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NYT Review: "New ‘Planet of the Apes’ Makes You Root Against Your Species"
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Our most celebrated thought leaders, such as Chancellor Merkel, have repeatedly pointed out for us that European values morally require the demographic inundation of the European peoples in The Other. Similarly, the New York Times film critic is highly enthusiastic about how humane values require human extinction in War for the Planet of the Apes. A.O. Scott raves about the latest monkey movie for finally coming down wholeheartedly on the appropriate side of the Who? Whom? divide:

Review: New ‘Planet of the Apes’ Makes You Root Against Your Species

Speciesism is like racism only more so.

WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES

NYT Critic’s Pick Directed by Matt Reeves PG-13 2h 20m

Reviewed by A. O. SCOTT JULY 12, 2017

… The apes pause to witness the aftermath of the carnage they have narrowly escaped, and their wordless, shocked response, registered above all on the face of Caesar, their leader, is an eloquent rebuke to a species that has abandoned any but a biological claim to the name human.

… We are now, three movies into this reborn franchise, entirely on the side of the apes. The prospect of our own extinction, far from horrifying, comes as a relief. At last the poor planet will catch a break.

… The distinction of this run of “Planet of the Apes” movies has been its commitment to the venerable belief that science fiction belongs to the literature of ideas, and its willingness to risk seeming to take itself too seriously. Each episode has pursued a stark ethical or political problem, and each has shifted the moral ground from human to ape.

“Rise” was about how people treat and mistreat animals, about the tension between recognizing them as sentient beings and the long habit of exploiting and confining them. “Dawn” was a wishful parable of decolonization and counterinsurgency, concerned with the competing but equally legitimate claims of two tribes occupying adjacent territory. “War” — which, in spite of its title, is less a war film than a western wrapped around a prison movie — vindicates Koba’s view of humanity as irredeemably cruel and deceitful.

… A new strain of virus is robbing people of their ability to speak, accelerating a reversal of species hierarchy set in motion two movies ago when Caesar first howled the word “no.”

He is a grayer, sadder hero now, and in “War” he succumbs for a while to a vengeful impulse at odds with his essential high-mindedness. You could say that he is putting his humanity at risk, or that he’s only human, after all, but of course both descriptions would be absurd.

Mr. Scott is aware that his praising the apes for being more “humane” than the humans is speciesist, and thus we need a new vocabulary purged of the old insensitive human supremacist terms that reflected the intolerable old hierarchy of species. But we’ll have to make do with these archaic words for now:

We’ll have to come up with a new vocabulary, but while we still have this one — and while flesh-and-blood people are still directing digital gorillas and chimps — I’ll just say that it’s good to see a movie so thoroughly humane.

Mr. Scott, however, has one complaint: the heroes aren’t portrayed quite as feministically woke as one might wish:

This world is also intensely and somewhat unimaginatively masculine. The default setting for primate social organization in these movies, human and otherwise, is patriarchal, and while a few female apes and a young human girl appear on screen, the filmmakers’ inability to flesh out the familial and affective dimensions of an otherwise richly rendered reality is frustrating.

 
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  1. A. O. Scott is upset that Hillary Clinton didn’t win the presidential election, so he laments the lack of a feminist perspective in an ape movie. Let us once again praise the 53 percent of White women who voted for President Trump. Trump women are the most beautiful women in the world. Trump women voters are just tremendous.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Trelane
    Nova: young, innocent, beautiful, mute.

    Got to give Rod Serling credit for recognizing the essential elements of the perfect woman.
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  2. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    A thing to remember is that A.O. Scott is a very effete guy. He was probably mothered aggressively from a young age. Critics should have sufficient insight into themselves to acknowledge when a multi-hundred-million-dollar movie was not made with them as the target audience in mind, yet Scott never registers this Self-Awareness. He measures everything against his own dainty hugbox tastes, more like the fashion of a YouTube blowhard than a traditional tough-minded movie critic. For a blatant example see his reaction to “300,” a lousy movie with such manifest flaws and faults it practically tees itself up for film reviewing berserkerdom, but Scott homes in on the tetchiest, girliest possible objections anyone could imagine. He is the quintessence of betahood.

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    • Replies: @Rifleman

    He is the quintessence of betahood.
     
    Google image search his name.
  3. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    SJW verbiage. Read recently that the fur is flying at the NYT. Wonder if this guy Scott is one of those slated to be pink-slipped (guess even the Gray Hag concluded that they can only employ “x” number of Forbes Top 20 grads, after which they become redundant).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Forbes
    I think you meant to write "Gay Hag"...
    , @Bitfu
    SJW Verbiage, indeed.

    Scott's writing reminded me of a term called "hypergraphic writing"--which describes so much of the writing I am seeing from these ethical high-minded Progressives.

    Hypergraphic writing is filled with prefab combinations of noble-sounding jibberish. Hypergraphic writing is marked by an irresistible urge to string together abstract and interchangeable words. Hypergraphics tend to be hyper-philosophical, hyper-religious, or hyper-political.

    Take a good prefix, like “pseudo”, “neo” or “post” and combine it with a robust historical adjective, like “fascist” or “feudal”, tack on a noun picked up in a collegiate classroom…and you’ve got the core of SJW Zombified, hypergraphic prose.

    “The pseudo-capitalistic hegemon is embarking down a path of post-feudal servitude.”

    The interchangeability, of course, allows the Blog Zombie to come back strong the next day with:

    “The neo-Marxist Leviathan trudges down the post-apocalyptic highway of pseudo-serfdom.”

    It's content-spinning for pretentious assholes. Yes, it’s content-free and nonsensical, But it’s fresh! Plus, the writer appears to harbor quite the intellectual cache, so he “must be taken seriously”.

  4. How doesn’t the NYT building holocaust itself through all the burning self-hate?

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    • Replies: @bomag

    ...through all the burning self-hate
     
    I suspect they love themselves immensely as they gleefully mix the purple kool-aid for others to consume.
  5. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Maybe there’s another layer to the analogy. It’s okay to root for their replacement by another species, as long as it is a related one that is less capable. Just like its okay for whites to root for brown people.

    But root for, say squirrels ahead of apes? Or for roaches ahead of squirrrels?

    This ‘leapfrogging’ seems to have limits.

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  6. What was the first movie to root against humans, that James Cameron movie about the blue aliens?

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    • Replies: @Polichinello
    What was the first movie to root against humans, that James Cameron movie about the blue aliens?

    Escape from the Planet of the Apes, 1971. If not the first, it predated Dances with Smurfs by quite a few years.
    , @Benjamin I. Espen
    That was the first thing I thought of when I saw this. I rooted for the evil space marines when they burned down the sacred tree.
    , @German_reader
    Avatar:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avatar_(2009_film)
    , @Steve Sailer
    The fourth chapter of Swift's "Gulliver's Travels" from 300 years ago is extremely anti-human.
    , @The Millennial Falcon
    Shrek wasn't quite as on the nose about it - more post-human than anti-human.

    X-Men flirted with outright anti-humanism before settling on colonial paternalism.
    , @Peter Akuleyev
    There is a long tradition of misanthropy in English culture. "Watership Down" immediately springs to my mind as an anti-human book/film. But quite a lot of popular English fiction is in that vein - The Lord of the Rings depicts the coming age of Man as a sad diminishment, as the beauty of the Elves fades away. And Hobbits and Elves are almost uniformly good, while most humans are weak and vacillating. Harry Potter is at heart the story of a master race who is internally conflicted about killing and enslaving the inferior humans (the Voldemort faction) or treating them with the kind condescension reserved for children (the Dumbledore faction).

    The irony is that the English tradition treats all humans as essentially equal (equally bad), the new "liberal" American tradition has apparently decided that people of color are no longer human.
  7. In the original, upon seeing the ape’s Stone Age toolkit Charlton Heston turns to him companions and says, “If this is all they’ve got we’ll be running this place in six months.” That made me laugh.

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    • Replies: @MarcB.
    He may have been quoting the first European who stepped foot in South Africa.
  8. @Dave Pinsen
    What was the first movie to root against humans, that James Cameron movie about the blue aliens?

    What was the first movie to root against humans, that James Cameron movie about the blue aliens?

    Escape from the Planet of the Apes, 1971. If not the first, it predated Dances with Smurfs by quite a few years.

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    • Replies: @flyover hick
    My parents took the family to see Escape from the Planet of the Apes at a drive-in.

    I was a little kid at the time, yet I was the only one in the family who agreed with
    Eric Braeden’s character that the apes had to be killed.
    Everyone else thought that was mean. Midwest nice taken to an extreme, I guess.
  9. “… Koba’s view of humanity as irredeemably cruel and deceitful.”

    I suppose that we’ll have to wait for the next of this series to see Koba adopt his new pseudonym, Stalin, so that at least a few members of the audience will appreciate that he’s the mortal enemy of human civilisation.

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    • Replies: @Pericles
    Stalin ("steel man") has some cinematic crossover potential too.
    , @Seamus Padraig

    I suppose that we’ll have to wait for the next of this series to see Koba adopt his new pseudonym, Stalin ...
     
    The next installment in the series will be called Paradise of the Apes. After the death of Caesar, Koba takes over, purges all the Trotskyite chimps, beats back an invasion of German gorillas, and takes for himself the title of 'Uncle Koba'. Original soundtrack by Eugène Pottier: "Arise, ye toiling monkeys ... !"
  10. The default setting for primate social organization in these movies, human and otherwise, is patriarchal, and while a few female apes and a young human girl appear on screen, the filmmakers’ inability to flesh out the familial and affective dimensions of an otherwise richly rendered reality is frustrating.

    As Ceaser might have put it, “Ape not pre-judge ape….but Koba listen to Rush Limbaugh. Him NOT ape.”

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  11. @anonymous
    SJW verbiage. Read recently that the fur is flying at the NYT. Wonder if this guy Scott is one of those slated to be pink-slipped (guess even the Gray Hag concluded that they can only employ "x" number of Forbes Top 20 grads, after which they become redundant).

    I think you meant to write “Gay Hag”…

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  12. @Dave Pinsen
    What was the first movie to root against humans, that James Cameron movie about the blue aliens?

    That was the first thing I thought of when I saw this. I rooted for the evil space marines when they burned down the sacred tree.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    To quote from another great space Marine: "Nuke it from orbit; it's the only way to be sure."
  13. @Dave Pinsen
    What was the first movie to root against humans, that James Cameron movie about the blue aliens?
    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    That's it, thanks. Was thinking it might have been called Pandora, but that was the planet.

    The beginning where the sleeping space passengers were woken up by the space nurses was well done, IMO. But the movie went downhill from there.

    That might have been the first hugely popular movie where I completely didn't get the appeal.
  14. @El Dato
    How doesn't the NYT building holocaust itself through all the burning self-hate?

    …through all the burning self-hate

    I suspect they love themselves immensely as they gleefully mix the purple kool-aid for others to consume.

    Read More
  15. @Dave Pinsen
    What was the first movie to root against humans, that James Cameron movie about the blue aliens?

    The fourth chapter of Swift’s “Gulliver’s Travels” from 300 years ago is extremely anti-human.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    In the sense that "Idiocracy" is anti-human or Vox Day's MPAI is anti-human.

    It's likely that the NYT anti-humanism imagines itself to be in the same high-standards vein. Certainly none of the three are the picture of open-hearted charity.
    , @philhellenic
    Indeed: http://www.online-literature.com/swift/3514/

    -iFrank
    , @philhellenic
    Indeed: http://www.online-literature.com/swift/3514/

    -iFrank
    , @Dave Pinsen
    Guessing that's the one with the talking horses.
  16. NYT Review: “New ‘Planet of the Apes’ Makes You Root Against Your Species”

    This is why writing in second person is frowned on.

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  17. @Steve Sailer
    The fourth chapter of Swift's "Gulliver's Travels" from 300 years ago is extremely anti-human.

    In the sense that “Idiocracy” is anti-human or Vox Day’s MPAI is anti-human.

    It’s likely that the NYT anti-humanism imagines itself to be in the same high-standards vein. Certainly none of the three are the picture of open-hearted charity.

    Read More
  18. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    But nationalism, continentalism, etc., also involve leapfrogging loyalties. Nationalists, continentalists, etc. don’t ally with or favor other nations, continents against other species. Quite the opposite – they ally with and favor their pets, animals, natural resources, etc. against other nations, continents.

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  19. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Well… it’s the only way to explain the first movie.

    So, the villainous conservative orangutan was right.
    Humans are subhuman. There must be Chimp Crow to keep them down.
    The liberal nice chimps were wrong. They felt for poor Taylor and were very curious to know the truth.
    But the conservative orangutan was correct. Humans are the cancer of history.

    Archie Jungle is right. Bananahead is wrong.

    I hear lots of Indians grew up cheering for cowboys against Indians in westerns.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I hear lots of Indians grew up cheering for cowboys against Indians in westerns.
     
    And apropos of the video you posted, lots of people cheered Archie against Meathead.
  20. @Dave Pinsen
    What was the first movie to root against humans, that James Cameron movie about the blue aliens?

    Shrek wasn’t quite as on the nose about it – more post-human than anti-human.

    X-Men flirted with outright anti-humanism before settling on colonial paternalism.

    Read More
  21. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Well… it’s the only way to explain the first movie.

    So, the villainous conservative orangutan was right.
    Humans are subhuman. There must be Chimp Crow to keep them down.
    The liberal nice chimps were wrong. They felt for poor Taylor and were very curious to know the truth.
    But the conservative orangutan was correct. Humans are the cancer of history.

    Archie Jungle is right. Bananahead is wrong.

    I hear lots of Indians grew up cheering for cowboys against Indians in westerns.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    Dr. Zaius merely wants to deny ape rights to humans, and to keep them docile and breeding in low numbers. That's to moderate for Scott. Come the ascension of apes, we'll need Permanent Revolution to keep the Man down.

    There's a gorilla character from the second movie called General Ursus, I think. His motto was, "The only good human is a dead human," if I recall correctly. That's what we need. No humans, no problems,right, A.O.?
  22. It seems a lot of SF had an undercurrent of humacide.
    One that springs to mind is “The Day The Earth Stood Still,” where we gasp with terrors as the robot slowly,ever so slowly# ,opens his visor. We kind of think that giant tin can guy is cool,and his victims pretty much deserve what they get. He’s slow to anger but when he gets mad,look out. Like Gary Cooper, sort of.
    I saw this at the perfect age ,being 9 or 10. Old enough to follow it,but young enough to take it absolutely seriously.
    NOTE: The word “slowly” brings to mind George Carlin’s greatest line,from his famous routine about taking violence out of movies and replacing it with sex:
    “We’re gonna fuck ya sherrif,…but we’re gonna fuck ya slow.”

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    • Replies: @Rod1963
    The book it was based on was better. The writer did not portray the military as a bunch of crazies. In the book the shooter was a lunatic who promptly shot dead by the authorities.

    The reboot was just plain ass stupid. Plot, characters, pacing all failures.

    Same with the remake of the Mist. Male characters are either nuts or wimps. Strong characters are a female drug who is a murderer and serial liar. And a house frau that is borderline psycho. Her husband is a total cuck.

    Of course the Christian minister and his moronic assistant are the real bad guys along with the sheriff and his rapist son whose on the HS foot ball team.

    The good kid is a tranny/gay marxist student.
  23. These people obviously have no idea what violent assholes chimps are.

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  24. Re the feminism, of course chimps are a male-centered species. In the vein of Supergirl, next installment: Planet of the Bonobos. NC-17 rating for depictions of onanistic social signaling.

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  25. ET was pretty anti-human when you think about it. The humans who were trying to protect a little boy against a goddamn space alien were the bad guys while the good humans were only good because they served him.

    I have a vague memory of an endless line of movies from that time which thought that “maybe we are the bad guys…” was an awfully clever twist. Ugh.

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    • Replies: @Roderick Spode
    "The real monster is us" is a haggard cliché spanning the complete SF canon.

    This is my favorite anti-human Science Fiction story: https://genius.com/Ray-bradbury-june-2001-and-the-moon-be-still-as-bright-annotated
  26. an eloquent rebuke to a species that has abandoned any but a biological claim to the name human.

    … We are now, three movies into this reborn franchise, entirely on the side of the apes. The prospect of our own extinction, far from horrifying, comes as a relief. At last the poor planet will catch a break.

    “Let’s root for our own extinction” is a sophomoric, shallow response to the conclusion that humanity is inherently cruel and inhumane.

    Greater artists and thinkers than A.O. Scott accept this premise of original sin but position the inherent evil of human nature as the necessary ground against which figures of beauty, tenderness, and justice emerge, if only in temporary moments. Cormac McCarthy’s novels are the best examples of this positioning: acts of goodness are only understood as such because they are set against a backdrop of regular evil. St. Paul’s letter to the Romans hits on this theme, as well. It’s central to St. Augustine’s thinking: “For God judged it better to bring good out of evil than not to permit any evil to exist.”

    David Fincher’s Seven is my favorite American film that gets this theme right. Morgan Freeman’s closing monologue has echoes of Augustine, though darkly rendered: “Hemingway once wrote, The world is a fine place and worth fighting for. I agree with the second part.”

    The racial or special extinction fetish is worse than politically dangerous; it’s aesthetically and philosophically childish.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "Cormac McCarthy's novels are the best example of this positioning"

    What about Shakespeare, for Pete's sake? Or Moby Dick? Or, since we're talking about Original Sin, any of an uncountable number of Christian works?

    But I see where you're going, and it's towards more extreme nihilism. Because I've read a few McCarthy books and seen the Sunset Limited, I imagine McCarthy doesn't really believe in anything. But he isn't a psychopath, so he probably shares a lot of the same opinions and values the same things as other, normal people in his civilization.

    Yet he writes very bleak things. Not Lovecraft bleak, but bleak nonetheless. Though A.O. Scott doesn't actually believe what he writes about humanity deserving to die, if you were to step back from that a bit you'd be in McCarthy territory.

    That being said, why can't we step back a little farther. I find the real world not to be very McCarthyesque. Though I suppose if I looked at it objectively, in a Lovecraftian if not McCarthyesque way, it'd be--for living things at least--mostly suffering, death, and unfulfilled desire.

    I think that narration makes the movie Seven (Se7en?), because without it it, it'd one long "Eww, why did I watch that?" A more intelligent and stylish-looking (dirty and dark is a style) slasher film. But there was hope within the bleakness, which gave it a point.
    , @Olorin

    “Let’s root for our own extinction” is a sophomoric, shallow response to the conclusion that humanity is inherently cruel and inhumane.
     
    I see you haven't spent much time studying military history.

    The science fiction trope of rooting for human extinction, as you put it, is a broader expression of a long series of more particularly focused martial snuff porn (war is OK so long as you're killing the other guy).

    WWI and WWII propaganda involved much "rooting for our own extinction."

    The entire Cold War was about rooting for what amounted to our own extinction. And hoping to god nobody would take that seriously enough to try it.

    We still haven't resolved the tension within evolutionary biology where evolution itself means rooting for our own extinction.

    "Original Sin" as a concept describing this is all well and good. But it's not nearly a good or bold enough one for the present and future.

  27. The Atlantic‘s take

    In War, though, Reeves doesn’t do enough to build on the major achievements of Dawn. That film was a parable of the toxicity of humanity and the corrupting power of guns—its main conflict broke out when the villainous, vengeful ape Koba (Toby Kebbell) found a cache of weapons. In War, the carnage is taken for granted and Caesar’s conflict is internal, as he wrestles with his own desire for payback (represented by taunting nightmares he has of Koba) versus the necessity of leading his colony to a newer, safer place far away from human threats

    .

    Much of the action in War is framed around that personal struggle, charting Caesar’s mission to attack a particular colony of militant humans led by the unnamed Colonel (Woody Harrelson). It’s here that I began to lose the thread of whatever allegory Reeves is working with. The Colonel, surely named for Kurtz of Apocalypse Now (Harrelson is similarly bald and insane), is an uninteresting tyrant who has enslaved groups of apes to fortify his base in preparation for some final, mysterious conflict. Caesar’s need to destroy the Colonel feels reasonable, rather than like a reflection of his darkest demons.

    Dawn gave more of an emotional grounding to the rift between Caesar (who had largely been treated kindly by human scientists in Rise) and Koba (who was essentially tortured into existence). In War, what remains of humanity is basically a plague waiting to be finally scrubbed away—a notion that doesn’t really make for good drama. The most compelling dynamic comes with the evolved apes who work for the Colonel, who are referred to as “donkeys” and exist as second-class citizens within his miserable militia.

    Though the sight of these simian sonderkommandos is initially horrifying, Reeves doesn’t do much with them, and that whole sub-plot gets a pat resolution as the Colonel’s last stand draws to a bloody close. The film’s imagery is impressively bleak, but it’s in service of a disappointing retread of Dawn’s story. Caesar’s instincts as a leader remain more moral and humane than the species that created him, and the earth continues to thrive largely without the people who were previously helping to destroy it.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2017/07/war-for-the-planet-of-the-apes-review/533442/

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  28. This is just like people sympathizing with the smurfs from Avatar.

    It’s one thing to have white guilt, quite another to have human guilt. Keep your bullshit to your own race.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Oh, it's not guilt.

    It's working up the courage to load us into the cattle cars.
    , @Hunsdon
    It is as if they have taken the old taunt "race traitor" and decided to own it fully.
  29. “Better for us, perhaps, it might appear,
    Were there all harmony, all virtue here;
    That never air or ocean felt the wind;
    That never passion discompos’d the mind.
    But ALL subsists by elemental strife;
    And passions are the elements of life.
    The gen’ral order, since the whole began,
    Is kept in nature, and is kept in man.

    VI.
    What would this man? Now upward will he soar,
    And little less than angel, would be more;
    Now looking downwards, just as griev’d appears
    To want the strength of bulls, the fur of bears.
    Made for his use all creatures if he call,
    Say what their use, had he the pow’rs of all?
    Nature to these, without profusion, kind,
    The proper organs, proper pow’rs assign’d;
    Each seeming want compensated of course,
    Here with degrees of swiftness, there of force;
    All in exact proportion to the state;
    Nothing to add, and nothing to abate.
    Each beast, each insect, happy in its own:
    Is Heav’n unkind to man, and man alone?
    Shall he alone, whom rational we call,
    Be pleas’d with nothing, if not bless’d with all?

    The bliss of man (could pride that blessing find)
    Is not to act or think beyond mankind;
    No pow’rs of body or of soul to share,
    But what his nature and his state can bear.
    Why has not man a microscopic eye?
    For this plain reason, man is not a fly.
    Say what the use, were finer optics giv’n,
    T’ inspect a mite, not comprehend the heav’n?
    Or touch, if tremblingly alive all o’er,
    To smart and agonize at ev’ry pore?
    Or quick effluvia darting through the brain,
    Die of a rose in aromatic pain?
    If nature thunder’d in his op’ning ears,
    And stunn’d him with the music of the spheres,
    How would he wish that Heav’n had left him still
    The whisp’ring zephyr, and the purling rill?
    Who finds not Providence all good and wise,
    Alike in what it gives, and what denies?

    VII.
    Far as creation’s ample range extends,
    The scale of sensual, mental pow’rs ascends:
    Mark how it mounts, to man’s imperial race,
    From the green myriads in the peopled grass:
    What modes of sight betwixt each wide extreme,
    The mole’s dim curtain, and the lynx’s beam:
    Of smell, the headlong lioness between,
    And hound sagacious on the tainted green:
    Of hearing, from the life that fills the flood,
    To that which warbles through the vernal wood:
    The spider’s touch, how exquisitely fine!
    Feels at each thread, and lives along the line:
    In the nice bee, what sense so subtly true
    From pois’nous herbs extracts the healing dew:
    How instinct varies in the grov’lling swine,
    Compar’d, half-reas’ning elephant, with thine:
    ‘Twixt that, and reason, what a nice barrier;
    For ever sep’rate, yet for ever near!
    Remembrance and reflection how allied;
    What thin partitions sense from thought divide:
    And middle natures, how they long to join,
    Yet never pass th’ insuperable line!
    Without this just gradation, could they be
    Subjected, these to those, or all to thee?
    The pow’rs of all subdu’d by thee alone,
    Is not thy reason all these pow’rs in one?

    VIII.
    See, through this air, this ocean, and this earth,
    All matter quick, and bursting into birth.
    Above, how high, progressive life may go!
    Around, how wide! how deep extend below!
    Vast chain of being, which from God began,
    Natures ethereal, human, angel, man,
    Beast, bird, fish, insect! what no eye can see,
    No glass can reach! from infinite to thee,
    From thee to nothing!—On superior pow’rs
    Were we to press, inferior might on ours:
    Or in the full creation leave a void,
    Where, one step broken, the great scale’s destroy’d:
    From nature’s chain whatever link you strike,
    Tenth or ten thousandth, breaks the chain alike. ”

    Pope, Essay on Man

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  30. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Are there bonobos and gibbons in this one?

    If not, that is so ape-ist.

    Are PETA people spared at least as good humans?

    PETA and POTA.

    Will there be a POTA musical?

    Cheering for and collaborating with the other side is as old as the jungle.

    Plenty of Iraqi exiles cheered for the invasion of Iraq.

    Saudis cheer for US wars on fellow Muslims.

    European imperialists had lots of cooperation from natives in their wars on fellow natives.
    Some American Indian tribes hated other tribes so much that they were happy to see them wiped out by whites.

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  31. See also:

    “Know then thyself, presume not God to scan
    The proper study of Mankind is Man.
    Placed on this isthmus of a middle state,
    A Being darkly wise, and rudely great:
    With too much knowledge for the Sceptic side,
    With too much weakness for the Stoic’s pride,
    He hangs between; in doubt to act, or rest;
    In doubt to deem himself a God, or Beast;
    In doubt his mind or body to prefer;
    Born but to die, and reas’ning but to err;
    Alike in ignorance, his reason such,
    Whether he thinks too little, or too much;
    Chaos of Thought and Passion, all confus’d;
    Still by himself, abus’d or disabus’d;
    Created half to rise and half to fall;
    Great Lord of all things, yet a prey to all,
    Sole judge of truth, in endless error hurl’d;
    The glory, jest and riddle of the world.

    Go, wondrous creature! mount where science guides,
    Go, measure earth, weigh air, and state the tides;
    Instruct the planets in what orbs to run,
    Correct old time, and regulate the sun;
    Go, soar with Plato to th’ empyreal sphere,
    To the first good, first perfect, and first fair;
    Or tread the mazy round his followers trod,
    And quitting sense call imitating God;
    As Eastern priests in giddy circles run,
    And turn their heads to imitate the sun.
    Go, teach Eternal Wisdom how to rule—
    Then drop into thyself, and be a fool!”

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  32. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Next. The apes grow corrupt and cruel, and the baboons and monkeys rise against them.

    Baboonheart.

    Rise of the Rhesus Monkeys

    rhesus christ

    http://www.blackroomsociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/1424887812561.jpg

    Musical about the Founding Monkeys

    Emperor Monkey

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  33. @Anon
    Well... it's the only way to explain the first movie.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YuytpQT6gW4

    So, the villainous conservative orangutan was right.
    Humans are subhuman. There must be Chimp Crow to keep them down.
    The liberal nice chimps were wrong. They felt for poor Taylor and were very curious to know the truth.
    But the conservative orangutan was correct. Humans are the cancer of history.

    Archie Jungle is right. Bananahead is wrong.

    I hear lots of Indians grew up cheering for cowboys against Indians in westerns.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZ5_Prde6xU

    Dr. Zaius merely wants to deny ape rights to humans, and to keep them docile and breeding in low numbers. That’s to moderate for Scott. Come the ascension of apes, we’ll need Permanent Revolution to keep the Man down.

    There’s a gorilla character from the second movie called General Ursus, I think. His motto was, “The only good human is a dead human,” if I recall correctly. That’s what we need. No humans, no problems,right, A.O.?

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    • Replies: @Desiderius
    See:

    http://www.worldwithoutus.com/index2.html

    Genocide pron is the thing for superwoke progs.

    50 Shades of Green.
  34. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    If apes took over and then captured King Kong, would it be like Gorillaver’s Travels?

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  35. @Polichinello
    What was the first movie to root against humans, that James Cameron movie about the blue aliens?

    Escape from the Planet of the Apes, 1971. If not the first, it predated Dances with Smurfs by quite a few years.

    My parents took the family to see Escape from the Planet of the Apes at a drive-in.

    I was a little kid at the time, yet I was the only one in the family who agreed with
    Eric Braeden’s character that the apes had to be killed.
    Everyone else thought that was mean. Midwest nice taken to an extreme, I guess.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    I was a little kid at the time, yet I was the only one in the family who agreed with
    Eric Braeden’s character that the apes had to be killed.
     
    Dr. Otto Hasslein was the series' true hero. He understood the threat posed by demographic change. Hasslein knows that the intelligent apes in ESCAPE must not be allowed to breed. Hasslein has the foresight to think in terms of future generations:

    Dr. Otto Hasslein: Negative, negative, negative!
    E-1: Don't worry. We'll catch them, sooner or later.
    Dr. Otto Hasslein: That's what I'm worried about. Later. Later we'll do something about pollution. Later we'll do something about the population explosion. Later we'll do something about the nuclear war. We think we've got all the time in the world, but how much time has the world got? Somebody has to begin to care.
     
    The American political establishment, in contrast, can think only in terms of the next election (cf the President’s response to news of an ape ruled future:”I doubt that we shall still be in office by then.”).They lack Hasslein’s perception that society is a covenant between the present generation and those who are yet to come.
  36. @guest
    Dr. Zaius merely wants to deny ape rights to humans, and to keep them docile and breeding in low numbers. That's to moderate for Scott. Come the ascension of apes, we'll need Permanent Revolution to keep the Man down.

    There's a gorilla character from the second movie called General Ursus, I think. His motto was, "The only good human is a dead human," if I recall correctly. That's what we need. No humans, no problems,right, A.O.?

    See:

    http://www.worldwithoutus.com/index2.html

    Genocide pron is the thing for superwoke progs.

    50 Shades of Green.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    I read some of that book like ten years ago, when I was way into Last Man literature: Mary Shelly's Last Man and I Am Legend, mostly. I was thinking of writing a parody, which in my mind really was just a rip-off of the Talking Heads song Nothing But Flowers. Fortunately, the world was deprived of that when I failed to follow through.

    I didn't realize going in the book was genocide porn, though I remember intruding on a message board somewhere, maybe, Amazon, where a customer was all, "Look, I know everyone interested in this book agrees, so let's drop pretenses. How do we save the world from the greedy a-holes in cigar smoke-filled backrooms who don't care about the little people, blah, blah, blah." It went on like that.

    I was thinking, "Hey, I'm not on your side. I just want some Last Man on Earth background color."
    , @guest
    Oh, and I forgot to mention Robinson Crusoe, which I also read in that period, and Castaway, which is like Robinson Crusoe starring Homer Simpson. James Gould Cozzens' worst book, perhaps, but a page turner.
  37. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Seth Largo
    an eloquent rebuke to a species that has abandoned any but a biological claim to the name human.

    … We are now, three movies into this reborn franchise, entirely on the side of the apes. The prospect of our own extinction, far from horrifying, comes as a relief. At last the poor planet will catch a break.


    "Let's root for our own extinction" is a sophomoric, shallow response to the conclusion that humanity is inherently cruel and inhumane.

    Greater artists and thinkers than A.O. Scott accept this premise of original sin but position the inherent evil of human nature as the necessary ground against which figures of beauty, tenderness, and justice emerge, if only in temporary moments. Cormac McCarthy's novels are the best examples of this positioning: acts of goodness are only understood as such because they are set against a backdrop of regular evil. St. Paul's letter to the Romans hits on this theme, as well. It's central to St. Augustine's thinking: "For God judged it better to bring good out of evil than not to permit any evil to exist."

    David Fincher's Seven is my favorite American film that gets this theme right. Morgan Freeman's closing monologue has echoes of Augustine, though darkly rendered: "Hemingway once wrote, The world is a fine place and worth fighting for. I agree with the second part."

    The racial or special extinction fetish is worse than politically dangerous; it's aesthetically and philosophically childish.

    “Cormac McCarthy’s novels are the best example of this positioning”

    What about Shakespeare, for Pete’s sake? Or Moby Dick? Or, since we’re talking about Original Sin, any of an uncountable number of Christian works?

    But I see where you’re going, and it’s towards more extreme nihilism. Because I’ve read a few McCarthy books and seen the Sunset Limited, I imagine McCarthy doesn’t really believe in anything. But he isn’t a psychopath, so he probably shares a lot of the same opinions and values the same things as other, normal people in his civilization.

    Yet he writes very bleak things. Not Lovecraft bleak, but bleak nonetheless. Though A.O. Scott doesn’t actually believe what he writes about humanity deserving to die, if you were to step back from that a bit you’d be in McCarthy territory.

    That being said, why can’t we step back a little farther. I find the real world not to be very McCarthyesque. Though I suppose if I looked at it objectively, in a Lovecraftian if not McCarthyesque way, it’d be–for living things at least–mostly suffering, death, and unfulfilled desire.

    I think that narration makes the movie Seven (Se7en?), because without it it, it’d one long “Eww, why did I watch that?” A more intelligent and stylish-looking (dirty and dark is a style) slasher film. But there was hope within the bleakness, which gave it a point.

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  38. @Jason Liu
    This is just like people sympathizing with the smurfs from Avatar.

    It's one thing to have white guilt, quite another to have human guilt. Keep your bullshit to your own race.

    Oh, it’s not guilt.

    It’s working up the courage to load us into the cattle cars.

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    • Replies: @Rod1963
    Quite possibly. Make the viewers look at others and see "scum" or "people who don't deserve to live".

    After all the Left does think in those terms. One only has to look at the bloody froth the Left and Neo-Cons are in over Trump. They want him dead and his supporters punished. Hell our colleges are veritable indoctrination centers for this stuff. Centers of evil.

    That said, I saw the originals as a kid in the drive-in when they came out. Humans were certainly portrayed as the bad guys who needed to be wiped out.

    The reboot series is no different. Not even sci-fi but fantasy on par with Avatar(I did love the flaming horses in the movie - grind'em up and use them for fuel). In general most modern sci-fi now has a distinct post-modern if not nihilistic tinge to it.
  39. @Anon
    Next. The apes grow corrupt and cruel, and the baboons and monkeys rise against them.

    Baboonheart.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cph0D7Vdjp4

    Rise of the Rhesus Monkeys

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a81qhzfYABc

    rhesus christ

    http://www.blackroomsociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/1424887812561.jpg

    Musical about the Founding Monkeys

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FIf5Ec2Keh0

    Emperor Monkey

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EEsNpFTUGC8

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zCj-XP5cjOY

    Is that Jack Hanson in the second to last video?

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Oh, man, you've got me cracking up - glad I'm not at work.
    , @Jack Hanson
    Lmao still buttmad af.
  40. @flyover hick
    My parents took the family to see Escape from the Planet of the Apes at a drive-in.

    I was a little kid at the time, yet I was the only one in the family who agreed with
    Eric Braeden’s character that the apes had to be killed.
    Everyone else thought that was mean. Midwest nice taken to an extreme, I guess.

    I was a little kid at the time, yet I was the only one in the family who agreed with
    Eric Braeden’s character that the apes had to be killed.

    Dr. Otto Hasslein was the series’ true hero. He understood the threat posed by demographic change. Hasslein knows that the intelligent apes in ESCAPE must not be allowed to breed. Hasslein has the foresight to think in terms of future generations:

    Dr. Otto Hasslein: Negative, negative, negative!
    E-1: Don’t worry. We’ll catch them, sooner or later.
    Dr. Otto Hasslein: That’s what I’m worried about. Later. Later we’ll do something about pollution. Later we’ll do something about the population explosion. Later we’ll do something about the nuclear war. We think we’ve got all the time in the world, but how much time has the world got? Somebody has to begin to care.

    The American political establishment, in contrast, can think only in terms of the next election (cf the President’s response to news of an ape ruled future:”I doubt that we shall still be in office by then.”).They lack Hasslein’s perception that society is a covenant between the present generation and those who are yet to come.

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    • Replies: @guest
    Those apes only had one kid, though, right? Caesar, who goes on to lead a rebellion in the next movie because he has the power of speech. I can't see much trouble coming from one evolved ape, in reality.

    Do they ever bother explaining how all the regular apes, even ones somehow trained to be slaves, could ever possibly overthrow humanity and create a functioning ape society, with a Lawgiver and everything? Or did Caesar radically accelerate ape evolution the same way someone recently speculated that Trump may be causing a genetic shift for the worse?

    That's not the biggest plot hole of the series, however. I'd like to point out the fact that Charlton Heston, star traveller and scientist, thinks he's on a distant planet and takes it as perfectly normal that all the apes are speaking English.
    , @Seamus Padraig

    Dr. Otto Hasslein was the series’ true hero.
     
    Interestingly enough, the name Hasslein in German means 'little hate'. I wonder if the producers knew that?
  41. The original was an allegory for the (coming?) race war (one of the apes was called Cornelius for heaven’s sake) evinced by the many and various racial riots of the time. It was a warning/boogyman movie, like Red Dawn. Watch out white folks they’re coming. It was a frisson of panic for white people to see in the dark, and then emerge into whiteopia again, to sigh in relief.
    The new one(s) is an allegory for the (existing? burgeoning?) race war. It is no longer a warning it is a cynical prediction, a sneering thumb in the eye for young white couples to see and for the woke girls to insist how right the movie was, and how bad humanity is, and for the guys to agree with them so they can get laid.
    I wonder if one could get a comp lit PhD by comparing the philosophy and the meaning behind the two versions of the franchise. Like a comparison of Carlyle’s and Irving’s portraits of Mohammed – but with monkeys… more monkeys.
    But hey, it’s just a movie, right?

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  42. I feel like animal rights will inevitably become part of the ever expanding sphere of victim-hood. Yeah, there’s some of it now, but I’m talking about mass disgust at things like zoos or meat eating. You can see it telegraphed with the popularity of Blackfish and circuses getting rid of elephants. Farming/ranching will increasingly look cruel and outdated to the masses once we can 3-d print hamburgers and chicken nuggets. Peter Singer is the future. Not that I’m against treating animals with dignity and respect but, if we really count animals as our equals, the voluntary human extinction movement is really the logical conclusion of that extreme line of thinking.

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  43. The next logical, and all but inevitable, step from desire for the white race to be exterminated/enslaved by Numinous Negroes is to desire that humans be exterminated/enslaved by apes.

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  44. Back to reality: actual apes castrate and sodomise their human male victims and rip off the faces of their human female victims. The only good ape is a dead ape.

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  45. The super villain played by Samuel L. Jackson in “Kingsmen” was a genocidal anti-humanist. One of the best action movies in years, by the way, with a definite conservative undertone.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I need to watch that. Also the Man from Uncle.

    The Guy Ritchie/Matthew Vaughn school of movies is pretty fun.

    , @Roderick Spode
    Uh, are you David Cole?
  46. This new focus on inter-species relations is something I’m sure we can handle. We are the melting pot after all. Apes, jaguars, large mosquitoes, Live Oaks, big yellow tree frogs, Venus Fly Traps, fire ants, white rhinoceroses, all of this diversity is making us much stronger as a fauna-flora when we aren’t afraid or rhinophobic, as it were. We can deal with the bathroom situations, the single-payer interspecial healthcare plans, the infrastructure improvements, such as blood stations in the bars for the skeeters, easements for the Live Oak roots on the interstates and that sort of thing. Taxes may go up, but hey, that’s what taxes do.

    It’s the interplanetary lack of diversity that will be much more of a chore to use the mass media to drill into people’s heads educate our earthly population about. According to a non-stupid man earthly being, Mr. Stephen Hawking, apparently all this extra mileage we’ve been putting on the station old wagons will soon be turning this planet into something resembling Venus, and we may need to go to Mars soon.

    We still can’t seem to completely assimilate our own kind here – as an example, this is the 21st century and the current year, yet still fire ant colonies are being blown up daily by M-80′s, and grass blades are being cut down in their prime by 22″ blades of mass destruction! We earth-flora/fauna are better than that!

    We must prepare ourselves to be assimilated by a better culture, that of the Venusians, by the time our Global Climate Disruption (TM) is complete. I for one, welcome our Venusian Overladies, with their firm, round thighs, short teal miniskirts, and big Venusian eyes. Take me to your leader, and hold all the calls.

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  47. The War Between Whites is strong. Much of it fueled by the bitter, bitter resentment most White women feel towards their own men for not being Alpha enough. The Planet of the Ape movies would not even have been made had most White dudes been extremely Alpha. But inter-White warfare is a thing among Whites.

    Caesar killed a million Gauls to conquer it. Charlemagne killed nearly as many Saxons during the Saxon War to make Germany Christian (what you thought the Christianization of Western Europe happened during Rome or was peaceful?) About 40% of Germans were slaughtered during the Thirty Years War. And that’s before WWI even.

    Consistently, there has been a common thread among Germanic peoples that they alone (and often just a small portion of them) are the real humans, and the rest all devils to be culled, or killed. Ragnarok writ often, then. Predestined saved and damned. Given steroid driven growth by feminism and the female rage at too many beta males and not enough Alphas (interested in their fat/slutty/cat lady behinds).

    Whites have a huge genetic flaw here — our good treatment of women is as much a weakness as strength, and our ability to be individuals rather than a tribe’s agent often results in this stuff.

    Planet of the Apes is a metaphor of White Genocide, pure and simple. Its not even the standard WASP adventuring tale of bang the local princess and turn traitor to be a king among foreigners rather than a captain among your own people. Its not even Mutiny on the Bounty* or Avatar; its pure White Ragnarok Genocide.

    *Most of those who followed Bligh onto that tiny boat lived. A few died of native attacks or fevers but all made it ashore thousands of miles away in an astonishing feat of navigation. All but one of the Mutineers died within a year; Fletcher Christian among the first. The Mutineers took many Tahitian men as well as women; and yes naturally there were far more men than women. The Tahitian men finding themselves enslaved soon revolted, and a White-Tahitian war of extermination including women and children soon broke out. The feuds continued over women even with just three mutineers left and all the Tahitian men dead. Eventually the sole White male survivor claimed the other two killed each other though local legend has it as him doing the deed. When discovered twenty plus years later there were a bunch of young adults and kids and only this old man as the sole older male survivor. So much for the noble savage.

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  48. @Chrisnonymous
    Is that Jack Hanson in the second to last video?

    Oh, man, you’ve got me cracking up – glad I’m not at work.

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  49. @Desiderius
    See:

    http://www.worldwithoutus.com/index2.html

    Genocide pron is the thing for superwoke progs.

    50 Shades of Green.

    I read some of that book like ten years ago, when I was way into Last Man literature: Mary Shelly’s Last Man and I Am Legend, mostly. I was thinking of writing a parody, which in my mind really was just a rip-off of the Talking Heads song Nothing But Flowers. Fortunately, the world was deprived of that when I failed to follow through.

    I didn’t realize going in the book was genocide porn, though I remember intruding on a message board somewhere, maybe, Amazon, where a customer was all, “Look, I know everyone interested in this book agrees, so let’s drop pretenses. How do we save the world from the greedy a-holes in cigar smoke-filled backrooms who don’t care about the little people, blah, blah, blah.” It went on like that.

    I was thinking, “Hey, I’m not on your side. I just want some Last Man on Earth background color.”

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  50. @Desiderius
    See:

    http://www.worldwithoutus.com/index2.html

    Genocide pron is the thing for superwoke progs.

    50 Shades of Green.

    Oh, and I forgot to mention Robinson Crusoe, which I also read in that period, and Castaway, which is like Robinson Crusoe starring Homer Simpson. James Gould Cozzens’ worst book, perhaps, but a page turner.

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  51. “I hate every ape I see
    from Chimpan-A to Chimpanzee.
    No, you’ll never make a monkey out of me.”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2E1m90YSpA

    C’mon guys, especially Steve… you’ve had ape posts out the yin-yang under which to include this. Sometimes, if you want to do something right, you’ve got to do it yourself. ;-}

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  52. @syonredux

    I was a little kid at the time, yet I was the only one in the family who agreed with
    Eric Braeden’s character that the apes had to be killed.
     
    Dr. Otto Hasslein was the series' true hero. He understood the threat posed by demographic change. Hasslein knows that the intelligent apes in ESCAPE must not be allowed to breed. Hasslein has the foresight to think in terms of future generations:

    Dr. Otto Hasslein: Negative, negative, negative!
    E-1: Don't worry. We'll catch them, sooner or later.
    Dr. Otto Hasslein: That's what I'm worried about. Later. Later we'll do something about pollution. Later we'll do something about the population explosion. Later we'll do something about the nuclear war. We think we've got all the time in the world, but how much time has the world got? Somebody has to begin to care.
     
    The American political establishment, in contrast, can think only in terms of the next election (cf the President’s response to news of an ape ruled future:”I doubt that we shall still be in office by then.”).They lack Hasslein’s perception that society is a covenant between the present generation and those who are yet to come.

    Those apes only had one kid, though, right? Caesar, who goes on to lead a rebellion in the next movie because he has the power of speech. I can’t see much trouble coming from one evolved ape, in reality.

    Do they ever bother explaining how all the regular apes, even ones somehow trained to be slaves, could ever possibly overthrow humanity and create a functioning ape society, with a Lawgiver and everything? Or did Caesar radically accelerate ape evolution the same way someone recently speculated that Trump may be causing a genetic shift for the worse?

    That’s not the biggest plot hole of the series, however. I’d like to point out the fact that Charlton Heston, star traveller and scientist, thinks he’s on a distant planet and takes it as perfectly normal that all the apes are speaking English.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Do they ever bother explaining how all the regular apes, even ones somehow trained to be slaves, could ever possibly overthrow humanity and create a functioning ape society, with a Lawgiver and everything? Or did Caesar radically accelerate ape evolution the same way someone recently speculated that Trump may be causing a genetic shift for the worse?
     
    Yeah, that's one of the areas where the current cycle improves on the original. To the best of my recollection, they never explain how the other apes learn how to speak.

    That’s not the biggest plot hole of the series, however. I’d like to point out the fact that Charlton Heston, star traveller and scientist, thinks he’s on a distant planet and takes it as perfectly normal that all the apes are speaking English.
     
    I'll give you another one. In Planet of the Apes, we are explicitly told that the apes believe that flight is impossible.Indeed, their knowledge of aerodynamics is so crude that they are astonished when Heston makes a paper airplane. Plus, ape civilization seems to be largely pre-industrial in character....But they somehow manage to salvage Heston's submerged spacecraft and use it to escape the nuclear doom that occurs in Beneath the Planet of the Apes...
  53. @Desiderius
    Oh, it's not guilt.

    It's working up the courage to load us into the cattle cars.

    Quite possibly. Make the viewers look at others and see “scum” or “people who don’t deserve to live”.

    After all the Left does think in those terms. One only has to look at the bloody froth the Left and Neo-Cons are in over Trump. They want him dead and his supporters punished. Hell our colleges are veritable indoctrination centers for this stuff. Centers of evil.

    That said, I saw the originals as a kid in the drive-in when they came out. Humans were certainly portrayed as the bad guys who needed to be wiped out.

    The reboot series is no different. Not even sci-fi but fantasy on par with Avatar(I did love the flaming horses in the movie – grind’em up and use them for fuel). In general most modern sci-fi now has a distinct post-modern if not nihilistic tinge to it.

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  54. @Father O'Hara
    It seems a lot of SF had an undercurrent of humacide.
    One that springs to mind is "The Day The Earth Stood Still," where we gasp with terrors as the robot slowly,ever so slowly# ,opens his visor. We kind of think that giant tin can guy is cool,and his victims pretty much deserve what they get. He's slow to anger but when he gets mad,look out. Like Gary Cooper, sort of.
    I saw this at the perfect age ,being 9 or 10. Old enough to follow it,but young enough to take it absolutely seriously.
    NOTE: The word "slowly" brings to mind George Carlin's greatest line,from his famous routine about taking violence out of movies and replacing it with sex:
    "We're gonna fuck ya sherrif,...but we're gonna fuck ya slow."

    The book it was based on was better. The writer did not portray the military as a bunch of crazies. In the book the shooter was a lunatic who promptly shot dead by the authorities.

    The reboot was just plain ass stupid. Plot, characters, pacing all failures.

    Same with the remake of the Mist. Male characters are either nuts or wimps. Strong characters are a female drug who is a murderer and serial liar. And a house frau that is borderline psycho. Her husband is a total cuck.

    Of course the Christian minister and his moronic assistant are the real bad guys along with the sheriff and his rapist son whose on the HS foot ball team.

    The good kid is a tranny/gay marxist student.

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  55. Misanthropy is old news, nothing revolutionary. It is so second millenium.

    Look for “efilism”. Efilists wants end of all suffering through extinction of all life. Like Buddhism, but with teeth. This is the creed for the new millenium.

    http://www.efilism.com

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draft:Efilism

    https://www.reddit.com/r/Efilism/

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  56. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    The originals were B-movie shlock …. the reboot series is the same.

    The exaggerated importance of the films is annoying.

    But that is the new Amerika: where all sorts of trash is studied and debated in the academy and the media ad nauseum.

    Still, the monkey soap opera is not as bad a situation as Star Wars. The obsession with Star Wars (by grown men) is a national disgrace.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    The originals were B-movie shlock …. the reboot series is the same.
     
    I haven't seen the reboots, nor any of the original sequels, but the original Planet of the Apes was pretty good. Was it B-movie shlock? Maybe. But I often find B-movie Shlock to be much better than A-movie pretension. I'd rather watch just about any random Schwarzenegger movie than any random fashionably approved, academy-nominated message-movie.

    The obsession with Star Wars (by grown men) is a national disgrace.
     
    There you have no disagreement from me.
  57. @Charles Pewitt
    A. O. Scott is upset that Hillary Clinton didn't win the presidential election, so he laments the lack of a feminist perspective in an ape movie. Let us once again praise the 53 percent of White women who voted for President Trump. Trump women are the most beautiful women in the world. Trump women voters are just tremendous.

    https://twitter.com/kitschkong/status/754743329615675395

    Nova: young, innocent, beautiful, mute.

    Got to give Rod Serling credit for recognizing the essential elements of the perfect woman.

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  58. Merkel was the first western leader to denounce multiculturalism. She still believes in assimilation and is opposed to moral relativism. She opposes gay marriage. Can Americans stop using other people as footballs without trying to understand what they are saying? No I guess not.

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    • Replies: @Seamus Padraig

    Merkel was the first western leader to denounce multiculturalism.
     
    Of course she was ... before the election. Then, after the election, she pulled one of her famous U-ies, throwing the floodgates wide open: "Come one, come all, to Mutti Merkel's refugee ball!"

    She still believes in assimilation and is opposed to moral relativism. She opposes gay marriage.
     
    Believing in assimilation is easy when you believe, as Merkel does, that "Islam belongs to Germany."

    https://www.thelocal.de/20150112/merkel-islam-belongs-to-germany-turkey

    As for gay marriage, she just did a U-ie on that one too:

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/german-gay-marriage-law-could-face-constitutional-challenge-a-1155351.html

    So you see, other than the big banks, there just isn't much that Angela Merkel is willing to go to the mat for.
    , @peterike
    Merkel was the first western leader to denounce multiculturalism.

    And after she told that lie, she opened the flood gates and destroyed her country.

    She still believes in assimilation and is opposed to moral relativism.

    And after she told that lie, she opened the flood gates and destroyed her country.

    She opposes gay marriage.

    Big deal.

    Can Americans stop using other people as footballs without trying to understand what they are saying? No I guess not.

    Can non-Americans stop taking fraudulent, lying, anti-white globalist vermin at their word? How childishly naive do you have to be to believe ANYTHING that comes out of that woman's pie hole?
  59. @Hapalong Cassidy
    The super villain played by Samuel L. Jackson in "Kingsmen" was a genocidal anti-humanist. One of the best action movies in years, by the way, with a definite conservative undertone.

    I need to watch that. Also the Man from Uncle.

    The Guy Ritchie/Matthew Vaughn school of movies is pretty fun.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    Also the Man from Uncle.
     
    It's very enjoyable. Henry Cavill is quite charming as Napoleon Solo and does a pretty good impersonation of Robert Vaughn.
    , @guest
    I was dragged to Man From Uncle by someone who was a fan of the tv series (apparently some of them are still alive), expecting nothing. Fortunately I didn't know it was a Guy Ritchie movie, because then I would have expected less than nothing. I was pleasantly surprised by an action movie full of apparent adults. Men who acted like men, and women like women. Also, people interested in the finer things in life, like good food and personal grooming, without coming off like homos.

    It transported me to a weird, alternate world which I guess actually existed in some form decades before my birth. Sad how little it takes, because Man From Uncle was no To Catch a Thief, for instance.
  60. @Richard of Melbourne
    "... Koba’s view of humanity as irredeemably cruel and deceitful."

    I suppose that we'll have to wait for the next of this series to see Koba adopt his new pseudonym, Stalin, so that at least a few members of the audience will appreciate that he's the mortal enemy of human civilisation.

    Stalin (“steel man”) has some cinematic crossover potential too.

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  61. @kihowi
    ET was pretty anti-human when you think about it. The humans who were trying to protect a little boy against a goddamn space alien were the bad guys while the good humans were only good because they served him.

    I have a vague memory of an endless line of movies from that time which thought that "maybe we are the bad guys..." was an awfully clever twist. Ugh.

    “The real monster is us” is a haggard cliché spanning the complete SF canon.

    This is my favorite anti-human Science Fiction story: https://genius.com/Ray-bradbury-june-2001-and-the-moon-be-still-as-bright-annotated

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  62. @Hapalong Cassidy
    The super villain played by Samuel L. Jackson in "Kingsmen" was a genocidal anti-humanist. One of the best action movies in years, by the way, with a definite conservative undertone.

    Uh, are you David Cole?

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  63. @guest
    Those apes only had one kid, though, right? Caesar, who goes on to lead a rebellion in the next movie because he has the power of speech. I can't see much trouble coming from one evolved ape, in reality.

    Do they ever bother explaining how all the regular apes, even ones somehow trained to be slaves, could ever possibly overthrow humanity and create a functioning ape society, with a Lawgiver and everything? Or did Caesar radically accelerate ape evolution the same way someone recently speculated that Trump may be causing a genetic shift for the worse?

    That's not the biggest plot hole of the series, however. I'd like to point out the fact that Charlton Heston, star traveller and scientist, thinks he's on a distant planet and takes it as perfectly normal that all the apes are speaking English.

    Do they ever bother explaining how all the regular apes, even ones somehow trained to be slaves, could ever possibly overthrow humanity and create a functioning ape society, with a Lawgiver and everything? Or did Caesar radically accelerate ape evolution the same way someone recently speculated that Trump may be causing a genetic shift for the worse?

    Yeah, that’s one of the areas where the current cycle improves on the original. To the best of my recollection, they never explain how the other apes learn how to speak.

    That’s not the biggest plot hole of the series, however. I’d like to point out the fact that Charlton Heston, star traveller and scientist, thinks he’s on a distant planet and takes it as perfectly normal that all the apes are speaking English.

    I’ll give you another one. In Planet of the Apes, we are explicitly told that the apes believe that flight is impossible.Indeed, their knowledge of aerodynamics is so crude that they are astonished when Heston makes a paper airplane. Plus, ape civilization seems to be largely pre-industrial in character….But they somehow manage to salvage Heston’s submerged spacecraft and use it to escape the nuclear doom that occurs in Beneath the Planet of the Apes

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The 2001 Tim Burton version that everybody hates has the apes at Roman Empire levels of technology. The screenplay is by a Texan I met a few times when I was at Rice U., William Broyles Jr. (best known for the scripts for Apollo 13 and Cast Away). It's a smarter screenplay than Rod Serling's 1968 original, but, unlike the original, it doesn't really work.
  64. @Steve Sailer
    I need to watch that. Also the Man from Uncle.

    The Guy Ritchie/Matthew Vaughn school of movies is pretty fun.

    Also the Man from Uncle.

    It’s very enjoyable. Henry Cavill is quite charming as Napoleon Solo and does a pretty good impersonation of Robert Vaughn.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    So the recent Man from Uncle movie that flopped (but I've heard was pretty decent) was directed by Guy Ritchie, while his protege Matthew Vaughn directed Kingsman? I have a hard time keeping these movies that I haven't seen straight in my head for the following reason:

    Matthew Vaughn is the putative son of Robert Vaughn. He was raised to believe the Man from Uncle star was his father, but then as an adult discovered he was the actual son of some English aristocrat. Ritchie is a minor Scottish aristocrat of some sorts. Vaughn served as a producer on early Ritchie-directed movies such as Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch and then moved into directing with Layer Cake, which introduced Daniel Craig as a leading man to American audiences.

    What's the great Michael Caine early 1970s English gangster movie they are emulating?

    Get Carter.
  65. @syonredux

    Do they ever bother explaining how all the regular apes, even ones somehow trained to be slaves, could ever possibly overthrow humanity and create a functioning ape society, with a Lawgiver and everything? Or did Caesar radically accelerate ape evolution the same way someone recently speculated that Trump may be causing a genetic shift for the worse?
     
    Yeah, that's one of the areas where the current cycle improves on the original. To the best of my recollection, they never explain how the other apes learn how to speak.

    That’s not the biggest plot hole of the series, however. I’d like to point out the fact that Charlton Heston, star traveller and scientist, thinks he’s on a distant planet and takes it as perfectly normal that all the apes are speaking English.
     
    I'll give you another one. In Planet of the Apes, we are explicitly told that the apes believe that flight is impossible.Indeed, their knowledge of aerodynamics is so crude that they are astonished when Heston makes a paper airplane. Plus, ape civilization seems to be largely pre-industrial in character....But they somehow manage to salvage Heston's submerged spacecraft and use it to escape the nuclear doom that occurs in Beneath the Planet of the Apes...

    The 2001 Tim Burton version that everybody hates has the apes at Roman Empire levels of technology. The screenplay is by a Texan I met a few times when I was at Rice U., William Broyles Jr. (best known for the scripts for Apollo 13 and Cast Away). It’s a smarter screenplay than Rod Serling’s 1968 original, but, unlike the original, it doesn’t really work.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    It’s a smarter screenplay than Rod Serling’s 1968 original, but, unlike the original, it doesn’t really work.
     
    The original had Charlton Heston; the remake had Mark Wahlberg. Heston > Wahlberg .

    Mind you, I like Wahlberg. He was the best thing in The Departed. But he just doesn't have Heston's gravitas.
    , @guest
    Like everyone else, all I remember about that movie is Ape Lincoln. I don't know if the screenwriter came up with it, if the studio demanded they have a twist because the original had a twist, or what. But Ape Lincoln is one of the stupidest ideas in movie history, a category with lots of stupid ideas.
  66. @Dave Pinsen
    What was the first movie to root against humans, that James Cameron movie about the blue aliens?

    There is a long tradition of misanthropy in English culture. “Watership Down” immediately springs to my mind as an anti-human book/film. But quite a lot of popular English fiction is in that vein – The Lord of the Rings depicts the coming age of Man as a sad diminishment, as the beauty of the Elves fades away. And Hobbits and Elves are almost uniformly good, while most humans are weak and vacillating. Harry Potter is at heart the story of a master race who is internally conflicted about killing and enslaving the inferior humans (the Voldemort faction) or treating them with the kind condescension reserved for children (the Dumbledore faction).

    The irony is that the English tradition treats all humans as essentially equal (equally bad), the new “liberal” American tradition has apparently decided that people of color are no longer human.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    the new “liberal” American tradition has apparently decided that people of color are no longer human.
     
    It's neither new, liberal, nor much American.

    It's what many of our ancestors came to America to escape.
    , @Thea
    Off the Top of my head, Greek, Russian, German and French literature also contain works dealing with the darker realities of human nature. I'm not sure the English have this market cornered.
    , @Allen
    I don't see how Lord of the Rings belongs on a list of anti-human works. Tolkien's Catholicism would always prevent any real misanthrophy. The humans in the story may not be "perfect" like the elves, but they are good and fully capable of noble heroism.

    I would argue that it is the Catholic idea of original sin and loss of Eden that provides the bittersweet tone of the Lord of the Rings books. Such doctrines are really the healthiest way to deal with the dark side of human nature without embracing the nihilistic self-loathing that this movie and review seem to celebrate. These doctrines account for man's capability for both amazing good and amazing evil, but I digress.

    Harry Potter meanwhile is arguably not anti-human but anti-common people. It celebrates the elites who "know what is best" for the unwashed masses. The characters in Lord of the Rings must confront the darkness inside of themselves, as represented by the corrupting power of the ring. In Harry Potter, evil is always external, whether it is Voldemort of the prejudiced wizarding society that won't acknowledge that all magical creatures are equal. The "good" characters meanwhile have no need for reflection on their own failings.
    , @Logan
    Lord of the Rings portrays the elves as sinless. Tolkien's earlier works, notably the Similarillion, not so much. They commit Kinslaying, genocide, murder of children, kidnapping, rape, etc.

    The bad ones pretty much all get killed off and LOTR has only the good ones still around.

    The hobbits are also mostly more or less children, with some exceptions, so not capable of true evil.

  67. @syonredux

    Also the Man from Uncle.
     
    It's very enjoyable. Henry Cavill is quite charming as Napoleon Solo and does a pretty good impersonation of Robert Vaughn.

    So the recent Man from Uncle movie that flopped (but I’ve heard was pretty decent) was directed by Guy Ritchie, while his protege Matthew Vaughn directed Kingsman? I have a hard time keeping these movies that I haven’t seen straight in my head for the following reason:

    Matthew Vaughn is the putative son of Robert Vaughn. He was raised to believe the Man from Uncle star was his father, but then as an adult discovered he was the actual son of some English aristocrat. Ritchie is a minor Scottish aristocrat of some sorts. Vaughn served as a producer on early Ritchie-directed movies such as Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch and then moved into directing with Layer Cake, which introduced Daniel Craig as a leading man to American audiences.

    What’s the great Michael Caine early 1970s English gangster movie they are emulating?

    Get Carter.

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  68. @Benjamin I. Espen
    That was the first thing I thought of when I saw this. I rooted for the evil space marines when they burned down the sacred tree.

    To quote from another great space Marine: “Nuke it from orbit; it’s the only way to be sure.”

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  69. @Jason Liu
    This is just like people sympathizing with the smurfs from Avatar.

    It's one thing to have white guilt, quite another to have human guilt. Keep your bullshit to your own race.

    It is as if they have taken the old taunt “race traitor” and decided to own it fully.

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  70. @anonymous
    SJW verbiage. Read recently that the fur is flying at the NYT. Wonder if this guy Scott is one of those slated to be pink-slipped (guess even the Gray Hag concluded that they can only employ "x" number of Forbes Top 20 grads, after which they become redundant).

    SJW Verbiage, indeed.

    Scott’s writing reminded me of a term called “hypergraphic writing”–which describes so much of the writing I am seeing from these ethical high-minded Progressives.

    Hypergraphic writing is filled with prefab combinations of noble-sounding jibberish. Hypergraphic writing is marked by an irresistible urge to string together abstract and interchangeable words. Hypergraphics tend to be hyper-philosophical, hyper-religious, or hyper-political.

    Take a good prefix, like “pseudo”, “neo” or “post” and combine it with a robust historical adjective, like “fascist” or “feudal”, tack on a noun picked up in a collegiate classroom…and you’ve got the core of SJW Zombified, hypergraphic prose.

    “The pseudo-capitalistic hegemon is embarking down a path of post-feudal servitude.”

    The interchangeability, of course, allows the Blog Zombie to come back strong the next day with:

    “The neo-Marxist Leviathan trudges down the post-apocalyptic highway of pseudo-serfdom.”

    It’s content-spinning for pretentious assholes. Yes, it’s content-free and nonsensical, But it’s fresh! Plus, the writer appears to harbor quite the intellectual cache, so he “must be taken seriously”.

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  71. @syonredux

    I was a little kid at the time, yet I was the only one in the family who agreed with
    Eric Braeden’s character that the apes had to be killed.
     
    Dr. Otto Hasslein was the series' true hero. He understood the threat posed by demographic change. Hasslein knows that the intelligent apes in ESCAPE must not be allowed to breed. Hasslein has the foresight to think in terms of future generations:

    Dr. Otto Hasslein: Negative, negative, negative!
    E-1: Don't worry. We'll catch them, sooner or later.
    Dr. Otto Hasslein: That's what I'm worried about. Later. Later we'll do something about pollution. Later we'll do something about the population explosion. Later we'll do something about the nuclear war. We think we've got all the time in the world, but how much time has the world got? Somebody has to begin to care.
     
    The American political establishment, in contrast, can think only in terms of the next election (cf the President’s response to news of an ape ruled future:”I doubt that we shall still be in office by then.”).They lack Hasslein’s perception that society is a covenant between the present generation and those who are yet to come.

    Dr. Otto Hasslein was the series’ true hero.

    Interestingly enough, the name Hasslein in German means ‘little hate’. I wonder if the producers knew that?

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  72. @Cary Gouper
    Merkel was the first western leader to denounce multiculturalism. She still believes in assimilation and is opposed to moral relativism. She opposes gay marriage. Can Americans stop using other people as footballs without trying to understand what they are saying? No I guess not.

    Merkel was the first western leader to denounce multiculturalism.

    Of course she was … before the election. Then, after the election, she pulled one of her famous U-ies, throwing the floodgates wide open: “Come one, come all, to Mutti Merkel’s refugee ball!”

    She still believes in assimilation and is opposed to moral relativism. She opposes gay marriage.

    Believing in assimilation is easy when you believe, as Merkel does, that “Islam belongs to Germany.”

    https://www.thelocal.de/20150112/merkel-islam-belongs-to-germany-turkey

    As for gay marriage, she just did a U-ie on that one too:

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/german-gay-marriage-law-could-face-constitutional-challenge-a-1155351.html

    So you see, other than the big banks, there just isn’t much that Angela Merkel is willing to go to the mat for.

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  73. BTW, the Planet of the Apes was originally a French novel written by Pierre Boulle, who also wrote The Bridge over the River Kwai. Just thought you might like to know …

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Boulle

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Bridge on the River Kwai was a hell of a movie - one of my all time favorites. Do you know if the movie followed the book well?
  74. @Cary Gouper
    Merkel was the first western leader to denounce multiculturalism. She still believes in assimilation and is opposed to moral relativism. She opposes gay marriage. Can Americans stop using other people as footballs without trying to understand what they are saying? No I guess not.

    Merkel was the first western leader to denounce multiculturalism.

    And after she told that lie, she opened the flood gates and destroyed her country.

    She still believes in assimilation and is opposed to moral relativism.

    And after she told that lie, she opened the flood gates and destroyed her country.

    She opposes gay marriage.

    Big deal.

    Can Americans stop using other people as footballs without trying to understand what they are saying? No I guess not.

    Can non-Americans stop taking fraudulent, lying, anti-white globalist vermin at their word? How childishly naive do you have to be to believe ANYTHING that comes out of that woman’s pie hole?

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  75. @Anon
    Well... it's the only way to explain the first movie.

    So, the villainous conservative orangutan was right.
    Humans are subhuman. There must be Chimp Crow to keep them down.
    The liberal nice chimps were wrong. They felt for poor Taylor and were very curious to know the truth.
    But the conservative orangutan was correct. Humans are the cancer of history.

    Archie Jungle is right. Bananahead is wrong.

    I hear lots of Indians grew up cheering for cowboys against Indians in westerns.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZ5_Prde6xU

    I hear lots of Indians grew up cheering for cowboys against Indians in westerns.

    And apropos of the video you posted, lots of people cheered Archie against Meathead.

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  76. @Anonymous
    The originals were B-movie shlock .... the reboot series is the same.

    The exaggerated importance of the films is annoying.

    But that is the new Amerika: where all sorts of trash is studied and debated in the academy and the media ad nauseum.

    Still, the monkey soap opera is not as bad a situation as Star Wars. The obsession with Star Wars (by grown men) is a national disgrace.

    The originals were B-movie shlock …. the reboot series is the same.

    I haven’t seen the reboots, nor any of the original sequels, but the original Planet of the Apes was pretty good. Was it B-movie shlock? Maybe. But I often find B-movie Shlock to be much better than A-movie pretension. I’d rather watch just about any random Schwarzenegger movie than any random fashionably approved, academy-nominated message-movie.

    The obsession with Star Wars (by grown men) is a national disgrace.

    There you have no disagreement from me.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    The story of Predator: A Deportation Force is pretty serious about deporting an illegal alien.
    , @CAL

    I haven’t seen the reboots, nor any of the original sequels, but the original Planet of the Apes was pretty good. Was it B-movie shlock? Maybe. But I often find B-movie Shlock to be much better than A-movie pretension. I’d rather watch just about any random Schwarzenegger movie than any random fashionably approved, academy-nominated message-movie.
     
    The original is pretty good. The sequels are schlock. Heston plays the misanthrope suddenly faced with a moronic, subjugated humanity. He doesn't like people but he's human and will stand up for humanity. The twist with him finding that humanity destroyed itself plays against his final speech about a prior human-like race being superior and previous to the apes is what gives the film its bite.

    The thing about B genre films, at least until the 00's when crud flooded the market, was that they typically had modest budgets and well defined stories with know characters types. It allows for the stories to move without explaining everything. They also typically had quality role actors or actors at the latter parts of their career. You ended up with solid acting. Tremors and Red Dawn are really two great examples of B genre films. The first does a great job of telling a straightforward monster movie. The latter looks like a standard 80's action movie but really has more depth than you would expect.
  77. @Peter Akuleyev
    There is a long tradition of misanthropy in English culture. "Watership Down" immediately springs to my mind as an anti-human book/film. But quite a lot of popular English fiction is in that vein - The Lord of the Rings depicts the coming age of Man as a sad diminishment, as the beauty of the Elves fades away. And Hobbits and Elves are almost uniformly good, while most humans are weak and vacillating. Harry Potter is at heart the story of a master race who is internally conflicted about killing and enslaving the inferior humans (the Voldemort faction) or treating them with the kind condescension reserved for children (the Dumbledore faction).

    The irony is that the English tradition treats all humans as essentially equal (equally bad), the new "liberal" American tradition has apparently decided that people of color are no longer human.

    the new “liberal” American tradition has apparently decided that people of color are no longer human.

    It’s neither new, liberal, nor much American.

    It’s what many of our ancestors came to America to escape.

    Read More
  78. @Mr. Anon

    The originals were B-movie shlock …. the reboot series is the same.
     
    I haven't seen the reboots, nor any of the original sequels, but the original Planet of the Apes was pretty good. Was it B-movie shlock? Maybe. But I often find B-movie Shlock to be much better than A-movie pretension. I'd rather watch just about any random Schwarzenegger movie than any random fashionably approved, academy-nominated message-movie.

    The obsession with Star Wars (by grown men) is a national disgrace.
     
    There you have no disagreement from me.

    The story of Predator: A Deportation Force is pretty serious about deporting an illegal alien.

    Read More
  79. @Seamus Padraig
    BTW, the Planet of the Apes was originally a French novel written by Pierre Boulle, who also wrote The Bridge over the River Kwai. Just thought you might like to know ...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Boulle

    Bridge on the River Kwai was a hell of a movie – one of my all time favorites. Do you know if the movie followed the book well?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Seamus Padraig
    Yes, it did: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Boulle#The_Bridge_over_the_River_Kwai

    It appears the story was inspired by Boulle's own real-life experience as a POW during WW2.
  80. @Peter Akuleyev
    There is a long tradition of misanthropy in English culture. "Watership Down" immediately springs to my mind as an anti-human book/film. But quite a lot of popular English fiction is in that vein - The Lord of the Rings depicts the coming age of Man as a sad diminishment, as the beauty of the Elves fades away. And Hobbits and Elves are almost uniformly good, while most humans are weak and vacillating. Harry Potter is at heart the story of a master race who is internally conflicted about killing and enslaving the inferior humans (the Voldemort faction) or treating them with the kind condescension reserved for children (the Dumbledore faction).

    The irony is that the English tradition treats all humans as essentially equal (equally bad), the new "liberal" American tradition has apparently decided that people of color are no longer human.

    Off the Top of my head, Greek, Russian, German and French literature also contain works dealing with the darker realities of human nature. I’m not sure the English have this market cornered.

    Read More
  81. @Steve Sailer
    The 2001 Tim Burton version that everybody hates has the apes at Roman Empire levels of technology. The screenplay is by a Texan I met a few times when I was at Rice U., William Broyles Jr. (best known for the scripts for Apollo 13 and Cast Away). It's a smarter screenplay than Rod Serling's 1968 original, but, unlike the original, it doesn't really work.

    It’s a smarter screenplay than Rod Serling’s 1968 original, but, unlike the original, it doesn’t really work.

    The original had Charlton Heston; the remake had Mark Wahlberg. Heston > Wahlberg .

    Mind you, I like Wahlberg. He was the best thing in The Departed. But he just doesn’t have Heston’s gravitas.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius
    He may be working up to it. It's never really been asked of him.
  82. @Luke Lea
    In the original, upon seeing the ape's Stone Age toolkit Charlton Heston turns to him companions and says, "If this is all they've got we'll be running this place in six months." That made me laugh.

    He may have been quoting the first European who stepped foot in South Africa.

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  83. @Achmed E. Newman
    Bridge on the River Kwai was a hell of a movie - one of my all time favorites. Do you know if the movie followed the book well?

    Yes, it did: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Boulle#The_Bridge_over_the_River_Kwai

    It appears the story was inspired by Boulle’s own real-life experience as a POW during WW2.

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    • Replies: @anonguy
    If you are interested in this topic, read "Prisoners of the Japanese" by Gavan Daws, just a phenomenal work on the subject of white/western prisoners of the Japanese in WWII.

    He comparatively studies how different groups of prisoners, Dutch, British, American, and Australian adapted and survived, and with markedly different survival strategies and rates.

    Written in 1996, it borders on hatefact today, tribal characteristics are treated quite openly.

    Every iSteve reader should read this book, one of my more memorable reads.

    "King Rat", a novel by James Clavell of "Shogun" fame, also treats the Japanese POW experience fictionally based upon his experiences in Changi.
  84. @Richard of Melbourne
    "... Koba’s view of humanity as irredeemably cruel and deceitful."

    I suppose that we'll have to wait for the next of this series to see Koba adopt his new pseudonym, Stalin, so that at least a few members of the audience will appreciate that he's the mortal enemy of human civilisation.

    I suppose that we’ll have to wait for the next of this series to see Koba adopt his new pseudonym, Stalin …

    The next installment in the series will be called Paradise of the Apes. After the death of Caesar, Koba takes over, purges all the Trotskyite chimps, beats back an invasion of German gorillas, and takes for himself the title of ‘Uncle Koba’. Original soundtrack by Eugène Pottier: “Arise, ye toiling monkeys … !”

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  85. @Steve Sailer
    The 2001 Tim Burton version that everybody hates has the apes at Roman Empire levels of technology. The screenplay is by a Texan I met a few times when I was at Rice U., William Broyles Jr. (best known for the scripts for Apollo 13 and Cast Away). It's a smarter screenplay than Rod Serling's 1968 original, but, unlike the original, it doesn't really work.

    Like everyone else, all I remember about that movie is Ape Lincoln. I don’t know if the screenwriter came up with it, if the studio demanded they have a twist because the original had a twist, or what. But Ape Lincoln is one of the stupidest ideas in movie history, a category with lots of stupid ideas.

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  86. @Steve Sailer
    I need to watch that. Also the Man from Uncle.

    The Guy Ritchie/Matthew Vaughn school of movies is pretty fun.

    I was dragged to Man From Uncle by someone who was a fan of the tv series (apparently some of them are still alive), expecting nothing. Fortunately I didn’t know it was a Guy Ritchie movie, because then I would have expected less than nothing. I was pleasantly surprised by an action movie full of apparent adults. Men who acted like men, and women like women. Also, people interested in the finer things in life, like good food and personal grooming, without coming off like homos.

    It transported me to a weird, alternate world which I guess actually existed in some form decades before my birth. Sad how little it takes, because Man From Uncle was no To Catch a Thief, for instance.

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  87. @Peter Akuleyev
    There is a long tradition of misanthropy in English culture. "Watership Down" immediately springs to my mind as an anti-human book/film. But quite a lot of popular English fiction is in that vein - The Lord of the Rings depicts the coming age of Man as a sad diminishment, as the beauty of the Elves fades away. And Hobbits and Elves are almost uniformly good, while most humans are weak and vacillating. Harry Potter is at heart the story of a master race who is internally conflicted about killing and enslaving the inferior humans (the Voldemort faction) or treating them with the kind condescension reserved for children (the Dumbledore faction).

    The irony is that the English tradition treats all humans as essentially equal (equally bad), the new "liberal" American tradition has apparently decided that people of color are no longer human.

    I don’t see how Lord of the Rings belongs on a list of anti-human works. Tolkien’s Catholicism would always prevent any real misanthrophy. The humans in the story may not be “perfect” like the elves, but they are good and fully capable of noble heroism.

    I would argue that it is the Catholic idea of original sin and loss of Eden that provides the bittersweet tone of the Lord of the Rings books. Such doctrines are really the healthiest way to deal with the dark side of human nature without embracing the nihilistic self-loathing that this movie and review seem to celebrate. These doctrines account for man’s capability for both amazing good and amazing evil, but I digress.

    Harry Potter meanwhile is arguably not anti-human but anti-common people. It celebrates the elites who “know what is best” for the unwashed masses. The characters in Lord of the Rings must confront the darkness inside of themselves, as represented by the corrupting power of the ring. In Harry Potter, evil is always external, whether it is Voldemort of the prejudiced wizarding society that won’t acknowledge that all magical creatures are equal. The “good” characters meanwhile have no need for reflection on their own failings.

    Read More
    • Agree: Logan
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Very well said.

    It's the Golden Compass which is (intentionally, as the anti-Narnia) anti-Christian and thus anti-human.
  88. Depressing thread. There are so few good movies today, and I liked the last two POTA reboot films. If the third one is as bad as it looks like on this thread …

    Read More
    • Replies: @al gore rhythms
    I agree. Unlike others here, I enjoyed the second film in the new series, and a large part of that was precisely because it defied my expectations. I assumed it would be a lazy 'humans are the real monsters' film, yet in actual fact the Apes are probably more to blame for the start of the war than the humans.

    If the final film has gone down the predictable route of depicting humans as worthy of extinction then that is a real disappointment. Surely the whole point of a film like this is that you would want to root for the humans, what with us being human? If we are all horrible and worthy of death then I just don't see much of an attraction in watching it. Unless you are a liberal film critic.
  89. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    NYT at times seems indistinguishable from The Onion.

    CNN, not to be outdone, now patterns itself after the knucklehead roundtable at TMZ. Ted Turner should be turning over in his figurative grave, in anticipation of going to his reward known for a failed business that was once groundbreaking. Will Wolf Blitzer or Jake Tapper give the eulogy?

    In keeping with the SAT HBD sub-theme – NYT : The Onion :: CNN : TMZ

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Smart people don't watch TV anymore. They need rich people to get advertisers to pay the bills. Rich + stupid = TMZ/SJW.
  90. @Mr. Anon

    The originals were B-movie shlock …. the reboot series is the same.
     
    I haven't seen the reboots, nor any of the original sequels, but the original Planet of the Apes was pretty good. Was it B-movie shlock? Maybe. But I often find B-movie Shlock to be much better than A-movie pretension. I'd rather watch just about any random Schwarzenegger movie than any random fashionably approved, academy-nominated message-movie.

    The obsession with Star Wars (by grown men) is a national disgrace.
     
    There you have no disagreement from me.

    I haven’t seen the reboots, nor any of the original sequels, but the original Planet of the Apes was pretty good. Was it B-movie shlock? Maybe. But I often find B-movie Shlock to be much better than A-movie pretension. I’d rather watch just about any random Schwarzenegger movie than any random fashionably approved, academy-nominated message-movie.

    The original is pretty good. The sequels are schlock. Heston plays the misanthrope suddenly faced with a moronic, subjugated humanity. He doesn’t like people but he’s human and will stand up for humanity. The twist with him finding that humanity destroyed itself plays against his final speech about a prior human-like race being superior and previous to the apes is what gives the film its bite.

    The thing about B genre films, at least until the 00′s when crud flooded the market, was that they typically had modest budgets and well defined stories with know characters types. It allows for the stories to move without explaining everything. They also typically had quality role actors or actors at the latter parts of their career. You ended up with solid acting. Tremors and Red Dawn are really two great examples of B genre films. The first does a great job of telling a straightforward monster movie. The latter looks like a standard 80′s action movie but really has more depth than you would expect.

    Read More
  91. @Steve Sailer
    The fourth chapter of Swift's "Gulliver's Travels" from 300 years ago is extremely anti-human.

    Guessing that’s the one with the talking horses.

    Read More
  92. @German_reader
    Avatar:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avatar_(2009_film)

    That’s it, thanks. Was thinking it might have been called Pandora, but that was the planet.

    The beginning where the sleeping space passengers were woken up by the space nurses was well done, IMO. But the movie went downhill from there.

    That might have been the first hugely popular movie where I completely didn’t get the appeal.

    Read More
  93. @CJ
    Depressing thread. There are so few good movies today, and I liked the last two POTA reboot films. If the third one is as bad as it looks like on this thread ...

    I agree. Unlike others here, I enjoyed the second film in the new series, and a large part of that was precisely because it defied my expectations. I assumed it would be a lazy ‘humans are the real monsters’ film, yet in actual fact the Apes are probably more to blame for the start of the war than the humans.

    If the final film has gone down the predictable route of depicting humans as worthy of extinction then that is a real disappointment. Surely the whole point of a film like this is that you would want to root for the humans, what with us being human? If we are all horrible and worthy of death then I just don’t see much of an attraction in watching it. Unless you are a liberal film critic.

    Read More
  94. @Anonymous
    A thing to remember is that A.O. Scott is a very effete guy. He was probably mothered aggressively from a young age. Critics should have sufficient insight into themselves to acknowledge when a multi-hundred-million-dollar movie was not made with them as the target audience in mind, yet Scott never registers this Self-Awareness. He measures everything against his own dainty hugbox tastes, more like the fashion of a YouTube blowhard than a traditional tough-minded movie critic. For a blatant example see his reaction to "300," a lousy movie with such manifest flaws and faults it practically tees itself up for film reviewing berserkerdom, but Scott homes in on the tetchiest, girliest possible objections anyone could imagine. He is the quintessence of betahood.

    He is the quintessence of betahood.

    Google image search his name.

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  95. I don’t know about those monkeys but this: “vindicates Koba’s view of humanity as irredeemably cruel and deceitful.” does describe Stalin’s view of mankind pretty well from what I remember reading about him. Interesting that the reviewer supports this outlook.

    Read More
  96. @Peter Akuleyev
    There is a long tradition of misanthropy in English culture. "Watership Down" immediately springs to my mind as an anti-human book/film. But quite a lot of popular English fiction is in that vein - The Lord of the Rings depicts the coming age of Man as a sad diminishment, as the beauty of the Elves fades away. And Hobbits and Elves are almost uniformly good, while most humans are weak and vacillating. Harry Potter is at heart the story of a master race who is internally conflicted about killing and enslaving the inferior humans (the Voldemort faction) or treating them with the kind condescension reserved for children (the Dumbledore faction).

    The irony is that the English tradition treats all humans as essentially equal (equally bad), the new "liberal" American tradition has apparently decided that people of color are no longer human.

    Lord of the Rings portrays the elves as sinless. Tolkien’s earlier works, notably the Similarillion, not so much. They commit Kinslaying, genocide, murder of children, kidnapping, rape, etc.

    The bad ones pretty much all get killed off and LOTR has only the good ones still around.

    The hobbits are also mostly more or less children, with some exceptions, so not capable of true evil.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Lord of the Rings portrays the elves as sinless.
     
    No, despair is the greatest sin of all.
  97. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Is there something in the water cooler at the New York Times office?

    Read More
  98. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    I guess the next craziness will be people “transitioning” into Simians. Trans-speciesism?

    Read More
  99. @Logan
    Lord of the Rings portrays the elves as sinless. Tolkien's earlier works, notably the Similarillion, not so much. They commit Kinslaying, genocide, murder of children, kidnapping, rape, etc.

    The bad ones pretty much all get killed off and LOTR has only the good ones still around.

    The hobbits are also mostly more or less children, with some exceptions, so not capable of true evil.

    Lord of the Rings portrays the elves as sinless.

    No, despair is the greatest sin of all.

    Read More
  100. @anonymous
    NYT at times seems indistinguishable from The Onion.

    CNN, not to be outdone, now patterns itself after the knucklehead roundtable at TMZ. Ted Turner should be turning over in his figurative grave, in anticipation of going to his reward known for a failed business that was once groundbreaking. Will Wolf Blitzer or Jake Tapper give the eulogy?

    In keeping with the SAT HBD sub-theme - NYT : The Onion :: CNN : TMZ

    Smart people don’t watch TV anymore. They need rich people to get advertisers to pay the bills. Rich + stupid = TMZ/SJW.

    Read More
  101. @Allen
    I don't see how Lord of the Rings belongs on a list of anti-human works. Tolkien's Catholicism would always prevent any real misanthrophy. The humans in the story may not be "perfect" like the elves, but they are good and fully capable of noble heroism.

    I would argue that it is the Catholic idea of original sin and loss of Eden that provides the bittersweet tone of the Lord of the Rings books. Such doctrines are really the healthiest way to deal with the dark side of human nature without embracing the nihilistic self-loathing that this movie and review seem to celebrate. These doctrines account for man's capability for both amazing good and amazing evil, but I digress.

    Harry Potter meanwhile is arguably not anti-human but anti-common people. It celebrates the elites who "know what is best" for the unwashed masses. The characters in Lord of the Rings must confront the darkness inside of themselves, as represented by the corrupting power of the ring. In Harry Potter, evil is always external, whether it is Voldemort of the prejudiced wizarding society that won't acknowledge that all magical creatures are equal. The "good" characters meanwhile have no need for reflection on their own failings.

    Very well said.

    It’s the Golden Compass which is (intentionally, as the anti-Narnia) anti-Christian and thus anti-human.

    Read More
  102. @syonredux

    It’s a smarter screenplay than Rod Serling’s 1968 original, but, unlike the original, it doesn’t really work.
     
    The original had Charlton Heston; the remake had Mark Wahlberg. Heston > Wahlberg .

    Mind you, I like Wahlberg. He was the best thing in The Departed. But he just doesn't have Heston's gravitas.

    He may be working up to it. It’s never really been asked of him.

    Read More
  103. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    You’re all overthinking this. It’s a popcorn movie. Everybody likes apes. If you WERE to stretch a philosophy out of this franchise, the matter is simple. When Capitalism breaks down, everybody goes tribal, and shittious life circumstances ensue.

    End of story!

    That said, what if apes became intelligent within a successful Capitalist system?

    Here’s some scenes from “Planet of the Entrepreneurial Apes”. Note the glaring lack of that dark nihilist “at your feet or at your throat” German shit featured in the latest ape movie:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vsfl3wq86k4&list=PLfIwDwfWZIC6xGeIIgsAYIhbU697Pk2oO&index=1

    Read More
  104. @Seamus Padraig
    Yes, it did: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Boulle#The_Bridge_over_the_River_Kwai

    It appears the story was inspired by Boulle's own real-life experience as a POW during WW2.

    If you are interested in this topic, read “Prisoners of the Japanese” by Gavan Daws, just a phenomenal work on the subject of white/western prisoners of the Japanese in WWII.

    He comparatively studies how different groups of prisoners, Dutch, British, American, and Australian adapted and survived, and with markedly different survival strategies and rates.

    Written in 1996, it borders on hatefact today, tribal characteristics are treated quite openly.

    Every iSteve reader should read this book, one of my more memorable reads.

    “King Rat”, a novel by James Clavell of “Shogun” fame, also treats the Japanese POW experience fictionally based upon his experiences in Changi.

    Read More
  105. @Seth Largo
    an eloquent rebuke to a species that has abandoned any but a biological claim to the name human.

    … We are now, three movies into this reborn franchise, entirely on the side of the apes. The prospect of our own extinction, far from horrifying, comes as a relief. At last the poor planet will catch a break.


    "Let's root for our own extinction" is a sophomoric, shallow response to the conclusion that humanity is inherently cruel and inhumane.

    Greater artists and thinkers than A.O. Scott accept this premise of original sin but position the inherent evil of human nature as the necessary ground against which figures of beauty, tenderness, and justice emerge, if only in temporary moments. Cormac McCarthy's novels are the best examples of this positioning: acts of goodness are only understood as such because they are set against a backdrop of regular evil. St. Paul's letter to the Romans hits on this theme, as well. It's central to St. Augustine's thinking: "For God judged it better to bring good out of evil than not to permit any evil to exist."

    David Fincher's Seven is my favorite American film that gets this theme right. Morgan Freeman's closing monologue has echoes of Augustine, though darkly rendered: "Hemingway once wrote, The world is a fine place and worth fighting for. I agree with the second part."

    The racial or special extinction fetish is worse than politically dangerous; it's aesthetically and philosophically childish.

    “Let’s root for our own extinction” is a sophomoric, shallow response to the conclusion that humanity is inherently cruel and inhumane.

    I see you haven’t spent much time studying military history.

    The science fiction trope of rooting for human extinction, as you put it, is a broader expression of a long series of more particularly focused martial snuff porn (war is OK so long as you’re killing the other guy).

    WWI and WWII propaganda involved much “rooting for our own extinction.”

    The entire Cold War was about rooting for what amounted to our own extinction. And hoping to god nobody would take that seriously enough to try it.

    We still haven’t resolved the tension within evolutionary biology where evolution itself means rooting for our own extinction.

    “Original Sin” as a concept describing this is all well and good. But it’s not nearly a good or bold enough one for the present and future.

    Read More
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