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NYT: Denmark's "Golden Era of Full Employment" Means Precision Parts Are Rotting on the Robotic Assembly Lines
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Denmark has had a relatively immigration restrictionist government for most of the last decade and a half. The economic horrors of that kind of Nazi regime are now becoming clear, as the NYT explains:

Danish Companies Seek to Hire, but Everyone’s Already Working
By LIZ ALDERMAN FEB. 28, 2017

COPENHAGEN — When Peter Enevoldsen won a lucrative order for the precision tractor parts that his company, Sjorring Maskinfabrik, makes in northern Denmark, his eyes lit up. The contract was worth more than half a million euros — a boon for his profits.

There was just one hitch: He did not have enough employees for the job. …

As Europe rebounds from its economic malaise, Denmark is one of a few countries that can boast of nearing a golden era of full employment, meaning almost everyone who is able and willing to work has a job. But instead of being cheered, it is posing new challenges to the country’s recovery. …

The government has helped ease the strain by linking the retirement age to life expectancy, allowing seniors to work longer, and encouraging more employment of European Union nationals, who do not need employment visas to work in Denmark.

Some employers have also looked to refugees to fill jobs, but few of the newcomers are readily employable in high-skilled work, and the government tightened policies recently to discourage more asylum seekers from coming in.

Germany, which faces a shortage of engineers, nurses and other skilled workers, has taken the opposite tack, setting up training programs for refugees in an attempt to bridge the gap. …

At Sjorring, Mr. Enevoldsen tried for more than a year to add skilled welders and industrial designers to the 275-person work force. The company, which has won business from Volvo and Caterpillar, has a 20-acre factory in Denmark’s forested north that runs a partly automated assembly line.

He offered a salary bump of more than 2 percent, but raising wages further would crimp his margins.

Do you hear that? The boss offered a pay raise of more than 2 percent. Not just 2 percent, but More Than 2 Percent.

It’s a law of economics that capitalists can’t go nuts and offer labor a 3 percent raise, much less a 4 percent raise.

If they tried something insane like that, it would crimp their margins.

 
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  1. Steady on, Steve. You’ve encountered material that’s so ripely self-parodying that you’ve been unable to resist italicization!

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  2. A.I. must be pretty close to tagging those rhetorical strategies without human intervention… especially if it’s a topic domain where we suspect the powerful want to set the agenda. Has anyone compiled a thesaurus yet, of such weasel words?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    The robot tells some truth though - ehe - she isn't all bad.
    It's true, that the integration of refugees in the labour-market is happening very, very slow, and in depressing numbers really, in all of Europe. An optimistic (!) forecast on the existing data by German expert Bernd Raffelhüschen speaks of 60% of the refugees that will be on welfare - ten years from now - under the best asssumptions, you can reasonably make...

    So, her comparison of Denmark and Germany is flatout wrong. The Danes fare better than the Germans in bringing the foreigners to work. But they too prodduce no miracles (= all in all quite depressing numbers).

    She seems to be of very little knowledge and of very little understanding - cf. Anonymus No. 3 .

    The most important information in her piece is, that Denmark is doing very well - and that Denmark is immigration-restrictive.

    As Desiderius put it - it's almost a complete laugh.

    But I'm serious now: Only almost. Her article has two informations in it, that do make a difference: Danish immigration restriction and economic well being!

    I wonder if that's the robot part of the story - or - - the subversive one...

  3. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Absolute f*cking crap.

    The EU, of which Denmark is a member state, is a free labor movement area.
    Now, Poland, for example, which is also an EU member, is a mere few hundred (at the most) miles from Denmark.
    Poland has welders aplenty only too willing to work for Danish wages.

    Read More
    • Agree: NickG
    • Replies: @Colleen Pater
    yes and why not go even farther and import some chinese workers, cheaper still outsource the work.

    It might indeed be as steve implies that there is still plenty of margin with which to pay still higher wages. But at some point you come up against imports at third world labor rates. The west had an advantage of inventing and making the absolute best of everything often the only maker of some things. That puts you in a position to charge whatever you want certainly whatever is needed to pay first world wages.
    outsourcing and immigration disperse our technology before we can profit from it, we ship out to foreign factories we allow spies into our own factories and universities and we allow our tech to be hacked. granted a certain amount of this is inevitable today but ask yourselves how much chinese tech we manage to steal.
    The answer to crops rotting in the field perhaps can simply lead to better wages and higher fruit costs but at some point if everyones wages are not going up its simply inflation. maybe america can make the best fruit picking robots. but what are we going to do about the 150 million moron minorities we already have here
    , @Jack D
    Why indeed aren't Poles and other EU nationals flocking to Denmark to fill these jobs (whereas the UK now has almost million Poles alone)?

    I can think of a couple of reasons:

    1. Very high taxes. Danes get a lot of value for these taxes - free health care, high quality schools, parks, etc. but immigrants may be more interested in the take home pay that they can send back home.

    2. Odd language and closed culture. If you are going to learn a new language you are much better off with a widely spoken language like English than a niche language like Danish. Also, Denmark is a much less welcoming place for foreigners and you are not going to get the infrastructure (Polish grocery stores, Catholic churches with masses in Polish, etc.) that is present in today's multicultural UK which has become almost like a European version of the US with people from everywhere.
  4. “Some employers have also looked to refugees to fill jobs, but few of the newcomers are readily employable in high-skilled work”

    Muslims in Denmark are not employable in high-skilled work, but how can that be? Isn’t diversity suppose to be our strength? And Muslims have plenty of diversity strength flowing through their bodies.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RW
    "Diversity Strength" - I laughed out loud a that one! Need to incorporate it into the UNZ phrasal lexicon.
  5. Which European countries will I see White people working at the local McDonald’s instead of Muslims and Blacks?

    Read More
    • Replies: @for-the-record

    Which European countries will I see White people working at the local McDonald’s instead of Muslims and Blacks?
     
    In most of Portugal, particularly on the island of Madeira where I live.
    , @TheBoom
    Portugal, Hungary, Croatia, and Poland
    , @Fredrik
    In Latvia I've seen White people working at a Asian restaurant.
    , @Miro23
    Spain; mostly Spanish and a few Latinos.
  6. Chicago teachers avoid strike after reaching new deal

    The city had initially pledged to give teachers a raise of 8.75 percent.

    http://edition.cnn.com/2016/10/11/us/chicago-teachers-strike-avoided/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Chicago teachers avoid strike after reaching new deal

    The city had initially pledged to give teachers a raise of 8.75 percent."

    Chicago K-12 public school teachers are vastly overpaid when you factor in that they suck at their jobs. If this was the private sector most of them would be fired. This is one of the rare examples where I agree with the term White mediocrity as Chicago public school teachers are mostly made up of White female social justice warriors.

  7. @George
    Chicago teachers avoid strike after reaching new deal

    The city had initially pledged to give teachers a raise of 8.75 percent.

    http://edition.cnn.com/2016/10/11/us/chicago-teachers-strike-avoided/

    “Chicago teachers avoid strike after reaching new deal

    The city had initially pledged to give teachers a raise of 8.75 percent.”

    Chicago K-12 public school teachers are vastly overpaid when you factor in that they suck at their jobs. If this was the private sector most of them would be fired. This is one of the rare examples where I agree with the term White mediocrity as Chicago public school teachers are mostly made up of White female social justice warriors.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hhsiii
    It's combat pay. Not sure how successful anyone could be teaching in Chicago public schools.
    , @anonymous
    Chicago public schools are 46.5% Hispanic, 37.7% black, 9.9% white, 17.7% are so-called English Language Learners and a whopping 80.22% are classified as 'economically disadvantaged'. Miracles don't exist.
    , @MBlanc46
    In defense of Chicago teachers--and I've known quite a few of them--may I say that, although some of them certainly do suck at their jobs, a great many of the students suck even worse at their's.
  8. Can’t have your margins crimped, can you? That would never do.

    Liz Alderman – good Saxon name there. Tacitus had a quote which applies to Goodwhites like her, originally applied to Britons who aped the Roman custom.

    “All this in their ignorance, they called civilization, when it was but a part of their servitude.”

    Talking of those who “warm their hands at the invaders’ hearth” I see Matthew Goodwin (another Saxon name), goto guy for the Guardian and BBC on the menace of the “far right”, has joined Heterodox Academy, despite being as assiduous a promulgator of Received Wisdom as any.

    On the poor guy with his pinched margins – in the City of London around 1986 (the financial “Big Bang” there) firms were recruiting heavily, and established firms were losing key staff. The solution for my then employer was an out-of-the-blue 20% wage rise.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kyle McKenna
    Your points are good as usual, though as someone whose ancestral family names include "Goodwin" I feel constrained to point out that it derives from Old English Godwine, Protector of Our Lord, cf: Earl of Wessex et al..

    http://www.behindthename.com/name/godwine

    All of which is by way of saying please don't confuse us with the Aldermans of the world. Actually, I also know of some good Early Christian Aldermen...

  9. Reminds me of Ned Flanders’ beatnik father: “We’ve tried nothing and we’re all out of ideas!”

    Read More
  10. @Jefferson
    "Chicago teachers avoid strike after reaching new deal

    The city had initially pledged to give teachers a raise of 8.75 percent."

    Chicago K-12 public school teachers are vastly overpaid when you factor in that they suck at their jobs. If this was the private sector most of them would be fired. This is one of the rare examples where I agree with the term White mediocrity as Chicago public school teachers are mostly made up of White female social justice warriors.

    It’s combat pay. Not sure how successful anyone could be teaching in Chicago public schools.

    Read More
  11. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    If West cannot produce enough life, there is something wrong with the Western Way.

    End feminism, reject hedonism, promote familism, and push read-and-breed strategy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "End feminism,"

    The only way feminism will die in Europe is if Whites become a Minority in Europe. Immigrants from The Middle East, North Africa, and Sub Saharan Africa are not big on feminism. Make them the majority in Europe and you will get your wish of feminism dying a horrible death on that continent.

    , @Opinionator
    And the West has the conceit, the hubris to criticize Islam.
    , @bomag

    If West cannot produce enough life, there is something wrong with the Western Way.
     
    The West produces plenty of life. Let us ask instead if non-western countries are producing "life, if they essentially have no cultural or scientific achievement, and create dismal societies from which they are so anxious to maintain an escape route via immigration to western countries.
  12. @robot
    A.I. must be pretty close to tagging those rhetorical strategies without human intervention... especially if it's a topic domain where we suspect the powerful want to set the agenda. Has anyone compiled a thesaurus yet, of such weasel words?

    The robot tells some truth though – ehe – she isn’t all bad.
    It’s true, that the integration of refugees in the labour-market is happening very, very slow, and in depressing numbers really, in all of Europe. An optimistic (!) forecast on the existing data by German expert Bernd Raffelhüschen speaks of 60% of the refugees that will be on welfare – ten years from now – under the best asssumptions, you can reasonably make…

    So, her comparison of Denmark and Germany is flatout wrong. The Danes fare better than the Germans in bringing the foreigners to work. But they too prodduce no miracles (= all in all quite depressing numbers).

    She seems to be of very little knowledge and of very little understanding – cf. Anonymus No. 3 .

    The most important information in her piece is, that Denmark is doing very well – and that Denmark is immigration-restrictive.

    As Desiderius put it – it’s almost a complete laugh.

    But I’m serious now: Only almost. Her article has two informations in it, that do make a difference: Danish immigration restriction and economic well being!

    I wonder if that’s the robot part of the story – or – – the subversive one…

    Read More
  13. @Jefferson
    Which European countries will I see White people working at the local McDonald’s instead of Muslims and Blacks?

    Which European countries will I see White people working at the local McDonald’s instead of Muslims and Blacks?

    In most of Portugal, particularly on the island of Madeira where I live.

    Read More
  14. The Times is solicitous and sympathetic when a company voluntarily offers a 2% pay raise, endorsing the idea that 3% would unacceptably cut profits—in a country with full employment.

    Of course, here at home with real unemployment and more than enough immigrants to satisfy the rapacious appetite of big business, the Gray Lady has a slightly different take: over and over they’ve endorsed a 107% increase in the Federal Minimum Wage, from $7.25 to $15.00.

    Read More
  15. @Anonymous Nephew
    Can't have your margins crimped, can you? That would never do.

    Liz Alderman - good Saxon name there. Tacitus had a quote which applies to Goodwhites like her, originally applied to Britons who aped the Roman custom.

    "All this in their ignorance, they called civilization, when it was but a part of their servitude."

    Talking of those who "warm their hands at the invaders' hearth" I see Matthew Goodwin (another Saxon name), goto guy for the Guardian and BBC on the menace of the "far right", has joined Heterodox Academy, despite being as assiduous a promulgator of Received Wisdom as any.

    On the poor guy with his pinched margins - in the City of London around 1986 (the financial "Big Bang" there) firms were recruiting heavily, and established firms were losing key staff. The solution for my then employer was an out-of-the-blue 20% wage rise.

    Your points are good as usual, though as someone whose ancestral family names include “Goodwin” I feel constrained to point out that it derives from Old English Godwine, Protector of Our Lord, cf: Earl of Wessex et al..

    http://www.behindthename.com/name/godwine

    All of which is by way of saying please don’t confuse us with the Aldermans of the world. Actually, I also know of some good Early Christian Aldermen…

    Read More
  16. Denmark, along with Switzerland and a very few other countries, remains remarkably civilized. Expect more focus upon these nations, by which of course I mean the uniquely pernicious focus of the Establishment Empire and its MSM.

    Read More
  17. @Anon
    If West cannot produce enough life, there is something wrong with the Western Way.

    End feminism, reject hedonism, promote familism, and push read-and-breed strategy.

    “End feminism,”

    The only way feminism will die in Europe is if Whites become a Minority in Europe. Immigrants from The Middle East, North Africa, and Sub Saharan Africa are not big on feminism. Make them the majority in Europe and you will get your wish of feminism dying a horrible death on that continent.

    Read More
  18. @Anon
    If West cannot produce enough life, there is something wrong with the Western Way.

    End feminism, reject hedonism, promote familism, and push read-and-breed strategy.

    And the West has the conceit, the hubris to criticize Islam.

    Read More
  19. @Jefferson
    Which European countries will I see White people working at the local McDonald’s instead of Muslims and Blacks?

    Portugal, Hungary, Croatia, and Poland

    Read More
    • Replies: @Romanian
    Bulgaria, Romania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania
  20. …few of the newcomers are readily employable in high-skilled work…

    Speaking of crimped margins, another huge change I’ve seen in my own lifetime is that employers will now choke and die before they will be bothered to provide new employees so much as an hour’s paid, on-the-job training.

    I was once part of a team seeking to find a new vice president for an employer of mine, and the orders were that only persons who were currently vice presidents for other employers would be considered. I identified a guy perfect for the gig – inarguably more qualified than any of the other candidates who were, in fact, already holding the title of vice president. The guy I’d found had been working as a senior director for several years. When he was dismissed by muckity-mucks who couldn’t even be bothered to read his résumé despite the endorsements by my whole team coordinating the search, I asked, in exasperation “Where in the Hell do you think vice presidents come from? No one springs forth like Minerva from Jupiter’s head a vice president!”

    This insistence that new employees be not bright, eager, people with a necessary fundamental set of skills, but, rather, that they happen to have exactly the résumé the employer fantasises about is akin to an average Joe insisting he will only date a woman if she is as physically beautiful as Helen of Troy.

    It goes to:

    1) The phony shortage of employees
    2) The pretexts used to run the H1B and similar scams, nepotism, and cronyism (“Nope, no qualified candidates in the pool; see? Not one of them has experience with all five programmng languages and fluency in Czech (it’s mere coincidence the boss’ nephew studied in Prague…). What’s that? Yeah, I know anyone conversant with MySQL can teach himself PostgreSQL in a day or two, but we must have someone who knows PostgreSQL already, even though it will take us another month to get him here from India. What’s that? No, no nothing to do with how much less we may happen to pay an Indian; what’re you, some kind of racist?!”)
    3) The insistence in subsidising worthless degrees in Feminine, Albino, Atonal Musicology while simultaneously arguing not enough scientists and engineers are educated in the U.S.A. (and remember, a programmer who uses MySQL instead of PostgreSQL may as well not know what a tuple is…).
    4) The increasing impossibility of promotion for anyone not the boss’ nephew (see supra: “But he’s not already a vice president!”) This last supports the churn and burn philosophy of business to keep from ever paying people raises for seniority or having to provide healthcare for those of us who aren’t spring chickens anymore and actually have to occassionally seek medical treatment.

    I could go on but I reckon I’ve made my point: employers are increasingly returning to the abuses present before the reforms begun in Germany with workers’ compensation, in the U.S.A. under Theodore Roosevelt and the progressive movement, etc. It ties to globalism not just because of labor arbitrage via immivasion, but also because employers demand to employ the same shenanigans in the U.S.A., Europe, Canada, Australia, etc. as they have gotten used to pulling off in China, India, etc. If the laws of the previously civilised nations preclude openly exercising those shenanigans, the work-arounds and kludges I’ve written about will suffice.

    Lastly, notice that Japanese employers continue to promote internally, train their employees, and to be famously loyal to employees (fostering reciprocal loyalty from those employees—it was the globalist employers who drew first blood in that question of chickens and eggs, by the way…). Oh, and the Japanese openly acknowldge and support the idea that Japan is for the Japanese. Any chance of a correlation and causation here…?

    Read More
    • Agree: Randal
    • Replies: @bomag
    Excellent points. (My "agree" button is not registering.)

    Also, add in here the symbiotic relationship with the academy, where sundry degrees plus continued credentials help maintain the education racket.
    , @Randal
    Tried to "Agree" to your eminently agreement-worthy comment, but although the option was apparently available (not greyed out) and it appeared initially to take the click, no "Agree" showed up.

    So here it is, by the long way round.

    Agree: Randal
    , @res

    in the U.S.A. under Theodore Roosevelt and the progressive movement
     
    One of the many great ironies here is how much that has been happening under today's "progressives" would cause the original progressives to spin in their graves. IMHO those scare quotes are well earned.

    To add to your VP story, the best version of that is when the candidate has more actual responsibility (e.g. organization size/budget), but just not the desired title.

    P.S. Thanks for a great post. Perhaps we could print up copies and nail it to the doors of the companies with practices like you describe.
    , @Logan
    My brother and I some years ago ran a very successful small business in a small CO mountain town.

    We tried hiring "experienced people," then found that we had to untrain them from their bad habits before we could train them to do it right.

    So we started recruiting people on one criterion only: attitude. If we ran across a person in a gas station or grocery store or anywhere else with a good job attitude, we'd give them a card and ask them to come buy and apply.

    Based entirely on a simple idea. Our work wasn't unbelievably complex. We could train them to do it all, and correctly, but we couldn't train them to have the right attitude.

    We also paid significant bonuses to existing employees and anybody else who recruited somebody who we hired, with an even bigger bonus if they were working for us a year later.

    All worked very well.

    , @JackOH
    Great points, Autochthon, agree 100%. The crony 'n' patronage staff hires at my local state university know they'll be the successful candidates before the opening is posted. The cost of this nonsense is in the number of "assistants" and "coordinators" who do the actual work, and the frittering away of institutional energy.
  21. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Jefferson
    "Chicago teachers avoid strike after reaching new deal

    The city had initially pledged to give teachers a raise of 8.75 percent."

    Chicago K-12 public school teachers are vastly overpaid when you factor in that they suck at their jobs. If this was the private sector most of them would be fired. This is one of the rare examples where I agree with the term White mediocrity as Chicago public school teachers are mostly made up of White female social justice warriors.

    Chicago public schools are 46.5% Hispanic, 37.7% black, 9.9% white, 17.7% are so-called English Language Learners and a whopping 80.22% are classified as ‘economically disadvantaged’. Miracles don’t exist.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Laugh Track

    Chicago public schools are 46.5% Hispanic, 37.7% black, 9.9% white, 17.7% are so-called English Language Learners and a whopping 80.22% are classified as ‘economically disadvantaged’. Miracles don’t exist.
     
    Got a link for those stats?
    , @Bill B.

    Chicago public schools are 46.5% Hispanic, 37.7% black
     
    So at some point the murder rate is going to drop as blacks run out of blacks to shoot?
  22. @Jefferson
    "Some employers have also looked to refugees to fill jobs, but few of the newcomers are readily employable in high-skilled work"

    Muslims in Denmark are not employable in high-skilled work, but how can that be? Isn't diversity suppose to be our strength? And Muslims have plenty of diversity strength flowing through their bodies.

    “Diversity Strength” – I laughed out loud a that one! Need to incorporate it into the UNZ phrasal lexicon.

    Read More
  23. @Anon
    If West cannot produce enough life, there is something wrong with the Western Way.

    End feminism, reject hedonism, promote familism, and push read-and-breed strategy.

    If West cannot produce enough life, there is something wrong with the Western Way.

    The West produces plenty of life. Let us ask instead if non-western countries are producing “life, if they essentially have no cultural or scientific achievement, and create dismal societies from which they are so anxious to maintain an escape route via immigration to western countries.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    The West produces good material and legal conditions for life but not enough life.

    Much of the non-west produces life but not the good legal & material conditions for life.

    Israel has the balance. The good material conditions for life and life itself.

    It promotes a sense of identity and heritage. A sense of cultural obligation. An organic vision of society. Modernity and history and spirituality. Democratic fascism works.

    And of course, the read-and-breed strategy.

    NYT should the urge the Israeli way on all of the West.
  24. @Anonymous
    Absolute f*cking crap.

    The EU, of which Denmark is a member state, is a free labor movement area.
    Now, Poland, for example, which is also an EU member, is a mere few hundred (at the most) miles from Denmark.
    Poland has welders aplenty only too willing to work for Danish wages.

    yes and why not go even farther and import some chinese workers, cheaper still outsource the work.

    It might indeed be as steve implies that there is still plenty of margin with which to pay still higher wages. But at some point you come up against imports at third world labor rates. The west had an advantage of inventing and making the absolute best of everything often the only maker of some things. That puts you in a position to charge whatever you want certainly whatever is needed to pay first world wages.
    outsourcing and immigration disperse our technology before we can profit from it, we ship out to foreign factories we allow spies into our own factories and universities and we allow our tech to be hacked. granted a certain amount of this is inevitable today but ask yourselves how much chinese tech we manage to steal.
    The answer to crops rotting in the field perhaps can simply lead to better wages and higher fruit costs but at some point if everyones wages are not going up its simply inflation. maybe america can make the best fruit picking robots. but what are we going to do about the 150 million moron minorities we already have here

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    No.

    My point is that Denmark is part of the same federalist super-state as Poland, or Hungary or Czechia or Slovakia or Romania or east Germany at this very moment in time.
    A founding principle of the EU, as Britain learned to its cost, is that there is absolutely no distinction made whatsoever, legally or otherwise, between a citizen of Denmark or a citizen of Romania if the said citizen wishes to sell his labour in Denmark.
  25. @Autochthon

    ...few of the newcomers are readily employable in high-skilled work...
     
    Speaking of crimped margins, another huge change I've seen in my own lifetime is that employers will now choke and die before they will be bothered to provide new employees so much as an hour's paid, on-the-job training.

    I was once part of a team seeking to find a new vice president for an employer of mine, and the orders were that only persons who were currently vice presidents for other employers would be considered. I identified a guy perfect for the gig – inarguably more qualified than any of the other candidates who were, in fact, already holding the title of vice president. The guy I'd found had been working as a senior director for several years. When he was dismissed by muckity-mucks who couldn't even be bothered to read his résumé despite the endorsements by my whole team coordinating the search, I asked, in exasperation "Where in the Hell do you think vice presidents come from? No one springs forth like Minerva from Jupiter's head a vice president!"

    This insistence that new employees be not bright, eager, people with a necessary fundamental set of skills, but, rather, that they happen to have exactly the résumé the employer fantasises about is akin to an average Joe insisting he will only date a woman if she is as physically beautiful as Helen of Troy.

    It goes to:

    1) The phony shortage of employees
    2) The pretexts used to run the H1B and similar scams, nepotism, and cronyism ("Nope, no qualified candidates in the pool; see? Not one of them has experience with all five programmng languages and fluency in Czech (it's mere coincidence the boss' nephew studied in Prague...). What's that? Yeah, I know anyone conversant with MySQL can teach himself PostgreSQL in a day or two, but we must have someone who knows PostgreSQL already, even though it will take us another month to get him here from India. What's that? No, no nothing to do with how much less we may happen to pay an Indian; what're you, some kind of racist?!")
    3) The insistence in subsidising worthless degrees in Feminine, Albino, Atonal Musicology while simultaneously arguing not enough scientists and engineers are educated in the U.S.A. (and remember, a programmer who uses MySQL instead of PostgreSQL may as well not know what a tuple is...).
    4) The increasing impossibility of promotion for anyone not the boss' nephew (see supra: "But he's not already a vice president!") This last supports the churn and burn philosophy of business to keep from ever paying people raises for seniority or having to provide healthcare for those of us who aren't spring chickens anymore and actually have to occassionally seek medical treatment.

    I could go on but I reckon I've made my point: employers are increasingly returning to the abuses present before the reforms begun in Germany with workers' compensation, in the U.S.A. under Theodore Roosevelt and the progressive movement, etc. It ties to globalism not just because of labor arbitrage via immivasion, but also because employers demand to employ the same shenanigans in the U.S.A., Europe, Canada, Australia, etc. as they have gotten used to pulling off in China, India, etc. If the laws of the previously civilised nations preclude openly exercising those shenanigans, the work-arounds and kludges I've written about will suffice.

    Lastly, notice that Japanese employers continue to promote internally, train their employees, and to be famously loyal to employees (fostering reciprocal loyalty from those employees—it was the globalist employers who drew first blood in that question of chickens and eggs, by the way...). Oh, and the Japanese openly acknowldge and support the idea that Japan is for the Japanese. Any chance of a correlation and causation here...?

    Excellent points. (My “agree” button is not registering.)

    Also, add in here the symbiotic relationship with the academy, where sundry degrees plus continued credentials help maintain the education racket.

    Read More
  26. what are we going to do about the 150 million moron minorities we already have here?

    Much of what we do now is concerned with warehousing humanity. I expect the future to be even more so.

    Read More
  27. Sounds to me like his winning bid was too low.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dai Alanye
    Exactly!

    As a general advisory, in fact, if you are too busy, raise your prices. Make more profit while your backlog automatically reduces itself.
  28. Pardon the length, but from today’s Gatestone Institute:

    A Month of Islam and Multiculturalism in France: January 2017
    by Soeren Kern
    February 23, 2017 at 5:00 am

    https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/9978/islam-france-january

    “I am not ashamed of what I am. I am a Muslim, that is to say, submissive to Allah who created me and who by his grace has harmoniously shaped me.” — Salah Abdeslam, a Belgium-born French national of Moroccan descent and the main suspect in the November 13, 2015 attacks that killed 130 people in Paris.

    The Grand Mosque of Paris announced that it was withdrawing from the Foundation for Islam of France, a new, government-sponsored foundation charged with “contributing to the emergence of an Islam of France that is fully anchored in the French Republic.” In a statement, the mosque, which represents 250 of the 2,500 of the mosques and Muslim associations in France, said that it denounced “any form of interference in the management of Muslim worship.”

    “An Algerian sociologist, Smaïn Laacher, with great courage, just said in a documentary aired on Channel 3: ‘It is a shame to deny this taboo, namely that in the Arab families in France, and everyone knows it but nobody wants to say it, anti-Semitism is sucked with mother’s milk.’” —Georges Bensoussan, a highly regarded Jewish historian of Moroccan descent, who is being prosecuted for talking about anti-Semitism among French Arabs.

    “When parents shout at their children, when they want to reprimand them, they call them Jews. Yes. All Arab families know this. It is monumental hypocrisy not to see that this anti-Semitism begins as a domestic one.” — Smaïn Laacher, a French-Algerian sociologist, in a documentary called, “Teachers in the Lost Territories of the Republic.”

    “Islamophobia is a weapon of intimidation and an invention to forbid debate.” — Pascal Bruckner.

    Three months after French authorities demolished the “Jungle” migrant camp, migrants are returning to Calais at the rate of around 30 a day. Most of them are unaccompanied minors hoping to smuggle their way across the English Channel to Britain.

    January 1. The Interior Ministry announced the most anticipated statistic of the year: a total of 945 cars and trucks were torched across France on New Year’s Eve, a 17.5% increase from the 804 vehicles burned during the annual ritual on the same holiday in 2015. Car burnings, commonplace in France, are often attributed to rival Muslim gangs that compete with each other for the media spotlight over which can cause the most destruction. An estimated 40,000 cars are torched in France every year.

    A van burns during a recent riot in a Paris suburb. Car burnings, commonplace in France, are often attributed to rival Muslim gangs that compete with each other for the media spotlight. An estimated 40,000 cars are torched in France every year. (Image source: RT video screenshot)
    January 2. Approximately 3.7 million crimes were reported in France in 2016, a 4% increase over 2015, according to Le Figaro. Seine-Saint-Denis, a Paris suburb which has one of the highest concentrations of Muslims in France, ranks as the most dangerous part of the country, with 18.2 attacks per 1,000 inhabitants. It is followed by Paris, with 15.7 attacks per 1,000 inhabitants and Bouches-du-Rhône with 11.5 attacks per 1,000 inhabitants.

    January 2. The Criminal Court of Paris sentenced Nicolas Moreau, a 32-year-old French jihadist, to ten years in prison for fighting for the Islamic State. He is the brother of Flavien Moreau, the first French jihadist to be sentenced for such an offense upon his return from Syria in November 2014. Born in South Korea, adopted by a French family at the age of 4, Nicolas became a delinquent after the divorce of his adoptive parents. He converted to Islam in prison, where he spent five years. Nicolas said he fled the Islamic State after 17 months due to its “excesses.”

    January 3. Jean-Christophe Lagarde, the president of the Union of Democrats and Independents, a center-right political party, attributed the closure of a PSA Peugeot-Citroën automobile factory to an excess of religious demands by Muslim employees. “There have been difficulties even in my department, for example in Aulnay-sous-Bois. It has never been said, but part of the reason for the closure of PSA was due to the omnipresence of religion and the fact that there were religious demands at work, work stoppages, decreased productivity. PSA’s decision to close Aulnay was influenced by this aspect.”

    January 3. The Administrative Court of Poitiers dismissed a lawsuit filed by the Coalition against Racism and Islamophobia (CRI), which tried to ban a 14-page document aimed at preventing radicalization in schools. The document called on teachers to monitor several criteria, including “uncut long beards,” “shaved hair,” “Muslim clothing,” “refusal of tattoos,” and “weight loss associated with frequent fasting.” The document also referred to behavior such as “identity withdrawal,” “selective exposure to the media,” and “political rhetoric” concerning Palestine, Chechnya and Iraq. The document urged teachers to monitor closely students interested in the “history of early Islam.” The court emphasized the strictly internal nature of the document, which was deemed to be “devoid of any legal effect” because it contains “no mandatory provisions.”

    January 4. Of the 230 French jihadists who have been killed in Iraq and Syria, seven were killed by American drones, according to Le Monde. “The French targets had a twofold status: they were military objectives, the elimination of which is theoretically governed by the law of war, and they were also targets of judicial proceedings in France. In the name of the ‘self-defense,’ which the coalition states claim, military logic prevailed over the right to legal defense,” the paper complained.

    January 4. Jean-Sébastien Vialatte, the deputy mayor of Six-Four-Les-Plages, ordered police to visit the Reynier Primary School there on two occasions after he heard rumors that the school was requiring students to attend Arabic language classes. The courses, which were optional, not mandatory, have since been cancelled.

    January 5. The Magistrate’s Court of Rennes sentenced a 34-year-old man to 17 months in prison on charges of domestic violence for striking his female companion because she refused to convert to Islam. The woman said the man had “profoundly changed” after he visited Mali. “He has become radicalized,” she said. “He promises Allah will take revenge against the disbelievers who do not convert. Religion has taken an increasingly important place in his life. He believes he is good and all others are evil.” The man denied he ever “forced someone to be a Muslim.” He added, “Before, I was like her, I smoked, I drank, but it is over now.”

    January 5. Farid Benyettou, a 35-year-old former French jihadist who indoctrinated the gunmen who attacked the Charlie Hebdo magazine in Paris in January 2015, admitted that he was partly to blame for the violence. “I bear a share of responsibility, I cannot deny it,” he said in an interview with Le Parisien. “I preached hate, I distilled this ideology even though it was not me who told him to commit this massacre. I served my prison sentence, I paid my debt to society, but not my moral debt.” He tells his story in a new book, “My Jihad: Journey of a Repenter.”

    January 6. A statistical analysis carried out by François Desouche, an influential French blog, found a dramatic increase in the popularity of Muslim first names given to children born in France during the past 20 years. In Paris, for example, 17.1% of babies born in 2016 received Muslim first names, up from 9.4% in 1996. In Seine-Saint-Denis, a Paris suburb, 42.9% of babies born in 2016 received Muslim first names, up from 17.3% in 1996. The trend repeats itself across France.

    January 6. Zineb El Rhazoui, a 35-year-old Moroccan-born journalist, quit her job at Charlie Hebdo because the magazine is now following an editorial line that “Mohammed is no longer drawn” — as demanded by Islamists before the January 2015 attacks. She said Charlie Hebdo now feels “too alone to go to the front.” But our colleagues “must not have died for nothing. If it were up to me, I would continue,” she said.

    January 6. The Nice Criminal Court acquitted Pierre-Alain Mannoni, 45, for helping three Eritrean women who crossed the border into France from Italy. Mannoni, a teacher-researcher at the French national research center (CNRS), was arrested at the Turbie toll booth just beyond the Italian border in October 2015 and charged with “assisting the entry, movement and residence of irregular migrants.” The charge incurs five years in prison and €30,000 ($31,000) in fines. The prosecutor argued that people are not allowed to help illegal migrants move about the country. Mannoni said he was “protecting their dignity and integrity.” Christian Estrosi, the president of the Nice Côte d’Azur Riviera region, said the ruling was “an insult to the work of the security forces who put their life in danger to protect ours.”

    January 10. Around 5,000 Jews emigrated from France to Israel in 2016, according to the Jewish Agency of Israel, which released the data to mark two years since attacks on the Charlie Hebdo and on a Jewish supermarket in Paris in January 2015. The departures in 2016 add to the 7,900 who left in 2015 and 7,231 in 2014. In total, since 2006, 40,000 French Jews have emigrated.

    January 12. Salah Abdeslam — a Belgium-born French national of Moroccan descent and the main suspect in the November 13, 2015 attacks that killed 130 people in Paris — said, “I am not ashamed of what I am. I am a Muslim, that is to say, submissive to Allah who created me and who by his grace has harmoniously shaped me.” Abdeslam is reportedly receiving stacks of mail “from Catholics with questions about his faith, from women who declare their love for him and say they want to bear his child, from lawyers who offer their services, it is incessant,” according to Libération.

    January 12. A French couple were given suspended sentences for selling Islamic State flags online. They were caught after neighbors saw them boasting about their business in a television documentary about jihadi recruitment and called the police.

    January 16. Asian tourists are avoiding France due to fears over terrorism and spiraling crime, according to Le Parisien, which interviewed Jean-François Zhou, President of the Chinese Association of Travel Agencies in France. Some 1.6 million Chinese tourists visited France in 2016, compared to 2.2 million in 2015, a 27% decline. The number of tourists from South Korea also declined by 27%, and the number of Japanese tourists declined by 39%. “Our tourists have turned to Russia, which is less attractive but at least it is a safe country,” Zhou said. “For Putin, it is an economic windfall.” Zhou explained:

    “The decline is explained above all to the scourge of petty delinquency aimed especially at Chinese tourists. They are robbed in the Palace of Versailles, at the foot of the Eiffel Tower, in front of their hotel, when they exit the buses. In high season, there is not a day without tourists being assaulted. I saw an 80-year-old man seriously injured because he was trying to resist thieves. Women are pushed and when they fall their bags are stolen with all their papers. This has created a panic on Chinese social networks. The Chinese began turning away from France last year.

    “The police have increased their numbers to protect tourists. But since the terrorist attacks, these forces have been mobilized elsewhere. We want France to stop its laxity. We, along with my traveling colleagues, are counting on the future government to get things done. I have been in France for twenty-five years, and I myself have seen the decline of France in terms of security. Before, the Chinese tour operators deplored the insecurity in Italy, today it is France and more particularly Paris and Marseilles which we speak. There are many regions in France where tourism can be leisurely pursued, but Paris is ranked No. 1 in Europe in terms of the increase in delinquency.”

    January 17. The Magistrate’s Court in Paris acquitted Pascal Bruckner, a renowned intellectual and author, on charges of defamation after he remarked on the “28 minutes-Arte” television program that pro-Muslim activist groups such as “The Indivisibles” (Les Indivisibles) and “The Republic’s Natives” (Les Indigènes de la République) were “ideological accomplices” of jihadism. The decision was hailed as a “victory for the freedom of expression” in France, which does not have legal protections such as the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, guaranteeing the freedom of speech.

    January 18. One of the suicide bombers who blew himself up outside the Stade de France during the November 2015 attacks on Paris turned out to be an Iraqi jihadist, according to France’s DGSE intelligence agency. Until now, only one of the three bombers had been identified: a 20-year-old Frenchman living in Belgium. DGSE believes that one of that man’s accomplices, who was carrying a fake Syrian passport, was from the Iraqi city of Mosul. He and the third attacker, whose identity is still unknown, are believed to have slipped into Europe with a group of refugees who landed on the Greek island of Leros on October 3, 2015.

    January 20. The Council of State (Conseil d’État), France’s highest administrative court, ruled that the mosque in Stains (Centre Culturel et Islamique de Stains) in Seine-Saint-Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, will remain closed. The Salafist mosque, which was identified as the last place of prayer for several French jihadists before they joined the Islamic State, was shuttered in November 2016 as part of a state of emergency.

    January 21. Kevin Guiavarch, a 24-year-old convert to Islam, was charged with terrorism offenses after being extradited from Turkey. He is believed to have been a member of both the Islamic State and the former Al-Nusra Front. He was arrested in Turkey in June 2016 after leaving Syria with his four wives and six children. Guiavarch, a Breton who converted to Islam at the age of 14, is believed to have gone to Syria in 2012.

    January 23. The Grand Mosque of Paris announced that it was withdrawing from the Foundation for Islam of France (Fondation de l’Islam de France), a new, government-sponsored foundation charged with “contributing to the emergence of an Islam of France that is fully anchored in the French Republic.” In a statement, the mosque, which represents 250 of the 2,500 of the mosques and Muslim associations in France, said that it denounced “any form of interference in the management of Muslim worship.” Others said the mosque’s rector, Dalil Boubakeur, 76, was angry that he was not named to be president of the foundation.

    January 23. The Administrative Court of Marseilles effectively terminated a project to build a €22 million ($23 million) mega-mosque with a capacity for 7,000 worshippers. In July 2007, the municipality granted a Muslim association a parcel of land in the 15th arrondissement to build the Grand Mosque of Marseille, but the project has been plagued by legal and financial problems. The cornerstone was laid in 2010, but since then nothing else has been built. In October 2016, the city terminated the lease for the land because the association had not paid the rent since 2013. According to the court, “the materiality of all the facts alleged against the association does not appear to be seriously contestable.”

    January 23. Benoît Hamon, the presidential candidate for the Socialist Party, lashed out at critics of Islam:

    “There is ultimately a desire to say that Islam is incompatible with the Republic. This is not true. It is unbearable that we continue to make the faith of millions of our compatriots a problem in French society. Let us stop making Islam an adversary of the Republic.”

    January 25. The trial began of Georges Bensoussan, a highly regarded Jewish historian of Moroccan descent, who is being prosecuted for talking about anti-Semitism among French Arabs. During a debate on Radio France Culture, he said:

    “An Algerian sociologist, Smaïn Laacher, with great courage, just said in a documentary aired on Channel 3: ‘It is a shame to deny this taboo, namely that in the Arab families in France, and everyone knows it but nobody wants to say it, anti-Semitism is sucked with mother’s milk.’”

    Bensoussan was referring to a documentary entitled “Teachers in the Lost Territories of the Republic,” aired on Channel 3 in October 2015. In this documentary, Laacher, who is a French professor of Algerian origin, said:

    “Antisemitism is already awash in the domestic space. It rolls almost naturally off the tongue, awash in the language. It is an insult. When parents shout at their children, when they want to reprimand them, they call them Jews. Yes. All Arab families know this. It is monumental hypocrisy not to see that this anti-Semitism begins as a domestic one.”

    Laacher was not prosecuted but Bensoussan was. The court’s decision will be rendered March 7. “This witch-hunt against Bensoussan is symptomatic of the state of free speech today in France,” wrote the French journalist Yves Mamou.

    January 26. The Administrative Court of Bastia in Corsica validated a burkini ban in the village of Sisco. Mayor Ange-Pierre Vivoni argued the ban was necessary to avoid a repeat of fighting between local youths and Muslims in August 2016, when five people were hurt. The court rejected a similar ban in Ghisonaccio, due to a lack of evidence that the garment was a threat to public order.

    January 27. Pascal Bruckner, a renowned author and intellectual, in an essay entitled “An Imaginary Racism,” wrote that Islamophobia is a “weapon of intimidation” and an “invention to forbid debate.”

    January 27. “The Halal Market: The Invention of a Tradition,” a new book by anthropologist Florence Bergeaud-Blackler, argues that “buying halal is not a religious obligation.” Although the Koran and Sunnah (the teachings and practices of Mohammed) prohibit pork, blood and alcohol, they do not impose rules dictating behavior, according to Bergeaud-Blackler.

    “Eating halal is presented today as an obligatory practice for Muslims, even though the term did not exist in the Muslim world before it was exported by developed countries,” she told FRANCE 24. Bergeaud-Blackler, who has studied halal for the past 20 years, said the market has flourished in non-Muslim countries because of immigration. “There’s a recent poll by the Montaigne Institute which shows that 40% of France’s Muslim population thinks eating halal is a pillar of Islam; this notion is false,” she said.

    In reality, the halal food industry is a product of the “random convergence of neo-fundamentalism and neo-liberalism” during the early 1980s, Bergeaud-Blackler explained. “At the time, these two ideologies were dominant on the international scene. Their convergence would change the theological definition of halal from ‘recommended’ to ‘required’ and which is a hallmark of fundamentalism,” she said.

    January 29. Three months after French authorities demolished the “Jungle” migrant camp, migrants are returning to Calais at the rate of around 30 a day. Most of them are unaccompanied minors hoping to smuggle their way across the English Channel to Britain.

    Soeren Kern is a Senior Fellow at the New York-based Gatestone Institute. Follow him on Facebook and on Twitter.

    Follow Soeren Kern on Twitter and Facebook
    © 2017 Gatestone Institute. All rights reserved. The articles printed here do not necessarily reflect the views of the Editors or of Gatestone Institute. No part of the Gatestone website or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied or modified, without the prior written consent of Gatestone Institute.

    Read More
  29. Pardon the length, but from today’s Gatestone Institute:

    A Month of Islam and Multiculturalism in France: January 2017
    by Soeren Kern
    February 23, 2017 at 5:00 am

    https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/9978/islam-france-january

    “I am not ashamed of what I am. I am a Muslim, that is to say, submissive to Allah who created me and who by his grace has harmoniously shaped me.” — Salah Abdeslam, a Belgium-born French national of Moroccan descent and the main suspect in the November 13, 2015 attacks that killed 130 people in Paris.

    The Grand Mosque of Paris announced that it was withdrawing from the Foundation for Islam of France, a new, government-sponsored foundation charged with “contributing to the emergence of an Islam of France that is fully anchored in the French Republic.” In a statement, the mosque, which represents 250 of the 2,500 of the mosques and Muslim associations in France, said that it denounced “any form of interference in the management of Muslim worship.”

    “An Algerian sociologist, Smaïn Laacher, with great courage, just said in a documentary aired on Channel 3: ‘It is a shame to deny this taboo, namely that in the Arab families in France, and everyone knows it but nobody wants to say it, anti-Semitism is sucked with mother’s milk.’” —Georges Bensoussan, a highly regarded Jewish historian of Moroccan descent, who is being prosecuted for talking about anti-Semitism among French Arabs.

    “When parents shout at their children, when they want to reprimand them, they call them Jews. Yes. All Arab families know this. It is monumental hypocrisy not to see that this anti-Semitism begins as a domestic one.” — Smaïn Laacher, a French-Algerian sociologist, in a documentary called, “Teachers in the Lost Territories of the Republic.”

    “Islamophobia is a weapon of intimidation and an invention to forbid debate.” — Pascal Bruckner.

    Three months after French authorities demolished the “Jungle” migrant camp, migrants are returning to Calais at the rate of around 30 a day. Most of them are unaccompanied minors hoping to smuggle their way across the English Channel to Britain.

    January 1. The Interior Ministry announced the most anticipated statistic of the year: a total of 945 cars and trucks were torched across France on New Year’s Eve, a 17.5% increase from the 804 vehicles burned during the annual ritual on the same holiday in 2015. Car burnings, commonplace in France, are often attributed to rival Muslim gangs that compete with each other for the media spotlight over which can cause the most destruction. An estimated 40,000 cars are torched in France every year.

    A van burns during a recent riot in a Paris suburb. Car burnings, commonplace in France, are often attributed to rival Muslim gangs that compete with each other for the media spotlight. An estimated 40,000 cars are torched in France every year. (Image source: RT video screenshot)
    January 2. Approximately 3.7 million crimes were reported in France in 2016, a 4% increase over 2015, according to Le Figaro. Seine-Saint-Denis, a Paris suburb which has one of the highest concentrations of Muslims in France, ranks as the most dangerous part of the country, with 18.2 attacks per 1,000 inhabitants. It is followed by Paris, with 15.7 attacks per 1,000 inhabitants and Bouches-du-Rhône with 11.5 attacks per 1,000 inhabitants.

    January 2. The Criminal Court of Paris sentenced Nicolas Moreau, a 32-year-old French jihadist, to ten years in prison for fighting for the Islamic State. He is the brother of Flavien Moreau, the first French jihadist to be sentenced for such an offense upon his return from Syria in November 2014. Born in South Korea, adopted by a French family at the age of 4, Nicolas became a delinquent after the divorce of his adoptive parents. He converted to Islam in prison, where he spent five years. Nicolas said he fled the Islamic State after 17 months due to its “excesses.”

    January 3. Jean-Christophe Lagarde, the president of the Union of Democrats and Independents, a center-right political party, attributed the closure of a PSA Peugeot-Citroën automobile factory to an excess of religious demands by Muslim employees. “There have been difficulties even in my department, for example in Aulnay-sous-Bois. It has never been said, but part of the reason for the closure of PSA was due to the omnipresence of religion and the fact that there were religious demands at work, work stoppages, decreased productivity. PSA’s decision to close Aulnay was influenced by this aspect.”

    January 3. The Administrative Court of Poitiers dismissed a lawsuit filed by the Coalition against Racism and Islamophobia (CRI), which tried to ban a 14-page document aimed at preventing radicalization in schools. The document called on teachers to monitor several criteria, including “uncut long beards,” “shaved hair,” “Muslim clothing,” “refusal of tattoos,” and “weight loss associated with frequent fasting.” The document also referred to behavior such as “identity withdrawal,” “selective exposure to the media,” and “political rhetoric” concerning Palestine, Chechnya and Iraq. The document urged teachers to monitor closely students interested in the “history of early Islam.” The court emphasized the strictly internal nature of the document, which was deemed to be “devoid of any legal effect” because it contains “no mandatory provisions.”

    January 4. Of the 230 French jihadists who have been killed in Iraq and Syria, seven were killed by American drones, according to Le Monde. “The French targets had a twofold status: they were military objectives, the elimination of which is theoretically governed by the law of war, and they were also targets of judicial proceedings in France. In the name of the ‘self-defense,’ which the coalition states claim, military logic prevailed over the right to legal defense,” the paper complained.

    January 4. Jean-Sébastien Vialatte, the deputy mayor of Six-Four-Les-Plages, ordered police to visit the Reynier Primary School there on two occasions after he heard rumors that the school was requiring students to attend Arabic language classes. The courses, which were optional, not mandatory, have since been cancelled.

    January 5. The Magistrate’s Court of Rennes sentenced a 34-year-old man to 17 months in prison on charges of domestic violence for striking his female companion because she refused to convert to Islam. The woman said the man had “profoundly changed” after he visited Mali. “He has become radicalized,” she said. “He promises Allah will take revenge against the disbelievers who do not convert. Religion has taken an increasingly important place in his life. He believes he is good and all others are evil.” The man denied he ever “forced someone to be a Muslim.” He added, “Before, I was like her, I smoked, I drank, but it is over now.”

    January 5. Farid Benyettou, a 35-year-old former French jihadist who indoctrinated the gunmen who attacked the Charlie Hebdo magazine in Paris in January 2015, admitted that he was partly to blame for the violence. “I bear a share of responsibility, I cannot deny it,” he said in an interview with Le Parisien. “I preached hate, I distilled this ideology even though it was not me who told him to commit this massacre. I served my prison sentence, I paid my debt to society, but not my moral debt.” He tells his story in a new book, “My Jihad: Journey of a Repenter.”

    January 6. A statistical analysis carried out by François Desouche, an influential French blog, found a dramatic increase in the popularity of Muslim first names given to children born in France during the past 20 years. In Paris, for example, 17.1% of babies born in 2016 received Muslim first names, up from 9.4% in 1996. In Seine-Saint-Denis, a Paris suburb, 42.9% of babies born in 2016 received Muslim first names, up from 17.3% in 1996. The trend repeats itself across France.

    January 6. Zineb El Rhazoui, a 35-year-old Moroccan-born journalist, quit her job at Charlie Hebdo because the magazine is now following an editorial line that “Mohammed is no longer drawn” — as demanded by Islamists before the January 2015 attacks. She said Charlie Hebdo now feels “too alone to go to the front.” But our colleagues “must not have died for nothing. If it were up to me, I would continue,” she said.

    January 6. The Nice Criminal Court acquitted Pierre-Alain Mannoni, 45, for helping three Eritrean women who crossed the border into France from Italy. Mannoni, a teacher-researcher at the French national research center (CNRS), was arrested at the Turbie toll booth just beyond the Italian border in October 2015 and charged with “assisting the entry, movement and residence of irregular migrants.” The charge incurs five years in prison and €30,000 ($31,000) in fines. The prosecutor argued that people are not allowed to help illegal migrants move about the country. Mannoni said he was “protecting their dignity and integrity.” Christian Estrosi, the president of the Nice Côte d’Azur Riviera region, said the ruling was “an insult to the work of the security forces who put their life in danger to protect ours.”

    January 10. Around 5,000 Jews emigrated from France to Israel in 2016, according to the Jewish Agency of Israel, which released the data to mark two years since attacks on the Charlie Hebdo and on a Jewish supermarket in Paris in January 2015. The departures in 2016 add to the 7,900 who left in 2015 and 7,231 in 2014. In total, since 2006, 40,000 French Jews have emigrated.

    January 12. Salah Abdeslam — a Belgium-born French national of Moroccan descent and the main suspect in the November 13, 2015 attacks that killed 130 people in Paris — said, “I am not ashamed of what I am. I am a Muslim, that is to say, submissive to Allah who created me and who by his grace has harmoniously shaped me.” Abdeslam is reportedly receiving stacks of mail “from Catholics with questions about his faith, from women who declare their love for him and say they want to bear his child, from lawyers who offer their services, it is incessant,” according to Libération.

    January 12. A French couple were given suspended sentences for selling Islamic State flags online. They were caught after neighbors saw them boasting about their business in a television documentary about jihadi recruitment and called the police.

    January 16. Asian tourists are avoiding France due to fears over terrorism and spiraling crime, according to Le Parisien, which interviewed Jean-François Zhou, President of the Chinese Association of Travel Agencies in France. Some 1.6 million Chinese tourists visited France in 2016, compared to 2.2 million in 2015, a 27% decline. The number of tourists from South Korea also declined by 27%, and the number of Japanese tourists declined by 39%. “Our tourists have turned to Russia, which is less attractive but at least it is a safe country,” Zhou said. “For Putin, it is an economic windfall.” Zhou explained:

    “The decline is explained above all to the scourge of petty delinquency aimed especially at Chinese tourists. They are robbed in the Palace of Versailles, at the foot of the Eiffel Tower, in front of their hotel, when they exit the buses. In high season, there is not a day without tourists being assaulted. I saw an 80-year-old man seriously injured because he was trying to resist thieves. Women are pushed and when they fall their bags are stolen with all their papers. This has created a panic on Chinese social networks. The Chinese began turning away from France last year.

    “The police have increased their numbers to protect tourists. But since the terrorist attacks, these forces have been mobilized elsewhere. We want France to stop its laxity. We, along with my traveling colleagues, are counting on the future government to get things done. I have been in France for twenty-five years, and I myself have seen the decline of France in terms of security. Before, the Chinese tour operators deplored the insecurity in Italy, today it is France and more particularly Paris and Marseilles which we speak. There are many regions in France where tourism can be leisurely pursued, but Paris is ranked No. 1 in Europe in terms of the increase in delinquency.”

    January 17. The Magistrate’s Court in Paris acquitted Pascal Bruckner, a renowned intellectual and author, on charges of defamation after he remarked on the “28 minutes-Arte” television program that pro-Muslim activist groups such as “The Indivisibles” (Les Indivisibles) and “The Republic’s Natives” (Les Indigènes de la République) were “ideological accomplices” of jihadism. The decision was hailed as a “victory for the freedom of expression” in France, which does not have legal protections such as the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, guaranteeing the freedom of speech.

    January 18. One of the suicide bombers who blew himself up outside the Stade de France during the November 2015 attacks on Paris turned out to be an Iraqi jihadist, according to France’s DGSE intelligence agency. Until now, only one of the three bombers had been identified: a 20-year-old Frenchman living in Belgium. DGSE believes that one of that man’s accomplices, who was carrying a fake Syrian passport, was from the Iraqi city of Mosul. He and the third attacker, whose identity is still unknown, are believed to have slipped into Europe with a group of refugees who landed on the Greek island of Leros on October 3, 2015.

    January 20. The Council of State (Conseil d’État), France’s highest administrative court, ruled that the mosque in Stains (Centre Culturel et Islamique de Stains) in Seine-Saint-Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, will remain closed. The Salafist mosque, which was identified as the last place of prayer for several French jihadists before they joined the Islamic State, was shuttered in November 2016 as part of a state of emergency.

    January 21. Kevin Guiavarch, a 24-year-old convert to Islam, was charged with terrorism offenses after being extradited from Turkey. He is believed to have been a member of both the Islamic State and the former Al-Nusra Front. He was arrested in Turkey in June 2016 after leaving Syria with his four wives and six children. Guiavarch, a Breton who converted to Islam at the age of 14, is believed to have gone to Syria in 2012.

    January 23. The Grand Mosque of Paris announced that it was withdrawing from the Foundation for Islam of France (Fondation de l’Islam de France), a new, government-sponsored foundation charged with “contributing to the emergence of an Islam of France that is fully anchored in the French Republic.” In a statement, the mosque, which represents 250 of the 2,500 of the mosques and Muslim associations in France, said that it denounced “any form of interference in the management of Muslim worship.” Others said the mosque’s rector, Dalil Boubakeur, 76, was angry that he was not named to be president of the foundation.

    January 23. The Administrative Court of Marseilles effectively terminated a project to build a €22 million ($23 million) mega-mosque with a capacity for 7,000 worshippers. In July 2007, the municipality granted a Muslim association a parcel of land in the 15th arrondissement to build the Grand Mosque of Marseille, but the project has been plagued by legal and financial problems. The cornerstone was laid in 2010, but since then nothing else has been built. In October 2016, the city terminated the lease for the land because the association had not paid the rent since 2013. According to the court, “the materiality of all the facts alleged against the association does not appear to be seriously contestable.”

    January 23. Benoît Hamon, the presidential candidate for the Socialist Party, lashed out at critics of Islam:

    “There is ultimately a desire to say that Islam is incompatible with the Republic. This is not true. It is unbearable that we continue to make the faith of millions of our compatriots a problem in French society. Let us stop making Islam an adversary of the Republic.”

    January 25. The trial began of Georges Bensoussan, a highly regarded Jewish historian of Moroccan descent, who is being prosecuted for talking about anti-Semitism among French Arabs. During a debate on Radio France Culture, he said:

    “An Algerian sociologist, Smaïn Laacher, with great courage, just said in a documentary aired on Channel 3: ‘It is a shame to deny this taboo, namely that in the Arab families in France, and everyone knows it but nobody wants to say it, anti-Semitism is sucked with mother’s milk.’”

    Bensoussan was referring to a documentary entitled “Teachers in the Lost Territories of the Republic,” aired on Channel 3 in October 2015. In this documentary, Laacher, who is a French professor of Algerian origin, said:

    “Antisemitism is already awash in the domestic space. It rolls almost naturally off the tongue, awash in the language. It is an insult. When parents shout at their children, when they want to reprimand them, they call them Jews. Yes. All Arab families know this. It is monumental hypocrisy not to see that this anti-Semitism begins as a domestic one.”

    Laacher was not prosecuted but Bensoussan was. The court’s decision will be rendered March 7. “This witch-hunt against Bensoussan is symptomatic of the state of free speech today in France,” wrote the French journalist Yves Mamou.

    January 26. The Administrative Court of Bastia in Corsica validated a burkini ban in the village of Sisco. Mayor Ange-Pierre Vivoni argued the ban was necessary to avoid a repeat of fighting between local youths and Muslims in August 2016, when five people were hurt. The court rejected a similar ban in Ghisonaccio, due to a lack of evidence that the garment was a threat to public order.

    January 27. Pascal Bruckner, a renowned author and intellectual, in an essay entitled “An Imaginary Racism,” wrote that Islamophobia is a “weapon of intimidation” and an “invention to forbid debate.”

    January 27. “The Halal Market: The Invention of a Tradition,” a new book by anthropologist Florence Bergeaud-Blackler, argues that “buying halal is not a religious obligation.” Although the Koran and Sunnah (the teachings and practices of Mohammed) prohibit pork, blood and alcohol, they do not impose rules dictating behavior, according to Bergeaud-Blackler.

    “Eating halal is presented today as an obligatory practice for Muslims, even though the term did not exist in the Muslim world before it was exported by developed countries,” she told FRANCE 24. Bergeaud-Blackler, who has studied halal for the past 20 years, said the market has flourished in non-Muslim countries because of immigration. “There’s a recent poll by the Montaigne Institute which shows that 40% of France’s Muslim population thinks eating halal is a pillar of Islam; this notion is false,” she said.

    In reality, the halal food industry is a product of the “random convergence of neo-fundamentalism and neo-liberalism” during the early 1980s, Bergeaud-Blackler explained. “At the time, these two ideologies were dominant on the international scene. Their convergence would change the theological definition of halal from ‘recommended’ to ‘required’ and which is a hallmark of fundamentalism,” she said.

    January 29. Three months after French authorities demolished the “Jungle” migrant camp, migrants are returning to Calais at the rate of around 30 a day. Most of them are unaccompanied minors hoping to smuggle their way across the English Channel to Britain.

    Soeren Kern is a Senior Fellow at the New York-based Gatestone Institute. Follow him on Facebook and on Twitter.

    Follow Soeren Kern on Twitter and Facebook
    © 2017 Gatestone Institute. All rights reserved. The articles printed here do not necessarily reflect the views of the Editors or of Gatestone Institute. No part of the Gatestone website or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied or modified, without the prior written consent of Gatestone Institute.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Romanian
    They keep talking about Anti-Semitism to the exclusion of Anti-Frenchism. Maybe both should be highlighted?
    , @bomag
    tl:dr: France is swirling the drain.
  30. https://twitter.com/PernilleVermund/status/516110152333025281

    Denmark has some good-looking female political leaders. If Hillary Clinton looked like Pernille Vermund, and if Hillary wasn’t such an open borders baby boomer rat, she might have defeated Trump.

    Vermund is a beautiful Danish lady political leader who is a mother and patriot. She loves Denmark and wants to keep it full of Danes. Vermund says mass immigration will destroy Denmark and she rejects it.

    She keeps herself in fighting trim by running and then skinny dipping in the sea. In order for her to be comfortable skinny dipping in a civilized manner, it is obviously necessary to maintain the pleasant natural culture that Danes possess.

    This beautiful Danish political leader and her athletic skinny dipping lifestyle brings to mind the Australian riots in Cronulla. Foreigners began attacking and harassing scantily clad Australian women on a beach and the Anglo-Celtic Australian young men got pissed off about it. The Australians and the Danes should begin deporting all foreigners immediately.

    Read More
  31. @TheBoom
    Portugal, Hungary, Croatia, and Poland

    Bulgaria, Romania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania

    Read More
  32. The contract was worth more than half a million euros — a boon for his profits.

    I wonder if the journalist actually noted that Denmark doesn’t have the Euro as currency. One wonders, did she visit the country, or was this an email investigation?

    Read More
  33. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Colleen Pater
    yes and why not go even farther and import some chinese workers, cheaper still outsource the work.

    It might indeed be as steve implies that there is still plenty of margin with which to pay still higher wages. But at some point you come up against imports at third world labor rates. The west had an advantage of inventing and making the absolute best of everything often the only maker of some things. That puts you in a position to charge whatever you want certainly whatever is needed to pay first world wages.
    outsourcing and immigration disperse our technology before we can profit from it, we ship out to foreign factories we allow spies into our own factories and universities and we allow our tech to be hacked. granted a certain amount of this is inevitable today but ask yourselves how much chinese tech we manage to steal.
    The answer to crops rotting in the field perhaps can simply lead to better wages and higher fruit costs but at some point if everyones wages are not going up its simply inflation. maybe america can make the best fruit picking robots. but what are we going to do about the 150 million moron minorities we already have here

    No.

    My point is that Denmark is part of the same federalist super-state as Poland, or Hungary or Czechia or Slovakia or Romania or east Germany at this very moment in time.
    A founding principle of the EU, as Britain learned to its cost, is that there is absolutely no distinction made whatsoever, legally or otherwise, between a citizen of Denmark or a citizen of Romania if the said citizen wishes to sell his labour in Denmark.

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  34. @Autochthon

    ...few of the newcomers are readily employable in high-skilled work...
     
    Speaking of crimped margins, another huge change I've seen in my own lifetime is that employers will now choke and die before they will be bothered to provide new employees so much as an hour's paid, on-the-job training.

    I was once part of a team seeking to find a new vice president for an employer of mine, and the orders were that only persons who were currently vice presidents for other employers would be considered. I identified a guy perfect for the gig – inarguably more qualified than any of the other candidates who were, in fact, already holding the title of vice president. The guy I'd found had been working as a senior director for several years. When he was dismissed by muckity-mucks who couldn't even be bothered to read his résumé despite the endorsements by my whole team coordinating the search, I asked, in exasperation "Where in the Hell do you think vice presidents come from? No one springs forth like Minerva from Jupiter's head a vice president!"

    This insistence that new employees be not bright, eager, people with a necessary fundamental set of skills, but, rather, that they happen to have exactly the résumé the employer fantasises about is akin to an average Joe insisting he will only date a woman if she is as physically beautiful as Helen of Troy.

    It goes to:

    1) The phony shortage of employees
    2) The pretexts used to run the H1B and similar scams, nepotism, and cronyism ("Nope, no qualified candidates in the pool; see? Not one of them has experience with all five programmng languages and fluency in Czech (it's mere coincidence the boss' nephew studied in Prague...). What's that? Yeah, I know anyone conversant with MySQL can teach himself PostgreSQL in a day or two, but we must have someone who knows PostgreSQL already, even though it will take us another month to get him here from India. What's that? No, no nothing to do with how much less we may happen to pay an Indian; what're you, some kind of racist?!")
    3) The insistence in subsidising worthless degrees in Feminine, Albino, Atonal Musicology while simultaneously arguing not enough scientists and engineers are educated in the U.S.A. (and remember, a programmer who uses MySQL instead of PostgreSQL may as well not know what a tuple is...).
    4) The increasing impossibility of promotion for anyone not the boss' nephew (see supra: "But he's not already a vice president!") This last supports the churn and burn philosophy of business to keep from ever paying people raises for seniority or having to provide healthcare for those of us who aren't spring chickens anymore and actually have to occassionally seek medical treatment.

    I could go on but I reckon I've made my point: employers are increasingly returning to the abuses present before the reforms begun in Germany with workers' compensation, in the U.S.A. under Theodore Roosevelt and the progressive movement, etc. It ties to globalism not just because of labor arbitrage via immivasion, but also because employers demand to employ the same shenanigans in the U.S.A., Europe, Canada, Australia, etc. as they have gotten used to pulling off in China, India, etc. If the laws of the previously civilised nations preclude openly exercising those shenanigans, the work-arounds and kludges I've written about will suffice.

    Lastly, notice that Japanese employers continue to promote internally, train their employees, and to be famously loyal to employees (fostering reciprocal loyalty from those employees—it was the globalist employers who drew first blood in that question of chickens and eggs, by the way...). Oh, and the Japanese openly acknowldge and support the idea that Japan is for the Japanese. Any chance of a correlation and causation here...?

    Tried to “Agree” to your eminently agreement-worthy comment, but although the option was apparently available (not greyed out) and it appeared initially to take the click, no “Agree” showed up.

    So here it is, by the long way round.

    Agree: Randal

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  35. @Luke Lea
    Pardon the length, but from today's Gatestone Institute:

    A Month of Islam and Multiculturalism in France: January 2017
    by Soeren Kern
    February 23, 2017 at 5:00 am
    https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/9978/islam-france-january

    "I am not ashamed of what I am. I am a Muslim, that is to say, submissive to Allah who created me and who by his grace has harmoniously shaped me." — Salah Abdeslam, a Belgium-born French national of Moroccan descent and the main suspect in the November 13, 2015 attacks that killed 130 people in Paris.

    The Grand Mosque of Paris announced that it was withdrawing from the Foundation for Islam of France, a new, government-sponsored foundation charged with "contributing to the emergence of an Islam of France that is fully anchored in the French Republic." In a statement, the mosque, which represents 250 of the 2,500 of the mosques and Muslim associations in France, said that it denounced "any form of interference in the management of Muslim worship."

    "An Algerian sociologist, Smaïn Laacher, with great courage, just said in a documentary aired on Channel 3: 'It is a shame to deny this taboo, namely that in the Arab families in France, and everyone knows it but nobody wants to say it, anti-Semitism is sucked with mother's milk.'" —Georges Bensoussan, a highly regarded Jewish historian of Moroccan descent, who is being prosecuted for talking about anti-Semitism among French Arabs.

    "When parents shout at their children, when they want to reprimand them, they call them Jews. Yes. All Arab families know this. It is monumental hypocrisy not to see that this anti-Semitism begins as a domestic one." — Smaïn Laacher, a French-Algerian sociologist, in a documentary called, "Teachers in the Lost Territories of the Republic."

    "Islamophobia is a weapon of intimidation and an invention to forbid debate." — Pascal Bruckner.

    Three months after French authorities demolished the "Jungle" migrant camp, migrants are returning to Calais at the rate of around 30 a day. Most of them are unaccompanied minors hoping to smuggle their way across the English Channel to Britain.

    January 1. The Interior Ministry announced the most anticipated statistic of the year: a total of 945 cars and trucks were torched across France on New Year's Eve, a 17.5% increase from the 804 vehicles burned during the annual ritual on the same holiday in 2015. Car burnings, commonplace in France, are often attributed to rival Muslim gangs that compete with each other for the media spotlight over which can cause the most destruction. An estimated 40,000 cars are torched in France every year.


    A van burns during a recent riot in a Paris suburb. Car burnings, commonplace in France, are often attributed to rival Muslim gangs that compete with each other for the media spotlight. An estimated 40,000 cars are torched in France every year. (Image source: RT video screenshot)
    January 2. Approximately 3.7 million crimes were reported in France in 2016, a 4% increase over 2015, according to Le Figaro. Seine-Saint-Denis, a Paris suburb which has one of the highest concentrations of Muslims in France, ranks as the most dangerous part of the country, with 18.2 attacks per 1,000 inhabitants. It is followed by Paris, with 15.7 attacks per 1,000 inhabitants and Bouches-du-Rhône with 11.5 attacks per 1,000 inhabitants.

    January 2. The Criminal Court of Paris sentenced Nicolas Moreau, a 32-year-old French jihadist, to ten years in prison for fighting for the Islamic State. He is the brother of Flavien Moreau, the first French jihadist to be sentenced for such an offense upon his return from Syria in November 2014. Born in South Korea, adopted by a French family at the age of 4, Nicolas became a delinquent after the divorce of his adoptive parents. He converted to Islam in prison, where he spent five years. Nicolas said he fled the Islamic State after 17 months due to its "excesses."

    January 3. Jean-Christophe Lagarde, the president of the Union of Democrats and Independents, a center-right political party, attributed the closure of a PSA Peugeot-Citroën automobile factory to an excess of religious demands by Muslim employees. "There have been difficulties even in my department, for example in Aulnay-sous-Bois. It has never been said, but part of the reason for the closure of PSA was due to the omnipresence of religion and the fact that there were religious demands at work, work stoppages, decreased productivity. PSA's decision to close Aulnay was influenced by this aspect."

    January 3. The Administrative Court of Poitiers dismissed a lawsuit filed by the Coalition against Racism and Islamophobia (CRI), which tried to ban a 14-page document aimed at preventing radicalization in schools. The document called on teachers to monitor several criteria, including "uncut long beards," "shaved hair," "Muslim clothing," "refusal of tattoos," and "weight loss associated with frequent fasting." The document also referred to behavior such as "identity withdrawal," "selective exposure to the media," and "political rhetoric" concerning Palestine, Chechnya and Iraq. The document urged teachers to monitor closely students interested in the "history of early Islam." The court emphasized the strictly internal nature of the document, which was deemed to be "devoid of any legal effect" because it contains "no mandatory provisions."

    January 4. Of the 230 French jihadists who have been killed in Iraq and Syria, seven were killed by American drones, according to Le Monde. "The French targets had a twofold status: they were military objectives, the elimination of which is theoretically governed by the law of war, and they were also targets of judicial proceedings in France. In the name of the 'self-defense,' which the coalition states claim, military logic prevailed over the right to legal defense," the paper complained.

    January 4. Jean-Sébastien Vialatte, the deputy mayor of Six-Four-Les-Plages, ordered police to visit the Reynier Primary School there on two occasions after he heard rumors that the school was requiring students to attend Arabic language classes. The courses, which were optional, not mandatory, have since been cancelled.

    January 5. The Magistrate's Court of Rennes sentenced a 34-year-old man to 17 months in prison on charges of domestic violence for striking his female companion because she refused to convert to Islam. The woman said the man had "profoundly changed" after he visited Mali. "He has become radicalized," she said. "He promises Allah will take revenge against the disbelievers who do not convert. Religion has taken an increasingly important place in his life. He believes he is good and all others are evil." The man denied he ever "forced someone to be a Muslim." He added, "Before, I was like her, I smoked, I drank, but it is over now."

    January 5. Farid Benyettou, a 35-year-old former French jihadist who indoctrinated the gunmen who attacked the Charlie Hebdo magazine in Paris in January 2015, admitted that he was partly to blame for the violence. "I bear a share of responsibility, I cannot deny it," he said in an interview with Le Parisien. "I preached hate, I distilled this ideology even though it was not me who told him to commit this massacre. I served my prison sentence, I paid my debt to society, but not my moral debt." He tells his story in a new book, "My Jihad: Journey of a Repenter."

    January 6. A statistical analysis carried out by François Desouche, an influential French blog, found a dramatic increase in the popularity of Muslim first names given to children born in France during the past 20 years. In Paris, for example, 17.1% of babies born in 2016 received Muslim first names, up from 9.4% in 1996. In Seine-Saint-Denis, a Paris suburb, 42.9% of babies born in 2016 received Muslim first names, up from 17.3% in 1996. The trend repeats itself across France.

    January 6. Zineb El Rhazoui, a 35-year-old Moroccan-born journalist, quit her job at Charlie Hebdo because the magazine is now following an editorial line that "Mohammed is no longer drawn" — as demanded by Islamists before the January 2015 attacks. She said Charlie Hebdo now feels "too alone to go to the front." But our colleagues "must not have died for nothing. If it were up to me, I would continue," she said.

    January 6. The Nice Criminal Court acquitted Pierre-Alain Mannoni, 45, for helping three Eritrean women who crossed the border into France from Italy. Mannoni, a teacher-researcher at the French national research center (CNRS), was arrested at the Turbie toll booth just beyond the Italian border in October 2015 and charged with "assisting the entry, movement and residence of irregular migrants." The charge incurs five years in prison and €30,000 ($31,000) in fines. The prosecutor argued that people are not allowed to help illegal migrants move about the country. Mannoni said he was "protecting their dignity and integrity." Christian Estrosi, the president of the Nice Côte d'Azur Riviera region, said the ruling was "an insult to the work of the security forces who put their life in danger to protect ours."

    January 10. Around 5,000 Jews emigrated from France to Israel in 2016, according to the Jewish Agency of Israel, which released the data to mark two years since attacks on the Charlie Hebdo and on a Jewish supermarket in Paris in January 2015. The departures in 2016 add to the 7,900 who left in 2015 and 7,231 in 2014. In total, since 2006, 40,000 French Jews have emigrated.

    January 12. Salah Abdeslam — a Belgium-born French national of Moroccan descent and the main suspect in the November 13, 2015 attacks that killed 130 people in Paris — said, "I am not ashamed of what I am. I am a Muslim, that is to say, submissive to Allah who created me and who by his grace has harmoniously shaped me." Abdeslam is reportedly receiving stacks of mail "from Catholics with questions about his faith, from women who declare their love for him and say they want to bear his child, from lawyers who offer their services, it is incessant," according to Libération.

    January 12. A French couple were given suspended sentences for selling Islamic State flags online. They were caught after neighbors saw them boasting about their business in a television documentary about jihadi recruitment and called the police.

    January 16. Asian tourists are avoiding France due to fears over terrorism and spiraling crime, according to Le Parisien, which interviewed Jean-François Zhou, President of the Chinese Association of Travel Agencies in France. Some 1.6 million Chinese tourists visited France in 2016, compared to 2.2 million in 2015, a 27% decline. The number of tourists from South Korea also declined by 27%, and the number of Japanese tourists declined by 39%. "Our tourists have turned to Russia, which is less attractive but at least it is a safe country," Zhou said. "For Putin, it is an economic windfall." Zhou explained:

    "The decline is explained above all to the scourge of petty delinquency aimed especially at Chinese tourists. They are robbed in the Palace of Versailles, at the foot of the Eiffel Tower, in front of their hotel, when they exit the buses. In high season, there is not a day without tourists being assaulted. I saw an 80-year-old man seriously injured because he was trying to resist thieves. Women are pushed and when they fall their bags are stolen with all their papers. This has created a panic on Chinese social networks. The Chinese began turning away from France last year.

    "The police have increased their numbers to protect tourists. But since the terrorist attacks, these forces have been mobilized elsewhere. We want France to stop its laxity. We, along with my traveling colleagues, are counting on the future government to get things done. I have been in France for twenty-five years, and I myself have seen the decline of France in terms of security. Before, the Chinese tour operators deplored the insecurity in Italy, today it is France and more particularly Paris and Marseilles which we speak. There are many regions in France where tourism can be leisurely pursued, but Paris is ranked No. 1 in Europe in terms of the increase in delinquency."

    January 17. The Magistrate's Court in Paris acquitted Pascal Bruckner, a renowned intellectual and author, on charges of defamation after he remarked on the "28 minutes-Arte" television program that pro-Muslim activist groups such as "The Indivisibles" (Les Indivisibles) and "The Republic's Natives" (Les Indigènes de la République) were "ideological accomplices" of jihadism. The decision was hailed as a "victory for the freedom of expression" in France, which does not have legal protections such as the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, guaranteeing the freedom of speech.

    January 18. One of the suicide bombers who blew himself up outside the Stade de France during the November 2015 attacks on Paris turned out to be an Iraqi jihadist, according to France's DGSE intelligence agency. Until now, only one of the three bombers had been identified: a 20-year-old Frenchman living in Belgium. DGSE believes that one of that man's accomplices, who was carrying a fake Syrian passport, was from the Iraqi city of Mosul. He and the third attacker, whose identity is still unknown, are believed to have slipped into Europe with a group of refugees who landed on the Greek island of Leros on October 3, 2015.

    January 20. The Council of State (Conseil d'État), France's highest administrative court, ruled that the mosque in Stains (Centre Culturel et Islamique de Stains) in Seine-Saint-Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, will remain closed. The Salafist mosque, which was identified as the last place of prayer for several French jihadists before they joined the Islamic State, was shuttered in November 2016 as part of a state of emergency.

    January 21. Kevin Guiavarch, a 24-year-old convert to Islam, was charged with terrorism offenses after being extradited from Turkey. He is believed to have been a member of both the Islamic State and the former Al-Nusra Front. He was arrested in Turkey in June 2016 after leaving Syria with his four wives and six children. Guiavarch, a Breton who converted to Islam at the age of 14, is believed to have gone to Syria in 2012.

    January 23. The Grand Mosque of Paris announced that it was withdrawing from the Foundation for Islam of France (Fondation de l'Islam de France), a new, government-sponsored foundation charged with "contributing to the emergence of an Islam of France that is fully anchored in the French Republic." In a statement, the mosque, which represents 250 of the 2,500 of the mosques and Muslim associations in France, said that it denounced "any form of interference in the management of Muslim worship." Others said the mosque's rector, Dalil Boubakeur, 76, was angry that he was not named to be president of the foundation.

    January 23. The Administrative Court of Marseilles effectively terminated a project to build a €22 million ($23 million) mega-mosque with a capacity for 7,000 worshippers. In July 2007, the municipality granted a Muslim association a parcel of land in the 15th arrondissement to build the Grand Mosque of Marseille, but the project has been plagued by legal and financial problems. The cornerstone was laid in 2010, but since then nothing else has been built. In October 2016, the city terminated the lease for the land because the association had not paid the rent since 2013. According to the court, "the materiality of all the facts alleged against the association does not appear to be seriously contestable."

    January 23. Benoît Hamon, the presidential candidate for the Socialist Party, lashed out at critics of Islam:

    "There is ultimately a desire to say that Islam is incompatible with the Republic. This is not true. It is unbearable that we continue to make the faith of millions of our compatriots a problem in French society. Let us stop making Islam an adversary of the Republic."

    January 25. The trial began of Georges Bensoussan, a highly regarded Jewish historian of Moroccan descent, who is being prosecuted for talking about anti-Semitism among French Arabs. During a debate on Radio France Culture, he said:

    "An Algerian sociologist, Smaïn Laacher, with great courage, just said in a documentary aired on Channel 3: 'It is a shame to deny this taboo, namely that in the Arab families in France, and everyone knows it but nobody wants to say it, anti-Semitism is sucked with mother's milk.'"

    Bensoussan was referring to a documentary entitled "Teachers in the Lost Territories of the Republic," aired on Channel 3 in October 2015. In this documentary, Laacher, who is a French professor of Algerian origin, said:

    "Antisemitism is already awash in the domestic space. It rolls almost naturally off the tongue, awash in the language. It is an insult. When parents shout at their children, when they want to reprimand them, they call them Jews. Yes. All Arab families know this. It is monumental hypocrisy not to see that this anti-Semitism begins as a domestic one."

    Laacher was not prosecuted but Bensoussan was. The court's decision will be rendered March 7. "This witch-hunt against Bensoussan is symptomatic of the state of free speech today in France," wrote the French journalist Yves Mamou.

    January 26. The Administrative Court of Bastia in Corsica validated a burkini ban in the village of Sisco. Mayor Ange-Pierre Vivoni argued the ban was necessary to avoid a repeat of fighting between local youths and Muslims in August 2016, when five people were hurt. The court rejected a similar ban in Ghisonaccio, due to a lack of evidence that the garment was a threat to public order.

    January 27. Pascal Bruckner, a renowned author and intellectual, in an essay entitled "An Imaginary Racism," wrote that Islamophobia is a "weapon of intimidation" and an "invention to forbid debate."

    January 27. "The Halal Market: The Invention of a Tradition," a new book by anthropologist Florence Bergeaud-Blackler, argues that "buying halal is not a religious obligation." Although the Koran and Sunnah (the teachings and practices of Mohammed) prohibit pork, blood and alcohol, they do not impose rules dictating behavior, according to Bergeaud-Blackler.

    "Eating halal is presented today as an obligatory practice for Muslims, even though the term did not exist in the Muslim world before it was exported by developed countries," she told FRANCE 24. Bergeaud-Blackler, who has studied halal for the past 20 years, said the market has flourished in non-Muslim countries because of immigration. "There's a recent poll by the Montaigne Institute which shows that 40% of France's Muslim population thinks eating halal is a pillar of Islam; this notion is false," she said.

    In reality, the halal food industry is a product of the "random convergence of neo-fundamentalism and neo-liberalism" during the early 1980s, Bergeaud-Blackler explained. "At the time, these two ideologies were dominant on the international scene. Their convergence would change the theological definition of halal from 'recommended' to 'required' and which is a hallmark of fundamentalism," she said.

    January 29. Three months after French authorities demolished the "Jungle" migrant camp, migrants are returning to Calais at the rate of around 30 a day. Most of them are unaccompanied minors hoping to smuggle their way across the English Channel to Britain.

    Soeren Kern is a Senior Fellow at the New York-based Gatestone Institute. Follow him on Facebook and on Twitter.

    Follow Soeren Kern on Twitter and Facebook
    © 2017 Gatestone Institute. All rights reserved. The articles printed here do not necessarily reflect the views of the Editors or of Gatestone Institute. No part of the Gatestone website or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied or modified, without the prior written consent of Gatestone Institute.

    They keep talking about Anti-Semitism to the exclusion of Anti-Frenchism. Maybe both should be highlighted?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Think of the Jews as the canaries in the French coal mine, or if you prefer, rats from a sinking ship. When Jews start to flee your country, it's not usually a signal that things are really going to go well for everyone else in the long run.
  36. Epic self trolling by the Carlos Slim blog….Can you imagine the Monte Python routine? Manager–But sir, could we PLEASE just offer 2+1/2 percent? John Cleese–Have you forgotten that we are CAPITALISTS…

    Read More
  37. @anonymous
    Chicago public schools are 46.5% Hispanic, 37.7% black, 9.9% white, 17.7% are so-called English Language Learners and a whopping 80.22% are classified as 'economically disadvantaged'. Miracles don't exist.

    Chicago public schools are 46.5% Hispanic, 37.7% black, 9.9% white, 17.7% are so-called English Language Learners and a whopping 80.22% are classified as ‘economically disadvantaged’. Miracles don’t exist.

    Got a link for those stats?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    http://cps.edu/About_CPS/At-a-glance/Pages/Stats_and_facts.aspx
  38. Youth unemployment is around 50% in Spain. Spain is a cheap plane ride from Denmark. I imagine that any number of young Spaniards would be overjoyed to work in a Danish factory for Danish wages.

    Story is globalist BS.

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  39. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @bomag

    If West cannot produce enough life, there is something wrong with the Western Way.
     
    The West produces plenty of life. Let us ask instead if non-western countries are producing "life, if they essentially have no cultural or scientific achievement, and create dismal societies from which they are so anxious to maintain an escape route via immigration to western countries.

    The West produces good material and legal conditions for life but not enough life.

    Much of the non-west produces life but not the good legal & material conditions for life.

    Israel has the balance. The good material conditions for life and life itself.

    It promotes a sense of identity and heritage. A sense of cultural obligation. An organic vision of society. Modernity and history and spirituality. Democratic fascism works.

    And of course, the read-and-breed strategy.

    NYT should the urge the Israeli way on all of the West.

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  40. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Adam Smith had an interesting observation on the differences between high profits and high wages upon the final cost of a product.

    In reality high profits tend much more to raise the price of work than high wages…. That part of the price of the commodity which resolved itself into wages would, through all the different stages of the manufacture, rise only in arithmetical proportion to this rise of wages. But if the profits of all the different employers of those working people should be raised five per cent, that part of the price of the commodity which resolved itself into profit would, through all the different stages of the manufacture, rise in geometrical proportion to this rise of profit….

    In raising the price of commodities the rise of wages operates in the same manner as simple interest does in the accumulation of debt. The rise of profit operates like compound interest. Our merchants and master-manufacturers complain much of the bad effects of high wages in raising the price, and thereby lessening the sale of their goods both at home and abroad. They say nothing concerning the bad effects of high profits. They are silent with regard to the pernicious effects of their own gains. They complain only of those of other people.

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  41. @Anonymous
    Absolute f*cking crap.

    The EU, of which Denmark is a member state, is a free labor movement area.
    Now, Poland, for example, which is also an EU member, is a mere few hundred (at the most) miles from Denmark.
    Poland has welders aplenty only too willing to work for Danish wages.

    Why indeed aren’t Poles and other EU nationals flocking to Denmark to fill these jobs (whereas the UK now has almost million Poles alone)?

    I can think of a couple of reasons:

    1. Very high taxes. Danes get a lot of value for these taxes – free health care, high quality schools, parks, etc. but immigrants may be more interested in the take home pay that they can send back home.

    2. Odd language and closed culture. If you are going to learn a new language you are much better off with a widely spoken language like English than a niche language like Danish. Also, Denmark is a much less welcoming place for foreigners and you are not going to get the infrastructure (Polish grocery stores, Catholic churches with masses in Polish, etc.) that is present in today’s multicultural UK which has become almost like a European version of the US with people from everywhere.

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    • Replies: @Matra
    Why indeed aren’t Poles and other EU nationals flocking to Denmark to fill these jobs (whereas the UK now has almost million Poles alone)?

    Denmark did not lift labour restrictions on Eastern Europeans until 2014. Only the UK, Ireland, and Sweden had no restrictions between 2004, when Poland and her neighbours joined the EU, and 2014 patterns of migration had been well established by the time the rest of the EU lifted restrictions. There's no reason why Poles can't go to Denmark now; I'm guessing they prefer to go where many of their friends and countrymen are already established. Also, Poland is doing quite well so there aren't as many workers eager to leave home.

  42. One thing is for sure, where most of the native men are their equals, White women get the lady tingles up their legs for violence and acts of sadistic domination. The more violent, the better. The lady tingles is why the violence is self-reinforcing. More dudes get laid for killing people, and have more kids, who grow up to … kill people. Or at least, engage in violence. Much of the violence in the Muslim world is self-defeating — aimed at other Muslims when no non-Muslims can be found. For the same reason, an ever escalating domination war for the few available women not already part of a harem.

    Of course, women prefer a harem to being the wife 100% of an ordinary man. This will not end well.

    The Japanese have at least distracted their women into endless Kawai competitions about who can have the cutest outfit. You’ll notice THEY don’t have constantly accelerating violence cycles.

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  43. @Anon
    Back then, it was assassination. Now, it's murder.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/book-review-ou-est-le-montmartre-dantan-godfrey-hodgson-on-an-erudite-and-amorous-elegy-for-the-1423413.html

    The reviewer gets extra points for working the word “threnody” into his review.

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  44. @Romanian
    They keep talking about Anti-Semitism to the exclusion of Anti-Frenchism. Maybe both should be highlighted?

    Think of the Jews as the canaries in the French coal mine, or if you prefer, rats from a sinking ship. When Jews start to flee your country, it’s not usually a signal that things are really going to go well for everyone else in the long run.

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  45. …almost everyone who is able and willing to work has a job.

    Off-topic, but still amusing.

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    • Replies: @black sea
    The labor force participation rate in Denmark is, or was as of 2014, the same as that in the US, which is to say 62%. So probably there are a quite a few able-bodied people who would enter the workforce at a sufficient wage. Now, whether they would be trainable as skilled welders and industrial designers is another matter.
  46. @Busby
    Sounds to me like his winning bid was too low.

    Exactly!

    As a general advisory, in fact, if you are too busy, raise your prices. Make more profit while your backlog automatically reduces itself.

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  47. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    OK.

    You got an incredible contract. 1/2 million Euros.

    Or, maybe he could hire someone, but not without .. crimping margins?

    He got this wonderful contract because he under bid it. The guy has a pricing problem, not a labor problem.

    And if you dig into it, manufacturing has economies of scale and decreasing marginal costs of production — so my guess is that he a lot bigger issues than this.

    Or whatever … but unless they have inflation issues — which doesn’t seem to be the case in the EU — where deflation is considered a bigger threat, a labor shortage sounds like a benefit. They have a surplus of jobs .. sounds good to me. A shortage of unemployment.

    And, this half million Euros? That sort of revenue would add maybe 1 headcount but the arithmetic gets hard if 2 employees are needed.

    Or maybe they haven’t really adjusted to the Euro falling to $1.06. Which is why the US isn’t booming. Yet. The US economy was poised to boom in 2015-2016 until the dollar soared and US unconventional oil crashed. That’s two reasons for the 2% instead of 3% in that period and ended up dooming Hillary. Of course, Bill beat Bush for the same reason. The recovery kicked in a few months too late.

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  48. @Autochthon

    ...few of the newcomers are readily employable in high-skilled work...
     
    Speaking of crimped margins, another huge change I've seen in my own lifetime is that employers will now choke and die before they will be bothered to provide new employees so much as an hour's paid, on-the-job training.

    I was once part of a team seeking to find a new vice president for an employer of mine, and the orders were that only persons who were currently vice presidents for other employers would be considered. I identified a guy perfect for the gig – inarguably more qualified than any of the other candidates who were, in fact, already holding the title of vice president. The guy I'd found had been working as a senior director for several years. When he was dismissed by muckity-mucks who couldn't even be bothered to read his résumé despite the endorsements by my whole team coordinating the search, I asked, in exasperation "Where in the Hell do you think vice presidents come from? No one springs forth like Minerva from Jupiter's head a vice president!"

    This insistence that new employees be not bright, eager, people with a necessary fundamental set of skills, but, rather, that they happen to have exactly the résumé the employer fantasises about is akin to an average Joe insisting he will only date a woman if she is as physically beautiful as Helen of Troy.

    It goes to:

    1) The phony shortage of employees
    2) The pretexts used to run the H1B and similar scams, nepotism, and cronyism ("Nope, no qualified candidates in the pool; see? Not one of them has experience with all five programmng languages and fluency in Czech (it's mere coincidence the boss' nephew studied in Prague...). What's that? Yeah, I know anyone conversant with MySQL can teach himself PostgreSQL in a day or two, but we must have someone who knows PostgreSQL already, even though it will take us another month to get him here from India. What's that? No, no nothing to do with how much less we may happen to pay an Indian; what're you, some kind of racist?!")
    3) The insistence in subsidising worthless degrees in Feminine, Albino, Atonal Musicology while simultaneously arguing not enough scientists and engineers are educated in the U.S.A. (and remember, a programmer who uses MySQL instead of PostgreSQL may as well not know what a tuple is...).
    4) The increasing impossibility of promotion for anyone not the boss' nephew (see supra: "But he's not already a vice president!") This last supports the churn and burn philosophy of business to keep from ever paying people raises for seniority or having to provide healthcare for those of us who aren't spring chickens anymore and actually have to occassionally seek medical treatment.

    I could go on but I reckon I've made my point: employers are increasingly returning to the abuses present before the reforms begun in Germany with workers' compensation, in the U.S.A. under Theodore Roosevelt and the progressive movement, etc. It ties to globalism not just because of labor arbitrage via immivasion, but also because employers demand to employ the same shenanigans in the U.S.A., Europe, Canada, Australia, etc. as they have gotten used to pulling off in China, India, etc. If the laws of the previously civilised nations preclude openly exercising those shenanigans, the work-arounds and kludges I've written about will suffice.

    Lastly, notice that Japanese employers continue to promote internally, train their employees, and to be famously loyal to employees (fostering reciprocal loyalty from those employees—it was the globalist employers who drew first blood in that question of chickens and eggs, by the way...). Oh, and the Japanese openly acknowldge and support the idea that Japan is for the Japanese. Any chance of a correlation and causation here...?

    in the U.S.A. under Theodore Roosevelt and the progressive movement

    One of the many great ironies here is how much that has been happening under today’s “progressives” would cause the original progressives to spin in their graves. IMHO those scare quotes are well earned.

    To add to your VP story, the best version of that is when the candidate has more actual responsibility (e.g. organization size/budget), but just not the desired title.

    P.S. Thanks for a great post. Perhaps we could print up copies and nail it to the doors of the companies with practices like you describe.

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  49. @Jack D
    Why indeed aren't Poles and other EU nationals flocking to Denmark to fill these jobs (whereas the UK now has almost million Poles alone)?

    I can think of a couple of reasons:

    1. Very high taxes. Danes get a lot of value for these taxes - free health care, high quality schools, parks, etc. but immigrants may be more interested in the take home pay that they can send back home.

    2. Odd language and closed culture. If you are going to learn a new language you are much better off with a widely spoken language like English than a niche language like Danish. Also, Denmark is a much less welcoming place for foreigners and you are not going to get the infrastructure (Polish grocery stores, Catholic churches with masses in Polish, etc.) that is present in today's multicultural UK which has become almost like a European version of the US with people from everywhere.

    Why indeed aren’t Poles and other EU nationals flocking to Denmark to fill these jobs (whereas the UK now has almost million Poles alone)?

    Denmark did not lift labour restrictions on Eastern Europeans until 2014. Only the UK, Ireland, and Sweden had no restrictions between 2004, when Poland and her neighbours joined the EU, and 2014 patterns of migration had been well established by the time the rest of the EU lifted restrictions. There’s no reason why Poles can’t go to Denmark now; I’m guessing they prefer to go where many of their friends and countrymen are already established. Also, Poland is doing quite well so there aren’t as many workers eager to leave home.

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  50. @Autochthon

    ...few of the newcomers are readily employable in high-skilled work...
     
    Speaking of crimped margins, another huge change I've seen in my own lifetime is that employers will now choke and die before they will be bothered to provide new employees so much as an hour's paid, on-the-job training.

    I was once part of a team seeking to find a new vice president for an employer of mine, and the orders were that only persons who were currently vice presidents for other employers would be considered. I identified a guy perfect for the gig – inarguably more qualified than any of the other candidates who were, in fact, already holding the title of vice president. The guy I'd found had been working as a senior director for several years. When he was dismissed by muckity-mucks who couldn't even be bothered to read his résumé despite the endorsements by my whole team coordinating the search, I asked, in exasperation "Where in the Hell do you think vice presidents come from? No one springs forth like Minerva from Jupiter's head a vice president!"

    This insistence that new employees be not bright, eager, people with a necessary fundamental set of skills, but, rather, that they happen to have exactly the résumé the employer fantasises about is akin to an average Joe insisting he will only date a woman if she is as physically beautiful as Helen of Troy.

    It goes to:

    1) The phony shortage of employees
    2) The pretexts used to run the H1B and similar scams, nepotism, and cronyism ("Nope, no qualified candidates in the pool; see? Not one of them has experience with all five programmng languages and fluency in Czech (it's mere coincidence the boss' nephew studied in Prague...). What's that? Yeah, I know anyone conversant with MySQL can teach himself PostgreSQL in a day or two, but we must have someone who knows PostgreSQL already, even though it will take us another month to get him here from India. What's that? No, no nothing to do with how much less we may happen to pay an Indian; what're you, some kind of racist?!")
    3) The insistence in subsidising worthless degrees in Feminine, Albino, Atonal Musicology while simultaneously arguing not enough scientists and engineers are educated in the U.S.A. (and remember, a programmer who uses MySQL instead of PostgreSQL may as well not know what a tuple is...).
    4) The increasing impossibility of promotion for anyone not the boss' nephew (see supra: "But he's not already a vice president!") This last supports the churn and burn philosophy of business to keep from ever paying people raises for seniority or having to provide healthcare for those of us who aren't spring chickens anymore and actually have to occassionally seek medical treatment.

    I could go on but I reckon I've made my point: employers are increasingly returning to the abuses present before the reforms begun in Germany with workers' compensation, in the U.S.A. under Theodore Roosevelt and the progressive movement, etc. It ties to globalism not just because of labor arbitrage via immivasion, but also because employers demand to employ the same shenanigans in the U.S.A., Europe, Canada, Australia, etc. as they have gotten used to pulling off in China, India, etc. If the laws of the previously civilised nations preclude openly exercising those shenanigans, the work-arounds and kludges I've written about will suffice.

    Lastly, notice that Japanese employers continue to promote internally, train their employees, and to be famously loyal to employees (fostering reciprocal loyalty from those employees—it was the globalist employers who drew first blood in that question of chickens and eggs, by the way...). Oh, and the Japanese openly acknowldge and support the idea that Japan is for the Japanese. Any chance of a correlation and causation here...?

    My brother and I some years ago ran a very successful small business in a small CO mountain town.

    We tried hiring “experienced people,” then found that we had to untrain them from their bad habits before we could train them to do it right.

    So we started recruiting people on one criterion only: attitude. If we ran across a person in a gas station or grocery store or anywhere else with a good job attitude, we’d give them a card and ask them to come buy and apply.

    Based entirely on a simple idea. Our work wasn’t unbelievably complex. We could train them to do it all, and correctly, but we couldn’t train them to have the right attitude.

    We also paid significant bonuses to existing employees and anybody else who recruited somebody who we hired, with an even bigger bonus if they were working for us a year later.

    All worked very well.

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  51. In even a moderately competitive environment capitalists as a class neither benefit nor gain from low or high wage rates. If wage rates are high then they raise their prices, if wage rates are low then they (have to) lower their prices. The long term rate of profit is a function of capital invested not input costs.

    However, some capitalists benefit from a change in the wage rate, either up or down. In the latter case, those who have first access to the newly cheap labour can enjoy temporary extra profits. However, at the same time, some capitalists (those who do not have first access to cheap labour) lose out. The political problem is a classic one of concentrated gains vs. distributed and hidden costs. The employers who are benefiting from cheap labour know it and lobby for it. Those who are being out-competed don’t know why. Those who figure it out may lobby for even more cheap labour so they can catch up.

    It should be noted that the only group that actually benefits from cheap labour as a class are consumers. Of course, most consumers also earn wages so they lose what they gain. The big exception is people on welfare.

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  52. I feel sorry for the manager. If his margins go down that means he is a less profitable and possibly less secure business. Companies with razor thin margins go out of business left and right during downturns.

    Plus his has a giant expensive facility, Building, maintaining, improving and expanding that requires capital. Who is the bank more likely to make a loan to: a company with good margins or a company with little margins? What about investors. Would you put your pension money in a risky thing like stock if the return were dismal? His company competes with millions of other companies worldwide for capital. I can see his pitch for money now. “My company makes very little money but we pay great salaries to the local people. Maybe the town government will give him money for expansion.

    If he has to raise his prices to maintain a healthy margin he is probably competing with every other manufacturer in the EU and maybe worldwide. If the orders go out the door he looses his life accomplishment and all his employees loose their jobs.

    I’m not arguing for immigration, just that a company’s margin is not something optional nor is it squeezed out of workers paychecks. With the skilled labor shortage Denmark may be uncompetitive on that particular tractor part order and some other factory with other workers will get it. He may have offered as large a raise as he could while still being a viable enterprise.

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  53. @Jefferson
    Which European countries will I see White people working at the local McDonald’s instead of Muslims and Blacks?

    In Latvia I’ve seen White people working at a Asian restaurant.

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  54. @anonymous
    Chicago public schools are 46.5% Hispanic, 37.7% black, 9.9% white, 17.7% are so-called English Language Learners and a whopping 80.22% are classified as 'economically disadvantaged'. Miracles don't exist.

    Chicago public schools are 46.5% Hispanic, 37.7% black

    So at some point the murder rate is going to drop as blacks run out of blacks to shoot?

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  55. In his Antifragile Taleb says that Denmark’s system is deceptive and economic elites have a lot of power,.

    “The state exists as a tax collector, but the money is spent in the communes themselves, directed by the communes— for, say, skills training locally determined as deemed necessary by the community themselves, to respond to private demand for workers”

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  56. Here’s something new that will prevent hamburgers from rotting under the warming lamps:

    http://www.freep.com/story/money/business/2017/02/27/ordering-kiosks-coming-1000-wendys/98496644/

    Also the answer to “what do you do when they raise the minimum wage to $15?”

    Don’t assume that sealing the border would automatically mean that employers are going to rehire their old American work force. For every action there is a reaction and employers’ reaction will be to replace labor with robots wherever possible.

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    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    For every action there is a reaction and employers’ reaction will be to replace labor with robots wherever possible.

     

    McDonald's in Hong Kong has recently introduced ordering/payment kiosks, even though the minimum wage here is well under USD5.00/hour. I like them very much. They're big touchscreens with highly intuitive navigation, and immediate payment via either a credit card or Hong Kong's stored-value Octopus card. You get a receipt with your order pick-up number on it, and it all goes very smoothly. There's still the option to line up to order in person, but from what I've seen, lots of people are comfortable using the kiosks, and they move people through quickly.

    My guess is that there not only won't be much resistance to this change, but that lots of people will prefer using a screen rather than talking to a person when ordering fast food. I think the use of kiosks will spread fast.
    , @Brutusale
    As long as the majority of people don't understand that the minimum wage is actually ZERO, the human factor in the down-market retail environment is going away.
  57. Germany, which faces a shortage of engineers, nurses and other skilled workers, has taken the opposite tack, setting up training programs for refugees in an attempt to bridge the gap. …

    Ben Tillman– the South Carolina Senator, not the commenter– strongly opposed drafting blacks for the First World War, which he otherwise supported. So did Senator Vardaman of Mississippi, who went so far as to vote against our entry into the war.

    Can you think of any reason why Southern senators might oppose the military training of blacks, despite the resulting cost of more white boys’* deaths? (White boys from black-majority states, no less.)

    And why this might be pertinent to the question of giving engineering training– German engineering training– to Middle Eastern “refugees”?

    *White boys from black-majority states, no less.*

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  58. @Luke Lea
    Pardon the length, but from today's Gatestone Institute:

    A Month of Islam and Multiculturalism in France: January 2017
    by Soeren Kern
    February 23, 2017 at 5:00 am
    https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/9978/islam-france-january

    "I am not ashamed of what I am. I am a Muslim, that is to say, submissive to Allah who created me and who by his grace has harmoniously shaped me." — Salah Abdeslam, a Belgium-born French national of Moroccan descent and the main suspect in the November 13, 2015 attacks that killed 130 people in Paris.

    The Grand Mosque of Paris announced that it was withdrawing from the Foundation for Islam of France, a new, government-sponsored foundation charged with "contributing to the emergence of an Islam of France that is fully anchored in the French Republic." In a statement, the mosque, which represents 250 of the 2,500 of the mosques and Muslim associations in France, said that it denounced "any form of interference in the management of Muslim worship."

    "An Algerian sociologist, Smaïn Laacher, with great courage, just said in a documentary aired on Channel 3: 'It is a shame to deny this taboo, namely that in the Arab families in France, and everyone knows it but nobody wants to say it, anti-Semitism is sucked with mother's milk.'" —Georges Bensoussan, a highly regarded Jewish historian of Moroccan descent, who is being prosecuted for talking about anti-Semitism among French Arabs.

    "When parents shout at their children, when they want to reprimand them, they call them Jews. Yes. All Arab families know this. It is monumental hypocrisy not to see that this anti-Semitism begins as a domestic one." — Smaïn Laacher, a French-Algerian sociologist, in a documentary called, "Teachers in the Lost Territories of the Republic."

    "Islamophobia is a weapon of intimidation and an invention to forbid debate." — Pascal Bruckner.

    Three months after French authorities demolished the "Jungle" migrant camp, migrants are returning to Calais at the rate of around 30 a day. Most of them are unaccompanied minors hoping to smuggle their way across the English Channel to Britain.

    January 1. The Interior Ministry announced the most anticipated statistic of the year: a total of 945 cars and trucks were torched across France on New Year's Eve, a 17.5% increase from the 804 vehicles burned during the annual ritual on the same holiday in 2015. Car burnings, commonplace in France, are often attributed to rival Muslim gangs that compete with each other for the media spotlight over which can cause the most destruction. An estimated 40,000 cars are torched in France every year.


    A van burns during a recent riot in a Paris suburb. Car burnings, commonplace in France, are often attributed to rival Muslim gangs that compete with each other for the media spotlight. An estimated 40,000 cars are torched in France every year. (Image source: RT video screenshot)
    January 2. Approximately 3.7 million crimes were reported in France in 2016, a 4% increase over 2015, according to Le Figaro. Seine-Saint-Denis, a Paris suburb which has one of the highest concentrations of Muslims in France, ranks as the most dangerous part of the country, with 18.2 attacks per 1,000 inhabitants. It is followed by Paris, with 15.7 attacks per 1,000 inhabitants and Bouches-du-Rhône with 11.5 attacks per 1,000 inhabitants.

    January 2. The Criminal Court of Paris sentenced Nicolas Moreau, a 32-year-old French jihadist, to ten years in prison for fighting for the Islamic State. He is the brother of Flavien Moreau, the first French jihadist to be sentenced for such an offense upon his return from Syria in November 2014. Born in South Korea, adopted by a French family at the age of 4, Nicolas became a delinquent after the divorce of his adoptive parents. He converted to Islam in prison, where he spent five years. Nicolas said he fled the Islamic State after 17 months due to its "excesses."

    January 3. Jean-Christophe Lagarde, the president of the Union of Democrats and Independents, a center-right political party, attributed the closure of a PSA Peugeot-Citroën automobile factory to an excess of religious demands by Muslim employees. "There have been difficulties even in my department, for example in Aulnay-sous-Bois. It has never been said, but part of the reason for the closure of PSA was due to the omnipresence of religion and the fact that there were religious demands at work, work stoppages, decreased productivity. PSA's decision to close Aulnay was influenced by this aspect."

    January 3. The Administrative Court of Poitiers dismissed a lawsuit filed by the Coalition against Racism and Islamophobia (CRI), which tried to ban a 14-page document aimed at preventing radicalization in schools. The document called on teachers to monitor several criteria, including "uncut long beards," "shaved hair," "Muslim clothing," "refusal of tattoos," and "weight loss associated with frequent fasting." The document also referred to behavior such as "identity withdrawal," "selective exposure to the media," and "political rhetoric" concerning Palestine, Chechnya and Iraq. The document urged teachers to monitor closely students interested in the "history of early Islam." The court emphasized the strictly internal nature of the document, which was deemed to be "devoid of any legal effect" because it contains "no mandatory provisions."

    January 4. Of the 230 French jihadists who have been killed in Iraq and Syria, seven were killed by American drones, according to Le Monde. "The French targets had a twofold status: they were military objectives, the elimination of which is theoretically governed by the law of war, and they were also targets of judicial proceedings in France. In the name of the 'self-defense,' which the coalition states claim, military logic prevailed over the right to legal defense," the paper complained.

    January 4. Jean-Sébastien Vialatte, the deputy mayor of Six-Four-Les-Plages, ordered police to visit the Reynier Primary School there on two occasions after he heard rumors that the school was requiring students to attend Arabic language classes. The courses, which were optional, not mandatory, have since been cancelled.

    January 5. The Magistrate's Court of Rennes sentenced a 34-year-old man to 17 months in prison on charges of domestic violence for striking his female companion because she refused to convert to Islam. The woman said the man had "profoundly changed" after he visited Mali. "He has become radicalized," she said. "He promises Allah will take revenge against the disbelievers who do not convert. Religion has taken an increasingly important place in his life. He believes he is good and all others are evil." The man denied he ever "forced someone to be a Muslim." He added, "Before, I was like her, I smoked, I drank, but it is over now."

    January 5. Farid Benyettou, a 35-year-old former French jihadist who indoctrinated the gunmen who attacked the Charlie Hebdo magazine in Paris in January 2015, admitted that he was partly to blame for the violence. "I bear a share of responsibility, I cannot deny it," he said in an interview with Le Parisien. "I preached hate, I distilled this ideology even though it was not me who told him to commit this massacre. I served my prison sentence, I paid my debt to society, but not my moral debt." He tells his story in a new book, "My Jihad: Journey of a Repenter."

    January 6. A statistical analysis carried out by François Desouche, an influential French blog, found a dramatic increase in the popularity of Muslim first names given to children born in France during the past 20 years. In Paris, for example, 17.1% of babies born in 2016 received Muslim first names, up from 9.4% in 1996. In Seine-Saint-Denis, a Paris suburb, 42.9% of babies born in 2016 received Muslim first names, up from 17.3% in 1996. The trend repeats itself across France.

    January 6. Zineb El Rhazoui, a 35-year-old Moroccan-born journalist, quit her job at Charlie Hebdo because the magazine is now following an editorial line that "Mohammed is no longer drawn" — as demanded by Islamists before the January 2015 attacks. She said Charlie Hebdo now feels "too alone to go to the front." But our colleagues "must not have died for nothing. If it were up to me, I would continue," she said.

    January 6. The Nice Criminal Court acquitted Pierre-Alain Mannoni, 45, for helping three Eritrean women who crossed the border into France from Italy. Mannoni, a teacher-researcher at the French national research center (CNRS), was arrested at the Turbie toll booth just beyond the Italian border in October 2015 and charged with "assisting the entry, movement and residence of irregular migrants." The charge incurs five years in prison and €30,000 ($31,000) in fines. The prosecutor argued that people are not allowed to help illegal migrants move about the country. Mannoni said he was "protecting their dignity and integrity." Christian Estrosi, the president of the Nice Côte d'Azur Riviera region, said the ruling was "an insult to the work of the security forces who put their life in danger to protect ours."

    January 10. Around 5,000 Jews emigrated from France to Israel in 2016, according to the Jewish Agency of Israel, which released the data to mark two years since attacks on the Charlie Hebdo and on a Jewish supermarket in Paris in January 2015. The departures in 2016 add to the 7,900 who left in 2015 and 7,231 in 2014. In total, since 2006, 40,000 French Jews have emigrated.

    January 12. Salah Abdeslam — a Belgium-born French national of Moroccan descent and the main suspect in the November 13, 2015 attacks that killed 130 people in Paris — said, "I am not ashamed of what I am. I am a Muslim, that is to say, submissive to Allah who created me and who by his grace has harmoniously shaped me." Abdeslam is reportedly receiving stacks of mail "from Catholics with questions about his faith, from women who declare their love for him and say they want to bear his child, from lawyers who offer their services, it is incessant," according to Libération.

    January 12. A French couple were given suspended sentences for selling Islamic State flags online. They were caught after neighbors saw them boasting about their business in a television documentary about jihadi recruitment and called the police.

    January 16. Asian tourists are avoiding France due to fears over terrorism and spiraling crime, according to Le Parisien, which interviewed Jean-François Zhou, President of the Chinese Association of Travel Agencies in France. Some 1.6 million Chinese tourists visited France in 2016, compared to 2.2 million in 2015, a 27% decline. The number of tourists from South Korea also declined by 27%, and the number of Japanese tourists declined by 39%. "Our tourists have turned to Russia, which is less attractive but at least it is a safe country," Zhou said. "For Putin, it is an economic windfall." Zhou explained:

    "The decline is explained above all to the scourge of petty delinquency aimed especially at Chinese tourists. They are robbed in the Palace of Versailles, at the foot of the Eiffel Tower, in front of their hotel, when they exit the buses. In high season, there is not a day without tourists being assaulted. I saw an 80-year-old man seriously injured because he was trying to resist thieves. Women are pushed and when they fall their bags are stolen with all their papers. This has created a panic on Chinese social networks. The Chinese began turning away from France last year.

    "The police have increased their numbers to protect tourists. But since the terrorist attacks, these forces have been mobilized elsewhere. We want France to stop its laxity. We, along with my traveling colleagues, are counting on the future government to get things done. I have been in France for twenty-five years, and I myself have seen the decline of France in terms of security. Before, the Chinese tour operators deplored the insecurity in Italy, today it is France and more particularly Paris and Marseilles which we speak. There are many regions in France where tourism can be leisurely pursued, but Paris is ranked No. 1 in Europe in terms of the increase in delinquency."

    January 17. The Magistrate's Court in Paris acquitted Pascal Bruckner, a renowned intellectual and author, on charges of defamation after he remarked on the "28 minutes-Arte" television program that pro-Muslim activist groups such as "The Indivisibles" (Les Indivisibles) and "The Republic's Natives" (Les Indigènes de la République) were "ideological accomplices" of jihadism. The decision was hailed as a "victory for the freedom of expression" in France, which does not have legal protections such as the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, guaranteeing the freedom of speech.

    January 18. One of the suicide bombers who blew himself up outside the Stade de France during the November 2015 attacks on Paris turned out to be an Iraqi jihadist, according to France's DGSE intelligence agency. Until now, only one of the three bombers had been identified: a 20-year-old Frenchman living in Belgium. DGSE believes that one of that man's accomplices, who was carrying a fake Syrian passport, was from the Iraqi city of Mosul. He and the third attacker, whose identity is still unknown, are believed to have slipped into Europe with a group of refugees who landed on the Greek island of Leros on October 3, 2015.

    January 20. The Council of State (Conseil d'État), France's highest administrative court, ruled that the mosque in Stains (Centre Culturel et Islamique de Stains) in Seine-Saint-Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, will remain closed. The Salafist mosque, which was identified as the last place of prayer for several French jihadists before they joined the Islamic State, was shuttered in November 2016 as part of a state of emergency.

    January 21. Kevin Guiavarch, a 24-year-old convert to Islam, was charged with terrorism offenses after being extradited from Turkey. He is believed to have been a member of both the Islamic State and the former Al-Nusra Front. He was arrested in Turkey in June 2016 after leaving Syria with his four wives and six children. Guiavarch, a Breton who converted to Islam at the age of 14, is believed to have gone to Syria in 2012.

    January 23. The Grand Mosque of Paris announced that it was withdrawing from the Foundation for Islam of France (Fondation de l'Islam de France), a new, government-sponsored foundation charged with "contributing to the emergence of an Islam of France that is fully anchored in the French Republic." In a statement, the mosque, which represents 250 of the 2,500 of the mosques and Muslim associations in France, said that it denounced "any form of interference in the management of Muslim worship." Others said the mosque's rector, Dalil Boubakeur, 76, was angry that he was not named to be president of the foundation.

    January 23. The Administrative Court of Marseilles effectively terminated a project to build a €22 million ($23 million) mega-mosque with a capacity for 7,000 worshippers. In July 2007, the municipality granted a Muslim association a parcel of land in the 15th arrondissement to build the Grand Mosque of Marseille, but the project has been plagued by legal and financial problems. The cornerstone was laid in 2010, but since then nothing else has been built. In October 2016, the city terminated the lease for the land because the association had not paid the rent since 2013. According to the court, "the materiality of all the facts alleged against the association does not appear to be seriously contestable."

    January 23. Benoît Hamon, the presidential candidate for the Socialist Party, lashed out at critics of Islam:

    "There is ultimately a desire to say that Islam is incompatible with the Republic. This is not true. It is unbearable that we continue to make the faith of millions of our compatriots a problem in French society. Let us stop making Islam an adversary of the Republic."

    January 25. The trial began of Georges Bensoussan, a highly regarded Jewish historian of Moroccan descent, who is being prosecuted for talking about anti-Semitism among French Arabs. During a debate on Radio France Culture, he said:

    "An Algerian sociologist, Smaïn Laacher, with great courage, just said in a documentary aired on Channel 3: 'It is a shame to deny this taboo, namely that in the Arab families in France, and everyone knows it but nobody wants to say it, anti-Semitism is sucked with mother's milk.'"

    Bensoussan was referring to a documentary entitled "Teachers in the Lost Territories of the Republic," aired on Channel 3 in October 2015. In this documentary, Laacher, who is a French professor of Algerian origin, said:

    "Antisemitism is already awash in the domestic space. It rolls almost naturally off the tongue, awash in the language. It is an insult. When parents shout at their children, when they want to reprimand them, they call them Jews. Yes. All Arab families know this. It is monumental hypocrisy not to see that this anti-Semitism begins as a domestic one."

    Laacher was not prosecuted but Bensoussan was. The court's decision will be rendered March 7. "This witch-hunt against Bensoussan is symptomatic of the state of free speech today in France," wrote the French journalist Yves Mamou.

    January 26. The Administrative Court of Bastia in Corsica validated a burkini ban in the village of Sisco. Mayor Ange-Pierre Vivoni argued the ban was necessary to avoid a repeat of fighting between local youths and Muslims in August 2016, when five people were hurt. The court rejected a similar ban in Ghisonaccio, due to a lack of evidence that the garment was a threat to public order.

    January 27. Pascal Bruckner, a renowned author and intellectual, in an essay entitled "An Imaginary Racism," wrote that Islamophobia is a "weapon of intimidation" and an "invention to forbid debate."

    January 27. "The Halal Market: The Invention of a Tradition," a new book by anthropologist Florence Bergeaud-Blackler, argues that "buying halal is not a religious obligation." Although the Koran and Sunnah (the teachings and practices of Mohammed) prohibit pork, blood and alcohol, they do not impose rules dictating behavior, according to Bergeaud-Blackler.

    "Eating halal is presented today as an obligatory practice for Muslims, even though the term did not exist in the Muslim world before it was exported by developed countries," she told FRANCE 24. Bergeaud-Blackler, who has studied halal for the past 20 years, said the market has flourished in non-Muslim countries because of immigration. "There's a recent poll by the Montaigne Institute which shows that 40% of France's Muslim population thinks eating halal is a pillar of Islam; this notion is false," she said.

    In reality, the halal food industry is a product of the "random convergence of neo-fundamentalism and neo-liberalism" during the early 1980s, Bergeaud-Blackler explained. "At the time, these two ideologies were dominant on the international scene. Their convergence would change the theological definition of halal from 'recommended' to 'required' and which is a hallmark of fundamentalism," she said.

    January 29. Three months after French authorities demolished the "Jungle" migrant camp, migrants are returning to Calais at the rate of around 30 a day. Most of them are unaccompanied minors hoping to smuggle their way across the English Channel to Britain.

    Soeren Kern is a Senior Fellow at the New York-based Gatestone Institute. Follow him on Facebook and on Twitter.

    Follow Soeren Kern on Twitter and Facebook
    © 2017 Gatestone Institute. All rights reserved. The articles printed here do not necessarily reflect the views of the Editors or of Gatestone Institute. No part of the Gatestone website or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied or modified, without the prior written consent of Gatestone Institute.

    tl:dr: France is swirling the drain.

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  59. @Jefferson
    Which European countries will I see White people working at the local McDonald’s instead of Muslims and Blacks?

    Spain; mostly Spanish and a few Latinos.

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  60. @Jack D
    Here's something new that will prevent hamburgers from rotting under the warming lamps:

    http://www.freep.com/story/money/business/2017/02/27/ordering-kiosks-coming-1000-wendys/98496644/

    Also the answer to "what do you do when they raise the minimum wage to $15?"

    Don't assume that sealing the border would automatically mean that employers are going to rehire their old American work force. For every action there is a reaction and employers' reaction will be to replace labor with robots wherever possible.

    For every action there is a reaction and employers’ reaction will be to replace labor with robots wherever possible.

    McDonald’s in Hong Kong has recently introduced ordering/payment kiosks, even though the minimum wage here is well under USD5.00/hour. I like them very much. They’re big touchscreens with highly intuitive navigation, and immediate payment via either a credit card or Hong Kong’s stored-value Octopus card. You get a receipt with your order pick-up number on it, and it all goes very smoothly. There’s still the option to line up to order in person, but from what I’ve seen, lots of people are comfortable using the kiosks, and they move people through quickly.

    My guess is that there not only won’t be much resistance to this change, but that lots of people will prefer using a screen rather than talking to a person when ordering fast food. I think the use of kiosks will spread fast.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Here is the East, rural areas have Sheetz gas stations and convenience stores. You use a kiosk to order what you want - extra cheese, wheat bread, spicy mustard, etc.

    Some of the diverse help at my local McDonalds are so dumb or bad at English that orders are sometimes different from what I asked for. Kiosks avoid that, plus Sheetz doesn't have to pay someone to take orders.
  61. @Jefferson
    "Chicago teachers avoid strike after reaching new deal

    The city had initially pledged to give teachers a raise of 8.75 percent."

    Chicago K-12 public school teachers are vastly overpaid when you factor in that they suck at their jobs. If this was the private sector most of them would be fired. This is one of the rare examples where I agree with the term White mediocrity as Chicago public school teachers are mostly made up of White female social justice warriors.

    In defense of Chicago teachers–and I’ve known quite a few of them–may I say that, although some of them certainly do suck at their jobs, a great many of the students suck even worse at their’s.

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  62. @Autochthon

    ...few of the newcomers are readily employable in high-skilled work...
     
    Speaking of crimped margins, another huge change I've seen in my own lifetime is that employers will now choke and die before they will be bothered to provide new employees so much as an hour's paid, on-the-job training.

    I was once part of a team seeking to find a new vice president for an employer of mine, and the orders were that only persons who were currently vice presidents for other employers would be considered. I identified a guy perfect for the gig – inarguably more qualified than any of the other candidates who were, in fact, already holding the title of vice president. The guy I'd found had been working as a senior director for several years. When he was dismissed by muckity-mucks who couldn't even be bothered to read his résumé despite the endorsements by my whole team coordinating the search, I asked, in exasperation "Where in the Hell do you think vice presidents come from? No one springs forth like Minerva from Jupiter's head a vice president!"

    This insistence that new employees be not bright, eager, people with a necessary fundamental set of skills, but, rather, that they happen to have exactly the résumé the employer fantasises about is akin to an average Joe insisting he will only date a woman if she is as physically beautiful as Helen of Troy.

    It goes to:

    1) The phony shortage of employees
    2) The pretexts used to run the H1B and similar scams, nepotism, and cronyism ("Nope, no qualified candidates in the pool; see? Not one of them has experience with all five programmng languages and fluency in Czech (it's mere coincidence the boss' nephew studied in Prague...). What's that? Yeah, I know anyone conversant with MySQL can teach himself PostgreSQL in a day or two, but we must have someone who knows PostgreSQL already, even though it will take us another month to get him here from India. What's that? No, no nothing to do with how much less we may happen to pay an Indian; what're you, some kind of racist?!")
    3) The insistence in subsidising worthless degrees in Feminine, Albino, Atonal Musicology while simultaneously arguing not enough scientists and engineers are educated in the U.S.A. (and remember, a programmer who uses MySQL instead of PostgreSQL may as well not know what a tuple is...).
    4) The increasing impossibility of promotion for anyone not the boss' nephew (see supra: "But he's not already a vice president!") This last supports the churn and burn philosophy of business to keep from ever paying people raises for seniority or having to provide healthcare for those of us who aren't spring chickens anymore and actually have to occassionally seek medical treatment.

    I could go on but I reckon I've made my point: employers are increasingly returning to the abuses present before the reforms begun in Germany with workers' compensation, in the U.S.A. under Theodore Roosevelt and the progressive movement, etc. It ties to globalism not just because of labor arbitrage via immivasion, but also because employers demand to employ the same shenanigans in the U.S.A., Europe, Canada, Australia, etc. as they have gotten used to pulling off in China, India, etc. If the laws of the previously civilised nations preclude openly exercising those shenanigans, the work-arounds and kludges I've written about will suffice.

    Lastly, notice that Japanese employers continue to promote internally, train their employees, and to be famously loyal to employees (fostering reciprocal loyalty from those employees—it was the globalist employers who drew first blood in that question of chickens and eggs, by the way...). Oh, and the Japanese openly acknowldge and support the idea that Japan is for the Japanese. Any chance of a correlation and causation here...?

    Great points, Autochthon, agree 100%. The crony ‘n’ patronage staff hires at my local state university know they’ll be the successful candidates before the opening is posted. The cost of this nonsense is in the number of “assistants” and “coordinators” who do the actual work, and the frittering away of institutional energy.

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  63. @Kevin O'Keeffe

    ...almost everyone who is able and willing to work has a job.
     
    Off-topic, but still amusing.

    The labor force participation rate in Denmark is, or was as of 2014, the same as that in the US, which is to say 62%. So probably there are a quite a few able-bodied people who would enter the workforce at a sufficient wage. Now, whether they would be trainable as skilled welders and industrial designers is another matter.

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  64. @Laugh Track

    Chicago public schools are 46.5% Hispanic, 37.7% black, 9.9% white, 17.7% are so-called English Language Learners and a whopping 80.22% are classified as ‘economically disadvantaged’. Miracles don’t exist.
     
    Got a link for those stats?
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  65. @Jack D
    Here's something new that will prevent hamburgers from rotting under the warming lamps:

    http://www.freep.com/story/money/business/2017/02/27/ordering-kiosks-coming-1000-wendys/98496644/

    Also the answer to "what do you do when they raise the minimum wage to $15?"

    Don't assume that sealing the border would automatically mean that employers are going to rehire their old American work force. For every action there is a reaction and employers' reaction will be to replace labor with robots wherever possible.

    As long as the majority of people don’t understand that the minimum wage is actually ZERO, the human factor in the down-market retail environment is going away.

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  66. @The Last Real Calvinist

    For every action there is a reaction and employers’ reaction will be to replace labor with robots wherever possible.

     

    McDonald's in Hong Kong has recently introduced ordering/payment kiosks, even though the minimum wage here is well under USD5.00/hour. I like them very much. They're big touchscreens with highly intuitive navigation, and immediate payment via either a credit card or Hong Kong's stored-value Octopus card. You get a receipt with your order pick-up number on it, and it all goes very smoothly. There's still the option to line up to order in person, but from what I've seen, lots of people are comfortable using the kiosks, and they move people through quickly.

    My guess is that there not only won't be much resistance to this change, but that lots of people will prefer using a screen rather than talking to a person when ordering fast food. I think the use of kiosks will spread fast.

    Here is the East, rural areas have Sheetz gas stations and convenience stores. You use a kiosk to order what you want – extra cheese, wheat bread, spicy mustard, etc.

    Some of the diverse help at my local McDonalds are so dumb or bad at English that orders are sometimes different from what I asked for. Kiosks avoid that, plus Sheetz doesn’t have to pay someone to take orders.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    The orders of magnitude by which service declined when Anerican teenagers were displaced by middle-aged invaders with discernibly pitiable intelligence quotients and frightening hygiene are truly staggering.

    What's more, accuracy and convenience aside, I'd gladly pay twice as much for a sandwich knowing I was helping a bright young man or woman develop a work ethic and get money for a car, tuition, etc.; it was a very minor form of noblesse oblige any of us in the middle or even working classes gladly invested in our people's youth, and it was even gratifying to chat about how close they were to getting that car or what have you.

    In contrast, I am loathe to subsidise one red cent to raise the spawn of invaders already mooching off of me via confiscatory taxes and welfare to those contemptuous of my people and culture, etc.

    The robots cannot come fast enough.
  67. Good stuff, as usual, Steve. The only thing missing is the “jobs Danes won’t do” meme. One can speculate about how this story came to be written. What were her editor’s instructions? We know that the NY Times is an editor-driven paper rather than a news-driven paper. I can guess that the editor told her to write a story about how restrictions on immigration are hurting Denmark’s economy. So she turns herself inside out trying to do this, without giving any indication that these restrictions might have anything to do with Denmark’s “Golden Age” of virtually total employment. The result is hilarious. She even frets about the employer’s profit margin, which, at the Times, must be very close to blasphemy.

    Regards,
    Rob

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  68. @Jim Don Bob
    Here is the East, rural areas have Sheetz gas stations and convenience stores. You use a kiosk to order what you want - extra cheese, wheat bread, spicy mustard, etc.

    Some of the diverse help at my local McDonalds are so dumb or bad at English that orders are sometimes different from what I asked for. Kiosks avoid that, plus Sheetz doesn't have to pay someone to take orders.

    The orders of magnitude by which service declined when Anerican teenagers were displaced by middle-aged invaders with discernibly pitiable intelligence quotients and frightening hygiene are truly staggering.

    What’s more, accuracy and convenience aside, I’d gladly pay twice as much for a sandwich knowing I was helping a bright young man or woman develop a work ethic and get money for a car, tuition, etc.; it was a very minor form of noblesse oblige any of us in the middle or even working classes gladly invested in our people’s youth, and it was even gratifying to chat about how close they were to getting that car or what have you.

    In contrast, I am loathe to subsidise one red cent to raise the spawn of invaders already mooching off of me via confiscatory taxes and welfare to those contemptuous of my people and culture, etc.

    The robots cannot come fast enough.

    Read More

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