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NYT: Ellis Island Represents Not "An American Idea" But "The American Idea"
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From my column today in Taki’s Magazine on the Establishment’s response to Rep. Steve King’s blunt truths: “Frantic Yelling Ensued.”

Screenshot 2017-03-15 17.15.38

Not “an American idea,” but “the American idea.”

 
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  1. Somebody should make Mr. (((Cohen))) read George Washington’s 1796 Farewell Address to learn something about the American ideas of the Founders:

    “The name of American, which belongs to you in your national capacity, must always exalt the just pride of patriotism more than any appellation derived from local discriminations. With slight shades of difference, you have the same religion, manners, habits, and political principles.

    …Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me, fellow-citizens!) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake, since history and experience prove that foreign influence is one of the most baneful foes of republican government.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Well as the NYT taught us this week, old George was a slave owner, so he's not someone we should admire in any way.
    , @Harold
    ‘I conjure you to believe me, fellow-citizens!’

    Or, as Trump would say, ‘Believe me! Believe me!’

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  2. To be fair, that’s about all that Cohen can fit in the limited bandwidth of his brain.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Cohen has a brain? Do you have data to support that assertion? I doubt that he does. The better explanation is that Cohen is a Caenorhabditis Elegans that gets paid for reactivity.
  3. When I was growing up as a small child in East Asia, my conception of America was shaped by references to the Mayflower, the Revolutionary War (“Valley Forge”!), cowboys and Indians movies, tales of settlers (e.g. Little House on the Prairie) and what have you. To this day, that still remains in my mental construct of the United States. It’s only after I came to the U.S. that I was inundated by what Mr. Sailer calls the Ellis Island schmaltz.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Yo, Twinkie, I responded (#107) to your question in a recent thread (in case you missed it). Reply there if you want.
    , @drahthaar
    I grew up in SoCal, with pioneer farmers and ministers, train men and civil engineers as forebears. They were Anglo-American in mind and soul, unconflicted about their heritage, and proud of their achievements. I only encountered Ellis Island schmaltz, intransigent ethnicity, and full-blown nation of immigrants idea when I moved East to graduate school and then settled in NYC.

    It is bubbe and cream soda on the Lower East Side, hollow-eyed seamstresses slaving in deathtraps, and children crammed into tenements where the American story begins, never Valley Forge or Gettysburg, nor Erie Canal or Transcontinental Railroad. The social hierarchy and political culture that preceded late 19th c. migration from eastern and southern Europe is something to overcome and reform.

    , @Anonymous
    "When I was growing up as a small child in East Asia, my conception of America was shaped by references to the Mayflower, the Revolutionary War (“Valley Forge”!), cowboys and Indians movies, tales of settlers (e.g. Little House on the Prairie) and what have you. To this day, that still remains in my mental construct of the United States. It’s only after I came to the U.S. that I was inundated by what Mr. Sailer calls the Ellis Island schmaltz."

    This was my conception of America, too, as a child growing up here! I actually never really heard much about this Ellis Island scmaltz until fairly recent years. Or, I think whenever I heard about it when I was younger it seemed like something that happened at one point in the past and now was over. It also seemed of far less importance than the things you mentioned.
    , @ogunsiron
    As a kid in LBV, America was about cowboys, indians, Davey Crockett, Little house on the prairie and black slavery like in Roots. Nope, we definitely were not aware of the america for whom purim is a mainstream holiday. Nope, we were quite ignorant of the "this american life" side of things.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    I'd be interested if you could say more about that as, living in Japan, I have encountered widespread familiarity with Ellis Island schmaltz combined with widespread ignorance of the aspects of national mythos you mention. (Even among Europeans I know here, knowledge of US domestic history is pretty thin until the post-WWII era.)

    How were you educated?
  4. If Ellis Island (i.e. Inviting the World) is the American idea, what was the American idea before Ellis Island?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Nazi Germany West.

    Either that, or very White Bread.

    , @Desiderius
    Canaan
    , @Barnard
    The country was over 100 years old when Ellis Island opened and English settlements begin over 150 years before that. To them, it is still invite the world because all those settlers came from somewhere else.
    , @syonredux

    If Ellis Island (i.e. Inviting the World) is the American idea, what was the American idea before Ellis Island?
     
    Before Ellis Island, America was without form and void......
    , @SPMoore8
    Msnifest Destiny
    , @Chrisnonymous
    Obviously, since the Founding Fathers came over on the Mayflower, the American Idea has always been that America is open to anyone who wants to escape their old lives.

    Also, as we all learn in the public school system, the Native Americans didn't believe in ownership and just wanted to share all the land with anyone who came here. So, the American Idea actually predates the USA and is more foundational than the Constitution.

    Unfortunately, some of the Founding Fathers burned witches, some hunted Indians to extinction, some owned slaves, and some were not gay. Later on, they also put Japanese people in concentration camps.

    So, you can see the American Idea is good but white people are bad. Duh.
    , @Mike Zwick
    A gleam in Tevye's eye.
  5. @Lord Jeff Sessions
    If Ellis Island (i.e. Inviting the World) is the American idea, what was the American idea before Ellis Island?

    Nazi Germany West.

    Either that, or very White Bread.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    France gave us the Statue of Liberty in 1886, six years before Ellis Island opened. And the 20th Century became "the American Century" mostly because of the ideas and inventions of the descendants of pre-Ellis Island Americans (the airplane, the telephone, the telegraph, all of the inventions of Thomas Edison, etc.).

    But Roger Cohen, the descendant of Ellis Island Jews, declares Ellis Island "the American Idea" because that's how his ancestors got here. I suppose a lot of Asians will declare Hart-Cellar "the American Idea" because that's how their ancestors got here, and Latinos will declare Simpson-Mazzoli "the American Idea" because that's how their ancestors got here.

    Blacks could call the Civil War "the American Idea," since that freed their ancestors - if they were inclined to give whites any credit at all, which they aren't. If you have any emotional attachment to the Southern cause in that war (which I don't) I suppose there's a delicious vindication in the facts that blacks have no gratitude for all the white Union Army soldiers who died on their behalf.
  6. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Apparently, there was no America prior to Ellis Island.

    Speaking of ‘fascism’(meaning supremacist imperialism), more immigration meant more fulfillment of Manifest(or Manifascist) Destiny and more ‘genocide’ of Indians. Nazi-like!!

    Also, if ‘fascism’ is imperialism, Mexico was created by Latin-European ‘fascist’ conquest of native peoples, and then SW territories of Mexico was taken by American ‘white supremacist fascist imperialists’. And more immigration meant more nazi-like Lebenraum conquest of native indigenous peoples.

    Read More
  7. @Dr. X
    Somebody should make Mr. (((Cohen))) read George Washington's 1796 Farewell Address to learn something about the American ideas of the Founders:

    "The name of American, which belongs to you in your national capacity, must always exalt the just pride of patriotism more than any appellation derived from local discriminations. With slight shades of difference, you have the same religion, manners, habits, and political principles.

    ...Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me, fellow-citizens!) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake, since history and experience prove that foreign influence is one of the most baneful foes of republican government."

    Well as the NYT taught us this week, old George was a slave owner, so he’s not someone we should admire in any way.

    Read More
  8. Dear Mr. Cohen, My grandparents, both paternal and maternal came to America and landed and were processed through Ellis Island. Notice I said they were processed through Ellis, as was the procedure at that time. They came here legally, found jobs and raised families and played by the book. My grandparents spoke Italian and some broken English. My parents and their siblings spoke English and broken Italian and took advantage of the Buffalo Public Schools, all graduating from HS. Myself, my brother and all of my cousins only spoke English and almost all, if not all, have graduated from college. The reason my grandparents came to America was because the country was growing and expanding, still westward, and workers were needed. Not everyone welcomed them but they endured. They survived the Great Depression and my father and five of my uncles fought in WWII. The “idea” was to become Americans. I don’t know your family’s history in America, but it probably mirrors mine. The real American Idea is to play by the rules and respect our laws. There is also nothing wrong in being proud to be an American.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Elli
    Although not Italian myself, I've been inside my home town's local Italian Club. Painted on the wall: Crossed American and Italian flags, and the slogan Proudly Italian, 100% American. In English. And now that the old paisans have mostly passed on, their children don't even use the place any more. They are American.
    , @Mark F.
    "The real American Idea is to play by the rules and respect our laws. " Well yes, but most people have literally no way of legally immigrating to the U.S. It's disingenuous to suggest you just "wait in line." There is no line for most. That may or may not be good policy, but there were fewer restrictions 100 years ago.
  9. @Lord Jeff Sessions
    If Ellis Island (i.e. Inviting the World) is the American idea, what was the American idea before Ellis Island?

    Canaan

    Read More
  10. Steve, evidence of leapfrogging loyalties from Bernard-Henri Levy

    http://diversitymachtfrei.blogspot.com/2017/03/bhl-i-feel-closer-to-afghan-than-to.html

    But I certainly feel closer to an Afghan or a democratic Kurd than to a French person who votes for the Front National.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    My guess is that BHL is consciously inverting a well known quote from Raymond Aron: "I feel closer to a French anti-Semite than I do to a Yemeni Jew."
    , @JerryC
    Very noble. But the feeling may not be mutual!
    , @Ben tillman
    That's not really leapfrogging.
    , @Autochthon
    I call bullshit; people like this idiot never move to Afghanistan, which they would if their solidarity with the Afghan people were sincere.
    , @ogunsiron
    BHL also feels closer to ukranian nazoids like Svoboda than to the FN. Weird isn't it ?
  11. @Twinkie
    When I was growing up as a small child in East Asia, my conception of America was shaped by references to the Mayflower, the Revolutionary War ("Valley Forge"!), cowboys and Indians movies, tales of settlers (e.g. Little House on the Prairie) and what have you. To this day, that still remains in my mental construct of the United States. It's only after I came to the U.S. that I was inundated by what Mr. Sailer calls the Ellis Island schmaltz.

    Yo, Twinkie, I responded (#107) to your question in a recent thread (in case you missed it). Reply there if you want.

    Read More
  12. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    What is this ‘American Idea’?

    If it is freedom, then other nations can have the idea by having democracy. And democracy has spread all over the world. So, why not enjoy Americanism there?

    Is the American Idea about the dominant majority population being replaced by new peoples? How can you have any continuous civilization that way when every dominant group soon fade and are replaced by new people of different race and culture?

    Is America about constant remaking and reinvention and replacement? Whites take over from Indians. Browns take over from whites. Yellows take over from browns. Africans take over from yellows. and etc. etc.

    But, that is hardly a new idea. It’s what happened in the Near East as one civilization got buried under new ones. What happened to the Sumerians, Babylonians, Hittites, Phoenicians, Byzatines, Turks, and etc? They got replaced by new civilizations. And eventually, the original Ancient Egyptians got buried under other invaders. So, if America is about New People coming to take over and become the new majority, it’s hardly a novel idea. It happened too many times in history.

    And why pretend that this ‘idea’ is unique to USA? Same thing happened in Latin America. Also, since Latin America is more diverse — and whites are already minority — , I suggest every prog move there since they claim Diversity will be even better when whites become minorities. (Funny, those browns wanna move ot US where whites are still the majority.)

    I don’t know, but I think Chinese like the idea that they’ve had a continuous history by one people on the same territory. And Persian-Iranians too. And Russians. And Japanese. Why is it a good thing for a people to go from majority to minority? Just ask the Palestinians. Just ask the Serbs in Kosovo.

    So, this ‘American Idea’ is NOTHING NEW. Massive displacements of peoples and demographic eclipse has been happening all throughout history… mostly tragically.

    But then, I don’t trust Cohen. Cohen says whites should graciously accept their demographic and cultural decline and demise to make way for the new since that is so ‘American’. You’d think this applies to everyone, including Jews who, one day, plan to graciously hand over their elite domination of America to non-white gentiles such as Hindus, Chinese, and Muslims.
    But seriously, are Jews willing to relinquish their own power and fade away too into the sunset? No, the reason why Jews want more diversity is to MAKE PERMANENT their elite supremacist power. They figure gentile diversity will prevent any unity among gentiles to challenge Jewish power and agenda.

    So, even though Cohen mocks white folks for being sour-grapes for not accepting change and decline graciously — apparently, it is Nazi-like to want to survive — , his people are not willing to let go of Jewish elite power in the US and Jewish supremacist power in Israel/Palestine. If anything, they want more diversity to guarantee Jewish elite domination for as long as possible.

    Cohen tells white people, “let other people take your place and be gracious about it”, but his agenda is “ensure eternal Jewish mastery over America by using diversity to prevent any united challenge to Jewish elite power.”

    Btw, Nazi Germans should have been a bit more clever. When they were invading Russia with the aim to replace native Russians, they should have condemned Russia resistance as ‘nazi’ and ‘fascist’. Imagine the nerve of those Slavic a**holes. Apparently, they believe that someone else’s babies cannot replace Russian babies in the preservation of the Russian motherland.
    Damn fools! Rotten Russian Nazis.

    I mean look at Israel. Jews took over from Palestinians, and Jewish babies have done a wonderful job of preserving Palestinian identity and culture. So, Palestinians need not have worried about losing Palestine because other people’s babies will not care about and carry the torch of Palestinian-hood.

    Read More
  13. @Drake
    Steve, evidence of leapfrogging loyalties from Bernard-Henri Levy

    http://diversitymachtfrei.blogspot.com/2017/03/bhl-i-feel-closer-to-afghan-than-to.html

    But I certainly feel closer to an Afghan or a democratic Kurd than to a French person who votes for the Front National.
     

    My guess is that BHL is consciously inverting a well known quote from Raymond Aron: “I feel closer to a French anti-Semite than I do to a Yemeni Jew.”

    Read More
  14. @Lord Jeff Sessions
    If Ellis Island (i.e. Inviting the World) is the American idea, what was the American idea before Ellis Island?

    The country was over 100 years old when Ellis Island opened and English settlements begin over 150 years before that. To them, it is still invite the world because all those settlers came from somewhere else.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    English settlements begin over 150 years before that.
     
    Based on that tenuous excuse, and with Mr. Sailer's forbearance...

    https://youtu.be/grNqazfyDkc
  15. @Lord Jeff Sessions
    If Ellis Island (i.e. Inviting the World) is the American idea, what was the American idea before Ellis Island?

    If Ellis Island (i.e. Inviting the World) is the American idea, what was the American idea before Ellis Island?

    Before Ellis Island, America was without form and void……

    Read More
  16. @Lord Jeff Sessions
    If Ellis Island (i.e. Inviting the World) is the American idea, what was the American idea before Ellis Island?

    Msnifest Destiny

    Read More
  17. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lurker
    If automation is really the coming thing then why do we need to import a horde of unskilled 3rd worlders?
    , @Bill B.
    I just happened to have listened to that 'automation' podcast and looked up the mentioned Acemoglu paper - which should be thrust deep up Merkel's nose.

    Aging economies DO NOT decline the evidence shows, probably because this stimulates automation.

    http://economics.mit.edu/files/12536
  18. Off-topic:

    The Atlantic talks about the deep roots of Dutch “Islamophobia”:

    There has been some progress. The Dutch government has begun paying modest reparations to some of the widows of Indonesians executed during the Netherlands’s attempt to recolonize Indonesia after World War II. But this is only a first step. “We tend to discover new cruelties in our colonial past and then instantly forget it so next year there is a new revelation and new discovery. It’s a very structural amnesia.” Contributing to this amnesia is the fact that only a small number of Indonesians moved to the Netherlands after the 1960s, making the country’s colonial legacy even less apparent, Nordholt said.

    The takeaway: It’s always a good thing when ethnies with grudges are not fellow citizens….

    https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2017/03/netherlands-geert-wilders-islam-election-empire/519648/

    Read More
  19. @Desiderius
    To be fair, that's about all that Cohen can fit in the limited bandwidth of his brain.

    Cohen has a brain? Do you have data to support that assertion? I doubt that he does. The better explanation is that Cohen is a Caenorhabditis Elegans that gets paid for reactivity.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    Those 302 neurons must be working some serious overtime.
  20. @Twinkie
    When I was growing up as a small child in East Asia, my conception of America was shaped by references to the Mayflower, the Revolutionary War ("Valley Forge"!), cowboys and Indians movies, tales of settlers (e.g. Little House on the Prairie) and what have you. To this day, that still remains in my mental construct of the United States. It's only after I came to the U.S. that I was inundated by what Mr. Sailer calls the Ellis Island schmaltz.

    I grew up in SoCal, with pioneer farmers and ministers, train men and civil engineers as forebears. They were Anglo-American in mind and soul, unconflicted about their heritage, and proud of their achievements. I only encountered Ellis Island schmaltz, intransigent ethnicity, and full-blown nation of immigrants idea when I moved East to graduate school and then settled in NYC.

    It is bubbe and cream soda on the Lower East Side, hollow-eyed seamstresses slaving in deathtraps, and children crammed into tenements where the American story begins, never Valley Forge or Gettysburg, nor Erie Canal or Transcontinental Railroad. The social hierarchy and political culture that preceded late 19th c. migration from eastern and southern Europe is something to overcome and reform.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sid
    Grew up in NorCal and had a similar experience. A lot of it was playing Oregon Trail, but the stories of the 49ers and going to their old forts instilled pride that I lived in a nation of... settlers.
  21. The Dutch voted today they’d rather be dead than offend Islam.

    They will again have a Merkel situation with a “conservative” party leader in charge who relies mostly on left wing votes.

    What was really depressing is that it was not even close. Wilders was crushed and even did worse than the combined hard left parties.

    Le Pen is probably going to lose too, but at least she will come close to winning.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Matra
    If I'm reading the results right Denk, the new Muslim party, actually got slightly more votes in Amsterdam than PVV (Wilders).
    , @Anonymous

    Carl Bildt‏ @carlbildt

    Is there an anti-Trump wave in Europe? Yes, that seems to be the case. Saw it in Austria. Stronger in Netherlands.

     

    How much of the loss is European anti-Trump snobbery, or worries about how Brexit is working out? Supposedly Wilders tanked in the opinion polls in December after supporting Trump.
    , @dfordoom

    Le Pen is probably going to lose too, but at least she will come close to winning.
     
    The bad news is that it's very unlikely that she'll go anywhere near to winning.

    Nationalist anti-immigration parties have very little political appeal in western Europe. They cause too much badfeelz.
    , @Anonymous Nephew
    I'd have thought the biggest story of the Dutch elections is the eclipse of the Dutch Labour Party - from about 38 seats in 2012 to 8. Wilders' party is up from 15 to 20 - a 33% increase.

    Media control makes such a difference. Imagine if a patriotic administration had done what Rutte's done, sending in the police to break up Muslim demonstrations and towing a Turkish minister's car back to the frontier! I know how the BBC and Guardian would have reacted, instead of the sober and factual coverage. And notice the usual far-left suspects didn't take to the streets protesting 'Islamophobia'.
    , @LondonBob
    Wilders is a weirdo with odd connections to US based Zionists. A normal guy without the Muslim obsession and sane economic policies, the Euro and EU is a disaster but continentals want reform, but otherwise the same platform would do a lot better. Same reason pre scandal Fillon was set to win the French Presidency but Marine never will.
  22. @Buffalo Joe
    Dear Mr. Cohen, My grandparents, both paternal and maternal came to America and landed and were processed through Ellis Island. Notice I said they were processed through Ellis, as was the procedure at that time. They came here legally, found jobs and raised families and played by the book. My grandparents spoke Italian and some broken English. My parents and their siblings spoke English and broken Italian and took advantage of the Buffalo Public Schools, all graduating from HS. Myself, my brother and all of my cousins only spoke English and almost all, if not all, have graduated from college. The reason my grandparents came to America was because the country was growing and expanding, still westward, and workers were needed. Not everyone welcomed them but they endured. They survived the Great Depression and my father and five of my uncles fought in WWII. The "idea" was to become Americans. I don't know your family's history in America, but it probably mirrors mine. The real American Idea is to play by the rules and respect our laws. There is also nothing wrong in being proud to be an American.

    Although not Italian myself, I’ve been inside my home town’s local Italian Club. Painted on the wall: Crossed American and Italian flags, and the slogan Proudly Italian, 100% American. In English. And now that the old paisans have mostly passed on, their children don’t even use the place any more. They are American.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Elli, Every time my mother tried to teach me some Italian, I would say "Mom, I'm American."
  23. Who triggered Roger Rabid?

    Cohen,when asked what was his most embarrassing moment:

    “Arriving in India as the New York Times foreign editor without a visa.
    I had assumed that I didn’t need one.
    It took our bureau chief there several hours to extricate me from Indian bureaucracy.

    I felt like an idiot.”

    Cohen on his father:

    “When my father was about to emigrate from South Africa to England in the 1950s, a friend of the family suggested that a change of name was in order because it would be unwise to pursue his career in Britain while called “Cohen.”*

    * Which means that Cohens did pretty well during peak-apartheid in South Africa, no?

    Cohen continues:

    My Dad, a young doctor, said he would think it over. A few days later he announced to the friend that he had decided to make the change.

    “To what?” she asked with satisfaction.

    “Einstein,” he deadpanned.

    And so Sydney Cohen came to London and in time had the title of Commander of the Order of the British Empire (C.B.E.) bestowed upon him by the queen, and was named a fellow of the Royal Society (founded 1660), and, most important to him, became a member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    most important to him, became a member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews
     
    Seriously?

    No one tell Steve.
    , @celt darnell
    Well trust me, Cohen's repaid us handsomely for all of the above.

    You can read his anti-British screeds on a regular basis in the NY Times...
    , @Desiderius
    The dad sounds like a reasonably impressive dude.

    The son wasn't content with regressing to the mean, instead crashing clear through to the other extreme.

    Evidently trying to keep up with the Sulzbergers.
  24. @Drake
    Steve, evidence of leapfrogging loyalties from Bernard-Henri Levy

    http://diversitymachtfrei.blogspot.com/2017/03/bhl-i-feel-closer-to-afghan-than-to.html

    But I certainly feel closer to an Afghan or a democratic Kurd than to a French person who votes for the Front National.
     

    Very noble. But the feeling may not be mutual!

    Read More
  25. The problem is the Dutch economy. It’s doing reasonably well, despite the immigration problems. For example, Holland currently runs a fairly large trade surplus. In contrast, Britain and the US have significant economic problems (including chronic trade deficits).

    The economic situation is France is pretty bad, so Le Pen has a much stronger chance of winning. With their managerial instincts the middle classes will only vote for change if a country is doing badly on a number of levels.

    Read More
  26. Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Actually, the deep state is the American idea.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-founders-might-actually-have-liked-the-deep-state/2017/03/15/0b8951ca-08e0-11e7-93dc-00f9bdd74ed1_story.html?utm_term=.a68f5e9cabd7
     

    That op-ed was certainly a tendentious, and fallacious, interpretation of American history. Sure, the founding fathers would have been cool with government bureaucrat busy-bodies intruding themselves in every facet of American life.

    WaPo has really become the broadsheet of "The Resistance" (how pathetic that liberals now take their cues from sh**ty Star Wars movies). The comments are correspondingly unhinged. If you were to play a drinking game of taking a shot everytime someone uses the word "fascist", you'd be drunk by the third comment down.

  27. @Drake
    Steve, evidence of leapfrogging loyalties from Bernard-Henri Levy

    http://diversitymachtfrei.blogspot.com/2017/03/bhl-i-feel-closer-to-afghan-than-to.html

    But I certainly feel closer to an Afghan or a democratic Kurd than to a French person who votes for the Front National.
     

    That’s not really leapfrogging.

    Read More
  28. @bored identity
    Who triggered Roger Rabid?

    Cohen,when asked what was his most embarrassing moment:



    "Arriving in India as the New York Times foreign editor without a visa.
    I had assumed that I didn't need one.
    It took our bureau chief there several hours to extricate me from Indian bureaucracy.

    I felt like an idiot."

     

    Cohen on his father:



    "When my father was about to emigrate from South Africa to England in the 1950s, a friend of the family suggested that a change of name was in order because it would be unwise to pursue his career in Britain while called “Cohen.”*

     

    * Which means that Cohens did pretty well during peak-apartheid in South Africa, no?

    Cohen continues:



    My Dad, a young doctor, said he would think it over. A few days later he announced to the friend that he had decided to make the change.

    “To what?” she asked with satisfaction.

    “Einstein,” he deadpanned.

    And so Sydney Cohen came to London and in time had the title of Commander of the Order of the British Empire (C.B.E.) bestowed upon him by the queen, and was named a fellow of the Royal Society (founded 1660), and, most important to him, became a member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews."

     

    most important to him, became a member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews

    Seriously?

    No one tell Steve.

    Read More
    • LOL: res
    • Replies: @Paul Walker Most beautiful man ever...
    "most important to him, became a member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews"
    Thank goodness they let Cohen in. We wouldn't hear the end of it otherwise.
  29. @Drake
    Steve, evidence of leapfrogging loyalties from Bernard-Henri Levy

    http://diversitymachtfrei.blogspot.com/2017/03/bhl-i-feel-closer-to-afghan-than-to.html

    But I certainly feel closer to an Afghan or a democratic Kurd than to a French person who votes for the Front National.
     

    I call bullshit; people like this idiot never move to Afghanistan, which they would if their solidarity with the Afghan people were sincere.

    Read More
  30. @drahthaar
    I grew up in SoCal, with pioneer farmers and ministers, train men and civil engineers as forebears. They were Anglo-American in mind and soul, unconflicted about their heritage, and proud of their achievements. I only encountered Ellis Island schmaltz, intransigent ethnicity, and full-blown nation of immigrants idea when I moved East to graduate school and then settled in NYC.

    It is bubbe and cream soda on the Lower East Side, hollow-eyed seamstresses slaving in deathtraps, and children crammed into tenements where the American story begins, never Valley Forge or Gettysburg, nor Erie Canal or Transcontinental Railroad. The social hierarchy and political culture that preceded late 19th c. migration from eastern and southern Europe is something to overcome and reform.

    Grew up in NorCal and had a similar experience. A lot of it was playing Oregon Trail, but the stories of the 49ers and going to their old forts instilled pride that I lived in a nation of… settlers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Oregon Trail is actually the last gasp of the frontier mythos in my opinion.

    My brother grew up with Oregon Trail, but really it was his only connection to the frontier. The game had some status in my house because my parents could relate to it. My brother was probably aware of some acknowledgement of the game's premise being based in US history, but I don't think he had any other sources of media to draw images or narratives from to form concrete ideas about the game. His children's books, for example, were all about the natural world or inane fantasies.

    I'm ten years older than he is, and I caught the tail end of the period when Disney specials were on TV. I have memories of seeing Davey Crocket on TV and Little House on the Prairie was on in syndication. Some of my children's books were about cowboys.

    So, between my childhood and my brother's, the Wild West and the frontier mythos exited popular children's entertainments. I can't imagine a game like Oregon Trail today.

    Why the frontier exited entertainment is an open question, but I observe that parallel changes were taking place. For example: (1) the replacement of "frontier-style" camping with nylon dome tents and small propane stoves; (2) the restriction by parents of children's freedom to roam their communities; (3) the replacement of "building" as a past-time via blocks or via dad's tools with non-construction amusements. The frontier mythos appealed to a sense of liberty, but it also appealed to a desire to meet challenges. I suspect the general elimination from children's lives of the idea of difficulty as somewhat desirable made frontier themes a losing proposition for toys, books, movies, etc.
  31. It’s basically Semites vs. Whites. Or desert revolutionists and their orc irregulars vs. everyone else.

    Round 1 went to the Semites (Rome, per Gibbon).

    Round 2? Things have been looking down since Napoleon, and especially so since World War Two.

    Today two orcs (“Snoop Dogg” and “Bow Wow”), no doubt at the bidding of their Presbyterian masters, urged fellow orcs to shoot Trump and promised to “pimp” his wife. You may be reasonably sure that many of the inhabitants of Brooklyn, New York threw a tiny party in their hearts over this (to use a figure from that echt American, Ben Hecht).

    Those darn hypocritical liberals!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kylie
    "Things have been looking down since Napoleon, and especially so since World War Two."

    I'm glad to see someone else recognize that things started looking down a lot earlier than the 1960s, the 1930s or 100 hundred years ago.
  32. @Lot
    The Dutch voted today they'd rather be dead than offend Islam.

    They will again have a Merkel situation with a "conservative" party leader in charge who relies mostly on left wing votes.

    What was really depressing is that it was not even close. Wilders was crushed and even did worse than the combined hard left parties.

    Le Pen is probably going to lose too, but at least she will come close to winning.

    If I’m reading the results right Denk, the new Muslim party, actually got slightly more votes in Amsterdam than PVV (Wilders).

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  33. @Barnard
    The country was over 100 years old when Ellis Island opened and English settlements begin over 150 years before that. To them, it is still invite the world because all those settlers came from somewhere else.

    English settlements begin over 150 years before that.

    Based on that tenuous excuse, and with Mr. Sailer’s forbearance…

    Read More
  34. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Lot
    The Dutch voted today they'd rather be dead than offend Islam.

    They will again have a Merkel situation with a "conservative" party leader in charge who relies mostly on left wing votes.

    What was really depressing is that it was not even close. Wilders was crushed and even did worse than the combined hard left parties.

    Le Pen is probably going to lose too, but at least she will come close to winning.

    Carl Bildt‏ @carlbildt

    Is there an anti-Trump wave in Europe? Yes, that seems to be the case. Saw it in Austria. Stronger in Netherlands.

    How much of the loss is European anti-Trump snobbery, or worries about how Brexit is working out? Supposedly Wilders tanked in the opinion polls in December after supporting Trump.

    Read More
  35. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Twinkie
    When I was growing up as a small child in East Asia, my conception of America was shaped by references to the Mayflower, the Revolutionary War ("Valley Forge"!), cowboys and Indians movies, tales of settlers (e.g. Little House on the Prairie) and what have you. To this day, that still remains in my mental construct of the United States. It's only after I came to the U.S. that I was inundated by what Mr. Sailer calls the Ellis Island schmaltz.

    “When I was growing up as a small child in East Asia, my conception of America was shaped by references to the Mayflower, the Revolutionary War (“Valley Forge”!), cowboys and Indians movies, tales of settlers (e.g. Little House on the Prairie) and what have you. To this day, that still remains in my mental construct of the United States. It’s only after I came to the U.S. that I was inundated by what Mr. Sailer calls the Ellis Island schmaltz.”

    This was my conception of America, too, as a child growing up here! I actually never really heard much about this Ellis Island scmaltz until fairly recent years. Or, I think whenever I heard about it when I was younger it seemed like something that happened at one point in the past and now was over. It also seemed of far less importance than the things you mentioned.

    Read More
  36. @Twinkie
    When I was growing up as a small child in East Asia, my conception of America was shaped by references to the Mayflower, the Revolutionary War ("Valley Forge"!), cowboys and Indians movies, tales of settlers (e.g. Little House on the Prairie) and what have you. To this day, that still remains in my mental construct of the United States. It's only after I came to the U.S. that I was inundated by what Mr. Sailer calls the Ellis Island schmaltz.

    As a kid in LBV, America was about cowboys, indians, Davey Crockett, Little house on the prairie and black slavery like in Roots. Nope, we definitely were not aware of the america for whom purim is a mainstream holiday. Nope, we were quite ignorant of the “this american life” side of things.

    Read More
  37. @Drake
    Steve, evidence of leapfrogging loyalties from Bernard-Henri Levy

    http://diversitymachtfrei.blogspot.com/2017/03/bhl-i-feel-closer-to-afghan-than-to.html

    But I certainly feel closer to an Afghan or a democratic Kurd than to a French person who votes for the Front National.
     

    BHL also feels closer to ukranian nazoids like Svoboda than to the FN. Weird isn’t it ?

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  38. Read More
  39. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    What were we all about before Ellis Island?

    (Besides Manifest Destiny and many other big 19th C. ideas…..)

    Columbia was the national female personage instead of the Statue of Liberty.

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  40. I think Steve has said that for most of American history, the idea of the Frontier has balanced and even overshadowed the idea of the Immigrant in defining what it means to be an American. A lot of the problem we’re encountering is the lack of a counterweight.

    Read More
  41. @Lot
    The Dutch voted today they'd rather be dead than offend Islam.

    They will again have a Merkel situation with a "conservative" party leader in charge who relies mostly on left wing votes.

    What was really depressing is that it was not even close. Wilders was crushed and even did worse than the combined hard left parties.

    Le Pen is probably going to lose too, but at least she will come close to winning.

    Le Pen is probably going to lose too, but at least she will come close to winning.

    The bad news is that it’s very unlikely that she’ll go anywhere near to winning.

    Nationalist anti-immigration parties have very little political appeal in western Europe. They cause too much badfeelz.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    Unemployment never went higher than 11% in Western Europe, while it went above 25% for a time in Spain, the people went far-left to Podemos. CultMarx is much more entrenched and featherbedded in media/academia. You also don't have a FoxNews/talk radio, and evangelical Protestants.

    Should Le Pen score above 35%, that's the best result the FN has ever received. They got 27% in the 2015 regional elections.

    France has it's elections for the Assemble Nationale (lower house) right after the Presidential, rather than the same time. The FN might run up the middle if the other parties don't all agree to back Macron's party.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    Trump's victory, which some thought would paved the way for the victory of nationalist parties in Europe, may have done the opposite. The explosion of rage and panic on the Left here may have alarmed the Europeans. I don't know, just speculating.
    , @Lot
    I think she will outperform polls and get 42-46% in the second round.

    She has time on her side. Her worst demographic is over 65 age group by a crazy margin.
    , @Ragno
    Backdate this a year, and replace "Le Pen" with "Trump" or "Brexit".
  42. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    https://www.amren.com/news/2017/03/mexico-confront-xenophobic-past/

    ROTFL

    I don’t know what is parody anymore.

    Yeah, cuz China had a long history of honoring foreign devils.

    Chinese, they would never do anything like build a wall.

    So, Mexico should have been more like Tibet. LOL

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Mostly agree with this caveat:

    For what it is worth, China has had an assimilation notion for thousands of years including the notion of "cooked barbarians" with Confucianism, with the notion that as foreigners absorb the proper values, they become more able to fit in and become Chinese. She had to be, since like most large nations, she was effectively multicultural by default - Han is really an admixture, to be honest, though these days only the Northern and Southern differences are worth noting. North/South stereotypes and baiting continues lightly to this day: the height and personality differences are real.


    Its just that the bar of Chinese assimilation has always been exceptionally high, often assumed multigenerational.

  43. American population growth was fueled by having large families. Constance Hopkins, the 16-year old who came on the Mayflower, had at least 72 grandchildren.

    Read More
  44. @Twinkie
    When I was growing up as a small child in East Asia, my conception of America was shaped by references to the Mayflower, the Revolutionary War ("Valley Forge"!), cowboys and Indians movies, tales of settlers (e.g. Little House on the Prairie) and what have you. To this day, that still remains in my mental construct of the United States. It's only after I came to the U.S. that I was inundated by what Mr. Sailer calls the Ellis Island schmaltz.

    I’d be interested if you could say more about that as, living in Japan, I have encountered widespread familiarity with Ellis Island schmaltz combined with widespread ignorance of the aspects of national mythos you mention. (Even among Europeans I know here, knowledge of US domestic history is pretty thin until the post-WWII era.)

    How were you educated?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Twinkie

    I’d be interested if you could say more about that as, living in Japan, I have encountered widespread familiarity with Ellis Island schmaltz combined with widespread ignorance of the aspects of national mythos you mention.
     
    My own experience is from 40+ years ago. Much of East Asia today is blanketed with modern American mass media products that are drenched in the Ellis Island mythos.

    How were you educated?
     
    By very traditional parents who loved America, the old America, that is. My father had me watch "The Alamo" multiple times when I was little.
  45. Fun fact: Roger Cohen was naturalized as a US citizen about three years ago.

    Levels of chutzpah that, by now, we should be embarrassed to have thought were impossible.

    Read More
    • Replies: @celt darnell
    Good -- that means you're stuck with him.

    We don't want him back. Ever.
  46. @Lord Jeff Sessions
    If Ellis Island (i.e. Inviting the World) is the American idea, what was the American idea before Ellis Island?

    Obviously, since the Founding Fathers came over on the Mayflower, the American Idea has always been that America is open to anyone who wants to escape their old lives.

    Also, as we all learn in the public school system, the Native Americans didn’t believe in ownership and just wanted to share all the land with anyone who came here. So, the American Idea actually predates the USA and is more foundational than the Constitution.

    Unfortunately, some of the Founding Fathers burned witches, some hunted Indians to extinction, some owned slaves, and some were not gay. Later on, they also put Japanese people in concentration camps.

    So, you can see the American Idea is good but white people are bad. Duh.

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  47. @Desiderius

    most important to him, became a member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews
     
    Seriously?

    No one tell Steve.

    “most important to him, became a member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews”
    Thank goodness they let Cohen in. We wouldn’t hear the end of it otherwise.

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  48. OF COURSE the Muslim Party did better than Wilders. The word you are looking for is … women. Women “win” (at least in the short run) with Islam because they can be fat and still have an Alpha, they just have to share him and he’ll be as dumb as a rock but ultra-violent and sadistic. Which sadly is what most women in the West want. They figure that’s Alpha enough.

    White men lose under Islam but then they are demotivated and pressured by both their women and the State to submit. There is no hope for politics, and Europe’s fate is to be totally Muslim/African dominated in the next few years. Their women would not have it any other way and their elites are so stupid as to think they not Muslim goat herders or African Big Man shamans will be running things.

    Marie Le Pen will do better than her Father but most French women will happily submit to Islam, they want to anyway. Thus she has no chance at all, really.

    Read More
    • Replies: @celt darnell
    So you're saying Michel Houellebecq's Submission is correct.
  49. @Sid
    Grew up in NorCal and had a similar experience. A lot of it was playing Oregon Trail, but the stories of the 49ers and going to their old forts instilled pride that I lived in a nation of... settlers.

    Oregon Trail is actually the last gasp of the frontier mythos in my opinion.

    My brother grew up with Oregon Trail, but really it was his only connection to the frontier. The game had some status in my house because my parents could relate to it. My brother was probably aware of some acknowledgement of the game’s premise being based in US history, but I don’t think he had any other sources of media to draw images or narratives from to form concrete ideas about the game. His children’s books, for example, were all about the natural world or inane fantasies.

    I’m ten years older than he is, and I caught the tail end of the period when Disney specials were on TV. I have memories of seeing Davey Crocket on TV and Little House on the Prairie was on in syndication. Some of my children’s books were about cowboys.

    So, between my childhood and my brother’s, the Wild West and the frontier mythos exited popular children’s entertainments. I can’t imagine a game like Oregon Trail today.

    Why the frontier exited entertainment is an open question, but I observe that parallel changes were taking place. For example: (1) the replacement of “frontier-style” camping with nylon dome tents and small propane stoves; (2) the restriction by parents of children’s freedom to roam their communities; (3) the replacement of “building” as a past-time via blocks or via dad’s tools with non-construction amusements. The frontier mythos appealed to a sense of liberty, but it also appealed to a desire to meet challenges. I suspect the general elimination from children’s lives of the idea of difficulty as somewhat desirable made frontier themes a losing proposition for toys, books, movies, etc.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    The frontier, bureaucratically defined as population density of less than two people per square mile, closed in 1890. So the TV shows you and I remember seeing in the 60s and 70s represent the last echoes of people with grandparents and great-grandparents who had actual frontier experience.

    I've argued for some time that America has been shaped by what I called "frontier capitalism." I'm not very well-read, so imagine my surprise at just coming across Frederick Jackson Turner's "Frontier Thesis":


    The Frontier Thesis or Turner Thesis, is the argument advanced by historian Frederick Jackson Turner in 1893 that American democracy was formed by the American frontier. He stressed the process—the moving frontier line—and the impact it had on pioneers going through the process. He also stressed results; especially that American democracy was the primary result, along with egalitarianism, a lack of interest in high culture, and violence. "American democracy was born of no theorist's dream; it was not carried in the Susan Constant to Virginia, nor in the Mayflower to Plymouth. It came out of the American forest, and it gained new strength each time it touched a new frontier," said Turner.

    In the thesis, the American frontier established liberty by releasing Americans from European mindsets and eroding old, dysfunctional customs. The frontier had no need for standing armies, established churches, aristocrats or nobles, nor for landed gentry who controlled most of the land and charged heavy rents. Frontier land was free for the taking. Turner first announced his thesis in a paper entitled "The Significance of the Frontier in American History", delivered to the American Historical Association in 1893 in Chicago. He won wide acclaim among historians and intellectuals. Turner elaborated on the theme in his advanced history lectures and in a series of essays published over the next 25 years, published along with his initial paper as The Frontier in American History.
     

    So now there's no more frontier, nobody left to conquer, and the Anglos have settled into comfortable metropolises with all the calories and entertainment we will ever need. People need a mythos, and the new arrivals don't like the old one, so they substitute the Ellis Island mythos as a way to make themselves comfortable in the new land and one-up their Anglo rivals.

    I have another thesis: that different myths, different heroic figures are visible manifests of irreconcilable worldviews. The new arrivals and their goodwhite allies are literally outlawing the mythic and historic heroes of founding stock America. As our host puts it: control the past, control the future. There can only ever be one tribe on top, and as the Anglo-American share of the population slips into minority status, their ethno-cultural rivals smell blood in the water. If you want to know what comes next, ask the Christians of the Levant.

    , @Lovernios X
    I was a boy during the 50’s and 60’s in Boston. You could see the culture’s values in the schools themselves, grand imposing architecture of brick and granite. The names of these schools were likewise indicators of Bostonian’s pride in Western and Anglo-American civilization: Samuel Adams, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, John Greenleaf Whittier, Beethoven, Mozart, Washington Irving, Francis Parkman, Gregor Mendel, David Farragut, Horace Mann, Robert Gould Shaw, Dante Alighieri, – great names from literature, science, education, and of course Civil War heroes.

    And of course the great high schools: Boston Latin School (the first public school in UA), Boston English, Boston Technical High.

    In the 60’s you saw a shift in the new schools, the new glass and steel buildings with no soul, the names came from local Irish politicians, school officials, civil rights leaders: Paul A. Dever, J.F.K., James P. Timilty, William H Ohrenberger, William Trotter, John D. O’Bryant.

    Later the schools were given inspirational names such as: Boston Arts Academy, Boston Collaborative High School, Boston Community Leadership Academy, Another Course to College, Community Academy of Science & Health, Umana, Mario Academy, Urban Science Academy.

    I’m sure none of the students in these schools know who Longfellow, Parkman, Mendel or Dante were. Or care. Probably few of the teachers know.

    Many of those older schools were renamed, closed, torn down or converted for other uses.
    Sad commentary of the changing demographics of Boston.
  50. @Paul Walker Most beautiful man ever...
    "most important to him, became a member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews"
    Thank goodness they let Cohen in. We wouldn't hear the end of it otherwise.

    As if we have heard the end of it.

    Read More
  51. “Frantic yelling ensued”

    Coincidentally, Three’s Company went on the air 40 years ago today.

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  52. Simply said, the idea of Ellis Island was that the Ellis Islanders would become Americans. Cohen’s idea is that all America becomes Ellis Island.

    Read More
    • Agree: celt darnell
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Great observation. That goes into my "keep" file.
  53. “the American idea.”

    The immigration of cheap African labor, called slavery, is what kept the colonies going. The underlying cause of the American revolution, not talked about, was the British outlawing slavery 1772. So cheap foreign labor is “the American idea” or maybe the American bad idea.

    Search on, blackagendareport revolution slavery, for a view of slavery and the American revolution.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Foreign Expert
    Slaves aren't cheap. Initial cost 400-1000 dollars. Then you have to feed, house, and clothe them.
    , @FPD72
    The Slavery Abolition Act, which banned slavery in the British Empire, was not passed until 1833. A bill that banned the slave trade was passed in 1807. Nothing was passed in 1772 that impacted the American colonies to any major extent.
    , @celt darnell
    It's an idea that's become more popular lately (because the whole purpose of academia now is to trash the US -- especially anything white Americans might take pride in) and while there is some truth to it (I have no doubt that Somerset was not well-received in the southern colonies) there's a wealth of evidence -- i.e. what people actually said at the time -- pointing to other grievances as being far more important.

    I'm actually surprised it's taken as long as it has for the left to finally start to directly attack the Founding Fathers...
    , @syonredux

    “the American idea.”

    The immigration of cheap African labor, called slavery, is what kept the colonies going. The underlying cause of the American revolution, not talked about, was the British outlawing slavery 1772. So cheap foreign labor is “the American idea” or maybe the American bad idea.

    Search on, blackagendareport revolution slavery, for a view of slavery and the American revolution.
     
    A popular notion with SJWs, but it just doesn't hold up. For one thing, the Revolution began in Massachusetts, where slaves/Blacks peaked at 2% of the population.....And New England as a whole was absolutely critical to the Revolutionary cause (as one historian of my acquaintance put it:"No no New England, no Revolution").....

    was the British outlawing slavery 1772.
     
    The Somerset decision only affected slaves within the British Isles....Slaves elsewhere in the British Empire were unaffected. Parliament did finally get around to abolishing slavery in 1833 (Slavery Abolition Act). British slave-owners were compensated to the tune of 20 million pounds.....
  54. This comment section has gone so far downhill it’s not funny. Whereas Blogspot was often full of insightful and intelligent commentary, now it’s just a sea of elderly nitwits crying and weeping about how we’re all doomed. You all bitch about the NYT and Guardian but you’re just as bad as those comments if not worse.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    I appreciate your viewpoint; though I don't think we're all quite so ancient and lugubrious as all that (I'm thirty-nine, I'm solidly middle-aged but hardly decrepit; at least a couple of fellows have indicated they are significantly younger).

    Much of the lament and resignation is gallows' humour; many of us are still trying, despite increasingly desperate situations, to find a way through.

    What would you recommend, though?
    , @Jack Hanson
    Agree. This place more and more is people standing around with a rope around their necks while Steve rattles his tin cup every three months.
    , @Lot
    The good thing for you is that Unz.com offers a full refund for dissatisfied visitors.
  55. @Chrisnonymous
    I'd be interested if you could say more about that as, living in Japan, I have encountered widespread familiarity with Ellis Island schmaltz combined with widespread ignorance of the aspects of national mythos you mention. (Even among Europeans I know here, knowledge of US domestic history is pretty thin until the post-WWII era.)

    How were you educated?

    I’d be interested if you could say more about that as, living in Japan, I have encountered widespread familiarity with Ellis Island schmaltz combined with widespread ignorance of the aspects of national mythos you mention.

    My own experience is from 40+ years ago. Much of East Asia today is blanketed with modern American mass media products that are drenched in the Ellis Island mythos.

    How were you educated?

    By very traditional parents who loved America, the old America, that is. My father had me watch “The Alamo” multiple times when I was little.

    Read More
  56. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Yo, Twinkie, I responded (#107) to your question in a recent thread (in case you missed it). Reply there if you want.

    Replied.

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  57. @Dr. X
    Somebody should make Mr. (((Cohen))) read George Washington's 1796 Farewell Address to learn something about the American ideas of the Founders:

    "The name of American, which belongs to you in your national capacity, must always exalt the just pride of patriotism more than any appellation derived from local discriminations. With slight shades of difference, you have the same religion, manners, habits, and political principles.

    ...Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me, fellow-citizens!) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake, since history and experience prove that foreign influence is one of the most baneful foes of republican government."

    ‘I conjure you to believe me, fellow-citizens!’

    Or, as Trump would say, ‘Believe me! Believe me!’

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  58. @Lot
    The Dutch voted today they'd rather be dead than offend Islam.

    They will again have a Merkel situation with a "conservative" party leader in charge who relies mostly on left wing votes.

    What was really depressing is that it was not even close. Wilders was crushed and even did worse than the combined hard left parties.

    Le Pen is probably going to lose too, but at least she will come close to winning.

    I’d have thought the biggest story of the Dutch elections is the eclipse of the Dutch Labour Party – from about 38 seats in 2012 to 8. Wilders’ party is up from 15 to 20 – a 33% increase.

    Media control makes such a difference. Imagine if a patriotic administration had done what Rutte’s done, sending in the police to break up Muslim demonstrations and towing a Turkish minister’s car back to the frontier! I know how the BBC and Guardian would have reacted, instead of the sober and factual coverage. And notice the usual far-left suspects didn’t take to the streets protesting ‘Islamophobia’.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    The PVV did better in the 2010 elections, for a time several months ago, it was polling at 40+ seats.

    The election was an utter disaster for Wilders, and a miracle for the establishment. Europhile parties all picked up major gains. A Muslim party got 2 seats in Parliament.

    This in the face of blatant intimidation by Sultan Erdogan.

    A people cannot be allowed to vote themselves into extinction. There is only one way to do that, the final argument of the kings.
  59. @Berty
    This comment section has gone so far downhill it's not funny. Whereas Blogspot was often full of insightful and intelligent commentary, now it's just a sea of elderly nitwits crying and weeping about how we're all doomed. You all bitch about the NYT and Guardian but you're just as bad as those comments if not worse.

    I appreciate your viewpoint; though I don’t think we’re all quite so ancient and lugubrious as all that (I’m thirty-nine, I’m solidly middle-aged but hardly decrepit; at least a couple of fellows have indicated they are significantly younger).

    Much of the lament and resignation is gallows’ humour; many of us are still trying, despite increasingly desperate situations, to find a way through.

    What would you recommend, though?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Yeah, the election was "gallows humor" with Steve and everyone else banging around how doomed we were every time the MSM breathlessly reported another HRC 12 point lead in the polls with a +28D sample.

    Get over yourself with the "isteve commentariat as secret masters of politics".
  60. @dfordoom

    Le Pen is probably going to lose too, but at least she will come close to winning.
     
    The bad news is that it's very unlikely that she'll go anywhere near to winning.

    Nationalist anti-immigration parties have very little political appeal in western Europe. They cause too much badfeelz.

    Unemployment never went higher than 11% in Western Europe, while it went above 25% for a time in Spain, the people went far-left to Podemos. CultMarx is much more entrenched and featherbedded in media/academia. You also don’t have a FoxNews/talk radio, and evangelical Protestants.

    Should Le Pen score above 35%, that’s the best result the FN has ever received. They got 27% in the 2015 regional elections.

    France has it’s elections for the Assemble Nationale (lower house) right after the Presidential, rather than the same time. The FN might run up the middle if the other parties don’t all agree to back Macron’s party.

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  61. @Anonymous Nephew
    I'd have thought the biggest story of the Dutch elections is the eclipse of the Dutch Labour Party - from about 38 seats in 2012 to 8. Wilders' party is up from 15 to 20 - a 33% increase.

    Media control makes such a difference. Imagine if a patriotic administration had done what Rutte's done, sending in the police to break up Muslim demonstrations and towing a Turkish minister's car back to the frontier! I know how the BBC and Guardian would have reacted, instead of the sober and factual coverage. And notice the usual far-left suspects didn't take to the streets protesting 'Islamophobia'.

    The PVV did better in the 2010 elections, for a time several months ago, it was polling at 40+ seats.

    The election was an utter disaster for Wilders, and a miracle for the establishment. Europhile parties all picked up major gains. A Muslim party got 2 seats in Parliament.

    This in the face of blatant intimidation by Sultan Erdogan.

    A people cannot be allowed to vote themselves into extinction. There is only one way to do that, the final argument of the kings.

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    • Replies: @dfordoom

    The election was an utter disaster for Wilders
     
    Wilders is a liberal. Anyone who thinks a liberal is going to save civilisation is being rather optimistic.
  62. @Anon
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RR2JA8FTtlo

    If automation is really the coming thing then why do we need to import a horde of unskilled 3rd worlders?

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    Here's how it works:

    Part of the gains from automation will be distributed in transfer payments to Third Worlders, who will then remit monies to billion-dollar retailers, such as Walmart, T-Mobile, etc.

    Third Worlders get to be fat, dumb, and happy. Facebook has its eyeball-count, Walmart sells its cheap shit.

    It's all good, right?
  63. Whether Ellis Island represents an American Idea or the American Idea is moot … the salient point is that the havoc wreaked on America by essentially unconstrained immigration makes the America that is anything but ideal.

    Read More
  64. @Anon
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RR2JA8FTtlo

    I just happened to have listened to that ‘automation’ podcast and looked up the mentioned Acemoglu paper – which should be thrust deep up Merkel’s nose.

    Aging economies DO NOT decline the evidence shows, probably because this stimulates automation.

    http://economics.mit.edu/files/12536

    Read More
  65. @Lord Jeff Sessions
    If Ellis Island (i.e. Inviting the World) is the American idea, what was the American idea before Ellis Island?

    A gleam in Tevye’s eye.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pachyderm Pachyderma
    But it was Golde (Emma Lazarus) who put​ out the verbal welcome mat...
  66. @eah
    https://twitter.com/JBurtonXP/status/842136996785094658

    Yeah, John Derbyshire explored that territory.

    Read More
  67. @dfordoom

    Le Pen is probably going to lose too, but at least she will come close to winning.
     
    The bad news is that it's very unlikely that she'll go anywhere near to winning.

    Nationalist anti-immigration parties have very little political appeal in western Europe. They cause too much badfeelz.

    Trump’s victory, which some thought would paved the way for the victory of nationalist parties in Europe, may have done the opposite. The explosion of rage and panic on the Left here may have alarmed the Europeans. I don’t know, just speculating.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    I suspect the Europe's press is outrageously partisan and anti-Trump and that its populations were already overwhelmingly in a liberal-globalist trance. Very susceptible to such media influence.
    , @Peter Akuleyev
    Part of the reason Trump is not helping the nationalist cause in Europe is that Trump doesn't translate well. Literally. When he is interpreted into German or French on television he just sounds stupid. I don't know if it is malice, or the interpreters simply not being used to a politician speaking so informally and with such a limited vocabulary. Trump communicates a great deal through gestures, intonation and certain key phrases, and non-Americans just don't understand him.
    , @dfordoom

    Trump’s victory, which some thought would paved the way for the victory of nationalist parties in Europe, may have done the opposite. The explosion of rage and panic on the Left here may have alarmed the Europeans. I don’t know, just speculating.
     
    I think it's possible. Europeans do despise Americans, and they particularly despise Americans like Trump who glory in their Americanness. Europeans like to think of themselves as being both intellectually and morally superior to Americans. Which is rather amusing given the catastrophic trajectory of European history over the past century.

    It's quite likely that the Trump Hysteria has frightened a lot of European moderates. It's ironic but Trump might indirectly and unwittingly have given the European establishment the weapon it needed to crush the nationalists. If the moderates can be frightened into abandoning the nationalists then the remaining hardcore nationalists can be simply ignored.



    Marine le Pen should be doing everything she can to distance herself from Trump. The
  68. @Stogumber
    Simply said, the idea of Ellis Island was that the Ellis Islanders would become Americans. Cohen's idea is that all America becomes Ellis Island.

    Great observation. That goes into my “keep” file.

    Read More
  69. @Harry Baldwin
    Trump's victory, which some thought would paved the way for the victory of nationalist parties in Europe, may have done the opposite. The explosion of rage and panic on the Left here may have alarmed the Europeans. I don't know, just speculating.

    I suspect the Europe’s press is outrageously partisan and anti-Trump and that its populations were already overwhelmingly in a liberal-globalist trance. Very susceptible to such media influence.

    Read More
  70. @dfordoom

    Le Pen is probably going to lose too, but at least she will come close to winning.
     
    The bad news is that it's very unlikely that she'll go anywhere near to winning.

    Nationalist anti-immigration parties have very little political appeal in western Europe. They cause too much badfeelz.

    I think she will outperform polls and get 42-46% in the second round.

    She has time on her side. Her worst demographic is over 65 age group by a crazy margin.

    Read More
  71. @George
    “the American idea.”

    The immigration of cheap African labor, called slavery, is what kept the colonies going. The underlying cause of the American revolution, not talked about, was the British outlawing slavery 1772. So cheap foreign labor is “the American idea” or maybe the American bad idea.

    Search on, blackagendareport revolution slavery, for a view of slavery and the American revolution.

    Slaves aren’t cheap. Initial cost 400-1000 dollars. Then you have to feed, house, and clothe them.

    Read More
  72. We can doubt that Cohen’s grandparents or great-grandparents arrived at Ellis Island bathing in the warm glow of an idea. Like my forbears on the ship to Jamestown they were coming for the opportunity of a better life than they were leaving behind.

    Read More
  73. @PiltdownMan
    Actually, the deep state is the American idea.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-founders-might-actually-have-liked-the-deep-state/2017/03/15/0b8951ca-08e0-11e7-93dc-00f9bdd74ed1_story.html?utm_term=.a68f5e9cabd7

    Actually, the deep state is the American idea.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-founders-might-actually-have-liked-the-deep-state/2017/03/15/0b8951ca-08e0-11e7-93dc-00f9bdd74ed1_story.html?utm_term=.a68f5e9cabd7

    That op-ed was certainly a tendentious, and fallacious, interpretation of American history. Sure, the founding fathers would have been cool with government bureaucrat busy-bodies intruding themselves in every facet of American life.

    WaPo has really become the broadsheet of “The Resistance” (how pathetic that liberals now take their cues from sh**ty Star Wars movies). The comments are correspondingly unhinged. If you were to play a drinking game of taking a shot everytime someone uses the word “fascist”, you’d be drunk by the third comment down.

    Read More
  74. @George
    “the American idea.”

    The immigration of cheap African labor, called slavery, is what kept the colonies going. The underlying cause of the American revolution, not talked about, was the British outlawing slavery 1772. So cheap foreign labor is “the American idea” or maybe the American bad idea.

    Search on, blackagendareport revolution slavery, for a view of slavery and the American revolution.

    The Slavery Abolition Act, which banned slavery in the British Empire, was not passed until 1833. A bill that banned the slave trade was passed in 1807. Nothing was passed in 1772 that impacted the American colonies to any major extent.

    Read More
  75. @Steve Sailer
    Nazi Germany West.

    Either that, or very White Bread.

    France gave us the Statue of Liberty in 1886, six years before Ellis Island opened. And the 20th Century became “the American Century” mostly because of the ideas and inventions of the descendants of pre-Ellis Island Americans (the airplane, the telephone, the telegraph, all of the inventions of Thomas Edison, etc.).

    But Roger Cohen, the descendant of Ellis Island Jews, declares Ellis Island “the American Idea” because that’s how his ancestors got here. I suppose a lot of Asians will declare Hart-Cellar “the American Idea” because that’s how their ancestors got here, and Latinos will declare Simpson-Mazzoli “the American Idea” because that’s how their ancestors got here.

    Blacks could call the Civil War “the American Idea,” since that freed their ancestors – if they were inclined to give whites any credit at all, which they aren’t. If you have any emotional attachment to the Southern cause in that war (which I don’t) I suppose there’s a delicious vindication in the facts that blacks have no gratitude for all the white Union Army soldiers who died on their behalf.

    Read More
  76. @Anon
    https://www.amren.com/news/2017/03/mexico-confront-xenophobic-past/

    ROTFL

    I don't know what is parody anymore.

    Yeah, cuz China had a long history of honoring foreign devils.

    Chinese, they would never do anything like build a wall.

    So, Mexico should have been more like Tibet. LOL

    Mostly agree with this caveat:

    For what it is worth, China has had an assimilation notion for thousands of years including the notion of “cooked barbarians” with Confucianism, with the notion that as foreigners absorb the proper values, they become more able to fit in and become Chinese. She had to be, since like most large nations, she was effectively multicultural by default – Han is really an admixture, to be honest, though these days only the Northern and Southern differences are worth noting. North/South stereotypes and baiting continues lightly to this day: the height and personality differences are real.

    Its just that the bar of Chinese assimilation has always been exceptionally high, often assumed multigenerational.

    Read More
  77. Wilders lost because Erdogan allowed Rutte take a nationalist anti-Islamic stance and steal Wilders thunder. Most Dutch don’t trust Wilders – they prefer to see the establishment stand up for the Dutch rather than hand the government to an unknown quantity. Whether Rutte will have the balls to stay the nationalist course is an open question. But this was not a vote for greater tolerance for Islam, and if the government interprets it that way there will be fireworks.

    If you want some optimism:

    “Wilders did not want to enter government,” said André Krouwel, a political scientist at Amsterdam’s Free University. “What he wanted – and he’s pretty much already achieved it – is for the two mainstream rightwing parties … to say and do what he wants. In a sense, he had already won the elections.”

    LePen is in better shape because I don’t think Macron can move as far to the right on immigration and Islam as Rutte did.

    Read More
  78. @Harry Baldwin
    Trump's victory, which some thought would paved the way for the victory of nationalist parties in Europe, may have done the opposite. The explosion of rage and panic on the Left here may have alarmed the Europeans. I don't know, just speculating.

    Part of the reason Trump is not helping the nationalist cause in Europe is that Trump doesn’t translate well. Literally. When he is interpreted into German or French on television he just sounds stupid. I don’t know if it is malice, or the interpreters simply not being used to a politician speaking so informally and with such a limited vocabulary. Trump communicates a great deal through gestures, intonation and certain key phrases, and non-Americans just don’t understand him.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ragno

    Trump doesn’t translate well. Literally. When he is interpreted into German or French on television he just sounds stupid. I don’t know if it is malice, or the interpreters simply not being used to a politician speaking so informally
     
    You're joking, right?

    It's malice.
  79. @bored identity
    Who triggered Roger Rabid?

    Cohen,when asked what was his most embarrassing moment:



    "Arriving in India as the New York Times foreign editor without a visa.
    I had assumed that I didn't need one.
    It took our bureau chief there several hours to extricate me from Indian bureaucracy.

    I felt like an idiot."

     

    Cohen on his father:



    "When my father was about to emigrate from South Africa to England in the 1950s, a friend of the family suggested that a change of name was in order because it would be unwise to pursue his career in Britain while called “Cohen.”*

     

    * Which means that Cohens did pretty well during peak-apartheid in South Africa, no?

    Cohen continues:



    My Dad, a young doctor, said he would think it over. A few days later he announced to the friend that he had decided to make the change.

    “To what?” she asked with satisfaction.

    “Einstein,” he deadpanned.

    And so Sydney Cohen came to London and in time had the title of Commander of the Order of the British Empire (C.B.E.) bestowed upon him by the queen, and was named a fellow of the Royal Society (founded 1660), and, most important to him, became a member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews."

     

    Well trust me, Cohen’s repaid us handsomely for all of the above.

    You can read his anti-British screeds on a regular basis in the NY Times…

    Read More
  80. @Berty
    This comment section has gone so far downhill it's not funny. Whereas Blogspot was often full of insightful and intelligent commentary, now it's just a sea of elderly nitwits crying and weeping about how we're all doomed. You all bitch about the NYT and Guardian but you're just as bad as those comments if not worse.

    Agree. This place more and more is people standing around with a rope around their necks while Steve rattles his tin cup every three months.

    Read More
  81. @Opinionator
    Fun fact: Roger Cohen was naturalized as a US citizen about three years ago.

    Levels of chutzpah that, by now, we should be embarrassed to have thought were impossible.

    Good — that means you’re stuck with him.

    We don’t want him back. Ever.

    Read More
  82. @Chrisnonymous
    Oregon Trail is actually the last gasp of the frontier mythos in my opinion.

    My brother grew up with Oregon Trail, but really it was his only connection to the frontier. The game had some status in my house because my parents could relate to it. My brother was probably aware of some acknowledgement of the game's premise being based in US history, but I don't think he had any other sources of media to draw images or narratives from to form concrete ideas about the game. His children's books, for example, were all about the natural world or inane fantasies.

    I'm ten years older than he is, and I caught the tail end of the period when Disney specials were on TV. I have memories of seeing Davey Crocket on TV and Little House on the Prairie was on in syndication. Some of my children's books were about cowboys.

    So, between my childhood and my brother's, the Wild West and the frontier mythos exited popular children's entertainments. I can't imagine a game like Oregon Trail today.

    Why the frontier exited entertainment is an open question, but I observe that parallel changes were taking place. For example: (1) the replacement of "frontier-style" camping with nylon dome tents and small propane stoves; (2) the restriction by parents of children's freedom to roam their communities; (3) the replacement of "building" as a past-time via blocks or via dad's tools with non-construction amusements. The frontier mythos appealed to a sense of liberty, but it also appealed to a desire to meet challenges. I suspect the general elimination from children's lives of the idea of difficulty as somewhat desirable made frontier themes a losing proposition for toys, books, movies, etc.

    The frontier, bureaucratically defined as population density of less than two people per square mile, closed in 1890. So the TV shows you and I remember seeing in the 60s and 70s represent the last echoes of people with grandparents and great-grandparents who had actual frontier experience.

    I’ve argued for some time that America has been shaped by what I called “frontier capitalism.” I’m not very well-read, so imagine my surprise at just coming across Frederick Jackson Turner’s “Frontier Thesis”:

    The Frontier Thesis or Turner Thesis, is the argument advanced by historian Frederick Jackson Turner in 1893 that American democracy was formed by the American frontier. He stressed the process—the moving frontier line—and the impact it had on pioneers going through the process. He also stressed results; especially that American democracy was the primary result, along with egalitarianism, a lack of interest in high culture, and violence. “American democracy was born of no theorist’s dream; it was not carried in the Susan Constant to Virginia, nor in the Mayflower to Plymouth. It came out of the American forest, and it gained new strength each time it touched a new frontier,” said Turner.

    In the thesis, the American frontier established liberty by releasing Americans from European mindsets and eroding old, dysfunctional customs. The frontier had no need for standing armies, established churches, aristocrats or nobles, nor for landed gentry who controlled most of the land and charged heavy rents. Frontier land was free for the taking. Turner first announced his thesis in a paper entitled “The Significance of the Frontier in American History”, delivered to the American Historical Association in 1893 in Chicago. He won wide acclaim among historians and intellectuals. Turner elaborated on the theme in his advanced history lectures and in a series of essays published over the next 25 years, published along with his initial paper as The Frontier in American History.

    So now there’s no more frontier, nobody left to conquer, and the Anglos have settled into comfortable metropolises with all the calories and entertainment we will ever need. People need a mythos, and the new arrivals don’t like the old one, so they substitute the Ellis Island mythos as a way to make themselves comfortable in the new land and one-up their Anglo rivals.

    I have another thesis: that different myths, different heroic figures are visible manifests of irreconcilable worldviews. The new arrivals and their goodwhite allies are literally outlawing the mythic and historic heroes of founding stock America. As our host puts it: control the past, control the future. There can only ever be one tribe on top, and as the Anglo-American share of the population slips into minority status, their ethno-cultural rivals smell blood in the water. If you want to know what comes next, ask the Christians of the Levant.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    Space, the final frontier, to boldly go where no man has gone before.
    Time, the zeroth frontier, to boldly exist where no man has existed before.
  83. @Autochthon
    I appreciate your viewpoint; though I don't think we're all quite so ancient and lugubrious as all that (I'm thirty-nine, I'm solidly middle-aged but hardly decrepit; at least a couple of fellows have indicated they are significantly younger).

    Much of the lament and resignation is gallows' humour; many of us are still trying, despite increasingly desperate situations, to find a way through.

    What would you recommend, though?

    Yeah, the election was “gallows humor” with Steve and everyone else banging around how doomed we were every time the MSM breathlessly reported another HRC 12 point lead in the polls with a +28D sample.

    Get over yourself with the “isteve commentariat as secret masters of politics”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    I don't even know what in the Hell anything you wrote means. If you can express it in the Queen's English, I should be happy to respond.
    , @Random Dude on the Internet
    Yeah the sad truth is that you had people in this comment section who took polls as gospel that even Nate Silver would dismiss as being unrealistically favorable towards Hillary. It's not gallows humor, it's bog standard defeatism.

    There are a depressing number of people who think that modern conservatism consists only of snarky ripostes in comment sections. You have #NeverTrump radio hosts and "conservative" authors and bloggers who tried their hardest to sabotage Trump because they get more ratings, clicks, and book sales if there is a Democrat in the White House. Then when Trump won the elections, these same people said we should be somber, even apologetic about the results. Now these same people reflexively throw in the towel at even the slightest suggestion of a road bump.
  84. @Whiskey
    OF COURSE the Muslim Party did better than Wilders. The word you are looking for is ... women. Women "win" (at least in the short run) with Islam because they can be fat and still have an Alpha, they just have to share him and he'll be as dumb as a rock but ultra-violent and sadistic. Which sadly is what most women in the West want. They figure that's Alpha enough.

    White men lose under Islam but then they are demotivated and pressured by both their women and the State to submit. There is no hope for politics, and Europe's fate is to be totally Muslim/African dominated in the next few years. Their women would not have it any other way and their elites are so stupid as to think they not Muslim goat herders or African Big Man shamans will be running things.

    Marie Le Pen will do better than her Father but most French women will happily submit to Islam, they want to anyway. Thus she has no chance at all, really.

    So you’re saying Michel Houellebecq’s Submission is correct.

    Read More
  85. @Elli
    Although not Italian myself, I've been inside my home town's local Italian Club. Painted on the wall: Crossed American and Italian flags, and the slogan Proudly Italian, 100% American. In English. And now that the old paisans have mostly passed on, their children don't even use the place any more. They are American.

    Elli, Every time my mother tried to teach me some Italian, I would say “Mom, I’m American.”

    Read More
  86. @George
    “the American idea.”

    The immigration of cheap African labor, called slavery, is what kept the colonies going. The underlying cause of the American revolution, not talked about, was the British outlawing slavery 1772. So cheap foreign labor is “the American idea” or maybe the American bad idea.

    Search on, blackagendareport revolution slavery, for a view of slavery and the American revolution.

    It’s an idea that’s become more popular lately (because the whole purpose of academia now is to trash the US — especially anything white Americans might take pride in) and while there is some truth to it (I have no doubt that Somerset was not well-received in the southern colonies) there’s a wealth of evidence — i.e. what people actually said at the time — pointing to other grievances as being far more important.

    I’m actually surprised it’s taken as long as it has for the left to finally start to directly attack the Founding Fathers…

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    They've been doing it in the colleges for at least 30 years.
  87. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Cohen has a brain? Do you have data to support that assertion? I doubt that he does. The better explanation is that Cohen is a Caenorhabditis Elegans that gets paid for reactivity.

    Those 302 neurons must be working some serious overtime.

    Read More
  88. @dfordoom

    Le Pen is probably going to lose too, but at least she will come close to winning.
     
    The bad news is that it's very unlikely that she'll go anywhere near to winning.

    Nationalist anti-immigration parties have very little political appeal in western Europe. They cause too much badfeelz.

    Backdate this a year, and replace “Le Pen” with “Trump” or “Brexit”.

    Read More
  89. @Peter Akuleyev
    Part of the reason Trump is not helping the nationalist cause in Europe is that Trump doesn't translate well. Literally. When he is interpreted into German or French on television he just sounds stupid. I don't know if it is malice, or the interpreters simply not being used to a politician speaking so informally and with such a limited vocabulary. Trump communicates a great deal through gestures, intonation and certain key phrases, and non-Americans just don't understand him.

    Trump doesn’t translate well. Literally. When he is interpreted into German or French on television he just sounds stupid. I don’t know if it is malice, or the interpreters simply not being used to a politician speaking so informally

    You’re joking, right?

    It’s malice.

    Read More
  90. It’s disingenuous and treasonous and for those of us not descended from Founding Stock to apply the small window of time that our forbears were allowed entry to the entire history (and future) of the USA. Anybody from immigrant origins has a duty to respect the choices of those whose families blazed the trail long before our arrival.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Thank you for understanding and acknowledging this fundamental concept.
  91. @Chrisnonymous
    Oregon Trail is actually the last gasp of the frontier mythos in my opinion.

    My brother grew up with Oregon Trail, but really it was his only connection to the frontier. The game had some status in my house because my parents could relate to it. My brother was probably aware of some acknowledgement of the game's premise being based in US history, but I don't think he had any other sources of media to draw images or narratives from to form concrete ideas about the game. His children's books, for example, were all about the natural world or inane fantasies.

    I'm ten years older than he is, and I caught the tail end of the period when Disney specials were on TV. I have memories of seeing Davey Crocket on TV and Little House on the Prairie was on in syndication. Some of my children's books were about cowboys.

    So, between my childhood and my brother's, the Wild West and the frontier mythos exited popular children's entertainments. I can't imagine a game like Oregon Trail today.

    Why the frontier exited entertainment is an open question, but I observe that parallel changes were taking place. For example: (1) the replacement of "frontier-style" camping with nylon dome tents and small propane stoves; (2) the restriction by parents of children's freedom to roam their communities; (3) the replacement of "building" as a past-time via blocks or via dad's tools with non-construction amusements. The frontier mythos appealed to a sense of liberty, but it also appealed to a desire to meet challenges. I suspect the general elimination from children's lives of the idea of difficulty as somewhat desirable made frontier themes a losing proposition for toys, books, movies, etc.

    I was a boy during the 50’s and 60’s in Boston. You could see the culture’s values in the schools themselves, grand imposing architecture of brick and granite. The names of these schools were likewise indicators of Bostonian’s pride in Western and Anglo-American civilization: Samuel Adams, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, John Greenleaf Whittier, Beethoven, Mozart, Washington Irving, Francis Parkman, Gregor Mendel, David Farragut, Horace Mann, Robert Gould Shaw, Dante Alighieri, – great names from literature, science, education, and of course Civil War heroes.

    And of course the great high schools: Boston Latin School (the first public school in UA), Boston English, Boston Technical High.

    In the 60’s you saw a shift in the new schools, the new glass and steel buildings with no soul, the names came from local Irish politicians, school officials, civil rights leaders: Paul A. Dever, J.F.K., James P. Timilty, William H Ohrenberger, William Trotter, John D. O’Bryant.

    Later the schools were given inspirational names such as: Boston Arts Academy, Boston Collaborative High School, Boston Community Leadership Academy, Another Course to College, Community Academy of Science & Health, Umana, Mario Academy, Urban Science Academy.

    I’m sure none of the students in these schools know who Longfellow, Parkman, Mendel or Dante were. Or care. Probably few of the teachers know.

    Many of those older schools were renamed, closed, torn down or converted for other uses.
    Sad commentary of the changing demographics of Boston.

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  92. @bored identity
    Who triggered Roger Rabid?

    Cohen,when asked what was his most embarrassing moment:



    "Arriving in India as the New York Times foreign editor without a visa.
    I had assumed that I didn't need one.
    It took our bureau chief there several hours to extricate me from Indian bureaucracy.

    I felt like an idiot."

     

    Cohen on his father:



    "When my father was about to emigrate from South Africa to England in the 1950s, a friend of the family suggested that a change of name was in order because it would be unwise to pursue his career in Britain while called “Cohen.”*

     

    * Which means that Cohens did pretty well during peak-apartheid in South Africa, no?

    Cohen continues:



    My Dad, a young doctor, said he would think it over. A few days later he announced to the friend that he had decided to make the change.

    “To what?” she asked with satisfaction.

    “Einstein,” he deadpanned.

    And so Sydney Cohen came to London and in time had the title of Commander of the Order of the British Empire (C.B.E.) bestowed upon him by the queen, and was named a fellow of the Royal Society (founded 1660), and, most important to him, became a member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews."

     

    The dad sounds like a reasonably impressive dude.

    The son wasn’t content with regressing to the mean, instead crashing clear through to the other extreme.

    Evidently trying to keep up with the Sulzbergers.

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  93. @The Anti-Gnostic
    The frontier, bureaucratically defined as population density of less than two people per square mile, closed in 1890. So the TV shows you and I remember seeing in the 60s and 70s represent the last echoes of people with grandparents and great-grandparents who had actual frontier experience.

    I've argued for some time that America has been shaped by what I called "frontier capitalism." I'm not very well-read, so imagine my surprise at just coming across Frederick Jackson Turner's "Frontier Thesis":


    The Frontier Thesis or Turner Thesis, is the argument advanced by historian Frederick Jackson Turner in 1893 that American democracy was formed by the American frontier. He stressed the process—the moving frontier line—and the impact it had on pioneers going through the process. He also stressed results; especially that American democracy was the primary result, along with egalitarianism, a lack of interest in high culture, and violence. "American democracy was born of no theorist's dream; it was not carried in the Susan Constant to Virginia, nor in the Mayflower to Plymouth. It came out of the American forest, and it gained new strength each time it touched a new frontier," said Turner.

    In the thesis, the American frontier established liberty by releasing Americans from European mindsets and eroding old, dysfunctional customs. The frontier had no need for standing armies, established churches, aristocrats or nobles, nor for landed gentry who controlled most of the land and charged heavy rents. Frontier land was free for the taking. Turner first announced his thesis in a paper entitled "The Significance of the Frontier in American History", delivered to the American Historical Association in 1893 in Chicago. He won wide acclaim among historians and intellectuals. Turner elaborated on the theme in his advanced history lectures and in a series of essays published over the next 25 years, published along with his initial paper as The Frontier in American History.
     

    So now there's no more frontier, nobody left to conquer, and the Anglos have settled into comfortable metropolises with all the calories and entertainment we will ever need. People need a mythos, and the new arrivals don't like the old one, so they substitute the Ellis Island mythos as a way to make themselves comfortable in the new land and one-up their Anglo rivals.

    I have another thesis: that different myths, different heroic figures are visible manifests of irreconcilable worldviews. The new arrivals and their goodwhite allies are literally outlawing the mythic and historic heroes of founding stock America. As our host puts it: control the past, control the future. There can only ever be one tribe on top, and as the Anglo-American share of the population slips into minority status, their ethno-cultural rivals smell blood in the water. If you want to know what comes next, ask the Christians of the Levant.

    Space, the final frontier, to boldly go where no man has gone before.
    Time, the zeroth frontier, to boldly exist where no man has existed before.

    Read More
  94. @George
    “the American idea.”

    The immigration of cheap African labor, called slavery, is what kept the colonies going. The underlying cause of the American revolution, not talked about, was the British outlawing slavery 1772. So cheap foreign labor is “the American idea” or maybe the American bad idea.

    Search on, blackagendareport revolution slavery, for a view of slavery and the American revolution.

    “the American idea.”

    The immigration of cheap African labor, called slavery, is what kept the colonies going. The underlying cause of the American revolution, not talked about, was the British outlawing slavery 1772. So cheap foreign labor is “the American idea” or maybe the American bad idea.

    Search on, blackagendareport revolution slavery, for a view of slavery and the American revolution.

    A popular notion with SJWs, but it just doesn’t hold up. For one thing, the Revolution began in Massachusetts, where slaves/Blacks peaked at 2% of the population…..And New England as a whole was absolutely critical to the Revolutionary cause (as one historian of my acquaintance put it:”No no New England, no Revolution”)…..

    was the British outlawing slavery 1772.

    The Somerset decision only affected slaves within the British Isles….Slaves elsewhere in the British Empire were unaffected. Parliament did finally get around to abolishing slavery in 1833 (Slavery Abolition Act). British slave-owners were compensated to the tune of 20 million pounds…..

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    • Replies: @Desiderius
    What have facts to do with The Grand Unified Theory of American Racism?
  95. When you think you’re God’s Chosen, and your first ancestor’s arrival in America was marked by a freighter passage and an immigration processing center, it’s probably pretty easy to ignore the Americans who were fighting hostile Indian tribes and rival European conquerors, mapping and taming the vast wilderness of a continent, creating a vast nation from scratch, etc.

    If Ellis Island (i.e. Inviting the World) is the American idea, what was the American idea before Ellis Island?

    Not sure what you mean. All the important battles of the Revolutionary War were fought on Ellis Island, after the Ellis Island Tea Party; all the founding documents were written and ratified on Ellis Island, etc. It all started when the First Peoples opened an immigration office on Ellis Island.

    What is this ‘American Idea’?

    Invade the World, Invite the World.

    Unemployment never went higher than 11% in Western Europe, while it went above 25% for a time in Spain, the people went far-left to Podemos. CultMarx is much more entrenched and featherbedded in media/academia. You also don’t have a FoxNews/talk radio, and evangelical Protestants.

    They have truly nationalist, anti-open-borders parties all over Europe, and have for many years. With a lot less “Diversity” as trigger, mind you. It’s America that lacked any until a couple months ago, and the jury’s still out on how lasting or thorough the change will be.

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  96. @syonredux

    “the American idea.”

    The immigration of cheap African labor, called slavery, is what kept the colonies going. The underlying cause of the American revolution, not talked about, was the British outlawing slavery 1772. So cheap foreign labor is “the American idea” or maybe the American bad idea.

    Search on, blackagendareport revolution slavery, for a view of slavery and the American revolution.
     
    A popular notion with SJWs, but it just doesn't hold up. For one thing, the Revolution began in Massachusetts, where slaves/Blacks peaked at 2% of the population.....And New England as a whole was absolutely critical to the Revolutionary cause (as one historian of my acquaintance put it:"No no New England, no Revolution").....

    was the British outlawing slavery 1772.
     
    The Somerset decision only affected slaves within the British Isles....Slaves elsewhere in the British Empire were unaffected. Parliament did finally get around to abolishing slavery in 1833 (Slavery Abolition Act). British slave-owners were compensated to the tune of 20 million pounds.....

    What have facts to do with The Grand Unified Theory of American Racism?

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  97. Cohen? Hmmm, Irish extraction?

    Let me educate Paddy O’Cohen. The USA was founded on limited government and individual liberty – not on open borders leading to population replacement.

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  98. This Washington Post article attracting lots of hostile comments

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/03/16/immigrants-are-now-canceling-their-food-stamps-for-fear-that-trump-will-deport-them/?utm_term=.35d5b0fee052#comments


    Immigrants are going hungry so Trump won’t deport them

    By Caitlin Dewey March 16 at 10:30 AM
    In the two months since President Trump’s inauguration, food banks and hunger advocates around the country have noted a decline in the number of eligible immigrants applying for SNAP — and an uptick in immigrants seeking to withdraw from the program.

    Their fear, advocates say, is that participation could draw the eye of Immigration and Customs Enforcement or hurt their chances of attaining citizenship. Without federal nutrition benefits, many are resorting to food pantries and soup kitchens to feed themselves and their children.

    The evidence is still anecdotal — and The Washington Post was unable to speak directly with immigrants who chose to cancel their SNAP benefits.

    I am a former immigrant and refugee. We waited for years to be admitted legally to the US. We never accepted welfare or assistance. This lady should have been deported before she had all these children. Unless the gov’t takes away these citizen children so they can have a chance at a decent life rather than be used as pawns by these con artists. She should have followed the law.
    Immigrants are” legal aliens” not people who violate US immigration laws and other laws.

    ______

    And here’s the WaPo helping fuel this exodus from SNAP. Every time they refuse to differentiate legal and illegal immigration and simply lump them as one they are helping to perpetuate this issue further. Legal immigrants have absolutely nothing to fear. Does the WaPo do this intentionally? Only people legally entitled to be here should be eligible to receive SNAP benefits. If a child is here legally then they should be eligible but that doesn’t mean the benefit should be bestowed upon their illegal parent.

    ____

    I don’t believe a word of whats reported and don’t feel sorry for none of the Illegal Aliens here… They all on welfare and work under the table and have an husband that works…Go home let your own Government take care of you… We have our own here to take care of….We have Senior Citizen, and our VET and children need help..take care of Americans first…

    ______

    Border Patrol Agent (Democrat): Why are you entering the US?

    Illegal alien: Just want to be a tourist for the weekend.

    Border Patrol Agent:What is the real purpose of your visit?

    Illegal alien: We want to stay indefinitely, have numerous children who will be US citizens and eligible for a multitude of government benefits, plan to work under the table or with forged documents and only pay income tax if the Earned Income Tax Credit gives back more that what was paid in, protest immigration laws that hinder us and start businesses so we can hire other illegal aliens for low wages to win on contract bids.

    Border Patrol Agent: I am not sure…

    Illegal alien: We will work with amnesty groups to get citizenship or at the very least have all our children VOTE DEMOCRAT.

    Border Patrol Agent: All clear to go..enjoy your trip. Wink, wink.

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  99. @Lurker
    If automation is really the coming thing then why do we need to import a horde of unskilled 3rd worlders?

    Here’s how it works:

    Part of the gains from automation will be distributed in transfer payments to Third Worlders, who will then remit monies to billion-dollar retailers, such as Walmart, T-Mobile, etc.

    Third Worlders get to be fat, dumb, and happy. Facebook has its eyeball-count, Walmart sells its cheap shit.

    It’s all good, right?

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  100. @Jack Hanson
    Yeah, the election was "gallows humor" with Steve and everyone else banging around how doomed we were every time the MSM breathlessly reported another HRC 12 point lead in the polls with a +28D sample.

    Get over yourself with the "isteve commentariat as secret masters of politics".

    I don’t even know what in the Hell anything you wrote means. If you can express it in the Queen’s English, I should be happy to respond.

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    • Replies: @Random Dude on the Internet
    He's saying that what went on wasn't gallows humor but whiny, mopey defeatism. The people who instantly reach the worst possible conclusion about something and then just keep doubling and tripling down on it until it gets disproven and then they move onto the next Trump story to start all over again. It would be different if these people offered amazing insight as to why they are eternal pessimists but nope, they just declare how we're all doomed. These people keep getting proven wrong but they must have some condition where they refuse to learn from any of their mistakes. Ironically enough these people are often the most vocal as well. I'd be embarrassed to keep posting if my track record was as bad as some of the "gallows" humorists are.
    , @Jack Hanson
    Your reflexive snark in the face of uncomfortable truths is noted and expected.

    Pretty much what RGOTI said. Don't let me interrupt your Secret Master LARP tho.
  101. @Lovernios X
    I was a boy during the 50’s and 60’s in Boston. You could see the culture’s values in the schools themselves, grand imposing architecture of brick and granite. The names of these schools were likewise indicators of Bostonian’s pride in Western and Anglo-American civilization: Samuel Adams, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, John Greenleaf Whittier, Beethoven, Mozart, Washington Irving, Francis Parkman, Gregor Mendel, David Farragut, Horace Mann, Robert Gould Shaw, Dante Alighieri, – great names from literature, science, education, and of course Civil War heroes.

    And of course the great high schools: Boston Latin School (the first public school in UA), Boston English, Boston Technical High.

    In the 60’s you saw a shift in the new schools, the new glass and steel buildings with no soul, the names came from local Irish politicians, school officials, civil rights leaders: Paul A. Dever, J.F.K., James P. Timilty, William H Ohrenberger, William Trotter, John D. O’Bryant.

    Later the schools were given inspirational names such as: Boston Arts Academy, Boston Collaborative High School, Boston Community Leadership Academy, Another Course to College, Community Academy of Science & Health, Umana, Mario Academy, Urban Science Academy.

    I’m sure none of the students in these schools know who Longfellow, Parkman, Mendel or Dante were. Or care. Probably few of the teachers know.

    Many of those older schools were renamed, closed, torn down or converted for other uses.
    Sad commentary of the changing demographics of Boston.

    Well said and astutely observed.

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  102. @Buffalo Joe
    Dear Mr. Cohen, My grandparents, both paternal and maternal came to America and landed and were processed through Ellis Island. Notice I said they were processed through Ellis, as was the procedure at that time. They came here legally, found jobs and raised families and played by the book. My grandparents spoke Italian and some broken English. My parents and their siblings spoke English and broken Italian and took advantage of the Buffalo Public Schools, all graduating from HS. Myself, my brother and all of my cousins only spoke English and almost all, if not all, have graduated from college. The reason my grandparents came to America was because the country was growing and expanding, still westward, and workers were needed. Not everyone welcomed them but they endured. They survived the Great Depression and my father and five of my uncles fought in WWII. The "idea" was to become Americans. I don't know your family's history in America, but it probably mirrors mine. The real American Idea is to play by the rules and respect our laws. There is also nothing wrong in being proud to be an American.

    “The real American Idea is to play by the rules and respect our laws. ” Well yes, but most people have literally no way of legally immigrating to the U.S. It’s disingenuous to suggest you just “wait in line.” There is no line for most. That may or may not be good policy, but there were fewer restrictions 100 years ago.

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    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    One hundred years ago, travel was much more prohibitive, and there was no Title VII, welfare, or political correctness to grease the skids and encourage you to despise your hosts.

    If you have no way of legally immigrating to the US you have two options: stay home, or try to immigrate somewhere else.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Mark F, Commenter Anti-Gnostic answers your question quite nicely. There is no guaranteed way to immigrate to America. Please do a little research and see what unstoppable waves of "immigrants" are doing to the land of my grandparents.
    , @Autochthon
    You seem to be assuming they should have a way to come to the U.S.A. They should not, not legally nor illegally; we are full up; they should make the most of the circumstances they find themselves in, just as, for example, I did, not having any viable way to emigrate to Europe and receive a free education.

    Why does it even need explaining on Steve's blog of all places: People of Earth, you have no right whatsoever to enter the U.S.A. None. We don't give a hoot in Hell how sad that makes you. You cannot sleep with Emma Stone, either, and it makes as much sense for you to bitch about that as though it were some grand injustice. Piss off!

  103. @Mark F.
    "The real American Idea is to play by the rules and respect our laws. " Well yes, but most people have literally no way of legally immigrating to the U.S. It's disingenuous to suggest you just "wait in line." There is no line for most. That may or may not be good policy, but there were fewer restrictions 100 years ago.

    One hundred years ago, travel was much more prohibitive, and there was no Title VII, welfare, or political correctness to grease the skids and encourage you to despise your hosts.

    If you have no way of legally immigrating to the US you have two options: stay home, or try to immigrate somewhere else.

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  104. @Mark F.
    "The real American Idea is to play by the rules and respect our laws. " Well yes, but most people have literally no way of legally immigrating to the U.S. It's disingenuous to suggest you just "wait in line." There is no line for most. That may or may not be good policy, but there were fewer restrictions 100 years ago.

    Mark F, Commenter Anti-Gnostic answers your question quite nicely. There is no guaranteed way to immigrate to America. Please do a little research and see what unstoppable waves of “immigrants” are doing to the land of my grandparents.

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  105. @Jack Hanson
    Yeah, the election was "gallows humor" with Steve and everyone else banging around how doomed we were every time the MSM breathlessly reported another HRC 12 point lead in the polls with a +28D sample.

    Get over yourself with the "isteve commentariat as secret masters of politics".

    Yeah the sad truth is that you had people in this comment section who took polls as gospel that even Nate Silver would dismiss as being unrealistically favorable towards Hillary. It’s not gallows humor, it’s bog standard defeatism.

    There are a depressing number of people who think that modern conservatism consists only of snarky ripostes in comment sections. You have #NeverTrump radio hosts and “conservative” authors and bloggers who tried their hardest to sabotage Trump because they get more ratings, clicks, and book sales if there is a Democrat in the White House. Then when Trump won the elections, these same people said we should be somber, even apologetic about the results. Now these same people reflexively throw in the towel at even the slightest suggestion of a road bump.

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  106. @Autochthon
    I don't even know what in the Hell anything you wrote means. If you can express it in the Queen's English, I should be happy to respond.

    He’s saying that what went on wasn’t gallows humor but whiny, mopey defeatism. The people who instantly reach the worst possible conclusion about something and then just keep doubling and tripling down on it until it gets disproven and then they move onto the next Trump story to start all over again. It would be different if these people offered amazing insight as to why they are eternal pessimists but nope, they just declare how we’re all doomed. These people keep getting proven wrong but they must have some condition where they refuse to learn from any of their mistakes. Ironically enough these people are often the most vocal as well. I’d be embarrassed to keep posting if my track record was as bad as some of the “gallows” humorists are.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Your hallucination is noted.
    , @Autochthon
    Thank you for translating. I don't think – and I don't think other well-adjusted persons think – the product nor even the aim of Steve's blog is to somehow solve all the problems facing the West. We are not a deliberative political body with any sort of agreed charter, goals, or organisation.

    Steve is a writer; he reports interesting and important matters, and those of us with interests and views similar to his gather to be edified by his observations and in turn exchange our own ideas.

    That's it; that's all, to my understanding, iSteve or even The Unz Review writ large purport to be.

    I vote, I support and have supported organisations and movements like Mr. Trump's campaign, Californians for Population Stabilisation, the National Rifle Association, and so on, both financially and in other ways as I am able. I speak to those who will listen in my community and social circles, advocating sense to them. I expect many and maybe all others of the rest of you do the same.

    I'm not sure what else Berty, Jack, and others expect. If they've grand designs, I am all ears.

    , @Lot
    On the topic of optimism v pessimism, seems to me that Enoch Powell was right. As was Mike Judge with Idiocracy.

    The only bright side I see is that the ability to have designer babies boosts the fertility of the civilized populations, but that is still 15 years away from the mass market, and demographic momentum will keep the bad trends trending along for a long while after.
  107. @Twinkie

    I’d be interested if you could say more about that as, living in Japan, I have encountered widespread familiarity with Ellis Island schmaltz combined with widespread ignorance of the aspects of national mythos you mention.
     
    My own experience is from 40+ years ago. Much of East Asia today is blanketed with modern American mass media products that are drenched in the Ellis Island mythos.

    How were you educated?
     
    By very traditional parents who loved America, the old America, that is. My father had me watch "The Alamo" multiple times when I was little.

    The Alamo? Huh! Interesting. Thanks.

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  108. @Random Dude on the Internet
    He's saying that what went on wasn't gallows humor but whiny, mopey defeatism. The people who instantly reach the worst possible conclusion about something and then just keep doubling and tripling down on it until it gets disproven and then they move onto the next Trump story to start all over again. It would be different if these people offered amazing insight as to why they are eternal pessimists but nope, they just declare how we're all doomed. These people keep getting proven wrong but they must have some condition where they refuse to learn from any of their mistakes. Ironically enough these people are often the most vocal as well. I'd be embarrassed to keep posting if my track record was as bad as some of the "gallows" humorists are.

    Your hallucination is noted.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    This from the dude with about a gorillion comments about how doomed we were through the election.
  109. @Random Dude on the Internet
    He's saying that what went on wasn't gallows humor but whiny, mopey defeatism. The people who instantly reach the worst possible conclusion about something and then just keep doubling and tripling down on it until it gets disproven and then they move onto the next Trump story to start all over again. It would be different if these people offered amazing insight as to why they are eternal pessimists but nope, they just declare how we're all doomed. These people keep getting proven wrong but they must have some condition where they refuse to learn from any of their mistakes. Ironically enough these people are often the most vocal as well. I'd be embarrassed to keep posting if my track record was as bad as some of the "gallows" humorists are.

    Thank you for translating. I don’t think – and I don’t think other well-adjusted persons think – the product nor even the aim of Steve’s blog is to somehow solve all the problems facing the West. We are not a deliberative political body with any sort of agreed charter, goals, or organisation.

    Steve is a writer; he reports interesting and important matters, and those of us with interests and views similar to his gather to be edified by his observations and in turn exchange our own ideas.

    That’s it; that’s all, to my understanding, iSteve or even The Unz Review writ large purport to be.

    I vote, I support and have supported organisations and movements like Mr. Trump’s campaign, Californians for Population Stabilisation, the National Rifle Association, and so on, both financially and in other ways as I am able. I speak to those who will listen in my community and social circles, advocating sense to them. I expect many and maybe all others of the rest of you do the same.

    I’m not sure what else Berty, Jack, and others expect. If they’ve grand designs, I am all ears.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    "What do they expect?"

    For you and everyone else to stop playing Internet Aristocrat in blog comments and grow a spine.
    , @Autochthon
    Neither I not anyone else posting here has ever, to my knowledge, purported to be an aristocrat, of the Internet or otherwise.

    Please tell me more about how spineless I am and many ways in which I have purported to be aristocratic.

    Then regale me with tales of your own heroic exploits, the merest fraction of which will doubtless reveal you to be the bravest man to live since Audie Murphy.

    And close, please, by revealing what exactly I ought to be doing that would make me brave instead of cowardly? Shall I load my Beretta and storm the statehouse in Sacramento? Do you harbour some kind of fantasy that rioting in the streets or blowing up governmental buildings is a viable way to effect change? Just what would constitute bravery?

    Lastly, only because I am a curious and enquiring man, tell me who pissed in your cornflakes, anyhow?
  110. @Berty
    This comment section has gone so far downhill it's not funny. Whereas Blogspot was often full of insightful and intelligent commentary, now it's just a sea of elderly nitwits crying and weeping about how we're all doomed. You all bitch about the NYT and Guardian but you're just as bad as those comments if not worse.

    The good thing for you is that Unz.com offers a full refund for dissatisfied visitors.

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  111. @Random Dude on the Internet
    He's saying that what went on wasn't gallows humor but whiny, mopey defeatism. The people who instantly reach the worst possible conclusion about something and then just keep doubling and tripling down on it until it gets disproven and then they move onto the next Trump story to start all over again. It would be different if these people offered amazing insight as to why they are eternal pessimists but nope, they just declare how we're all doomed. These people keep getting proven wrong but they must have some condition where they refuse to learn from any of their mistakes. Ironically enough these people are often the most vocal as well. I'd be embarrassed to keep posting if my track record was as bad as some of the "gallows" humorists are.

    On the topic of optimism v pessimism, seems to me that Enoch Powell was right. As was Mike Judge with Idiocracy.

    The only bright side I see is that the ability to have designer babies boosts the fertility of the civilized populations, but that is still 15 years away from the mass market, and demographic momentum will keep the bad trends trending along for a long while after.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Random Dude on the Internet
    If we really wanted to change the demographic destiny of America, then we can find ways of doing it. Enforce immigration laws, limit how much money single mothers can get for welfare programs, and throw in some crazy incentives for couples to have children. Get really crazy. Maybe like the government cancelling out your student loans if you have two children. This would really target white families (since minorities often go to school for free or nearly free thanks to scholarships) and heck, we wasted $20 trillion on The Great Society so why not invest at most a few hundred billion increasing the white birthrates? Granted I know that this would instantly see lawsuits from the usual suspects but it depends on how bad we want it. Right now, nobody, even Evil Nazi Trump, has the desire to do such a thing, just Ivanka giving some boring lip service about maternity leave.
  112. @Maj. Kong
    The PVV did better in the 2010 elections, for a time several months ago, it was polling at 40+ seats.

    The election was an utter disaster for Wilders, and a miracle for the establishment. Europhile parties all picked up major gains. A Muslim party got 2 seats in Parliament.

    This in the face of blatant intimidation by Sultan Erdogan.

    A people cannot be allowed to vote themselves into extinction. There is only one way to do that, the final argument of the kings.

    The election was an utter disaster for Wilders

    Wilders is a liberal. Anyone who thinks a liberal is going to save civilisation is being rather optimistic.

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  113. @Harry Baldwin
    Trump's victory, which some thought would paved the way for the victory of nationalist parties in Europe, may have done the opposite. The explosion of rage and panic on the Left here may have alarmed the Europeans. I don't know, just speculating.

    Trump’s victory, which some thought would paved the way for the victory of nationalist parties in Europe, may have done the opposite. The explosion of rage and panic on the Left here may have alarmed the Europeans. I don’t know, just speculating.

    I think it’s possible. Europeans do despise Americans, and they particularly despise Americans like Trump who glory in their Americanness. Europeans like to think of themselves as being both intellectually and morally superior to Americans. Which is rather amusing given the catastrophic trajectory of European history over the past century.

    It’s quite likely that the Trump Hysteria has frightened a lot of European moderates. It’s ironic but Trump might indirectly and unwittingly have given the European establishment the weapon it needed to crush the nationalists. If the moderates can be frightened into abandoning the nationalists then the remaining hardcore nationalists can be simply ignored.

    Marine le Pen should be doing everything she can to distance herself from Trump. The

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Europeans are sheep. That is the problem. They need to learn to question the globalist media and deprogram themselves.
  114. @Mark F.
    "The real American Idea is to play by the rules and respect our laws. " Well yes, but most people have literally no way of legally immigrating to the U.S. It's disingenuous to suggest you just "wait in line." There is no line for most. That may or may not be good policy, but there were fewer restrictions 100 years ago.

    You seem to be assuming they should have a way to come to the U.S.A. They should not, not legally nor illegally; we are full up; they should make the most of the circumstances they find themselves in, just as, for example, I did, not having any viable way to emigrate to Europe and receive a free education.

    Why does it even need explaining on Steve’s blog of all places: People of Earth, you have no right whatsoever to enter the U.S.A. None. We don’t give a hoot in Hell how sad that makes you. You cannot sleep with Emma Stone, either, and it makes as much sense for you to bitch about that as though it were some grand injustice. Piss off!

    Read More
  115. @Lot
    On the topic of optimism v pessimism, seems to me that Enoch Powell was right. As was Mike Judge with Idiocracy.

    The only bright side I see is that the ability to have designer babies boosts the fertility of the civilized populations, but that is still 15 years away from the mass market, and demographic momentum will keep the bad trends trending along for a long while after.

    If we really wanted to change the demographic destiny of America, then we can find ways of doing it. Enforce immigration laws, limit how much money single mothers can get for welfare programs, and throw in some crazy incentives for couples to have children. Get really crazy. Maybe like the government cancelling out your student loans if you have two children. This would really target white families (since minorities often go to school for free or nearly free thanks to scholarships) and heck, we wasted $20 trillion on The Great Society so why not invest at most a few hundred billion increasing the white birthrates? Granted I know that this would instantly see lawsuits from the usual suspects but it depends on how bad we want it. Right now, nobody, even Evil Nazi Trump, has the desire to do such a thing, just Ivanka giving some boring lip service about maternity leave.

    Read More
  116. @Autochthon
    Thank you for translating. I don't think – and I don't think other well-adjusted persons think – the product nor even the aim of Steve's blog is to somehow solve all the problems facing the West. We are not a deliberative political body with any sort of agreed charter, goals, or organisation.

    Steve is a writer; he reports interesting and important matters, and those of us with interests and views similar to his gather to be edified by his observations and in turn exchange our own ideas.

    That's it; that's all, to my understanding, iSteve or even The Unz Review writ large purport to be.

    I vote, I support and have supported organisations and movements like Mr. Trump's campaign, Californians for Population Stabilisation, the National Rifle Association, and so on, both financially and in other ways as I am able. I speak to those who will listen in my community and social circles, advocating sense to them. I expect many and maybe all others of the rest of you do the same.

    I'm not sure what else Berty, Jack, and others expect. If they've grand designs, I am all ears.

    “What do they expect?”

    For you and everyone else to stop playing Internet Aristocrat in blog comments and grow a spine.

    Read More
  117. @Opinionator
    Your hallucination is noted.

    This from the dude with about a gorillion comments about how doomed we were through the election.

    Read More
  118. @Autochthon
    I don't even know what in the Hell anything you wrote means. If you can express it in the Queen's English, I should be happy to respond.

    Your reflexive snark in the face of uncomfortable truths is noted and expected.

    Pretty much what RGOTI said. Don’t let me interrupt your Secret Master LARP tho.

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  119. @dfordoom

    Trump’s victory, which some thought would paved the way for the victory of nationalist parties in Europe, may have done the opposite. The explosion of rage and panic on the Left here may have alarmed the Europeans. I don’t know, just speculating.
     
    I think it's possible. Europeans do despise Americans, and they particularly despise Americans like Trump who glory in their Americanness. Europeans like to think of themselves as being both intellectually and morally superior to Americans. Which is rather amusing given the catastrophic trajectory of European history over the past century.

    It's quite likely that the Trump Hysteria has frightened a lot of European moderates. It's ironic but Trump might indirectly and unwittingly have given the European establishment the weapon it needed to crush the nationalists. If the moderates can be frightened into abandoning the nationalists then the remaining hardcore nationalists can be simply ignored.



    Marine le Pen should be doing everything she can to distance herself from Trump. The

    Europeans are sheep. That is the problem. They need to learn to question the globalist media and deprogram themselves.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dfordoom

    Europeans are sheep. That is the problem.
     
    It's human nature. Mostly we don't worry about a problem until it actually affects us personally. People who live in nice rich middle-class neighbourhoods don't care very much about crime because it doesn't affect them. People don't care about the drug problem until one of their kids dies of an overdose. People don't care about the feminazis until they find themselves the target of one. People don't care about the loss of freedom of speech until they lose their jobs because of some innocuous remark.

    And people don't care about immigration until their own neighbourhood gets culturally enriched.

    That's why democracy doesn't work. People are naturally selfish and short-sighted. All people.
  120. @celt darnell
    It's an idea that's become more popular lately (because the whole purpose of academia now is to trash the US -- especially anything white Americans might take pride in) and while there is some truth to it (I have no doubt that Somerset was not well-received in the southern colonies) there's a wealth of evidence -- i.e. what people actually said at the time -- pointing to other grievances as being far more important.

    I'm actually surprised it's taken as long as it has for the left to finally start to directly attack the Founding Fathers...

    They’ve been doing it in the colleges for at least 30 years.

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  121. @Opinionator
    Europeans are sheep. That is the problem. They need to learn to question the globalist media and deprogram themselves.

    Europeans are sheep. That is the problem.

    It’s human nature. Mostly we don’t worry about a problem until it actually affects us personally. People who live in nice rich middle-class neighbourhoods don’t care very much about crime because it doesn’t affect them. People don’t care about the drug problem until one of their kids dies of an overdose. People don’t care about the feminazis until they find themselves the target of one. People don’t care about the loss of freedom of speech until they lose their jobs because of some innocuous remark.

    And people don’t care about immigration until their own neighbourhood gets culturally enriched.

    That’s why democracy doesn’t work. People are naturally selfish and short-sighted. All people.

    Read More
  122. @Autochthon
    Thank you for translating. I don't think – and I don't think other well-adjusted persons think – the product nor even the aim of Steve's blog is to somehow solve all the problems facing the West. We are not a deliberative political body with any sort of agreed charter, goals, or organisation.

    Steve is a writer; he reports interesting and important matters, and those of us with interests and views similar to his gather to be edified by his observations and in turn exchange our own ideas.

    That's it; that's all, to my understanding, iSteve or even The Unz Review writ large purport to be.

    I vote, I support and have supported organisations and movements like Mr. Trump's campaign, Californians for Population Stabilisation, the National Rifle Association, and so on, both financially and in other ways as I am able. I speak to those who will listen in my community and social circles, advocating sense to them. I expect many and maybe all others of the rest of you do the same.

    I'm not sure what else Berty, Jack, and others expect. If they've grand designs, I am all ears.

    Neither I not anyone else posting here has ever, to my knowledge, purported to be an aristocrat, of the Internet or otherwise.

    Please tell me more about how spineless I am and many ways in which I have purported to be aristocratic.

    Then regale me with tales of your own heroic exploits, the merest fraction of which will doubtless reveal you to be the bravest man to live since Audie Murphy.

    And close, please, by revealing what exactly I ought to be doing that would make me brave instead of cowardly? Shall I load my Beretta and storm the statehouse in Sacramento? Do you harbour some kind of fantasy that rioting in the streets or blowing up governmental buildings is a viable way to effect change? Just what would constitute bravery?

    Lastly, only because I am a curious and enquiring man, tell me who pissed in your cornflakes, anyhow?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Steve deleted my first comment because he, like you, believes the height of allowable resistance is posting snarky comments on shit-tier blogs.
  123. @MarcB.
    It's disingenuous and treasonous and for those of us not descended from Founding Stock to apply the small window of time that our forbears were allowed entry to the entire history (and future) of the USA. Anybody from immigrant origins has a duty to respect the choices of those whose families blazed the trail long before our arrival.

    Thank you for understanding and acknowledging this fundamental concept.

    Read More
  124. @Lot
    The Dutch voted today they'd rather be dead than offend Islam.

    They will again have a Merkel situation with a "conservative" party leader in charge who relies mostly on left wing votes.

    What was really depressing is that it was not even close. Wilders was crushed and even did worse than the combined hard left parties.

    Le Pen is probably going to lose too, but at least she will come close to winning.

    Wilders is a weirdo with odd connections to US based Zionists. A normal guy without the Muslim obsession and sane economic policies, the Euro and EU is a disaster but continentals want reform, but otherwise the same platform would do a lot better. Same reason pre scandal Fillon was set to win the French Presidency but Marine never will.

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  125. @The True and Original David
    It's basically Semites vs. Whites. Or desert revolutionists and their orc irregulars vs. everyone else.

    Round 1 went to the Semites (Rome, per Gibbon).

    Round 2? Things have been looking down since Napoleon, and especially so since World War Two.

    Today two orcs ("Snoop Dogg" and "Bow Wow"), no doubt at the bidding of their Presbyterian masters, urged fellow orcs to shoot Trump and promised to "pimp" his wife. You may be reasonably sure that many of the inhabitants of Brooklyn, New York threw a tiny party in their hearts over this (to use a figure from that echt American, Ben Hecht).

    Those darn hypocritical liberals!

    “Things have been looking down since Napoleon, and especially so since World War Two.”

    I’m glad to see someone else recognize that things started looking down a lot earlier than the 1960s, the 1930s or 100 hundred years ago.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dfordoom


    “Things have been looking down since Napoleon, and especially so since World War Two.”
     
    I’m glad to see someone else recognize that things started looking down a lot earlier than the 1960s, the 1930s or 100 hundred years ago.
     
    Things have been looking down since the Reformation destroyed the idea of Christendom.
  126. @Kylie
    "Things have been looking down since Napoleon, and especially so since World War Two."

    I'm glad to see someone else recognize that things started looking down a lot earlier than the 1960s, the 1930s or 100 hundred years ago.

    “Things have been looking down since Napoleon, and especially so since World War Two.”

    I’m glad to see someone else recognize that things started looking down a lot earlier than the 1960s, the 1930s or 100 hundred years ago.

    Things have been looking down since the Reformation destroyed the idea of Christendom.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The True and Original David
    Since we are all apparently experts at being blackpilled Eeyores, why not let's go all the way and just say that everything has gone downhill since our Lord was slain. That's 2,000 years.
  127. @Autochthon
    Neither I not anyone else posting here has ever, to my knowledge, purported to be an aristocrat, of the Internet or otherwise.

    Please tell me more about how spineless I am and many ways in which I have purported to be aristocratic.

    Then regale me with tales of your own heroic exploits, the merest fraction of which will doubtless reveal you to be the bravest man to live since Audie Murphy.

    And close, please, by revealing what exactly I ought to be doing that would make me brave instead of cowardly? Shall I load my Beretta and storm the statehouse in Sacramento? Do you harbour some kind of fantasy that rioting in the streets or blowing up governmental buildings is a viable way to effect change? Just what would constitute bravery?

    Lastly, only because I am a curious and enquiring man, tell me who pissed in your cornflakes, anyhow?

    Steve deleted my first comment because he, like you, believes the height of allowable resistance is posting snarky comments on shit-tier blogs.

    Read More
  128. @dfordoom


    “Things have been looking down since Napoleon, and especially so since World War Two.”
     
    I’m glad to see someone else recognize that things started looking down a lot earlier than the 1960s, the 1930s or 100 hundred years ago.
     
    Things have been looking down since the Reformation destroyed the idea of Christendom.

    Since we are all apparently experts at being blackpilled Eeyores, why not let’s go all the way and just say that everything has gone downhill since our Lord was slain. That’s 2,000 years.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dfordoom

    Since we are all apparently experts at being blackpilled Eeyores, why not let’s go all the way and just say that everything has gone downhill since our Lord was slain. That’s 2,000 years.

     

    Actually things were looking pretty promising in the Middle Ages. Science and technology were advancing, but not too fast. Progress was allowed but change for change's sake wasn't fetishised. Without the Reformation we'd have been OK.
  129. @The True and Original David
    Since we are all apparently experts at being blackpilled Eeyores, why not let's go all the way and just say that everything has gone downhill since our Lord was slain. That's 2,000 years.

    Since we are all apparently experts at being blackpilled Eeyores, why not let’s go all the way and just say that everything has gone downhill since our Lord was slain. That’s 2,000 years.

    Actually things were looking pretty promising in the Middle Ages. Science and technology were advancing, but not too fast. Progress was allowed but change for change’s sake wasn’t fetishised. Without the Reformation we’d have been OK.

    Read More

Comments are closed.

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