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From the New York Times:

Steve Bannon Cited Italian Thinker Who Inspired Fascists
By JASON HOROWITZ FEB. 10, 2017

Stephen K. Bannon referred to the Italian philosopher Julius Evola in a Vatican speech in 2014.

ROME — Those trying to divine the roots of Stephen K. Bannon’s dark and at times apocalyptic worldview have repeatedly combed over a speech that Mr. Bannon, President Trump’s ideological guru, made in 2014 to a Vatican conference, where he expounded on Islam, populism and capitalism.

But for all the examination of those remarks, a passing reference by Mr. Bannon to an esoteric Italian philosopher has gone little noticed, except perhaps by scholars and followers of the deeply taboo, Nazi-affiliated thinker, Julius Evola.

Many, many words on who Ebola was ensue, followed, finally, by this on what exactly Bannon said about him:

… he mentioned “Julius Evola and different writers of the early 20th century who are really the supporters of what’s called the Traditionalist movement, which really eventually metastasized into Italian Fascism.”

That’s it?

You pretty much have to assume Bannon is pro-cancer to think his use of the word “metastasized” constitutes an endorsement, but I imagine a lot of people imagine Bannon is pro-cancer after all the hate propaganda.

 
    []
  1. syonredux says:

    Many, many words on who Ebola was ensue, followed, finally, by this on what exactly Bannon said about him:

    … he mentioned “Julius Evola and different writers of the early 20th century who are really the supporters of what’s called the Traditionalist movement, which really eventually metastasized into Italian Fascism.”

    Granted, I don’t work for the NYTIMES, but “metastasized” is not usually regarded as a term of approval.

    Read More
    • Agree: PV van der Byl
    • Replies: @for-the-record

    … he mentioned “Julius Evola and different writers of the early 20th century who are really the supporters of what’s called the Traditionalist movement, which really eventually metastasized into Italian Fascism.”
     
    Bannon's crime was not what he said about Evola . It was the fact that he knew about him. This is a thoughtcrime which would not occur to a goodthinking person.

    If he is a person naturally orthodox (in Newspeak, a goodthinker), he will in all circumstances know, without taking thought, what is the true belief or the desirable emotion.

    Thoughtcrime does not entail death: thoughtcrime IS death.

    Orwell, 1984.
     
    , @anonymous
    I listened to that speech a while back and found it funny how many times Bannon used the term 'metastasized'… It was like a word he just learned and wanted to use at every opportunity.

    Good speech though -- he came off as knowledgeable and level headed to me.
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  2. Hail says: • Website

    Next up:

    News Item: Steve Bannon Overheard Whistling “Dixie” outside White House: Emergency Civil Rights Session Called.

    Op-Ed: Just Why Does Steve Bannon Hate Black People?

    Read More
    • Agree: MBlanc46
    • Replies: @Olorin
    Wait till they find out that Trump Tower's housekeepers use the new Mr. Clean to put a sheen where they clean.
  3. Lot says:

    Good news dept:

    Trump overrules Tillerson, refuses to appoint Elliott Abrams;

    ICE confirms that nationwide it has been conducting “targeted enforcement actions” aka old fashioned raids and detained many hundreds of illegals. In Los Angeles alone 160 were detained. They focused on criminals, and felons were 75% of the detainees, but unlike Obama the non felons who got swept up were not released.

    The LA office also stated that 37 of the 160 had already been deported. Most likely these were all Mexicans who decided immediate removal to Mexico would be better than sitting in a detention center waiting for a more formal deportation order.

    Read More
    • Replies: @donut
    " In Los Angeles alone 160 were detained." Fingernail clippings , 1600 would be a good start , 16000 , women and children first , even better .
    , @artichoke
    Some had deportation orders already, like that woman in Arizona who had a felony conviction for using someone else's SSN. (Shades of Obama hehe ...) So no further hearing would be required I think, just implement the existing order.

    For that matter, this would be a precedent for arresting Obama wouldn't it? Just so he's careful and nice ...

  4. From Wikipedia:

    Evola has been described as “one of the most influential fascist racists in Italian history.”[2] He was admired by Benito Mussolini[3], and continues to influence contemporary fascists and neofascists.[4][5] movement, and Russian political scientist and sometime Vladimir Putin advisor Aleksander Dugin[6][7] cites Evola’s influence. President Donald Trump’s chief adviser Steve Bannon, in a speech at the Vatican, noted Evola’s influence on the Traditionalist movement and Eurasianism favored by Dugin and the alt-right.[8]

    I think it is fair to say that first sentence has been vandalized, given the rather sketchy attempt to rope in Putin and Bannon into the rogues gallery.

    Evola appears to have been a sort of Italian Aleister Crowley or L. Ron Hubbard. I do not get any coherent sense of his work from Wikipedia, nor any sense as to whether he was central to Italian fascism.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    The New York Times practices hit-and-run journalism, blurring further the lines between editorial and opinion. They are trapped in their own short reactive news cycle, a troublesome self-inflicted position for a newspaper, and are trying to move onto their next theme and manufactured outrage before people call them on the past problems and inconsistencies. Newspapers face the same unblinking eye of reality that ordinary citizens must, even if they refuse to acknowledge that.
    , @Crawfurdmuir

    Evola appears to have been a sort of Italian Aleister Crowley or L. Ron Hubbard. I do not get any coherent sense of his work from Wikipedia, nor any sense as to whether he was central to Italian fascism.
     
    This is just about right. Evola was never a Fascist although he had some sympathy with Fascism. He was much more an aristocratic reactionary, differing from others of that class in his rejection of Catholicism and his extensive involvement in the occult.

    A much greater influence on Mussolini was Gabriele d'Annunzio (who was also never a Fascist). From d'Annunzio's Fiume adventure came the fusion of nationalism and syndicalism, the theatrical harangues from a balcony, the paramilitary element (cf. d'Annunzio's arditi vis-à-vis Mussolini's blackshirts), irredentist and imperialist elements, and much else. D'Annunzio was a wild and impractical romantic; Mussolini a comparatively businesslike politician, who successfully borrowed from him what he found useful, and kept him in a sort of luxurious house arrest until his death in 1938.

    , @Anonymous
    Evola was sort of a hack and his writing is generally very bad. He was a dilettante who dabbled in esoterica and comparative religion. Crowley and Hubbard are decent analogies, although Crowely had much more knowledge and expertise in the esoteric tradition because he was a serious practitioner of magick, and Hubbard had a greater personal impact and influence during his lifetime and after. Evola was never taken very seriously by the Italian fascists, let alone the Nazis, who had their own hacks to deal with.
    , @Anon
    He's no Spengler.
    , @utu
    The SS let Evola go through confiscated archives of secret societies in Europe that were kept, I think, in Vienna, where Evola got wounded during ally bombing towards the end of WWII. I am not aware of any post WWII work by Evola where he would relate to his findings in Vienna. Was he not allowed to bring it up? Certainly he did not state that the archives did not contain anything interesting.
  5. Hunsdon says:

    Elliott Abrams meets the Trumproll. Who’s the sad neocon now? And who’s the happy Hunsdon? (THIS GUY!)

    Read More
  6. Cagey Beast says: • Website

    Isn’t it funny how actual, living and active Fascists are never mentioned when people throw around the word so much? Have any of the anti-Trumpers ever managed to connects Bannon to the “third millenium Fascism” movement of CasaPound Italia? I mean, if this is all about Fascism, shouldn’t they come into this at some point?

    People should just have a quick look at their YouTube account to get a sense of them. Have a look at their promotional street fighting music video, entitled: “Mille Cuori Una Bandiera – Video Ufficiale Blocco Studentesco”. The alt-right are a bunch of de-clawed house cats compared to them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Boomstick
    Huh. It looks like CasaPound Italia is using Oswald Mosley's lightning-bolt-in-a-circle symbol on their flag, with the colors changed a bit.
    , @Laugh Track

    People should just have a quick look at their YouTube account to get a sense of them. Have a look at their promotional street fighting music video, entitled: “Mille Cuori Una Bandiera – Video Ufficiale Blocco Studentesco”. The alt-right are a bunch of de-clawed house cats compared to them.
     
    So, I guess the alt-right need to wave a bunch of flags and flares to not be de-clawed? I failed to see the street fighting.
  7. guest says:

    “That’s it?”

    Bannon knows the guy’s name; that’s enough. Who knows about Evola, besides dirty fascists? Plus dirty-fascist-hunters, who scan what names are dropped by suspected fascists. If these names are actual, quasi-, or kinda-sorta-fascists, then you know the suspected fascists are actual fascists.

    Because that’d be a huge coincidence, right, if suspected fascists just happened to know those names? It’s not like rightists have any culture, or anything. If it were a Berkeley professor, no big deal.

    At least he didn’t say it three times, like Beetlejuice. In which case we’d have caught the Evola Curse, which makes the trains run on time and instills an insatiable desire to invade Abyssinia.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Actually, Bannon specifically mentioned Evola in the context of Traditionalism. The fact that Evola is known well in North America due to his connections with Nazis doesn't change the fact that you could come in contact with him through a different route, ie, reading about religion.

    The journalists of course know nothing about comparative religion studies, so don't know Traditionalist or Perennialist thinking. If they did, they would understand that Bannon, speaking to the Vatican (!), is obviously not endorsing Evola.

    I think Bannon's contention that Traditionalism turned into fascism is kind of wishy-washy on historical grounds, and with a better-informed journalism they might more profitably call into question his political judgement based on his historical knowledge.
    , @Prof. Woland
    During Stalin's reign after WW2 right though Putin's, it has been an official / unofficial policy of the USSR / Russia to use the phrase Fascism instead of Nazism due to the connotation with National and Socialism. Any negative reference to socialism was verboten for the obvious reason and as the Soviet Union matured there was much less emphasis on international revolution and socialism and more on the country (A good example of that is how the National Anthem of the USSR was changed from the International to the State Anthem). Also how the Comintern was neutered to appease the British and Americans. Nationalism was revived to whip up fervor against the Germans and they could never really get rid of it afterwards even though they would have liked to have.

    So to refer to the West-Capitalism-Germany-America, etc. they fell back on the use of Fascism which was always ill defined and used by Mussolini not Hitler. Even in Ukraine, the Russians 9 times out of 10 will call them fascists. If you called them National Socialists you might confuse them with Russians.

    , @NOTA
    There is something deeply creepy about the movement to turn having read some controversial author into scandal material. It ties in with the general worship of ignorance and distrust of knowledge in our society.
  8. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    That’s it?

    Lol, yep, that’s it. Just like reaching the end of the Internet they’ve now exhausted ever last bit of anti-Trump rhetoric. The only thing left now is to start all over again. Look for the P.T. Barnum comparisons.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Random Dude on the Internet

    Lol, yep, that’s it. Just like reaching the end of the Internet they’ve now exhausted ever last bit of anti-Trump rhetoric. The only thing left now is to start all over again. Look for the P.T. Barnum comparisons.
     
    This is what they did during the election as well. How many times did they talk about Trump University or his supposed mafia connections, hoping that the eighth or ninth time they reported on it would finally be the thing that sinks Trump? Maybe they can talk about the taco bowl he ate nearly a year ago again.
  9. guest says:

    By the way, I delved into far-right (for lack of a better term) and fascist literature a few years ago, to see what’s what. Mostly Counter-Currents type stuff. Not as bad as I was led to believe, but still not my cup of tea. Before then I wouldn’t have been caught dead reading “white nationalist” literature. Now I don’t care.

    Thing is, I thought I was utterly ignorant on the subject beforehand, except as an outsider (like every other reader of Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, for instance). Yet I had heard the name Evola. He wrote a book titled Ride the Tiger, which stuck in my mind because it’s pretty awesome.

    You wouldn’t find it in Barnes and Noble, probably. But Evola isn’t *that* obscure. He’s not well known enough for me to call “bubble” on the libs for this one. But it’s not as if you have to have been a Mussolini aficionado to have heard his name.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SFG
    I first read about him when reading about the occult in high school. (I was smart enough to know magic didn't work, but still found it interesting to read about, in an alternate-history kind of way).

    I found the PDF on the web. Didn't really do it for me (though I suppose I'm not one of his chosen few), but I can see the appeal--who doesn't want to think he's part of some secret elite?
  10. B.B. says:

    The noted scholar of fascism Anthony James Gregor claims contra Bannon, the NYT and Wikipedia, Julius Evola is a right-wing critic of fascism who had little intellectual influence during the Mussolini period of Italian history. Mussolini did once use the anti-clerical Evola as pawn to bait the Catholic Church into being more co-operative with the fascist regime during negotiations, but he was never a real believer in Evola’s ideas.

    B.B.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    Wouldn't surprise me. Basically anyone who wasn't a commie (plus some of them, including THE commie, Iron Joe) last century has been called a fascist.
  11. Ivy says:
    @PiltdownMan
    From Wikipedia:

    Evola has been described as "one of the most influential fascist racists in Italian history."[2] He was admired by Benito Mussolini[3], and continues to influence contemporary fascists and neofascists.[4][5] movement, and Russian political scientist and sometime Vladimir Putin advisor Aleksander Dugin[6][7] cites Evola's influence. President Donald Trump's chief adviser Steve Bannon, in a speech at the Vatican, noted Evola's influence on the Traditionalist movement and Eurasianism favored by Dugin and the alt-right.[8]
     
    I think it is fair to say that first sentence has been vandalized, given the rather sketchy attempt to rope in Putin and Bannon into the rogues gallery.

    Evola appears to have been a sort of Italian Aleister Crowley or L. Ron Hubbard. I do not get any coherent sense of his work from Wikipedia, nor any sense as to whether he was central to Italian fascism.

    The New York Times practices hit-and-run journalism, blurring further the lines between editorial and opinion. They are trapped in their own short reactive news cycle, a troublesome self-inflicted position for a newspaper, and are trying to move onto their next theme and manufactured outrage before people call them on the past problems and inconsistencies. Newspapers face the same unblinking eye of reality that ordinary citizens must, even if they refuse to acknowledge that.

    Read More
    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @guest
    Like the news equivalent of check kiting? Which now that I think of it oughtta be known as "newspaper hanging."
    , @Frau Katze
    They (NYT) will tell outright lies if they think can get away with it.

    They have made it their mission to bring down Trump.

    I wouldn't trust them anymore than Russians trusted Pravda.
  12. Olorin says:

    the deeply taboo, Nazi-affiliated thinker, Julius Evola.

    Translation:

    “We found a new taboo! Let’s tell you all about it…so we can tell you who to shun!”

    What a bunch of gossipy high school girls the Grey Hag is these days.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sarah Toga
    ... plus - "Evola" sounds like ebola. Therefore the new taboo is scary by association. Deadly, even. Oh, my!
  13. Olorin says:
    @Hail
    Next up:

    News Item: Steve Bannon Overheard Whistling "Dixie" outside White House: Emergency Civil Rights Session Called.

    Op-Ed: Just Why Does Steve Bannon Hate Black People?

    Wait till they find out that Trump Tower’s housekeepers use the new Mr. Clean to put a sheen where they clean.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dr kill
    I recently viewed a new Mr. Clean advert where he was 'poppin his booty' for an appreciative white women. I don't watch network TV, so it must have been on Discovery while I was enjoying Moonshiners. Who knew white housewives dig Moonshiners too?
  14. SFG says:
    @guest
    By the way, I delved into far-right (for lack of a better term) and fascist literature a few years ago, to see what's what. Mostly Counter-Currents type stuff. Not as bad as I was led to believe, but still not my cup of tea. Before then I wouldn't have been caught dead reading "white nationalist" literature. Now I don't care.

    Thing is, I thought I was utterly ignorant on the subject beforehand, except as an outsider (like every other reader of Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, for instance). Yet I had heard the name Evola. He wrote a book titled Ride the Tiger, which stuck in my mind because it's pretty awesome.

    You wouldn't find it in Barnes and Noble, probably. But Evola isn't *that* obscure. He's not well known enough for me to call "bubble" on the libs for this one. But it's not as if you have to have been a Mussolini aficionado to have heard his name.

    I first read about him when reading about the occult in high school. (I was smart enough to know magic didn’t work, but still found it interesting to read about, in an alternate-history kind of way).

    I found the PDF on the web. Didn’t really do it for me (though I suppose I’m not one of his chosen few), but I can see the appeal–who doesn’t want to think he’s part of some secret elite?

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    There was a lot of overlap between the occult of the previous century-plus and the far right, I think, though I'm not particularly knowledgeable on the subject. Of course it went decidedly lefty in the 60s.

    I read an interesting, halfway sympathetic book on the subject called Turn Off Your Mind, by Gary Lachman, bassist in the band Blondie of all things. I don't remember whether Evola was mentioned, but there were plenty of figures of whom contemporary fascists are fans, like H.P. Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard.

  15. guest says:
    @Ivy
    The New York Times practices hit-and-run journalism, blurring further the lines between editorial and opinion. They are trapped in their own short reactive news cycle, a troublesome self-inflicted position for a newspaper, and are trying to move onto their next theme and manufactured outrage before people call them on the past problems and inconsistencies. Newspapers face the same unblinking eye of reality that ordinary citizens must, even if they refuse to acknowledge that.

    Like the news equivalent of check kiting? Which now that I think of it oughtta be known as “newspaper hanging.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Forbes
    Paper hanging or hanging paper is counterfeiting. Counterfeiting could be another name for fake news. Something at which the NYT is adroit.
  16. @PiltdownMan
    From Wikipedia:

    Evola has been described as "one of the most influential fascist racists in Italian history."[2] He was admired by Benito Mussolini[3], and continues to influence contemporary fascists and neofascists.[4][5] movement, and Russian political scientist and sometime Vladimir Putin advisor Aleksander Dugin[6][7] cites Evola's influence. President Donald Trump's chief adviser Steve Bannon, in a speech at the Vatican, noted Evola's influence on the Traditionalist movement and Eurasianism favored by Dugin and the alt-right.[8]
     
    I think it is fair to say that first sentence has been vandalized, given the rather sketchy attempt to rope in Putin and Bannon into the rogues gallery.

    Evola appears to have been a sort of Italian Aleister Crowley or L. Ron Hubbard. I do not get any coherent sense of his work from Wikipedia, nor any sense as to whether he was central to Italian fascism.

    Evola appears to have been a sort of Italian Aleister Crowley or L. Ron Hubbard. I do not get any coherent sense of his work from Wikipedia, nor any sense as to whether he was central to Italian fascism.

    This is just about right. Evola was never a Fascist although he had some sympathy with Fascism. He was much more an aristocratic reactionary, differing from others of that class in his rejection of Catholicism and his extensive involvement in the occult.

    A much greater influence on Mussolini was Gabriele d’Annunzio (who was also never a Fascist). From d’Annunzio’s Fiume adventure came the fusion of nationalism and syndicalism, the theatrical harangues from a balcony, the paramilitary element (cf. d’Annunzio’s arditi vis-à-vis Mussolini’s blackshirts), irredentist and imperialist elements, and much else. D’Annunzio was a wild and impractical romantic; Mussolini a comparatively businesslike politician, who successfully borrowed from him what he found useful, and kept him in a sort of luxurious house arrest until his death in 1938.

    Read More
    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    D'annunzio lived during that explosion of isms/styles that fascinated me when I was young: Late Romantic, Belle Epoque/Decadent, Futurism, Dada/Surrealism, and a host more. He seems to be a figure who partied, fought, and wrote manifestos like business letters- in other words, so all over the place that everybody interprets him differently. And he seems to be a fellow who got a lot of pleasure being on the cusp of things, not all that concerned about the details. Agreed about the occult as a reactionary impulse. Never my thing, but I indeed got the impression that its practitioners were reacting from a "Fuck this gay earth" attitude as anything else. D'Annunzio seems to be a model for today's hipster rightists like Douglas P and Boyd Rice.
  17. guest says:
    @SFG
    I first read about him when reading about the occult in high school. (I was smart enough to know magic didn't work, but still found it interesting to read about, in an alternate-history kind of way).

    I found the PDF on the web. Didn't really do it for me (though I suppose I'm not one of his chosen few), but I can see the appeal--who doesn't want to think he's part of some secret elite?

    There was a lot of overlap between the occult of the previous century-plus and the far right, I think, though I’m not particularly knowledgeable on the subject. Of course it went decidedly lefty in the 60s.

    I read an interesting, halfway sympathetic book on the subject called Turn Off Your Mind, by Gary Lachman, bassist in the band Blondie of all things. I don’t remember whether Evola was mentioned, but there were plenty of figures of whom contemporary fascists are fans, like H.P. Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SFG
    Continued afterward with guys like David Parry, and Asatru always had a far-right component. But, yeah, the hippies moving in in the 60s made it go far-left.

    That's true, although a lot of not-particularly-political nerds dug Lovecraft and Howard--they invented Cthulhu and Conan, after all. You don't have to be a fascist to like tentacled monsters and big dumb guys with swords.

    I think the reason they keep coming up, honestly, is their influence on Dungeons and Dragons--Gary Gygax actually listed his literary (?) influences in an appendix, and cited "de Camp & Pratt, R. E. Howard, Fritz Leiber, Jack Vance, H. P. Lovecraft, and A. Merritt". That, of course, had a huge effect on 80s nerd culture (and don't forget the Cthulhu tabletop RPG), which was when the personal computer age was starting to gain steam...and so you have SJWs calling Trump 'chaotic evil'.

    Howard and Lovecraft are the most famous of the two, and also the ones with right-wing sympathies. Of course, taking either of these guys as any kind of social or political theorist is a little silly--Howard literally sat in his mom's basement waving a sword around and wound up killing himself when his mom died, and Lovecraft died in his 40s poor because he didn't promote his stuff. They weren't too good at the real world--that's not where their interests lay, when you get down to it.

  18. Bannon is completely wrong on this though. Fascism derived from Mussolini with philosophical assistance from Gentile’s Actual Idealism. If anything, Evola was a freerider on Fascism and was referred to as “the magic baron.” An excellent book on this is “Mussolini’s Intellectuals” by James Gregor. Mussolini apparently used Evola towards the end of the war as a way to signal connection with Nazi Germany (where Evola was again trying to freeride on their success.)

    Read More
  19. Remember when it was terrible how the Republicans kept trying to tie Alinsky and Pastor Wright to President Obama???

    Curious how you guys keep up with all the changing rules.

    Example: “Stephen K. Bannon’s dark and at times apocalyptic worldview”

    While you guys grew fat on reality TV, simple nationalism was morphed into “dark and apocalyptic”.

    Ohh and irony alert, the reporter (likely?) being from a group famed for its personal openness, where new entrants aren’t made to assimilate at all.

    Read More
  20. guest says:
    @B.B.
    The noted scholar of fascism Anthony James Gregor claims contra Bannon, the NYT and Wikipedia, Julius Evola is a right-wing critic of fascism who had little intellectual influence during the Mussolini period of Italian history. Mussolini did once use the anti-clerical Evola as pawn to bait the Catholic Church into being more co-operative with the fascist regime during negotiations, but he was never a real believer in Evola's ideas.

    B.B.

    Wouldn’t surprise me. Basically anyone who wasn’t a commie (plus some of them, including THE commie, Iron Joe) last century has been called a fascist.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Forbes
    Anyone to the right of the commies is always and everywhere a fascist. Fascist is the term du jour that has replaced racist in the all-purpose prog-left screed. Yawn.
  21. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @PiltdownMan
    From Wikipedia:

    Evola has been described as "one of the most influential fascist racists in Italian history."[2] He was admired by Benito Mussolini[3], and continues to influence contemporary fascists and neofascists.[4][5] movement, and Russian political scientist and sometime Vladimir Putin advisor Aleksander Dugin[6][7] cites Evola's influence. President Donald Trump's chief adviser Steve Bannon, in a speech at the Vatican, noted Evola's influence on the Traditionalist movement and Eurasianism favored by Dugin and the alt-right.[8]
     
    I think it is fair to say that first sentence has been vandalized, given the rather sketchy attempt to rope in Putin and Bannon into the rogues gallery.

    Evola appears to have been a sort of Italian Aleister Crowley or L. Ron Hubbard. I do not get any coherent sense of his work from Wikipedia, nor any sense as to whether he was central to Italian fascism.

    Evola was sort of a hack and his writing is generally very bad. He was a dilettante who dabbled in esoterica and comparative religion. Crowley and Hubbard are decent analogies, although Crowely had much more knowledge and expertise in the esoteric tradition because he was a serious practitioner of magick, and Hubbard had a greater personal impact and influence during his lifetime and after. Evola was never taken very seriously by the Italian fascists, let alone the Nazis, who had their own hacks to deal with.

    Read More
    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Disagree. His writing is very pretty, in my opinion, though his ideas are not always well thought out.
  22. NYT would rather have all the West killed with , by the Zeroeth Amandment imported, Ebola, while conveniently scaremongering about Evola.

    Read More
  23. Amasius says:

    Evola rules. Revolt Against the Modern World, Men Among the Ruins, and Ride the Tiger are all essential reading. Fascism Viewed From the Right (yes, lol) and Notes on the Third Reich, shorter volumes, are excellent as well and can serve as an introduction to his thought.

    Read More
    • Replies: @a reader
    You can read Revolt Against the Modern World here.

    Men Among the Ruins here.

    Ride the Tiger here.

    Fascism Viewed From the Right here.
    , @oh its just me too
    " Revolt Against the Modern World, "
    I liked the title but it was all downhill from there...It was one of the most incoherent books i have ever read... maybe I had a bad translation.

    So now even reading (but not necessarily agreeing with) something is hate think? I can't keep up.

    Like many, I think we're headed for an inevitable hot civil war. The left has always and only succeeded by inciting violence and very obviously the global elite at best are turning a blind eye at worst seemed to be in on it.

  24. B-plug says:

    Finally, I get to bring up my theory that the lyric “…ride the tiger…” from the Dio song “Holy Diver” is referencing Evola! I know no one on this blog cares or even knows what I’m talking about, but I’d like to thank the New York Times for giving me this opportunity. Much of Dio’s lyrical content could be considered “traditionalist”. You heard it here first.

    Read More
    • Replies: @JohnnyGeo
    Jump! Jump!
    , @passive-aggressivist
    i care and thought the same thing! although the phrase seems to be in more widespread use than just dio/evola, judging by a quick search.

    now if evola also had an uncanny obsession with rainbows...
    , @utu
    Do Bannon or Trump realize that are attempting to ride the tiger and it is too late to get off unharmed. They have to tame it or kill it or else.
    , @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Finally, I get to bring up my theory that the lyric “…ride the tiger…” from the Dio song “Holy Diver” is referencing Evola! I know no one on this blog cares or even knows what I’m talking about...
     
    You think I don't know the lyrics to "Holy Diver?" Dio may be largely forgotten today, but in the 1980s, he was really big stuff among the metalhead/rocker/stoner crowd. And everyone else was listening to music that seemed to be inspired by a homoerotic aesthetic ("Duran Duran" and such), so there was no place else for a red-blooded American male teen to gravitate.
    , @BenKenobi
    Recently I've really gotten into the British Glam-Rock band "The Darkness" -- I've seen them referred to as the "heirs of Queen", and I feel that's a fair description.

    Their latest album, Last of Our Kind, is full of lyrical content that seems to be rather right-wing. Although that could just be confirmation bias on my part, I'm sure an SJW would find many songs to be 'problematic.'

    If so inclined, check out the lyrics to the songs Barbarian, Roaring Waters, Mighty Wings, Mudslide (!), Conquerors, and the definitely the title track Last of Our Kind (this one could be our theme song)

    We've sat like this just waiting for their arrows to blacken the sky;
    Many times before, and we will again, God willing;
    I am honored to have served alongside men who inspire defiance;
    Sometimes I tire of the fighting, and the killing;
    We are survivors, the ones left behind;
    Defenders of The Legacy, the last of our kind.
     
    , @P. Barbicane
    As I recall, Dio is of Italian descent. Supposedly, he brought the sign of the horns to Heavy Metal because his Italian grandmother used it to ward off the Evil Eye.
  25. The thing about this NY Times article is just how lame brain it is as a piece of analysis. Somehow they’ve convinced themselves that the game of connect the dots from Trump to Hitler is deep thinking–just as Freudians knew that every psychological problem afflicting any man came about because he wanted to sleep with his mother and kill his father.

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  26. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @PiltdownMan
    From Wikipedia:

    Evola has been described as "one of the most influential fascist racists in Italian history."[2] He was admired by Benito Mussolini[3], and continues to influence contemporary fascists and neofascists.[4][5] movement, and Russian political scientist and sometime Vladimir Putin advisor Aleksander Dugin[6][7] cites Evola's influence. President Donald Trump's chief adviser Steve Bannon, in a speech at the Vatican, noted Evola's influence on the Traditionalist movement and Eurasianism favored by Dugin and the alt-right.[8]
     
    I think it is fair to say that first sentence has been vandalized, given the rather sketchy attempt to rope in Putin and Bannon into the rogues gallery.

    Evola appears to have been a sort of Italian Aleister Crowley or L. Ron Hubbard. I do not get any coherent sense of his work from Wikipedia, nor any sense as to whether he was central to Italian fascism.

    He’s no Spengler.

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  27. Mr. Blank says:

    Oh, man, the Trump years are gonna be hilarious, with all these clueless liberal journalist combing around the heterodox parts of the right to try and get a grasp on Trump and his circle. We need to start treating Haven Monahan as a real person to see if we can bait the New York Times into citing him as a “major alt-right political theorist” or something.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Shouldn't be hard. How many times have they had to walk back "Sam Hyde, well known Trump supporter" whenever one of their pet minorities goes off?
    , @NOTA
    Haven Monahan: Writing alt-right political treatises by day, organizing fraternity initiation gang-rapes by night. He's a busy dude.
  28. Boomstick says:
    @Cagey Beast
    Isn't it funny how actual, living and active Fascists are never mentioned when people throw around the word so much? Have any of the anti-Trumpers ever managed to connects Bannon to the "third millenium Fascism" movement of CasaPound Italia? I mean, if this is all about Fascism, shouldn't they come into this at some point?

    People should just have a quick look at their YouTube account to get a sense of them. Have a look at their promotional street fighting music video, entitled: "Mille Cuori Una Bandiera - Video Ufficiale Blocco Studentesco". The alt-right are a bunch of de-clawed house cats compared to them.

    Huh. It looks like CasaPound Italia is using Oswald Mosley’s lightning-bolt-in-a-circle symbol on their flag, with the colors changed a bit.

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  29. Langley says:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2017/02/10/fake-news-killing-peoples-minds-says-apple-boss-tim-cook/

    Tim Cook wants massive campaign to promote his agenda.

    Claiming “fake news ” a passing fad.

    In other news Greenspan says sub prime meltdown contained.

    Read More
  30. @syonredux

    Many, many words on who Ebola was ensue, followed, finally, by this on what exactly Bannon said about him:

    … he mentioned “Julius Evola and different writers of the early 20th century who are really the supporters of what’s called the Traditionalist movement, which really eventually metastasized into Italian Fascism.”
     
    Granted, I don't work for the NYTIMES, but "metastasized" is not usually regarded as a term of approval.

    … he mentioned “Julius Evola and different writers of the early 20th century who are really the supporters of what’s called the Traditionalist movement, which really eventually metastasized into Italian Fascism.”

    Bannon’s crime was not what he said about Evola . It was the fact that he knew about him. This is a thoughtcrime which would not occur to a goodthinking person.

    If he is a person naturally orthodox (in Newspeak, a goodthinker), he will in all circumstances know, without taking thought, what is the true belief or the desirable emotion.

    Thoughtcrime does not entail death: thoughtcrime IS death.

    Orwell, 1984.

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  31. It will be interesting to see if Evola’s sales start skyrocketing on Amazon.

    What now needs to happen is some troll has to release a Steve Bannon Reading List similar to the John Boyd list. Put all the best crimethinkers of the last 200 years on it. Once the list is out then we convince the good folks at Berkeley to hold a book burning of the Bannon Canon! This may even be more fun that Bronze Age Pervert’s coming flash mob.

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  32. Olorin says:

    Evola always calls to my mind Sir Simon Milligan.

    “…and know–that to look into my face–is to look into the face–OF EVOL!”

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  33. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    I believe many people read… Marx and Marcuse. If we play the game of associations…

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  34. @for-the-record

    … he mentioned “Julius Evola and different writers of the early 20th century who are really the supporters of what’s called the Traditionalist movement, which really eventually metastasized into Italian Fascism.”
     
    Bannon's crime was not what he said about Evola . It was the fact that he knew about him. This is a thoughtcrime which would not occur to a goodthinking person.

    If he is a person naturally orthodox (in Newspeak, a goodthinker), he will in all circumstances know, without taking thought, what is the true belief or the desirable emotion.

    Thoughtcrime does not entail death: thoughtcrime IS death.

    Orwell, 1984.
     

    Worse to know of Evola or Sailer?

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    • Replies: @celt darnell
    Sailer -- Sailer is he who shall not be named (even as we steal his stuff) apparently.
  35. JackOH says:

    I’d read some of Evola’s books years ago. I admired his outright unhappiness with the consequences of the French Revolution, and, I suppose, the massive impracticality of the solutions he proposed. There’s at least one interview with him, I think, on You Tube.

    I can’t recall whether or how he influenced my thinking at the time I’d read him. In retrospect, though, I’d guess he helped persuade me at the very least that there’s a significant down side to representative government. (There’re also James Burnham, Hans Hoppe, the “public choice” economists, several writers and many commenters here at UR, et. al., on the perhaps irredeemable failure of representative governments.) (Steve, any chance of fixing that typo after “Many, many words . . .”?)

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  36. donut says:
    @Lot
    Good news dept:

    Trump overrules Tillerson, refuses to appoint Elliott Abrams;


    ICE confirms that nationwide it has been conducting "targeted enforcement actions" aka old fashioned raids and detained many hundreds of illegals. In Los Angeles alone 160 were detained. They focused on criminals, and felons were 75% of the detainees, but unlike Obama the non felons who got swept up were not released.

    The LA office also stated that 37 of the 160 had already been deported. Most likely these were all Mexicans who decided immediate removal to Mexico would be better than sitting in a detention center waiting for a more formal deportation order.

    ” In Los Angeles alone 160 were detained.” Fingernail clippings , 1600 would be a good start , 16000 , women and children first , even better .

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  37. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Plenty read Alinsky.

    Neocons read Trotsky.

    Progressives read Lukacs.

    Sartre the Stalinist was widely read.

    Nazi Heidegger inspired leftists like Sartre.

    Godard was once a Maoist.

    Gould the stalinist inspired many.

    Obama knew Ayers.

    Hollywood Ten were Stalin apologists.

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    • Replies: @SFG
    The original neocons read Trotsky, but I doubt if John Podhoretz or William Kristol have. They've convinced themselves they're conservative and would never do such a thing, even as the slice of 'conservatism' they represent grows smaller and less significant.

    60 years from now some guys trying to mediate between the White, Hispanic, and Black blocs will rediscover their 'proposition nation' ideology and think of it as a way to keep the country from falling apart. The thing with old ideologies coming back is that most of the people who remember why it failed the first time have to be gone.
    , @HA
    "Neocons read Trotsky."

    Don't forget Christopher Hitchens, another longtime groupie.
  38. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Proggish cult mentality

    Read More
    • Replies: @Forbes
    "Aquarius" running on Netflix, starring David Duchovny (as a detective) is an interesting look at Charles Manson (and his girls). 10 episodes.
  39. dr kill says:
    @Olorin
    Wait till they find out that Trump Tower's housekeepers use the new Mr. Clean to put a sheen where they clean.

    I recently viewed a new Mr. Clean advert where he was ‘poppin his booty’ for an appreciative white women. I don’t watch network TV, so it must have been on Discovery while I was enjoying Moonshiners. Who knew white housewives dig Moonshiners too?

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  40. @guest
    "That's it?"

    Bannon knows the guy's name; that's enough. Who knows about Evola, besides dirty fascists? Plus dirty-fascist-hunters, who scan what names are dropped by suspected fascists. If these names are actual, quasi-, or kinda-sorta-fascists, then you know the suspected fascists are actual fascists.

    Because that'd be a huge coincidence, right, if suspected fascists just happened to know those names? It's not like rightists have any culture, or anything. If it were a Berkeley professor, no big deal.

    At least he didn't say it three times, like Beetlejuice. In which case we'd have caught the Evola Curse, which makes the trains run on time and instills an insatiable desire to invade Abyssinia.

    Actually, Bannon specifically mentioned Evola in the context of Traditionalism. The fact that Evola is known well in North America due to his connections with Nazis doesn’t change the fact that you could come in contact with him through a different route, ie, reading about religion.

    The journalists of course know nothing about comparative religion studies, so don’t know Traditionalist or Perennialist thinking. If they did, they would understand that Bannon, speaking to the Vatican (!), is obviously not endorsing Evola.

    I think Bannon’s contention that Traditionalism turned into fascism is kind of wishy-washy on historical grounds, and with a better-informed journalism they might more profitably call into question his political judgement based on his historical knowledge.

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    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    The journalists just know that he's reading someone who is engaged in BadThink and this is horrifying to such doubleplus goodcitizens not thinkcrime goodcitizen
  41. Many, many words on who Ebola was ensue, followed,

    Spell-checker, 1 ; Sailer, 0.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SFG
    I thought it was intentional. Though the letters are next to each other.
    , @San Fernando Curt
    We all, in our way, appreciate your mighty blow for justice.
  42. a reader says:
    @Amasius
    Evola rules. Revolt Against the Modern World, Men Among the Ruins, and Ride the Tiger are all essential reading. Fascism Viewed From the Right (yes, lol) and Notes on the Third Reich, shorter volumes, are excellent as well and can serve as an introduction to his thought.

    You can read Revolt Against the Modern World here.

    Men Among the Ruins here.

    Ride the Tiger here.

    Fascism Viewed From the Right here.

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  43. meh says:

    I don’t know how to embed vids here, but Jonathan Bowden is worth a listen if you want a quick intro to Julius Evola:

    Jonathan Bowden – Julius Evola: The World’s Most Right Wing Thinker

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YqKf3v2aPs

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    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    I'll watch this later, but calling Evola right-wing seems silly. As far as I know, he never repudiated Dadaism. That should give everyone pause. You can read some convoluted thoughts here:

    https://books.google.co.jp/books?id=zmOyK1e7C0oC&pg=PA120&lpg=PA120&dq=evola+arte+astratta+translation&source=bl&ots=47dq0wfvuq&sig=340NIb3yCrPsKx5iyCaW06iM7i4&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi74_PL-4fSAhUBU7wKHQZvBO4Q6AEIJjAB#v=onepage&q&f=false
  44. @Mr. Blank
    Oh, man, the Trump years are gonna be hilarious, with all these clueless liberal journalist combing around the heterodox parts of the right to try and get a grasp on Trump and his circle. We need to start treating Haven Monahan as a real person to see if we can bait the New York Times into citing him as a "major alt-right political theorist" or something.

    Shouldn’t be hard. How many times have they had to walk back “Sam Hyde, well known Trump supporter” whenever one of their pet minorities goes off?

    Read More
  45. @meh
    I don't know how to embed vids here, but Jonathan Bowden is worth a listen if you want a quick intro to Julius Evola:

    Jonathan Bowden - Julius Evola: The World's Most Right Wing Thinker

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YqKf3v2aPs

    I’ll watch this later, but calling Evola right-wing seems silly. As far as I know, he never repudiated Dadaism. That should give everyone pause. You can read some convoluted thoughts here:

    https://books.google.co.jp/books?id=zmOyK1e7C0oC&pg=PA120&lpg=PA120&dq=evola+arte+astratta+translation&source=bl&ots=47dq0wfvuq&sig=340NIb3yCrPsKx5iyCaW06iM7i4&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi74_PL-4fSAhUBU7wKHQZvBO4Q6AEIJjAB#v=onepage&q&f=false

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    • Replies: @meh

    I’ll watch this later, but calling Evola right-wing seems silly. As far as I know, he never repudiated Dadaism. That should give everyone pause.
     
    Well then, your argument is not with Bowden, but with Evola himself. Evola criticized fascism "from the right". Evola considered himself on the right; his disagreement with almost the entire right was that it simply was not nearly rightwing, or traditionalist, enough. As for Dada, Evola explained it as a necessary preliminary first step of destruction of modernist bourgeois notions of art prior to returning to proper tradition, or words to that effect. If you were actually familiar with Evola, you would already know this.
  46. El Dato says:

    Well, FDR was pro-Mussolini before he was anti-Mussolini, so what should we do with grubby Saint Franklin?

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  47. I bet they could be trolled into believing Bannon is one of the Stonecutters.

    Who controls the British crown? Who keeps the metric system down? Who keeps Atlantis off the maps? Who keeps the Martians under wraps?

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  48. JohnnyGeo says:
    @B-plug
    Finally, I get to bring up my theory that the lyric "...ride the tiger..." from the Dio song "Holy Diver" is referencing Evola! I know no one on this blog cares or even knows what I'm talking about, but I'd like to thank the New York Times for giving me this opportunity. Much of Dio's lyrical content could be considered "traditionalist". You heard it here first.

    Jump! Jump!

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  49. Kirt says:

    Evola??? That’s that plague out of Africa, right? And Bannon is spreading it around???!!! We’re all gonna die!!!! Oh wait a minute – I read that they recently developed a vaccine. Whew, just in time!

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  50. “Steve Bannon Cited Italian Thinker Who Inspired Fascists”

    Of course you could claim the same of anyone who has ever cited Keynes, or spoken approvingly of FDR or whoever given the admiration of many fascists for them (and their admiration of many fascists).

    Anyway the NYT and others aren’t scaring anyone who isn’t already deranged at the thought of Trump and Bannon with this revealation. But they will certainly see many people who wouldn’t otherwise hear of the likes of Evola to check out his work.

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    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Elk, I am going to sacrifice my minds for all the Steve fans and read both Obama books to see if I can similarly smear him with a random quote or two. Nah, just kidding.
  51. @B-plug
    Finally, I get to bring up my theory that the lyric "...ride the tiger..." from the Dio song "Holy Diver" is referencing Evola! I know no one on this blog cares or even knows what I'm talking about, but I'd like to thank the New York Times for giving me this opportunity. Much of Dio's lyrical content could be considered "traditionalist". You heard it here first.

    i care and thought the same thing! although the phrase seems to be in more widespread use than just dio/evola, judging by a quick search.

    now if evola also had an uncanny obsession with rainbows…

    Read More
    • Replies: @B-plug
    I see a rainbow rising...

    I thought with Dio being Italian the connection to Evola might be a little stronger.
  52. SFG says:
    @guest
    There was a lot of overlap between the occult of the previous century-plus and the far right, I think, though I'm not particularly knowledgeable on the subject. Of course it went decidedly lefty in the 60s.

    I read an interesting, halfway sympathetic book on the subject called Turn Off Your Mind, by Gary Lachman, bassist in the band Blondie of all things. I don't remember whether Evola was mentioned, but there were plenty of figures of whom contemporary fascists are fans, like H.P. Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard.

    Continued afterward with guys like David Parry, and Asatru always had a far-right component. But, yeah, the hippies moving in in the 60s made it go far-left.

    That’s true, although a lot of not-particularly-political nerds dug Lovecraft and Howard–they invented Cthulhu and Conan, after all. You don’t have to be a fascist to like tentacled monsters and big dumb guys with swords.

    I think the reason they keep coming up, honestly, is their influence on Dungeons and Dragons–Gary Gygax actually listed his literary (?) influences in an appendix, and cited “de Camp & Pratt, R. E. Howard, Fritz Leiber, Jack Vance, H. P. Lovecraft, and A. Merritt”. That, of course, had a huge effect on 80s nerd culture (and don’t forget the Cthulhu tabletop RPG), which was when the personal computer age was starting to gain steam…and so you have SJWs calling Trump ‘chaotic evil’.

    Howard and Lovecraft are the most famous of the two, and also the ones with right-wing sympathies. Of course, taking either of these guys as any kind of social or political theorist is a little silly–Howard literally sat in his mom’s basement waving a sword around and wound up killing himself when his mom died, and Lovecraft died in his 40s poor because he didn’t promote his stuff. They weren’t too good at the real world–that’s not where their interests lay, when you get down to it.

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  53. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @syonredux

    Many, many words on who Ebola was ensue, followed, finally, by this on what exactly Bannon said about him:

    … he mentioned “Julius Evola and different writers of the early 20th century who are really the supporters of what’s called the Traditionalist movement, which really eventually metastasized into Italian Fascism.”
     
    Granted, I don't work for the NYTIMES, but "metastasized" is not usually regarded as a term of approval.

    I listened to that speech a while back and found it funny how many times Bannon used the term ‘metastasized’… It was like a word he just learned and wanted to use at every opportunity.

    Good speech though — he came off as knowledgeable and level headed to me.

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  54. SFG says:
    @Chrisnonymous

    Many, many words on who Ebola was ensue, followed,
     
    Spell-checker, 1 ; Sailer, 0.

    I thought it was intentional. Though the letters are next to each other.

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  55. Many, many words on who Ebola was ensue, followed, finally, by this on what exactly Bannon said about him:

    Weren’t we assured that we could not turn people away who came from countries that might be afflicted with Ebola?

    So, how can we turn people away who might be afflicted with Evola? Surely, it would be intellectualist to do so!

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  56. SFG says:
    @Anon
    Plenty read Alinsky.

    Neocons read Trotsky.

    Progressives read Lukacs.

    Sartre the Stalinist was widely read.

    Nazi Heidegger inspired leftists like Sartre.

    Godard was once a Maoist.

    Gould the stalinist inspired many.

    Obama knew Ayers.

    Hollywood Ten were Stalin apologists.

    The original neocons read Trotsky, but I doubt if John Podhoretz or William Kristol have. They’ve convinced themselves they’re conservative and would never do such a thing, even as the slice of ‘conservatism’ they represent grows smaller and less significant.

    60 years from now some guys trying to mediate between the White, Hispanic, and Black blocs will rediscover their ‘proposition nation’ ideology and think of it as a way to keep the country from falling apart. The thing with old ideologies coming back is that most of the people who remember why it failed the first time have to be gone.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Is Trotsky worth reading?
    , @Forbes
    Surely fathers Podhoretz and Kristol (original neocons) read Trotsky, so their sons got it by conception.
  57. BB753 says:

    Wait till they find out Bannon has been reading Steve Sailer for a decade! Our host is more evil than Evola, Gentile, d’Annunzio and Nietzsche combined! Evil incarnate! Human Biodiversity!

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  58. Dumbo says:

    Obama and Hillary read Alinsky, Alinsky dedicated a book to Lucifer, so Obama and Hillary are Satanists?

    It seems that they are just trying to link Bannon and therefore Trump to anything remotely “Nazi”. Maybe Ivanka Trump is a vegetarian, like, you know, Hitler?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "It seems that they are just trying to link Bannon and therefore Trump to anything remotely “Nazi”. Maybe Ivanka Trump is a vegetarian, like, you know, Hitler?"

    Trump neither smokes nor drinks. Just like Hitler.

    And I bet that Steve Bannon likes dogs too - what Fascist doesn't?
    , @Manchurian Take Out
    And Hitler liked dogs, ergo PETA must be Nazi sympathizers. Gee kids! Isn't slander association fun!
  59. This is just more #FakeNews, like the following:

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  60. @Crawfurdmuir

    Evola appears to have been a sort of Italian Aleister Crowley or L. Ron Hubbard. I do not get any coherent sense of his work from Wikipedia, nor any sense as to whether he was central to Italian fascism.
     
    This is just about right. Evola was never a Fascist although he had some sympathy with Fascism. He was much more an aristocratic reactionary, differing from others of that class in his rejection of Catholicism and his extensive involvement in the occult.

    A much greater influence on Mussolini was Gabriele d'Annunzio (who was also never a Fascist). From d'Annunzio's Fiume adventure came the fusion of nationalism and syndicalism, the theatrical harangues from a balcony, the paramilitary element (cf. d'Annunzio's arditi vis-à-vis Mussolini's blackshirts), irredentist and imperialist elements, and much else. D'Annunzio was a wild and impractical romantic; Mussolini a comparatively businesslike politician, who successfully borrowed from him what he found useful, and kept him in a sort of luxurious house arrest until his death in 1938.

    D’annunzio lived during that explosion of isms/styles that fascinated me when I was young: Late Romantic, Belle Epoque/Decadent, Futurism, Dada/Surrealism, and a host more. He seems to be a figure who partied, fought, and wrote manifestos like business letters- in other words, so all over the place that everybody interprets him differently. And he seems to be a fellow who got a lot of pleasure being on the cusp of things, not all that concerned about the details. Agreed about the occult as a reactionary impulse. Never my thing, but I indeed got the impression that its practitioners were reacting from a “Fuck this gay earth” attitude as anything else. D’Annunzio seems to be a model for today’s hipster rightists like Douglas P and Boyd Rice.

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  61. utu says:
    @PiltdownMan
    From Wikipedia:

    Evola has been described as "one of the most influential fascist racists in Italian history."[2] He was admired by Benito Mussolini[3], and continues to influence contemporary fascists and neofascists.[4][5] movement, and Russian political scientist and sometime Vladimir Putin advisor Aleksander Dugin[6][7] cites Evola's influence. President Donald Trump's chief adviser Steve Bannon, in a speech at the Vatican, noted Evola's influence on the Traditionalist movement and Eurasianism favored by Dugin and the alt-right.[8]
     
    I think it is fair to say that first sentence has been vandalized, given the rather sketchy attempt to rope in Putin and Bannon into the rogues gallery.

    Evola appears to have been a sort of Italian Aleister Crowley or L. Ron Hubbard. I do not get any coherent sense of his work from Wikipedia, nor any sense as to whether he was central to Italian fascism.

    The SS let Evola go through confiscated archives of secret societies in Europe that were kept, I think, in Vienna, where Evola got wounded during ally bombing towards the end of WWII. I am not aware of any post WWII work by Evola where he would relate to his findings in Vienna. Was he not allowed to bring it up? Certainly he did not state that the archives did not contain anything interesting.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Crawfurdmuir

    The SS let Evola go through confiscated archives of secret societies in Europe that were kept, I think, in Vienna, where Evola got wounded during ally bombing towards the end of WWII.
     
    Here is a link to a Wikipedia article (unfortunately in German) about some of the records Evola examined:

    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schwedenkiste

    I am not sure it would have had much in it that drew his particular esoteric attention, though of course there is much of historic significance in it.

    The Traditionalist/Perennialist thinkers concern themselves greatly with the concept of initiation, but distinguish between true and valid initiation, and that which is not. Some Traditionalists (among others, Guénon) believed that Masonic initiation was genuine - others dismiss it. I have not studied Evola in enough depth to know what he thought.

    Continental European Freemasonry was (and still is) much more overtly political than the Anglo-American kind, which strongly discourages discussion of politics and religion. The potential that Freemasonry or some branch of it could be used as a platform for political conspiracy was doubtless high in the thoughts of the Gestapo. The secrecy to which a Mason is obligated and the ostensibly charitable and fraternal character of the Order lent itself to such purposes, especially in a society where open political debate has been suppressed.

    There is a long history of this in Germany, where rival fringe Masonic bodies - the Illuminati and the Gold- und Rosenkreuz - were effectively opposing political parties in the Prussia of Frederick William II. For all that is written about the Illuminati, their Rosicrucian enemies were far more effective politically, having recruited the king himself to their society. A similar situation existed in Mexico when Joel Poinsett was the American minister there; the country was politically divided between "Yorquinas" (adherents of the York Rite) and "Escoseses" (adherents of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite). If you are familiar with recent Italian history, you will know about Licio Gelli and the clandestine Lodge P2 ("Propaganda Due").

    Whether someone like Evola, hoping to discover some new insight into the sophia perennis, found anything of interest in materials largely related to such ἀπόκρυφη ἱστορία seems unlikely to me. In the post-war years, believing that the war against modernity was lost, he took a deliberately apolitical stance. That is the likeliest explanation of why he never wrote anything about what he found in the Gestapo's confiscated Masonic archives.
  62. utu says:
    @B-plug
    Finally, I get to bring up my theory that the lyric "...ride the tiger..." from the Dio song "Holy Diver" is referencing Evola! I know no one on this blog cares or even knows what I'm talking about, but I'd like to thank the New York Times for giving me this opportunity. Much of Dio's lyrical content could be considered "traditionalist". You heard it here first.

    Do Bannon or Trump realize that are attempting to ride the tiger and it is too late to get off unharmed. They have to tame it or kill it or else.

    Read More
    • Replies: @neon2
    Profoundly true, utu. Bannon knows it, but I'm not sure about Trump.
  63. @B-plug
    Finally, I get to bring up my theory that the lyric "...ride the tiger..." from the Dio song "Holy Diver" is referencing Evola! I know no one on this blog cares or even knows what I'm talking about, but I'd like to thank the New York Times for giving me this opportunity. Much of Dio's lyrical content could be considered "traditionalist". You heard it here first.

    Finally, I get to bring up my theory that the lyric “…ride the tiger…” from the Dio song “Holy Diver” is referencing Evola! I know no one on this blog cares or even knows what I’m talking about…

    You think I don’t know the lyrics to “Holy Diver?” Dio may be largely forgotten today, but in the 1980s, he was really big stuff among the metalhead/rocker/stoner crowd. And everyone else was listening to music that seemed to be inspired by a homoerotic aesthetic (“Duran Duran” and such), so there was no place else for a red-blooded American male teen to gravitate.

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  64. Jack D says:

    “Julius Evola and different writers of the early 20th century who are really the supporters of what’s called the Traditionalist movement, which really eventually metastasized into Italian Fascism.”

    Although the use of the word “metastasized” does not exactly imply admiration, it’s also not true. Evola was to the RIGHT of the Italian Fascists – he thought they were too soft. The boys he really admired (Evola never married – did he really admire boys?) were the SS, with their hardcore anti-Semitism. In Italy, if you were Jewish you could usually find someone in the Fascist hierarchy to bribe so they would leave you alone more or less, but those Germans – they were unbribable! [After the war when he was in Allied custody, Höss, the commandant of Auschwitz,was asked whether maybe he had taken some of the gold extracted from the mouths of the gassed for himself. Höss replied indignantly, “Für was halten Sie mich?” What kind of man do you take me for?]

    So Evola is not really my cup of tea. But what the NYT is getting at is that a goodthinker shouldn’t even know who someone like Evola is, let alone read his books. If you attend an American university, you will get assigned reading from authors who were avowed admirers of Stalin and Mao and Che. You may even be required to read those Maximum Leaders yourself. But the youth of America must never never allow their souls to be blackened by the forced reading of any intellectual to the right of Bernie Sanders. They might get the wrong idea.

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  65. @Anonymous

    That’s it?
     
    Lol, yep, that's it. Just like reaching the end of the Internet they've now exhausted ever last bit of anti-Trump rhetoric. The only thing left now is to start all over again. Look for the P.T. Barnum comparisons.

    Lol, yep, that’s it. Just like reaching the end of the Internet they’ve now exhausted ever last bit of anti-Trump rhetoric. The only thing left now is to start all over again. Look for the P.T. Barnum comparisons.

    This is what they did during the election as well. How many times did they talk about Trump University or his supposed mafia connections, hoping that the eighth or ninth time they reported on it would finally be the thing that sinks Trump? Maybe they can talk about the taco bowl he ate nearly a year ago again.

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  66. @Anonymous
    Evola was sort of a hack and his writing is generally very bad. He was a dilettante who dabbled in esoterica and comparative religion. Crowley and Hubbard are decent analogies, although Crowely had much more knowledge and expertise in the esoteric tradition because he was a serious practitioner of magick, and Hubbard had a greater personal impact and influence during his lifetime and after. Evola was never taken very seriously by the Italian fascists, let alone the Nazis, who had their own hacks to deal with.

    Disagree. His writing is very pretty, in my opinion, though his ideas are not always well thought out.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SFG
    Style and accuracy don't have to go together--look at Hunter S. Thompson.
  67. SFG says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    Disagree. His writing is very pretty, in my opinion, though his ideas are not always well thought out.

    Style and accuracy don’t have to go together–look at Hunter S. Thompson.

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  68. HA says:
    @Anon
    Plenty read Alinsky.

    Neocons read Trotsky.

    Progressives read Lukacs.

    Sartre the Stalinist was widely read.

    Nazi Heidegger inspired leftists like Sartre.

    Godard was once a Maoist.

    Gould the stalinist inspired many.

    Obama knew Ayers.

    Hollywood Ten were Stalin apologists.

    “Neocons read Trotsky.”

    Don’t forget Christopher Hitchens, another longtime groupie.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Didn't the 2002 movie Frida pretty much glamorize Trotsky and Trotskyites?
  69. JDG1980 says:

    The NYT article refers to “the deeply taboo, Nazi-affiliated thinker, Julius Evola“.

    Should any thinker really be “taboo”? That doesn’t seem healthy. If they’re wrong, then they should be debated, discussed, and argued against – not declared “taboo”. If they’re “taboo”, that indicates that people don’t like what they have to say, but can’t really coherently explain why. Or else their reasons are bad (guilt by association, as appears to be the case here).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Forbes
    You're gonna grow old and gray expecting a logical argument (or premise) from the NYT.
  70. Svigor says:

    You guys are all idiots. It’s guys like Evola who lead fascists to Mjolnir, the Spear of Destiny, the Ark of the Covenant, the Cosmic Cube, etc., and thence to ultimate power. This is how it starts. Bannon is probably supervising a dig above Loki’s Staff as we speak.

    Read More
    • LOL: Buffalo Joe
    • Replies: @SFG
    Can I have the two-handed sword +3, +5 against feminists?
  71. To fully understand the left’s obsession with Bannon you have to realize that he is the ‘face’ that broke the monopoly of the (((MSM))). It is not enough that he helped Trump win, which in itself is a sin, he represents the internet’s surpassing of television and newspapers and the beginning of the end of the left’s ability to completely control the dissemination of information. This has not only angered the left but it has put fear into them because they know that was always their single most important weapon and their ace in the hole. Without the elite’s ability to control the flow of information they have been exposed and diminished and are now forced to rely more on judicial sabotage and AstroTurf rent-a-mob populism, both of which come with problems and risks.

    Bannon is also ‘face’ that broke the left’s monopoly on ethnic politics. The alt-right has opened the door for whites to begin coalescing. Trump’s victory has removed the handicap that whites belabored under and in turn, has set off infighting among the left as the country realigns around this new reality. There will be winners and losers on the left, but mostly losers.

    The truth is that the whole country owes Steve Bannon their thanks’ by breaking the last taboo.

    Read More
  72. @Cagey Beast
    Isn't it funny how actual, living and active Fascists are never mentioned when people throw around the word so much? Have any of the anti-Trumpers ever managed to connects Bannon to the "third millenium Fascism" movement of CasaPound Italia? I mean, if this is all about Fascism, shouldn't they come into this at some point?

    People should just have a quick look at their YouTube account to get a sense of them. Have a look at their promotional street fighting music video, entitled: "Mille Cuori Una Bandiera - Video Ufficiale Blocco Studentesco". The alt-right are a bunch of de-clawed house cats compared to them.

    People should just have a quick look at their YouTube account to get a sense of them. Have a look at their promotional street fighting music video, entitled: “Mille Cuori Una Bandiera – Video Ufficiale Blocco Studentesco”. The alt-right are a bunch of de-clawed house cats compared to them.

    So, I guess the alt-right need to wave a bunch of flags and flares to not be de-clawed? I failed to see the street fighting.

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  73. Moldbug… Evola… now Nassim Taleb is part of Bannon’s evil dark chaotic evil world view!

    http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/02/steve-bannon-books-reading-list-214745

    Many political onlookers described Trump’s election as a “black swan” event: unexpected but enormously consequential. The term was popularized by Nassim Taleb, the best-selling author whose 2014 book Antifragile—which has been read and circulated by Bannon and his aides—reads like a user’s guide to the Trump insurgency.

    It’s a broadside against big government, which Taleb faults for suppressing the randomness, volatility and stress that keep institutions and people healthy. “As with neurotically overprotective parents, those who are trying to help us are hurting us the most,” he writes. Taleb also offers a withering critique of global elites, whom he describes as a corrupt class of risk-averse insiders immune to the consequences of their actions: “We are witnessing the rise of a new class of inverse heroes, that is, bureaucrats, bankers, Davos-attending members of the I.A.N.D (International Association of Name Droppers), and academics with too much power and no real downside and/or accountability. They game the system while citizens pay the price.”

    It might as well have been the mission statement of the Trump campaign. Asked in a phone interview this week whether he’s had meetings with Bannon or his associates, Taleb said he could not comment. “Anything about private meetings would need to come from them,” he said, though he noted cryptically he’s had “coffee with friends.” He has been supportive of Trump but does not define himself as a supporter per se, though he said he would “be on the first train” to Washington were he invited to the White House.

    “They look like the incarnation of ‘antifragile’ people,” Taleb said of the new administration. “The definition of ‘antifragile’ is having more upside than downside. For example, Obama had little upside because everyone thought he was brilliant and would solve the world’s problems, so when he didn’t it was disappointing. Trump has little downside because he’s already been so heavily criticized. He’s heavily vaccinated because of his checkered history. People have to understand: Trump did not run to be archbishop of Canterbury.”

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    • Replies: @Forbes

    The term was popularized by Nassim Taleb, the best-selling author whose 2014 book Antifragile—which has been read and circulated by Bannon and his aides
     
    This is like mixed metaphors. The term black swan was popularized in a book titled "The Black Swan." The book "Antifragile" is a different work of non-fiction.

    Calling Trump's election a black swan event necessitates ignoring that a presidential election occurs like clockwork every four years, and a transfer of power occurs when a new president is inaugurated following the election. For it to be a black swan event, the occurrence of the election and/or Trump as a candidate would need to be unknown. Merely an improbable outcome of a known event is not sufficient. In other words, these "political onlookers' are as clueless regarding a well-know work of non-fiction, as they are about elections.

    The Politico piece is merely another attempt at writing and reinforcing The Narrative.
  74. You know, they ought’a get out the Brasso and polish up one of those Presidential Medals of Freedom for whoever came up with the term, “earworm”. Nothing better fits, as the definition has it, “song or melody that runs continually through the mind.” HAH! Like “ebola” a few years ago, we can’t help but notice “Evola” perfectly fits the “Ricola” jingle. Wooo! EEEEeeeee-vola!!! HAH! Over and over and over! Like Lawrence Harvey in the old earwig episode on “Night Gallery”. Hahahahah! Can’t. Stop. It. Hawwwhahah. Gee, THANKS!!! HahahhahahhHAHAHAHAH!!!

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  75. Lol… this is even better, from Macleans:

    Steve Bannon’s dangerous reading list
    The voracious reader is said to admire the writings of authoritarian intellectuals whose views helped fuel inter-war fascism

    http://www.macleans.ca/politics/washington/steve-bannons-dangerous-reading-list/

    Read More
    • Replies: @candid_observer
    Again and again, the left betrays its greatest fear: that somebody, somewhere, might think a thought that isn't permitted.

    It isn't enough that such a thought be refuted: it must not be thought. We can't be left at the mercy of logic and evidence: the idea must be strangled in its cradle before it can speak.
  76. @guest
    "That's it?"

    Bannon knows the guy's name; that's enough. Who knows about Evola, besides dirty fascists? Plus dirty-fascist-hunters, who scan what names are dropped by suspected fascists. If these names are actual, quasi-, or kinda-sorta-fascists, then you know the suspected fascists are actual fascists.

    Because that'd be a huge coincidence, right, if suspected fascists just happened to know those names? It's not like rightists have any culture, or anything. If it were a Berkeley professor, no big deal.

    At least he didn't say it three times, like Beetlejuice. In which case we'd have caught the Evola Curse, which makes the trains run on time and instills an insatiable desire to invade Abyssinia.

    During Stalin’s reign after WW2 right though Putin’s, it has been an official / unofficial policy of the USSR / Russia to use the phrase Fascism instead of Nazism due to the connotation with National and Socialism. Any negative reference to socialism was verboten for the obvious reason and as the Soviet Union matured there was much less emphasis on international revolution and socialism and more on the country (A good example of that is how the National Anthem of the USSR was changed from the International to the State Anthem). Also how the Comintern was neutered to appease the British and Americans. Nationalism was revived to whip up fervor against the Germans and they could never really get rid of it afterwards even though they would have liked to have.

    So to refer to the West-Capitalism-Germany-America, etc. they fell back on the use of Fascism which was always ill defined and used by Mussolini not Hitler. Even in Ukraine, the Russians 9 times out of 10 will call them fascists. If you called them National Socialists you might confuse them with Russians.

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  77. BenKenobi says:
    @B-plug
    Finally, I get to bring up my theory that the lyric "...ride the tiger..." from the Dio song "Holy Diver" is referencing Evola! I know no one on this blog cares or even knows what I'm talking about, but I'd like to thank the New York Times for giving me this opportunity. Much of Dio's lyrical content could be considered "traditionalist". You heard it here first.

    Recently I’ve really gotten into the British Glam-Rock band “The Darkness” — I’ve seen them referred to as the “heirs of Queen”, and I feel that’s a fair description.

    Their latest album, Last of Our Kind, is full of lyrical content that seems to be rather right-wing. Although that could just be confirmation bias on my part, I’m sure an SJW would find many songs to be ‘problematic.’

    If so inclined, check out the lyrics to the songs Barbarian, Roaring Waters, Mighty Wings, Mudslide (!), Conquerors, and the definitely the title track Last of Our Kind (this one could be our theme song)

    We’ve sat like this just waiting for their arrows to blacken the sky;
    Many times before, and we will again, God willing;
    I am honored to have served alongside men who inspire defiance;
    Sometimes I tire of the fighting, and the killing;
    We are survivors, the ones left behind;
    Defenders of The Legacy, the last of our kind.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The Darkness has been around for a while. They had a hit single in the early 2000s with their cheesy ballad "I Believe in a Thing Called Love" but sort of fell off after that.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tKjZuykKY1I
    , @Anonymous
    There are genuinely fascist groups and musicians, and there are those which eschew or are indifferent to fascism in the traditional sense but which have a fascist esthetic, e.g, Death in June, Boyd Rice, stc.

    Probably the best was Blood Axis (which included nonwhite members and which explicitly denied any attempt at racialism).
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PxotLDtwT50

  78. @B-plug
    Finally, I get to bring up my theory that the lyric "...ride the tiger..." from the Dio song "Holy Diver" is referencing Evola! I know no one on this blog cares or even knows what I'm talking about, but I'd like to thank the New York Times for giving me this opportunity. Much of Dio's lyrical content could be considered "traditionalist". You heard it here first.

    As I recall, Dio is of Italian descent. Supposedly, he brought the sign of the horns to Heavy Metal because his Italian grandmother used it to ward off the Evil Eye.

    Read More
  79. @Chrisnonymous

    Many, many words on who Ebola was ensue, followed,
     
    Spell-checker, 1 ; Sailer, 0.

    We all, in our way, appreciate your mighty blow for justice.

    Read More
  80. @Amasius
    Evola rules. Revolt Against the Modern World, Men Among the Ruins, and Ride the Tiger are all essential reading. Fascism Viewed From the Right (yes, lol) and Notes on the Third Reich, shorter volumes, are excellent as well and can serve as an introduction to his thought.

    ” Revolt Against the Modern World, ”
    I liked the title but it was all downhill from there…It was one of the most incoherent books i have ever read… maybe I had a bad translation.

    So now even reading (but not necessarily agreeing with) something is hate think? I can’t keep up.

    Like many, I think we’re headed for an inevitable hot civil war. The left has always and only succeeded by inciting violence and very obviously the global elite at best are turning a blind eye at worst seemed to be in on it.

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  81. Gee, wasn’t there an Obama administration official who said one of her two favorite philosophers was Mao? Why, yes, White House communications director Anita Dunn said it in a high school commencement address in 2009.

    The news wasn’t featured in a NY Times article to tie the Obama administration to Communism or a murderous dictator. The angle the Times chose was the “intensifying war of words” between Fox News and the Obama administration.

    https://thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/10/16/white-house-vs-fox-chairman-mao/

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  82. @Muh Current Year
    Lol... this is even better, from Macleans:

    Steve Bannon’s dangerous reading list
    The voracious reader is said to admire the writings of authoritarian intellectuals whose views helped fuel inter-war fascism
    http://www.macleans.ca/politics/washington/steve-bannons-dangerous-reading-list/

    Again and again, the left betrays its greatest fear: that somebody, somewhere, might think a thought that isn’t permitted.

    It isn’t enough that such a thought be refuted: it must not be thought. We can’t be left at the mercy of logic and evidence: the idea must be strangled in its cradle before it can speak.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy

    that somebody, somewhere, might think a thought that isn’t permitted.
     
    In the spirit of the thread, there is a connection between the lefties above and the Puritans who thought that someone, somewhere might be having fun. What killjoys they are.
  83. B-plug says:
    @passive-aggressivist
    i care and thought the same thing! although the phrase seems to be in more widespread use than just dio/evola, judging by a quick search.

    now if evola also had an uncanny obsession with rainbows...

    I see a rainbow rising…

    I thought with Dio being Italian the connection to Evola might be a little stronger.

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  84. @Elkanahaon
    "Steve Bannon Cited Italian Thinker Who Inspired Fascists"

    Of course you could claim the same of anyone who has ever cited Keynes, or spoken approvingly of FDR or whoever given the admiration of many fascists for them (and their admiration of many fascists).

    Anyway the NYT and others aren't scaring anyone who isn't already deranged at the thought of Trump and Bannon with this revealation. But they will certainly see many people who wouldn't otherwise hear of the likes of Evola to check out his work.

    Elk, I am going to sacrifice my minds for all the Steve fans and read both Obama books to see if I can similarly smear him with a random quote or two. Nah, just kidding.

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  85. Steve, Don’t want to be a brown nose but, “pro-cancer” has to be the ultimate insult.

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  86. SFG says:
    @Svigor
    You guys are all idiots. It's guys like Evola who lead fascists to Mjolnir, the Spear of Destiny, the Ark of the Covenant, the Cosmic Cube, etc., and thence to ultimate power. This is how it starts. Bannon is probably supervising a dig above Loki's Staff as we speak.

    Can I have the two-handed sword +3, +5 against feminists?

    Read More
  87. neon2 says:
    @utu
    Do Bannon or Trump realize that are attempting to ride the tiger and it is too late to get off unharmed. They have to tame it or kill it or else.

    Profoundly true, utu. Bannon knows it, but I’m not sure about Trump.

    Read More
    • Replies: @utu

    "Bannon knows it, but I’m not sure about Trump."
     
    I suspect that Bannon is the only guy who knows what are the stakes. He is the one who has a vision and some ideology and possibly some strategy. Once he is eliminated from the administration and access to Trump a chance for Trump revolution or more correctly counter-revolution will be zero. The biggest problem is that they do not have tacticians that could implement Bannon strategy. All the other guys around Trump, like Priebus or Pence are really there to make Trump fall into the worn out grove of Republican and possibly Neocon politics. Bannon may think that he will be able to play Zionist to shelter under their protective umbrella but they are playing him as well and being very careful looking for how far he wants to go. W/o the Zionist protective umbrella it will be a turkey shoot.
  88. @SFG
    The original neocons read Trotsky, but I doubt if John Podhoretz or William Kristol have. They've convinced themselves they're conservative and would never do such a thing, even as the slice of 'conservatism' they represent grows smaller and less significant.

    60 years from now some guys trying to mediate between the White, Hispanic, and Black blocs will rediscover their 'proposition nation' ideology and think of it as a way to keep the country from falling apart. The thing with old ideologies coming back is that most of the people who remember why it failed the first time have to be gone.

    Is Trotsky worth reading?

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  89. @Prof. Woland
    To fully understand the left's obsession with Bannon you have to realize that he is the 'face' that broke the monopoly of the (((MSM))). It is not enough that he helped Trump win, which in itself is a sin, he represents the internet's surpassing of television and newspapers and the beginning of the end of the left's ability to completely control the dissemination of information. This has not only angered the left but it has put fear into them because they know that was always their single most important weapon and their ace in the hole. Without the elite's ability to control the flow of information they have been exposed and diminished and are now forced to rely more on judicial sabotage and AstroTurf rent-a-mob populism, both of which come with problems and risks.

    Bannon is also 'face' that broke the left's monopoly on ethnic politics. The alt-right has opened the door for whites to begin coalescing. Trump's victory has removed the handicap that whites belabored under and in turn, has set off infighting among the left as the country realigns around this new reality. There will be winners and losers on the left, but mostly losers.

    The truth is that the whole country owes Steve Bannon their thanks' by breaking the last taboo.

    Heady stuff

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  90. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    I never read Evola, but it’s good to see a revival of interest in the rightist intellectuals of the 20th century. We need a balance in intellectual discourse.

    In college, lots of people are exposed to works of Gramsi. George Lukacs the communist Hungarian intellectual was once a big thing. Lillian Hellman the Stalinist had a huge impact on a generation.

    And this nutjob held sway over many young intellectuals in the late 60s.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Althusser

    Anyway, look what May 68 generation did to France.

    Hammer-and-Sickle-Cell Anemia is what new France is all about.

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  91. Stan says:

    NYT journalists’ shallow and superficial knowledge of traditional conservatism has been exposed by the inaccurate description of traditionalism and traditionalist conservatism.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traditionalist_conservatism

    gives a good summary of traditionalism.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Crawfurdmuir
    There is a difference between "traditionalist conservatism" and "Traditionalism."

    Traditionalist conservatism is as represented in the Wikipedia article you cite, a type of political and social outlook expressed by such varied figures as Burke, de Maistre, the Southern Agrarians, Russell Kirk, etc. - but Traditionalism (sometimes also called Perennialism) is a term often used to describe a philosophical and religious school of thought centered around the sophia perennis.

    This is a term first used by Steuco in the 16th century to describe the ancient wisdom, held in common by all religions, that was handed down from the world's golden age and supposedly found in the writings of the prisci theologi, including Zoroaster, the poet Vergil (whose fifth Eclogue was thought to foretell the birth of Christ), and above all, Hermes Trismegistus. Hermeticism met its downfall at the hands of Isaac Casaubon, who showed through textual analysis that the Corpus Hermeticum was not nearly as ancient as it had been thought to be; but by the late eighteenth century, after the British had established themselves in India, British scholars such as Reuben Burrow discovered Sanskrit literature and saw both the linguistic and philosophical parallels to the European sophia perennis. Ancient Asian wisdom took the place previously occupied by the Corpus Hermeticum.

    Twentieth-century Traditionalist thinkers often came from a background of occultism or esotericism, especially from Mme. Blavatsky's Theosophy, and from the fringes of Freemasonry. The esoteric aspect is shown in their emphasis on initiation. Probably the principal Traditionalist is René Guénon; more recent exponents include Ananda Coomaraswamy and Sayyed Hossein Nasr. Julius Evola is also a Traditionalist of this type. He had been a follower of Guénon, but came to differ from him on a number of points.

  92. From:

    https://newrepublic.com/minutes/140475/steve-bannon-brains-trump-white-house-read-three-books

    .

    Has Steve Bannon, the brains of the Trump White House, read more than three books? ...This reading list does not suggest “the ‘Rainman’ of nationalism,” so much as “an unambitious rightwing college freshman at Claremont McKenna” or “someone who only buys books from the clearance section at Barnes & Noble.” Only in Trump’s White House would a guy whose taste in books could be defined as “airport bookstore” be considered an intellectual.

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    • Replies: @oh its just me too
    one of the first reactions of liberals to any new republican is to say they are stupid, which leads me to to believe being a lefty is a fashionable status identity that insecure whites use to telegraph that 'i am not a working class white' the strongest adherents to it are whites who have moved from the midwest to say, New York City , they go through a whole ritual to let you know that despite the fact they are from so and so Iowa, they are really new yorkers and don't like those right wing christian nuts.

    The funny thing is ... well.. liberals are pretty damn stupid.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Books, The author of your linked quote has sat on those pithy statements waiting for a chance to put them all in one article. Well bully for him, but who reads that drivel but the "elites?" Don't they sell the New Republic in airport stores?
  93. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    In truth, most people never heard of the Alt Right.

    If Alt Right became a household name, it is due to the media. Spencer himself admitted he felt like was getting nowhere.

    But in 2016, the media in cahoots with the Hillary campaign has a brilliant idea. It would exaggerate the power of the Alt Right, associate it with Trump — Hillary’s speech had been planned long beforehand — , and Trump would be smeared as ‘nazi’. He would lose for sure, especially as he’d be associated with Duke too.

    But in this age of trolling, the Trump side used ‘basketful of deplorables’ as a badge of honor. Also, Alt Right was too obscure and ideologically varied to pigeonhole as ‘neo-nazi’. The most the media could squeeze out in that regard was ‘heilgate’ AFTER the election.

    So, it wasn’t Moldbug and Evola that made Alt Right known worldwide. It was the media that miscalculated in hyping a fringe movement as a SPECTER HAUNTING THE WORLD.

    But of course, the media were never much for self-reflection. They unwittingly played the role of John Reed and Edgar Snow. Now, Reed and Snow were sympathetic to the radical movements they covered(and Reed was a communist himself), whereas the media meant to harm Trump and Alt Right. But they just ended up providing free publicity to a movement that had once been limited to a corner of the internet.

    They did for Alt Right what NYT did for Castro. Unwittingly but effectively just the same. Lame Media turned Alt Right into the ‘les enfants terribles’ of politics.

    http://www.breitbart.com/national-security/2016/11/28/zumwalt-new-york-times-used-fake-news-help-fidel-castro/

    http://ultimateclassicrock.com/rolling-stones-urinate-in-public/

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  94. Mr. Anon says:
    @Dumbo
    Obama and Hillary read Alinsky, Alinsky dedicated a book to Lucifer, so Obama and Hillary are Satanists?

    It seems that they are just trying to link Bannon and therefore Trump to anything remotely "Nazi". Maybe Ivanka Trump is a vegetarian, like, you know, Hitler?

    “It seems that they are just trying to link Bannon and therefore Trump to anything remotely “Nazi”. Maybe Ivanka Trump is a vegetarian, like, you know, Hitler?”

    Trump neither smokes nor drinks. Just like Hitler.

    And I bet that Steve Bannon likes dogs too – what Fascist doesn’t?

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  95. NOTA says:
    @guest
    "That's it?"

    Bannon knows the guy's name; that's enough. Who knows about Evola, besides dirty fascists? Plus dirty-fascist-hunters, who scan what names are dropped by suspected fascists. If these names are actual, quasi-, or kinda-sorta-fascists, then you know the suspected fascists are actual fascists.

    Because that'd be a huge coincidence, right, if suspected fascists just happened to know those names? It's not like rightists have any culture, or anything. If it were a Berkeley professor, no big deal.

    At least he didn't say it three times, like Beetlejuice. In which case we'd have caught the Evola Curse, which makes the trains run on time and instills an insatiable desire to invade Abyssinia.

    There is something deeply creepy about the movement to turn having read some controversial author into scandal material. It ties in with the general worship of ignorance and distrust of knowledge in our society.

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  96. NOTA says:
    @Mr. Blank
    Oh, man, the Trump years are gonna be hilarious, with all these clueless liberal journalist combing around the heterodox parts of the right to try and get a grasp on Trump and his circle. We need to start treating Haven Monahan as a real person to see if we can bait the New York Times into citing him as a "major alt-right political theorist" or something.

    Haven Monahan: Writing alt-right political treatises by day, organizing fraternity initiation gang-rapes by night. He’s a busy dude.

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  97. Forbes says:
    @guest
    Like the news equivalent of check kiting? Which now that I think of it oughtta be known as "newspaper hanging."

    Paper hanging or hanging paper is counterfeiting. Counterfeiting could be another name for fake news. Something at which the NYT is adroit.

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  98. Forbes says:
    @guest
    Wouldn't surprise me. Basically anyone who wasn't a commie (plus some of them, including THE commie, Iron Joe) last century has been called a fascist.

    Anyone to the right of the commies is always and everywhere a fascist. Fascist is the term du jour that has replaced racist in the all-purpose prog-left screed. Yawn.

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  99. Forbes says:
    @Anon
    Proggish cult mentality

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W0ahZh8dEWo

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ms1vRoDpIE

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVWsr2vqir4

    “Aquarius” running on Netflix, starring David Duchovny (as a detective) is an interesting look at Charles Manson (and his girls). 10 episodes.

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  100. Daniel H says:

    Just being acquainted with Julius Evola’s name is enough to indict you in the eyes of the NY Times, because, like, why would you even want to know about him….how did you ever discover him, unless……..

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  101. Forbes says:
    @SFG
    The original neocons read Trotsky, but I doubt if John Podhoretz or William Kristol have. They've convinced themselves they're conservative and would never do such a thing, even as the slice of 'conservatism' they represent grows smaller and less significant.

    60 years from now some guys trying to mediate between the White, Hispanic, and Black blocs will rediscover their 'proposition nation' ideology and think of it as a way to keep the country from falling apart. The thing with old ideologies coming back is that most of the people who remember why it failed the first time have to be gone.

    Surely fathers Podhoretz and Kristol (original neocons) read Trotsky, so their sons got it by conception.

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  102. Forbes says:
    @JDG1980
    The NYT article refers to "the deeply taboo, Nazi-affiliated thinker, Julius Evola".

    Should any thinker really be "taboo"? That doesn't seem healthy. If they're wrong, then they should be debated, discussed, and argued against - not declared "taboo". If they're "taboo", that indicates that people don't like what they have to say, but can't really coherently explain why. Or else their reasons are bad (guilt by association, as appears to be the case here).

    You’re gonna grow old and gray expecting a logical argument (or premise) from the NYT.

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  103. Forbes says:
    @Prof. Woland
    To fully understand the left's obsession with Bannon you have to realize that he is the 'face' that broke the monopoly of the (((MSM))). It is not enough that he helped Trump win, which in itself is a sin, he represents the internet's surpassing of television and newspapers and the beginning of the end of the left's ability to completely control the dissemination of information. This has not only angered the left but it has put fear into them because they know that was always their single most important weapon and their ace in the hole. Without the elite's ability to control the flow of information they have been exposed and diminished and are now forced to rely more on judicial sabotage and AstroTurf rent-a-mob populism, both of which come with problems and risks.

    Bannon is also 'face' that broke the left's monopoly on ethnic politics. The alt-right has opened the door for whites to begin coalescing. Trump's victory has removed the handicap that whites belabored under and in turn, has set off infighting among the left as the country realigns around this new reality. There will be winners and losers on the left, but mostly losers.

    The truth is that the whole country owes Steve Bannon their thanks' by breaking the last taboo.

    Absolutely.

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  104. @Chrisnonymous
    Actually, Bannon specifically mentioned Evola in the context of Traditionalism. The fact that Evola is known well in North America due to his connections with Nazis doesn't change the fact that you could come in contact with him through a different route, ie, reading about religion.

    The journalists of course know nothing about comparative religion studies, so don't know Traditionalist or Perennialist thinking. If they did, they would understand that Bannon, speaking to the Vatican (!), is obviously not endorsing Evola.

    I think Bannon's contention that Traditionalism turned into fascism is kind of wishy-washy on historical grounds, and with a better-informed journalism they might more profitably call into question his political judgement based on his historical knowledge.

    The journalists just know that he’s reading someone who is engaged in BadThink and this is horrifying to such doubleplus goodcitizens not thinkcrime goodcitizen

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  105. @Ivy
    The New York Times practices hit-and-run journalism, blurring further the lines between editorial and opinion. They are trapped in their own short reactive news cycle, a troublesome self-inflicted position for a newspaper, and are trying to move onto their next theme and manufactured outrage before people call them on the past problems and inconsistencies. Newspapers face the same unblinking eye of reality that ordinary citizens must, even if they refuse to acknowledge that.

    They (NYT) will tell outright lies if they think can get away with it.

    They have made it their mission to bring down Trump.

    I wouldn’t trust them anymore than Russians trusted Pravda.

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    • Agree: Ivy
    • Replies: @oh its just me too

    They (NYT) will tell outright lies if they think can get away with it.
     
    well they covered up the entire Ukrainian famine and lied the nation into the Iraq war so I think they can get away with it!
  106. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @HA
    "Neocons read Trotsky."

    Don't forget Christopher Hitchens, another longtime groupie.

    Didn’t the 2002 movie Frida pretty much glamorize Trotsky and Trotskyites?

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  107. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @BenKenobi
    Recently I've really gotten into the British Glam-Rock band "The Darkness" -- I've seen them referred to as the "heirs of Queen", and I feel that's a fair description.

    Their latest album, Last of Our Kind, is full of lyrical content that seems to be rather right-wing. Although that could just be confirmation bias on my part, I'm sure an SJW would find many songs to be 'problematic.'

    If so inclined, check out the lyrics to the songs Barbarian, Roaring Waters, Mighty Wings, Mudslide (!), Conquerors, and the definitely the title track Last of Our Kind (this one could be our theme song)

    We've sat like this just waiting for their arrows to blacken the sky;
    Many times before, and we will again, God willing;
    I am honored to have served alongside men who inspire defiance;
    Sometimes I tire of the fighting, and the killing;
    We are survivors, the ones left behind;
    Defenders of The Legacy, the last of our kind.
     

    The Darkness has been around for a while. They had a hit single in the early 2000s with their cheesy ballad “I Believe in a Thing Called Love” but sort of fell off after that.

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    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    Quite so. That song came out when I was still in high school. Ironically, I remember hating it.

    They kinda fell off because the bassist left after the first couple albums, but he's back. This latest album is a solid effort.
  108. Ivy says:
    @candid_observer
    Again and again, the left betrays its greatest fear: that somebody, somewhere, might think a thought that isn't permitted.

    It isn't enough that such a thought be refuted: it must not be thought. We can't be left at the mercy of logic and evidence: the idea must be strangled in its cradle before it can speak.

    that somebody, somewhere, might think a thought that isn’t permitted.

    In the spirit of the thread, there is a connection between the lefties above and the Puritans who thought that someone, somewhere might be having fun. What killjoys they are.

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    • Replies: @Crawfurdmuir

    In the spirit of the thread, there is a connection between the lefties above and the Puritans who thought that someone, somewhere might be having fun. What killjoys they are.
     
    There is such a connection. Eric Voegelin commented on the Cromwellian ancestry of modern ideological totalitarianism in his New Science of Politics.

    The Trotskyite concept of continual revolution is adumbrated in that grand old satire on the Puritans, Samuel Butler's Hudibras, whose eponymous hero was one

    "Such as do build their Faith upon
    The holy Text of Pike and Gun,
    Decide all Controversies by
    Infallible Artillery;
    And prove their Doctrine Orthodox
    By Apostolick Blows and Knocks;
    Call Fire, and Sword, and Desolation,
    A godly thorough Reformation,
    Which always must be carry'd on,
    And still be doing, never done:
    As if Religion were intended
    For nothing else but to be mended."

  109. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    The funny thing is is that the actual books Bannon purportedly reads are depressingly middlebrow. His “bible” is “The Art of War”, like every other mid-level insurance executive.

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  110. Forbes says:
    @Muh Current Year
    Moldbug... Evola... now Nassim Taleb is part of Bannon's evil dark chaotic evil world view!

    http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/02/steve-bannon-books-reading-list-214745

    Many political onlookers described Trump’s election as a “black swan” event: unexpected but enormously consequential. The term was popularized by Nassim Taleb, the best-selling author whose 2014 book Antifragile—which has been read and circulated by Bannon and his aides—reads like a user’s guide to the Trump insurgency.

    It’s a broadside against big government, which Taleb faults for suppressing the randomness, volatility and stress that keep institutions and people healthy. “As with neurotically overprotective parents, those who are trying to help us are hurting us the most,” he writes. Taleb also offers a withering critique of global elites, whom he describes as a corrupt class of risk-averse insiders immune to the consequences of their actions: “We are witnessing the rise of a new class of inverse heroes, that is, bureaucrats, bankers, Davos-attending members of the I.A.N.D (International Association of Name Droppers), and academics with too much power and no real downside and/or accountability. They game the system while citizens pay the price.”

    It might as well have been the mission statement of the Trump campaign. Asked in a phone interview this week whether he’s had meetings with Bannon or his associates, Taleb said he could not comment. “Anything about private meetings would need to come from them,” he said, though he noted cryptically he’s had “coffee with friends.” He has been supportive of Trump but does not define himself as a supporter per se, though he said he would “be on the first train” to Washington were he invited to the White House.

    “They look like the incarnation of ‘antifragile’ people,” Taleb said of the new administration. “The definition of ‘antifragile’ is having more upside than downside. For example, Obama had little upside because everyone thought he was brilliant and would solve the world’s problems, so when he didn’t it was disappointing. Trump has little downside because he’s already been so heavily criticized. He’s heavily vaccinated because of his checkered history. People have to understand: Trump did not run to be archbishop of Canterbury.”

    The term was popularized by Nassim Taleb, the best-selling author whose 2014 book Antifragile—which has been read and circulated by Bannon and his aides

    This is like mixed metaphors. The term black swan was popularized in a book titled “The Black Swan.” The book “Antifragile” is a different work of non-fiction.

    Calling Trump’s election a black swan event necessitates ignoring that a presidential election occurs like clockwork every four years, and a transfer of power occurs when a new president is inaugurated following the election. For it to be a black swan event, the occurrence of the election and/or Trump as a candidate would need to be unknown. Merely an improbable outcome of a known event is not sufficient. In other words, these “political onlookers’ are as clueless regarding a well-know work of non-fiction, as they are about elections.

    The Politico piece is merely another attempt at writing and reinforcing The Narrative.

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  111. Svigor says:

    Can I have the two-handed sword +3, +5 against feminists?

    Fresh out. Try this instead.

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  112. @Stan
    NYT journalists' shallow and superficial knowledge of traditional conservatism has been exposed by the inaccurate description of traditionalism and traditionalist conservatism.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traditionalist_conservatism

    gives a good summary of traditionalism.

    There is a difference between “traditionalist conservatism” and “Traditionalism.”

    Traditionalist conservatism is as represented in the Wikipedia article you cite, a type of political and social outlook expressed by such varied figures as Burke, de Maistre, the Southern Agrarians, Russell Kirk, etc. – but Traditionalism (sometimes also called Perennialism) is a term often used to describe a philosophical and religious school of thought centered around the sophia perennis.

    This is a term first used by Steuco in the 16th century to describe the ancient wisdom, held in common by all religions, that was handed down from the world’s golden age and supposedly found in the writings of the prisci theologi, including Zoroaster, the poet Vergil (whose fifth Eclogue was thought to foretell the birth of Christ), and above all, Hermes Trismegistus. Hermeticism met its downfall at the hands of Isaac Casaubon, who showed through textual analysis that the Corpus Hermeticum was not nearly as ancient as it had been thought to be; but by the late eighteenth century, after the British had established themselves in India, British scholars such as Reuben Burrow discovered Sanskrit literature and saw both the linguistic and philosophical parallels to the European sophia perennis. Ancient Asian wisdom took the place previously occupied by the Corpus Hermeticum.

    Twentieth-century Traditionalist thinkers often came from a background of occultism or esotericism, especially from Mme. Blavatsky’s Theosophy, and from the fringes of Freemasonry. The esoteric aspect is shown in their emphasis on initiation. Probably the principal Traditionalist is René Guénon; more recent exponents include Ananda Coomaraswamy and Sayyed Hossein Nasr. Julius Evola is also a Traditionalist of this type. He had been a follower of Guénon, but came to differ from him on a number of points.

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    • Replies: @JackOH
    Thanks, I learned something.

    I do recall the Rene Guenon name from about the time I was reading Evola. My memory's dim, but I admired what he, Evola, was saying. Still, there wasn't an ounce of popular political traction there. Much as I dislike admitting it, lots of folks, including myself, are sufficiently okay with our crappy and corrupt representative governments and our secular consumer culture that Evola's notions, such as I remember them, seem a fantasy.
  113. utu says:
    @neon2
    Profoundly true, utu. Bannon knows it, but I'm not sure about Trump.

    “Bannon knows it, but I’m not sure about Trump.”

    I suspect that Bannon is the only guy who knows what are the stakes. He is the one who has a vision and some ideology and possibly some strategy. Once he is eliminated from the administration and access to Trump a chance for Trump revolution or more correctly counter-revolution will be zero. The biggest problem is that they do not have tacticians that could implement Bannon strategy. All the other guys around Trump, like Priebus or Pence are really there to make Trump fall into the worn out grove of Republican and possibly Neocon politics. Bannon may think that he will be able to play Zionist to shelter under their protective umbrella but they are playing him as well and being very careful looking for how far he wants to go. W/o the Zionist protective umbrella it will be a turkey shoot.

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  114. @Ivy

    that somebody, somewhere, might think a thought that isn’t permitted.
     
    In the spirit of the thread, there is a connection between the lefties above and the Puritans who thought that someone, somewhere might be having fun. What killjoys they are.

    In the spirit of the thread, there is a connection between the lefties above and the Puritans who thought that someone, somewhere might be having fun. What killjoys they are.

    There is such a connection. Eric Voegelin commented on the Cromwellian ancestry of modern ideological totalitarianism in his New Science of Politics.

    The Trotskyite concept of continual revolution is adumbrated in that grand old satire on the Puritans, Samuel Butler’s Hudibras, whose eponymous hero was one

    “Such as do build their Faith upon
    The holy Text of Pike and Gun,
    Decide all Controversies by
    Infallible Artillery;
    And prove their Doctrine Orthodox
    By Apostolick Blows and Knocks;
    Call Fire, and Sword, and Desolation,
    A godly thorough Reformation,
    Which always must be carry’d on,
    And still be doing, never done:
    As if Religion were intended
    For nothing else but to be mended.”

    Read More
  115. dr kill says:
    @william munny
    I bet they could be trolled into believing Bannon is one of the Stonecutters.

    Who controls the British crown? Who keeps the metric system down? Who keeps Atlantis off the maps? Who keeps the Martians under wraps?

    The Cowardly Lion?

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  116. artichoke says:
    @Lot
    Good news dept:

    Trump overrules Tillerson, refuses to appoint Elliott Abrams;


    ICE confirms that nationwide it has been conducting "targeted enforcement actions" aka old fashioned raids and detained many hundreds of illegals. In Los Angeles alone 160 were detained. They focused on criminals, and felons were 75% of the detainees, but unlike Obama the non felons who got swept up were not released.

    The LA office also stated that 37 of the 160 had already been deported. Most likely these were all Mexicans who decided immediate removal to Mexico would be better than sitting in a detention center waiting for a more formal deportation order.

    Some had deportation orders already, like that woman in Arizona who had a felony conviction for using someone else’s SSN. (Shades of Obama hehe …) So no further hearing would be required I think, just implement the existing order.

    For that matter, this would be a precedent for arresting Obama wouldn’t it? Just so he’s careful and nice …

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  117. @Dumbo
    Obama and Hillary read Alinsky, Alinsky dedicated a book to Lucifer, so Obama and Hillary are Satanists?

    It seems that they are just trying to link Bannon and therefore Trump to anything remotely "Nazi". Maybe Ivanka Trump is a vegetarian, like, you know, Hitler?

    And Hitler liked dogs, ergo PETA must be Nazi sympathizers. Gee kids! Isn’t slander association fun!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    While PeTA is not a 'nazi' organization, there are certainly parallels between the esoteric aspects of National Socialism and the animal rights movement, both of which reference the Vedic Hindu traditions and doctrines. Hitler himself was a vegetarian, and so were many other Party leaders.

    Savitri Devi was a Greek authoress who renamed herself after Hindu doctrines and was both an influence on and enthusiast of national Socialism, both during the NSDP years in Germany and in the latter day segments of WP/WN activity styling themselves "National Socialist". Savitri was a delegate to the Cotswold conference of 1962, which codified in the postwar world what a Nazi was and what it was not, and a signatory.

    Reading interviews with Chrissie Hynde (a board member of PETA) where she discusses the Bhagavad Gita and her very emotional and intense commitment to vegetarianism, and her disdain for carnivorous humans (but not other carnivorous species) , she echoes what Devi said almost word for word. Hynde is not stupid, and I find it difficult to believe she is ignorant of Devi and her writings. No one has ever asked her about it, though.

  118. BenKenobi says:
    @Anonymous
    The Darkness has been around for a while. They had a hit single in the early 2000s with their cheesy ballad "I Believe in a Thing Called Love" but sort of fell off after that.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tKjZuykKY1I

    Quite so. That song came out when I was still in high school. Ironically, I remember hating it.

    They kinda fell off because the bassist left after the first couple albums, but he’s back. This latest album is a solid effort.

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  119. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    On just about any matter or issue, NYT just spews out ‘decoy flares’ to prevent the honing in on the Truth-of-the-Matter so that we can finally bring down the Globogus Narrative.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flare_(countermeasure)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeDeqxcB5go

    Take NYT’s articles and columns on intelligence and education. It keeps churning out new fads and theories so that the public will be TOO BUSY yammering about the latest Idea to wake up to what’s really happening and why.

    And it’s no different with the Trump administration. All this talk of Russian Hacking and other nonsense. All this talk of New Cold War to avoid discussing the fact that the US is the main aggressor in the world and that this state of affairs had to do with the Tribe. Bannon and Moldbug and Evola and etc. I mean gimme a break. Just about anyone in journalism and academia read tons of radical stuff written by everyone from Marx to Chomsky(the one-time apologist for the Khmer Rouge).

    Maybe if we focus on Putin as New Hitler-Stalin, maybe people won’t ask WHY he came to power in the aftermath of the economic disasters in the 90s, some of which can be traced back to terrible advice by globalists.

    In a way, the elite professional academics and media people, along with top officials, are in the best position to know about the world and write about it. They got the most education, have lots of connections, have access that most of us don’t have, and can travel around the world to see different lands, peoples, and crisis. And they have access to elites around the world.
    And that is why we need to pay attention to books and articles written by insiders, officials, elite journalist, and elite academics.

    They are in the best position to know the most.

    But the downside is that they are most compromised because they are part of the system. Their ideal position to see and know the most is made possible by being part of the system. So, they cannot really go against the system since the system enables their advantage. Even if they began as ‘idealists’ seeking to change the system, the fact is their entry into the system makes them dependent on the continued viability of the system. While the system’s agenda and outlooks may change, every system maintains itself with a certain fixed narrative or myth. Truth undermines all systems. It’s like when Jews were making the climb, they didn’t like what the Wasps were doing with the system. But once they got into the system and changed the agenda, they became just as addicted to the systemic need for a narrative, the official myth, to maintain the new agenda.

    [MORE]

    This was the interesting thing about Oliver Stone’s SNOWDEN. The movie presents Snowden as exceptionally smart, so he is admitted into the System, and there, he can access all sorts of information about so much. But he mustn’t spill the beans.
    Granted, he was hired by intelligence services, so he’d made a pledge not to spill the beans.

    But media people and academics are supposed to be committed to the truth. Their job is to spill the beans, not hide the beans. But, in certain respects, their situation isn’t entirely different from that of Snowden. To make it into elite academia, they have to be for globalism. And same for journalists.
    So, if you make it Harvard or NYT, you gain great access to information that most people cannot access, and this goes for those in lesser academia and media. But you were only admitted on the understanding that you will be a team player and not upset the apple cart. Same goes for Hollywood. If anyone hints that he will make a movie about Nakba, bye bye. He will be treated worse than Mel Gibson after his shameful drunken tirade.

    If those who are allowed into the System spill the beans or open up the Narrative, out they go. Therefore, most of them will play the game since they’re status-obsessed and addicted to the advantages of being part of the system. It’s like a game where you are admitted into a room with the truth on the agreement that you can see it but can’t talk about it. They will play along with the Official Narrative until they are reasonably sure that they can say something without being destroyed. But by then, it may be too late to do any good for society.

    This is why there is more free thought in the independent media and alternative organizations. Since they are not part of some privileged system, they have nothing to lose if they were to expound on a controversial topic without restraint and inhibitions. Those with less to lose are less fearful.
    The downside is they have fewer resources to access facts and information all over the world. Someone at Yale or Harvard could access tons of archival and government material that most people wont’t have access to. They can also meet with insiders and controllers of the world. In contrast, those in alternative media must often rely on secondary sources unless they happen to know someone or have some secret connection. Another problem is the indie-media sphere is open to just about anyone, and it can attract a lot of conspiracy-theorists and other nutters.

    This is why we need more insiders who turn ‘outsider’. Like Snowden. Those on the outside could only speculate about what the US government is doing.
    Snowden knew exactly what was happening because he worked on the inside. So, he could play the promethean role of ‘stealing the fire’. Granted, his example is complicated because he’d given his word, which he violated. Surely, what goes for academics and journalists cannot apply to those in government.
    OTOH, the US has welcomed as a hero anyone in a communist or enemy nation who betrayed his own nation in the name of higher principles. And the movie VALKYRIE honors the ‘good Nazis’ who turned against Hitler on grounds of higher loyalty to justice.

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  120. @Books are Hitler and Republicans are Dumb
    From:
    https://newrepublic.com/minutes/140475/steve-bannon-brains-trump-white-house-read-three-books


    .

    Has Steve Bannon, the brains of the Trump White House, read more than three books? ...This reading list does not suggest “the ‘Rainman’ of nationalism,” so much as “an unambitious rightwing college freshman at Claremont McKenna” or “someone who only buys books from the clearance section at Barnes & Noble.” Only in Trump’s White House would a guy whose taste in books could be defined as “airport bookstore” be considered an intellectual.
     

    one of the first reactions of liberals to any new republican is to say they are stupid, which leads me to to believe being a lefty is a fashionable status identity that insecure whites use to telegraph that ‘i am not a working class white’ the strongest adherents to it are whites who have moved from the midwest to say, New York City , they go through a whole ritual to let you know that despite the fact they are from so and so Iowa, they are really new yorkers and don’t like those right wing christian nuts.

    The funny thing is … well.. liberals are pretty damn stupid.

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  121. @Frau Katze
    They (NYT) will tell outright lies if they think can get away with it.

    They have made it their mission to bring down Trump.

    I wouldn't trust them anymore than Russians trusted Pravda.

    They (NYT) will tell outright lies if they think can get away with it.

    well they covered up the entire Ukrainian famine and lied the nation into the Iraq war so I think they can get away with it!

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  122. @Opinionator
    Worse to know of Evola or Sailer?

    Sailer — Sailer is he who shall not be named (even as we steal his stuff) apparently.

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  123. @Books are Hitler and Republicans are Dumb
    From:
    https://newrepublic.com/minutes/140475/steve-bannon-brains-trump-white-house-read-three-books


    .

    Has Steve Bannon, the brains of the Trump White House, read more than three books? ...This reading list does not suggest “the ‘Rainman’ of nationalism,” so much as “an unambitious rightwing college freshman at Claremont McKenna” or “someone who only buys books from the clearance section at Barnes & Noble.” Only in Trump’s White House would a guy whose taste in books could be defined as “airport bookstore” be considered an intellectual.
     

    Books, The author of your linked quote has sat on those pithy statements waiting for a chance to put them all in one article. Well bully for him, but who reads that drivel but the “elites?” Don’t they sell the New Republic in airport stores?

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  124. @utu
    The SS let Evola go through confiscated archives of secret societies in Europe that were kept, I think, in Vienna, where Evola got wounded during ally bombing towards the end of WWII. I am not aware of any post WWII work by Evola where he would relate to his findings in Vienna. Was he not allowed to bring it up? Certainly he did not state that the archives did not contain anything interesting.

    The SS let Evola go through confiscated archives of secret societies in Europe that were kept, I think, in Vienna, where Evola got wounded during ally bombing towards the end of WWII.

    Here is a link to a Wikipedia article (unfortunately in German) about some of the records Evola examined:

    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schwedenkiste

    I am not sure it would have had much in it that drew his particular esoteric attention, though of course there is much of historic significance in it.

    The Traditionalist/Perennialist thinkers concern themselves greatly with the concept of initiation, but distinguish between true and valid initiation, and that which is not. Some Traditionalists (among others, Guénon) believed that Masonic initiation was genuine – others dismiss it. I have not studied Evola in enough depth to know what he thought.

    Continental European Freemasonry was (and still is) much more overtly political than the Anglo-American kind, which strongly discourages discussion of politics and religion. The potential that Freemasonry or some branch of it could be used as a platform for political conspiracy was doubtless high in the thoughts of the Gestapo. The secrecy to which a Mason is obligated and the ostensibly charitable and fraternal character of the Order lent itself to such purposes, especially in a society where open political debate has been suppressed.

    There is a long history of this in Germany, where rival fringe Masonic bodies – the Illuminati and the Gold- und Rosenkreuz – were effectively opposing political parties in the Prussia of Frederick William II. For all that is written about the Illuminati, their Rosicrucian enemies were far more effective politically, having recruited the king himself to their society. A similar situation existed in Mexico when Joel Poinsett was the American minister there; the country was politically divided between “Yorquinas” (adherents of the York Rite) and “Escoseses” (adherents of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite). If you are familiar with recent Italian history, you will know about Licio Gelli and the clandestine Lodge P2 (“Propaganda Due”).

    Whether someone like Evola, hoping to discover some new insight into the sophia perennis, found anything of interest in materials largely related to such ἀπόκρυφη ἱστορία seems unlikely to me. In the post-war years, believing that the war against modernity was lost, he took a deliberately apolitical stance. That is the likeliest explanation of why he never wrote anything about what he found in the Gestapo’s confiscated Masonic archives.

    Read More
    • Replies: @utu
    Evola wrote about Nazism after WWII and its esoteric aspects but only as a review of work by others and did not bring into it his own findings:

    Hitler and the Secret Societies by J. Evola
    http://www.juliusevola.net/excerpts/Hitler_and_the_Secret_Societies.html
    , @neon2
    An excellent summary.
    The man who made great use (in the short time given him by historical events) of German-captured Masonic records was Bernard Faÿ. He paid for his efforts with life imprisonment; this he avoided by flight to Switzerland, where he ended his days at Econe teaching the seminarians of Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre about the nefarious doings of the secret societies.
    I have always interpreted the P2 lodge as a phenomenon not truly free-masonic at all, but rather as a patriotic anti-Communist movement which copied the secrecy of freemasonry - in the end, sadly, not particularly effectively.
  125. JackOH says:
    @Crawfurdmuir
    There is a difference between "traditionalist conservatism" and "Traditionalism."

    Traditionalist conservatism is as represented in the Wikipedia article you cite, a type of political and social outlook expressed by such varied figures as Burke, de Maistre, the Southern Agrarians, Russell Kirk, etc. - but Traditionalism (sometimes also called Perennialism) is a term often used to describe a philosophical and religious school of thought centered around the sophia perennis.

    This is a term first used by Steuco in the 16th century to describe the ancient wisdom, held in common by all religions, that was handed down from the world's golden age and supposedly found in the writings of the prisci theologi, including Zoroaster, the poet Vergil (whose fifth Eclogue was thought to foretell the birth of Christ), and above all, Hermes Trismegistus. Hermeticism met its downfall at the hands of Isaac Casaubon, who showed through textual analysis that the Corpus Hermeticum was not nearly as ancient as it had been thought to be; but by the late eighteenth century, after the British had established themselves in India, British scholars such as Reuben Burrow discovered Sanskrit literature and saw both the linguistic and philosophical parallels to the European sophia perennis. Ancient Asian wisdom took the place previously occupied by the Corpus Hermeticum.

    Twentieth-century Traditionalist thinkers often came from a background of occultism or esotericism, especially from Mme. Blavatsky's Theosophy, and from the fringes of Freemasonry. The esoteric aspect is shown in their emphasis on initiation. Probably the principal Traditionalist is René Guénon; more recent exponents include Ananda Coomaraswamy and Sayyed Hossein Nasr. Julius Evola is also a Traditionalist of this type. He had been a follower of Guénon, but came to differ from him on a number of points.

    Thanks, I learned something.

    I do recall the Rene Guenon name from about the time I was reading Evola. My memory’s dim, but I admired what he, Evola, was saying. Still, there wasn’t an ounce of popular political traction there. Much as I dislike admitting it, lots of folks, including myself, are sufficiently okay with our crappy and corrupt representative governments and our secular consumer culture that Evola’s notions, such as I remember them, seem a fantasy.

    Read More
  126. utu says:
    @Crawfurdmuir

    The SS let Evola go through confiscated archives of secret societies in Europe that were kept, I think, in Vienna, where Evola got wounded during ally bombing towards the end of WWII.
     
    Here is a link to a Wikipedia article (unfortunately in German) about some of the records Evola examined:

    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schwedenkiste

    I am not sure it would have had much in it that drew his particular esoteric attention, though of course there is much of historic significance in it.

    The Traditionalist/Perennialist thinkers concern themselves greatly with the concept of initiation, but distinguish between true and valid initiation, and that which is not. Some Traditionalists (among others, Guénon) believed that Masonic initiation was genuine - others dismiss it. I have not studied Evola in enough depth to know what he thought.

    Continental European Freemasonry was (and still is) much more overtly political than the Anglo-American kind, which strongly discourages discussion of politics and religion. The potential that Freemasonry or some branch of it could be used as a platform for political conspiracy was doubtless high in the thoughts of the Gestapo. The secrecy to which a Mason is obligated and the ostensibly charitable and fraternal character of the Order lent itself to such purposes, especially in a society where open political debate has been suppressed.

    There is a long history of this in Germany, where rival fringe Masonic bodies - the Illuminati and the Gold- und Rosenkreuz - were effectively opposing political parties in the Prussia of Frederick William II. For all that is written about the Illuminati, their Rosicrucian enemies were far more effective politically, having recruited the king himself to their society. A similar situation existed in Mexico when Joel Poinsett was the American minister there; the country was politically divided between "Yorquinas" (adherents of the York Rite) and "Escoseses" (adherents of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite). If you are familiar with recent Italian history, you will know about Licio Gelli and the clandestine Lodge P2 ("Propaganda Due").

    Whether someone like Evola, hoping to discover some new insight into the sophia perennis, found anything of interest in materials largely related to such ἀπόκρυφη ἱστορία seems unlikely to me. In the post-war years, believing that the war against modernity was lost, he took a deliberately apolitical stance. That is the likeliest explanation of why he never wrote anything about what he found in the Gestapo's confiscated Masonic archives.

    Evola wrote about Nazism after WWII and its esoteric aspects but only as a review of work by others and did not bring into it his own findings:

    Hitler and the Secret Societies by J. Evola

    http://www.juliusevola.net/excerpts/Hitler_and_the_Secret_Societies.html

    Read More
  127. neon2 says:
    @Crawfurdmuir

    The SS let Evola go through confiscated archives of secret societies in Europe that were kept, I think, in Vienna, where Evola got wounded during ally bombing towards the end of WWII.
     
    Here is a link to a Wikipedia article (unfortunately in German) about some of the records Evola examined:

    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schwedenkiste

    I am not sure it would have had much in it that drew his particular esoteric attention, though of course there is much of historic significance in it.

    The Traditionalist/Perennialist thinkers concern themselves greatly with the concept of initiation, but distinguish between true and valid initiation, and that which is not. Some Traditionalists (among others, Guénon) believed that Masonic initiation was genuine - others dismiss it. I have not studied Evola in enough depth to know what he thought.

    Continental European Freemasonry was (and still is) much more overtly political than the Anglo-American kind, which strongly discourages discussion of politics and religion. The potential that Freemasonry or some branch of it could be used as a platform for political conspiracy was doubtless high in the thoughts of the Gestapo. The secrecy to which a Mason is obligated and the ostensibly charitable and fraternal character of the Order lent itself to such purposes, especially in a society where open political debate has been suppressed.

    There is a long history of this in Germany, where rival fringe Masonic bodies - the Illuminati and the Gold- und Rosenkreuz - were effectively opposing political parties in the Prussia of Frederick William II. For all that is written about the Illuminati, their Rosicrucian enemies were far more effective politically, having recruited the king himself to their society. A similar situation existed in Mexico when Joel Poinsett was the American minister there; the country was politically divided between "Yorquinas" (adherents of the York Rite) and "Escoseses" (adherents of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite). If you are familiar with recent Italian history, you will know about Licio Gelli and the clandestine Lodge P2 ("Propaganda Due").

    Whether someone like Evola, hoping to discover some new insight into the sophia perennis, found anything of interest in materials largely related to such ἀπόκρυφη ἱστορία seems unlikely to me. In the post-war years, believing that the war against modernity was lost, he took a deliberately apolitical stance. That is the likeliest explanation of why he never wrote anything about what he found in the Gestapo's confiscated Masonic archives.

    An excellent summary.
    The man who made great use (in the short time given him by historical events) of German-captured Masonic records was Bernard Faÿ. He paid for his efforts with life imprisonment; this he avoided by flight to Switzerland, where he ended his days at Econe teaching the seminarians of Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre about the nefarious doings of the secret societies.
    I have always interpreted the P2 lodge as a phenomenon not truly free-masonic at all, but rather as a patriotic anti-Communist movement which copied the secrecy of freemasonry – in the end, sadly, not particularly effectively.

    Read More
    • Replies: @utu
    I did not know about Bernard Faÿ just like about many other Europeans who made the mistake of taking advantage of Nazi shakeup of power in Europe. Apparently he helped a great deal Gertrude Stein and Alice Toklas during German occupation who in in return helped him to escape to Switzerland from a labor camp. (BTW, Stein actually nominated Hitler for Nobel Peace Prize.)

    Some of masonic archives that were confiscated by Gestapo were kept in Berlin and later they were captured by Soviets. At some point Soviets returned the archives to Stasi in East Germany (DDR) but w/o the membership list. But Evola worked in Vienna. What is the masonic connection to NKVD/KGB? Certainly Soviets never exposed them. Jura Lina in his film

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oIuW-vNQsQI&t=50s

    greatly emphasizes masonic roots of Bolshevik revolution.

  128. meh says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    I'll watch this later, but calling Evola right-wing seems silly. As far as I know, he never repudiated Dadaism. That should give everyone pause. You can read some convoluted thoughts here:

    https://books.google.co.jp/books?id=zmOyK1e7C0oC&pg=PA120&lpg=PA120&dq=evola+arte+astratta+translation&source=bl&ots=47dq0wfvuq&sig=340NIb3yCrPsKx5iyCaW06iM7i4&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi74_PL-4fSAhUBU7wKHQZvBO4Q6AEIJjAB#v=onepage&q&f=false

    I’ll watch this later, but calling Evola right-wing seems silly. As far as I know, he never repudiated Dadaism. That should give everyone pause.

    Well then, your argument is not with Bowden, but with Evola himself. Evola criticized fascism “from the right”. Evola considered himself on the right; his disagreement with almost the entire right was that it simply was not nearly rightwing, or traditionalist, enough. As for Dada, Evola explained it as a necessary preliminary first step of destruction of modernist bourgeois notions of art prior to returning to proper tradition, or words to that effect. If you were actually familiar with Evola, you would already know this.

    Read More
  129. utu says:
    @neon2
    An excellent summary.
    The man who made great use (in the short time given him by historical events) of German-captured Masonic records was Bernard Faÿ. He paid for his efforts with life imprisonment; this he avoided by flight to Switzerland, where he ended his days at Econe teaching the seminarians of Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre about the nefarious doings of the secret societies.
    I have always interpreted the P2 lodge as a phenomenon not truly free-masonic at all, but rather as a patriotic anti-Communist movement which copied the secrecy of freemasonry - in the end, sadly, not particularly effectively.

    I did not know about Bernard Faÿ just like about many other Europeans who made the mistake of taking advantage of Nazi shakeup of power in Europe. Apparently he helped a great deal Gertrude Stein and Alice Toklas during German occupation who in in return helped him to escape to Switzerland from a labor camp. (BTW, Stein actually nominated Hitler for Nobel Peace Prize.)

    Some of masonic archives that were confiscated by Gestapo were kept in Berlin and later they were captured by Soviets. At some point Soviets returned the archives to Stasi in East Germany (DDR) but w/o the membership list. But Evola worked in Vienna. What is the masonic connection to NKVD/KGB? Certainly Soviets never exposed them. Jura Lina in his film

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oIuW-vNQsQI&t=50s

    greatly emphasizes masonic roots of Bolshevik revolution.

    Read More
  130. There is such a connection. Eric Voegelin commented on the Cromwellian ancestry of modern ideological totalitarianism in his New Science of Politics.

    Voegelin was an apologist for the Roman so-called Catholic church who smeared Protestants by claiming that Protestantism is Gnosticism.

    The Trotskyite concept of continual revolution is adumbrated in that grand old satire on the Puritans, Samuel Butler’s Hudibras, whose eponymous hero ..

    … was a adoring fan of Charles I, about whom Wikipedia says:

    Charles I of England
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649[a]) was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649.

    After his succession, Charles quarrelled with the Parliament of England, which sought to curb his royal prerogative. Charles believed in the divine right of kings and thought he could govern according to his own conscience. Many of his subjects opposed his policies, in particular the levying of taxes without parliamentary consent, and perceived his actions as those of a tyrannical absolute monarch. His religious policies, coupled with his marriage to a Roman Catholic, generated the antipathy and mistrust of reformed groups such as the English Puritans and Scottish Covenanters, who thought his views too Catholic. He supported high church ecclesiastics, such as Richard Montagu and William Laud, and failed to aid Protestant forces successfully during the Thirty Years’ War. His attempts to force the Church of Scotland to adopt high Anglican practices led to the Bishops’ Wars, strengthened the position of the English and Scottish parliaments and helped precipitate his own downfall.

    From 1642, Charles fought the armies of the English and Scottish parliaments in the English Civil War. After his defeat in 1645, he surrendered to a Scottish force that eventually handed him over to the English Parliament. Charles refused to accept his captors’ demands for a constitutional monarchy, and temporarily escaped captivity in November 1647. Re-imprisoned on the Isle of Wight, Charles forged an alliance with Scotland, but by the end of 1648 Oliver Cromwell’s New Model Army had consolidated its control over England. Charles was tried, convicted, and executed for high treason in January 1649. The monarchy was abolished and a republic called the Commonwealth of England was declared. …

    Did you read the Many of his subjects opposed his policies, in particular the levying of taxes without parliamentary consent part? The English Civil War was forerunner and antecedent to the American War of Independence. You might notice that America’s Founding Fathers and the 18th century American population was not very Catholic.

    We sure don’t hope that Trump is the new Cromwell, do we? After all, polite dissent is one thing, but populist overthrow of the throne-and-alter establishment, we can’t have that!

    Read More
    • Replies: @HA
    "Voegelin was an apologist for the Roman so-called Catholic church who smeared Protestants by claiming that Protestantism is Gnosticism."

    Voegelin was actually a lifelong Protestant (Lutheran-born), to the extent he was any kind of a Christian at all, which is a matter of dispute. In light of that, calling him an apologist for Catholicism is simply Black Legend quackery.

    I realize, now that Jack Chick is dead, someone is going to want to fill his shoes, but come on, now -- make an effort. If this is the best you can do, then take a cue from him and stick with comic books, since that seems to be more your speed.

    , @Crawfurdmuir
    It is true there were secular issues at hand in the English civil war; Charles I's attempt to collect ship-money, a form of tax, without the consent of Parliament, was one. However, the absolute rule of Parliament proved no friendlier to liberty than the absolute rule of a monarch. Our Founders recognized this. The reason bills of attainder are forbidden by Article I, sec. 9, para. 3 of the U.S. Constitution had largely to do with their history of abuse by the English parliament.

    It was in their religious aspect that the Parliamentary forces, particularly the Presbyterian faction, resembled modern ideological totalitarianism. The Presbyterian faction of Parliament declared that "to make a Law for Toleration, was establishing Iniquity by Law," and that "Toleration was the appointing a City of Refuge in Men's Consciences for the Devil to fly to, a Toleration of Soul Murther, the greatest Murther of all others." See Dr. Grey's footnote to Pt. I, canto I, lines 195 et seq. in the 1744 edition of Hudibras, vol. I, p. 26.

    In summary, the Puritans were advancing the same old notion that "error has no rights" which every totalitarian regime has always proclaimed. "Political correctness" is merely the latest manifestation of this doctrine. You don't have to be nearly as rarefied a thinker as Voegelin was to recognize this.

    I do not think that Trump is the new Cromwell. We've had Cromwell and the Reconstruction of 1865-77 all wrapped up in one repulsive package during the past eight years of unremitting ideological warfare against historic American norms under the Obama administration. Santayana noted that the Boston liberals of his time adhered to a sort of Puritanism that was bereft of Christianity, so that only fanaticism and moral vanity remained. Such secular Puritanism is even more intense today. It underlay the effort to "fundamentally transform" this country, from which we most fortunately, and in the nick of time, have been delivered.

    Trump's election, far from being a Cromwellian phenomenon, was an Astræa redux moment, rather like the Restoration. It was said that Sir Thomas Urquhart of Cromartie, the translator of Rabelais, and a stout royalist, died in a fit of laughter on learning that Charles II had returned in triumph. I wasn't laughing quite that hard (after all, I'm still alive), but it gave me hearty amusement to watch the crestfallen newsreaders on election night as they began to realize that Trump was winning.

    , @ben tillman

    Did you read the Many of his subjects opposed his policies, in particular the levying of taxes without parliamentary consent part?
     
    Nothing wrong with that.
  131. HA says:
    @David Davenport
    There is such a connection. Eric Voegelin commented on the Cromwellian ancestry of modern ideological totalitarianism in his New Science of Politics.

    Voegelin was an apologist for the Roman so-called Catholic church who smeared Protestants by claiming that Protestantism is Gnosticism.

    The Trotskyite concept of continual revolution is adumbrated in that grand old satire on the Puritans, Samuel Butler’s Hudibras, whose eponymous hero ..

    ... was a adoring fan of Charles I, about whom Wikipedia says:

    Charles I of England
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649[a]) was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649.

    ...

    After his succession, Charles quarrelled with the Parliament of England, which sought to curb his royal prerogative. Charles believed in the divine right of kings and thought he could govern according to his own conscience. Many of his subjects opposed his policies, in particular the levying of taxes without parliamentary consent, and perceived his actions as those of a tyrannical absolute monarch. His religious policies, coupled with his marriage to a Roman Catholic, generated the antipathy and mistrust of reformed groups such as the English Puritans and Scottish Covenanters, who thought his views too Catholic. He supported high church ecclesiastics, such as Richard Montagu and William Laud, and failed to aid Protestant forces successfully during the Thirty Years' War. His attempts to force the Church of Scotland to adopt high Anglican practices led to the Bishops' Wars, strengthened the position of the English and Scottish parliaments and helped precipitate his own downfall.

    From 1642, Charles fought the armies of the English and Scottish parliaments in the English Civil War. After his defeat in 1645, he surrendered to a Scottish force that eventually handed him over to the English Parliament. Charles refused to accept his captors' demands for a constitutional monarchy, and temporarily escaped captivity in November 1647. Re-imprisoned on the Isle of Wight, Charles forged an alliance with Scotland, but by the end of 1648 Oliver Cromwell's New Model Army had consolidated its control over England. Charles was tried, convicted, and executed for high treason in January 1649. The monarchy was abolished and a republic called the Commonwealth of England was declared. ...


    Did you read the Many of his subjects opposed his policies, in particular the levying of taxes without parliamentary consent part? The English Civil War was forerunner and antecedent to the American War of Independence. You might notice that America's Founding Fathers and the 18th century American population was not very Catholic.

    We sure don't hope that Trump is the new Cromwell, do we? After all, polite dissent is one thing, but populist overthrow of the throne-and-alter establishment, we can't have that!

    “Voegelin was an apologist for the Roman so-called Catholic church who smeared Protestants by claiming that Protestantism is Gnosticism.”

    Voegelin was actually a lifelong Protestant (Lutheran-born), to the extent he was any kind of a Christian at all, which is a matter of dispute. In light of that, calling him an apologist for Catholicism is simply Black Legend quackery.

    I realize, now that Jack Chick is dead, someone is going to want to fill his shoes, but come on, now — make an effort. If this is the best you can do, then take a cue from him and stick with comic books, since that seems to be more your speed.

    Read More
  132. a collection of almost ruthless critiques of Martin Luther and John Calvin

    From VOEGELIN AND CHRISTIANITY

    Ruminations on the Topic
    for the Eric Voegelin Society Panel Discussion,
    Boston, 2002

    As far as the materials that were not published in his lifetime, among which must be included those on Luther and Calvin, Voegelin on occasion expressed reservations: that he would have had to rework the materials in the manuscript to bring them up to a current state of scholarship; that the restoration of science following upon the slough that constituted positivism had led to the proliferation of good scholarship, that the explosion of such good scholarship had made it impossible for one man to keep abreast of all current developments, and lastly, and I suspect most importantly, that he no longer cared to spend his remaining time on these pre-philosophical matters.

    Nevertheless we are faced with a collection of almost ruthless critiques of Martin Luther and John Calvin, primarily, and with additional hard blows against the Puritans, John Milton, John “Dutch Lunch” Locke, and the “spiritual thinning of the English” in general. The reaction has been swift and barbed, as in Joshua Mitchell’s 2000 EVS paper titled “Voegelin and the Scandal of Luther: Philosophy, Faith and the Modern Age,” in which Voegelin is portrayed as a producer of anti-Reformation writings consistent with his anti-democratic and aristocratic elitism.

    Likewise there is William Stevenson’s “An Agnostic View of Voegelin’s Gnostic Calvin.” Both essays, I suggest, were composed using unanalyzed terminology—the pre scientific doxic vocabulary that Voegelin always tried to avoid. …

    Jack Chick? Do you think he was trying to immanentize the eschaton? Admit it, you got a more to-the-point Christian message in his little pamphlets than you probably have heard in a lifetime of genteel Sunday sermons.

    And Jack Chick, unlike Prof. Voegelin, never said that he was a Protestant and that he also believed in Papal infallibility.

    Pre scientific doxic vocabulary? You got me there.

    Read More
    • Replies: @HA
    "Nevertheless we are faced with a collection of almost ruthless critiques of Martin Luther and John Calvin..."

    He also blamed St Paul "for laying the groundwork for gnosticism". That being the case, why would you expect that Martin Luther or Calvin would get a pass? Like the proverbial kid with a hammer who sees everything as a nail, Voegelin saw gnosticism pretty much everywhere. That still doesn't get you to Catholicism, especially given his affirmation of "pre-Nicene" Protestantism. No, I don't know what he means by pre-Nicene, and I doubt you do, either. (And as seen in my previous link, the exact phrasing of his quip about infallibility was " "I believe in papal infallibility and I'm glad I'm a Protestant!")

    Unless you too, like Voegelin and that kid with the hammer, see nails everywhere you look (or in this case, papist apologists) -- which would explain a lot -- then you're just talking out your hat about things no one -- I suspect that includes Voegelin -- was all that sure of. I hope your Protestant apologetics you rely on make at least a little more sense. Oh, wait:

    "Admit it, you got a more to-the-point Christian message..."

    Well, so much for that hope. Never mind. Then again, if a Jack Chick view of the world is all you're good for, it explains the rest of your post.

    , @Anonymous
    Jack Chick HATED the Roman Catholic Church and everything about it.


    http://www.chick.com/catalog/tractByKeyword.asp?Subject=Catholicism
  133. Wikipedia has separate entries for “Jack Chick” and for “Chick Tracts.” No, I didn’t have to refer to Wikipedia to familiarize myself with Chick Tracts.

    “Chick Tracts” has more content. I did learn from “Chick Tracts” that the late Jack was born in Los Angeles.

    Early 20th century LA does seem to have been D. W. Griffith’s Los Angeles.

    Read More
  134. anon says: • Disclaimer

    Never think of Trump as a fascists, never understood why the alt-right thought Trump was so great in the first placed since he voted legalizing everyone last time. Trump is more of a Bismarck not a fascists. Supports medicare and social security which the more freer market right doesn’t like and trade protectionism.

    Read More
  135. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Manchurian Take Out
    And Hitler liked dogs, ergo PETA must be Nazi sympathizers. Gee kids! Isn't slander association fun!

    While PeTA is not a ‘nazi’ organization, there are certainly parallels between the esoteric aspects of National Socialism and the animal rights movement, both of which reference the Vedic Hindu traditions and doctrines. Hitler himself was a vegetarian, and so were many other Party leaders.

    Savitri Devi was a Greek authoress who renamed herself after Hindu doctrines and was both an influence on and enthusiast of national Socialism, both during the NSDP years in Germany and in the latter day segments of WP/WN activity styling themselves “National Socialist”. Savitri was a delegate to the Cotswold conference of 1962, which codified in the postwar world what a Nazi was and what it was not, and a signatory.

    Reading interviews with Chrissie Hynde (a board member of PETA) where she discusses the Bhagavad Gita and her very emotional and intense commitment to vegetarianism, and her disdain for carnivorous humans (but not other carnivorous species) , she echoes what Devi said almost word for word. Hynde is not stupid, and I find it difficult to believe she is ignorant of Devi and her writings. No one has ever asked her about it, though.

    Read More
  136. HA says:
    @David Davenport
    a collection of almost ruthless critiques of Martin Luther and John Calvin

    From VOEGELIN AND CHRISTIANITY

    Ruminations on the Topic
    for the Eric Voegelin Society Panel Discussion,
    Boston, 2002

    ...

    As far as the materials that were not published in his lifetime, among which must be included those on Luther and Calvin, Voegelin on occasion expressed reservations: that he would have had to rework the materials in the manuscript to bring them up to a current state of scholarship; that the restoration of science following upon the slough that constituted positivism had led to the proliferation of good scholarship, that the explosion of such good scholarship had made it impossible for one man to keep abreast of all current developments, and lastly, and I suspect most importantly, that he no longer cared to spend his remaining time on these pre-philosophical matters.

    Nevertheless we are faced with a collection of almost ruthless critiques of Martin Luther and John Calvin, primarily, and with additional hard blows against the Puritans, John Milton, John "Dutch Lunch" Locke, and the "spiritual thinning of the English" in general. The reaction has been swift and barbed, as in Joshua Mitchell's 2000 EVS paper titled "Voegelin and the Scandal of Luther: Philosophy, Faith and the Modern Age," in which Voegelin is portrayed as a producer of anti-Reformation writings consistent with his anti-democratic and aristocratic elitism.

    Likewise there is William Stevenson's "An Agnostic View of Voegelin's Gnostic Calvin." Both essays, I suggest, were composed using unanalyzed terminology—the pre scientific doxic vocabulary that Voegelin always tried to avoid. ...

    Jack Chick? Do you think he was trying to immanentize the eschaton? Admit it, you got a more to-the-point Christian message in his little pamphlets than you probably have heard in a lifetime of genteel Sunday sermons.

    And Jack Chick, unlike Prof. Voegelin, never said that he was a Protestant and that he also believed in Papal infallibility.

    Pre scientific doxic vocabulary? You got me there.

    “Nevertheless we are faced with a collection of almost ruthless critiques of Martin Luther and John Calvin…”

    He also blamed St Paul “for laying the groundwork for gnosticism”. That being the case, why would you expect that Martin Luther or Calvin would get a pass? Like the proverbial kid with a hammer who sees everything as a nail, Voegelin saw gnosticism pretty much everywhere. That still doesn’t get you to Catholicism, especially given his affirmation of “pre-Nicene” Protestantism. No, I don’t know what he means by pre-Nicene, and I doubt you do, either. (And as seen in my previous link, the exact phrasing of his quip about infallibility was ” “I believe in papal infallibility and I’m glad I’m a Protestant!”)

    Unless you too, like Voegelin and that kid with the hammer, see nails everywhere you look (or in this case, papist apologists) — which would explain a lot — then you’re just talking out your hat about things no one — I suspect that includes Voegelin — was all that sure of. I hope your Protestant apologetics you rely on make at least a little more sense. Oh, wait:

    “Admit it, you got a more to-the-point Christian message…”

    Well, so much for that hope. Never mind. Then again, if a Jack Chick view of the world is all you’re good for, it explains the rest of your post.

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  137. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @David Davenport
    a collection of almost ruthless critiques of Martin Luther and John Calvin

    From VOEGELIN AND CHRISTIANITY

    Ruminations on the Topic
    for the Eric Voegelin Society Panel Discussion,
    Boston, 2002

    ...

    As far as the materials that were not published in his lifetime, among which must be included those on Luther and Calvin, Voegelin on occasion expressed reservations: that he would have had to rework the materials in the manuscript to bring them up to a current state of scholarship; that the restoration of science following upon the slough that constituted positivism had led to the proliferation of good scholarship, that the explosion of such good scholarship had made it impossible for one man to keep abreast of all current developments, and lastly, and I suspect most importantly, that he no longer cared to spend his remaining time on these pre-philosophical matters.

    Nevertheless we are faced with a collection of almost ruthless critiques of Martin Luther and John Calvin, primarily, and with additional hard blows against the Puritans, John Milton, John "Dutch Lunch" Locke, and the "spiritual thinning of the English" in general. The reaction has been swift and barbed, as in Joshua Mitchell's 2000 EVS paper titled "Voegelin and the Scandal of Luther: Philosophy, Faith and the Modern Age," in which Voegelin is portrayed as a producer of anti-Reformation writings consistent with his anti-democratic and aristocratic elitism.

    Likewise there is William Stevenson's "An Agnostic View of Voegelin's Gnostic Calvin." Both essays, I suggest, were composed using unanalyzed terminology—the pre scientific doxic vocabulary that Voegelin always tried to avoid. ...

    Jack Chick? Do you think he was trying to immanentize the eschaton? Admit it, you got a more to-the-point Christian message in his little pamphlets than you probably have heard in a lifetime of genteel Sunday sermons.

    And Jack Chick, unlike Prof. Voegelin, never said that he was a Protestant and that he also believed in Papal infallibility.

    Pre scientific doxic vocabulary? You got me there.

    Jack Chick HATED the Roman Catholic Church and everything about it.

    http://www.chick.com/catalog/tractByKeyword.asp?Subject=Catholicism

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  138. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @BenKenobi
    Recently I've really gotten into the British Glam-Rock band "The Darkness" -- I've seen them referred to as the "heirs of Queen", and I feel that's a fair description.

    Their latest album, Last of Our Kind, is full of lyrical content that seems to be rather right-wing. Although that could just be confirmation bias on my part, I'm sure an SJW would find many songs to be 'problematic.'

    If so inclined, check out the lyrics to the songs Barbarian, Roaring Waters, Mighty Wings, Mudslide (!), Conquerors, and the definitely the title track Last of Our Kind (this one could be our theme song)

    We've sat like this just waiting for their arrows to blacken the sky;
    Many times before, and we will again, God willing;
    I am honored to have served alongside men who inspire defiance;
    Sometimes I tire of the fighting, and the killing;
    We are survivors, the ones left behind;
    Defenders of The Legacy, the last of our kind.
     

    There are genuinely fascist groups and musicians, and there are those which eschew or are indifferent to fascism in the traditional sense but which have a fascist esthetic, e.g, Death in June, Boyd Rice, stc.

    Probably the best was Blood Axis (which included nonwhite members and which explicitly denied any attempt at racialism).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PxotLDtwT50

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  139. @Olorin

    the deeply taboo, Nazi-affiliated thinker, Julius Evola.
     
    Translation:

    "We found a new taboo! Let's tell you all about it...so we can tell you who to shun!"

    What a bunch of gossipy high school girls the Grey Hag is these days.

    … plus – “Evola” sounds like ebola. Therefore the new taboo is scary by association. Deadly, even. Oh, my!

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  140. @David Davenport
    There is such a connection. Eric Voegelin commented on the Cromwellian ancestry of modern ideological totalitarianism in his New Science of Politics.

    Voegelin was an apologist for the Roman so-called Catholic church who smeared Protestants by claiming that Protestantism is Gnosticism.

    The Trotskyite concept of continual revolution is adumbrated in that grand old satire on the Puritans, Samuel Butler’s Hudibras, whose eponymous hero ..

    ... was a adoring fan of Charles I, about whom Wikipedia says:

    Charles I of England
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649[a]) was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649.

    ...

    After his succession, Charles quarrelled with the Parliament of England, which sought to curb his royal prerogative. Charles believed in the divine right of kings and thought he could govern according to his own conscience. Many of his subjects opposed his policies, in particular the levying of taxes without parliamentary consent, and perceived his actions as those of a tyrannical absolute monarch. His religious policies, coupled with his marriage to a Roman Catholic, generated the antipathy and mistrust of reformed groups such as the English Puritans and Scottish Covenanters, who thought his views too Catholic. He supported high church ecclesiastics, such as Richard Montagu and William Laud, and failed to aid Protestant forces successfully during the Thirty Years' War. His attempts to force the Church of Scotland to adopt high Anglican practices led to the Bishops' Wars, strengthened the position of the English and Scottish parliaments and helped precipitate his own downfall.

    From 1642, Charles fought the armies of the English and Scottish parliaments in the English Civil War. After his defeat in 1645, he surrendered to a Scottish force that eventually handed him over to the English Parliament. Charles refused to accept his captors' demands for a constitutional monarchy, and temporarily escaped captivity in November 1647. Re-imprisoned on the Isle of Wight, Charles forged an alliance with Scotland, but by the end of 1648 Oliver Cromwell's New Model Army had consolidated its control over England. Charles was tried, convicted, and executed for high treason in January 1649. The monarchy was abolished and a republic called the Commonwealth of England was declared. ...


    Did you read the Many of his subjects opposed his policies, in particular the levying of taxes without parliamentary consent part? The English Civil War was forerunner and antecedent to the American War of Independence. You might notice that America's Founding Fathers and the 18th century American population was not very Catholic.

    We sure don't hope that Trump is the new Cromwell, do we? After all, polite dissent is one thing, but populist overthrow of the throne-and-alter establishment, we can't have that!

    It is true there were secular issues at hand in the English civil war; Charles I’s attempt to collect ship-money, a form of tax, without the consent of Parliament, was one. However, the absolute rule of Parliament proved no friendlier to liberty than the absolute rule of a monarch. Our Founders recognized this. The reason bills of attainder are forbidden by Article I, sec. 9, para. 3 of the U.S. Constitution had largely to do with their history of abuse by the English parliament.

    It was in their religious aspect that the Parliamentary forces, particularly the Presbyterian faction, resembled modern ideological totalitarianism. The Presbyterian faction of Parliament declared that “to make a Law for Toleration, was establishing Iniquity by Law,” and that “Toleration was the appointing a City of Refuge in Men’s Consciences for the Devil to fly to, a Toleration of Soul Murther, the greatest Murther of all others.” See Dr. Grey’s footnote to Pt. I, canto I, lines 195 et seq. in the 1744 edition of Hudibras, vol. I, p. 26.

    In summary, the Puritans were advancing the same old notion that “error has no rights” which every totalitarian regime has always proclaimed. “Political correctness” is merely the latest manifestation of this doctrine. You don’t have to be nearly as rarefied a thinker as Voegelin was to recognize this.

    I do not think that Trump is the new Cromwell. We’ve had Cromwell and the Reconstruction of 1865-77 all wrapped up in one repulsive package during the past eight years of unremitting ideological warfare against historic American norms under the Obama administration. Santayana noted that the Boston liberals of his time adhered to a sort of Puritanism that was bereft of Christianity, so that only fanaticism and moral vanity remained. Such secular Puritanism is even more intense today. It underlay the effort to “fundamentally transform” this country, from which we most fortunately, and in the nick of time, have been delivered.

    Trump’s election, far from being a Cromwellian phenomenon, was an Astræa redux moment, rather like the Restoration. It was said that Sir Thomas Urquhart of Cromartie, the translator of Rabelais, and a stout royalist, died in a fit of laughter on learning that Charles II had returned in triumph. I wasn’t laughing quite that hard (after all, I’m still alive), but it gave me hearty amusement to watch the crestfallen newsreaders on election night as they began to realize that Trump was winning.

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  141. In other words, Bannon is a well read man of the right who rejects fascism because fascism rejects Christianity.

    This puts him within the national conservative tradition of Solzhenitsyn, Orban, Philippe de Villiers, and Buchanan, not in the radical traditionalist camp of Dugin’s Eurasianism, Jobbik’s pan-Turanism, the French New Right, Arktos, Radix and Counter Currents.

    Good for Bannon.

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  142. @David Davenport
    There is such a connection. Eric Voegelin commented on the Cromwellian ancestry of modern ideological totalitarianism in his New Science of Politics.

    Voegelin was an apologist for the Roman so-called Catholic church who smeared Protestants by claiming that Protestantism is Gnosticism.

    The Trotskyite concept of continual revolution is adumbrated in that grand old satire on the Puritans, Samuel Butler’s Hudibras, whose eponymous hero ..

    ... was a adoring fan of Charles I, about whom Wikipedia says:

    Charles I of England
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649[a]) was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649.

    ...

    After his succession, Charles quarrelled with the Parliament of England, which sought to curb his royal prerogative. Charles believed in the divine right of kings and thought he could govern according to his own conscience. Many of his subjects opposed his policies, in particular the levying of taxes without parliamentary consent, and perceived his actions as those of a tyrannical absolute monarch. His religious policies, coupled with his marriage to a Roman Catholic, generated the antipathy and mistrust of reformed groups such as the English Puritans and Scottish Covenanters, who thought his views too Catholic. He supported high church ecclesiastics, such as Richard Montagu and William Laud, and failed to aid Protestant forces successfully during the Thirty Years' War. His attempts to force the Church of Scotland to adopt high Anglican practices led to the Bishops' Wars, strengthened the position of the English and Scottish parliaments and helped precipitate his own downfall.

    From 1642, Charles fought the armies of the English and Scottish parliaments in the English Civil War. After his defeat in 1645, he surrendered to a Scottish force that eventually handed him over to the English Parliament. Charles refused to accept his captors' demands for a constitutional monarchy, and temporarily escaped captivity in November 1647. Re-imprisoned on the Isle of Wight, Charles forged an alliance with Scotland, but by the end of 1648 Oliver Cromwell's New Model Army had consolidated its control over England. Charles was tried, convicted, and executed for high treason in January 1649. The monarchy was abolished and a republic called the Commonwealth of England was declared. ...


    Did you read the Many of his subjects opposed his policies, in particular the levying of taxes without parliamentary consent part? The English Civil War was forerunner and antecedent to the American War of Independence. You might notice that America's Founding Fathers and the 18th century American population was not very Catholic.

    We sure don't hope that Trump is the new Cromwell, do we? After all, polite dissent is one thing, but populist overthrow of the throne-and-alter establishment, we can't have that!

    Did you read the Many of his subjects opposed his policies, in particular the levying of taxes without parliamentary consent part?

    Nothing wrong with that.

    Read More

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