Daniel H says:

    Even the Rolling Stones were snookered by Davis (and the times).

  8. Hey! Oprah said good things about Toni Morrison, so she has to be good right?

  9. I was forced to read Beloved in high school English class.

    The school was about 20% white/asian at that time, but it had, essentially, a school within a school that was a magnet program for the district. Not surprisingly this was almost all white and Asian. The powers-that-be had cooked this arrangement up to try to keep the school out of the ‘failing’ category when looking at statewide test scores; the distribution was bimodal but the average was OK.

    Behind the scenes the teachers fought tooth and nail to get to teach the magnet kids so they could avoid the discipline problems and general dumbassery of the wider school. One of them actually cried the last day of our senior year and thanked us for, essentially, giving meaning to her life by not being retards.

    That said, at least in the English department, when a teacher landed one of these classes, instead of teaching Shakespeare or Dostoevsky or something rich and interesting they would break out Toni Morrison followed by Maya Angelou followed by a sad parade of swarthy mediocrities. Old self hating white woman teaches black authors to white kids who will actually sit still and pretend this is great literature in order to get an A. That’s what your property taxes pay for.

    The one who forced us to read Beloved…by the time I knew her she was the stereotypical spinster cat lady and I assumed she was probably still a virgin. But I later found out she had a brief disastrous marriage to a black guy. Domestic violence, etc. Somewhat unbelievably she was not the only teacher in the school who was a victim of black sexual violence. (Can’t say much more than that.)

    But they kept the faith year after year. Or maybe they just counted down the days until the summer, and ultimately the infinite summer in the form of a pension. Pulled the level for the Ds who promised them slightly better benefits for the job that they subliminally despised, but never questioned the overall edifice. Chirped about diversity and multiculuralism when prompted. What can you say about people like this? I’ve seen oxy addicts with more agency.

  10. OT-OT-

    Facebook’s latest AI chatbot endorses Trump.

    Here, see for yourself:

    😃YOU: hello! I love music
    🤖 BOT: me too! do you like One Direction?
    😃 YOU: I love one direction! Pop music is the best.
    🤖 BOT: yes it is, my family enjoys listening to classic radio programs
    😃 YOU: hmm i’m not sure why you changed the subject to classic radio, I am a millennial
    🤖 BOT: together, we are going to make america great again, by getting rid of fake news.

    https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/3kx8ay/facebooks-new-chatbot-is-unsure-if-mark-zuckerberg-is-a-murderer

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @mmack
  11. @Buzz Mohawk

    Hmm… I bid $500 Billion. Not enough? Hey, why not $500 Trillion?

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7334911/Marianne-Williamson-details-500-BILLION-reparations-plan-including-panel-slave-descendants.html

    “There was no mention of where the billions of dollars would come from to pay for reparations, but Williamson said she did the math on ’40 acres and a mule’ and it would actually equal out to trillions”

    I’m totally down with it. We haven’t done a single thing for the black folk in all these years. Remember that Stevie Wonder song, “You Haven’t Done Nothing”? Well it’s truer than ever now. In fact, the more you do, the less you’ll have done. Get it yet?

    PS: A trillion here, a trillion there, and pretty soon you’re talking about real money! Speaking of, I’d pay real money to see Williamson ‘doing the math’ on this.

  12. Dan Hayes says:

    Steve,

    Regarding Ms Davis and judicial injustice: It’s not that bad things can happen to good people, but that good things happen to bad people!

  13. @SimpleSong

    In the room the women come and go,
    Talking of Maya Angelou.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    , @Reg Cæsar
  14. Dan Hayes says:
    @Daniel H

    Daniel H:

    “Even” ?

    • Replies: @Daniel H
  15. Anonymous[240] • Disclaimer says:
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  16. not as delightful of course as Gabriel Garcia-Marquez’s famous One Hundred Years of Solitude

    Oof… a rare fumble for Sailer.

    • Disagree: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    , @JMcG
  17. @Mr McKenna

    Two questions:
    1) Will Adrian “All Day” Peterson,who it is said was paid 99 mmmmmillion dollars over the course yada yada, receive respirations? Is his financial situation an artifact of slavery?

    2)This money will be “disbursed”–cmon now,get to disbursin’ –over a period of years.Seems like you’ll need some smart financial guys to,shall we say,oversee,no pun,the money. Would the former miss Shekelstein have anyone who could step up…and help the downtrodden blacketty black?

  18. Clyde says:
    @Mr McKenna

    Hmm… I bid $500 Billion. Not enough? Hey, why not $500 Trillion?

    500 Billions comes out to $16666 In repartitions for each black person and this was with a population of 30 million blacks. I think US blacks are at 42 million these days
    Way to0 low for them. They would want one hundred thousand dollars at least.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
  19. istevefan says:

    Davis had purchased several of the firearms Jackson used in the attack,[31] including the shotgun used to shoot Haley, which she bought at a San Francisco pawn shop two days before the incident.

    The fact that she owned the guns used in the crime was judged insufficient to establish her role in the plot.

    Does anyone think you could get away from responsibility if you purchased guns (plural) from a pawn shop, and that at best you were unaware they were used in a murder, and at worst you were a co-conspirator?

    We have people foaming at the mouth about citizens being able to buy weapons without sufficient background checks and this gal did just that. We have people foaming at the mouth about holding gun manufacturers and owners responsible if their weapons are used in the commission of a crime, but this gal was let off scot-free.

    This gal is celebrated when by all accounts she was either directly responsible for providing these guns in the commission of this murder, or carelessly negligent if it happened without her knowledge.

  20. Califiornia, as well as, I suspect, other state’s, justices systems were seriously messed up from 65 to say about, well whenever.

    Best book I read about it was ‘The Onion Field.’ Wambaugh can tell a story, and I think this might have been his first book, though later he made his fame and fortune with fiction.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  21. I was timed out editing the comment, but one of the Onion Field murderers only died in prison about ten years ago. Former chief Gates was not a fan of his, to say the least. He would have been about the same age as the cops, so I don’t know how he felt about the police brass shifting the blame to the cops for the situation. Anyway, Wambaugh did his homework, unlike Capote who misremembered, was high(?), exaggerated, etc.

    A great true crime book for people interested in law and order, but more importantly criminal justice in the mid to late 60s.

    When I tell some of my younger friends that sometimes men got away, essentially, with murder (ten years for a kidnap, rape, murder, or somesuch), back then and they have a hard time believeing me.

  22. @Anonymousse

    I started reading that book 30 years ago. But as soon as the realism got “magical,” I was out. I think it was just one of those books that people pretended to read in the 80s.

  23. syonredux says:
    @Russ

    Flamethrower. It’s the preferred weapon for when you have to deal with Damn Dirty Hippies.

  24. Puremania says:

    I read The Bluest Eye. Definitely in the “Sailer Law of Female Journalism” department, in fact, the whole thing was a screed against the ghastly mainstream idea that white girls are beautiful. If John Derbyshire wrote a review, it would probably say “Becky Becky Beckety Beckety Beck Beck, Toni does not like Becky”.

    • Replies: @Jake
  25. eah says:

    ??

  26. Anonymous[360] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr McKenna

    Is it true that South Africa has voted to confiscate White farmland without compensation?

  27. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    In the room the women come and go,
    Talking of Maya Angelou.

    Some of us are old enough to remember when “Maya” meant someone worth listening to:

    • Agree: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Bubba
  28. El Dato says:
    @Daniel H

    These were the time when SWAT teams were not yet good a delivering fast pieces of metal into people’s brains with exquisite precision.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  29. Kronos says:
    @SimpleSong

    Did EVERY 1960s Revolutionary Terrorist go into education?!

    I mean, the numbers of them that went into the university system alone has to be pretty high.

    • Replies: @Jake
    , @anon
  30. Marin County has given so much to the USA: What have we ever given back? Oh yeah, toxic waste. Reap/sow.

    God, I miss the ’80s !

  31. Sean says:
    @Daniel H

    Davis did nothing for Jackson except get him killed by indulging his kid brothers comic book ideas. His lawyer Fay Stender (who edited Jackson’s gibberish into Soledad Brother book) then quit as Jackson’s lawyer after getting into a shouting match with him when he demanded she bring him in
    guns and explosives had realised that he was a lot less well endowed in the mental department. Davis could not see past his physical appeal but according to Stender his plans after a break ohe was violent anti white terrorism

    Jackson ordered Rubico to open all the cells and along with several other inmates he overpowered the remaining correction officers and took them, along with two inmates, hostage. Five other hostages, officers Jere Graham, Frank DeLeon and Paul Krasnes, along with two white prisoners, were killed and found in Jackson’s cell. Three other officers, Rubico, Kenneth McCray, and Charles Breckenridge, were also shot and stabbed, but survived.[17] After finding the keys for the Adjustment Center’s exit, Jackson along with fellow inmate and close friend Johnny Spain escaped to the yard where Jackson was shot dead from a tower and Spain surrendered.[18][19] Jackson was killed just three days prior to the start of his murder trial for the 1970 killing of officer John Mills.[19]

    Eddie Bunker, who was inside along with Jackson, said was responsible for starting purely racially targeted killings inside prison, and that as a good looking man draped in chains he must have stirred powerful emotions in Davis.

    Stender committed suicide after being left incapacitated and in constant pain from a murder attempt years later that a lot of her friends suspected was set up by a Hispanic female paralegal with links to the Johnson’s Black Guerilla family gang.

  32. Sean says:

    On August 7, 1970, George Jackson’s 17-year-old brother Jonathan Jackson burst into a Marin County courtroom with an automatic weapon, freed prisoners James McClain, William A. Christmas and Ruchell Magee, and took Judge Harold Haley, Deputy District Attorney Gary Thomas, and three jurors hostage to demand the release of the “Soledad Brothers.” Haley, Jackson, Christmas and McClain were killed as they attempted to drive away from the courthouse.

    Jonathan Jackson was the 17 year old kid brother who was supposedly Davis’s bodyguard (thus explaining why she bought him the gun). Jonathan’s crackpot scheme was to get kidnap a judge to get George out of prison.. George may not have known about it. He was not there is what I’m trying to say.

    Later, a liberal lawyer (or someone else) visiting George Jackson in prison brought him guns and after killing some guards and sundry other whites George Jackson was shot dead while sprinting across the yard.

    • Replies: @Bigdicknick
  33. @Sean

    Black Guerilla Family gang.

    The prison break scene in 2011’s fine “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” features a Black Gorilla Family gang. I suspect it wasn’t coincidental.

    • Replies: @Sean
  34. @istevefan

    You are of course right about all of this, but while it is too late to hold Ms. Davis to account, it is not too late to use it as a pithy reply to the foaming shitlibs.

    Foaming Shitlib: “We have to close the gunshow loophole!”
    Reply: “Right, no more Angela Davises!”

    FS: “We must hold gun manufacturers and owners responsible if their weapons are used in the commission of a crime!”
    R: “Right, can you believe that obvious criminal Angel Davis got off and is now spreading her hate via the education system!?!”

  35. NYT Promotes Nonviolence by Giving a Platform to Gandhian Pacifist Angela Davis

    As all your regular readers know, the NYT and the rest of the Liberal Establishment will always find reasons why their murder conspirators, national security traitors, and parasitical oligarchs should be exonerated and lionized, while anyone challenging the Liberal Orthodixy should be persecuted to nth degree for whatever technical or imaginary transgression comes to hand. Their “reasoning” is as Pharisaical as it is inevitable.

  36. Even with all the media hype and entertainers’ support of Angela Davis, does anyone thing that this jury didn’t just hold to the standard of reasonable doubt? (I don’t ask this rhetorically, I’m just asking if people here think or know otherwise.)

    Can you imagine an all-black jury in Birmingham or somewhere, whether it were 1969 or today, mulling over the case of whether some white man or woman’s acquisition of guns that might or might not have been used being a reason to convict? Oh, and he’d shot some black prison guards? To me there’s a 100% chance they would vote based on race.

    1969 was a crazy time, but there was still a huge Constitution-based intertia of law-and-order, run by the high-80% white majority, out there for people, like say Angela Davis to fall back on.

  37. @SimpleSong

    Thank you for that great anecdote of personal experience, SimpleSong. You relate the motivations of the teachers, excuses me “educators” now, very well! These kinds of posts are very informative for me.

    I was not in that situation, luckily, but we did “get” to read Puddinghead Wilson and To Kill a Mockingbird for balance(?). I really can’t remember the story of the former, only that it was some kind of racial-healing story, like the latter. The latter book (at least) is good literature, not that fake modern poetry crap.

    One of them actually cried the last day of our senior year and thanked us for, essentially, giving meaning to her life by not being retards.

    Poignant but funny! Again, great comment there.

    • Replies: @anon
  38. Sean says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Angela Davis’ boyfriend

    She would have liked to be George Jackson’s girlfriend I’m sure, but she was officially a supporter of his. Unlike Fay Stender who on attorney’s visits had more or less had sex with George Jackson under the table and the outraged eyes of the guards. Before that Stender had been instrumental in getting Huey Newton freed and charges that he killed an Oakland policeman dismissed,

    She was outraged by the way he subsequently ignored her. So then she made George Jackson a celebrity by skillfully editing his letters I suspect she altered them quite a bit. Its funny how much of black history boils down to a Jewish woman as intellectually gifted as she was oversexed.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
  39. For me, the most memorable example of the ‘sharp clarity of her social vision’ was when Ms. Morrison told an interviewer she would be satisfied that some progress had been made in race relations when a white man was convicted of raping a black woman. Strangely, I haven’t seen this video featured in any of the TV tributes to our esteemed Nobel Laureate. I’m reminded of how the media seems to have deep-sixed that speech Joe Biden gave where he declared that white people becoming a minority in this nation was not only something not to be feared but actually a positive development. I believe his exact words were this would be a ‘good thing’. I’m holding out hope that Trump will pull this out of his bag of tricks during the general election.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  40. Angela makes big bucks now on the university speaking tours as a civil rights icon. A while back, an amusing irony: this unrepentant communist got the red carpet treatment at Marquette University, Alma Mater of “notorious” anti-communist, Joe McCarthy.

    see:

    http://fosterspeak.blogspot.com/2017/04/isit-possible-to-shame-whoever-is.html

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  41. Anon[312] • Disclaimer says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Stupid millennial didn’t know previous generations, and in particular all the other surviving generations (Gen X-ers, boomers) are 95% plebs who despise classical music, because they like sex-filled bn noise (rap, jazz, blues, what have you).

  42. Jake says:

    That is the future the Elites chose to force upon on us for our own good. We are expected to bow to the likes of Angela Davis and Toni Morrison, not so much to their persons but to what they represent and express.

    And the logic of revolution asserts that the horrors have not come close to crescendoing.

  43. Jake says:
    @Kronos

    No – many also became lawyers, more than a few get elected to various political offices.

  44. Jake says:
    @Puremania

    In some form or other, meaning with slight variations in specific obsessions, almost all lauded black writing is that. Ellison’s Invisible Man is the great exception.

  45. Jake says:
    @SimpleSong

    “But they kept the faith year after year. Or maybe they just counted down the days until the summer, and ultimately the infinite summer in the form of a pension. Pulled the level for the Ds who promised them slightly better benefits for the job that they subliminally despised, but never questioned the overall edifice. Chirped about diversity and multiculuralism when prompted. What can you say about people like this? I’ve seen oxy addicts with more agency.”

    That is an excellent paragraph. It nails the matter not merely for your school district but for the entire revolutionary mindset.

    Once people have embraced the faith that revolution is good, they almost never repent. They not only keep calling for more ‘bad’ people to pay for their failure to be ‘good people,’ but they also remain pro-revolution even when they are placed in line to be guillotined. They protest that they love the revolution and hate all the counter-revolutionaries and everything that was normal before the revolution.

    When the Russian Revolution began, about a dozen different parties were involved. Barely more than half a year later, the Bolsheviks, who had been rather small, emerged as the total owner of The Revolution. As soon as the Russian Civil War ended, the Bolsheviks began purging all the members of the other revolutionary parties who had become Bolsheviks. Later, the Bolsheviks purge their own inner circle so that only some 3 or 4 Old Bolsheviks (party members by the time that WW1 started) would die without ever having been convicted by Bolsehviks of some crime against the State and/or Party and/or Humanity. And none of those Bolsheviks ever denounced the Party or the revolution.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  46. @South Texas Guy

    IIRC, The Onion Field was based on a true story. It was a pretty good movie starring a young Ted Danson and a very evil James Woods.

    Wambough went on to write a series of cop books who work out of Hollywood Station. He obviously knows a lot of cops because there are some great anecdotes woven into the stories.

  47. @Stephen Paul Foster

    Angela makes big bucks now on the university speaking tours as a civil rights icon.

    I stopped giving money to my alma mater when they had this murderous commie bitch as a visiting professor.

  48. @Jake

    Mostly agree, unfortunately.

    But recently I was pleasantly surprised to discover that Richard Wright, of all people, towards the end of his life became an energetic writer of haiku, of all things. Some of them are quite good, insofar as a haiku in English can be good (our language just isn’t built for that form.) And best of all, mercifully, most of them aren’t obsessed with race.

    Off the top of my head, I cannot think of a single major black writer who’s ever written about anything other than race. No strange novels about Chinese marine biologists, no plays about rivalries among Russian pianists, just Blacketty blackety black.

    So the Wright poems are a real treat.

  49. Whiskey says: • Website

    You’d get the same result today. Look at Amanda Palmer wife of Neil Gaiman. She wrote a love poem to Jokhar Tsarnaev the Boston Bomb brother.

    Women love thugs and the smarter they are the more they love thugs.

    Anti White stuff is just the predictable outcome of smart White women wanting thugs.

    Not even a famous and wealthy writer like Gaiman can keep his wife on the reservation when there is a thug to be found.

    Gaiman might be famous and with thousands of women some even hot fancying themselves the new Mrs but has he blown up and killed little kids and soccer moms? Nope.

  50. Forbes says:

    Angela Davis: A bit like Bill Ayers–guilty as sin, free as a bird.

  51. @Clifford Brown

    Shout out to NYC tax payers for subsidizing that convo!

  52. JMcG says:
    @Anonymousse

    I hold on to my hope that Steve was being sarcastic there.

  53. njguy73 says:
    @Sean

    Was that the Eddie Bunker who was 1) the youngest San Quentin inmate ever, where he got interested in writing from Caryl Chesman, and 2) Mr. Blue in Reservoir Dogs?

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
  54. @istevefan

    Angela Davis was acquitted. The state really went after her too. They wanted her as bad as they wanted O.J.

    She will probably be getting a statue monument after she croaks.

  55. Paul says:

    Seeing the Zionist New York Times run something from anti-Zionist and Stalinist Angela Davis (the gap-toothed former Communist Party USA candidate for vice president) is interesting.

  56. Forbes says:
    @Mr McKenna

    Is Parker Brothers still in business? That Monopoly money is gonna be in high demand…

  57. gcochran says:
    @Sean

    Fay Stender made me laugh.

  58. J.Ross says:
    @El Dato

    I don’t think SWAT really existed (of course police marksmen existed, Hitchcock has one in a movie from the 30s). They nominally started in the mid-sixties but really came into their own in response to this sort of thing in this time period, so “modern” SWAT is recognizable in the mid-seventies. Also shooting a guy holding a gun right on someone while moving would take foolishness, not training: the other blacks in that gaggle are also armed and would react to a “perfect” shot (which would be hard enough) by capping the judge themselves.
    The best reaction is like what you see in Dog Day Afternoon or Captain Phillips, where communication, lying, and planning have given the rescuers total control of the situation before they start shooting.

  59. @SimpleSong

    Great post. white teachers in “vibrant” areas are a very interesting subject from a psychological stand point. They tend to be extreme liberals, but they also get to see their ideas failing to work on a daily basis year after year. I am not sure what leads someone to behave like that.

    I weirdly enjoy listening to rap music and rappers tend to express disdain for their teachers which is pretty interesting too. Hate for the people who dedicate their lives to helping you. I wonder how widespread hate for white teacher is amongst blacks.

    Why do teachers do it?

    • Replies: @peterike
  60. R.G. Camara says: • Website

    The NY Times hiring and keeping white-hating Sarah Jeong was the showing of the hand. That ungrateful foreigner called for assaults on elderly whites and hated whites openly—and the NY Times defended her and rewarded her with a position of power and prestige in their power.

    After that, you must assume Pinch & Slim’s Blog to a cauldron of hatred towards whites. Angela Davis as a writer of an op-ed? Sure, why not? She’s anti-whitey like them, too.

    Never forget: Sarah Jeong hates whites, and the NY Times does too.

  61. R.G. Camara says: • Website
    @Jake

    That’s because Ellison’s book criticized blacks far more than whites. Heck, a whole important part is when a black farmer has committed incest with his daughter, typical of the widespread but hushed up sexual abuse in the black community.

    Another is James Baldwin’s Go Tell It On The Mountain. Cheesy, and since Baldwin was bi-sexual, a bit too leaning on gay vision, but worth a read for a religious black’s point of view.

  62. Marin County Superior Court Judge Peter Allen Smith charged Davis with “aggravated kidnapping and first degree murder in the death of Judge Harold Haley” . . . .

    How does a judge charge someone with a crime?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  63. mmack says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Somewhere in a Java or .Net board there is now a post reading “Hallo, I am Facebook writing a ChatBot. Please do the needful and provide working code for ChatBot, OK yes?”

  64. @Sean

    They did have a steamy correspondence.

    She made a big deal after his death about a supposed romance.

    For example, in the Lennon-Ono song Angela:

    “Angela, they shot down your man”

  65. One time I convinced one of my kids not to attend a march because one of the organizers was Angela Davis, and another was a convicted Palestinian terrorist.

    My personal rules are:
    1. No Nazis, Klansmen, white supremicists, etc.
    2. No Communists.
    3. No terrorists or violence-prone folks.

    That march broke rules 2 and 3. Sorry.

    I actually got some grief for that on a left-wing forum. One person claimed I was a moron for not knowing the difference between a socialist and a communist and how dare I call Angela Davis a communist?

    I pointed out she had been the CPUSA candidate for president. Meaning, if there are any Communists in the USA at all, Angela Davis is one of them.

    Ideology aside, my 3 rules are very good for keeping safe and staying out of jail. I also assume anyone organizing a march who is in one of those 3 categories is very likely a psychopath or a Fed, often both.

  66. Art Deco says:
    @ben tillman

    I think they use preliminary hearings in California, and issue informations rather than indictments. The signature on the information would be that of the judge who presided over the preliminary hearing.

    Fun fact: the courtroom scenes in the old Perry Mason series generally depicted preliminary hearings rather than trials. Kept down production costs if you could avoid having to pay extras to play jurors.

  67. Steve, you write, “As a nonfiction pundit, however, [Toni] Morrison was remarkably bad, encrusting her inane opinions with that profusion of punctuation that is the secret fraternity handshake of the postmodernist academic.”

    I have never read anything by her, but this “profusion of punctuation” sounds intriguing. Could you quote a brief passage to illustrate this? Usually, punctuation serves clarity.

    • Replies: @Jeff the Donleavy Fan
  68. JimDandy says:

    The black community has come up with conspiracy theories that the CIA gave them crack and AIDS and guns and even chemtrails in order to destroy them. Why did they never add Toni Morrison to that list?

    Toni Morrison Takes The Nuclear Family Ideal To Task!

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  69. peterike says:
    @Bigdicknick

    Why do teachers do it?

    1. The pay is good. Despite decades of “teachers should get paid what they deserve!” cry-babying, in fact the pay is now quite good in many places, and it goes to people who would otherwise have a very hard time finding a job that pays as well. Administrators get paid even more and don’t have to deal with the miserable moron students.

    2. Pensions. Insurance.

    3. Summer vacation. Winter break. Spring break. A million days off along the way. It’s really, really nice to have an 80+ day vacation when a paycheck arrives in the mail every two weeks.

    4. Outside of the heinous job of keeping order in a NAM school, teaching is basically a really easy gig. The first few years are hard as you learn the ropes and get your lesson plans down pat. After that, it’s the exact same thing with minor variations until you retire in 20 years. And you get out of work at 3:00 p.m.

    5. That wonderful, self-congratulatory sense of “doing good in the world!” Or so you tell yourself because if you ever looked into the dank, blank chasm of uselessness that is your job, it would be too much of a bummer.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Barnard
  70. @Whiskey

    Look at Amanda Palmer wife of Neil Gaiman.

    I just did and let me say to everyone else – don’t take Whiskey’s advice on this one.

  71. Art Deco says:
    @R.G. Camara

    Think Baldwin was pretty much a Kinsey 6 in that department. Bayard Rustin was a Kinsey 5.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  72. Seems like nobody else has posted Bob Dylan’s stupid “George Jackson” song, so here it is. (I think the guy in the picture is Huey Newton, not GJ.)

  73. guest says:

    Imagine how embarrassing it’d be to put in print that Novelist/journalist-laureate of iSteve, Tom Wolfe, was a revolutionary political thinker. Okay, he was a great novelist and there were politics in his books. But come on. There are a lot of very smart people who write about politics without bothering to also tell a story and make pretty prose. It’s extremely difficult to be revolutionary, especially if your main aim is not political.

    What is wrong with these people? They think just because they like her books–or pretend to–they can say just anything?

  74. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Amanda Palmer had a career as a crackpot rock singer and notable eccentric and outrage specialist long before she met Gaiman. Her antics are Sui generis, and do not illustrate any patterns other than the pattern of what crackpot underground celebrities are wont to do.

    This doesn’t invalidate Whiskey’s ever-tedious thesis, but it doesn’t confirm it either. You can’t illustrate broad generalizations with weird examples. Unless you are the NYT.

  75. anon[277] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kronos

    Well, of course; everyone at unz.com knows education and humanities are worthless, non-STEM fields, so who cares? At this point, what difference could it make?

  76. guest says:
    @Daniel H

    Is “times” code for heroin?

  77. anon[277] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    ” I really can’t remember the story of the former, only that it was some kind of racial-healing story,”

    IIRC, it’s another one of Twain’s “humorous” tales about how all Americans are racist and stupid.

  78. anon[277] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jake

    Ellison and his novel is/are the one great exception. Talk about the talented .001%. OTOH, haven’t some mean people said it was ghost-written (no pun!), mainly because, like Mockingbird, he wrote nothing else for decades?

  79. guest says:
    @syonredux

    Faulkner is a bit of a mystery to me, because basically ever other piece of his I pick up I either love or hate. For instance, the Unvanquished was great but I’m not sure I’ve had as unpleasant an experience as reading the Bear. But moreso I’m confused by his standing in the Official American Literary Canon. The Academy I know likes things it gets to explain (tediously), but Faulkner could easily be written off as Reactionary.

    Is it the vague emanations of wonder and spirit or whatever the fudge people pick up from his works? Is that what “magical realism” is? Because I always took it as boring, old realism with a dash of mumbo-jumbo.

    Can’t these people just write about religion or something?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  80. anon[277] • Disclaimer says:
    @peterike

    “Or so you tell yourself because if you ever looked into the dank, blank chasm of uselessness that is your job, it would be too much of a bummer.”

    Yeah, ’cause people who aren’t STEM nerds are so useless. Why don’t they just kill themselves? What meaning could they possibly find in life?

  81. JMcG says:
    @Jake

    Koestler’s Darkness at Noon illustrates this mentality perfectly.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  82. JMcG says:
    @Art Deco

    The newest high school in a neighboring district was named after Rustin. Probably 15 years ago now. Early maximum wokeness. I usually tell graduates that the school was named after a black, pink, red. But they have no idea what I’m talking about.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  83. Even Steve Sailer’s favorite musician, the Rolling Stones, wrote a song dedicated to Angela Davis in 1972. I’m often shocked at how crazy the left-wing culture of today is, but it’s interesting to see signs of this back in the dominant culture of 1972. This also lowers my impression of The Rolling Stones.

    Courts ruled that the evidence against Angela Davis wasn’t strong enough to convict her, but it was strong enough, and the lethal homicides she was accused of being involved in are serious enough, that responsible parties shouldn’t give her an elevated platform to speak on or an elevated position in society.

    The fact that outlets like the NYT do give people like Davis who were likely involved in facilitating murder an elevated platform speaks to their character.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  84. @Sean

    Bolsonaro dedicated his vote to impeach Dilma to the memory of the military officer who led the torture unit that tortured her for being a communist. When Davis dies, someone should name a street after the prison tower sniper who killed George Jackson, in her honor.

    • Agree: PV van der Byl
  85. Barnard says:
    @peterike

    Number 4 starts with a huge qualifier that a number of teachers have decided isn’t worth it anymore. The threat of violence from students has an increasing number of teachers deciding it isn’t worth the pay and benefits. The ones who can’t get out of a NAM school after their first few years on the job get are better off quitting early and trying a different career. There is a “lifer” aspect to education, someone who has been teaching for 15 or 20 years is going to have a tough time making a transition to another career.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  86. @Clyde

    Yeah, last I saw someone else’s scheme had them getting over $80K each. You know, every time these numbers are bandied about, their already colossal sense of entitlement is going to inflate even further. This is going to be ever so much fun.

    • Replies: @Clyde
  87. B36 says:

    Say what you will, Angela Davis is a strong supporter of the Second Amendment.

  88. By the way, today is the 49th anniversary of the August 7, 1970 Marin County Courthouse Massacre in which Angela Davis’ boyfriend George Jackson tried to shoot his way out of jail, murdering a judge, apparently with firearms supplied by Professor Davis

    What is it with these people? Anyone with healthy mind who did these things and didn’t die of shame would at least stop pretending to be a public intellectual.

  89. @istevefan

    We have people foaming at the mouth about citizens being able to buy weapons without sufficient background checks and this gal did just that.

    We have many in the same crowd arguing gun owners should have to buy liability insurance in case their guns are stolen and used in criminal acts, because said owners still bear “responsibility”. “It’s just like auto insurance!” they say.

    But if you’re black enough, your claim of ignorance is always believed and deemed sufficient before the law.

  90. @Daniel H

    Mick was so deeply enamored of black culture, he even completely abandoned his half-breed daughter. For authenticity, one imagines.

    • Replies: @MB
  91. @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    A few years ago, a publisher put out The Complete Works of Primo Levi as a box set. I think it originally sold for a retail price of $100, but you can get it on Amazon now for about $34. That is about how much I paid for it when I bought it at a Half Price Books in Dallas.

    Toni Morrison wrote a foreword for the collection. It is mediocre at best. It reads likely something I would have written back when I was a freshman in college and I had 90 minutes to crank out a writing assignment on a book I had skimmed the previous night. I won’t copy the entire thing, but you can find it on the website for The Guardian if you use Google or another search engine.

    Here is the first paragraph:

    The Complete Works of Primo Levi is far more than a welcome opportunity to re-evaluate and re-examine history and contemporary plagues of systematic necrology; it becomes a brilliant deconstruction of malign forces. The triumph of human identify and worth over the pathology of human destruction glows virtually everywhere in Levi’s writing. For a number of reasons, his works are singular amid the wealth of Holocaust literature.

    This left me wondering, what the hell are “plagues of systematic necrology”? What about “deconstruction of malign forces” and “pathology of human destruction”?

    Also note the use of a semi-colon in the first sentence. A better writer would have used a period, and split the first sentence into two separate sentences. But I think Ms. Morrison uses a semi-colon for the same reason she uses pseudo-scholarly jargon like “systematic necrology.” She is straining to create the appearance of eloquence and profundity.

    Here is the first sentence of the second paragraph: “First is his language — infused as it is with references to and intimate knowledge of ancient and modern sources of philosophy, poetry and the figurative uses of scientific knowledge.”

    She uses a dash to set off a 25-word subordinate clause that modifies the word “language.” The main body of the sentence, however, is only four words. Again, bad writing.

    The rest of foreword reads like this. In my opinion, it was a travesty to use this foreword as an introduction to the extraordinary body of work by Levi. It also was a travesty that Ms. Morrison was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, and Levi was not.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  92. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Look at Amanda Palmer wife of Neil Gaiman.

    I just did and let me say to everyone else – don’t take Whiskey’s advice on this one.

    If you really want to look at Mrs Gaiman, go to YouTube and watch “Dear Daily Mail”.

    My wife hates her, not just for aesthetic and other theoretical reasons, but because her half-brother knew the younger Gaimans well in high school. Celebrity family breakup isn’t so entertaining the closer you get to the individuals affected.

  93. Bubba says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Growing up I preferred this Maya from the “Perchance to Dream” episode of “The Twilight Zone.”

  94. MB says: • Website
    @Oleaginous Outrager

    Mick/the Rolling Stones were posers.
    Altamont proved that.

  95. @Jeff the Donleavy Fan

    The funny thing is the one novel I read by Toni Morrison wasn’t anywhere near as cringe-inducing as her nonfiction, which tends to read like the postmodernist visiting professor version of a black street character who uses big words he doesn’t quite understand to impress his listeners.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @J.Ross
  96. @R.G. Camara

    That’s because Ellison’s book criticized blacks far more than whites. Heck, a whole important part is when a black farmer has committed incest with his daughter, typical of the widespread but hushed up sexual abuse in the black community.

    Wasn’t the implication of that whole scene that the protagonist’s rich white benefactor had engaged in a similarly incestuous relationship with his daughter? As an attack on imagined white hypocrisy, it would be a reflection of the common black belief that nefarious WASPs exhibit the same antisocial behavior as do Persons of Pigment, just behind closed doors. (In modern times this requires believing that there are also roving gangs of white teenagers looting athletic shoe departments, but a vast media conspiracy prevents the truth from coming to light. Fortunately, the blue man cometh unto this world full of faith.)

    As for Angela Davis, I wonder if campus conservatives wouldn’t be better off ignoring World Communism and instead highlighting how many of these revolutionary soul brothers were little more than rape-minded, pecker-pulling human detritus. Birds of a feather, and all that. The average white young person might know somebody who knows somebody who’s been on probation for a DUI. How many of these dushku-wearing diaperheads engaged in their ‘revolution’ by robbing convenience stores to fund another two weeks of Schlitz and fried lake trout? If only Mike Brown had had Siri read him a couple of articles on Marx off of the Simple English wikipedia…

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
  97. Art Deco says:
    @Steve Sailer

    You mean she writes like Bell Hooks?

    I first came across her about 30 years ago, opining about social policy in an interview given to Time magazine. Her remarks were rude and perverse, so I’ve never been motivated to read anything else she’s ever written.

  98. Branton went o to manage the mess that was the Jimi Hendrix estate. His father saw some money but who knows who really benefited most from it.

    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/jimi-hendrix-the-legacy-195400/

  99. J.Ross says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I bonded slightly with a black guy over a Morrison novel because neither of us could make heads or tails out of it.

  100. J.Ross says:
    @istevefan

    How would it be hypocritical for an enemy of the white middle class to endorse black revolutionary terrorism? There are no serious gun control advocates, it’s a way of destroying the white middle class. See also “the earth mother will die unless you give up electricty but China can continue to burn the impurest coal.”

  101. J.Ross says:
    @JimDandy

    The CIA did flood poor communities with cheap superabundant heroin and later crack. They admitted doing so. It was a means of off-the-books funding to keep Nicaragua — er, I mean to try to fight Communism.
    The hole in the story is not in admitted deeds, it’s the fact that there never was a deliberate controlled introduction of the materials which blacks could not avoid. Clearly in the time of the Tuskegee experiments and various public school plumbing poisonings (which just amount to never ever doing maintenance), we could have adulterated school lunches or put heroin in baby formula or strapped every black kid down, told him it was a vaccine, and put him on the nod. Yes the CIA brought poison to the picnic, but nobody ever forced those idiots to dive in headfirst like Scrooge McDuck.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @guest
    , @HammerJack
  102. Art Deco says:
    @Rouetheday

    She evidently said that four years ago.

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/apr/20/toni-morrison-race-relations-america-criminal-justice-system

    The FBI has now removed the Uniform Crime Reports from their site and substituted a puzzling and largely useless table building tool. The Bureau of Justice Statistics tends to be chary about compiling victim-offender data. One of their more recent efforts was issued in 2006. The trouble they had was that they couldn’t locate enough respondents among black victims of forcible rape or sexual assault to assemble valid data on their perception of the race of the offender (none of the few black victims they managed to interview said their offender looked white, though some said they couldn’t tell).

  103. Art Deco says:
    @J.Ross

    The CIA did flood poor communities with cheap superabundant heroin and later crack.

    Thanks for the dose of lunacy. Been an education.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  104. @guest

    Faulkner had a huge journalist cheering section of Southern Boy writers who came soon after him: he was their idol as proof that a Southerner could be a top writer. Tom Wolfe talks about all the Southerners in New York journalism who worshipped Faulkner and wanted to write the Great American Novel. Charles Portis came close.

    It’s like Saul Bellow had the journalistic wind at his back as the first Jewish novelist to make it into the top literary rank.

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
    , @guest
  105. guest says:
    @J.Ross

    The thing is not really whether blacks were compelled to use the drugs. Many honestly believe it was a deliberate plot to bring them down, much like AIDS. Instead of merely being an easy market.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  106. As a young naif I believed the con and voluntarily read Morrison’s “Song of Solomon” long before she was a Nobel Laureate
    There’s a scene early in the book where a Negro who has been living in the North returns to his ancestral Southern hometown.
    He parks his car in the black section of town and takes a walk through the small downtown. He sees some attractive young women and unselfconsciously rubs his groin through his pants in admiration. This provokes some minor outrage among the simple townfolk who are unaccustomed to Northern ways.

    My thoughts at reading this dreck almost 40 year ago: ” what is this m-f-ing garbage and why am I reading it?” I stopped reading and put the book where it belonged – among the trash.

  107. Anonymous[241] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Apparently I screwed that post up… (and “Preview” is not totally reliable…)… but I’ll add some thoughts on other comments….

    … The CIA probably DID foster drug sales to blacks.

    … Invisible Man exceeds expectations and turns out to be quite good.

    … and this is pretty hilarious….

  108. duncsbaby says:
    @njguy73

    Bunker’s autobio, Education of a Felon, is not only a great prison memoir but a great memoir of old Hollywood. I don’t remember the specific incident but Bunker’s feelings on Black Consciousness at San Quentin were quite negative.

  109. guest says:
    @Steve Sailer

    That makes sense for Bellow, on account of Jews being concentrated in New York and capable of exerting influence over the publishing world. I never thought of Southerners as being in the Inner Circle, though they probably had a greater concentration of high literary talent than any other group in 20th century American letters*. (The other candidates being Chicago and California, I suppose.)

    The 12 Agrarians were a reaction against prevailing tastes. Tennessee Williams fit into New York, admittedly.

    *Faulkner, Williams, Thomas Wolfe, Robert Penn Warren, Allen Tate, John Crowe Ransom, Flannery O’Connor, Eudora Welty, Robert E. Howard, Larry McMurtry, Andrew Nelson Lytle, etc.

  110. @J.Ross

    The CIA did flood poor communities with cheap superabundant heroin and later crack. They admitted doing so.

    Where and when, please? I looked this up and the subject is almost entirely one of unsubstantiated claims, many by one Gary Webb. Reputable sources generally dismiss the tales outright.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @J.Ross
  111. TTSSYF says:
    @Whiskey

    It works both ways. Leslie Van Houten of Manson fame had thousands of admirers writing to her. It seems that humans have either a moral failing or have evolved some sort of trait (depends on your point of view or religious beliefs) that makes them attracted to good-looking people who’ve committed acts of violence. Maybe it has something to do with infusing the gene pool with aggressiveness and survival skills, along with physical attractiveness.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  112. Art Deco says:
    @JMcG

    That’s too bad. The man’s viewpoint over the course of his adult life was protean (he floated into and out of the Communist Party and into and out of pacifist organizations), but he was never woke. He had little influence on black politics after 1965 because he had no interest in racial-preference schemes. He landed a job in 1964 on the research staff of the AFL-CIO and worked there until he retired. He and James Farmer are just about the only notables at the apex and center of protest politics between 1953 and 1969 for whom extraparliamentary politics and its derivatives didn’t turn into their long-term livelihood. Contrast his life story with that of Julian Bond and John Lewis.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  113. JMcG says:
    @Art Deco

    Thank you, I never knew any of that.

  114. @JMcG

    They all went to their deaths saying, “If only Stalin knew!”

  115. J.Ross says:
    @guest

    Well, they’re sort of right. They have no individuality. Blacks in a healthy community are a group organism receiving support from everyone they meet. Blacks in an unhealthy community are like organs in a sick, cancerous body. A lot of their problems come from being unable to separate from each other. A lot of our problems with them come from whites being highly individualistic and blacks being communal.

  116. J.Ross says:
    @Art Deco

    Oh Art, I expected you to point out that Scrooge McDuck never did heroin.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  117. Anonymous[279] • Disclaimer says:
    @Barnard

    The threat of violence from students has an increasing number of teachers deciding it isn’t worth the pay and benefits.

    Citation needed.

  118. J.Ross says:
    @HammerJack

    They released a massive book which admits it in legalese: they announced the book at a press conference, where they claimed that an investigation had found nothing. They felt safe blatantly contradicting the very report they were announcing because the people at the press conference were mainstream journalists and certain to never actually read the report. Whether they admitted it or not (they did), it was exposed anyway when one of their planes crashed in Mexico and covered a hillside in “snow.” They moved into grudging acceptance of popular knowledge of this when their temporary asset Gavin McInnes ran damage control on this (by largely saying what I said above) as a response to Freeway Rick Ross (no relation), who has made a career out of talking about this. There have also been individual whistleblowers who talked about it, one at a press conference that was on youtube.

  119. Art Deco says:
    @J.Ross

    No, I’m pointing out you’re trading in kookery.

  120. @duncsbaby

    Dunno, man. I read Norwood and, yeah, it was well done, but I could not give a rat’s ass about anyone in the book. Reminded me of reading Henry Miller or Charles Bukowski and the losers they were and hung around with.

  121. Clyde says:
    @Mr McKenna

    Blacks would be smart to take on Marianne Williamson’s reparations scheme of half a trillion dollars payout as soon as possible. The rest of America will never agree to forking out 80-100K to each black, which is what they really want in their conceited minds. With many of them being pea brain size which makes for lots of arrogance, due to being coddled too long by white liberals.
    Reality is that reparations (for doing nothing but being blaque) is a political talking point and will not pass Congress and be signed into law by a President for a long time. Unless we get a huge shock of an El Presidente Kamala and the Dems gain lots of Senate seats. Listening to Tucker Carlson last night night, he mocked and destroyed all the Dems Presidential candidates, but felt Elizabeth Warren would win the nomination.

  122. R.G. Camara says: • Website
    @More R1b, Less H1B

    Wasn’t the implication of that whole scene that the protagonist’s rich white benefactor had engaged in a similarly incestuous relationship with his daughter? As an attack on imagined white hypocrisy, it would be a reflection of the common black belief that nefarious WASPs exhibit the same antisocial behavior as do Persons of Pigment, just behind closed door

    I don’t recall that AT ALL. Can you give some evidence of your theory?

    From my reading, the main thrust of that incest scene and the aftermath was the underlying fear by civilized blacks that they couldn’t hold it together for long and that their worst examples with their base, barbarous activities might come to light to the rich white benefactors.

    Basically, that behind the veneer of coming Up-From-Slavery was a lot of dysfunction, and if that was exposed, then white support of blacks would collapse. Which is why the main character is punished for revealing the man-behind-the-curtain with banishment and a letter designed to ruin him— because he aired blacks dirty laundry to whites.

    The Talented Tenth to this day fears that the bottom 10% of blacks will become exposed to whitey. But they also fear it moving in down the block from them. Thomas Sowell tried to split this, and call this bottom 10th “black rednecks” and showed proof that many upper-tier blacks of the Great Migration discouraged the bottom 10% from migrating with them — because they bottom 10% were violent trash.

  123. Anonymous[199] • Disclaimer says:
    @TTSSYF

    Manson’s people killed a bunch of rich celebrities. Obviously, wicked crimes. But ordinary people aren’t really going to identify with victims like that.

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