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NYT: "Food Deserts" to Blame for Chicago Shootings
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The New York Times is going to keep running opeds on how the wave of shootings in Chicago since the triumph over the cops of BLM in November 2015 are the fault of the Usual Suspects (cops, white supremacy, white men, Trump, systemic racism, etc etc) until somebody comes up with a semi-persuasive sounding one. Today … “food deserts” are to blame:

The Police Aren’t the Solution to Chicago’s Violence

We need more jobs, thriving schools and better access to food.

Yup, Chicago killers are D’Jean Valjeans shooting people to steal a loaf of bread for their families.

… In a place known as a food desert, where there are no jobs and too few opportunities to acquire skills, and where there are failing schools, we are there. …

That’s what happens when you eliminate schools and allow food deserts to exist: People who can afford to move will do so, and the people left behind will be over-policed.

In less comic criminology, American Affairs recounts how Harvard political scientist James Q. Wilson stunned the intellectual world in 1974 by pointing out that whether or not prison rehabilitates criminals and whether or not the threat of prison deters criminals, we can say with a high degree of confidence that being locked up in prison incapacitates street criminals from preying on civilians on the street for the length of their terms. This observation then slowly led to a reassessment of the spirit of the age that had cut imprisonment during a vast increase in crime.

Incarceration as Incapacitation: An Intellectual History
by Timothy Crimmins

The general dumbness of the conventional wisdom in the Current Year is a recurrent subject here at iSteve, but let us not forget that the conventional wisdom of 1973 was often in a class of its own.

Commenter The Last Real Calvinist notes:

[Larry] Auster’s insight is evergreen. Just follow the pronouns. For example, in this article:

We need more jobs, thriving schools and better access to food. …

“That’s what happens when you eliminate schools and allow food deserts to exist.”

It’s not complicated.

 
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  1. Currahee says:

    So…..coppers back off and leave these poor people alone.

    Enough with this overpolicing:

    Just let them be themselves!

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    Theyre not so much food deserts as food under glass as in bullet proof glass every hood has all sorts of food that has to be protected by bullet proof glass
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  2. MEH 0910 says:
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  3. Forbes says:

    Yup. All those shootings in Chicago are because neighborhoods are over-policed!

    But I’m a little confused–they eliminated schools? There are no schools for the students to attend? Did they blame Trump yet?

    So the explanation is that children are just wandering the streets shooting each other…

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    • Replies: @Fred Boynton
    I was wondering about the schools as well. I'm certain I and others here would have heard about it if a city the size of Chicago had eliminated schools altogether. I'm not worried about the students of course, in time like these we need to focus all our concern on the plight of the poor teachers and admins; they're still getting paid I hope.
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  4. Arclight says:

    Yeah, let’s not look too closely at the people everyone who has the means to moves away from.

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  5. Declane says:

    Obama somehow found plenty of food in Chicago when he needed to airlift thousands of “pizzas” and “hot dogs” to the White House.

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    It wasn't thousands of pizzas and hotdogs, it was hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of hot dogs, with an implied promise that the "wait staff" serving the house-cost hot dogs would be more attractive and agreeable this time around. Only UFO-watchers could see any of that as a metaphor for prostitution.
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  6. bgates says:

    People who can afford to move will do so, and the people left behind will be over-policed.

    It’s like the Rapture except the elect end up at Whole Foods.

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    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    It’s like the Rapture except the elect end up at Whole Foods.

     

    Oh, that's excellent.
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  7. Barnard says:

    Food deserts were an interesting invention by progressives to explain why obese inner city residents shouldn’t have to take responsibility for their actions. I wonder if the NY Times thinks Wyoming ranchers who live 50 miles from the nearest grocery store live in a food desert. Why aren’t they shooting at each other? There must be a reason.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    The progressives seem to demand a full supermarket every 3 blocks or so. Most welfare and poor people have cars to drive 2 miles to the nearest supermarket. Or they have a friend from whom they can borrow a car.

    And of course there are no buses in the big cities where blacks live so they can’t get to the food market. That’s also why they can’t work and have to live on welfare. No cars buses or subways to get to work.

    Boo hoo boo hoo
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  8. “…and the people left behind will be over-policed.”

    As Sailer said in THBP, black leaders don’t want blacks moving out of the ghettos. How do you expect the black leaders to stay in charge if blacks aren’t kept poor, isolated and angry?

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  9. Let’s get SJWs to open healthy food stores in the ghetto, and make the food desert bloom!

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  10. Ibound1 says:

    I know it is English. The words are in the dictionary. It has nouns and verbs and subjects and objects and in the right order. And yet it makes absolutely no sense and I have no idea what they think they are talking about.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alfa158
    They aren’t thinking at all.
    1. Real thinking would lead to Crimethink, so they Crimestop themselves from doing it.
    2. They already own the power structure and the Megaphone so there is no need to think, all they have to do is scream louder through the Megaphone.
    3. Instead of thought they have a Rolodex in their heads with Acceptable Thoughts written on the index cards. When writing, debating or lecturing, they simply spin the Rolodex and read off of index cards that seem appropriate. I’ve talked to people like this and I can sometimes almost feel the little whiff of air as they spin their Rolodex. You can see this when you make an argument, and they ignore it and simply blurt out something unrelated. The couldn’t find a good enough index card that they could read off of to refute you, so they simply spin to another card.
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  11. Anon[217] • Disclaimer says:

    You don’t think this guy is trolling his audience, do you? Like that other Times writer who placed a photo of a racially homogeneous cast of Asians front and center to “prove” that diversity works?

    NYT thought process:

    “Hm, my audience is a bunch of self-centered foodie neurotics with way too much money and time on their hands. What kind of stories do they want to read? Oh yeah, stories that are really all about them despite the subject. Now, how can I also make fun of them? It’s not like they’ll ever get it because they aren’t as smart as I am with my Yale masters in journalism. Ha ha ha. Chumps.”

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  12. Anon[217] • Disclaimer says:

    The obvious solution here is to publicly bus those poor people into better off areas so they can do some proper food shopping. How many NYT readers are up for that?

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    • Replies: @Anon
    Tyson had a bag of cookies, but he still caused a lot of trouble.

    http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/1987-08-13/sports/8703060668_1_olympic-festival-muhammad-ali-riddick-bowe

    http://articles.latimes.com/1988-03-30/sports/sp-157_1_riddick-bowe

    https://www.nytimes.com/1992/11/15/sports/sports-of-the-times-a-different-brownsville-champion.html
    , @Anon
    Excellent idea! I suggest Park Slope Brooklyn and the upper West Side neighborhoods de blackio wants to bus in ghetto youth. It should be done on weekends when all the working people shop.

    Another suggestion is a Chinese neighborhood where the Chinese merchants are always being robbed by blacks.

    The only difference between a Chinese merchant and the black 75 IQ thug who robs him is what kind of crime they commit. They both are criminals. The Chinese commits fraud and other white collar crime. The black commits street crime
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  13. Bacsi says:

    Huh, so this reminds me of a National Geographic issue a while back. It’d be interesting to see how the “food deserts” correlate with crime, particularly in white Iowa and other rural areas. Lol

    Of course, with agricultural subsidies like soybeans we may very well be feeding the world and inviting the world…

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/foodfeatures/hunger/

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  14. El Dato says:

    The Police Aren’t the Solution to Chicago’s Violence

    Ok. So?

    We need more jobs, thriving schools and better access to food.

    These are outcomes of less violence, a healthy economy and a functional social structure. Not premisses.

    One premiss could be population dieoff.

    Or cut Chicago up into controllable, walled-off territories where violent behaviour results in people strung up at checkpoints as a warning. Go full Somalia NOW.

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  15. Polynikes says:

    I struggle to piece together how food deserts, access to SNAP , or anything food related is a social ill when one of the biggest health threats we face is obesity, especially among the poor (and stupid).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    You and Dean Wormer both:


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1hnwvWhbJw
    , @RudyM
    It's not difficult to understand, since "food desert" doesn't usually refer to the complete absence of food, as I understand it, but rather the absence of relatively healthy foods. Being surrounded by cheap junk food of various sorts, and not much else, can obviously promote obesity.
    , @Expletive Deleted
    Carpet-bomb the "communities" with organic broccoli (picked at dawn by robots that very morning). And rutabaga.
    Cheap enough, if it stops the hail of lead they're forced, I tell you forced to fill their bellies with.
    , @Olorin
    Setting aside the fact that Tamar Manasseh is a rabbi....

    https://www.facebook.com/jewishdailyforward/posts/tamar-manasseh-uses-her-power/10153804970747447/

    It has nothing to do with food, or deserts, or whatever.

    It has to do with a vast army of academic and government and foundation and private sector nutritionists, public healthists, social workers, teachers, and other Nanny Staters continually prowling for topics to revive and extend their careers overseeing and expanding the welfare state and guaranteeing trillion-dollar profits to Big Pharma (which owns much of Big Ag).

    It has to do with food as power, as control. "In the end they will lay their freedom at our feet and say, 'Make us your slaves--but feed us.'" While posing as altruism and equity and concern and worry and anti-racism and busting the glass ceiling and feeding the poor and caring about the sick.

    Here's one example for the uninitiated:

    Within days of Obama being sworn in in 2009, and with money from the Farm Bill, the National Academies/NRC held a big pricey "Public health effects of food deserts" workshop, when this topic was still relatively new to the US (it was imported from Tony Blair's UK about ten years previously).

    Then, as these folks tend to do, they published a big fat report on it.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK208019/

    There are literally thousands of these critters ensconced in these jobs, and they have to justify their existence. Scroll down here to "related books" to see what passes as "food systems" "research"...while supplying these Establishment players with big bucks, travel budgets, conference junkets, jobs for life with cadillac benefits, etc.

    https://www.nap.edu/catalog/12623/the-public-health-effects-of-food-deserts-workshop-summary

    Bazillions of dollars, dissertations, research papers, press releases, reports, words, careers, grants, programs, projects, and workshops/conferences…

    ...about what to do about stupid fat children and the lard-ass adults who engender them, for gods' sake.

    This is simply monetarization and politicization of denial of population genetics. That lucrative state religion that rewards those who can avoid the obvious and preach the latest PC catechism of avoidance, denial, and faith in the impossible.

    Just for the heck of it, and to further give the uninitiated a sense of how vast and robust this Establishment is, below is the list of people credited with just this one (of many thousands annually) report.

    The revolving door between their various programs, departments, institutions, corporations, granting agencies, and media outlets spins quickly. Outlets like the NYT are effectively a house organ/newsletter for them.

    They are resistant to concepts like race and IQ (and life itself being an IQ test) precisely because it so potently endangers their institutional/Establishment edifice and their lucrative blind faith.

    Now imagine that we had even a fraction of this presence looking at actual science on race and IQ and personal/societal/civilizational outcomes. Sadly, it seems to be going the other way.



    PLANNING COMMITTEE ON THE PUBLIC HEALTH EFFECTS OF FOOD DESERTS *
    • BARRY M. POPKIN (Chair), Director, UNC Interdisciplinary Obesity Program, The Carla Smith Chamblee Distinguished Professor of Global Nutrition, School of Public Health Professor, Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill



    • ANA V. DIEZ ROUX, Professor, Epidemiology Director, Center for Integrative Approaches to Health Disparities, Associate Director, Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor
    • JOEL GITTELSOHN, Associate Professor, Center for Human Nutrition, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins University, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
    • BARBARA A. LARAIA, Assistant Professor, Division of Prevention Sciences, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
    • ROBIN A. MCKINNON, Health Policy Specialist, Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch Applied Research Program, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland
    • JOSEPH R. SHARKEY, Associate Professor, Social and Behavioral Health, Director, Texas Healthy Aging Research Network, Director, Program for Research in Nutrition and Health Disparities, School of Rural Public Health, Texas A&M Health Science Center, College Station, Texas

    Study Staff
    • PEGGY TSAI, Study Director
    • JANET MULLIGAN, Research Associate
    • HEATHER BREINER, Program Associate
    • PAULA TARNAPOL WHITACRE, Consultant Science Writer
    • LINDA D. MEYERS, Food and Nutrition Board Director
    • ROBIN A. SCHOEN, Director, Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources

    FOOD AND NUTRITION BOARD *
    • DENNIS M. BIER (Chair), Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Houston, Texas
    • MICHAEL P. DOYLE (Vice Chair), Center for Food Safety, University of Georgia, Griffin
    • DIANE BIRT, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Iowa State University, Ames
    • YVONNE BRONNER, School of Public Health and Policy, Morgan State University, Baltimore, Maryland
    • FERGUS M. CLYDESDALE, Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
    • RICHARD J. DECKELBAUM, Institute of Human Nutrition, Columbia University, New York
    • GORDON L. JENSEN, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park
    • REYNALDO MARTORELL, Department of Global Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
    • SUSAN T. MAYNE, Division of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
    • SANFORD A. MILLER, Center for Food, Nutrition, and Agriculture Policy, University of Maryland, College Park
    • J. GLENN MORRIS, JR., Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore
    • SUZANNE P. MURPHY, Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, University of Hawaii, Honolulu
    • JOSE M. ORDOVAS, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts
    • MARTIN A. PHILBERT, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
    • JIM E. RIVIERE, Center for Chemical Toxicology Research and Pharmacokinetics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh
    • PATRICK J. STOVER, Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York
    • WALTER C. WILLETT, Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts

    Staff
    • LINDA D. MEYERS, Director
    • GERALDINE KENNEDO, Administrative Assistant
    • ANTON L. BANDY, Financial Associate

    BOARD ON AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES
    • W. REG GOMES (Chair), University of California (emeritus), Oakland
    • PEGGY F. BARLETT, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
    • ROGER N. BEACHY, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, Missouri
    • HAROLD L. BERGMAN, University of Wyoming, Laramie
    • H.H. CHENG, University of Minnesota (emeritus), St. Paul
    • RICHARD A. DIXON, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, Oklahoma
    • DANIEL M. DOOLEY, University of California, Oakland
    • JOAN H. EISEMANN, North Carolina State University, Raleigh
    • GARY F. HARTNELL, Monsanto Company, St. Louis, Missouri
    • GENE HUGOSON, Minnesota Department of Agriculture, St. Paul
    • KIRK C. KLASING, University of California, Davis
    • VICTOR L. LECHTENBERG, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
    • PHILLIP E. NELSON, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
    • ROBERT PAARLBERG, Wellesley College, Watertown, Massachusetts
    • KEITH PITTS, Marrone Organic Innovations, Davis, California
    • CHARLES W. RICE, Kansas State University, Manhattan
    • HAL SALWASSER, Oregon State University, Corvallis
    • PEDRO A. SANCHEZ, The Earth Institute, Columbia University, Palisades, New York
    • NORMAN R. SCOTT, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York
    • ROGER A. SEDJO, Resources for the Future, Washington, DC
    • KATHLEEN SEGERSON, University of Connecticut, Storrs
    • MERCEDES VAZQUEZ-AÑON, Novus International, Inc., St. Charles, Missouri

    Staff
    • ROBIN A. SCHOEN, Director
    • KAREN L. IMHOF, Administrative Assistant
    • AUSTIN J. LEWIS, Senior Program Officer
    • EVONNE P.Y. TANG, Senior Program Officer
    • PEGGY TSAI, Program Officer
    • CAMILLA YANDOC ABLES, Associate Program Officer
    • KARA N. LANEY, Associate Program Officer
    • RUTH S. ARIETI, Research Associate
    • JANET M. MULLIGAN, Research Associate
    • KAMWETI MUTU, Research Associate
    • ERIN P. MULCAHY, Senior Program Assistant

    BOARD ON POPULATION HEALTH AND PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE
    • JAMES W. CURRAN (Chair), Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
    • MARGARITA ALEGRÍA, Cambridge Health Alliance, Somerville, Massachusetts
    • SUSAN M. ALLAN, University of Washington, Seattle
    • GEORGES C. BENJAMIN, American Public Health Association, Washington, DC
    • BOBBIE A. BERKOWITZ, University of Washington, Seattle
    • DAN G. BLAZER, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
    • DAVID R. CHALLONER, University of Florida, Gainesville
    • R. ALTA CHARO, University of Wisconsin, Madison
    • JOSE JULIO ESCARCE, UCLA Med-GIM & HSR, Los Angeles, California
    • HOWARD HU, University of Michigan Schools of Public Health and Medicine, Ann Arbor
    • MATTHEW W. KREUTER, Washington University in Saint Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
    • MARGARET E. O’KANE, National Committee for Quality Assurance, Washington, DC
    • GEORGE W. RUTHERFORD, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco
    • SUSAN L. SANTOS, University of Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey, Medford, Massachusetts
    • MARTIN JOSE SEPULVEDA, International Business Machines Corporation, Somers, New York
    • SAMUEL SO, Stanford University, Stanford, California
    • ANTONIA M. VILLARRUEL, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor
    • PAUL J. WALLACE, The Permanente Federation, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California
    • GINA M. WINGOOD, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
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  16. njguy73 says:

    Not feeling like yourself? Feeling like you want to pop a cap in someone’s ass?

    Grab a Snickers.

    #SatisfactionSavesBlackLives

    Read More
    • LOL: fish
    • Replies: @40 Acres and A Kardashian

    Not feeling like yourself? Feeling like you want to pop a cap in someone’s ass?

    Grab a Snickers.
     
    LMAO!!!
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  17. Bubba says:

    “Food Deserts” are either the result of areas with extremely low trust, violent, anti-social behavior thugs (where Laquenaz or Shitavious rule the streets) or in extremely remote areas, usually brutally cold regions with very low populations. And I’ll gladly take the latter food desert any day.

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  18. Speaking of over policing, Chicago Police have broken out a sneaker “bait” truck in Englewood. Vice is on the case.

    By the way, there is a Whole Foods now in Englewood, but murders have not dropped in the surrounding area.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-whole-foods-englewood-opening-0929-biz-20160928-story.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Whole Foods is a step in the right direction, Clifford, but there are still just TOO MANY Dairy Queens and the like, so the Food Dessert won't go away anytime soon.

    I dunno, dessert has always appealed to me, so I'm not really sure what the damn problem is this time.

    "Baby, don't tempt me.
    I'm where I wanna be,
    cause on the 8th day,
    God made sweet tea.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S_uHb9Kbe5I
    , @El Dato
    "That's bait!"

    Sly humans! That's practically a National Geographic.
    , @Anon
    I read about the bait truck. As soon as word got around the activitists revuns and thugs had a demonstration denouncing the racist police.

    No riot yet.
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  19. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:

    We need more jobs, thriving schools and better access to food.

    If the NYT actually visited the ghetto once in awhile, they’d discover that better access to food may be the very last thing these people need.

    And while we’re at it, they’re not too keen on jobs (real jobs actually require work, as opposed to bogus “city jobs”) and “thriving schools” are routinely deprecated by these same people, who have roughly no appreciation for anything resembling scholarship.

    Because “real” schools, just like “real” jobs, require hard work and discipline, both of which are white af. Now shut up your racism, and gibsmedat.

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  20. Every time I think the New York Times has cooked up the stupidest parody imaginable of an op-ed, it finds some way to best itself. The New York Times – number one at publishing number two.

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  21. songbird says:

    I love this “food desert” stuff; it is so atavistic. The strategy of redistribution has to have started with food. Even if, in modern times, it is hokum, I feel like it is a nod to ancient prehistory – as such there’s a certain gentle humor in using this term in a modern urban environment, many years after trucking was deregulated.

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  22. @Clifford Brown
    Speaking of over policing, Chicago Police have broken out a sneaker "bait" truck in Englewood. Vice is on the case.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrsHJS7ELFQ



    By the way, there is a Whole Foods now in Englewood, but murders have not dropped in the surrounding area.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-whole-foods-englewood-opening-0929-biz-20160928-story.html

    Whole Foods is a step in the right direction, Clifford, but there are still just TOO MANY Dairy Queens and the like, so the Food Dessert won’t go away anytime soon.

    I dunno, dessert has always appealed to me, so I’m not really sure what the damn problem is this time.

    “Baby, don’t tempt me.
    I’m where I wanna be,
    cause on the 8th day,
    God made sweet tea.

    Read More
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  23. @Polynikes
    I struggle to piece together how food deserts, access to SNAP , or anything food related is a social ill when one of the biggest health threats we face is obesity, especially among the poor (and stupid).

    You and Dean Wormer both:

    Read More
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  24. Alfa158 says: • Website
    @Ibound1
    I know it is English. The words are in the dictionary. It has nouns and verbs and subjects and objects and in the right order. And yet it makes absolutely no sense and I have no idea what they think they are talking about.

    They aren’t thinking at all.
    1. Real thinking would lead to Crimethink, so they Crimestop themselves from doing it.
    2. They already own the power structure and the Megaphone so there is no need to think, all they have to do is scream louder through the Megaphone.
    3. Instead of thought they have a Rolodex in their heads with Acceptable Thoughts written on the index cards. When writing, debating or lecturing, they simply spin the Rolodex and read off of index cards that seem appropriate. I’ve talked to people like this and I can sometimes almost feel the little whiff of air as they spin their Rolodex. You can see this when you make an argument, and they ignore it and simply blurt out something unrelated. The couldn’t find a good enough index card that they could read off of to refute you, so they simply spin to another card.

    Read More
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  25. @bgates
    People who can afford to move will do so, and the people left behind will be over-policed.

    It's like the Rapture except the elect end up at Whole Foods.

    It’s like the Rapture except the elect end up at Whole Foods.

    Oh, that’s excellent.

    Read More
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  26. istevefan says:

    The late Lawrence Auster used to write that progressives will never acknowledge the wrongdoings of minorities because progressives don’t consider them to have agency. He wrote that the more blacks and other minorities misbehave, the more progressives will blame other whites.

    I believe he was correct. Though I don’t think he foresaw the ‘food deserts’ defense.

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    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    Auster's insight is evergreen.

    Just follow the pronouns.

    For example, in this article:


    We need more jobs, thriving schools and better access to food.

     


    That’s what happens when you eliminate schools and allow food deserts to exist.
     
    It's not complicated.
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  27. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    More food marts would open up if blacks didn’t steal so much.

    What did blacks do to stores in Ferguson after Gentle Giant Michael Brown charged a cop and got killed?

    But never mind what blacks do. Just pretend they are innocent and hapless victims at every turn.

    Btw, I’ve been through many small towns, and sometimes, you gotta go a distance to find a decent food mart. I don’t think Billy Bob goes around shooting Lyle because he’s out of hotdogs.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dtbb
    Yep. City of St, Pete has spent millions and millions of dollars over decades to try to keep a supermarket open in the hood. They all eventually go belly up from theft by "customers" or employees. The wailing is loud and constant but no one can ever figure out why they always close.
    , @wrd9
    Trump's budget proposal for 2019 mandates EBT recipients get half their benefits in "gubmint cheese", meaning a box of staples.
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  28. @istevefan
    The late Lawrence Auster used to write that progressives will never acknowledge the wrongdoings of minorities because progressives don't consider them to have agency. He wrote that the more blacks and other minorities misbehave, the more progressives will blame other whites.

    I believe he was correct. Though I don't think he foresaw the 'food deserts' defense.

    Auster’s insight is evergreen.

    Just follow the pronouns.

    For example, in this article:

    We need more jobs, thriving schools and better access to food.

    That’s what happens when you eliminate schools and allow food deserts to exist.

    It’s not complicated.

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    This is brilliant, this needs to be a feature from now on: in evaluating an SJW piece remember to parse for simple, visible identity code with pronouns. I bet this is all over the place.
    , @Lot
    Well done.
    , @black sea

    We need more jobs, thriving schools and better access to food.
     
    Not to mention weave(s):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4NJodJS9xQk
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  29. El Dato says:
    @Clifford Brown
    Speaking of over policing, Chicago Police have broken out a sneaker "bait" truck in Englewood. Vice is on the case.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrsHJS7ELFQ



    By the way, there is a Whole Foods now in Englewood, but murders have not dropped in the surrounding area.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-whole-foods-englewood-opening-0929-biz-20160928-story.html

    “That’s bait!”

    Sly humans! That’s practically a National Geographic.

    Read More
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  30. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Declane
    Obama somehow found plenty of food in Chicago when he needed to airlift thousands of "pizzas" and "hot dogs" to the White House.

    It wasn’t thousands of pizzas and hotdogs, it was hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of hot dogs, with an implied promise that the “wait staff” serving the house-cost hot dogs would be more attractive and agreeable this time around. Only UFO-watchers could see any of that as a metaphor for prostitution.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Is this the Gorilla Brain guy's theory?
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  31. J.Ross says: • Website
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    Auster's insight is evergreen.

    Just follow the pronouns.

    For example, in this article:


    We need more jobs, thriving schools and better access to food.

     


    That’s what happens when you eliminate schools and allow food deserts to exist.
     
    It's not complicated.

    This is brilliant, this needs to be a feature from now on: in evaluating an SJW piece remember to parse for simple, visible identity code with pronouns. I bet this is all over the place.

    Read More
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  32. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    The obvious solution here is to publicly bus those poor people into better off areas so they can do some proper food shopping. How many NYT readers are up for that?
    Read More
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  33. More proof that the engine pulls the train.

    Or is it that everything old is new again?

    Something anyway, but Detriot has been whinging this for many years. Here’s a UConn study on the subject:

    http://www.uconnruddcenter.org/resources/upload/docs/what/policy/DetroitFoodDesertReport.pdf

    Read More
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  34. BB753 says:

    That’s a good one, food deserts.. In the Land of the Obese. Lol!

    Read More
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  35. Lot says:

    “In a place known as a food desert, where there are no jobs and too few opportunities to acquire skills, and where there are failing schools”

    Good description of my grandma’s home town, still home to her sibling and my second cousins. Factory shut down, population way down, no higher ed of any sort, 100 year old high school is half empty and in poor physical shape.

    And yet, no violence. One of my HS dropout 2nd cousins makes about 40k as an ebay power seller. His wife does both telephone and online chat customer service for big companies from home, as well as baby sit. She has switched companies several times for more interesting and better paid CSR work, all of it remote.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    One of my HS dropout 2nd cousins makes about 40k as an ebay power seller. His wife does both telephone and online chat customer service for big companies from home, as well as baby sit. She has switched companies several times for more interesting and better paid CSR work, all of it remote.
     
    Your cousin and his wife sound far more intelligent than SWPLs who take on $100k in student loan debt to get useless degrees in Disabled Transgender Blatina Underwater Basketweaving Studies.
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  36. Lot says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    Auster's insight is evergreen.

    Just follow the pronouns.

    For example, in this article:


    We need more jobs, thriving schools and better access to food.

     


    That’s what happens when you eliminate schools and allow food deserts to exist.
     
    It's not complicated.

    Well done.

    Read More
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  37. Daniel H says:

    And we know that the most effective remedy for a “food desert” is, you guessed it, more immigration. Vibrant cuisine will learn the inner city how to behave. Who wouldn’t go crazy without access to, take your pick, thai, bhutanese, szechuan, mexican, caribbean , et. al. cuisine.

    To answer my own questions, well, the USA for the first 200 years of existence. We all used to get along pretty well with white bread and mayonnaise sandwiches

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  38. Also, we need our weave. I don’t wear it, but we need it.

    Every day is stupider than the day before.

    Read More
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  39. @njguy73
    Not feeling like yourself? Feeling like you want to pop a cap in someone's ass?

    Grab a Snickers.

    #SatisfactionSavesBlackLives

    Not feeling like yourself? Feeling like you want to pop a cap in someone’s ass?

    Grab a Snickers.

    LMAO!!!

    Read More
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  40. Apparently the illustrious NYT doesn’t appreciate that a CTA bus fare + transfer = $2.25 + .25 =$2.50.

    The CTA transfer is good for an additional 2 trips and reverse riding is allowed. So you bring a backpack and shopping cart to Aldis when shopping and Voila! your “food desert” problem is mitigated. I see plenty of Black women shopping at Aldis with filled shopping carts waiting for the bus so this is SOP in Chicago.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    I don’t think the NYT reporters are aware that those carts exist.
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  41. black sea says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    Auster's insight is evergreen.

    Just follow the pronouns.

    For example, in this article:


    We need more jobs, thriving schools and better access to food.

     


    That’s what happens when you eliminate schools and allow food deserts to exist.
     
    It's not complicated.

    We need more jobs, thriving schools and better access to food.

    Not to mention weave(s):

    Read More
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  42. @J.Ross
    It wasn't thousands of pizzas and hotdogs, it was hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of hot dogs, with an implied promise that the "wait staff" serving the house-cost hot dogs would be more attractive and agreeable this time around. Only UFO-watchers could see any of that as a metaphor for prostitution.

    Is this the Gorilla Brain guy’s theory?

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    This was what was consistently claimed from the first threads through popularization and InfoWars talking about it. FBI has "cheese pizza" as an E-Z code for child and pornography (same first letters), going back to the Seventies; it also appeared in an unrelated context ten years ago at 4chan in reference to cp there.
    Or, y'know, guys from Chicago really like their hot dogs and so will pay hundreds of thousands of dollars for them, and worry about what the "waitresses" look like. Maybe that's the reasonable thing to believe.
    >gorilla guy
    I don't know, I've never followed his stuff.
    , @Anon
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mh0wZd0IphI
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  43. SnakeEyes says:

    I mis-read the title and thought for a moment the latest theory was gun violence over Twinkies.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I mis-read the title and thought for a moment the latest theory was gun violence over Twinkies.
     
    Or gun violence blamed on Twinkies:

    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/the-twinkie-defense/
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  44. @SnakeEyes
    I mis-read the title and thought for a moment the latest theory was gun violence over Twinkies.

    I mis-read the title and thought for a moment the latest theory was gun violence over Twinkies.

    Or gun violence blamed on Twinkies:

    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/the-twinkie-defense/

    Read More
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  45. Anon[423] • Disclaimer says:

    This food desert stuff has been heavily researched, much of it by rational researchers without a political agenda, and a lot of the results are counterintuitive. So this is an area where off-the-cuff hot takes tend to shoot blanks. That’s all I’ll say for now, but Google, and Google Scholar, are your friends.

    Read More
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  46. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer
    Is this the Gorilla Brain guy's theory?

    This was what was consistently claimed from the first threads through popularization and InfoWars talking about it. FBI has “cheese pizza” as an E-Z code for child and pornography (same first letters), going back to the Seventies; it also appeared in an unrelated context ten years ago at 4chan in reference to cp there.
    Or, y’know, guys from Chicago really like their hot dogs and so will pay hundreds of thousands of dollars for them, and worry about what the “waitresses” look like. Maybe that’s the reasonable thing to believe.
    >gorilla guy
    I don’t know, I’ve never followed his stuff.

    Read More
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  47. RudyM says:
    @Polynikes
    I struggle to piece together how food deserts, access to SNAP , or anything food related is a social ill when one of the biggest health threats we face is obesity, especially among the poor (and stupid).

    It’s not difficult to understand, since “food desert” doesn’t usually refer to the complete absence of food, as I understand it, but rather the absence of relatively healthy foods. Being surrounded by cheap junk food of various sorts, and not much else, can obviously promote obesity.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Polynikes
    Is this a government conspiracy to keep city folks fat? Is that what you're promoting?

    Because I'm pretty sure these vibrant cities, with there immigrant infused variety of eating options, still operate on free market principles where people sell what the locals buy.

    But maybe I'm wrong and the surroundings are making the people substandard instead of vice versa.
    , @Alec Leamas

    It’s not difficult to understand, since “food desert” doesn’t usually refer to the complete absence of food, as I understand it, but rather the absence of relatively healthy foods. Being surrounded by cheap junk food of various sorts, and not much else, can obviously promote obesity.
     
    I grew up in a blue collar white ethnic urban neighborhood. There were a few smaller Supermarkets a good brisk walk away (they'd deliver your food order to your home for a nominal fee), a Huckster who sold fruits and vegetables from a box truck equipped with a loudspeaker "I GOT PEACHES, PEACHES FOUR FOR A DOOOOOLLAR," and corner stores that carried fresh foods. As they neighborhood got "diversified" by Section Eight and its follow-on consequences, the selection of fresh foods winnowed with decreased demand. Processed frozen foods and shelf-stable packaged edible goods make better stock in such a place. It's now probably an official "food desert." The desert analogy is apt, because it does not simply denote a lack of something, but a loss 0f something that was once there.

    You have to imagine that the disintegration of the black family probably accounts for a loss of instruction in traditional Southern cookery and foodways, and a consequent diminished demand for fresh foods and staples. Stewing Collard Greens takes hours of preparation and tending. Fast food is fatty, salty, sweet and savory - and yields near instant gratification. I'm not sure how you place the blame for fruits and vegetables rotting in the case when adults know better but choose otherwise.
    , @Brutusale
    I can't believe anyone seriously tries to make this argument. Have you ever noticed that the people paying for their groceries with the Little Blue Card (EBT for welfare in MA) stroll right past the fruit and vegetables on their way to loading 4 12-packs of soda and bags of sweet and salty snack food in their carts?

    They're not deprived, they're stupid.
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  48. Dtbb says:
    @Anon
    More food marts would open up if blacks didn't steal so much.

    What did blacks do to stores in Ferguson after Gentle Giant Michael Brown charged a cop and got killed?

    But never mind what blacks do. Just pretend they are innocent and hapless victims at every turn.

    Btw, I've been through many small towns, and sometimes, you gotta go a distance to find a decent food mart. I don't think Billy Bob goes around shooting Lyle because he's out of hotdogs.

    Yep. City of St, Pete has spent millions and millions of dollars over decades to try to keep a supermarket open in the hood. They all eventually go belly up from theft by “customers” or employees. The wailing is loud and constant but no one can ever figure out why they always close.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Everything explained, in a single photograph

    https://i.warosu.org/data/fa/img/0064/19/1372580492838.jpg
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  49. I believe it was right around 1973 when the smart folks decided closing mental institutions around the country would be a capital idea. One of those odd moments when right-wing Libertarians and the far left joined forces to make America insane again.

    Read More
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  50. Polynikes says:
    @RudyM
    It's not difficult to understand, since "food desert" doesn't usually refer to the complete absence of food, as I understand it, but rather the absence of relatively healthy foods. Being surrounded by cheap junk food of various sorts, and not much else, can obviously promote obesity.

    Is this a government conspiracy to keep city folks fat? Is that what you’re promoting?

    Because I’m pretty sure these vibrant cities, with there immigrant infused variety of eating options, still operate on free market principles where people sell what the locals buy.

    But maybe I’m wrong and the surroundings are making the people substandard instead of vice versa.

    Read More
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  51. Mr. Anon says:

    “We need more jobs, thriving schools and better access to food. …

    “That’s what happens when you eliminate schools and allow food deserts to exist.”

    It’s a common formulation:

    I have a problem! What are you going to do about it!?

    Read More
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  52. @RudyM
    It's not difficult to understand, since "food desert" doesn't usually refer to the complete absence of food, as I understand it, but rather the absence of relatively healthy foods. Being surrounded by cheap junk food of various sorts, and not much else, can obviously promote obesity.

    It’s not difficult to understand, since “food desert” doesn’t usually refer to the complete absence of food, as I understand it, but rather the absence of relatively healthy foods. Being surrounded by cheap junk food of various sorts, and not much else, can obviously promote obesity.

    I grew up in a blue collar white ethnic urban neighborhood. There were a few smaller Supermarkets a good brisk walk away (they’d deliver your food order to your home for a nominal fee), a Huckster who sold fruits and vegetables from a box truck equipped with a loudspeaker “I GOT PEACHES, PEACHES FOUR FOR A DOOOOOLLAR,” and corner stores that carried fresh foods. As they neighborhood got “diversified” by Section Eight and its follow-on consequences, the selection of fresh foods winnowed with decreased demand. Processed frozen foods and shelf-stable packaged edible goods make better stock in such a place. It’s now probably an official “food desert.” The desert analogy is apt, because it does not simply denote a lack of something, but a loss 0f something that was once there.

    You have to imagine that the disintegration of the black family probably accounts for a loss of instruction in traditional Southern cookery and foodways, and a consequent diminished demand for fresh foods and staples. Stewing Collard Greens takes hours of preparation and tending. Fast food is fatty, salty, sweet and savory – and yields near instant gratification. I’m not sure how you place the blame for fruits and vegetables rotting in the case when adults know better but choose otherwise.

    Read More
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  53. istevefan says:

    Why do all these shootings in Chicago seem to happen on the weekend? Each week we hear nothing about Chicago shootings. And then every Monday we get a summary of what just happened over the previous 60 hours. The shootings seem so skewed over a 60 hour period.

    Some might argue that people work during the week and so they don’t have time to shoot one another. But if they did have jobs, they probably would not be the type who engage in such behavior. My guess is the ones involved don’t have high employment levels. If so why do they wait until the weekend? What difference does it make?

    Read More
    • Replies: @CCZ
    Everything, yes EVERYTHING, that you might want to know about Chicago shootings and homicides, including day of the week statistics, cost statistics ($21,000 for the first 35 minutes of ER treatment, $800 per autopsy), shot zone lethality (136 KIA of 146 head shots but only 142 KIA of 404 torso shots), lots of lists and commentary, and an incident by incident photograph galley are at:

    https://heyjackass.com/

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  54. CCZ says:

    Read some of James LaFond’s first person accounts of Baltimore violence and “food deserts.”

    They used to wait until food stamps ran out before they started shoplifting in force. It’s only the fourteenth and we have this older woman walk in, break open a box of hefty lawn and leaf bags, take one, and then begins loading it with what she wants. That is just one of three shoplifters that Eddy caught and showed the door in our first three hours of business. You can see them—the ones you don’t catch—selling the stuff across the street at the bus stop.

    http://www.jameslafond.com/article.php?id=10714

    Of Kings and Queens, Theft As Aggression and the Genesis of Urban Food Deserts
    In the end, the entire urban crime scene is about entitlement. … Theft and violence, just as in medieval and ancient times, are forms of aggression most often practiced hierarchically, with those whom feel they are entitled to more than what they have either taking it from those who already have less, or terrorizing those who have no defenders in order to extort goods as diverse as submission and cash.

    It is no accident that the welfare recipients that have turned their own neighborhoods into wastelands refer to themselves as Kings and Queens.

    In my view, urban food deserts have been made by a government entitlement system, probably by accident. But having effectively produced a violent mob, the government that created it has now seen its purpose and is turning it on the rest of us. If we do not setup money-losing supermarkets in the ghettos the ghettos will come to our viable markets and destroy them.

    The belief that has been instilled in blacks that they are entitled to more than they have, and that the holders of their denied fortunes are white [the same color as most store managers], has lead the majority of black shoplifters to seek open combat with any supermarket employee—whether white or a race traitor—who unjustly tries to deny them what is imagined as rightfully their due. I cannot count the numerous black shoplifters who I have seen take something off a shelf and attempt to walk out the door with it and shamelessly declare it to be their property and declare me or my security man to be the thieving attacker!

    This boggles the mind, but is what we get for trying to appease a people for wrongs done to their ancestors by someone else’s ancestors. The food deserts and failing food markets of Baltimore are solid proof that fantasy, when believed by enough people, has real tangible effects.

    http://www.jameslafond.com/article.php?id=3467

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  55. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dtbb
    Yep. City of St, Pete has spent millions and millions of dollars over decades to try to keep a supermarket open in the hood. They all eventually go belly up from theft by "customers" or employees. The wailing is loud and constant but no one can ever figure out why they always close.

    Everything explained, in a single photograph

    Read More
    • LOL: jim jones
    • Replies: @Anon
    Link?
    , @Alec Leamas
    Walter "Clyde" Frazier's JFM rookie box in mint condition is quite valuable.
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  56. Anon[376] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Everything explained, in a single photograph

    https://i.warosu.org/data/fa/img/0064/19/1372580492838.jpg

    Link?

    Read More
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  57. Anon[575] • Disclaimer says:

    Totally unrelated, but food deserts also seem to have very high crime rates. It’s a baffling mystery.

    Assuming the high crime rates are mostly the doing of locals (and the opposite assumption implies that criminals commute to the absolute shittiest parts of town to ply their trade), then I propose a two-pronged solution. Simply:

    1.) Truck free food regularly into said food deserts. (I see a kind of militarized Meals-on-Wheels, with 2-inch-thick bullet proof glass.)

    2.) Move violent criminals to other neighborhoods, specifically ones which are safe and clean, and which have plentiful markets and eateries. (We might characterize such swaths as “criminal deserts.”)

    A well-armed and trained populace in the “criminal desert” areas might very gladly welcome the presence of such criminals — as guaranteed bythe Second Amendemnt — provided those criminals stand out in some clear way, rather than blend in with the local population. (Not flimsy social constructs, but physical, linguistic or behavioral attributes.)

    Once dispatched, the former criminals would be very quickly processed (cleaned, trimmed, deep fried) and transported back, to further remedy the food deserts they so thoughtlessly and so callously created.

    It may not seem likely to happen, but hey, can’t I also have a dream?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dtbb
    Soylant Brown?
    , @Father O'Hara
    Some of it does happen; I have heard of Rahm sending in buses, filled with fruits and vegetables, to food deserts where the "nomads" can get their fill.
    I don't know if it's ongoing,but I know I read a story about this being done a couple of years or so ago.
    , @JMcG
    “Criminal deserts” is great, I’m stealing that one.
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  58. Anon[554] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Is this the Gorilla Brain guy's theory?

    Read More
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  59. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Barnard
    Food deserts were an interesting invention by progressives to explain why obese inner city residents shouldn't have to take responsibility for their actions. I wonder if the NY Times thinks Wyoming ranchers who live 50 miles from the nearest grocery store live in a food desert. Why aren't they shooting at each other? There must be a reason.

    The progressives seem to demand a full supermarket every 3 blocks or so. Most welfare and poor people have cars to drive 2 miles to the nearest supermarket. Or they have a friend from whom they can borrow a car.

    And of course there are no buses in the big cities where blacks live so they can’t get to the food market. That’s also why they can’t work and have to live on welfare. No cars buses or subways to get to work.

    Boo hoo boo hoo

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  60. @Polynikes
    I struggle to piece together how food deserts, access to SNAP , or anything food related is a social ill when one of the biggest health threats we face is obesity, especially among the poor (and stupid).

    Carpet-bomb the “communities” with organic broccoli (picked at dawn by robots that very morning). And rutabaga.
    Cheap enough, if it stops the hail of lead they’re forced, I tell you forced to fill their bellies with.

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  61. CCZ says:
    @istevefan
    Why do all these shootings in Chicago seem to happen on the weekend? Each week we hear nothing about Chicago shootings. And then every Monday we get a summary of what just happened over the previous 60 hours. The shootings seem so skewed over a 60 hour period.

    Some might argue that people work during the week and so they don't have time to shoot one another. But if they did have jobs, they probably would not be the type who engage in such behavior. My guess is the ones involved don't have high employment levels. If so why do they wait until the weekend? What difference does it make?

    Everything, yes EVERYTHING, that you might want to know about Chicago shootings and homicides, including day of the week statistics, cost statistics ($21,000 for the first 35 minutes of ER treatment, $800 per autopsy), shot zone lethality (136 KIA of 146 head shots but only 142 KIA of 404 torso shots), lots of lists and commentary, and an incident by incident photograph galley are at:

    https://heyjackass.com/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    "OK LaQuarious is it? We're sending you to the OR for surgery. It appears you have been shot in...the shlong. We will do everything we can to save your shlong! We have a dedicated team of expert staff working on you! Now just count backwards from 100. "

    "Y'all best save...da shlong.."
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  62. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    The obvious solution here is to publicly bus those poor people into better off areas so they can do some proper food shopping. How many NYT readers are up for that?

    Excellent idea! I suggest Park Slope Brooklyn and the upper West Side neighborhoods de blackio wants to bus in ghetto youth. It should be done on weekends when all the working people shop.

    Another suggestion is a Chinese neighborhood where the Chinese merchants are always being robbed by blacks.

    The only difference between a Chinese merchant and the black 75 IQ thug who robs him is what kind of crime they commit. They both are criminals. The Chinese commits fraud and other white collar crime. The black commits street crime

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  63. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Joe Stalin
    Apparently the illustrious NYT doesn't appreciate that a CTA bus fare + transfer = $2.25 + .25 =$2.50.

    The CTA transfer is good for an additional 2 trips and reverse riding is allowed. So you bring a backpack and shopping cart to Aldis when shopping and Voila! your "food desert" problem is mitigated. I see plenty of Black women shopping at Aldis with filled shopping carts waiting for the bus so this is SOP in Chicago.

    I don’t think the NYT reporters are aware that those carts exist.

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  64. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Clifford Brown
    Speaking of over policing, Chicago Police have broken out a sneaker "bait" truck in Englewood. Vice is on the case.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrsHJS7ELFQ



    By the way, there is a Whole Foods now in Englewood, but murders have not dropped in the surrounding area.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-whole-foods-englewood-opening-0929-biz-20160928-story.html

    I read about the bait truck. As soon as word got around the activitists revuns and thugs had a demonstration denouncing the racist police.

    No riot yet.

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  65. Dtbb says:
    @Anon
    Totally unrelated, but food deserts also seem to have very high crime rates. It's a baffling mystery.

    Assuming the high crime rates are mostly the doing of locals (and the opposite assumption implies that criminals commute to the absolute shittiest parts of town to ply their trade), then I propose a two-pronged solution. Simply:

    1.) Truck free food regularly into said food deserts. (I see a kind of militarized Meals-on-Wheels, with 2-inch-thick bullet proof glass.)

    2.) Move violent criminals to other neighborhoods, specifically ones which are safe and clean, and which have plentiful markets and eateries. (We might characterize such swaths as "criminal deserts.")

    A well-armed and trained populace in the "criminal desert" areas might very gladly welcome the presence of such criminals -- as guaranteed bythe Second Amendemnt -- provided those criminals stand out in some clear way, rather than blend in with the local population. (Not flimsy social constructs, but physical, linguistic or behavioral attributes.)

    Once dispatched, the former criminals would be very quickly processed (cleaned, trimmed, deep fried) and transported back, to further remedy the food deserts they so thoughtlessly and so callously created.

    It may not seem likely to happen, but hey, can't I also have a dream?

    Soylant Brown?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    Ewwww.
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  66. @Anon
    Totally unrelated, but food deserts also seem to have very high crime rates. It's a baffling mystery.

    Assuming the high crime rates are mostly the doing of locals (and the opposite assumption implies that criminals commute to the absolute shittiest parts of town to ply their trade), then I propose a two-pronged solution. Simply:

    1.) Truck free food regularly into said food deserts. (I see a kind of militarized Meals-on-Wheels, with 2-inch-thick bullet proof glass.)

    2.) Move violent criminals to other neighborhoods, specifically ones which are safe and clean, and which have plentiful markets and eateries. (We might characterize such swaths as "criminal deserts.")

    A well-armed and trained populace in the "criminal desert" areas might very gladly welcome the presence of such criminals -- as guaranteed bythe Second Amendemnt -- provided those criminals stand out in some clear way, rather than blend in with the local population. (Not flimsy social constructs, but physical, linguistic or behavioral attributes.)

    Once dispatched, the former criminals would be very quickly processed (cleaned, trimmed, deep fried) and transported back, to further remedy the food deserts they so thoughtlessly and so callously created.

    It may not seem likely to happen, but hey, can't I also have a dream?

    Some of it does happen; I have heard of Rahm sending in buses, filled with fruits and vegetables, to food deserts where the “nomads” can get their fill.
    I don’t know if it’s ongoing,but I know I read a story about this being done a couple of years or so ago.

    Read More
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  67. “Just follow the pronouns….
    WE need more jobs, thriving schools and better access to food. …
    “That’s what happens when YOU eliminate schools and allow food deserts to exist.”

    Yes, watch those pronouns: they can be fatal.

    Last exchange between the Lone Ranger and Tonto____

    Lone Ranger: “Look, Tonto, surrounded by hostile Indians. It looks like we are done for.”

    Tonto: “Waddya mean, ‘we’?”

    Read More
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  68. @CCZ
    Everything, yes EVERYTHING, that you might want to know about Chicago shootings and homicides, including day of the week statistics, cost statistics ($21,000 for the first 35 minutes of ER treatment, $800 per autopsy), shot zone lethality (136 KIA of 146 head shots but only 142 KIA of 404 torso shots), lots of lists and commentary, and an incident by incident photograph galley are at:

    https://heyjackass.com/

    “OK LaQuarious is it? We’re sending you to the OR for surgery. It appears you have been shot in…the shlong. We will do everything we can to save your shlong! We have a dedicated team of expert staff working on you! Now just count backwards from 100. ”

    “Y’all best save…da shlong..”

    Read More
    • Replies: @CCZ
    The web-site's statistics for 2018 show 25 "groin shot" victims among the 1,660 (January 1 to July 31) shot and wounded (all 25 lives saved, no mention of saved "junk"), with 10 of those 25 groin shots in July. Could this be a trend?
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  69. @Lot
    "In a place known as a food desert, where there are no jobs and too few opportunities to acquire skills, and where there are failing schools"

    Good description of my grandma's home town, still home to her sibling and my second cousins. Factory shut down, population way down, no higher ed of any sort, 100 year old high school is half empty and in poor physical shape.

    And yet, no violence. One of my HS dropout 2nd cousins makes about 40k as an ebay power seller. His wife does both telephone and online chat customer service for big companies from home, as well as baby sit. She has switched companies several times for more interesting and better paid CSR work, all of it remote.

    One of my HS dropout 2nd cousins makes about 40k as an ebay power seller. His wife does both telephone and online chat customer service for big companies from home, as well as baby sit. She has switched companies several times for more interesting and better paid CSR work, all of it remote.

    Your cousin and his wife sound far more intelligent than SWPLs who take on $100k in student loan debt to get useless degrees in Disabled Transgender Blatina Underwater Basketweaving Studies.

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  70. @Dtbb
    Soylant Brown?

    Ewwww.

    Read More
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  71. Anonymous[125] • Disclaimer says:

    ‘Food deserts’.

    Nevertheless inhabited by some very well fed, if not clinically obese, vultures.

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  72. Rapparee says:

    The general dumbness of the conventional wisdom in the Current Year is a recurrent subject here at iSteve, but let us not forget that the conventional wisdom of 1973 was often in a class of its own.

    All in the Family is fondly remembered by many as a TV “classic”, but most episodes are virtually unwatchable today for exactly this reason.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    All in the Family was #1 for 5 straight seasons, but, you are right, nobody can watch it anymore. Was it the show or the era?
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  73. @Anonymous
    Everything explained, in a single photograph

    https://i.warosu.org/data/fa/img/0064/19/1372580492838.jpg

    Walter “Clyde” Frazier’s JFM rookie box in mint condition is quite valuable.

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  74. CCZ says:
    @Father O'Hara
    "OK LaQuarious is it? We're sending you to the OR for surgery. It appears you have been shot in...the shlong. We will do everything we can to save your shlong! We have a dedicated team of expert staff working on you! Now just count backwards from 100. "

    "Y'all best save...da shlong.."

    The web-site’s statistics for 2018 show 25 “groin shot” victims among the 1,660 (January 1 to July 31) shot and wounded (all 25 lives saved, no mention of saved “junk”), with 10 of those 25 groin shots in July. Could this be a trend?

    Read More
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  75. @Rapparee

    The general dumbness of the conventional wisdom in the Current Year is a recurrent subject here at iSteve, but let us not forget that the conventional wisdom of 1973 was often in a class of its own.
     
    All in the Family is fondly remembered by many as a TV "classic", but most episodes are virtually unwatchable today for exactly this reason.

    All in the Family was #1 for 5 straight seasons, but, you are right, nobody can watch it anymore. Was it the show or the era?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rapparee
    A bit of both, probably. Stories about hot-button political controversies rarely age well, because the contentious issues change- "Whoever marries the spirit of this age will find himself a widower in the next". Working-class Americans in the 1890s loved heated debates about currency policy that would bore anybody but bow-tied Austrian-school goldbugs today. Even a genius like Dante can start to lose readers when he's off on a screed about 14th-century Florentine politics.

    The other problem was Norman Lear's apparent tone-deafness about ordinary Americans. As written, Archie is more a left-wing Jewish TV producer's cartoonish, caricatured idea of a working-class bigot than a realistic and well-studied depiction of one (particularly in early seasons). Carroll O'Connor's superb acting breathed life and realism into what was a somewhat implausible character on the page (and also papered over some dreadful groaners).
    , @JMcG
    There is nothing, and I mean nothing, that my Irish immigrant father liked better than watching All in the Family with his Irish immigrant cousin, with the possible exception of Sanford and Son.
    I was a kid then, but the slow changes over the years have made the modern world unrecognizable to the old.
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  76. This quote from Incarceration as Incapacitation in trying to explain current disproportionately high rate of black incarceration on felony charges:

    “Since prosecutors are elected at the county level, suburbanization has given residents outside of cities—for whom crime is no longer a main concern—a great deal of power over urban criminal justice. These suburban voters are often indifferent to calls for reform, and the racial composition of this arrangement may explain some of the inertia.”

    In other words, since 1975, blacks, who had formerly lived in relatively isolated enclaves in which they were subject to their own internally developed and enforced code of justice, were, due to the passage of the civil rights legislation in 1965, now to be integrated into the broader system of justice that reflected the prevailing white mentality and system of morality. And that shoe pinches.

    Seems to argue a case for segregation, not just by neighborhood but in administrative systems as well.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    “Since prosecutors are elected at the county level, suburbanization has given residents outside of cities—for whom crime is no longer a main concern—a great deal of power over urban criminal justice. These suburban voters are often indifferent to calls for reform, and the racial composition of this arrangement may explain some of the inertia.”
     
    Perhaps it goes without saying, but the last period with "calls for reform" and the consequent rise in crime led to suburbanization in the first place. Perhaps the crime of noticing is eclipsed only by the crime of remembering.
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  77. countenance says: • Website

    A local activist here in St. Louis is blaming black violent crime on the suspects and victims being in arrears on traffic tickets and traffic ticket warrants.

    ISYN.

    https://fox2now.com/2018/08/18/better-family-life-and-churches-seek-to-root-out-issues-that-cause-violence-in-the-community/

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  78. countenance says: • Website

    Speaking of “food deserts,” I came to the inferential conclusion, back in the days when “food deserts” were a hot issue, that, officially speaking, all a “food desert” was, was a populated census tract that lacked either a supermarket with a unionized workforce, or a Whole Paycheck / Trader Blows expensive yuppie medium box.

    Almost all of the populated census tracts in the St. Louis area that were officially defined as food deserts had plentiful access to and markets for food. It’s just that the Obama White House, being what it was, focused on labor unions and yuppies.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan d Mute

    all a “food desert” was, was a populated census tract that lacked either a supermarket with a unionized workforce, or a Whole Paycheck / Trader Blows expensive yuppie medium box
     
    You need to get out of St Fooey more brother. Here in Detriot, food only comes from fast feeders, government cheese delivery services, Chaldean mini-marts with 4” plexiglas protecting said Arabs from their historical eunuch slaves, and trips across the Oakland or Macomb County lines. Grosse Pointe is a Wayne County anomaly, but you can’t expect the Ford family’s servants to actually drive through Detriot to get kale for the boss can you? Late-Obama and post-Obama, the Freep claims there are now some actual grocers, but you and I know that will last about as long as it takes for the stores to be ransacked a few dozen times. Eventually an Eddie Lampert type will look at the excel spreadsheets and shut them down like a K-Mart or Sears in the ghetto.
    , @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Speaking of “food deserts,” I came to the inferential conclusion, back in the days when “food deserts” were a hot issue, that, officially speaking, all a “food desert” was, was a populated census tract that lacked either a supermarket with a unionized workforce, or a Whole Paycheck / Trader Blows expensive yuppie medium box.
     
    "Food Desert" is a misnomer. There's plenty of food in "Food Deserts" as evidenced by the fact that the people are the fattest there. To complete the analogy, it'd be as if people in the Arabian Desert or Sahara were the best hydrated on Earth.

    I think what is meant by "Food Desert" is "lack of fresh nutritious food due to low market demand and reluctance to risk capital in a theft/vandalism/riot prone area." In other words, black people's preferences are reflected in the food choices on offer in their neighborhoods and SJWs are hopping mad about it. Black people just won't hop on the Kale trend, and this bothers people for some reason.

    Paradoxically, in Philadelphia the so-called "Soda Tax" (which apparently includes zero calorie flavored drinks, so includes substantially all flavored drinks) is exacerbating existing "Food Deserts" as consumers shop at Supermarkets across the City Line where they buy not only their flavored drinks but their entire food orders, causing a pending economic catastrophe for the few remaining intrepid proprietors of grocery stores.
    , @Mark G.
    Here in Indianapolis the local SJWs opened a smaller copy of a Whole Foods type of grocery store in the worst black ghetto in the city. It struggled along for a few years and went under. The poor people in the area didn't want to buy health food and didn't want to pay the higher prices and just went a couple miles away to a Kroger. Local black activists tried to get them to stock and sell the type of food ghetto people actually eat but the store owners resisted. They wanted to try to force their own food philosophy on their potential customers. If they had given in and started selling cheap junk food a lot of it probably would have been stolen and they would have gone out of business for that reason instead. They had started the store with the assistance of a government grant so the taxpayers had to subsidize their stupid idea that was never going to work.
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  79. @Forbes
    Yup. All those shootings in Chicago are because neighborhoods are over-policed!

    But I'm a little confused--they eliminated schools? There are no schools for the students to attend? Did they blame Trump yet?

    So the explanation is that children are just wandering the streets shooting each other...

    I was wondering about the schools as well. I’m certain I and others here would have heard about it if a city the size of Chicago had eliminated schools altogether. I’m not worried about the students of course, in time like these we need to focus all our concern on the plight of the poor teachers and admins; they’re still getting paid I hope.

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  80. @countenance
    Speaking of "food deserts," I came to the inferential conclusion, back in the days when "food deserts" were a hot issue, that, officially speaking, all a "food desert" was, was a populated census tract that lacked either a supermarket with a unionized workforce, or a Whole Paycheck / Trader Blows expensive yuppie medium box.

    Almost all of the populated census tracts in the St. Louis area that were officially defined as food deserts had plentiful access to and markets for food. It's just that the Obama White House, being what it was, focused on labor unions and yuppies.

    all a “food desert” was, was a populated census tract that lacked either a supermarket with a unionized workforce, or a Whole Paycheck / Trader Blows expensive yuppie medium box

    You need to get out of St Fooey more brother. Here in Detriot, food only comes from fast feeders, government cheese delivery services, Chaldean mini-marts with 4” plexiglas protecting said Arabs from their historical eunuch slaves, and trips across the Oakland or Macomb County lines. Grosse Pointe is a Wayne County anomaly, but you can’t expect the Ford family’s servants to actually drive through Detriot to get kale for the boss can you? Late-Obama and post-Obama, the Freep claims there are now some actual grocers, but you and I know that will last about as long as it takes for the stores to be ransacked a few dozen times. Eventually an Eddie Lampert type will look at the excel spreadsheets and shut them down like a K-Mart or Sears in the ghetto.

    Read More
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  81. @ThreeCranes
    This quote from Incarceration as Incapacitation in trying to explain current disproportionately high rate of black incarceration on felony charges:

    “Since prosecutors are elected at the county level, suburbanization has given residents outside of cities—for whom crime is no longer a main concern—a great deal of power over urban criminal justice. These suburban voters are often indifferent to calls for reform, and the racial composition of this arrangement may explain some of the inertia.”

    In other words, since 1975, blacks, who had formerly lived in relatively isolated enclaves in which they were subject to their own internally developed and enforced code of justice, were, due to the passage of the civil rights legislation in 1965, now to be integrated into the broader system of justice that reflected the prevailing white mentality and system of morality. And that shoe pinches.

    Seems to argue a case for segregation, not just by neighborhood but in administrative systems as well.

    “Since prosecutors are elected at the county level, suburbanization has given residents outside of cities—for whom crime is no longer a main concern—a great deal of power over urban criminal justice. These suburban voters are often indifferent to calls for reform, and the racial composition of this arrangement may explain some of the inertia.”

    Perhaps it goes without saying, but the last period with “calls for reform” and the consequent rise in crime led to suburbanization in the first place. Perhaps the crime of noticing is eclipsed only by the crime of remembering.

    Read More
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  82. @countenance
    Speaking of "food deserts," I came to the inferential conclusion, back in the days when "food deserts" were a hot issue, that, officially speaking, all a "food desert" was, was a populated census tract that lacked either a supermarket with a unionized workforce, or a Whole Paycheck / Trader Blows expensive yuppie medium box.

    Almost all of the populated census tracts in the St. Louis area that were officially defined as food deserts had plentiful access to and markets for food. It's just that the Obama White House, being what it was, focused on labor unions and yuppies.

    Speaking of “food deserts,” I came to the inferential conclusion, back in the days when “food deserts” were a hot issue, that, officially speaking, all a “food desert” was, was a populated census tract that lacked either a supermarket with a unionized workforce, or a Whole Paycheck / Trader Blows expensive yuppie medium box.

    “Food Desert” is a misnomer. There’s plenty of food in “Food Deserts” as evidenced by the fact that the people are the fattest there. To complete the analogy, it’d be as if people in the Arabian Desert or Sahara were the best hydrated on Earth.

    I think what is meant by “Food Desert” is “lack of fresh nutritious food due to low market demand and reluctance to risk capital in a theft/vandalism/riot prone area.” In other words, black people’s preferences are reflected in the food choices on offer in their neighborhoods and SJWs are hopping mad about it. Black people just won’t hop on the Kale trend, and this bothers people for some reason.

    Paradoxically, in Philadelphia the so-called “Soda Tax” (which apparently includes zero calorie flavored drinks, so includes substantially all flavored drinks) is exacerbating existing “Food Deserts” as consumers shop at Supermarkets across the City Line where they buy not only their flavored drinks but their entire food orders, causing a pending economic catastrophe for the few remaining intrepid proprietors of grocery stores.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Historically upscale blacks like Louis Pops Armstrong were health food nuts, and I have worked with black females who were as well. I remember well one that grew watercress and talked incessantly about her colon cleanses, high colonics and yoni eggs and beads in front of everyone, female or male.
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  83. anonymous[341] • Disclaimer says:

    Three people were shot at a “peace rally” event. Something of a bad joke, one might suppose.

    We need more jobs, thriving schools and better access to food

    Totally clueless. Anyone who wants a job can get one. The ones without one are unemployable types, criminals, addicts, etc. Thriving schools? Hard to achieve where they’re all on welfare and score in the mentally subnormal range. Chicago has a regular and extensive public transportation system where people can conveniently hop on a bus and go shopping and be back in a reasonable length of time so this “food desert” claim is bogus. There’s a mental block involved here where blaming the gangbangers for their own actions is avoided. Instead we’re to look everywhere else but at the perpetrators.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    they’re all on welfare and score in the mentally subnormal range.

    Again, the share of the black population collecting TANF at any one time is around 3.5%. The share collecting SSI is around 4.5%. The share receiving Social Security Disability w/o SSI is 2.5%. As we speak, I think about 1% are in households collecting Unemployment. Close to 90% of them are not collecting cash transfers available to working-aged people.

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  84. A view from the Great White North:

    Up here, I have often argued with SJW’s that if poverty were itself a sufficient explanation for violent crime, then Newfoundland, historically one of the poorest provinces, should be awash in blood. However, that province has 1.32 homicides per 100,000 residents. Strange…Newfoundland also has a relatively homogeneous Irish and British population. The highest rates of violent crime are in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, where our First Nations make up a larger proportion of the population.

    Read More
    • Replies: @wrd9
    Yes, and we have an example in the US, white Appalachia, which is even poorer than the black inner cities and has a violent crime rate half of the US average. Go figure.

    Here's a blurb from a 2000 govt report regarding crime in schools. In comparison to the Violent Crime group...

    "This profile is in contrast to the schools in the No Crime group, which are, on average, much smaller (370 students per school), more likely to be located in rural areas (62%) and have a low percentage of minority students (mean of 12% per school). Surprisingly, these two groups of schools do not differ by the percentage of students that are eligible for free and reduced-price school lunch."

    https://www2.ed.gov/offices/OUS/PES/studies-school-violence/school-crime-pattern.pdf

    Frankly, not surprisingly.
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  85. MarcB. says:

    The Twinkie Defense applied to an entire population group. The MSM has moved well beyond Onion territory.

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  86. JMcG says:
    @Anon
    Totally unrelated, but food deserts also seem to have very high crime rates. It's a baffling mystery.

    Assuming the high crime rates are mostly the doing of locals (and the opposite assumption implies that criminals commute to the absolute shittiest parts of town to ply their trade), then I propose a two-pronged solution. Simply:

    1.) Truck free food regularly into said food deserts. (I see a kind of militarized Meals-on-Wheels, with 2-inch-thick bullet proof glass.)

    2.) Move violent criminals to other neighborhoods, specifically ones which are safe and clean, and which have plentiful markets and eateries. (We might characterize such swaths as "criminal deserts.")

    A well-armed and trained populace in the "criminal desert" areas might very gladly welcome the presence of such criminals -- as guaranteed bythe Second Amendemnt -- provided those criminals stand out in some clear way, rather than blend in with the local population. (Not flimsy social constructs, but physical, linguistic or behavioral attributes.)

    Once dispatched, the former criminals would be very quickly processed (cleaned, trimmed, deep fried) and transported back, to further remedy the food deserts they so thoughtlessly and so callously created.

    It may not seem likely to happen, but hey, can't I also have a dream?

    “Criminal deserts” is great, I’m stealing that one.

    Read More
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  87. I don’t live in Chicago’s inner city but I do live in the gentrified part of harlem. I have no car.

    I just get groceries delivered. I get whatever organic fancy stuff I want. I’m not sure why that service would be unavailable to section 8 residents.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    When the deliveryman brings your quinoa and kale chips,do you make a habit of jumping him and robbing him?
    , @Father O'Hara
    When the deliveryman brings your quinoa and kale chips,do you make a habit of jumping him and robbing him?
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  88. countenance says: • Website

    CPD has had to close a lot of schools in recent years, because of a combination of AFFH-style negro removal (which the NYT demands and supports), competition from charter schools, and the overall relatively recent reduction in black TFR.

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  89. @Little spoon
    I don’t live in Chicago’s inner city but I do live in the gentrified part of harlem. I have no car.

    I just get groceries delivered. I get whatever organic fancy stuff I want. I’m not sure why that service would be unavailable to section 8 residents.

    When the deliveryman brings your quinoa and kale chips,do you make a habit of jumping him and robbing him?

    Read More
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  90. @Little spoon
    I don’t live in Chicago’s inner city but I do live in the gentrified part of harlem. I have no car.

    I just get groceries delivered. I get whatever organic fancy stuff I want. I’m not sure why that service would be unavailable to section 8 residents.

    When the deliveryman brings your quinoa and kale chips,do you make a habit of jumping him and robbing him?

    Read More
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  91. Art Deco says:

    We need more jobs, thriving schools and better access to food.

    The employment-to-population ratio for whites is currently 0.607. That for blacks is 0.584. The ‘missing’ jobs are in number about 4% of the population of employed blacks or perhaps 6% of the population of employed blacks living in inner city concentrations. There’s room for improvement, but ‘lack of jobs’ isn’t why slum homicide rates exceed suburban homicide rates by 20-fold in greater Chicago. (By the same token, it doesn’t explain the related phenomenon of horrible disciplinary problems in Chicago’s schools).

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  92. Anon[221] • Disclaimer says:

    “They all eventually go belly up from theft by “customers” or employees.”

    The only supermarkets I know of in majority black areas are Wal Marts. The next time you happen to be in such an area, stop by and check it out. There will be marked security vans rolling around the parking lots, the door greeters will be security guards in disguise – all massive black guys – and the intercom will randomly announce fictitious security scans of all the aisles to scare the ghetto customers away from stealing things (as if they aren’t already recording all the aisles to begin with). Smaller grocery stores can’t hire a small military to protect their stuff, so they go out of business.

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    • Replies: @Dtbb
    I believe the last iteration I was talking about was actually a Walmart.
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  93. anon[393] • Disclaimer says:
    @Currahee
    So.....coppers back off and leave these poor people alone.

    Enough with this overpolicing:

    Just let them be themselves!

    Theyre not so much food deserts as food under glass as in bullet proof glass every hood has all sorts of food that has to be protected by bullet proof glass

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  94. J1234 says:

    I don’t know, I was pretty hungry at the movies the other day, so I bought a 2 oz. bag of Twix pieces. I felt a little jumpy after eating them. Don’t have diabetes…fasting blood sugar routinely 100. Other tests are normal, too. There might be a violent additive in that stuff. Thankfully nothing happened, but what if I’d eaten the really big bag of Malted Milk Balls?

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  95. Art Deco says:
    @anonymous
    Three people were shot at a "peace rally" event. Something of a bad joke, one might suppose.

    We need more jobs, thriving schools and better access to food
     
    Totally clueless. Anyone who wants a job can get one. The ones without one are unemployable types, criminals, addicts, etc. Thriving schools? Hard to achieve where they're all on welfare and score in the mentally subnormal range. Chicago has a regular and extensive public transportation system where people can conveniently hop on a bus and go shopping and be back in a reasonable length of time so this "food desert" claim is bogus. There's a mental block involved here where blaming the gangbangers for their own actions is avoided. Instead we're to look everywhere else but at the perpetrators.

    they’re all on welfare and score in the mentally subnormal range.

    Again, the share of the black population collecting TANF at any one time is around 3.5%. The share collecting SSI is around 4.5%. The share receiving Social Security Disability w/o SSI is 2.5%. As we speak, I think about 1% are in households collecting Unemployment. Close to 90% of them are not collecting cash transfers available to working-aged people.

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    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    Why the disparity between your numbers and these? Am I to believe some random pseudonymous dude named for Miami Beach gay design ethos or CIS and AmRen?

    https://www.amren.com/features/2015/10/welfare-whos-on-it-whos-not/
    , @Crew Cut Man
    Why do you report so many figures without any references?
    , @anonymous
    You are spouting nonsense unconnected to reality. In many Chicago public schools the entire black student population are receiving Food Stamps and Medicaid which are a form of welfare apart from TANF. Counting TANF only is misleading. Entire schools receive free lunches. Also, welfare recipients are clustered just as black violence happens mainly in certain zip codes. Knowing nothing about Chicago schools apparently doesn't keep some people from pretending to be authoritative by quoting some statistics.
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  96. Brutusale says:
    @RudyM
    It's not difficult to understand, since "food desert" doesn't usually refer to the complete absence of food, as I understand it, but rather the absence of relatively healthy foods. Being surrounded by cheap junk food of various sorts, and not much else, can obviously promote obesity.

    I can’t believe anyone seriously tries to make this argument. Have you ever noticed that the people paying for their groceries with the Little Blue Card (EBT for welfare in MA) stroll right past the fruit and vegetables on their way to loading 4 12-packs of soda and bags of sweet and salty snack food in their carts?

    They’re not deprived, they’re stupid.

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    • Agree: fish
    • Replies: @JMcG
    It’s how food stamp fraud works. They use their SNAP card to buy junk. They sell 100.00 worth of junk to the guy with the corner market for 40 or 50.00 in cash. The corner market guy marks it up to corner market prices and sells it to the kids of the folks with the SNAP cards.
    It’s the circle of life.
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  97. @Art Deco
    they’re all on welfare and score in the mentally subnormal range.

    Again, the share of the black population collecting TANF at any one time is around 3.5%. The share collecting SSI is around 4.5%. The share receiving Social Security Disability w/o SSI is 2.5%. As we speak, I think about 1% are in households collecting Unemployment. Close to 90% of them are not collecting cash transfers available to working-aged people.

    Why the disparity between your numbers and these? Am I to believe some random pseudonymous dude named for Miami Beach gay design ethos or CIS and AmRen?

    https://www.amren.com/features/2015/10/welfare-whos-on-it-whos-not/

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    I check the Social Security Administration and other government sites for whatever data they have on caseloads and the demographic breakdown on caseloads. Not sure where AmRen is looking.
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  98. wrd9 says:
    @Anon
    More food marts would open up if blacks didn't steal so much.

    What did blacks do to stores in Ferguson after Gentle Giant Michael Brown charged a cop and got killed?

    But never mind what blacks do. Just pretend they are innocent and hapless victims at every turn.

    Btw, I've been through many small towns, and sometimes, you gotta go a distance to find a decent food mart. I don't think Billy Bob goes around shooting Lyle because he's out of hotdogs.

    Trump’s budget proposal for 2019 mandates EBT recipients get half their benefits in “gubmint cheese”, meaning a box of staples.

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  99. @Art Deco
    they’re all on welfare and score in the mentally subnormal range.

    Again, the share of the black population collecting TANF at any one time is around 3.5%. The share collecting SSI is around 4.5%. The share receiving Social Security Disability w/o SSI is 2.5%. As we speak, I think about 1% are in households collecting Unemployment. Close to 90% of them are not collecting cash transfers available to working-aged people.

    Why do you report so many figures without any references?

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    I generally use Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Federal Reserve Banks, the Social Security Administration, HUD, and the Census Bureau. Of course, when I occasionally do provide citations, I get a sarcastic response.
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  100. wrd9 says:
    @AngloBerserkerJew
    A view from the Great White North:

    Up here, I have often argued with SJW's that if poverty were itself a sufficient explanation for violent crime, then Newfoundland, historically one of the poorest provinces, should be awash in blood. However, that province has 1.32 homicides per 100,000 residents. Strange...Newfoundland also has a relatively homogeneous Irish and British population. The highest rates of violent crime are in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, where our First Nations make up a larger proportion of the population.

    Yes, and we have an example in the US, white Appalachia, which is even poorer than the black inner cities and has a violent crime rate half of the US average. Go figure.

    Here’s a blurb from a 2000 govt report regarding crime in schools. In comparison to the Violent Crime group…

    “This profile is in contrast to the schools in the No Crime group, which are, on average, much smaller (370 students per school), more likely to be located in rural areas (62%) and have a low percentage of minority students (mean of 12% per school). Surprisingly, these two groups of schools do not differ by the percentage of students that are eligible for free and reduced-price school lunch.”

    https://www2.ed.gov/offices/OUS/PES/studies-school-violence/school-crime-pattern.pdf

    Frankly, not surprisingly.

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    • Replies: @AngloBerserkerJew
    Thanks for your comment. I was not aware of the stats in Appalachia. Very interesting.
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  101. gwynedd1 says:

    A lot of these people cannot spell so many will think that the blame is on ice cream, and cake.

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  102. JMcG says:
    @Brutusale
    I can't believe anyone seriously tries to make this argument. Have you ever noticed that the people paying for their groceries with the Little Blue Card (EBT for welfare in MA) stroll right past the fruit and vegetables on their way to loading 4 12-packs of soda and bags of sweet and salty snack food in their carts?

    They're not deprived, they're stupid.

    It’s how food stamp fraud works. They use their SNAP card to buy junk. They sell 100.00 worth of junk to the guy with the corner market for 40 or 50.00 in cash. The corner market guy marks it up to corner market prices and sells it to the kids of the folks with the SNAP cards.
    It’s the circle of life.

    Read More
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  103. Art Deco says:
    @Stan d Mute
    Why the disparity between your numbers and these? Am I to believe some random pseudonymous dude named for Miami Beach gay design ethos or CIS and AmRen?

    https://www.amren.com/features/2015/10/welfare-whos-on-it-whos-not/

    I check the Social Security Administration and other government sites for whatever data they have on caseloads and the demographic breakdown on caseloads. Not sure where AmRen is looking.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan d Mute

    Not sure where AmRen is looking.
     
    CIS was the source for AmRen.

    https://cis.org/sites/cis.org/files/camarota-welfare-final.pdf
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  104. Art Deco says:
    @Crew Cut Man
    Why do you report so many figures without any references?

    I generally use Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Federal Reserve Banks, the Social Security Administration, HUD, and the Census Bureau. Of course, when I occasionally do provide citations, I get a sarcastic response.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Johann Ricke

    I generally use Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Federal Reserve Banks, the Social Security Administration, HUD, and the Census Bureau. Of course, when I occasionally do provide citations, I get a sarcastic response.
     
    The number of food stamp recipients alone was over 44m in 2016. The first item on the USDA website provides a link, entitled "National Level Annual Summary", to a PDF file showing various stats on food stamp disbursements:
    https://www.fns.usda.gov/pd/supplemental-nutrition-assistance-program-snap
    https://fns-prod.azureedge.net/sites/default/files/pd/SNAPsummary.pdf
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  105. Maybe they should ease up on food trucks

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  106. Rod1963 says:

    Food deserts they say. Mostly it’s a result of blacks being black.

    Look no one, not even Asians want to open up a supermarket in a black neighborhood. Too much downside to it. Your employees will be beaten and or robbed on a routine basis. Pilferage will be off the charts.

    I look at the convenience stores in my town’s seedy areas(high desert outside of LA). The clerks are protected by 2 inches of Lexan. The local Vallarta has armed security. Self-checkout has been tried and failed out here.

    When blacks started making the ER a major stop on Friday and Saturday nights. The hospital had to put in metal detectors and guards at the entrance to keep out the Dindus.

    Lets not forget about the black habit of eating and running out of a restaurant without paying. The eateries are lucky there are still enough paying customers to offset the blackness.

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  107. Olorin says:
    @Polynikes
    I struggle to piece together how food deserts, access to SNAP , or anything food related is a social ill when one of the biggest health threats we face is obesity, especially among the poor (and stupid).

    Setting aside the fact that Tamar Manasseh is a rabbi….

    https://www.facebook.com/jewishdailyforward/posts/tamar-manasseh-uses-her-power/10153804970747447/

    It has nothing to do with food, or deserts, or whatever.

    It has to do with a vast army of academic and government and foundation and private sector nutritionists, public healthists, social workers, teachers, and other Nanny Staters continually prowling for topics to revive and extend their careers overseeing and expanding the welfare state and guaranteeing trillion-dollar profits to Big Pharma (which owns much of Big Ag).

    It has to do with food as power, as control. “In the end they will lay their freedom at our feet and say, ‘Make us your slaves–but feed us.’” While posing as altruism and equity and concern and worry and anti-racism and busting the glass ceiling and feeding the poor and caring about the sick.

    Here’s one example for the uninitiated:

    Within days of Obama being sworn in in 2009, and with money from the Farm Bill, the National Academies/NRC held a big pricey “Public health effects of food deserts” workshop, when this topic was still relatively new to the US (it was imported from Tony Blair’s UK about ten years previously).

    Then, as these folks tend to do, they published a big fat report on it.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK208019/

    There are literally thousands of these critters ensconced in these jobs, and they have to justify their existence. Scroll down here to “related books” to see what passes as “food systems” “research”…while supplying these Establishment players with big bucks, travel budgets, conference junkets, jobs for life with cadillac benefits, etc.

    https://www.nap.edu/catalog/12623/the-public-health-effects-of-food-deserts-workshop-summary

    Bazillions of dollars, dissertations, research papers, press releases, reports, words, careers, grants, programs, projects, and workshops/conferences…

    …about what to do about stupid fat children and the lard-ass adults who engender them, for gods’ sake.

    This is simply monetarization and politicization of denial of population genetics. That lucrative state religion that rewards those who can avoid the obvious and preach the latest PC catechism of avoidance, denial, and faith in the impossible.

    Just for the heck of it, and to further give the uninitiated a sense of how vast and robust this Establishment is, below is the list of people credited with just this one (of many thousands annually) report.

    The revolving door between their various programs, departments, institutions, corporations, granting agencies, and media outlets spins quickly. Outlets like the NYT are effectively a house organ/newsletter for them.

    They are resistant to concepts like race and IQ (and life itself being an IQ test) precisely because it so potently endangers their institutional/Establishment edifice and their lucrative blind faith.

    Now imagine that we had even a fraction of this presence looking at actual science on race and IQ and personal/societal/civilizational outcomes. Sadly, it seems to be going the other way.

    [MORE]

    PLANNING COMMITTEE ON THE PUBLIC HEALTH EFFECTS OF FOOD DESERTS *
    • BARRY M. POPKIN (Chair), Director, UNC Interdisciplinary Obesity Program, The Carla Smith Chamblee Distinguished Professor of Global Nutrition, School of Public Health Professor, Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

    [MORE]

    • ANA V. DIEZ ROUX, Professor, Epidemiology Director, Center for Integrative Approaches to Health Disparities, Associate Director, Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor
    • JOEL GITTELSOHN, Associate Professor, Center for Human Nutrition, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins University, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
    • BARBARA A. LARAIA, Assistant Professor, Division of Prevention Sciences, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
    • ROBIN A. MCKINNON, Health Policy Specialist, Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch Applied Research Program, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland
    • JOSEPH R. SHARKEY, Associate Professor, Social and Behavioral Health, Director, Texas Healthy Aging Research Network, Director, Program for Research in Nutrition and Health Disparities, School of Rural Public Health, Texas A&M Health Science Center, College Station, Texas

    Study Staff
    • PEGGY TSAI, Study Director
    • JANET MULLIGAN, Research Associate
    • HEATHER BREINER, Program Associate
    • PAULA TARNAPOL WHITACRE, Consultant Science Writer
    • LINDA D. MEYERS, Food and Nutrition Board Director
    • ROBIN A. SCHOEN, Director, Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources

    FOOD AND NUTRITION BOARD *
    • DENNIS M. BIER (Chair), Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Houston, Texas
    • MICHAEL P. DOYLE (Vice Chair), Center for Food Safety, University of Georgia, Griffin
    • DIANE BIRT, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Iowa State University, Ames
    • YVONNE BRONNER, School of Public Health and Policy, Morgan State University, Baltimore, Maryland
    • FERGUS M. CLYDESDALE, Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
    • RICHARD J. DECKELBAUM, Institute of Human Nutrition, Columbia University, New York
    • GORDON L. JENSEN, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park
    • REYNALDO MARTORELL, Department of Global Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
    • SUSAN T. MAYNE, Division of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
    • SANFORD A. MILLER, Center for Food, Nutrition, and Agriculture Policy, University of Maryland, College Park
    • J. GLENN MORRIS, JR., Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore
    • SUZANNE P. MURPHY, Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, University of Hawaii, Honolulu
    • JOSE M. ORDOVAS, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts
    • MARTIN A. PHILBERT, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
    • JIM E. RIVIERE, Center for Chemical Toxicology Research and Pharmacokinetics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh
    • PATRICK J. STOVER, Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York
    • WALTER C. WILLETT, Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts

    Staff
    • LINDA D. MEYERS, Director
    • GERALDINE KENNEDO, Administrative Assistant
    • ANTON L. BANDY, Financial Associate

    BOARD ON AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES
    • W. REG GOMES (Chair), University of California (emeritus), Oakland
    • PEGGY F. BARLETT, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
    • ROGER N. BEACHY, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, Missouri
    • HAROLD L. BERGMAN, University of Wyoming, Laramie
    • H.H. CHENG, University of Minnesota (emeritus), St. Paul
    • RICHARD A. DIXON, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, Oklahoma
    • DANIEL M. DOOLEY, University of California, Oakland
    • JOAN H. EISEMANN, North Carolina State University, Raleigh
    • GARY F. HARTNELL, Monsanto Company, St. Louis, Missouri
    • GENE HUGOSON, Minnesota Department of Agriculture, St. Paul
    • KIRK C. KLASING, University of California, Davis
    • VICTOR L. LECHTENBERG, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
    • PHILLIP E. NELSON, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
    • ROBERT PAARLBERG, Wellesley College, Watertown, Massachusetts
    • KEITH PITTS, Marrone Organic Innovations, Davis, California
    • CHARLES W. RICE, Kansas State University, Manhattan
    • HAL SALWASSER, Oregon State University, Corvallis
    • PEDRO A. SANCHEZ, The Earth Institute, Columbia University, Palisades, New York
    • NORMAN R. SCOTT, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York
    • ROGER A. SEDJO, Resources for the Future, Washington, DC
    • KATHLEEN SEGERSON, University of Connecticut, Storrs
    • MERCEDES VAZQUEZ-AÑON, Novus International, Inc., St. Charles, Missouri

    Staff
    • ROBIN A. SCHOEN, Director
    • KAREN L. IMHOF, Administrative Assistant
    • AUSTIN J. LEWIS, Senior Program Officer
    • EVONNE P.Y. TANG, Senior Program Officer
    • PEGGY TSAI, Program Officer
    • CAMILLA YANDOC ABLES, Associate Program Officer
    • KARA N. LANEY, Associate Program Officer
    • RUTH S. ARIETI, Research Associate
    • JANET M. MULLIGAN, Research Associate
    • KAMWETI MUTU, Research Associate
    • ERIN P. MULCAHY, Senior Program Assistant

    BOARD ON POPULATION HEALTH AND PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE
    • JAMES W. CURRAN (Chair), Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
    • MARGARITA ALEGRÍA, Cambridge Health Alliance, Somerville, Massachusetts
    • SUSAN M. ALLAN, University of Washington, Seattle
    • GEORGES C. BENJAMIN, American Public Health Association, Washington, DC
    • BOBBIE A. BERKOWITZ, University of Washington, Seattle
    • DAN G. BLAZER, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
    • DAVID R. CHALLONER, University of Florida, Gainesville
    • R. ALTA CHARO, University of Wisconsin, Madison
    • JOSE JULIO ESCARCE, UCLA Med-GIM & HSR, Los Angeles, California
    • HOWARD HU, University of Michigan Schools of Public Health and Medicine, Ann Arbor
    • MATTHEW W. KREUTER, Washington University in Saint Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
    • MARGARET E. O’KANE, National Committee for Quality Assurance, Washington, DC
    • GEORGE W. RUTHERFORD, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco
    • SUSAN L. SANTOS, University of Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey, Medford, Massachusetts
    • MARTIN JOSE SEPULVEDA, International Business Machines Corporation, Somers, New York
    • SAMUEL SO, Stanford University, Stanford, California
    • ANTONIA M. VILLARRUEL, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor
    • PAUL J. WALLACE, The Permanente Federation, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California
    • GINA M. WINGOOD, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia

    Read More
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  108. Mark G. says:
    @countenance
    Speaking of "food deserts," I came to the inferential conclusion, back in the days when "food deserts" were a hot issue, that, officially speaking, all a "food desert" was, was a populated census tract that lacked either a supermarket with a unionized workforce, or a Whole Paycheck / Trader Blows expensive yuppie medium box.

    Almost all of the populated census tracts in the St. Louis area that were officially defined as food deserts had plentiful access to and markets for food. It's just that the Obama White House, being what it was, focused on labor unions and yuppies.

    Here in Indianapolis the local SJWs opened a smaller copy of a Whole Foods type of grocery store in the worst black ghetto in the city. It struggled along for a few years and went under. The poor people in the area didn’t want to buy health food and didn’t want to pay the higher prices and just went a couple miles away to a Kroger. Local black activists tried to get them to stock and sell the type of food ghetto people actually eat but the store owners resisted. They wanted to try to force their own food philosophy on their potential customers. If they had given in and started selling cheap junk food a lot of it probably would have been stolen and they would have gone out of business for that reason instead. They had started the store with the assistance of a government grant so the taxpayers had to subsidize their stupid idea that was never going to work.

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  109. @Art Deco
    I check the Social Security Administration and other government sites for whatever data they have on caseloads and the demographic breakdown on caseloads. Not sure where AmRen is looking.

    Not sure where AmRen is looking.

    CIS was the source for AmRen.

    https://cis.org/sites/cis.org/files/camarota-welfare-final.pdf

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  110. anonymous[341] • Disclaimer says:
    @Art Deco
    they’re all on welfare and score in the mentally subnormal range.

    Again, the share of the black population collecting TANF at any one time is around 3.5%. The share collecting SSI is around 4.5%. The share receiving Social Security Disability w/o SSI is 2.5%. As we speak, I think about 1% are in households collecting Unemployment. Close to 90% of them are not collecting cash transfers available to working-aged people.

    You are spouting nonsense unconnected to reality. In many Chicago public schools the entire black student population are receiving Food Stamps and Medicaid which are a form of welfare apart from TANF. Counting TANF only is misleading. Entire schools receive free lunches. Also, welfare recipients are clustered just as black violence happens mainly in certain zip codes. Knowing nothing about Chicago schools apparently doesn’t keep some people from pretending to be authoritative by quoting some statistics.

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  111. @Art Deco
    I generally use Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Federal Reserve Banks, the Social Security Administration, HUD, and the Census Bureau. Of course, when I occasionally do provide citations, I get a sarcastic response.

    I generally use Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Federal Reserve Banks, the Social Security Administration, HUD, and the Census Bureau. Of course, when I occasionally do provide citations, I get a sarcastic response.

    The number of food stamp recipients alone was over 44m in 2016. The first item on the USDA website provides a link, entitled “National Level Annual Summary”, to a PDF file showing various stats on food stamp disbursements:

    https://www.fns.usda.gov/pd/supplemental-nutrition-assistance-program-snap

    https://fns-prod.azureedge.net/sites/default/files/pd/SNAPsummary.pdf

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    His original post was weasel worded : CASH benefits. Food stamps don't count as cash, although to me they are - I pay for my order with a credit card and every black person in Philadelphia pays for hers with an EBT card and it works the same except I have to pay my credit card bill and they don't.
    , @Art Deco
    About 30% of the population qualifies for SNAP (ne Food Stamps) and ancillary nutritional programs. IIRC, the mean provision per beneficiary household is about $300 a month. These programs supplement household earnings. They do not replace household earnings, which is the purpose of the cash transfer programs I listed. (Housing subsidies have a much smaller clientele than grocery subsidies).

    As for Medicaid, about 30% of expenditure finances nursing homes and like custodial care. A great chunk of the remainder finances medical care for low-wage workers who work for companies whose work force has a lot of turnover or is too small to form an actuarial pool which will make medical benefits a feasible cost. That's s labor market subset composed largely of young people. The Medicaid beneficiary population is disproportionately black. The propensity to enroll exceeds that of non-blacks by 1.78 to 1.

    (At one time, 'welfare' was shorthand for "Aid to Families with Dependent Children" (AFDC), a federal program, and state 'general relief' programs; both dated from the Depression and by 1995 or thereabouts the propensity of blacks to enroll exceeded the non-black population by 6 to 1; TANF, their successor, has a smaller clientele and proportionately fewer blacks. You had 6 million blacks enrolled in AFDC &c in 1995, out of a population of 32 million blacks. Today, you have about 1.4 million blacks enrolled in TANF, out of a population of 41 million blacks).

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  112. Rapparee says:
    @Steve Sailer
    All in the Family was #1 for 5 straight seasons, but, you are right, nobody can watch it anymore. Was it the show or the era?

    A bit of both, probably. Stories about hot-button political controversies rarely age well, because the contentious issues change- “Whoever marries the spirit of this age will find himself a widower in the next“. Working-class Americans in the 1890s loved heated debates about currency policy that would bore anybody but bow-tied Austrian-school goldbugs today. Even a genius like Dante can start to lose readers when he’s off on a screed about 14th-century Florentine politics.

    The other problem was Norman Lear’s apparent tone-deafness about ordinary Americans. As written, Archie is more a left-wing Jewish TV producer’s cartoonish, caricatured idea of a working-class bigot than a realistic and well-studied depiction of one (particularly in early seasons). Carroll O’Connor’s superb acting breathed life and realism into what was a somewhat implausible character on the page (and also papered over some dreadful groaners).

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  113. @wrd9
    Yes, and we have an example in the US, white Appalachia, which is even poorer than the black inner cities and has a violent crime rate half of the US average. Go figure.

    Here's a blurb from a 2000 govt report regarding crime in schools. In comparison to the Violent Crime group...

    "This profile is in contrast to the schools in the No Crime group, which are, on average, much smaller (370 students per school), more likely to be located in rural areas (62%) and have a low percentage of minority students (mean of 12% per school). Surprisingly, these two groups of schools do not differ by the percentage of students that are eligible for free and reduced-price school lunch."

    https://www2.ed.gov/offices/OUS/PES/studies-school-violence/school-crime-pattern.pdf

    Frankly, not surprisingly.

    Thanks for your comment. I was not aware of the stats in Appalachia. Very interesting.

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  114. Ugh. I live near a small rural town that was officially designated a “food desert.” The town is literally ten minutes drive from a Super Walmart in one direction and five minutes from an IGA in another.

    However, the designation led to a grant to fund a little half-assed produce stand outside a gas station in town. The county newspaper touted it in its typical “regurgitate the press release” formula.

    I complained to the newspaper how bogus the “food desert” designation was, and what a waste of tax dollars the grant was, but they didn’t care. All they do is fellate the government in their articles.

    The same small town is now getting grant money for a grocery.

    There is a good reason the area doesn’t have any more grocery stores than it does: there aren’t enough people to support one. The money will just go to waste propping up a business that can’t survive on its own. Until the money runs out.

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  115. JMcG says:
    @Steve Sailer
    All in the Family was #1 for 5 straight seasons, but, you are right, nobody can watch it anymore. Was it the show or the era?

    There is nothing, and I mean nothing, that my Irish immigrant father liked better than watching All in the Family with his Irish immigrant cousin, with the possible exception of Sanford and Son.
    I was a kid then, but the slow changes over the years have made the modern world unrecognizable to the old.

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  116. Jack D says:

    His original post was weasel worded : CASH benefits. Food stamps don’t count as cash, although to me they are – I pay for my order with a credit card and every black person in Philadelphia pays for hers with an EBT card and it works the same except I have to pay my credit card bill and they don’t.

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  117. Jack D says:
    @Johann Ricke

    I generally use Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Federal Reserve Banks, the Social Security Administration, HUD, and the Census Bureau. Of course, when I occasionally do provide citations, I get a sarcastic response.
     
    The number of food stamp recipients alone was over 44m in 2016. The first item on the USDA website provides a link, entitled "National Level Annual Summary", to a PDF file showing various stats on food stamp disbursements:
    https://www.fns.usda.gov/pd/supplemental-nutrition-assistance-program-snap
    https://fns-prod.azureedge.net/sites/default/files/pd/SNAPsummary.pdf

    His original post was weasel worded : CASH benefits. Food stamps don’t count as cash, although to me they are – I pay for my order with a credit card and every black person in Philadelphia pays for hers with an EBT card and it works the same except I have to pay my credit card bill and they don’t.

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    • Replies: @Crew Cut Man
    Thanks to both of you for the extended analysis. I will be more skeptical henceforth.
    , @Art Deco
    His original post was weasel worded :

    Quit projecting.


    If you want a comprehensive description of cross subsidies available, you'd have to run through old age Social Security (whose beneficiary population is less black than the general population), Medicare (ditto), berths in public schools, low-interest student loans, You'd also have to run through programs with much smaller expenditures or clientele: housing vouchers (an obsession on these boards), any ancillary cross-subsidies to higher education, the public defender's office, the Legal Services Corporation, the foster care system, subsidies to public transit, the Indian affairs apparat, tax credits and tax deduction for this and that (e.g. mortgage interest). There are subsidies everywhere you turn. He said 'welfare'. That has a conventional usage, which is cash for the working-aged and their dependents.



    Food stamps don’t count as cash, although to me they are – I pay for my order with a credit card and every black person in Philadelphia pays for hers with an EBT card and it works the same except I have to pay my credit card bill and they don’t.

    About 2/3 of the black population isn't enrolled in SNAP. It's a federal program, so I don't imagine things are any different around Philly.

    For 17 years I got my groceries at a store right down the road from a trailer park. I'm told by the Food and Nutrition Service that about 15% of all the non-black households in this country are enrolled in SNAP, and Central New York certainly isn't a peculiarly affluent area. I think I remember people paying for things with Food Stamps and then EBT cards. Or maybe I don't. A number of you seem to be shlepping around to supermarkets frequented by slum blacks in order to take note of people paying with things with funny money. Rather like Mme. Defarge.
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  118. Anonymous[278] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Speaking of “food deserts,” I came to the inferential conclusion, back in the days when “food deserts” were a hot issue, that, officially speaking, all a “food desert” was, was a populated census tract that lacked either a supermarket with a unionized workforce, or a Whole Paycheck / Trader Blows expensive yuppie medium box.
     
    "Food Desert" is a misnomer. There's plenty of food in "Food Deserts" as evidenced by the fact that the people are the fattest there. To complete the analogy, it'd be as if people in the Arabian Desert or Sahara were the best hydrated on Earth.

    I think what is meant by "Food Desert" is "lack of fresh nutritious food due to low market demand and reluctance to risk capital in a theft/vandalism/riot prone area." In other words, black people's preferences are reflected in the food choices on offer in their neighborhoods and SJWs are hopping mad about it. Black people just won't hop on the Kale trend, and this bothers people for some reason.

    Paradoxically, in Philadelphia the so-called "Soda Tax" (which apparently includes zero calorie flavored drinks, so includes substantially all flavored drinks) is exacerbating existing "Food Deserts" as consumers shop at Supermarkets across the City Line where they buy not only their flavored drinks but their entire food orders, causing a pending economic catastrophe for the few remaining intrepid proprietors of grocery stores.

    Historically upscale blacks like Louis Pops Armstrong were health food nuts, and I have worked with black females who were as well. I remember well one that grew watercress and talked incessantly about her colon cleanses, high colonics and yoni eggs and beads in front of everyone, female or male.

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    I appreciate the way your last sentence was graduated so that midway through it I knew I wasn't going to finish it, much less look up the meanings of the words.
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  119. Dtbb says:
    @Anon
    "They all eventually go belly up from theft by “customers” or employees."

    The only supermarkets I know of in majority black areas are Wal Marts. The next time you happen to be in such an area, stop by and check it out. There will be marked security vans rolling around the parking lots, the door greeters will be security guards in disguise - all massive black guys - and the intercom will randomly announce fictitious security scans of all the aisles to scare the ghetto customers away from stealing things (as if they aren't already recording all the aisles to begin with). Smaller grocery stores can't hire a small military to protect their stuff, so they go out of business.

    I believe the last iteration I was talking about was actually a Walmart.

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  120. @Anonymous
    Historically upscale blacks like Louis Pops Armstrong were health food nuts, and I have worked with black females who were as well. I remember well one that grew watercress and talked incessantly about her colon cleanses, high colonics and yoni eggs and beads in front of everyone, female or male.

    I appreciate the way your last sentence was graduated so that midway through it I knew I wasn’t going to finish it, much less look up the meanings of the words.

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  121. @Jack D
    His original post was weasel worded : CASH benefits. Food stamps don't count as cash, although to me they are - I pay for my order with a credit card and every black person in Philadelphia pays for hers with an EBT card and it works the same except I have to pay my credit card bill and they don't.

    Thanks to both of you for the extended analysis. I will be more skeptical henceforth.

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  122. Art Deco says:
    @Johann Ricke

    I generally use Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Federal Reserve Banks, the Social Security Administration, HUD, and the Census Bureau. Of course, when I occasionally do provide citations, I get a sarcastic response.
     
    The number of food stamp recipients alone was over 44m in 2016. The first item on the USDA website provides a link, entitled "National Level Annual Summary", to a PDF file showing various stats on food stamp disbursements:
    https://www.fns.usda.gov/pd/supplemental-nutrition-assistance-program-snap
    https://fns-prod.azureedge.net/sites/default/files/pd/SNAPsummary.pdf

    About 30% of the population qualifies for SNAP (ne Food Stamps) and ancillary nutritional programs. IIRC, the mean provision per beneficiary household is about $300 a month. These programs supplement household earnings. They do not replace household earnings, which is the purpose of the cash transfer programs I listed. (Housing subsidies have a much smaller clientele than grocery subsidies).

    As for Medicaid, about 30% of expenditure finances nursing homes and like custodial care. A great chunk of the remainder finances medical care for low-wage workers who work for companies whose work force has a lot of turnover or is too small to form an actuarial pool which will make medical benefits a feasible cost. That’s s labor market subset composed largely of young people. The Medicaid beneficiary population is disproportionately black. The propensity to enroll exceeds that of non-blacks by 1.78 to 1.

    (At one time, ‘welfare’ was shorthand for “Aid to Families with Dependent Children” (AFDC), a federal program, and state ‘general relief’ programs; both dated from the Depression and by 1995 or thereabouts the propensity of blacks to enroll exceeded the non-black population by 6 to 1; TANF, their successor, has a smaller clientele and proportionately fewer blacks. You had 6 million blacks enrolled in AFDC &c in 1995, out of a population of 32 million blacks. Today, you have about 1.4 million blacks enrolled in TANF, out of a population of 41 million blacks).

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  123. Art Deco says:
    @Jack D
    His original post was weasel worded : CASH benefits. Food stamps don't count as cash, although to me they are - I pay for my order with a credit card and every black person in Philadelphia pays for hers with an EBT card and it works the same except I have to pay my credit card bill and they don't.

    His original post was weasel worded :

    Quit projecting.

    If you want a comprehensive description of cross subsidies available, you’d have to run through old age Social Security (whose beneficiary population is less black than the general population), Medicare (ditto), berths in public schools, low-interest student loans, You’d also have to run through programs with much smaller expenditures or clientele: housing vouchers (an obsession on these boards), any ancillary cross-subsidies to higher education, the public defender’s office, the Legal Services Corporation, the foster care system, subsidies to public transit, the Indian affairs apparat, tax credits and tax deduction for this and that (e.g. mortgage interest). There are subsidies everywhere you turn. He said ‘welfare’. That has a conventional usage, which is cash for the working-aged and their dependents.

    Food stamps don’t count as cash, although to me they are – I pay for my order with a credit card and every black person in Philadelphia pays for hers with an EBT card and it works the same except I have to pay my credit card bill and they don’t.

    About 2/3 of the black population isn’t enrolled in SNAP. It’s a federal program, so I don’t imagine things are any different around Philly.

    For 17 years I got my groceries at a store right down the road from a trailer park. I’m told by the Food and Nutrition Service that about 15% of all the non-black households in this country are enrolled in SNAP, and Central New York certainly isn’t a peculiarly affluent area. I think I remember people paying for things with Food Stamps and then EBT cards. Or maybe I don’t. A number of you seem to be shlepping around to supermarkets frequented by slum blacks in order to take note of people paying with things with funny money. Rather like Mme. Defarge.

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