The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
NYT Editorial Board Falls for Its Own Retconning
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New Reply
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

The New York Times Editorial Board expounds about today’s shooting of Republican Congressmen by a Trump-hating lefty:

Was this attack evidence of how vicious American politics has become? Probably. In 2011, when Jared Lee Loughner opened fire in a supermarket parking lot, grievously wounding Representative Gabby Giffords and killing six people, including a 9-year-old girl, the link to political incitement was clear. Before the shooting, Sarah Palin’s political action committee circulated a map of targeted electoral districts that put Ms. Giffords and 19 other Democrats under stylized cross hairs.

Conservatives and right-wing media were quick on Wednesday to demand forceful condemnation of hate speech and crimes by anti-Trump liberals. They’re right. Though there’s no sign of incitement as direct as in the Giffords attack, liberals should of course hold themselves to the same standard of decency that they ask of the right.

Jeez … talk about believing your own propaganda …

The paranoid schizophrenic guy who shot poor Rep. Giffords, who somehow has survived, was not motivated by Sarah Palin.

That’s just plain embarrassing.

It’s worth noting that the NYT heavily invested in its obsession that the apolitical nut who hated Giffords for personal reasons was actually motivated by the Tea Party, Sarah Palin, and anti-immigrationism, returning to that disproven theme even a year after the shooting. In contrast, Mother Jones did a far better job of showing how normal ideological politics had virtually nothing to do with the maniac’s motivation, as I recount here.

By the way, here’s another lethal case of Trump Derangement Syndrome that got virtually no national coverage. From the Ithaca [N.Y.] Voice:

Man accused of Ithaca homicide: ‘I shot and killed Donald Trump purposely, intentionally and very proudly’

DECEMBER 19, 2016 BY JOLENE ALMENDAREZ

ITHACA, N.Y. — An Ithaca man accused of killing a UPS driver from Candor said in court Monday afternoon that not only did he believe he shot and killed Donald Trump, but that no evidence could be presented to him to suggest otherwise.

Justin R. Barkley, 38, said during his arraignment and subsequent attempt to plead guilty, “I shot and killed Donald Trump purposely, intentionally and very proudly.”

He told the court that he knew where president elect Donald Trump would be on Dec. 8 and waited in the Ithaca Walmart parking lot kill him.

“I went there to purposely shoot and kill him and put him down,” Barkley said.

The victim

He told the court that he understood the difference between mistaking a person for being Trump and asserting that he actually killed Trump. When asked if any evidence could be presented to him to suggest he killed a different person, he said, “I would hope not.”

Behind him in court, victim William Schumacher’s family cried and shook as Barkley made his statements.

 
Hide 176 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. Steve, you are giving them far to much credit. This is with malice aforethought.

    Read More
    • Agree: The Z Blog, Barnard, prole
    • Replies: @vinteuil
    Sailer habitually errs on the side of interpreting the bad guys as generously as possible.
    , @oddsbodkins
    Convictions are more dangerous enemies of truth than lies.
    -Nietzsche
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. It’s a classic case of the Leftist strategy/mantra of “Heads I win, tails you lose.”

    A deranged person wounds a Democrat, and it’s the vile Republican hatred and incitement that led to the assault. An actual Democratic activist shoots a Republican, and it’s this “nonviolent” person who was driven to this madness by the divisive atmosphere, to which everyone – including Republicans – contributed.

    In a similar vein, read this editorial from the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-shooting-at-a-gop-baseball-practice-was-an-assault-on-democracy/2017/06/14/06587d9a-5131-11e7-91eb-9611861a988f_story.html

    Who knows what mixture of madness and circumstance causes someone to pick up a gun and go on a rampage?

    Translation: who knows, indeed? Nobody. Surely, not the leftist incitements against the President and the Republicans.

    Mr. Trump struck exactly the right tone. “We may have our differences, but we do well, in times like these, to remember that everyone who serves in our nation’s capital is here because, above all, they love our country,” he said from the White House.

    Translation: since there was a tragedy, Republicans must talk about unity and give up their partisan rancor.

    We think Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) was correct in not shying away from the issue of gun control when asked at a news conference if he was worried about the safety of politicians. He said he was concerned about all Americans’ safety from gun violence, not just politicians: “This is not what today is about, but we have too many guns on the street.”

    Translation: Democrats, this is no time for “unity” – keep pushing our agenda.

    By the way, what’s missing from the Washington Post’s selective quote of McAuliffe: “We lose 93 million Americans a day to gun violence.” He repeated this several times today. Pack your bags, the country will be devoid of people in four days due to gun violence.

    Read More
    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @anon

    Who knows what mixture of madness and circumstance causes someone to pick up a gun and go on a rampage?
     
    Boy, that's really weird that they wouldn't be able to figure that out, considering that these same people were able to divine the motives of people committing anti-Muslim hate crimes that never actually took place, as well as threats to Jewish community centers, that were actually made by an Israeli teenager and a black, leftist journslist.

    My blood pressure is going to be through the roof these next few days...

    , @BenKenobi

    this is no time for “unity” – keep pushing our agenda
     
    One day, our side will learn to be this ruthless.

    Um, right?
    , @Harry Baldwin
    Come on, McAuliffe made an honest mistake. He confused the number of Americans lost every day to gun violence with the number of miles from the earth to the sun. Could happen to anyone.
    , @Thomas

    A deranged person wounds a Democrat, and it’s the vile Republican hatred and incitement that led to the assault. An actual Democratic activist shoots a Republican, and it’s this “nonviolent” person who was driven to this madness by the divisive atmosphere, to which everyone – including Republicans – contributed.
     
    The Ur-example of this was JFK's assassination being transformed from being the work of a Castro-worshipping Communist into being the result of a "climate of hate" in Dallas (or else that of a "Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy").
    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    That can't be right. At the very least, it's 15 times greater than the actual number.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Twink, McAuliffe was extrapolating Baltimore's homicide rate. An honest mistake. Meanwhile, I went door to door in my neighborhood and everyone seems to be ok. How soon before this holocaust hits here in WNY?
    , @Lex Corvus
    Reminds me of how "[right-wing] hate" in Dallas killed JFK, rather than a Castro-loving Marxist who once defected to the Soviet Union.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  3. That’s just plain embarrassing.

    Steve is right of course, yet somehow it doesn’t embarrass the NY Times editorial board.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    It should, though.

    And: You never know.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  4. anon • Disclaimer says:

    Representative Gabby Giffords and killing six people, including a 9-year-old girl, the link to political incitement was clear.

    The nerve. The unimaginable chutzpah.

    I don’t want to go there and read the comments, because I’m about to go to bed, and I don’t know if I’d be able to sleep after I did so, but please, for the love of God, someone tell me that the commenters aren’t buying that.

    Read More
    • Replies: @God Emperor Putin
    The NYT doesn't allow you to voice your opinion on editorials. Editorials are for telling people how to think, not discussion.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  5. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Twinkie
    It's a classic case of the Leftist strategy/mantra of "Heads I win, tails you lose."

    A deranged person wounds a Democrat, and it's the vile Republican hatred and incitement that led to the assault. An actual Democratic activist shoots a Republican, and it's this "nonviolent" person who was driven to this madness by the divisive atmosphere, to which everyone - including Republicans - contributed.

    In a similar vein, read this editorial from the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-shooting-at-a-gop-baseball-practice-was-an-assault-on-democracy/2017/06/14/06587d9a-5131-11e7-91eb-9611861a988f_story.html

    Who knows what mixture of madness and circumstance causes someone to pick up a gun and go on a rampage?
     
    Translation: who knows, indeed? Nobody. Surely, not the leftist incitements against the President and the Republicans.

    Mr. Trump struck exactly the right tone. “We may have our differences, but we do well, in times like these, to remember that everyone who serves in our nation’s capital is here because, above all, they love our country,” he said from the White House.
     
    Translation: since there was a tragedy, Republicans must talk about unity and give up their partisan rancor.

    We think Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) was correct in not shying away from the issue of gun control when asked at a news conference if he was worried about the safety of politicians. He said he was concerned about all Americans’ safety from gun violence, not just politicians: “This is not what today is about, but we have too many guns on the street.”
     
    Translation: Democrats, this is no time for "unity" - keep pushing our agenda.

    By the way, what's missing from the Washington Post's selective quote of McAuliffe: "We lose 93 million Americans a day to gun violence." He repeated this several times today. Pack your bags, the country will be devoid of people in four days due to gun violence.

    Who knows what mixture of madness and circumstance causes someone to pick up a gun and go on a rampage?

    Boy, that’s really weird that they wouldn’t be able to figure that out, considering that these same people were able to divine the motives of people committing anti-Muslim hate crimes that never actually took place, as well as threats to Jewish community centers, that were actually made by an Israeli teenager and a black, leftist journslist.

    My blood pressure is going to be through the roof these next few days…

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    My blood pressure is going to be through the roof these next few days…
     
    If your blood pressure goes through the roof, the terrorists will have won.

    Revenge is a dish best served cold.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  6. I know they occurred just prior to Trump ,but I’d throw the blm cop massacres on the pile too. Nuts egged on by The good thinking left.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  7. @Twinkie
    It's a classic case of the Leftist strategy/mantra of "Heads I win, tails you lose."

    A deranged person wounds a Democrat, and it's the vile Republican hatred and incitement that led to the assault. An actual Democratic activist shoots a Republican, and it's this "nonviolent" person who was driven to this madness by the divisive atmosphere, to which everyone - including Republicans - contributed.

    In a similar vein, read this editorial from the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-shooting-at-a-gop-baseball-practice-was-an-assault-on-democracy/2017/06/14/06587d9a-5131-11e7-91eb-9611861a988f_story.html

    Who knows what mixture of madness and circumstance causes someone to pick up a gun and go on a rampage?
     
    Translation: who knows, indeed? Nobody. Surely, not the leftist incitements against the President and the Republicans.

    Mr. Trump struck exactly the right tone. “We may have our differences, but we do well, in times like these, to remember that everyone who serves in our nation’s capital is here because, above all, they love our country,” he said from the White House.
     
    Translation: since there was a tragedy, Republicans must talk about unity and give up their partisan rancor.

    We think Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) was correct in not shying away from the issue of gun control when asked at a news conference if he was worried about the safety of politicians. He said he was concerned about all Americans’ safety from gun violence, not just politicians: “This is not what today is about, but we have too many guns on the street.”
     
    Translation: Democrats, this is no time for "unity" - keep pushing our agenda.

    By the way, what's missing from the Washington Post's selective quote of McAuliffe: "We lose 93 million Americans a day to gun violence." He repeated this several times today. Pack your bags, the country will be devoid of people in four days due to gun violence.

    this is no time for “unity” – keep pushing our agenda

    One day, our side will learn to be this ruthless.

    Um, right?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Barnard
    Depends on what you mean by our side. I don't consider 90% of the politicians in the GOP on our side and they will never do it. Even among more mainstream media figures on the right, I am not seeing much pushback against the left.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. @Twinkie
    It's a classic case of the Leftist strategy/mantra of "Heads I win, tails you lose."

    A deranged person wounds a Democrat, and it's the vile Republican hatred and incitement that led to the assault. An actual Democratic activist shoots a Republican, and it's this "nonviolent" person who was driven to this madness by the divisive atmosphere, to which everyone - including Republicans - contributed.

    In a similar vein, read this editorial from the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-shooting-at-a-gop-baseball-practice-was-an-assault-on-democracy/2017/06/14/06587d9a-5131-11e7-91eb-9611861a988f_story.html

    Who knows what mixture of madness and circumstance causes someone to pick up a gun and go on a rampage?
     
    Translation: who knows, indeed? Nobody. Surely, not the leftist incitements against the President and the Republicans.

    Mr. Trump struck exactly the right tone. “We may have our differences, but we do well, in times like these, to remember that everyone who serves in our nation’s capital is here because, above all, they love our country,” he said from the White House.
     
    Translation: since there was a tragedy, Republicans must talk about unity and give up their partisan rancor.

    We think Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) was correct in not shying away from the issue of gun control when asked at a news conference if he was worried about the safety of politicians. He said he was concerned about all Americans’ safety from gun violence, not just politicians: “This is not what today is about, but we have too many guns on the street.”
     
    Translation: Democrats, this is no time for "unity" - keep pushing our agenda.

    By the way, what's missing from the Washington Post's selective quote of McAuliffe: "We lose 93 million Americans a day to gun violence." He repeated this several times today. Pack your bags, the country will be devoid of people in four days due to gun violence.

    Come on, McAuliffe made an honest mistake. He confused the number of Americans lost every day to gun violence with the number of miles from the earth to the sun. Could happen to anyone.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Twinkie

    McAuliffe made an honest mistake.
     
    SEVERAL TIMES.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Hahahaa! No wonder that number seem so familiar to me - and my kid just asked me a few weeks ago how far away it is (and I told him).

    But really, what must be happening with this Gun-control-nut McAuliffe is that he has this talking point in his head to spout out regularly as a reflex. Otherwise, how indeed would he make the same mistake a number of times. It's just in his head with his other talking points. He may be shuffling them around in there, as the only actual activity in the frontal lobe. It just comes out in due time "and 93 million people are lost to ...." while his mind is not focused on anything in particular.


    BTW, a commenter on the other post of Steve's about this attack brought up this mistake (same response, that's gonna clean us out in 4 days, maybe 5 tops with the illegal aliens). I just didn't want to click on a video with this idiot on it - it just encourages these people.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  9. I am still waiting to hear the outrage about innocent Muslim immigrants being gunned down by non-English speaking illegal Colombians.

    http://www.timesledger.com/stories/2016/37/107stabbing_2016_09_09_q.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    I'm just thankful we are still able to recruit the finest dishwashers and busboys in the world from Colombia, a land renowned for its tradition of excellence in these arcane disciplines. We certainly could never be expected to find and train Americans to wash dishes and bus tables, as it's well know from countless studies underwritten by disinterested restauranteurs that a crucial shortage of these skills exists, and universities are not graduating enough qualified busboys and dishwashers to satisfy surging demands, despite our best efforts. The new B2DW Visa for Busboys & Dishwashing, sponsored by Representati?ve Anna Eshoo (D – Assyria) and endorsed by President Trump (R – Mendacity) is just what is needed to prevent continuing shortages!
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  10. @Harry Baldwin
    Come on, McAuliffe made an honest mistake. He confused the number of Americans lost every day to gun violence with the number of miles from the earth to the sun. Could happen to anyone.

    McAuliffe made an honest mistake.

    SEVERAL TIMES.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Highlands
    HUMOR.

    (Great point about GOP 'healing' and Dem plowing on, though. This is war and I hope to hell Trump gets that, behind whatever n-dimensional chess he may be playing. I firmly believe he's the last chance to avoid gulags, civil war or both. He seems to be the kind of guy who is keeping mental lists and will eventually more than even it up over the mock beheadings, the et tu tribe and now open political shootings, the kind of guy who knows the significance of force. He'd better be or we're toast - Dems will ramp it up until rhetoric becomes real: they've already begun.)

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  11. It’s a classic case of the Leftist strategy/mantra of “Heads I win, tails you lose.”

    The strategy is less germane than the left’s total capture of the oligarch class’ minds, Big Media.

    Read More
    • Agree: Desiderius
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  12. By the way, what’s missing from the Washington Post’s selective quote of McAuliffe: “We lose 93 million Americans a day to gun violence.” He repeated this several times today. Pack your bags, the country will be devoid of people in four days due to gun violence.

    How stupid does one have to be to say this more than once in a lifetime, never mind in the same day?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kyle McKenna
    I'm three pages into Google results and not a one of the sources for this gaffe is MSM. It's almost like they want to completely ignore news and facts that don't fit their agenda. Perplexing, huh?

    If we had anything remotely resembling a free exchange of ideas in this country, the MSM would have to grapple with events and ideas that don't fit their Narratives. As things stand, their stranglehold upon public opinion is so strong that they can 'disappear' anything they don't like.

    This situation is diametrically opposed to the one ordained by our Founding Fathers, which is just one more reason they despise our Founding Fathers.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  13. Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  14. Yeah, this guy was clearly a Berniecrat and Loughner was all over the map. But crosshairs. That’s all they have to say: crosshairs.

    Until you show me crosshairs over the Republican softball team photo on the Rachel Maddow Show, it’s checkmate.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    There were no crosshairs - open sights, dude.

    We're gonna have to change the expression. "Democrats in Congress today set their iron sights on the gun violence tragically and unexpectedly moving into many of the minority neighborhoods in our inner cities. Today, barber shop crossfire shootings are in the crosshairs have the highest red stripe in the spiral covered by the front sight with the rear sights lined up, and Democrats are breathing out slowly and steadily with an even trigger pull.

    Nah, too cumbersome.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  15. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    There’s a large basket of ahistorical lies that the left keeps promulgating …

    The Great Depression was caused by a lack of government action! (Actually government policies prevented market forces from healing the economy)

    Joe McCarthy was wrong! (He was 90% accurate see Venona and Coulter’s book both of which have never been refuted only memory-holed)

    The evil right wingers killed JFK! (Oswald was a leftist, Castro was a leftist, LBJ was a leftist)

    Timothy McVeigh blew up the Federal building in OKC by parking a Ryder truck filled with fertilizer outside on the street! (Actually the combustion/impact physics of this type of explosion were a tiny fraction of the power necessary to cause the damage: it was controlled demolition just like the Twin Towers)

    Etc etc etc ad infinitum …

    Read More
    • Replies: @Forbes

    just like the Twin Towers
     
    Yes, of course! With airliners as the detonators. LOL.
    , @Jack D
    Not only was this a controlled demolition, but in order to make it look like someone blew up a Ryder truck loaded with tons of explosives, they also destroyed 324 other buildings within a 16-block radius, shattered glass in 258 nearby buildings, and destroyed or burned 86 cars. Only the BATF, the CIA and Mossad (working together) had the resources to carefully plant thousands of shaped charges that would create the exact same blast pattern that would exist if you blew up a truck full of explosives. Their deviousness is boundless.
    , @oddsbodkins
    Were the Beirut barracks, Khobar towers, Bishopsgate and Manchester truck bombings all faked as well?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  16. They are dead in the water, motile, and expending their remaining ammunition on bubbles and their own life boats.
    _______
    We must never forget the workplace shooter who, when arrested, would say only that he didn’t speak German. He claimed (to a psychiatrist speaking the same language as the arresting officers) that he thought he had time warped to WWII, and was shooting Nazis instead of his coworkers. This plan failed when his work conputer internet history showed inquiries about faking insanity.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  17. Over/under on when McCain, Grahamnesty, and BRAVE Sir Cuck Ryan offer “sensible gun control” as a means to “stop the violence?”

    A day? Two? Meanwhile supposedly Mueller will indict Trump within a week for “Obstruction of Justice” if you believe the Bezos Times.

    Game theory says the Dems will dial down the violence when they start losing leaders they can’t replace. Until then they’ll favor it. Same with “impeachment.” Republicans collect the scalp of say, Kamala Harris for various corrupt deals (hey she’s Willie Brown’s former mistress, she must be corrupt) and its Mutual Assured Destruction.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  18. Before the shooting, Sarah Palin’s political action committee circulated a map of targeted electoral districts that put Ms. Giffords and 19 other Democrats under stylized cross hairs.

    As I recall, Loughner had a long standing obsession of (and resentment towards) Gifford that predated Sarah Palin’s benign ad by several years, and had almost nothing to do with political philosophy and everything to do with psychological delusion and dysfunction. He had actually met Giffords 3 or 4 years before he had shot her and murdered those other people, and that’s about the time his obsession started. He had books by both Hitler and Marx, so he – like a lot of crazy people – developed an incoherent extremism that didn’t operate on the standard left/right paradigm.

    Or maybe all of that was all fake news.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Gandydancer
    "[Loughner] had books by both Hitler and Marx, so he – like a lot of crazy people – developed an incoherent extremism that didn’t operate on the standard left/right paradigm."

    That's two varieties of Socialist. What part of Loughner's extremism was not "left"?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  19. Involuntary commitment to mental institutions, abandoned in the 1960s, may have to be reconsidered in light of current domestic extremism.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  20. @Twinkie

    McAuliffe made an honest mistake.
     
    SEVERAL TIMES.

    HUMOR.

    (Great point about GOP ‘healing’ and Dem plowing on, though. This is war and I hope to hell Trump gets that, behind whatever n-dimensional chess he may be playing. I firmly believe he’s the last chance to avoid gulags, civil war or both. He seems to be the kind of guy who is keeping mental lists and will eventually more than even it up over the mock beheadings, the et tu tribe and now open political shootings, the kind of guy who knows the significance of force. He’d better be or we’re toast – Dems will ramp it up until rhetoric becomes real: they’ve already begun.)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  21. @Glaivester
    I am still waiting to hear the outrage about innocent Muslim immigrants being gunned down by non-English speaking illegal Colombians.

    http://www.timesledger.com/stories/2016/37/107stabbing_2016_09_09_q.html

    I’m just thankful we are still able to recruit the finest dishwashers and busboys in the world from Colombia, a land renowned for its tradition of excellence in these arcane disciplines. We certainly could never be expected to find and train Americans to wash dishes and bus tables, as it’s well know from countless studies underwritten by disinterested restauranteurs that a crucial shortage of these skills exists, and universities are not graduating enough qualified busboys and dishwashers to satisfy surging demands, despite our best efforts. The new B2DW Visa for Busboys & Dishwashing, sponsored by Representati?ve Anna Eshoo (D – Assyria) and endorsed by President Trump (R – Mendacity) is just what is needed to prevent continuing shortages!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  22. Off-topic, and yet vaguely topical re delusional thinking. It’s unclear whether the following excerpt has to do with ISIS groupies trying to avoid being killed in the upcoming battle for Raqqa, but it is possible that some of ISIS’s foreign members were just trying to reach what they were told was an Islamo-socialist paradise on earth:

    “When we in Indonesia… we read, we watch in the internet, Dawlah Islamiya is a place to live, to become a real Muslim,” said Leefa, 38, using the Arabic for Islamic State.

    “I have health problems, I need an operation in my neck and it’s very, very expensive in Indonesia,” she added, her eyes downcast behind her black-rimmed glasses.

    “But in Daesh, there’s all free, all free,” she said, using the Arabic acronym for IS.

    “We come to Daesh for become a real Muslim and for my health,” she added, her face framed by a green headscarf.

    This is a variation of the post October Revolution phenomenon of a number of people (including Lee Harvey Oswald) who moved to the Soviet Union expecting great things.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  23. Lot says:

    I’ve noticed over the years “critical condition” has been defined down from its former meaning of “high chance of death.” Scalise was shot in the hip, taken right to a top hospital, and was described as “in good spirits” and talking to his wife on his cell. I don’t think 20 years ago that would have been called critical.

    Read More
    • Replies: @G Pinfold
    Any chance your information is wrong, incomplete or out of date? Of course not. You're a f--king know-it-all.
    , @midtown
    And at that time he was considered to be in "stable" condition. Later, they said "critical." Sounds like he took a turn for the worse.
    , @AM
    It turns out that the media initially down played his condition. He was shot in the hip with no exit wound. That means that his lower torso absorbed all the energy of the bullet. There will be bone fractures, possible tears in his digestive tract (the real issue as it leads to infections), and just a generally hideous amount of tissue damage.

    I suspect he was running on adrenaline when he went into hospital. The last report I saw was 2 surgeries, more than one blood transfusion, and he'll need another surgery. He's in ICU right now. Yeah, he's critical.
    , @Jack Hanson
    Being shot in the pelvic girdle is one of two shots considered a 'stopping' shot, the other being a bullet placed into the inverted triangle formed by the eyes and the nose.

    So yes. Its pretty critical when its right up there with being shot in the face.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Lot, Bullet wounds that enter your innards, but don't exit your body can cause critical injuries that require bowel re-sectioning, colostomy bags, catheters or organ removal. Any gun shot wound to your lower pelvic region should be considered a life threatening injury.
    , @Jack D
    What's your point? That it's no big deal? Would you want to change places with that man right now?

    I can't believe the level of callousness and cynicism around here. I understand that people are sick of being lied to and spun by the press and politicians but you can't just assume that every damn thing you hear is a lie.
    , @Anonymous
    Obvious you know nothing of medicine or anatomy. The pelvis is the most important part of the skeleton. It holds the spine, shoulders and head up. The legs are supported by the pelvis. The pelvis is a very complicated structure of many bones held together by a complicated structure of cartilage.

    Because it is so complicated, the pelvis is very, very vulnerable to injury, difficult to fix, and pelvic injuries are very very serious.

    Stop pontificating about things of which you know nothing. He could speak with his wife. His ability to speak has nothing to do with his injuries.

    , @Chrisnonymous
    "Critical condition" isn't actually medical terminology. There's no standardized meaning. Whenever you hear about a hospitalization from a doctor or hospital representative, they are ethically prohibited from giving out detailed information, so this reporting in the news is always rather meaningless.
    , @bored identity
    The Kingfish was also in a good spirit...and critical condition:



    "... After Huey’s shooting, special trauma surgeons were summoned from New Orleans to perform his emergency surgery.

    They were not able to reach Baton Rouge in time, due to roadwork on the new Airline Highway, an 80-mile concrete road initiated by Long to link the two cities.

    Construction of the Bonnet Carré Spillway forced the surgeons to take the old River Road, where they had a car accident...."

    (...)

    "...After having met the man in Shreveport, he was blindfolded and taken to an unknown location where he had to take an oath on a Bible that he would not reveal what was going on.

    The meeting was actually a [Huey Long] 'assassination club' meeting.
    The members were doctors, attorneys, businessmen … upper class folks.

    He said he had never told that story until he told me about it, as he did not want any part of it, even though his family were strong anti-Longs. But he did like Earl.”

    — Greggory Davies, retired Winn Parish Deputy Sheriff

    http://www.hueylong.com/life-times/assassination.php

     

    , @Twinkie

    I’ve noticed over the years “critical condition” has been defined down from its former meaning of “high chance of death.” Scalise was shot in the hip, taken right to a top hospital, and was described as “in good spirits” and talking to his wife on his cell. I don’t think 20 years ago that would have been called critical.
     
    And you would be wrong. Don't take MY word for it: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2017/06/15/why-a-single-gunshot-to-steve-scalises-hip-could-be-life-threatening

    For those of us who experience gun violence via movies or television, the single bullet wound to the hip that House Majority Whip Steve Scalise suffered in a ballfield shooting Wednesday would seem less serious than what could have happened to him. After all, he wasn't hit in the head or chest, which can be immediately fatal.

    But even a single penetrating wound to the pelvic region, which is densely packed with blood vessels, organs and other structures, is extremely dangerous, according to trauma surgeons and emergency medical personnel.

    According to MedStar Washington Hospital Center, the rifle shot to the Louisiana congressman's left hip “traveled across his pelvis, fracturing bones, injuring internal organs, and causing severe bleeding.” He went into shock and within hours received many units of blood via transfusion and underwent two operations.

    In an update Thursday evening, the hospital said Scalise had undergone additional surgery "related to his internal injuries and a broken bone in his leg. He remains in critical condition, but has improved in the last 24 hours." The statement also said further surgery will be required and that Scalise "will be in the hospital for some time."

    Such details reflect the complexity of the pelvic area, which is home to the iliac blood vessels that include major arteries branching off the aorta — the main route that carries oxygenated blood to all parts of the body. Wounds to those vessels, large and small, cause fast, severe blood loss, which can set off a cascade of problems for surgeons trying to save a patient's life.

    In fact, 30 percent to 50 percent of injuries to the main iliac vessels result in death, said Joseph V. Sakran, director of emergency general surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital, who was himself shot in the throat after a football game about two decades ago when a fight broke out and someone fired into the crowd.
     
    It looks like he will survive, but he will be looking at a long, hard road back to some semblance of normal health. Even then, he may have drastically reduced mobility. Pelvis is a bad place to be shot... especially with a centerfire rifle.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  24. Meanwhile in Britain:

    Fierce rivals from the worlds of politics, journalism and broadcasting are uniting, for a few days at least, in support of this weekend’s Great Get Together events in memory of Jo Cox MP, who was murdered by a far-right fanatic a year ago.

    All four living former prime ministers, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown for Labour and Sir John Major and David Cameron for the Conservatives, are recording messages about what they believe unites Britain as a nation.

    Finally in Yorkshire, where Cox was MP for Batley and Spen, rival local news teams for the BBC and ITV will stage a joint broadcast about this weekend’s events, in which more than 116,000 community get-togethers and street parties have been planned across the UK.

    The acts of solidarity between people and organisations that are usually on opposite sides of the spectrum is about “setting aside differences and coming together”, said Lance Price, a spokesman for the Jo Cox Foundation.

    They conclude: “As the Great Get Together is launched this coming weekend in memory of Jo Cox’s life and work, we two editors have no hesitation in uniting, if for one day only, to share the fine sentiment of George Orwell, that: ‘If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear’.”

    Brendan Cox, the husband of this MP whose entire employment history is “invade the world, invite the world”, has been doing the media rounds for a year now to talk up the dangers of “populists” and why populism must be shut down at all costs.

    [MORE]

    We’ve had television documentaries about this murder and there’s a book coming out.

    The book is resolutely uplifting, but on the morning we meet Cox is looking shell-shocked again: only hours earlier, a suicide bomber had attacked the Manchester Arena. He is, he apologises, “feeling shit”.

    “I feel a huge desire, when anything like this happens, to be helpful. And to try to make sure the community tension doesn’t blow up, and that people’s anger is channelled against extremist ideology rather than communities.

    Translation: The terror attack was awful because white people might get angry, and it’s more important we shut patriots’ mouths and protect Muslims, than stop people blowing up proles.”

    What I find most curious about the Coxes and the #MoreInCommon shtick (that migrants and natives have “more in common than what divides us”) is how the late Jo’s main passion in parliament was urging support for Salafist jihadis to genocide religious minorities to destroy the Middle East.

    Cox launched the All Party Parliamentary Friends of Syria group, becoming its chair. In the Commons vote in December to approve UK military intervention against ISIL in Syria, Cox abstained because she believed in a more comprehensive strategy that would also include combatting President Bashar al-Assad and his “indiscriminate barrel bombs”.

    She wrote:
    By refusing to tackle Assad’s brutality, we may actively alienate more of the Sunni population, driving them towards Isis. So I have decided to abstain. Because I am not against airstrikes per se, but I cannot actively support them unless they are part of a plan. Because I believe in action to address Isis, but do not believe it will work in isolation.

    Brendan gave the money raised for his wife’s murder to al-Qaeda’s PR wing, the White Helmets, and Hope Not Hate, which is the UK’s, Soros-funded answer to the SPLC.

    In February 2016, Cox wrote to the Nobel Committee praising the work of the Syrian Civil Defense, a civilian voluntary emergency rescue organisation known as the White Helmets, and nominating them for the Nobel Peace Prize: “In the most dangerous place on earth these unarmed volunteers risk their lives to help anyone in need regardless of religion or politics”. The nomination was accepted by the committee, and garnered the support of twenty of her fellow MPs and several celebrities, including George Clooney, Daniel Craig, Chris Martin and Michael Palin. The nomination was supported by members of Canada’s New Democratic Party, who urged Stéphane Dion, the country’s Foreign Affairs Minister, to give his backing on behalf of Canada.

    No politicisation of this murder, nope, none whatsoever *cough*.

    Were it not for the violent hatred of one white supremacist, few of us would probably know the backbench MP’s name today. But her murder was a national tragedy, halting the referendum campaign in its tracks and mourned with messages of condolences from world leaders. On what would have been her 42nd birthday, six days later, thousands gathered in Trafalgar Square to celebrate her life; Malala Yousafzai spoke, Lily Allen sang, Bill Nighy read, while abroad crowds gathered in cities from Nairobi to Sydney. On the day of her funeral, constituents lined the streets of the cortege; the trial and conviction of her murderer several months later made headlines all over the world.

    Oh, and as a bonus:

    Every night, for almost a year, Brendan Cox and his wife sat up discussing the rise of the far right. He was conducting a major study of populist extremism across the western world and, once the children were in bed, the pair would talk through its implications and analyse the threat.

    and

    With the charity Tell MAMA she worked on The Geography of Anti-Muslim Hatred, investigating cases of Islamophobia; the report was dedicated to her at its launch on 29 June 2016.

    All the while, “[Cox's] West Yorkshire constituency is near the epicentre of the Muslim child rape epidemic that has been sweeping the Labour heartlands of northern England, largely ignored or covered up by social services workers, police and politicians.”

    Coincidentally, at the time of the deadly attack on the MP, who used her maiden speech in Parliament to proclaim that her community has been “deeply enhanced by immigration”, sentencing was about to take place on one such case nearby.

    The court heard that in Halifax, eleven miles from Cox’s constituency, a vulnerable underage girl had been left to fend for herself at the age of 13 after her mother died. This child ended up being preyed on by 100 Muslim males who plied her with alcohol and drugs. The girl — nominally in council care — was then passed from house to house and from town to town as far away as Manchester and London. The girl described being filmed by Muslims on a mobile phone while being orally raped. She contracted an STD. Some of the rapists were identified from CCTV which had been seized from the hotels she could remember, while others were caught because of DNA from stains on her clothing. The police said afterwords that the girl, one of two victims, had shown “immense courage and bravery in reporting these matters to the police and providing evidence.”

    At the Leeds trial, only fifteen of the men were convicted. Originally over a hundred were arrested and doubtless dozens of culprits walked free. It was a lurid and horrific story but such hearings are so common these days, they have become wearily familiar.

    Whether or not elites and the media consider it legitimate for political points to be made about attacks on lawmakers depends entirely on for which side the target bats.

    Read More
    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    "this weekend’s events, in which more than 116,000 community get-togethers and street parties have been planned across the UK"

    I smell (probably tax-funded) BS. Don't think many Bradfordians will be sat with the people who were trying to kill them a decade ago. I imagine a lot of student types signed up, have organised zilch and will at most be asking any Muslims they know to come and share a samosa - pity it's still Ramadan and they can't eat til dark. Likewise a lot of nice churchian ladies who probably run the foodbank as well - like these. The whole thing will be likeminded people meeting other likeminded people.

    https://nvite.com/moreincommon/mrj862

    Just been on the website.

    https://nvite.com/community/thegreatgettogether


    "There are more than 108,000 get-togethers happening across the country — from street parties and Big Lunches to BBQs, games of football and bake offs.

    Many of these events are run by individuals and their neighbours, so look out for stuff going on in your area (or organise your own event if you haven’t had an invite slip through your letterbox yet!). But there are also loads of exciting bigger events where all are welcome, so search for one near you below and get amongst the celebrations!"
     

    There are precisely 399 "Big Events", starting with "Grandparents Together" in that heartland of vibrancy (i.e. whitopia), Launceston in Cornwall. I wonder how much of our council tax will be funding these?
    , @Anonymous
    Cox was lobbying to settle Syrian refugees in West Yorkshire, which is an absolutely radioactive issue.

    If a Protestant politician in Northern Ireland were lobbying to settle Catholic families in East Belfast nobody would be very surprised if he turned up dead. Of course everybody would denounce the killers and express sympathy for the victim, but privately they would wonder if he was a fool or a madman.

    Politicans on the 'mainland' live in a strange fantasy world where they can do things like this with impunity. Consequence-free virtual-signalling.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    The Geography of Anti-Muslim Hatred
     
    It's strongest in those places once ruled by Turks, Arabs, etc. And on what Huntington called their "bloody borders". Eg, Mindanao, Timor, Nigeria…

    In other words, it's hard-fought-for and well-earned, so let's not deprive them of the fruits of their labors.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  25. Given the ongoing harassment of him and his administration by the ‘media political complex’ (which will never let up — ‘Whatevergate’), Trump must immediately and very publicly order the FBI to investigate the killing of Seth Rich.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  26. @Twinkie
    It's a classic case of the Leftist strategy/mantra of "Heads I win, tails you lose."

    A deranged person wounds a Democrat, and it's the vile Republican hatred and incitement that led to the assault. An actual Democratic activist shoots a Republican, and it's this "nonviolent" person who was driven to this madness by the divisive atmosphere, to which everyone - including Republicans - contributed.

    In a similar vein, read this editorial from the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-shooting-at-a-gop-baseball-practice-was-an-assault-on-democracy/2017/06/14/06587d9a-5131-11e7-91eb-9611861a988f_story.html

    Who knows what mixture of madness and circumstance causes someone to pick up a gun and go on a rampage?
     
    Translation: who knows, indeed? Nobody. Surely, not the leftist incitements against the President and the Republicans.

    Mr. Trump struck exactly the right tone. “We may have our differences, but we do well, in times like these, to remember that everyone who serves in our nation’s capital is here because, above all, they love our country,” he said from the White House.
     
    Translation: since there was a tragedy, Republicans must talk about unity and give up their partisan rancor.

    We think Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) was correct in not shying away from the issue of gun control when asked at a news conference if he was worried about the safety of politicians. He said he was concerned about all Americans’ safety from gun violence, not just politicians: “This is not what today is about, but we have too many guns on the street.”
     
    Translation: Democrats, this is no time for "unity" - keep pushing our agenda.

    By the way, what's missing from the Washington Post's selective quote of McAuliffe: "We lose 93 million Americans a day to gun violence." He repeated this several times today. Pack your bags, the country will be devoid of people in four days due to gun violence.

    A deranged person wounds a Democrat, and it’s the vile Republican hatred and incitement that led to the assault. An actual Democratic activist shoots a Republican, and it’s this “nonviolent” person who was driven to this madness by the divisive atmosphere, to which everyone – including Republicans – contributed.

    The Ur-example of this was JFK’s assassination being transformed from being the work of a Castro-worshipping Communist into being the result of a “climate of hate” in Dallas (or else that of a “Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy”).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Federalist
    I feel like I live in a Kafka novel. It used to be that every reasonably well-informed person understood that Oswald was a pro-Castro wannabe communist who had at one point defected to the Soviet Union. Somehow, though, we are supposed to believe that a climate of hate caused him to murder Kennedy. It's the miasma theory of politics. Without getting into the whole JFK conspiracy debate, if Oswald wasn't the lone gunman and there was a bigger conspiracy behind the assassination, then the "climate of hate" is an even less plausible explanation.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Thomas, yesterday we learned that "evolutionary" changes could happen in as little as six months, you know, since Trump was elected. So of course the shooter was driven to madness by Trump's election.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  27. @Lot
    I've noticed over the years "critical condition" has been defined down from its former meaning of "high chance of death." Scalise was shot in the hip, taken right to a top hospital, and was described as "in good spirits" and talking to his wife on his cell. I don't think 20 years ago that would have been called critical.

    Any chance your information is wrong, incomplete or out of date? Of course not. You’re a f–king know-it-all.

    Read More
    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Thank you! I am glad to see I'm not the only one who finds him insufferable.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  28. @anon

    Who knows what mixture of madness and circumstance causes someone to pick up a gun and go on a rampage?
     
    Boy, that's really weird that they wouldn't be able to figure that out, considering that these same people were able to divine the motives of people committing anti-Muslim hate crimes that never actually took place, as well as threats to Jewish community centers, that were actually made by an Israeli teenager and a black, leftist journslist.

    My blood pressure is going to be through the roof these next few days...

    My blood pressure is going to be through the roof these next few days…

    If your blood pressure goes through the roof, the terrorists will have won.

    Revenge is a dish best served cold.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  29. So Leftist shoots GOP congressman, and it reminds him of Leftist shooting Dem Congresswoman. Is politics getting too violent? No its just that one side of the political spectrum is now full of lunatics.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  30. @anon

    Representative Gabby Giffords and killing six people, including a 9-year-old girl, the link to political incitement was clear.
     
    The nerve. The unimaginable chutzpah.

    I don't want to go there and read the comments, because I'm about to go to bed, and I don't know if I'd be able to sleep after I did so, but please, for the love of God, someone tell me that the commenters aren't buying that.

    The NYT doesn’t allow you to voice your opinion on editorials. Editorials are for telling people how to think, not discussion.

    Read More
    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    And most fortuitously they recently got rid of their ombudsperson.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/02/public-editor/liz-spayd-final-public-editor-column.html?rref=collection%2Fcolumn%2Fthe-public-editor&action=click&contentCollection=opinion&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=1&pgtype=collection&_r=0
    , @res
    Editorials also seem to be for when misleading statements and selective reporting aren't enough and outright lying is necessary.
    , @bored identity
    bored identity dreams of America wherein 60.000.000 deplorables constantly serve as a Wallet Content Correction Officers to the excesses of echo chambering cosmopoliethnocentrism in New York Times Zone.

    Via Daily Caller:

    The New York Times corrected an editorial on the GOP baseball shooting Thursday that baselessly accused Sarah Palin of inciting the 2011 shooting of Gabby Giffords.



    “An earlier version of this editorial incorrectly stated that a link existed between political incitement and the 2011 shooting of Representative Gabby Giffords,” the correction reads. “In fact, no such link was established.”

    “Was this attack evidence of how vicious American politics has become?
    Probably.
    In 2011, Jared Lee Loughner opened fire in a supermarket parking lot, grievously wounding Representative Gabby Giffords and killing six people, including a 9-year-old girl.

    At the time, we and others were sharply critical of the heated political rhetoric on the right.
    Before the shooting, Sarah Palin’s political action committee circulated a map of targeted electoral districts that put Ms. Giffords and 19 other Democrats under stylized cross hairs.

    But in that case no connection to the shooting was ever established.

    Conservatives and right-wing media were quick on Wednesday to demand forceful condemnation of hate speech and crimes by anti-Trump liberals.
    They’re right.
    Liberals should of course be held to the same standard of decency that they ask of the right.”

     

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  31. An actual Democratic activist shoots a Republican, and it’s this “nonviolent” person who was driven to this madness by the divisive atmosphere,

    Actually the narrative I am seeing develop is that the shooter was a domestic abuser. Ergo, it is the culture of misogyny and guns that creates violence on all sides of the political spectrum, etc. etc.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Actually the narrative I am seeing develop is that the shooter was a domestic abuser.

     

    Yes, me too. They're trying to fix in people's minds that Hodgkinson's primary identity is a 'domestic abuser', and then immediately jump to the conclusion that The Real Problem Here is that we fail to deny domestic abusers access to guns. Besides, both wife-beating and guns are icky and evil, so it all fits together, doesn't it?

    This seems to be a fairly fresh take on narrative shaping. The Lefties don't lack for trying, that's for sure.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  32. @Svigor

    By the way, what’s missing from the Washington Post’s selective quote of McAuliffe: “We lose 93 million Americans a day to gun violence.” He repeated this several times today. Pack your bags, the country will be devoid of people in four days due to gun violence.
     
    How stupid does one have to be to say this more than once in a lifetime, never mind in the same day?

    I’m three pages into Google results and not a one of the sources for this gaffe is MSM. It’s almost like they want to completely ignore news and facts that don’t fit their agenda. Perplexing, huh?

    If we had anything remotely resembling a free exchange of ideas in this country, the MSM would have to grapple with events and ideas that don’t fit their Narratives. As things stand, their stranglehold upon public opinion is so strong that they can ‘disappear’ anything they don’t like.

    This situation is diametrically opposed to the one ordained by our Founding Fathers, which is just one more reason they despise our Founding Fathers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    I think it’s easy to underestimate how appallingly innumerate the average American is. Journalists and politicians are, on average, no smarter than a garbage man or roofer. There’s no reason to think the presstitutes even noticed anything amiss about the idiot governor’s six order of magnitude error.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  33. @Peter Akuleyev
    An actual Democratic activist shoots a Republican, and it’s this “nonviolent” person who was driven to this madness by the divisive atmosphere,

    Actually the narrative I am seeing develop is that the shooter was a domestic abuser. Ergo, it is the culture of misogyny and guns that creates violence on all sides of the political spectrum, etc. etc.

    Actually the narrative I am seeing develop is that the shooter was a domestic abuser.

    Yes, me too. They’re trying to fix in people’s minds that Hodgkinson’s primary identity is a ‘domestic abuser’, and then immediately jump to the conclusion that The Real Problem Here is that we fail to deny domestic abusers access to guns. Besides, both wife-beating and guns are icky and evil, so it all fits together, doesn’t it?

    This seems to be a fairly fresh take on narrative shaping. The Lefties don’t lack for trying, that’s for sure.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    "The Real Problem Here is that we fail to deny domestic abusers access to guns"

    We do deny abusers access to guns, if they're felons. What's the suggestion? That we start denying men access to guns if they at any point are informed upon by females? Or if they have any contact with law enforcement having to do with a female? Two birds, one stone, I guess.

    Women are already nearly omnipotent in such situations. Now they can threaten to get your guns taken away if you fail to please them, or if they just feel like it?

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  34. @Mishima Zaibatsu
    Meanwhile in Britain:

    Fierce rivals from the worlds of politics, journalism and broadcasting are uniting, for a few days at least, in support of this weekend’s Great Get Together events in memory of Jo Cox MP, who was murdered by a far-right fanatic a year ago.

    All four living former prime ministers, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown for Labour and Sir John Major and David Cameron for the Conservatives, are recording messages about what they believe unites Britain as a nation.

    Finally in Yorkshire, where Cox was MP for Batley and Spen, rival local news teams for the BBC and ITV will stage a joint broadcast about this weekend’s events, in which more than 116,000 community get-togethers and street parties have been planned across the UK.

    The acts of solidarity between people and organisations that are usually on opposite sides of the spectrum is about “setting aside differences and coming together”, said Lance Price, a spokesman for the Jo Cox Foundation.

    ...

    They conclude: “As the Great Get Together is launched this coming weekend in memory of Jo Cox’s life and work, we two editors have no hesitation in uniting, if for one day only, to share the fine sentiment of George Orwell, that: ‘If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear’.”
     
    Brendan Cox, the husband of this MP whose entire employment history is "invade the world, invite the world", has been doing the media rounds for a year now to talk up the dangers of "populists" and why populism must be shut down at all costs.



    We've had television documentaries about this murder and there's a book coming out.

    The book is resolutely uplifting, but on the morning we meet Cox is looking shell-shocked again: only hours earlier, a suicide bomber had attacked the Manchester Arena. He is, he apologises, “feeling shit”.

    ...

    “I feel a huge desire, when anything like this happens, to be helpful. And to try to make sure the community tension doesn’t blow up, and that people’s anger is channelled against extremist ideology rather than communities.
     
    Translation: The terror attack was awful because white people might get angry, and it's more important we shut patriots' mouths and protect Muslims, than stop people blowing up proles."

    What I find most curious about the Coxes and the #MoreInCommon shtick (that migrants and natives have "more in common than what divides us") is how the late Jo's main passion in parliament was urging support for Salafist jihadis to genocide religious minorities to destroy the Middle East.

    Cox launched the All Party Parliamentary Friends of Syria group, becoming its chair. In the Commons vote in December to approve UK military intervention against ISIL in Syria, Cox abstained because she believed in a more comprehensive strategy that would also include combatting President Bashar al-Assad and his "indiscriminate barrel bombs".

    She wrote:
    By refusing to tackle Assad's brutality, we may actively alienate more of the Sunni population, driving them towards Isis. So I have decided to abstain. Because I am not against airstrikes per se, but I cannot actively support them unless they are part of a plan. Because I believe in action to address Isis, but do not believe it will work in isolation.
     
    Brendan gave the money raised for his wife's murder to al-Qaeda's PR wing, the White Helmets, and Hope Not Hate, which is the UK's, Soros-funded answer to the SPLC.

    In February 2016, Cox wrote to the Nobel Committee praising the work of the Syrian Civil Defense, a civilian voluntary emergency rescue organisation known as the White Helmets, and nominating them for the Nobel Peace Prize: "In the most dangerous place on earth these unarmed volunteers risk their lives to help anyone in need regardless of religion or politics". The nomination was accepted by the committee, and garnered the support of twenty of her fellow MPs and several celebrities, including George Clooney, Daniel Craig, Chris Martin and Michael Palin. The nomination was supported by members of Canada's New Democratic Party, who urged Stéphane Dion, the country's Foreign Affairs Minister, to give his backing on behalf of Canada.
     
    No politicisation of this murder, nope, none whatsoever *cough*.

    Were it not for the violent hatred of one white supremacist, few of us would probably know the backbench MP’s name today. But her murder was a national tragedy, halting the referendum campaign in its tracks and mourned with messages of condolences from world leaders. On what would have been her 42nd birthday, six days later, thousands gathered in Trafalgar Square to celebrate her life; Malala Yousafzai spoke, Lily Allen sang, Bill Nighy read, while abroad crowds gathered in cities from Nairobi to Sydney. On the day of her funeral, constituents lined the streets of the cortege; the trial and conviction of her murderer several months later made headlines all over the world.
     
    Oh, and as a bonus:

    Every night, for almost a year, Brendan Cox and his wife sat up discussing the rise of the far right. He was conducting a major study of populist extremism across the western world and, once the children were in bed, the pair would talk through its implications and analyse the threat.
     
    and

    With the charity Tell MAMA she worked on The Geography of Anti-Muslim Hatred, investigating cases of Islamophobia; the report was dedicated to her at its launch on 29 June 2016.
     
    All the while, "[Cox's] West Yorkshire constituency is near the epicentre of the Muslim child rape epidemic that has been sweeping the Labour heartlands of northern England, largely ignored or covered up by social services workers, police and politicians."

    Coincidentally, at the time of the deadly attack on the MP, who used her maiden speech in Parliament to proclaim that her community has been “deeply enhanced by immigration", sentencing was about to take place on one such case nearby.

    The court heard that in Halifax, eleven miles from Cox’s constituency, a vulnerable underage girl had been left to fend for herself at the age of 13 after her mother died. This child ended up being preyed on by 100 Muslim males who plied her with alcohol and drugs. The girl — nominally in council care — was then passed from house to house and from town to town as far away as Manchester and London. The girl described being filmed by Muslims on a mobile phone while being orally raped. She contracted an STD. Some of the rapists were identified from CCTV which had been seized from the hotels she could remember, while others were caught because of DNA from stains on her clothing. The police said afterwords that the girl, one of two victims, had shown “immense courage and bravery in reporting these matters to the police and providing evidence.”

    At the Leeds trial, only fifteen of the men were convicted. Originally over a hundred were arrested and doubtless dozens of culprits walked free. It was a lurid and horrific story but such hearings are so common these days, they have become wearily familiar.
     
    Whether or not elites and the media consider it legitimate for political points to be made about attacks on lawmakers depends entirely on for which side the target bats.

    “this weekend’s events, in which more than 116,000 community get-togethers and street parties have been planned across the UK”

    I smell (probably tax-funded) BS. Don’t think many Bradfordians will be sat with the people who were trying to kill them a decade ago. I imagine a lot of student types signed up, have organised zilch and will at most be asking any Muslims they know to come and share a samosa – pity it’s still Ramadan and they can’t eat til dark. Likewise a lot of nice churchian ladies who probably run the foodbank as well – like these. The whole thing will be likeminded people meeting other likeminded people.

    https://nvite.com/moreincommon/mrj862

    Just been on the website.

    https://nvite.com/community/thegreatgettogether

    “There are more than 108,000 get-togethers happening across the country — from street parties and Big Lunches to BBQs, games of football and bake offs.

    Many of these events are run by individuals and their neighbours, so look out for stuff going on in your area (or organise your own event if you haven’t had an invite slip through your letterbox yet!). But there are also loads of exciting bigger events where all are welcome, so search for one near you below and get amongst the celebrations!”

    There are precisely 399 “Big Events”, starting with “Grandparents Together” in that heartland of vibrancy (i.e. whitopia), Launceston in Cornwall. I wonder how much of our council tax will be funding these?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    Aha !

    "The Big Lunch, funded by the National Lottery, is the UK's annual get-together for neighbours. It takes place each year in June, and 2017 is its ninth year. It's a day where neighbours and members of communities can stop what they're doing and come together for the simple act of sharing a meal.

    Since its inception, The Big Lunch has been striving to create a ‘Thanksgiving day for neighbours’, to create opportunities for neighbours to come together. We felt that the ‘more in common’ values that Jo Cox advocated throughout her work echoed our own, and thus a partnership with The Great Get Together and the Jo Cox Foundation made sense. The anniversary of Jo’s death is 16 June, and The Great Get Together weekend that follows is all about furthering what we are all trying to achieve: community connections and stronger relationships. "
     

    I might stroll along to my nearest (about 15 miles away) and do a headcount.
    , @jim jones
    I know a Muslim family and they are always bad-tempered around this time of year because they stay up all night watching TV and gorging on food. Several times I have asked them what is the point of changing what time you eat?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  35. @Anonymous Nephew
    "this weekend’s events, in which more than 116,000 community get-togethers and street parties have been planned across the UK"

    I smell (probably tax-funded) BS. Don't think many Bradfordians will be sat with the people who were trying to kill them a decade ago. I imagine a lot of student types signed up, have organised zilch and will at most be asking any Muslims they know to come and share a samosa - pity it's still Ramadan and they can't eat til dark. Likewise a lot of nice churchian ladies who probably run the foodbank as well - like these. The whole thing will be likeminded people meeting other likeminded people.

    https://nvite.com/moreincommon/mrj862

    Just been on the website.

    https://nvite.com/community/thegreatgettogether


    "There are more than 108,000 get-togethers happening across the country — from street parties and Big Lunches to BBQs, games of football and bake offs.

    Many of these events are run by individuals and their neighbours, so look out for stuff going on in your area (or organise your own event if you haven’t had an invite slip through your letterbox yet!). But there are also loads of exciting bigger events where all are welcome, so search for one near you below and get amongst the celebrations!"
     

    There are precisely 399 "Big Events", starting with "Grandparents Together" in that heartland of vibrancy (i.e. whitopia), Launceston in Cornwall. I wonder how much of our council tax will be funding these?

    Aha !

    “The Big Lunch, funded by the National Lottery, is the UK’s annual get-together for neighbours. It takes place each year in June, and 2017 is its ninth year. It’s a day where neighbours and members of communities can stop what they’re doing and come together for the simple act of sharing a meal.

    Since its inception, The Big Lunch has been striving to create a ‘Thanksgiving day for neighbours’, to create opportunities for neighbours to come together. We felt that the ‘more in common’ values that Jo Cox advocated throughout her work echoed our own, and thus a partnership with The Great Get Together and the Jo Cox Foundation made sense. The anniversary of Jo’s death is 16 June, and The Great Get Together weekend that follows is all about furthering what we are all trying to achieve: community connections and stronger relationships. “

    I might stroll along to my nearest (about 15 miles away) and do a headcount.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  36. @EriK

    That’s just plain embarrassing.
     
    Steve is right of course, yet somehow it doesn't embarrass the NY Times editorial board.

    It should, though.

    And: You never know.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  37. @Twinkie
    It's a classic case of the Leftist strategy/mantra of "Heads I win, tails you lose."

    A deranged person wounds a Democrat, and it's the vile Republican hatred and incitement that led to the assault. An actual Democratic activist shoots a Republican, and it's this "nonviolent" person who was driven to this madness by the divisive atmosphere, to which everyone - including Republicans - contributed.

    In a similar vein, read this editorial from the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-shooting-at-a-gop-baseball-practice-was-an-assault-on-democracy/2017/06/14/06587d9a-5131-11e7-91eb-9611861a988f_story.html

    Who knows what mixture of madness and circumstance causes someone to pick up a gun and go on a rampage?
     
    Translation: who knows, indeed? Nobody. Surely, not the leftist incitements against the President and the Republicans.

    Mr. Trump struck exactly the right tone. “We may have our differences, but we do well, in times like these, to remember that everyone who serves in our nation’s capital is here because, above all, they love our country,” he said from the White House.
     
    Translation: since there was a tragedy, Republicans must talk about unity and give up their partisan rancor.

    We think Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) was correct in not shying away from the issue of gun control when asked at a news conference if he was worried about the safety of politicians. He said he was concerned about all Americans’ safety from gun violence, not just politicians: “This is not what today is about, but we have too many guns on the street.”
     
    Translation: Democrats, this is no time for "unity" - keep pushing our agenda.

    By the way, what's missing from the Washington Post's selective quote of McAuliffe: "We lose 93 million Americans a day to gun violence." He repeated this several times today. Pack your bags, the country will be devoid of people in four days due to gun violence.

    That can’t be right. At the very least, it’s 15 times greater than the actual number.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  38. Because of the GOP’s ongoing war on the laws of cause and effect, it’s hard to take its words seriously.

    On two issues alone, the GOP loses credibility: deficits and guns. Cutting taxes increase deficits, nationally and locally (think Kansas) but the GOP continues to INSIST otherwise.

    On guns, only weeks ago, the GOP was pleased to increase guns for the mentally ill

    The laws of cause and effect cannot be repealed. Until the GOP stops indulging itself with fantasy, I will not believe its sanctimonious words.

    History matters.

    The only reason we have such insane gun laws is because white men have an irrational fear of Black Men

    Read More
    • Troll: Forbes
    • Replies: @anon
    The only reason we have such insane gun laws is because white men have an irrational fear of Black Men.

    The main reason to restrict guns is because of a rational fear of black men.
    , @fish
    "In my view, as good as the Yankees were in the first half of this game, that's how as bad they've been now."

    - Leonard Pitts
    , @bored identity



    History matters.

     

    Really?

    That's rajsis', Tiny D; not all histories matter equally.

    You 're slipping lately.


    Black History Matters.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Tiny Duck, Please pay close attention to what I am saying, in Chicago, Buffalo, Baltimore, Cleveland, St. Louis, Washington, DC and even Toronto, black people have a RATIONAL fear of black people with guns. Do some research, you'll find I am right.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  39. memo to nyt : keep weekly body count like in the old days (Vietnam war) that way we can all know who is ahead ,it’s the who vs. the whom……

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  40. I doubt they’re embarrassed. When I point out to progs that they’re lying, they grin at me and shrug. How many divisions has the truth?

    Read More
    • Replies: @neutral
    Of course they have no problem with lying because their core ideologies are blatant lies.
    - racial equality (because its completely rational to believe homo sapiens stopped evolving some time around 100, 000 years ago)
    - education fixes everything (despite the USA spending enormous amounts on certain schools and yet these schools would never be able to beat some school in Belarus with 1/100th of the budget in maths and science)
    - 57 flavours of gender (how is this even up for debate ?)
    - the old media/new social media (Google/Facebook) is objective and neutral
    , @Flip
    That's what they mean by "By any means necessary."
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  41. @Harry Baldwin
    Come on, McAuliffe made an honest mistake. He confused the number of Americans lost every day to gun violence with the number of miles from the earth to the sun. Could happen to anyone.

    Hahahaa! No wonder that number seem so familiar to me – and my kid just asked me a few weeks ago how far away it is (and I told him).

    But really, what must be happening with this Gun-control-nut McAuliffe is that he has this talking point in his head to spout out regularly as a reflex. Otherwise, how indeed would he make the same mistake a number of times. It’s just in his head with his other talking points. He may be shuffling them around in there, as the only actual activity in the frontal lobe. It just comes out in due time “and 93 million people are lost to ….” while his mind is not focused on anything in particular.

    BTW, a commenter on the other post of Steve’s about this attack brought up this mistake (same response, that’s gonna clean us out in 4 days, maybe 5 tops with the illegal aliens). I just didn’t want to click on a video with this idiot on it – it just encourages these people.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Barnard
    The correct number of people killed by gun violence also includes suicides, which are obviously much different than what happened in Alexandria.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  42. This Jo Cox stuff is a very sick joke. Until I read this thread I had literally no idea that all this get together bollocks was being planned. Presumably most events will feature an army of assorted SJW types all desperately looking around for a few trophy Muslims to parade for the cameras.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  43. @guest
    Yeah, this guy was clearly a Berniecrat and Loughner was all over the map. But crosshairs. That's all they have to say: crosshairs.

    Until you show me crosshairs over the Republican softball team photo on the Rachel Maddow Show, it's checkmate.

    There were no crosshairs – open sights, dude.

    We’re gonna have to change the expression. “Democrats in Congress today set their iron sights on the gun violence tragically and unexpectedly moving into many of the minority neighborhoods in our inner cities. Today, barber shop crossfire shootings are in the crosshairs have the highest red stripe in the spiral covered by the front sight with the rear sights lined up, and Democrats are breathing out slowly and steadily with an even trigger pull.

    Nah, too cumbersome.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  44. @God Emperor Putin
    The NYT doesn't allow you to voice your opinion on editorials. Editorials are for telling people how to think, not discussion.
    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    At least they allowed comments there. The Reader's Picks are interesting.

    I wonder if this interview from last month has anything to do with the firing: https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/05/a-conversation-with-liz-spayd-public-editor-of-the-new-york-times/526737/
    , @Anon
    The Times is still a money-losing paper doing what it can to nibble away at Slim's fortune. I'm curious to know how much money he's lost by choosing to invest in the paper.

    Anyway, getting rid of the omsbudsman is what you do when you want to go full tilt to into screeching libtardism. I'm kind of looking forward to the NYT falling to the circulation of The Nation. At the very least, I expect it to shrink to the Village Voice level.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    kagan, not so long ago the NYT had a Public Editor that responded to comments from the readers regarding the Times' point of view. The most recently retired one, Margaret Sullivan, had been the editor of the Buffalo News. Ms. Sullivan, before she underwent indoctrination, stated that seven of the eight black people shot in the Buffalo City Grill massacre were prior felons. Not a good thing to state facts when dealing with the black community. She was chastised and excoriated to tears. But the NYT hired her anyways. I remember her trying to explain why the Benghazi fiasco was relegated to the back pages of the Times' first section. The commenters hammered her, as they should. The Public Editor lasts about two years IIRC.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  45. The Left isn’t going to be shamed by directly appealing to their conscience. Rather, it they may be set back on their heels by showing how ridiculous they are to the general population.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Muse
    Conscience is a product of your thoughts and beliefs about yourself and your relationship to others. It is a product of introspection, and thus maturity.

    I find most social justice types more concerned about what others think about them. They are very concerned that what they have and what they do is perceived as cool by others. It is as if they are stuck in an adolescent stage of moral development.

    They do things that they hope will appear altruistic, but they are not true altruists.

    So you can shame them. And if a popular TV show like SNL made fun of them en mass this would change behavior.

    Most conservatives already believe they and the human race are imperfect and will remain so. When a progressive has a utopian vision (such as universal healthcare or eliminating poverty), a conservative sees a hopeless pipe dream. Poverty, sickness and death are a feature of human life, not a bug. It is why we promise in front of our community to stay with our spouse in sickness and in health, for richer or poorer.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  46. @Thomas

    A deranged person wounds a Democrat, and it’s the vile Republican hatred and incitement that led to the assault. An actual Democratic activist shoots a Republican, and it’s this “nonviolent” person who was driven to this madness by the divisive atmosphere, to which everyone – including Republicans – contributed.
     
    The Ur-example of this was JFK's assassination being transformed from being the work of a Castro-worshipping Communist into being the result of a "climate of hate" in Dallas (or else that of a "Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy").

    I feel like I live in a Kafka novel. It used to be that every reasonably well-informed person understood that Oswald was a pro-Castro wannabe communist who had at one point defected to the Soviet Union. Somehow, though, we are supposed to believe that a climate of hate caused him to murder Kennedy. It’s the miasma theory of politics. Without getting into the whole JFK conspiracy debate, if Oswald wasn’t the lone gunman and there was a bigger conspiracy behind the assassination, then the “climate of hate” is an even less plausible explanation.

    Read More
    • Agree: Abe
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    "Without getting into the whole JFK conspiracy debate, if Oswald wasn’t the lone gunman and there was a bigger conspiracy behind the assassination, then the “climate of hate” is an even less plausible explanation."

    I'm personally not a JFK-conspiracy believer-I just think people don't want to accept that a single deranged young loser can terribly impact history, all through simply squeezing a trigger, in that fashion. But if the government hid some facts of the case, it probably had a lot to do with Oswald's connections to the USSR and Cuba. Reagan had it right here: Baby Boomer mythology aside, JFK at the time was an unambiguous symbol of US Cold War might. It's not hard to imagine some loser with pro-Communist sympathies thinking that he could bring meaning to his useless life by killing him. Had the responsibility truly lay with some shadowy far-right conspiracy, does anybody seriously believe that LBJ, of all people, would have not broadcast that 24/7?

    Remember, this was a year after the Cuban Missile Crisis-I can't stress that enough. Things were very tense, and everybody was putting all their effort into avoiding a nuclear war. Paranoia about the Russians still abounded throughout US society, and vice versa. The Soviets would have never been so nutty to have anything direct to do with the shooting, given that they got out of the assassination business after bumping off Bandera in the late 1950s, and they had just signed the PTB treaty with JFK anyway. But a people grieving at the loss of their President wouldn't have been thinking too rationally about it. If it turned out that Oswald had connections to the KGB, however minor or tangential or defunct, there would have been an extreme public uproar at the worst possible time... and I can see why the government wouldn't want that brought up.

    (Castro on the other hand, that's a different story. If he had his way in 1962, we'd be worried about gigantic radioactive mutant lizards breaking into our caves right now as opposed to debating online.)

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  47. @Anonymous Nephew
    "this weekend’s events, in which more than 116,000 community get-togethers and street parties have been planned across the UK"

    I smell (probably tax-funded) BS. Don't think many Bradfordians will be sat with the people who were trying to kill them a decade ago. I imagine a lot of student types signed up, have organised zilch and will at most be asking any Muslims they know to come and share a samosa - pity it's still Ramadan and they can't eat til dark. Likewise a lot of nice churchian ladies who probably run the foodbank as well - like these. The whole thing will be likeminded people meeting other likeminded people.

    https://nvite.com/moreincommon/mrj862

    Just been on the website.

    https://nvite.com/community/thegreatgettogether


    "There are more than 108,000 get-togethers happening across the country — from street parties and Big Lunches to BBQs, games of football and bake offs.

    Many of these events are run by individuals and their neighbours, so look out for stuff going on in your area (or organise your own event if you haven’t had an invite slip through your letterbox yet!). But there are also loads of exciting bigger events where all are welcome, so search for one near you below and get amongst the celebrations!"
     

    There are precisely 399 "Big Events", starting with "Grandparents Together" in that heartland of vibrancy (i.e. whitopia), Launceston in Cornwall. I wonder how much of our council tax will be funding these?

    I know a Muslim family and they are always bad-tempered around this time of year because they stay up all night watching TV and gorging on food. Several times I have asked them what is the point of changing what time you eat?

    Read More
    • Replies: @AM
    I know. Christian fasts are actual fasts, although they wisely encourage drinking enough fluids. If it's just a "hold off the party until sunset" what's the point?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  48. That’s just plain embarrassing.

    It is not embarrassing, it is just George Costanza 101. You lie enough and it becomes the truth. Jerry: “And this means you’re and architect? George: “I’m not?!”

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    George, advising Jerry on how to pass a lie-detector test: "Just remember, it's not a lie if you believe it."
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  49. @Lot
    I've noticed over the years "critical condition" has been defined down from its former meaning of "high chance of death." Scalise was shot in the hip, taken right to a top hospital, and was described as "in good spirits" and talking to his wife on his cell. I don't think 20 years ago that would have been called critical.

    And at that time he was considered to be in “stable” condition. Later, they said “critical.” Sounds like he took a turn for the worse.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  50. AM says:
    @Lot
    I've noticed over the years "critical condition" has been defined down from its former meaning of "high chance of death." Scalise was shot in the hip, taken right to a top hospital, and was described as "in good spirits" and talking to his wife on his cell. I don't think 20 years ago that would have been called critical.

    It turns out that the media initially down played his condition. He was shot in the hip with no exit wound. That means that his lower torso absorbed all the energy of the bullet. There will be bone fractures, possible tears in his digestive tract (the real issue as it leads to infections), and just a generally hideous amount of tissue damage.

    I suspect he was running on adrenaline when he went into hospital. The last report I saw was 2 surgeries, more than one blood transfusion, and he’ll need another surgery. He’s in ICU right now. Yeah, he’s critical.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Lot knows everything though. How dare you contradict him?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  51. @Wilbur Hassenfus
    I doubt they're embarrassed. When I point out to progs that they're lying, they grin at me and shrug. How many divisions has the truth?

    Of course they have no problem with lying because their core ideologies are blatant lies.
    - racial equality (because its completely rational to believe homo sapiens stopped evolving some time around 100, 000 years ago)
    - education fixes everything (despite the USA spending enormous amounts on certain schools and yet these schools would never be able to beat some school in Belarus with 1/100th of the budget in maths and science)
    - 57 flavours of gender (how is this even up for debate ?)
    - the old media/new social media (Google/Facebook) is objective and neutral

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    The concrete (including truth) is for lesser mortals. They got where they are (and deserve it, dammit!) by living exclusively in the abstract.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  52. @kaganovitch
    Steve, you are giving them far to much credit. This is with malice aforethought.

    Sailer habitually errs on the side of interpreting the bad guys as generously as possible.

    Read More
    • Agree: Jack Hanson
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Not just the bad guys
    , @Jack Hanson
    I wonder when Steve is going to put his Boomer naviete aside (Sailer's Butterknife) and realise what happened to Scalise is just the very tip of what the Left wants to do to him.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  53. It is breathtaking to see the level to which The Gray Hag has fallen.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Forbes
    Actually, no. As a NYC resident, I stopped buying it daily in 2000. One exception: September 12, 2001 (for obvious reasons--the copy is stored in a black plastic bag for posterity).

    Grew tired of their preaching what to think. In the '80s and '90s I'd buy a copy of the NYT and WSJ before getting on the subway to work. Now, I occasionally read NYT articles on-line that have been linked or forwarded to me.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  54. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Mishima Zaibatsu
    Meanwhile in Britain:

    Fierce rivals from the worlds of politics, journalism and broadcasting are uniting, for a few days at least, in support of this weekend’s Great Get Together events in memory of Jo Cox MP, who was murdered by a far-right fanatic a year ago.

    All four living former prime ministers, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown for Labour and Sir John Major and David Cameron for the Conservatives, are recording messages about what they believe unites Britain as a nation.

    Finally in Yorkshire, where Cox was MP for Batley and Spen, rival local news teams for the BBC and ITV will stage a joint broadcast about this weekend’s events, in which more than 116,000 community get-togethers and street parties have been planned across the UK.

    The acts of solidarity between people and organisations that are usually on opposite sides of the spectrum is about “setting aside differences and coming together”, said Lance Price, a spokesman for the Jo Cox Foundation.

    ...

    They conclude: “As the Great Get Together is launched this coming weekend in memory of Jo Cox’s life and work, we two editors have no hesitation in uniting, if for one day only, to share the fine sentiment of George Orwell, that: ‘If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear’.”
     
    Brendan Cox, the husband of this MP whose entire employment history is "invade the world, invite the world", has been doing the media rounds for a year now to talk up the dangers of "populists" and why populism must be shut down at all costs.



    We've had television documentaries about this murder and there's a book coming out.

    The book is resolutely uplifting, but on the morning we meet Cox is looking shell-shocked again: only hours earlier, a suicide bomber had attacked the Manchester Arena. He is, he apologises, “feeling shit”.

    ...

    “I feel a huge desire, when anything like this happens, to be helpful. And to try to make sure the community tension doesn’t blow up, and that people’s anger is channelled against extremist ideology rather than communities.
     
    Translation: The terror attack was awful because white people might get angry, and it's more important we shut patriots' mouths and protect Muslims, than stop people blowing up proles."

    What I find most curious about the Coxes and the #MoreInCommon shtick (that migrants and natives have "more in common than what divides us") is how the late Jo's main passion in parliament was urging support for Salafist jihadis to genocide religious minorities to destroy the Middle East.

    Cox launched the All Party Parliamentary Friends of Syria group, becoming its chair. In the Commons vote in December to approve UK military intervention against ISIL in Syria, Cox abstained because she believed in a more comprehensive strategy that would also include combatting President Bashar al-Assad and his "indiscriminate barrel bombs".

    She wrote:
    By refusing to tackle Assad's brutality, we may actively alienate more of the Sunni population, driving them towards Isis. So I have decided to abstain. Because I am not against airstrikes per se, but I cannot actively support them unless they are part of a plan. Because I believe in action to address Isis, but do not believe it will work in isolation.
     
    Brendan gave the money raised for his wife's murder to al-Qaeda's PR wing, the White Helmets, and Hope Not Hate, which is the UK's, Soros-funded answer to the SPLC.

    In February 2016, Cox wrote to the Nobel Committee praising the work of the Syrian Civil Defense, a civilian voluntary emergency rescue organisation known as the White Helmets, and nominating them for the Nobel Peace Prize: "In the most dangerous place on earth these unarmed volunteers risk their lives to help anyone in need regardless of religion or politics". The nomination was accepted by the committee, and garnered the support of twenty of her fellow MPs and several celebrities, including George Clooney, Daniel Craig, Chris Martin and Michael Palin. The nomination was supported by members of Canada's New Democratic Party, who urged Stéphane Dion, the country's Foreign Affairs Minister, to give his backing on behalf of Canada.
     
    No politicisation of this murder, nope, none whatsoever *cough*.

    Were it not for the violent hatred of one white supremacist, few of us would probably know the backbench MP’s name today. But her murder was a national tragedy, halting the referendum campaign in its tracks and mourned with messages of condolences from world leaders. On what would have been her 42nd birthday, six days later, thousands gathered in Trafalgar Square to celebrate her life; Malala Yousafzai spoke, Lily Allen sang, Bill Nighy read, while abroad crowds gathered in cities from Nairobi to Sydney. On the day of her funeral, constituents lined the streets of the cortege; the trial and conviction of her murderer several months later made headlines all over the world.
     
    Oh, and as a bonus:

    Every night, for almost a year, Brendan Cox and his wife sat up discussing the rise of the far right. He was conducting a major study of populist extremism across the western world and, once the children were in bed, the pair would talk through its implications and analyse the threat.
     
    and

    With the charity Tell MAMA she worked on The Geography of Anti-Muslim Hatred, investigating cases of Islamophobia; the report was dedicated to her at its launch on 29 June 2016.
     
    All the while, "[Cox's] West Yorkshire constituency is near the epicentre of the Muslim child rape epidemic that has been sweeping the Labour heartlands of northern England, largely ignored or covered up by social services workers, police and politicians."

    Coincidentally, at the time of the deadly attack on the MP, who used her maiden speech in Parliament to proclaim that her community has been “deeply enhanced by immigration", sentencing was about to take place on one such case nearby.

    The court heard that in Halifax, eleven miles from Cox’s constituency, a vulnerable underage girl had been left to fend for herself at the age of 13 after her mother died. This child ended up being preyed on by 100 Muslim males who plied her with alcohol and drugs. The girl — nominally in council care — was then passed from house to house and from town to town as far away as Manchester and London. The girl described being filmed by Muslims on a mobile phone while being orally raped. She contracted an STD. Some of the rapists were identified from CCTV which had been seized from the hotels she could remember, while others were caught because of DNA from stains on her clothing. The police said afterwords that the girl, one of two victims, had shown “immense courage and bravery in reporting these matters to the police and providing evidence.”

    At the Leeds trial, only fifteen of the men were convicted. Originally over a hundred were arrested and doubtless dozens of culprits walked free. It was a lurid and horrific story but such hearings are so common these days, they have become wearily familiar.
     
    Whether or not elites and the media consider it legitimate for political points to be made about attacks on lawmakers depends entirely on for which side the target bats.

    Cox was lobbying to settle Syrian refugees in West Yorkshire, which is an absolutely radioactive issue.

    If a Protestant politician in Northern Ireland were lobbying to settle Catholic families in East Belfast nobody would be very surprised if he turned up dead. Of course everybody would denounce the killers and express sympathy for the victim, but privately they would wonder if he was a fool or a madman.

    Politicans on the ‘mainland’ live in a strange fantasy world where they can do things like this with impunity. Consequence-free virtual-signalling.

    Read More
    • Replies: @inselaffen
    'Politicans on the ‘mainland’ live in a strange fantasy world where they can do things like this with impunity. Consequence-free virtual-signalling.'

    They pretty much have been able to do things like this with impunity for a few decades now, though, so it shouldn't seem so fantastic. Maybe that's starting to change though. Which is a good thing as far as I'm concerned.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  55. I just perused the letters. The “Times Picks” are exactly what you’d expect them to be. But I spent several minutes digging through the other letters to see if anyone was challenging the Lougher-Palin lie. Couldn’t find one. I just finished composing one and submitted it. I suspect the Times will shit-can it. Look for Cesar Chavez, Delano, CA.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PhDPepper
    I saw about 2 mentioning the truth after reading the top 100 reader's picks (out of 500 when I checked). Immigration boosting articles get far more pushback than this issue in the NYT comments.


    They have issued a correction: "An earlier version of this editorial incorrectly stated that a link existed between political incitement and the 2011 shooting of Representative Gabby Giffords. In fact, no such link was established."

    A little while later they changed the text to read: "In 2011, Jared Lee Loughner opened fire in a supermarket parking lot, grievously wounding Representative Gabby Giffords and killing six people, including a 9-year-old girl. At the time, we and others were sharply critical of the heated political rhetoric on the right. Before the shooting, Sarah Palin’s political action committee circulated a map that showed the targeted electoral districts of Ms. Giffords and 19 other Democrats under stylized cross hairs. But in that case no connection to the shooting was ever established."

    It continues: "Conservatives and right-wing media were quick on Wednesday to demand forceful condemnation of hate speech and crimes by anti-Trump liberals. They’re right. Liberals should of course be held to the same standard of decency that they ask of the right."

    Progress? Have they felt shame, perhaps? Evidence of growing Sailerian influence?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  56. @Tiny Duck
    Because of the GOP's ongoing war on the laws of cause and effect, it's hard to take its words seriously.

    On two issues alone, the GOP loses credibility: deficits and guns. Cutting taxes increase deficits, nationally and locally (think Kansas) but the GOP continues to INSIST otherwise.

    On guns, only weeks ago, the GOP was pleased to increase guns for the mentally ill

    The laws of cause and effect cannot be repealed. Until the GOP stops indulging itself with fantasy, I will not believe its sanctimonious words.

    History matters.

    The only reason we have such insane gun laws is because white men have an irrational fear of Black Men

    The only reason we have such insane gun laws is because white men have an irrational fear of Black Men.

    The main reason to restrict guns is because of a rational fear of black men.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  57. @Kyle McKenna
    I'm three pages into Google results and not a one of the sources for this gaffe is MSM. It's almost like they want to completely ignore news and facts that don't fit their agenda. Perplexing, huh?

    If we had anything remotely resembling a free exchange of ideas in this country, the MSM would have to grapple with events and ideas that don't fit their Narratives. As things stand, their stranglehold upon public opinion is so strong that they can 'disappear' anything they don't like.

    This situation is diametrically opposed to the one ordained by our Founding Fathers, which is just one more reason they despise our Founding Fathers.

    I think it’s easy to underestimate how appallingly innumerate the average American is. Journalists and politicians are, on average, no smarter than a garbage man or roofer. There’s no reason to think the presstitutes even noticed anything amiss about the idiot governor’s six order of magnitude error.

    Read More
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    A more charitable interpretation of this is that your average elite journalist tends to be a very *quick* thinker. But that's not the same as being a particularly deep one, and a lot of the Fourth Estate tends to confuse the two.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Andrew, I will agree with you after you apologize to roofers and garbage men. However, it is amazing how many time the media uses numbers that the average person knows are way, way off.
    , @Anonymous
    Roofers know far more math than journalists and college grad liberals.
    Think about it. How many linear feet of what width planks to cover the roof? What size shingles? How many shingles to a box? How many boxes of shingles to cover the roof? How many cans of nails and staples? How many nail guns? How many roofers for how many days and hours?

    Ask a journalist or liberal to do that without a calculator.
    , @Olorin
    Andrew, you may recall this, which speaks to Joe's and anon's points:

    http://slideplayer.com/slide/6638251/23/images/9/Estimated+levels+of+usual+cognitive+functioning+U.+S.jpg

    From here....

    http://slideplayer.com/slide/7276684/

    Seeing this in around 1997 was one of my biggest red pills. Suddenly many things became clear about what I'd been seeing in the Ed Biz in the previous 20 years.

    I had no idea that cognitive functioning skills at the top level were so sparsely distributed. That "top level" to me was what I would have thought might comprise the 4th level...and both tasks were something that most of the non-high-school-grad tradesmen of my youth could do.

    Tradesmen today, I'm not so sure.

    This is one of the worst aspects of the "Free College For All" scam. All these "degreed" types running around who couldn't calculate a problem involving two units of measurement and one unit of currency.

    And isn't it interesting that the top tier's problems are cast as financial (money clever), rather than material or practical ones of a nonmonetary sort...?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  58. @G Pinfold
    Any chance your information is wrong, incomplete or out of date? Of course not. You're a f--king know-it-all.

    Thank you! I am glad to see I’m not the only one who finds him insufferable.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  59. @vinteuil
    Sailer habitually errs on the side of interpreting the bad guys as generously as possible.

    Not just the bad guys

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  60. @Federalist
    I feel like I live in a Kafka novel. It used to be that every reasonably well-informed person understood that Oswald was a pro-Castro wannabe communist who had at one point defected to the Soviet Union. Somehow, though, we are supposed to believe that a climate of hate caused him to murder Kennedy. It's the miasma theory of politics. Without getting into the whole JFK conspiracy debate, if Oswald wasn't the lone gunman and there was a bigger conspiracy behind the assassination, then the "climate of hate" is an even less plausible explanation.

    “Without getting into the whole JFK conspiracy debate, if Oswald wasn’t the lone gunman and there was a bigger conspiracy behind the assassination, then the “climate of hate” is an even less plausible explanation.”

    I’m personally not a JFK-conspiracy believer-I just think people don’t want to accept that a single deranged young loser can terribly impact history, all through simply squeezing a trigger, in that fashion. But if the government hid some facts of the case, it probably had a lot to do with Oswald’s connections to the USSR and Cuba. Reagan had it right here: Baby Boomer mythology aside, JFK at the time was an unambiguous symbol of US Cold War might. It’s not hard to imagine some loser with pro-Communist sympathies thinking that he could bring meaning to his useless life by killing him. Had the responsibility truly lay with some shadowy far-right conspiracy, does anybody seriously believe that LBJ, of all people, would have not broadcast that 24/7?

    Remember, this was a year after the Cuban Missile Crisis-I can’t stress that enough. Things were very tense, and everybody was putting all their effort into avoiding a nuclear war. Paranoia about the Russians still abounded throughout US society, and vice versa. The Soviets would have never been so nutty to have anything direct to do with the shooting, given that they got out of the assassination business after bumping off Bandera in the late 1950s, and they had just signed the PTB treaty with JFK anyway. But a people grieving at the loss of their President wouldn’t have been thinking too rationally about it. If it turned out that Oswald had connections to the KGB, however minor or tangential or defunct, there would have been an extreme public uproar at the worst possible time… and I can see why the government wouldn’t want that brought up.

    (Castro on the other hand, that’s a different story. If he had his way in 1962, we’d be worried about gigantic radioactive mutant lizards breaking into our caves right now as opposed to debating online.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Had the responsibility truly lay with some shadowy far-right conspiracy, does anybody seriously believe that LBJ, of all people, would have not broadcast that 24/7?
     
    I'm not an expert on the JFK assassination, but of the various theories, I am intrigued by what zerohedge commenters write about sometimes, that this was a deep state* job (CIA, whoever) to stop Kennedy's idea to get the US back to sound money (zerohedge, right?!). He had an executive order requesting the US gov't (treasury dept.) to issue 4 Billion in paper money and he wanted to eliminate the Federal Reserve Bank (they are NOT part of the Feral Government). There would be powerful people against that, who politicians of ANY stripe would not want to cross.

    Kennedy got shot about 1/2 year after this executive order, #11110. You'd figure, under this theory, it'd take some time to get a guy set up who has his reasons to shoot the president anyway.

    The people that make money, not earn a lot, but actually make it via keystrokes nowadays are the truly powerful.


    * I don't mean "deep state" in the sense that I've read it lately some, meaning "big government bureaucracy" I mean the "deep" secret organizations whose funding is not in the budget. It seems like there's two meanings lately.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Had the responsibility truly lay with some shadowy far-right conspiracy, does anybody seriously believe that LBJ, of all people, would have not broadcast that 24/7?
     
    Aren't the most obvious suspects in such murders the spurned wife and the ambitious underling?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  61. @neutral
    Of course they have no problem with lying because their core ideologies are blatant lies.
    - racial equality (because its completely rational to believe homo sapiens stopped evolving some time around 100, 000 years ago)
    - education fixes everything (despite the USA spending enormous amounts on certain schools and yet these schools would never be able to beat some school in Belarus with 1/100th of the budget in maths and science)
    - 57 flavours of gender (how is this even up for debate ?)
    - the old media/new social media (Google/Facebook) is objective and neutral

    The concrete (including truth) is for lesser mortals. They got where they are (and deserve it, dammit!) by living exclusively in the abstract.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  62. @AndrewR
    I think it’s easy to underestimate how appallingly innumerate the average American is. Journalists and politicians are, on average, no smarter than a garbage man or roofer. There’s no reason to think the presstitutes even noticed anything amiss about the idiot governor’s six order of magnitude error.

    A more charitable interpretation of this is that your average elite journalist tends to be a very *quick* thinker. But that’s not the same as being a particularly deep one, and a lot of the Fourth Estate tends to confuse the two.

    Read More
    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @guest
    Journalists are typically among the dumbest of the intellectual class. For the smart ones, they nevertheless tend to be superficial. Which is natural, considering you don't have to master any discipline to be in that field, except condescending writing. And you float from topic to topic, pretending mastery of subjects without anyone ever calling you on whether you got it right.

    The subjects they report on repeatedly tend toward gossip.
    , @Desiderius
    Not just the fourth estate.

    g is a measure of that quickness.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  63. @God Emperor Putin
    The NYT doesn't allow you to voice your opinion on editorials. Editorials are for telling people how to think, not discussion.

    Editorials also seem to be for when misleading statements and selective reporting aren’t enough and outright lying is necessary.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  64. @kaganovitch
    And most fortuitously they recently got rid of their ombudsperson.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/02/public-editor/liz-spayd-final-public-editor-column.html?rref=collection%2Fcolumn%2Fthe-public-editor&action=click&contentCollection=opinion&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=1&pgtype=collection&_r=0

    At least they allowed comments there. The Reader’s Picks are interesting.

    I wonder if this interview from last month has anything to do with the firing: https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/05/a-conversation-with-liz-spayd-public-editor-of-the-new-york-times/526737/

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  65. The NY Times used to have Sidney Lumet Jews running it. Now the NY Times is run by Steven Spielberg Jews. Sidney Lumet Jews would be more pragmatic and cynical about everybody’s motivations, including the motivations of Jews. Steven Spielberg Jews have an annoying habit of running the joint while acting like they are still shtetlized.

    The NY Times less than 20 years ago was writing editorials about how mass immigration and illegal immigration lower wages. Bernie Sanders suggested that open borders mass immigration is a Koch boys idea because it would lower wages.

    President Trump must begin the necessary task of destroying the New York Times and the Washington Post. President Trump should also go after the Murdochs for continuing the mass immigration boosterism of the Wall Street Journal. Just today, the WSJ published an opinion piece from Dartmouth globalizer Mathew Slaughter which suggested that globalization and free trade are great policies to be applauded.

    President Trump will be supported by tens of millions of patriotic Americans when he declares war upon the New York Times and the corporate media. President Trump will win his war against the DEEP STATE and the corporate media, but first he must get his troops ready to fight it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Charles, on an average day more than 90% of the articles in the Buffalo News first section are from the NYT, WaPo, Bloomberg News or LA Times.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  66. They’re very sorry for their earlier propaganda mistake.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  67. @Anonymous
    Cox was lobbying to settle Syrian refugees in West Yorkshire, which is an absolutely radioactive issue.

    If a Protestant politician in Northern Ireland were lobbying to settle Catholic families in East Belfast nobody would be very surprised if he turned up dead. Of course everybody would denounce the killers and express sympathy for the victim, but privately they would wonder if he was a fool or a madman.

    Politicans on the 'mainland' live in a strange fantasy world where they can do things like this with impunity. Consequence-free virtual-signalling.

    ‘Politicans on the ‘mainland’ live in a strange fantasy world where they can do things like this with impunity. Consequence-free virtual-signalling.’

    They pretty much have been able to do things like this with impunity for a few decades now, though, so it shouldn’t seem so fantastic. Maybe that’s starting to change though. Which is a good thing as far as I’m concerned.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  68. @jim jones
    I know a Muslim family and they are always bad-tempered around this time of year because they stay up all night watching TV and gorging on food. Several times I have asked them what is the point of changing what time you eat?

    I know. Christian fasts are actual fasts, although they wisely encourage drinking enough fluids. If it’s just a “hold off the party until sunset” what’s the point?

    Read More
    • Replies: @EdwardM
    And upscale Arabs hold lavish banquets (iftar and sohour) at night, consuming and wasting more food than in a typical non-fast day. (In the Gulf, upscale hotels hold these in their "tents" and they are lots of fun. They become corporate events, complete with VIP sections, etc.)

    Some Muslims say one of the purposes of the fast is to engender empathy for poor people who actually go hungry. I am not sure that this is the main reason*, but if so, the hypocrisy is amusing.

    *It seems to me that the main purpose of the fast is that the faster is thinking about it (and therefore about his faith) hours a day for a month. Your entire life revolves around the fast for that month; you're hungry and thirsty and tired, you have to plan your routine while avoiding temptation, etc. Typical Islamic ("submission") thinking. I had one Ramadan in Saudi Arabia which was not pleasant; in the other Gulf countries the inconvenience to a non-faster is less; in Turkey and Lebanon, practically not at all.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  69. They have now issued a partial retraction:

    “Correction: June 15, 2017

    An earlier version of this editorial incorrectly stated that a link existed between political incitement and the 2011 shooting of Representative Gabby Giffords. In fact, no such link was established.”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  70. @Achmed E. Newman
    Hahahaa! No wonder that number seem so familiar to me - and my kid just asked me a few weeks ago how far away it is (and I told him).

    But really, what must be happening with this Gun-control-nut McAuliffe is that he has this talking point in his head to spout out regularly as a reflex. Otherwise, how indeed would he make the same mistake a number of times. It's just in his head with his other talking points. He may be shuffling them around in there, as the only actual activity in the frontal lobe. It just comes out in due time "and 93 million people are lost to ...." while his mind is not focused on anything in particular.


    BTW, a commenter on the other post of Steve's about this attack brought up this mistake (same response, that's gonna clean us out in 4 days, maybe 5 tops with the illegal aliens). I just didn't want to click on a video with this idiot on it - it just encourages these people.

    The correct number of people killed by gun violence also includes suicides, which are obviously much different than what happened in Alexandria.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    The correct number of people killed by gun violence also includes suicides, which are obviously much different than what happened in Alexandria.
     
    True, and also, if you hear or read a stat about how many kids are killed via the use of guns, you will find out that 14-17-year-old ghetto thugs are most of those "kids" in the stats, not little Madison or Conner. There are lots of ways to lie via stats.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  71. @BenKenobi

    this is no time for “unity” – keep pushing our agenda
     
    One day, our side will learn to be this ruthless.

    Um, right?

    Depends on what you mean by our side. I don’t consider 90% of the politicians in the GOP on our side and they will never do it. Even among more mainstream media figures on the right, I am not seeing much pushback against the left.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  72. @Wilbur Hassenfus
    I doubt they're embarrassed. When I point out to progs that they're lying, they grin at me and shrug. How many divisions has the truth?

    That’s what they mean by “By any means necessary.”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  73. NYT issues a correction to the link between the Giffords shooter and the GOP.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  74. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @kaganovitch
    And most fortuitously they recently got rid of their ombudsperson.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/02/public-editor/liz-spayd-final-public-editor-column.html?rref=collection%2Fcolumn%2Fthe-public-editor&action=click&contentCollection=opinion&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=1&pgtype=collection&_r=0

    The Times is still a money-losing paper doing what it can to nibble away at Slim’s fortune. I’m curious to know how much money he’s lost by choosing to invest in the paper.

    Anyway, getting rid of the omsbudsman is what you do when you want to go full tilt to into screeching libtardism. I’m kind of looking forward to the NYT falling to the circulation of The Nation. At the very least, I expect it to shrink to the Village Voice level.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Eagle Eye
    Slim (aka Saleem) is a stooge for the Deep State.

    The deal is this: the Slim blog (formerly known as the New York Times) turns its entire publishing effort to pushing the Deep State Narrative. In return, Slims monopolies get to plunder Mexico and the U.S.

    The real aim of the Deep State is to create an America and a world that is congenial to pedophile billionaires and a narrow "elite" Aztec-style priesthood LITERALLY feeding on subject peoples. A few eggs will need to be cracked to make this omelette. The agenda involves exterminating some 95% of the world's population, and enslaving another 4% to serve the elite's every need.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  75. The NY Times does not believe any of the crap they print.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  76. Sailer picked this up first.

    The National Review does a more thorough job at scolding the NYT over this:

    http://www.nationalreview.com/article/448664/new-york-times-steve-scalise-shameful-editorial

    NYT have really humiliated themselves and destroyed their reputation. Good job :)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  77. Steve, your commentary in regards to the motivation of the enemy is approaching the farcical. They are not stupid, they want us dead, and you know this. Why be farcical?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Boomer naivete runs deep.
    , @Charles Pewitt
    Steve Sailer's farcical style is used as a shield to protect Sailer's polemical positions. Sailer is behind the farcical shield wall jabbing at the powers that be and occasionally launching spears at the enemy commanders.

    Sailer is in California. Another commenter a while back stated that there are millions of White Core Americans living in California who understand that they have no political representation. There is a lot of potential political energy in that sentiment.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  78. @Tiny Duck
    Because of the GOP's ongoing war on the laws of cause and effect, it's hard to take its words seriously.

    On two issues alone, the GOP loses credibility: deficits and guns. Cutting taxes increase deficits, nationally and locally (think Kansas) but the GOP continues to INSIST otherwise.

    On guns, only weeks ago, the GOP was pleased to increase guns for the mentally ill

    The laws of cause and effect cannot be repealed. Until the GOP stops indulging itself with fantasy, I will not believe its sanctimonious words.

    History matters.

    The only reason we have such insane gun laws is because white men have an irrational fear of Black Men

    “In my view, as good as the Yankees were in the first half of this game, that’s how as bad they’ve been now.”

    - Leonard Pitts

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  79. @AM
    It turns out that the media initially down played his condition. He was shot in the hip with no exit wound. That means that his lower torso absorbed all the energy of the bullet. There will be bone fractures, possible tears in his digestive tract (the real issue as it leads to infections), and just a generally hideous amount of tissue damage.

    I suspect he was running on adrenaline when he went into hospital. The last report I saw was 2 surgeries, more than one blood transfusion, and he'll need another surgery. He's in ICU right now. Yeah, he's critical.

    Lot knows everything though. How dare you contradict him?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  80. I know two guys who got shot in the head growing up in boston neighborhood. ..both survived but never the same.
    As I watch gabby giffords do her too cute by half Shirley temple act while calling for gun control I truly don’t believe she was ever shot at all.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  81. Lot says:

    Looks like the Coz might win a mistrial, jury reported they are deadlocked. While a perv with some obviously criminal conduct a long time ago, this is a selective feminist witch hunt against a rich and relatively conservative cishet figure who has dared to stand up against the anti-white “black activists.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    What was the point of Constand appearing in court groomed and dressed as a butch lesbian (other than she IS a butch lesbian)? Wouldn't she have made a more convincing witness as a modestly dressed woman - feminine but not slutty? Not only do I have trouble believing that Cosby raped Constand, I can't even believe he slept with her, except for the propensity of black men not to be picky about which females they screw.
    , @Flip
    She took her parents to meet him after the so-called rape and accepted money from him for a civil settlement. If there was a rape, she provided after the fact consent by her actions. I wouldn't convict in this instance.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  82. @Anonymous
    There's a large basket of ahistorical lies that the left keeps promulgating ...

    The Great Depression was caused by a lack of government action! (Actually government policies prevented market forces from healing the economy)

    Joe McCarthy was wrong! (He was 90% accurate see Venona and Coulter's book both of which have never been refuted only memory-holed)

    The evil right wingers killed JFK! (Oswald was a leftist, Castro was a leftist, LBJ was a leftist)

    Timothy McVeigh blew up the Federal building in OKC by parking a Ryder truck filled with fertilizer outside on the street! (Actually the combustion/impact physics of this type of explosion were a tiny fraction of the power necessary to cause the damage: it was controlled demolition just like the Twin Towers)

    Etc etc etc ad infinitum ...

    just like the Twin Towers

    Yes, of course! With airliners as the detonators. LOL.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  83. @Tiny Duck
    Because of the GOP's ongoing war on the laws of cause and effect, it's hard to take its words seriously.

    On two issues alone, the GOP loses credibility: deficits and guns. Cutting taxes increase deficits, nationally and locally (think Kansas) but the GOP continues to INSIST otherwise.

    On guns, only weeks ago, the GOP was pleased to increase guns for the mentally ill

    The laws of cause and effect cannot be repealed. Until the GOP stops indulging itself with fantasy, I will not believe its sanctimonious words.

    History matters.

    The only reason we have such insane gun laws is because white men have an irrational fear of Black Men

    History matters.

    Really?

    That’s rajsis’, Tiny D; not all histories matter equally.

    You ‘re slipping lately.

    Black History Matters.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  84. @Malcolm X-Lax
    I just perused the letters. The "Times Picks" are exactly what you'd expect them to be. But I spent several minutes digging through the other letters to see if anyone was challenging the Lougher-Palin lie. Couldn't find one. I just finished composing one and submitted it. I suspect the Times will shit-can it. Look for Cesar Chavez, Delano, CA.

    I saw about 2 mentioning the truth after reading the top 100 reader’s picks (out of 500 when I checked). Immigration boosting articles get far more pushback than this issue in the NYT comments.

    They have issued a correction: “An earlier version of this editorial incorrectly stated that a link existed between political incitement and the 2011 shooting of Representative Gabby Giffords. In fact, no such link was established.”

    A little while later they changed the text to read: “In 2011, Jared Lee Loughner opened fire in a supermarket parking lot, grievously wounding Representative Gabby Giffords and killing six people, including a 9-year-old girl. At the time, we and others were sharply critical of the heated political rhetoric on the right. Before the shooting, Sarah Palin’s political action committee circulated a map that showed the targeted electoral districts of Ms. Giffords and 19 other Democrats under stylized cross hairs. But in that case no connection to the shooting was ever established.

    It continues: “Conservatives and right-wing media were quick on Wednesday to demand forceful condemnation of hate speech and crimes by anti-Trump liberals. They’re right. Liberals should of course be held to the same standard of decency that they ask of the right.”

    Progress? Have they felt shame, perhaps? Evidence of growing Sailerian influence?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Massimo Heitor

    I saw about 2 mentioning the truth after reading the top 100 reader’s picks (out of 500 when I checked). Immigration boosting articles get far more pushback than this issue in the NYT comments.

     

    I suspect many of the more moderate or right-leaning readers didn't bother to read this article, or if they did, they skimmed past the insane quotes implicating Sarah Palin in the Giffords attack.


    They have issued a correction: “An earlier version of this editorial incorrectly stated that a link existed between political incitement and the 2011 shooting of Representative Gabby Giffords. In fact, no such link was established.”

     

    Even their correction is self-serving: This wasn't an honest mistake. It was not a whoop-sie. They've spent years manipulating narrative to tie political opponents, specifically Republicans, to this kind of ideological violence. Here, they got caught in a politically motivated lie. Their political opponents started to pounce. NYT knows when to hold and when to fold. So they hastily issued a quiet correction to dampen the blowback.

    National Review writes:


    "Thus, the [NYT] editorial board peers into Omar Mateen’s jihadist mind and finds visions of Republican transgender bathroom bills"

     

    I thought that was just the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan/wp/2016/06/12/orlando-massacre-we-cant-ignore-americas-homegrown-homophobia/?utm_term=.bc0f54211695
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    All I wanted to say to you is "great handle!"

    Oh, and you too, Malcolm X-Lax!!

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  85. @Anonymous
    There's a large basket of ahistorical lies that the left keeps promulgating ...

    The Great Depression was caused by a lack of government action! (Actually government policies prevented market forces from healing the economy)

    Joe McCarthy was wrong! (He was 90% accurate see Venona and Coulter's book both of which have never been refuted only memory-holed)

    The evil right wingers killed JFK! (Oswald was a leftist, Castro was a leftist, LBJ was a leftist)

    Timothy McVeigh blew up the Federal building in OKC by parking a Ryder truck filled with fertilizer outside on the street! (Actually the combustion/impact physics of this type of explosion were a tiny fraction of the power necessary to cause the damage: it was controlled demolition just like the Twin Towers)

    Etc etc etc ad infinitum ...

    Not only was this a controlled demolition, but in order to make it look like someone blew up a Ryder truck loaded with tons of explosives, they also destroyed 324 other buildings within a 16-block radius, shattered glass in 258 nearby buildings, and destroyed or burned 86 cars. Only the BATF, the CIA and Mossad (working together) had the resources to carefully plant thousands of shaped charges that would create the exact same blast pattern that would exist if you blew up a truck full of explosives. Their deviousness is boundless.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    I had never thought to look into the OK city bombing. However, it does seem odd that it is the same type of bomb as Breivik's, and same order of magnitude mass weight (950kg Oslo vs 2200kg OK City). The Oslo bomb didn't manage to destroy 1/3 of the building. And OK City bomb killed 21 times the people.

    Beyond that I would need to study it.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  86. OT – Here is a very iStevish chart of pastimes ranked by income distribution:

    Golf wins as the #1 upscale pastime.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Deckin
    If you look at only the 2 highest brackets, Racquet Sports (i.e. Tennis) tops all. Other high income hobbies besides gold and tennis: running, hiking, yoga. Sounds exactly like what you see everyday around you.
    , @James Richard
    Running and yoga are reported as the two most popular pastimes in the highest income bracket. This makes the entire chart highly suspect.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  87. @Lot
    Looks like the Coz might win a mistrial, jury reported they are deadlocked. While a perv with some obviously criminal conduct a long time ago, this is a selective feminist witch hunt against a rich and relatively conservative cishet figure who has dared to stand up against the anti-white "black activists."

    What was the point of Constand appearing in court groomed and dressed as a butch lesbian (other than she IS a butch lesbian)? Wouldn’t she have made a more convincing witness as a modestly dressed woman – feminine but not slutty? Not only do I have trouble believing that Cosby raped Constand, I can’t even believe he slept with her, except for the propensity of black men not to be picky about which females they screw.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  88. Even if he is factually guilty as Hell of all counts, I hope he is legally exonerated on general principal; a kind of anti-matter Orenthal Simpson.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  89. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Actually the narrative I am seeing develop is that the shooter was a domestic abuser.

     

    Yes, me too. They're trying to fix in people's minds that Hodgkinson's primary identity is a 'domestic abuser', and then immediately jump to the conclusion that The Real Problem Here is that we fail to deny domestic abusers access to guns. Besides, both wife-beating and guns are icky and evil, so it all fits together, doesn't it?

    This seems to be a fairly fresh take on narrative shaping. The Lefties don't lack for trying, that's for sure.

    “The Real Problem Here is that we fail to deny domestic abusers access to guns”

    We do deny abusers access to guns, if they’re felons. What’s the suggestion? That we start denying men access to guns if they at any point are informed upon by females? Or if they have any contact with law enforcement having to do with a female? Two birds, one stone, I guess.

    Women are already nearly omnipotent in such situations. Now they can threaten to get your guns taken away if you fail to please them, or if they just feel like it?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Actually, a misdemeanor domestic is enough to trigger Lautenberg. I believe that even being charged with such is enough, but don't quote me on that.
    , @Anonymous
    Anyone who is the subject of a restraining order has to turn in all their guns in many states. That's all restraining orders, neighbor squabbles, tenant squabbles, workplace disputes, everybody.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  90. @Mike Zwick

    That’s just plain embarrassing.
     
    It is not embarrassing, it is just George Costanza 101. You lie enough and it becomes the truth. Jerry: "And this means you're and architect? George: "I'm not?!"

    George, advising Jerry on how to pass a lie-detector test: “Just remember, it’s not a lie if you believe it.”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  91. Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  92. @Jack D
    Not only was this a controlled demolition, but in order to make it look like someone blew up a Ryder truck loaded with tons of explosives, they also destroyed 324 other buildings within a 16-block radius, shattered glass in 258 nearby buildings, and destroyed or burned 86 cars. Only the BATF, the CIA and Mossad (working together) had the resources to carefully plant thousands of shaped charges that would create the exact same blast pattern that would exist if you blew up a truck full of explosives. Their deviousness is boundless.

    I had never thought to look into the OK city bombing. However, it does seem odd that it is the same type of bomb as Breivik’s, and same order of magnitude mass weight (950kg Oslo vs 2200kg OK City). The Oslo bomb didn’t manage to destroy 1/3 of the building. And OK City bomb killed 21 times the people.

    Beyond that I would need to study it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @snorlax
    It's not just the amount of explosives, it's how much oxygen they get, how much of the explosion is absorbed/redirected by the vessel the explosives are contained in, and how much and what kind of shrapnel is created.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  93. @Lot
    I've noticed over the years "critical condition" has been defined down from its former meaning of "high chance of death." Scalise was shot in the hip, taken right to a top hospital, and was described as "in good spirits" and talking to his wife on his cell. I don't think 20 years ago that would have been called critical.

    Being shot in the pelvic girdle is one of two shots considered a ‘stopping’ shot, the other being a bullet placed into the inverted triangle formed by the eyes and the nose.

    So yes. Its pretty critical when its right up there with being shot in the face.

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Richard
    Sure Jack, getting shot in the triangle formed by the Adam's apple and nipples doesn't stop anyone.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  94. @vinteuil
    Sailer habitually errs on the side of interpreting the bad guys as generously as possible.

    I wonder when Steve is going to put his Boomer naviete aside (Sailer’s Butterknife) and realise what happened to Scalise is just the very tip of what the Left wants to do to him.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  95. Trump-hating lefty from Steve’s headline.

    James Hodgkinson’s complaint was not against Trump, specifically, from I could gather thus far. He had read a book from economist Richard Reich that blamed the Great Depression on lowering taxes on the wealthy by Republican presidents during the 1920s. He was also upset that the current Republicans were not funding the ACA.

    We’re looking at a Timothy McVeigh/Anders Breivik type of killer here, not a full-on kook.

    Gore Vidal has a famous interview with McVeigh and Moldbug actually read Breivik’s diary in full. Look those up for yourselves.

    I rarely take exception to our host’s general appraisal of the situation, but in this case I raise a warning sign.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  96. @Felix..
    Steve, your commentary in regards to the motivation of the enemy is approaching the farcical. They are not stupid, they want us dead, and you know this. Why be farcical?

    Boomer naivete runs deep.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  97. @guest
    "The Real Problem Here is that we fail to deny domestic abusers access to guns"

    We do deny abusers access to guns, if they're felons. What's the suggestion? That we start denying men access to guns if they at any point are informed upon by females? Or if they have any contact with law enforcement having to do with a female? Two birds, one stone, I guess.

    Women are already nearly omnipotent in such situations. Now they can threaten to get your guns taken away if you fail to please them, or if they just feel like it?

    Actually, a misdemeanor domestic is enough to trigger Lautenberg. I believe that even being charged with such is enough, but don’t quote me on that.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  98. @Felix..
    Steve, your commentary in regards to the motivation of the enemy is approaching the farcical. They are not stupid, they want us dead, and you know this. Why be farcical?

    Steve Sailer’s farcical style is used as a shield to protect Sailer’s polemical positions. Sailer is behind the farcical shield wall jabbing at the powers that be and occasionally launching spears at the enemy commanders.

    Sailer is in California. Another commenter a while back stated that there are millions of White Core Americans living in California who understand that they have no political representation. There is a lot of potential political energy in that sentiment.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot

    White Core Americans living in California who understand that they have no political representation.
     
    We control the state GOP, which is weak but which, when it was stronger but saw the writing on the wall, established a large number of veto points that allow it to block much of the left's agenda. Tax increases require 2/3 of both houses of the state legislature plus the governor, or two thirds of voters. And even with 100% of the local voters, property taxes are severely limited by Prop 13.

    Since Prop 13 is not indexed for inflation, total property taxes as a percentage of the state economy go down each year. That in turn has meant that a lot of liberal spending programs from the Edmund and Jerry Brown I era have been cut back.

    We also have the same "Top 2" multi-party primaries that whites in Louisiana long ago used to stay in control. With normal primaries in heavily Dem areas, the white Republican minority is completely powerless. We are sure to lose the general, and have no influence in the Dem primary. With the Top 2 system, we can vote for the more conservative of the two Democrats in the general. We also sometimes will randomly have an election with 2 Republicans running who each get 15% of the vote, and 10 Democrats who all get less than 15%, resulting in a general election between two Republicans in a 70% Dem area.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  99. res says:

    OT: Vox v. Murray round 2

    https://www.vox.com/the-big-idea/2017/6/15/15797120/race-black-white-iq-response-critics

    Too long to go through in detail here, but some points that leapt out.

    With the terms of the debate established, we now move on to some more technical questions raised about the topic. Nisbett is primarily responsible for the first section, Harden for the second, and Turkheimer for the third, although we are all in agreement on the main points.

    Hmm… Despite the last bit this still sounds like a bit of dissension.

    From Nisbett:

    Has the black-white gap in test scores narrowed in the past 25 years?

    The first graph gives the results for reading, the second for math. For reading, the black-white gap for the 1943 cohort was approximately double the gap associated with family income. The black-white gap then shrank from substantially more than a standard deviation for the 1943 cohort to roughly a standard deviation for the 1963 cohort to slightly more than half a standard deviation for the 2003 cohort. For math, the black-white gap went from around slightly more than a standard deviation to slightly more than half a standard deviation.

    Interesting to cite data from 1943, 1963, and 2003 to make a point about the last 25 years (that would be 1992-2017 for us non-experts).

    The best part was from Nisbett as well (in reference to James Thompson’s 2013 survey, emphasis mine):

    Still, in both the Snyderman and Rothman book and in the more recent survey, more than half of respondents selected one of two response categories that included zero (one option was “0 percent of [black-white] differences due to genes” and the other was “0-40 percent of differences due to genes”). Much more important, however, is that respondents were not allowed to endorse what in my view is the only reasonable response: It is not possible to give a meaningful estimate of the percentage.

    The bolded portion sounds surprisingly like the statement in The Bell Curve. If Nisbett really believes in 0% genetic contribution why does he say this instead–especially when 0% was an option? For the record, to clarify the lumping of categories in Dr. Thompson’s survey, 17% of experts picked 0% while 42% picked 0-40% of differences were due to genes. That seems like an uneven enough split to make being specific worthwhile (well, unless one is trying to mislead).

    From the conclusion (and I think this makes a good summary):

    In fact, I will close by noting that not even the three of us are completely in agreement about it: I (Turkheimer) am convinced that the question is irredeemably unscientific; Nisbett accepts it as a legitimate scientific question, and thinks evidence points fairly strongly in the direction of the black-white gap being entirely environmental in origin; while Harden questions the quality of the existing evidence, but thinks more determinative data may be found in future genetic knowledge.

    I guess at least one person can see the writing on the wall. Probably not a coincidence that Harden is the only one not near or past retirement age. She will have to live with the consequences of future knowledge of IQ genetics.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  100. @RobertTaylor
    The Left isn't going to be shamed by directly appealing to their conscience. Rather, it they may be set back on their heels by showing how ridiculous they are to the general population.

    Conscience is a product of your thoughts and beliefs about yourself and your relationship to others. It is a product of introspection, and thus maturity.

    I find most social justice types more concerned about what others think about them. They are very concerned that what they have and what they do is perceived as cool by others. It is as if they are stuck in an adolescent stage of moral development.

    They do things that they hope will appear altruistic, but they are not true altruists.

    So you can shame them. And if a popular TV show like SNL made fun of them en mass this would change behavior.

    Most conservatives already believe they and the human race are imperfect and will remain so. When a progressive has a utopian vision (such as universal healthcare or eliminating poverty), a conservative sees a hopeless pipe dream. Poverty, sickness and death are a feature of human life, not a bug. It is why we promise in front of our community to stay with our spouse in sickness and in health, for richer or poorer.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Forbes

    They are stuck in an adolescent stage of moral development.
     
    FIFY.

    They are stuck in adolescence. It's Show 'n Tell vanity signaling. Participation Trophies for all (rewards for showing up). Everyone is a winner. Mistakes/errors are not to be criticized or condemned--positive reinforcement is given. Fault always lies elsewhere. Feelings matter, feelings count.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  101. I haven’t read all the comments yet and I will but the Buffalo News leads off with this headline…”Mueller probe turns to Trump’s Conduct” and links it to an article from WaPo. On the left side of the front page is this headline…”Rifle attack cause terror in Virginia.” Subheading to the article is…”Congressman, 2 officers, two others wounded,” also from the WaPo. I remember when Gifford was shot, she got more US coverage than when Pope Paul was nearly assassinated. This is some sad, sad, shit.

    Read More
    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  102. @PhDPepper
    I saw about 2 mentioning the truth after reading the top 100 reader's picks (out of 500 when I checked). Immigration boosting articles get far more pushback than this issue in the NYT comments.


    They have issued a correction: "An earlier version of this editorial incorrectly stated that a link existed between political incitement and the 2011 shooting of Representative Gabby Giffords. In fact, no such link was established."

    A little while later they changed the text to read: "In 2011, Jared Lee Loughner opened fire in a supermarket parking lot, grievously wounding Representative Gabby Giffords and killing six people, including a 9-year-old girl. At the time, we and others were sharply critical of the heated political rhetoric on the right. Before the shooting, Sarah Palin’s political action committee circulated a map that showed the targeted electoral districts of Ms. Giffords and 19 other Democrats under stylized cross hairs. But in that case no connection to the shooting was ever established."

    It continues: "Conservatives and right-wing media were quick on Wednesday to demand forceful condemnation of hate speech and crimes by anti-Trump liberals. They’re right. Liberals should of course be held to the same standard of decency that they ask of the right."

    Progress? Have they felt shame, perhaps? Evidence of growing Sailerian influence?

    I saw about 2 mentioning the truth after reading the top 100 reader’s picks (out of 500 when I checked). Immigration boosting articles get far more pushback than this issue in the NYT comments.

    I suspect many of the more moderate or right-leaning readers didn’t bother to read this article, or if they did, they skimmed past the insane quotes implicating Sarah Palin in the Giffords attack.

    They have issued a correction: “An earlier version of this editorial incorrectly stated that a link existed between political incitement and the 2011 shooting of Representative Gabby Giffords. In fact, no such link was established.”

    Even their correction is self-serving: This wasn’t an honest mistake. It was not a whoop-sie. They’ve spent years manipulating narrative to tie political opponents, specifically Republicans, to this kind of ideological violence. Here, they got caught in a politically motivated lie. Their political opponents started to pounce. NYT knows when to hold and when to fold. So they hastily issued a quiet correction to dampen the blowback.

    National Review writes:

    “Thus, the [NYT] editorial board peers into Omar Mateen’s jihadist mind and finds visions of Republican transgender bathroom bills”

    I thought that was just the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan/wp/2016/06/12/orlando-massacre-we-cant-ignore-americas-homegrown-homophobia/?utm_term=.bc0f54211695

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  103. @Twinkie
    It's a classic case of the Leftist strategy/mantra of "Heads I win, tails you lose."

    A deranged person wounds a Democrat, and it's the vile Republican hatred and incitement that led to the assault. An actual Democratic activist shoots a Republican, and it's this "nonviolent" person who was driven to this madness by the divisive atmosphere, to which everyone - including Republicans - contributed.

    In a similar vein, read this editorial from the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-shooting-at-a-gop-baseball-practice-was-an-assault-on-democracy/2017/06/14/06587d9a-5131-11e7-91eb-9611861a988f_story.html

    Who knows what mixture of madness and circumstance causes someone to pick up a gun and go on a rampage?
     
    Translation: who knows, indeed? Nobody. Surely, not the leftist incitements against the President and the Republicans.

    Mr. Trump struck exactly the right tone. “We may have our differences, but we do well, in times like these, to remember that everyone who serves in our nation’s capital is here because, above all, they love our country,” he said from the White House.
     
    Translation: since there was a tragedy, Republicans must talk about unity and give up their partisan rancor.

    We think Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) was correct in not shying away from the issue of gun control when asked at a news conference if he was worried about the safety of politicians. He said he was concerned about all Americans’ safety from gun violence, not just politicians: “This is not what today is about, but we have too many guns on the street.”
     
    Translation: Democrats, this is no time for "unity" - keep pushing our agenda.

    By the way, what's missing from the Washington Post's selective quote of McAuliffe: "We lose 93 million Americans a day to gun violence." He repeated this several times today. Pack your bags, the country will be devoid of people in four days due to gun violence.

    Twink, McAuliffe was extrapolating Baltimore’s homicide rate. An honest mistake. Meanwhile, I went door to door in my neighborhood and everyone seems to be ok. How soon before this holocaust hits here in WNY?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  104. @God Emperor Putin
    The NYT doesn't allow you to voice your opinion on editorials. Editorials are for telling people how to think, not discussion.

    bored identity dreams of America wherein 60.000.000 deplorables constantly serve as a Wallet Content Correction Officers to the excesses of echo chambering cosmopoliethnocentrism in New York Times Zone.

    Via Daily Caller:

    The New York Times corrected an editorial on the GOP baseball shooting Thursday that baselessly accused Sarah Palin of inciting the 2011 shooting of Gabby Giffords.

    “An earlier version of this editorial incorrectly stated that a link existed between political incitement and the 2011 shooting of Representative Gabby Giffords,” the correction reads. “In fact, no such link was established.”

    “Was this attack evidence of how vicious American politics has become?
    Probably.
    In 2011, Jared Lee Loughner opened fire in a supermarket parking lot, grievously wounding Representative Gabby Giffords and killing six people, including a 9-year-old girl.

    At the time, we and others were sharply critical of the heated political rhetoric on the right.
    Before the shooting, Sarah Palin’s political action committee circulated a map of targeted electoral districts that put Ms. Giffords and 19 other Democrats under stylized cross hairs.

    But in that case no connection to the shooting was ever established.

    Conservatives and right-wing media were quick on Wednesday to demand forceful condemnation of hate speech and crimes by anti-Trump liberals.
    They’re right.
    Liberals should of course be held to the same standard of decency that they ask of the right.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Olorin
    But how many people will see and retransmit the correction?

    https://i.imgur.com/s44HSfB.png
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  105. @nebulafox
    A more charitable interpretation of this is that your average elite journalist tends to be a very *quick* thinker. But that's not the same as being a particularly deep one, and a lot of the Fourth Estate tends to confuse the two.

    Journalists are typically among the dumbest of the intellectual class. For the smart ones, they nevertheless tend to be superficial. Which is natural, considering you don’t have to master any discipline to be in that field, except condescending writing. And you float from topic to topic, pretending mastery of subjects without anyone ever calling you on whether you got it right.

    The subjects they report on repeatedly tend toward gossip.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  106. @Lot
    Looks like the Coz might win a mistrial, jury reported they are deadlocked. While a perv with some obviously criminal conduct a long time ago, this is a selective feminist witch hunt against a rich and relatively conservative cishet figure who has dared to stand up against the anti-white "black activists."

    She took her parents to meet him after the so-called rape and accepted money from him for a civil settlement. If there was a rape, she provided after the fact consent by her actions. I wouldn’t convict in this instance.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  107. @Lot
    I've noticed over the years "critical condition" has been defined down from its former meaning of "high chance of death." Scalise was shot in the hip, taken right to a top hospital, and was described as "in good spirits" and talking to his wife on his cell. I don't think 20 years ago that would have been called critical.

    Lot, Bullet wounds that enter your innards, but don’t exit your body can cause critical injuries that require bowel re-sectioning, colostomy bags, catheters or organ removal. Any gun shot wound to your lower pelvic region should be considered a life threatening injury.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AM
    But you know he seemed so chipper (adrenaline rush) on his way to the hospital. A real man wouldn't be in critical condition after having an insane amount of energy released into the bottom half of his torso. They just brush them off as a flesh wound. *eyeroll*
    , @Anonymous
    Lot knows nothing of medicine and anatomy. But being a Jewish supremacist Lot feels qualified as an expert about anything and everything.

    Jews are the most intelligent ethnic group in the world don't you know? Except in Israel where the average Jewish IQ is 95
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  108. @Anonym
    I had never thought to look into the OK city bombing. However, it does seem odd that it is the same type of bomb as Breivik's, and same order of magnitude mass weight (950kg Oslo vs 2200kg OK City). The Oslo bomb didn't manage to destroy 1/3 of the building. And OK City bomb killed 21 times the people.

    Beyond that I would need to study it.

    It’s not just the amount of explosives, it’s how much oxygen they get, how much of the explosion is absorbed/redirected by the vessel the explosives are contained in, and how much and what kind of shrapnel is created.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    I would be surprised if either truck differed much with containment - a thin metal skin. Given the brilliance with which Breivik planned his operation I would be surprised if he got the ratios wrong with his bomb.

    After 9/11 and WTC 7 I take the official conspiracy theories with a larger grain of salt. Doesn't mean they are wrong.
    , @oddsbodkins
    Yes, and the explosives must all detonate together to have the most effect. And of course proximity to the building is very important.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  109. @Thomas

    A deranged person wounds a Democrat, and it’s the vile Republican hatred and incitement that led to the assault. An actual Democratic activist shoots a Republican, and it’s this “nonviolent” person who was driven to this madness by the divisive atmosphere, to which everyone – including Republicans – contributed.
     
    The Ur-example of this was JFK's assassination being transformed from being the work of a Castro-worshipping Communist into being the result of a "climate of hate" in Dallas (or else that of a "Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy").

    Thomas, yesterday we learned that “evolutionary” changes could happen in as little as six months, you know, since Trump was elected. So of course the shooter was driven to madness by Trump’s election.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  110. @kaganovitch
    And most fortuitously they recently got rid of their ombudsperson.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/02/public-editor/liz-spayd-final-public-editor-column.html?rref=collection%2Fcolumn%2Fthe-public-editor&action=click&contentCollection=opinion&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=1&pgtype=collection&_r=0

    kagan, not so long ago the NYT had a Public Editor that responded to comments from the readers regarding the Times’ point of view. The most recently retired one, Margaret Sullivan, had been the editor of the Buffalo News. Ms. Sullivan, before she underwent indoctrination, stated that seven of the eight black people shot in the Buffalo City Grill massacre were prior felons. Not a good thing to state facts when dealing with the black community. She was chastised and excoriated to tears. But the NYT hired her anyways. I remember her trying to explain why the Benghazi fiasco was relegated to the back pages of the Times’ first section. The commenters hammered her, as they should. The Public Editor lasts about two years IIRC.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    The NY Times just announced that they are doing away with the Public Editor (1 year into her 2 year contract). Cost savings. Fortunately, we are (for the time being) still at the stage where "doing away with" just means that they are letting her go. The "no person, no problem" stage of leftism comes later, although yesterday was a sort of a preview of one of our possible futures.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  111. @Jack D
    OT - Here is a very iStevish chart of pastimes ranked by income distribution:

    https://raw.githubusercontent.com/halhen/viz-pub/master/pastime-income/pastime.png

    Golf wins as the #1 upscale pastime.

    If you look at only the 2 highest brackets, Racquet Sports (i.e. Tennis) tops all. Other high income hobbies besides gold and tennis: running, hiking, yoga. Sounds exactly like what you see everyday around you.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Squash was the highest income racket sport when I was in college. It was basically a signpost saying I went to Harvard/Yale, while racketball said: I'm a Sunbelt arriviste.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  112. @Tiny Duck
    Because of the GOP's ongoing war on the laws of cause and effect, it's hard to take its words seriously.

    On two issues alone, the GOP loses credibility: deficits and guns. Cutting taxes increase deficits, nationally and locally (think Kansas) but the GOP continues to INSIST otherwise.

    On guns, only weeks ago, the GOP was pleased to increase guns for the mentally ill

    The laws of cause and effect cannot be repealed. Until the GOP stops indulging itself with fantasy, I will not believe its sanctimonious words.

    History matters.

    The only reason we have such insane gun laws is because white men have an irrational fear of Black Men

    Tiny Duck, Please pay close attention to what I am saying, in Chicago, Buffalo, Baltimore, Cleveland, St. Louis, Washington, DC and even Toronto, black people have a RATIONAL fear of black people with guns. Do some research, you’ll find I am right.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  113. @AndrewR
    I think it’s easy to underestimate how appallingly innumerate the average American is. Journalists and politicians are, on average, no smarter than a garbage man or roofer. There’s no reason to think the presstitutes even noticed anything amiss about the idiot governor’s six order of magnitude error.

    Andrew, I will agree with you after you apologize to roofers and garbage men. However, it is amazing how many time the media uses numbers that the average person knows are way, way off.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  114. @Charles Pewitt
    The NY Times used to have Sidney Lumet Jews running it. Now the NY Times is run by Steven Spielberg Jews. Sidney Lumet Jews would be more pragmatic and cynical about everybody's motivations, including the motivations of Jews. Steven Spielberg Jews have an annoying habit of running the joint while acting like they are still shtetlized.

    The NY Times less than 20 years ago was writing editorials about how mass immigration and illegal immigration lower wages. Bernie Sanders suggested that open borders mass immigration is a Koch boys idea because it would lower wages.

    President Trump must begin the necessary task of destroying the New York Times and the Washington Post. President Trump should also go after the Murdochs for continuing the mass immigration boosterism of the Wall Street Journal. Just today, the WSJ published an opinion piece from Dartmouth globalizer Mathew Slaughter which suggested that globalization and free trade are great policies to be applauded.

    President Trump will be supported by tens of millions of patriotic Americans when he declares war upon the New York Times and the corporate media. President Trump will win his war against the DEEP STATE and the corporate media, but first he must get his troops ready to fight it.

    Charles, on an average day more than 90% of the articles in the Buffalo News first section are from the NYT, WaPo, Bloomberg News or LA Times.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  115. @Buffalo Joe
    Lot, Bullet wounds that enter your innards, but don't exit your body can cause critical injuries that require bowel re-sectioning, colostomy bags, catheters or organ removal. Any gun shot wound to your lower pelvic region should be considered a life threatening injury.

    But you know he seemed so chipper (adrenaline rush) on his way to the hospital. A real man wouldn’t be in critical condition after having an insane amount of energy released into the bottom half of his torso. They just brush them off as a flesh wound. *eyeroll*

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    AM, when I was 30 I was in a construction site accident where myself and an other worker fell 30 feet from a collapsing scaffold. My buddy was seriously injured and they rushed him to the hospital in a ambulance. I rode in the back of a police squad car. On arrival at the hospital I was placed in a chair in the ER waiting room...and forgotten. Shock also affects the way you react. They finally located me after the job supt. ask how I was doing. Sixteen days later I was released from the hospital. Different people, different reactions.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  116. OT: speaking of believing their own propaganda, Steve, did you ever catch this little gem from NPR, back in March, about refugee children in Sweden (and only in Sweden) coming down with a comatic illness the Swedish government accepts as a pretext for medical asylum, and magically fading back into life within several days to months of being granted asylum? I wish this were a joke.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2017/03/30/521958505/only-in-sweden-hundreds-of-refugee-children-gave-up-on-life

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  117. @snorlax
    It's not just the amount of explosives, it's how much oxygen they get, how much of the explosion is absorbed/redirected by the vessel the explosives are contained in, and how much and what kind of shrapnel is created.

    I would be surprised if either truck differed much with containment – a thin metal skin. Given the brilliance with which Breivik planned his operation I would be surprised if he got the ratios wrong with his bomb.

    After 9/11 and WTC 7 I take the official conspiracy theories with a larger grain of salt. Doesn’t mean they are wrong.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  118. @Lot
    I've noticed over the years "critical condition" has been defined down from its former meaning of "high chance of death." Scalise was shot in the hip, taken right to a top hospital, and was described as "in good spirits" and talking to his wife on his cell. I don't think 20 years ago that would have been called critical.

    What’s your point? That it’s no big deal? Would you want to change places with that man right now?

    I can’t believe the level of callousness and cynicism around here. I understand that people are sick of being lied to and spun by the press and politicians but you can’t just assume that every damn thing you hear is a lie.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    Just an observation. Here are the American Hospital Association's definitions, which I think actually applied 15-20 years ago, compared to now when "critical" is used to describe what was called "serious" previously.

    Good
    Vital signs are stable and within normal limits. Patient is conscious and comfortable. Indicators are excellent.
    Fair
    Vital signs are stable and within normal limits. Patient is conscious, but may be uncomfortable. Indicators are favorable.
    Serious
    Vital signs may be unstable and not within normal limits. Patient is seriously ill. Indicators are questionable.
    Critical
    Vital signs are unstable and not within normal limits. Patient may be unconscious. Indicators are unfavorable.
     
    It is actually the recent mass shootings and truck-on-sidewalk attacks that prompted my observation. They'd say something like "12 in critical condition," but no further fatalities would be reported later on. That simply was not how things were when I watched the news when I was kid, and critical condition was basically a 50/50 chance of death.

    As for Scalise, he is probably one of the five best members of the US House. Top 1%. (Steve King of course is #1).

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  119. @kaganovitch
    Steve, you are giving them far to much credit. This is with malice aforethought.

    Convictions are more dangerous enemies of truth than lies.
    -Nietzsche

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  120. @Buffalo Joe
    kagan, not so long ago the NYT had a Public Editor that responded to comments from the readers regarding the Times' point of view. The most recently retired one, Margaret Sullivan, had been the editor of the Buffalo News. Ms. Sullivan, before she underwent indoctrination, stated that seven of the eight black people shot in the Buffalo City Grill massacre were prior felons. Not a good thing to state facts when dealing with the black community. She was chastised and excoriated to tears. But the NYT hired her anyways. I remember her trying to explain why the Benghazi fiasco was relegated to the back pages of the Times' first section. The commenters hammered her, as they should. The Public Editor lasts about two years IIRC.

    The NY Times just announced that they are doing away with the Public Editor (1 year into her 2 year contract). Cost savings. Fortunately, we are (for the time being) still at the stage where “doing away with” just means that they are letting her go. The “no person, no problem” stage of leftism comes later, although yesterday was a sort of a preview of one of our possible futures.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Jack, Ms Sullivan can "Hide in Plain Sight" back here in Buffalo. I doubt too many people would recognize her.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  121. @Deckin
    If you look at only the 2 highest brackets, Racquet Sports (i.e. Tennis) tops all. Other high income hobbies besides gold and tennis: running, hiking, yoga. Sounds exactly like what you see everyday around you.

    Squash was the highest income racket sport when I was in college. It was basically a signpost saying I went to Harvard/Yale, while racketball said: I’m a Sunbelt arriviste.

    Read More
    • Agree: James Richard
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  122. @snorlax
    It's not just the amount of explosives, it's how much oxygen they get, how much of the explosion is absorbed/redirected by the vessel the explosives are contained in, and how much and what kind of shrapnel is created.

    Yes, and the explosives must all detonate together to have the most effect. And of course proximity to the building is very important.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  123. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @AndrewR
    I think it’s easy to underestimate how appallingly innumerate the average American is. Journalists and politicians are, on average, no smarter than a garbage man or roofer. There’s no reason to think the presstitutes even noticed anything amiss about the idiot governor’s six order of magnitude error.

    Roofers know far more math than journalists and college grad liberals.
    Think about it. How many linear feet of what width planks to cover the roof? What size shingles? How many shingles to a box? How many boxes of shingles to cover the roof? How many cans of nails and staples? How many nail guns? How many roofers for how many days and hours?

    Ask a journalist or liberal to do that without a calculator.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Lol I knew I'd get an autistic "rooferz iz mathematicianz" comment. Obviously there is math involved but I imagine the foreman takes care of most of the thinking. Roofers in general tend to be drawn from a pretty basic pool.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    Counting > regression analysis. LOL.
    , @snorlax
    Those all sound like word problems from my 7th-grade math textbook, but then I'm a software developer not a journalist.

    I believe the answer an actual roofer would give to any of those is "enough."
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  124. @Jack D
    The NY Times just announced that they are doing away with the Public Editor (1 year into her 2 year contract). Cost savings. Fortunately, we are (for the time being) still at the stage where "doing away with" just means that they are letting her go. The "no person, no problem" stage of leftism comes later, although yesterday was a sort of a preview of one of our possible futures.

    Jack, Ms Sullivan can “Hide in Plain Sight” back here in Buffalo. I doubt too many people would recognize her.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  125. @Anonymous
    There's a large basket of ahistorical lies that the left keeps promulgating ...

    The Great Depression was caused by a lack of government action! (Actually government policies prevented market forces from healing the economy)

    Joe McCarthy was wrong! (He was 90% accurate see Venona and Coulter's book both of which have never been refuted only memory-holed)

    The evil right wingers killed JFK! (Oswald was a leftist, Castro was a leftist, LBJ was a leftist)

    Timothy McVeigh blew up the Federal building in OKC by parking a Ryder truck filled with fertilizer outside on the street! (Actually the combustion/impact physics of this type of explosion were a tiny fraction of the power necessary to cause the damage: it was controlled demolition just like the Twin Towers)

    Etc etc etc ad infinitum ...

    Were the Beirut barracks, Khobar towers, Bishopsgate and Manchester truck bombings all faked as well?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  126. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot
    I've noticed over the years "critical condition" has been defined down from its former meaning of "high chance of death." Scalise was shot in the hip, taken right to a top hospital, and was described as "in good spirits" and talking to his wife on his cell. I don't think 20 years ago that would have been called critical.

    Obvious you know nothing of medicine or anatomy. The pelvis is the most important part of the skeleton. It holds the spine, shoulders and head up. The legs are supported by the pelvis. The pelvis is a very complicated structure of many bones held together by a complicated structure of cartilage.

    Because it is so complicated, the pelvis is very, very vulnerable to injury, difficult to fix, and pelvic injuries are very very serious.

    Stop pontificating about things of which you know nothing. He could speak with his wife. His ability to speak has nothing to do with his injuries.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  127. @AM
    But you know he seemed so chipper (adrenaline rush) on his way to the hospital. A real man wouldn't be in critical condition after having an insane amount of energy released into the bottom half of his torso. They just brush them off as a flesh wound. *eyeroll*

    AM, when I was 30 I was in a construction site accident where myself and an other worker fell 30 feet from a collapsing scaffold. My buddy was seriously injured and they rushed him to the hospital in a ambulance. I rode in the back of a police squad car. On arrival at the hospital I was placed in a chair in the ER waiting room…and forgotten. Shock also affects the way you react. They finally located me after the job supt. ask how I was doing. Sixteen days later I was released from the hospital. Different people, different reactions.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  128. @guest
    "The Real Problem Here is that we fail to deny domestic abusers access to guns"

    We do deny abusers access to guns, if they're felons. What's the suggestion? That we start denying men access to guns if they at any point are informed upon by females? Or if they have any contact with law enforcement having to do with a female? Two birds, one stone, I guess.

    Women are already nearly omnipotent in such situations. Now they can threaten to get your guns taken away if you fail to please them, or if they just feel like it?

    Anyone who is the subject of a restraining order has to turn in all their guns in many states. That’s all restraining orders, neighbor squabbles, tenant squabbles, workplace disputes, everybody.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  129. What ever . Our enemies hate us with a good and healthy hatred . And the best we can muster up is bridge party outrage . Nature equipped us with the capacity for love , compassion , sympathy and generosity for sound reasons . And it equipped us with the capacity for rage , hatred and the desire to exterminate our enemies and all their spawn for the same sound reasons . It is time to embrace your inner barbarian .

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  130. @Barnard
    The correct number of people killed by gun violence also includes suicides, which are obviously much different than what happened in Alexandria.

    The correct number of people killed by gun violence also includes suicides, which are obviously much different than what happened in Alexandria.

    True, and also, if you hear or read a stat about how many kids are killed via the use of guns, you will find out that 14-17-year-old ghetto thugs are most of those “kids” in the stats, not little Madison or Conner. There are lots of ways to lie via stats.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  131. @Buffalo Joe
    Lot, Bullet wounds that enter your innards, but don't exit your body can cause critical injuries that require bowel re-sectioning, colostomy bags, catheters or organ removal. Any gun shot wound to your lower pelvic region should be considered a life threatening injury.

    Lot knows nothing of medicine and anatomy. But being a Jewish supremacist Lot feels qualified as an expert about anything and everything.

    Jews are the most intelligent ethnic group in the world don’t you know? Except in Israel where the average Jewish IQ is 95

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  132. @PhDPepper
    I saw about 2 mentioning the truth after reading the top 100 reader's picks (out of 500 when I checked). Immigration boosting articles get far more pushback than this issue in the NYT comments.


    They have issued a correction: "An earlier version of this editorial incorrectly stated that a link existed between political incitement and the 2011 shooting of Representative Gabby Giffords. In fact, no such link was established."

    A little while later they changed the text to read: "In 2011, Jared Lee Loughner opened fire in a supermarket parking lot, grievously wounding Representative Gabby Giffords and killing six people, including a 9-year-old girl. At the time, we and others were sharply critical of the heated political rhetoric on the right. Before the shooting, Sarah Palin’s political action committee circulated a map that showed the targeted electoral districts of Ms. Giffords and 19 other Democrats under stylized cross hairs. But in that case no connection to the shooting was ever established."

    It continues: "Conservatives and right-wing media were quick on Wednesday to demand forceful condemnation of hate speech and crimes by anti-Trump liberals. They’re right. Liberals should of course be held to the same standard of decency that they ask of the right."

    Progress? Have they felt shame, perhaps? Evidence of growing Sailerian influence?

    All I wanted to say to you is “great handle!”

    Oh, and you too, Malcolm X-Lax!!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  133. @nebulafox
    A more charitable interpretation of this is that your average elite journalist tends to be a very *quick* thinker. But that's not the same as being a particularly deep one, and a lot of the Fourth Estate tends to confuse the two.

    Not just the fourth estate.

    g is a measure of that quickness.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  134. @nebulafox
    "Without getting into the whole JFK conspiracy debate, if Oswald wasn’t the lone gunman and there was a bigger conspiracy behind the assassination, then the “climate of hate” is an even less plausible explanation."

    I'm personally not a JFK-conspiracy believer-I just think people don't want to accept that a single deranged young loser can terribly impact history, all through simply squeezing a trigger, in that fashion. But if the government hid some facts of the case, it probably had a lot to do with Oswald's connections to the USSR and Cuba. Reagan had it right here: Baby Boomer mythology aside, JFK at the time was an unambiguous symbol of US Cold War might. It's not hard to imagine some loser with pro-Communist sympathies thinking that he could bring meaning to his useless life by killing him. Had the responsibility truly lay with some shadowy far-right conspiracy, does anybody seriously believe that LBJ, of all people, would have not broadcast that 24/7?

    Remember, this was a year after the Cuban Missile Crisis-I can't stress that enough. Things were very tense, and everybody was putting all their effort into avoiding a nuclear war. Paranoia about the Russians still abounded throughout US society, and vice versa. The Soviets would have never been so nutty to have anything direct to do with the shooting, given that they got out of the assassination business after bumping off Bandera in the late 1950s, and they had just signed the PTB treaty with JFK anyway. But a people grieving at the loss of their President wouldn't have been thinking too rationally about it. If it turned out that Oswald had connections to the KGB, however minor or tangential or defunct, there would have been an extreme public uproar at the worst possible time... and I can see why the government wouldn't want that brought up.

    (Castro on the other hand, that's a different story. If he had his way in 1962, we'd be worried about gigantic radioactive mutant lizards breaking into our caves right now as opposed to debating online.)

    Had the responsibility truly lay with some shadowy far-right conspiracy, does anybody seriously believe that LBJ, of all people, would have not broadcast that 24/7?

    I’m not an expert on the JFK assassination, but of the various theories, I am intrigued by what zerohedge commenters write about sometimes, that this was a deep state* job (CIA, whoever) to stop Kennedy’s idea to get the US back to sound money (zerohedge, right?!). He had an executive order requesting the US gov’t (treasury dept.) to issue 4 Billion in paper money and he wanted to eliminate the Federal Reserve Bank (they are NOT part of the Feral Government). There would be powerful people against that, who politicians of ANY stripe would not want to cross.

    Kennedy got shot about 1/2 year after this executive order, #11110. You’d figure, under this theory, it’d take some time to get a guy set up who has his reasons to shoot the president anyway.

    The people that make money, not earn a lot, but actually make it via keystrokes nowadays are the truly powerful.

    * I don’t mean “deep state” in the sense that I’ve read it lately some, meaning “big government bureaucracy” I mean the “deep” secret organizations whose funding is not in the budget. It seems like there’s two meanings lately.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    There aren't two meanings to "deep state." It always means a "state within the state," or an entity with government-like powers operating outside the authority of the legitimate government. That could refer to a bureaucratic cabal exceeding its mandate, an "off the books" agency or collection of agencies, or even something outside government altogether, like an organized crime syndicate.

    Could be anything, really, so long as it acts like a state without officially being a state within sovereign territory over which it's not supposed to be sovereign.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  135. @anonymous
    It is breathtaking to see the level to which The Gray Hag has fallen.

    Actually, no. As a NYC resident, I stopped buying it daily in 2000. One exception: September 12, 2001 (for obvious reasons–the copy is stored in a black plastic bag for posterity).

    Grew tired of their preaching what to think. In the ’80s and ’90s I’d buy a copy of the NYT and WSJ before getting on the subway to work. Now, I occasionally read NYT articles on-line that have been linked or forwarded to me.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  136. @Anonymous
    Roofers know far more math than journalists and college grad liberals.
    Think about it. How many linear feet of what width planks to cover the roof? What size shingles? How many shingles to a box? How many boxes of shingles to cover the roof? How many cans of nails and staples? How many nail guns? How many roofers for how many days and hours?

    Ask a journalist or liberal to do that without a calculator.

    Lol I knew I’d get an autistic “rooferz iz mathematicianz” comment. Obviously there is math involved but I imagine the foreman takes care of most of the thinking. Roofers in general tend to be drawn from a pretty basic pool.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dr kill
    Around Palm Beach County the pool seems to be pretty Guatemala City - based. Gutters and down spouts? That's the DR.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  137. @Muse
    Conscience is a product of your thoughts and beliefs about yourself and your relationship to others. It is a product of introspection, and thus maturity.

    I find most social justice types more concerned about what others think about them. They are very concerned that what they have and what they do is perceived as cool by others. It is as if they are stuck in an adolescent stage of moral development.

    They do things that they hope will appear altruistic, but they are not true altruists.

    So you can shame them. And if a popular TV show like SNL made fun of them en mass this would change behavior.

    Most conservatives already believe they and the human race are imperfect and will remain so. When a progressive has a utopian vision (such as universal healthcare or eliminating poverty), a conservative sees a hopeless pipe dream. Poverty, sickness and death are a feature of human life, not a bug. It is why we promise in front of our community to stay with our spouse in sickness and in health, for richer or poorer.

    They are stuck in an adolescent stage of moral development.

    FIFY.

    They are stuck in adolescence. It’s Show ‘n Tell vanity signaling. Participation Trophies for all (rewards for showing up). Everyone is a winner. Mistakes/errors are not to be criticized or condemned–positive reinforcement is given. Fault always lies elsewhere. Feelings matter, feelings count.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  138. @Lot
    I've noticed over the years "critical condition" has been defined down from its former meaning of "high chance of death." Scalise was shot in the hip, taken right to a top hospital, and was described as "in good spirits" and talking to his wife on his cell. I don't think 20 years ago that would have been called critical.

    “Critical condition” isn’t actually medical terminology. There’s no standardized meaning. Whenever you hear about a hospitalization from a doctor or hospital representative, they are ethically prohibited from giving out detailed information, so this reporting in the news is always rather meaningless.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  139. @Lot
    I've noticed over the years "critical condition" has been defined down from its former meaning of "high chance of death." Scalise was shot in the hip, taken right to a top hospital, and was described as "in good spirits" and talking to his wife on his cell. I don't think 20 years ago that would have been called critical.

    The Kingfish was also in a good spirit…and critical condition:

    “… After Huey’s shooting, special trauma surgeons were summoned from New Orleans to perform his emergency surgery.

    They were not able to reach Baton Rouge in time, due to roadwork on the new Airline Highway, an 80-mile concrete road initiated by Long to link the two cities.

    Construction of the Bonnet Carré Spillway forced the surgeons to take the old River Road, where they had a car accident….”

    (…)

    “…After having met the man in Shreveport, he was blindfolded and taken to an unknown location where he had to take an oath on a Bible that he would not reveal what was going on.

    The meeting was actually a [Huey Long] ‘assassination club’ meeting.
    The members were doctors, attorneys, businessmen … upper class folks.

    He said he had never told that story until he told me about it, as he did not want any part of it, even though his family were strong anti-Longs. But he did like Earl.”

    — Greggory Davies, retired Winn Parish Deputy Sheriff

    http://www.hueylong.com/life-times/assassination.php

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  140. @Anonymous
    Roofers know far more math than journalists and college grad liberals.
    Think about it. How many linear feet of what width planks to cover the roof? What size shingles? How many shingles to a box? How many boxes of shingles to cover the roof? How many cans of nails and staples? How many nail guns? How many roofers for how many days and hours?

    Ask a journalist or liberal to do that without a calculator.

    Counting > regression analysis. LOL.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  141. @bored identity
    bored identity dreams of America wherein 60.000.000 deplorables constantly serve as a Wallet Content Correction Officers to the excesses of echo chambering cosmopoliethnocentrism in New York Times Zone.

    Via Daily Caller:

    The New York Times corrected an editorial on the GOP baseball shooting Thursday that baselessly accused Sarah Palin of inciting the 2011 shooting of Gabby Giffords.



    “An earlier version of this editorial incorrectly stated that a link existed between political incitement and the 2011 shooting of Representative Gabby Giffords,” the correction reads. “In fact, no such link was established.”

    “Was this attack evidence of how vicious American politics has become?
    Probably.
    In 2011, Jared Lee Loughner opened fire in a supermarket parking lot, grievously wounding Representative Gabby Giffords and killing six people, including a 9-year-old girl.

    At the time, we and others were sharply critical of the heated political rhetoric on the right.
    Before the shooting, Sarah Palin’s political action committee circulated a map of targeted electoral districts that put Ms. Giffords and 19 other Democrats under stylized cross hairs.

    But in that case no connection to the shooting was ever established.

    Conservatives and right-wing media were quick on Wednesday to demand forceful condemnation of hate speech and crimes by anti-Trump liberals.
    They’re right.
    Liberals should of course be held to the same standard of decency that they ask of the right.”

     

    But how many people will see and retransmit the correction?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    If I wanted to completely destroy my credibility with the public and make myself look like a fool, I would say one thing and then a half hour later, I would say the exact opposite thing. Then no one would believe me - was I lying the 1st time or the 2nd time. Are these folks nuts?
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Olorin, This is shameful. These people have no moral compass. Pravda resurrected .
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  142. @AndrewR
    I think it’s easy to underestimate how appallingly innumerate the average American is. Journalists and politicians are, on average, no smarter than a garbage man or roofer. There’s no reason to think the presstitutes even noticed anything amiss about the idiot governor’s six order of magnitude error.

    Andrew, you may recall this, which speaks to Joe’s and anon’s points:

    From here….

    http://slideplayer.com/slide/7276684/

    Seeing this in around 1997 was one of my biggest red pills. Suddenly many things became clear about what I’d been seeing in the Ed Biz in the previous 20 years.

    I had no idea that cognitive functioning skills at the top level were so sparsely distributed. That “top level” to me was what I would have thought might comprise the 4th level…and both tasks were something that most of the non-high-school-grad tradesmen of my youth could do.

    Tradesmen today, I’m not so sure.

    This is one of the worst aspects of the “Free College For All” scam. All these “degreed” types running around who couldn’t calculate a problem involving two units of measurement and one unit of currency.

    And isn’t it interesting that the top tier’s problems are cast as financial (money clever), rather than material or practical ones of a nonmonetary sort…?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    olorin, I went back and found an article from 2013 in the Huffington Post that says 47% of Detroit's adults are functionally illiterate, meaning that they can barely read or perform basic math. Trust me on this, I don't want anyone here to have to read anything on the Huffpo. I will now go rinse my eyes with bleach.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  143. @AndrewR
    Lol I knew I'd get an autistic "rooferz iz mathematicianz" comment. Obviously there is math involved but I imagine the foreman takes care of most of the thinking. Roofers in general tend to be drawn from a pretty basic pool.

    Around Palm Beach County the pool seems to be pretty Guatemala City – based. Gutters and down spouts? That’s the DR.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  144. @Olorin
    But how many people will see and retransmit the correction?

    https://i.imgur.com/s44HSfB.png

    If I wanted to completely destroy my credibility with the public and make myself look like a fool, I would say one thing and then a half hour later, I would say the exact opposite thing. Then no one would believe me – was I lying the 1st time or the 2nd time. Are these folks nuts?

    Read More
    • Replies: @snorlax
    It's the tree-falling-in-a-forest principle. They know exactly what they're doing.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  145. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    Lack of oversight is having a faster effect on the NYT than I expected. They just tried to blame Bernie Sanders’ rhetoric for the egging on the shooter, and NYT commentators are ticked off at the paper:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/14/us/politics/bernie-sanders-supporters.html?smid=tw-nytpolitics&smtyp=cur

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  146. @Olorin
    But how many people will see and retransmit the correction?

    https://i.imgur.com/s44HSfB.png

    Olorin, This is shameful. These people have no moral compass. Pravda resurrected .

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  147. @Olorin
    Andrew, you may recall this, which speaks to Joe's and anon's points:

    http://slideplayer.com/slide/6638251/23/images/9/Estimated+levels+of+usual+cognitive+functioning+U.+S.jpg

    From here....

    http://slideplayer.com/slide/7276684/

    Seeing this in around 1997 was one of my biggest red pills. Suddenly many things became clear about what I'd been seeing in the Ed Biz in the previous 20 years.

    I had no idea that cognitive functioning skills at the top level were so sparsely distributed. That "top level" to me was what I would have thought might comprise the 4th level...and both tasks were something that most of the non-high-school-grad tradesmen of my youth could do.

    Tradesmen today, I'm not so sure.

    This is one of the worst aspects of the "Free College For All" scam. All these "degreed" types running around who couldn't calculate a problem involving two units of measurement and one unit of currency.

    And isn't it interesting that the top tier's problems are cast as financial (money clever), rather than material or practical ones of a nonmonetary sort...?

    olorin, I went back and found an article from 2013 in the Huffington Post that says 47% of Detroit’s adults are functionally illiterate, meaning that they can barely read or perform basic math. Trust me on this, I don’t want anyone here to have to read anything on the Huffpo. I will now go rinse my eyes with bleach.

    Read More
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    The truly depressing part about literacy rates in Detroit, Baltimore, and New Orleans is that they are typically lower than literacy rates in sub-Saharan Africa. I'll let that sink in for a bit, along with 14 of Baltimore's wards having a lower life expectancy than North Korea.

    It gets even worse when you realize that your typical illiterate African peasant is still nonetheless multilingual. They usually know some combination of the old colonial language (English, French, Portuguese, German, and occasionally Arabic in the northern Muslim areas, too) as well as a couple of local ones. His illiteracy is genuinely due to grinding poverty of the sort that few in the West can envision. Here, it is due to catastrophically bad educational management in the inner cities.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  148. @nebulafox
    "Without getting into the whole JFK conspiracy debate, if Oswald wasn’t the lone gunman and there was a bigger conspiracy behind the assassination, then the “climate of hate” is an even less plausible explanation."

    I'm personally not a JFK-conspiracy believer-I just think people don't want to accept that a single deranged young loser can terribly impact history, all through simply squeezing a trigger, in that fashion. But if the government hid some facts of the case, it probably had a lot to do with Oswald's connections to the USSR and Cuba. Reagan had it right here: Baby Boomer mythology aside, JFK at the time was an unambiguous symbol of US Cold War might. It's not hard to imagine some loser with pro-Communist sympathies thinking that he could bring meaning to his useless life by killing him. Had the responsibility truly lay with some shadowy far-right conspiracy, does anybody seriously believe that LBJ, of all people, would have not broadcast that 24/7?

    Remember, this was a year after the Cuban Missile Crisis-I can't stress that enough. Things were very tense, and everybody was putting all their effort into avoiding a nuclear war. Paranoia about the Russians still abounded throughout US society, and vice versa. The Soviets would have never been so nutty to have anything direct to do with the shooting, given that they got out of the assassination business after bumping off Bandera in the late 1950s, and they had just signed the PTB treaty with JFK anyway. But a people grieving at the loss of their President wouldn't have been thinking too rationally about it. If it turned out that Oswald had connections to the KGB, however minor or tangential or defunct, there would have been an extreme public uproar at the worst possible time... and I can see why the government wouldn't want that brought up.

    (Castro on the other hand, that's a different story. If he had his way in 1962, we'd be worried about gigantic radioactive mutant lizards breaking into our caves right now as opposed to debating online.)

    Had the responsibility truly lay with some shadowy far-right conspiracy, does anybody seriously believe that LBJ, of all people, would have not broadcast that 24/7?

    Aren’t the most obvious suspects in such murders the spurned wife and the ambitious underling?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  149. @Jack D
    If I wanted to completely destroy my credibility with the public and make myself look like a fool, I would say one thing and then a half hour later, I would say the exact opposite thing. Then no one would believe me - was I lying the 1st time or the 2nd time. Are these folks nuts?

    It’s the tree-falling-in-a-forest principle. They know exactly what they’re doing.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  150. @Anonymous
    Roofers know far more math than journalists and college grad liberals.
    Think about it. How many linear feet of what width planks to cover the roof? What size shingles? How many shingles to a box? How many boxes of shingles to cover the roof? How many cans of nails and staples? How many nail guns? How many roofers for how many days and hours?

    Ask a journalist or liberal to do that without a calculator.

    Those all sound like word problems from my 7th-grade math textbook, but then I’m a software developer not a journalist.

    I believe the answer an actual roofer would give to any of those is “enough.”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  151. @Mishima Zaibatsu
    Meanwhile in Britain:

    Fierce rivals from the worlds of politics, journalism and broadcasting are uniting, for a few days at least, in support of this weekend’s Great Get Together events in memory of Jo Cox MP, who was murdered by a far-right fanatic a year ago.

    All four living former prime ministers, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown for Labour and Sir John Major and David Cameron for the Conservatives, are recording messages about what they believe unites Britain as a nation.

    Finally in Yorkshire, where Cox was MP for Batley and Spen, rival local news teams for the BBC and ITV will stage a joint broadcast about this weekend’s events, in which more than 116,000 community get-togethers and street parties have been planned across the UK.

    The acts of solidarity between people and organisations that are usually on opposite sides of the spectrum is about “setting aside differences and coming together”, said Lance Price, a spokesman for the Jo Cox Foundation.

    ...

    They conclude: “As the Great Get Together is launched this coming weekend in memory of Jo Cox’s life and work, we two editors have no hesitation in uniting, if for one day only, to share the fine sentiment of George Orwell, that: ‘If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear’.”
     
    Brendan Cox, the husband of this MP whose entire employment history is "invade the world, invite the world", has been doing the media rounds for a year now to talk up the dangers of "populists" and why populism must be shut down at all costs.



    We've had television documentaries about this murder and there's a book coming out.

    The book is resolutely uplifting, but on the morning we meet Cox is looking shell-shocked again: only hours earlier, a suicide bomber had attacked the Manchester Arena. He is, he apologises, “feeling shit”.

    ...

    “I feel a huge desire, when anything like this happens, to be helpful. And to try to make sure the community tension doesn’t blow up, and that people’s anger is channelled against extremist ideology rather than communities.
     
    Translation: The terror attack was awful because white people might get angry, and it's more important we shut patriots' mouths and protect Muslims, than stop people blowing up proles."

    What I find most curious about the Coxes and the #MoreInCommon shtick (that migrants and natives have "more in common than what divides us") is how the late Jo's main passion in parliament was urging support for Salafist jihadis to genocide religious minorities to destroy the Middle East.

    Cox launched the All Party Parliamentary Friends of Syria group, becoming its chair. In the Commons vote in December to approve UK military intervention against ISIL in Syria, Cox abstained because she believed in a more comprehensive strategy that would also include combatting President Bashar al-Assad and his "indiscriminate barrel bombs".

    She wrote:
    By refusing to tackle Assad's brutality, we may actively alienate more of the Sunni population, driving them towards Isis. So I have decided to abstain. Because I am not against airstrikes per se, but I cannot actively support them unless they are part of a plan. Because I believe in action to address Isis, but do not believe it will work in isolation.
     
    Brendan gave the money raised for his wife's murder to al-Qaeda's PR wing, the White Helmets, and Hope Not Hate, which is the UK's, Soros-funded answer to the SPLC.

    In February 2016, Cox wrote to the Nobel Committee praising the work of the Syrian Civil Defense, a civilian voluntary emergency rescue organisation known as the White Helmets, and nominating them for the Nobel Peace Prize: "In the most dangerous place on earth these unarmed volunteers risk their lives to help anyone in need regardless of religion or politics". The nomination was accepted by the committee, and garnered the support of twenty of her fellow MPs and several celebrities, including George Clooney, Daniel Craig, Chris Martin and Michael Palin. The nomination was supported by members of Canada's New Democratic Party, who urged Stéphane Dion, the country's Foreign Affairs Minister, to give his backing on behalf of Canada.
     
    No politicisation of this murder, nope, none whatsoever *cough*.

    Were it not for the violent hatred of one white supremacist, few of us would probably know the backbench MP’s name today. But her murder was a national tragedy, halting the referendum campaign in its tracks and mourned with messages of condolences from world leaders. On what would have been her 42nd birthday, six days later, thousands gathered in Trafalgar Square to celebrate her life; Malala Yousafzai spoke, Lily Allen sang, Bill Nighy read, while abroad crowds gathered in cities from Nairobi to Sydney. On the day of her funeral, constituents lined the streets of the cortege; the trial and conviction of her murderer several months later made headlines all over the world.
     
    Oh, and as a bonus:

    Every night, for almost a year, Brendan Cox and his wife sat up discussing the rise of the far right. He was conducting a major study of populist extremism across the western world and, once the children were in bed, the pair would talk through its implications and analyse the threat.
     
    and

    With the charity Tell MAMA she worked on The Geography of Anti-Muslim Hatred, investigating cases of Islamophobia; the report was dedicated to her at its launch on 29 June 2016.
     
    All the while, "[Cox's] West Yorkshire constituency is near the epicentre of the Muslim child rape epidemic that has been sweeping the Labour heartlands of northern England, largely ignored or covered up by social services workers, police and politicians."

    Coincidentally, at the time of the deadly attack on the MP, who used her maiden speech in Parliament to proclaim that her community has been “deeply enhanced by immigration", sentencing was about to take place on one such case nearby.

    The court heard that in Halifax, eleven miles from Cox’s constituency, a vulnerable underage girl had been left to fend for herself at the age of 13 after her mother died. This child ended up being preyed on by 100 Muslim males who plied her with alcohol and drugs. The girl — nominally in council care — was then passed from house to house and from town to town as far away as Manchester and London. The girl described being filmed by Muslims on a mobile phone while being orally raped. She contracted an STD. Some of the rapists were identified from CCTV which had been seized from the hotels she could remember, while others were caught because of DNA from stains on her clothing. The police said afterwords that the girl, one of two victims, had shown “immense courage and bravery in reporting these matters to the police and providing evidence.”

    At the Leeds trial, only fifteen of the men were convicted. Originally over a hundred were arrested and doubtless dozens of culprits walked free. It was a lurid and horrific story but such hearings are so common these days, they have become wearily familiar.
     
    Whether or not elites and the media consider it legitimate for political points to be made about attacks on lawmakers depends entirely on for which side the target bats.

    The Geography of Anti-Muslim Hatred

    It’s strongest in those places once ruled by Turks, Arabs, etc. And on what Huntington called their “bloody borders”. Eg, Mindanao, Timor, Nigeria…

    In other words, it’s hard-fought-for and well-earned, so let’s not deprive them of the fruits of their labors.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  152. @Achmed E. Newman

    Had the responsibility truly lay with some shadowy far-right conspiracy, does anybody seriously believe that LBJ, of all people, would have not broadcast that 24/7?
     
    I'm not an expert on the JFK assassination, but of the various theories, I am intrigued by what zerohedge commenters write about sometimes, that this was a deep state* job (CIA, whoever) to stop Kennedy's idea to get the US back to sound money (zerohedge, right?!). He had an executive order requesting the US gov't (treasury dept.) to issue 4 Billion in paper money and he wanted to eliminate the Federal Reserve Bank (they are NOT part of the Feral Government). There would be powerful people against that, who politicians of ANY stripe would not want to cross.

    Kennedy got shot about 1/2 year after this executive order, #11110. You'd figure, under this theory, it'd take some time to get a guy set up who has his reasons to shoot the president anyway.

    The people that make money, not earn a lot, but actually make it via keystrokes nowadays are the truly powerful.


    * I don't mean "deep state" in the sense that I've read it lately some, meaning "big government bureaucracy" I mean the "deep" secret organizations whose funding is not in the budget. It seems like there's two meanings lately.

    There aren’t two meanings to “deep state.” It always means a “state within the state,” or an entity with government-like powers operating outside the authority of the legitimate government. That could refer to a bureaucratic cabal exceeding its mandate, an “off the books” agency or collection of agencies, or even something outside government altogether, like an organized crime syndicate.

    Could be anything, really, so long as it acts like a state without officially being a state within sovereign territory over which it’s not supposed to be sovereign.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E.Newman
    Nope, I don't agree. Here's the difference: The huge bureaucracy in government(s) is not usually illegitimate, guest. It does it's own thing, mostly always with a ststist bent, naturally. That's not illegal per the way our Feral gov't is set up.The problem is. that this huge mass of enforcers and sometime decision-makers* is out of control only when the chief executive and his direct minions do not EXERT enough control. The whole lot of them can be fired any day of the week (did you read my link?). Trump doesn't seem to have the guts to do anything like that.

    The "off the books collection of agencies", as you aptly put it, is truly out of control, barring an internal hot war of some kind, because they are the kind that have people killed in broad daylight or just shot with a .22 mag to teach them a quick lesson.

    As I wrote in the article linked to, the first definition (new to me) is mostly just a big mass of stupid with an evil crust of cream at the top. The latter definition is more like focused evil.


    * Unconstitutional, mind you, as their "rulemaking" is NOT voted upon by any elected officials, hence the 10th Amendment was written, but ufortunately, subsequently massively ignored.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  153. @Lot
    I've noticed over the years "critical condition" has been defined down from its former meaning of "high chance of death." Scalise was shot in the hip, taken right to a top hospital, and was described as "in good spirits" and talking to his wife on his cell. I don't think 20 years ago that would have been called critical.

    I’ve noticed over the years “critical condition” has been defined down from its former meaning of “high chance of death.” Scalise was shot in the hip, taken right to a top hospital, and was described as “in good spirits” and talking to his wife on his cell. I don’t think 20 years ago that would have been called critical.

    And you would be wrong. Don’t take MY word for it: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2017/06/15/why-a-single-gunshot-to-steve-scalises-hip-could-be-life-threatening

    For those of us who experience gun violence via movies or television, the single bullet wound to the hip that House Majority Whip Steve Scalise suffered in a ballfield shooting Wednesday would seem less serious than what could have happened to him. After all, he wasn’t hit in the head or chest, which can be immediately fatal.

    But even a single penetrating wound to the pelvic region, which is densely packed with blood vessels, organs and other structures, is extremely dangerous, according to trauma surgeons and emergency medical personnel.

    According to MedStar Washington Hospital Center, the rifle shot to the Louisiana congressman’s left hip “traveled across his pelvis, fracturing bones, injuring internal organs, and causing severe bleeding.” He went into shock and within hours received many units of blood via transfusion and underwent two operations.

    In an update Thursday evening, the hospital said Scalise had undergone additional surgery “related to his internal injuries and a broken bone in his leg. He remains in critical condition, but has improved in the last 24 hours.” The statement also said further surgery will be required and that Scalise “will be in the hospital for some time.”

    Such details reflect the complexity of the pelvic area, which is home to the iliac blood vessels that include major arteries branching off the aorta — the main route that carries oxygenated blood to all parts of the body. Wounds to those vessels, large and small, cause fast, severe blood loss, which can set off a cascade of problems for surgeons trying to save a patient’s life.

    In fact, 30 percent to 50 percent of injuries to the main iliac vessels result in death, said Joseph V. Sakran, director of emergency general surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital, who was himself shot in the throat after a football game about two decades ago when a fight broke out and someone fired into the crowd.

    It looks like he will survive, but he will be looking at a long, hard road back to some semblance of normal health. Even then, he may have drastically reduced mobility. Pelvis is a bad place to be shot… especially with a centerfire rifle.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    Maybe it is correct to call Scalise as in critical condition, I don't know.

    My point is more that the term seems a lot less informative than it used to be, and now includes what used to be described as serious condition. The American Hospital Association's definition include that the patient's "Indicators are unfavorable." Was that ever the case here?

    "Critical condition" now seems to be used for the whole range of 5% to 100% chance of death.

    Come on now, I am the only one who has noticed this?

    I think this is mostly about doctors covering their butts by being being more pessimistic publicly than they actually believe.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  154. Lot says:
    @Jack D
    What's your point? That it's no big deal? Would you want to change places with that man right now?

    I can't believe the level of callousness and cynicism around here. I understand that people are sick of being lied to and spun by the press and politicians but you can't just assume that every damn thing you hear is a lie.

    Just an observation. Here are the American Hospital Association’s definitions, which I think actually applied 15-20 years ago, compared to now when “critical” is used to describe what was called “serious” previously.

    Good
    Vital signs are stable and within normal limits. Patient is conscious and comfortable. Indicators are excellent.
    Fair
    Vital signs are stable and within normal limits. Patient is conscious, but may be uncomfortable. Indicators are favorable.
    Serious
    Vital signs may be unstable and not within normal limits. Patient is seriously ill. Indicators are questionable.
    Critical
    Vital signs are unstable and not within normal limits. Patient may be unconscious. Indicators are unfavorable.

    It is actually the recent mass shootings and truck-on-sidewalk attacks that prompted my observation. They’d say something like “12 in critical condition,” but no further fatalities would be reported later on. That simply was not how things were when I watched the news when I was kid, and critical condition was basically a 50/50 chance of death.

    As for Scalise, he is probably one of the five best members of the US House. Top 1%. (Steve King of course is #1).

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  155. Lot says:
    @Twinkie

    I’ve noticed over the years “critical condition” has been defined down from its former meaning of “high chance of death.” Scalise was shot in the hip, taken right to a top hospital, and was described as “in good spirits” and talking to his wife on his cell. I don’t think 20 years ago that would have been called critical.
     
    And you would be wrong. Don't take MY word for it: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2017/06/15/why-a-single-gunshot-to-steve-scalises-hip-could-be-life-threatening

    For those of us who experience gun violence via movies or television, the single bullet wound to the hip that House Majority Whip Steve Scalise suffered in a ballfield shooting Wednesday would seem less serious than what could have happened to him. After all, he wasn't hit in the head or chest, which can be immediately fatal.

    But even a single penetrating wound to the pelvic region, which is densely packed with blood vessels, organs and other structures, is extremely dangerous, according to trauma surgeons and emergency medical personnel.

    According to MedStar Washington Hospital Center, the rifle shot to the Louisiana congressman's left hip “traveled across his pelvis, fracturing bones, injuring internal organs, and causing severe bleeding.” He went into shock and within hours received many units of blood via transfusion and underwent two operations.

    In an update Thursday evening, the hospital said Scalise had undergone additional surgery "related to his internal injuries and a broken bone in his leg. He remains in critical condition, but has improved in the last 24 hours." The statement also said further surgery will be required and that Scalise "will be in the hospital for some time."

    Such details reflect the complexity of the pelvic area, which is home to the iliac blood vessels that include major arteries branching off the aorta — the main route that carries oxygenated blood to all parts of the body. Wounds to those vessels, large and small, cause fast, severe blood loss, which can set off a cascade of problems for surgeons trying to save a patient's life.

    In fact, 30 percent to 50 percent of injuries to the main iliac vessels result in death, said Joseph V. Sakran, director of emergency general surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital, who was himself shot in the throat after a football game about two decades ago when a fight broke out and someone fired into the crowd.
     
    It looks like he will survive, but he will be looking at a long, hard road back to some semblance of normal health. Even then, he may have drastically reduced mobility. Pelvis is a bad place to be shot... especially with a centerfire rifle.

    Maybe it is correct to call Scalise as in critical condition, I don’t know.

    My point is more that the term seems a lot less informative than it used to be, and now includes what used to be described as serious condition. The American Hospital Association’s definition include that the patient’s “Indicators are unfavorable.” Was that ever the case here?

    “Critical condition” now seems to be used for the whole range of 5% to 100% chance of death.

    Come on now, I am the only one who has noticed this?

    I think this is mostly about doctors covering their butts by being being more pessimistic publicly than they actually believe.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  156. Lot says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    Steve Sailer's farcical style is used as a shield to protect Sailer's polemical positions. Sailer is behind the farcical shield wall jabbing at the powers that be and occasionally launching spears at the enemy commanders.

    Sailer is in California. Another commenter a while back stated that there are millions of White Core Americans living in California who understand that they have no political representation. There is a lot of potential political energy in that sentiment.

    White Core Americans living in California who understand that they have no political representation.

    We control the state GOP, which is weak but which, when it was stronger but saw the writing on the wall, established a large number of veto points that allow it to block much of the left’s agenda. Tax increases require 2/3 of both houses of the state legislature plus the governor, or two thirds of voters. And even with 100% of the local voters, property taxes are severely limited by Prop 13.

    Since Prop 13 is not indexed for inflation, total property taxes as a percentage of the state economy go down each year. That in turn has meant that a lot of liberal spending programs from the Edmund and Jerry Brown I era have been cut back.

    We also have the same “Top 2″ multi-party primaries that whites in Louisiana long ago used to stay in control. With normal primaries in heavily Dem areas, the white Republican minority is completely powerless. We are sure to lose the general, and have no influence in the Dem primary. With the Top 2 system, we can vote for the more conservative of the two Democrats in the general. We also sometimes will randomly have an election with 2 Republicans running who each get 15% of the vote, and 10 Democrats who all get less than 15%, resulting in a general election between two Republicans in a 70% Dem area.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  157. NPR had Gabby Giffords husband on this morning and the announcer kept saying over and over how Gabby Giffords shooting was very similar to the GOP Baseball shooting.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  158. @guest
    There aren't two meanings to "deep state." It always means a "state within the state," or an entity with government-like powers operating outside the authority of the legitimate government. That could refer to a bureaucratic cabal exceeding its mandate, an "off the books" agency or collection of agencies, or even something outside government altogether, like an organized crime syndicate.

    Could be anything, really, so long as it acts like a state without officially being a state within sovereign territory over which it's not supposed to be sovereign.

    Nope, I don’t agree. Here’s the difference: The huge bureaucracy in government(s) is not usually illegitimate, guest. It does it’s own thing, mostly always with a ststist bent, naturally. That’s not illegal per the way our Feral gov’t is set up.The problem is. that this huge mass of enforcers and sometime decision-makers* is out of control only when the chief executive and his direct minions do not EXERT enough control. The whole lot of them can be fired any day of the week (did you read my link?). Trump doesn’t seem to have the guts to do anything like that.

    The “off the books collection of agencies”, as you aptly put it, is truly out of control, barring an internal hot war of some kind, because they are the kind that have people killed in broad daylight or just shot with a .22 mag to teach them a quick lesson.

    As I wrote in the article linked to, the first definition (new to me) is mostly just a big mass of stupid with an evil crust of cream at the top. The latter definition is more like focused evil.

    * Unconstitutional, mind you, as their “rulemaking” is NOT voted upon by any elected officials, hence the 10th Amendment was written, but ufortunately, subsequently massively ignored.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    I believe it is illegal, but that's not really the point. We're in a sorta Beyond Lawful and Unlawful realm, here. But I didn't bring up legality; I was talking about legitimacy. And in a purported democracy, legitimacy derives from public perception, among other things. The public knows about politicians, who are the PR front for our government. If it has no idea that the majority of the government operates without the control, consent, and often knowledge of politicians, how can you consider that government legitimate?

    I'm not just talking here about, say, an army camp on the fringes of Indian territory, which naturally would have been back in the day semi-autonomous, making its own decisions. I'm talking entire buildings, right under the capitol/White House's nose in Washington, which they don't oversee directly for years. That happens.

    Anyway, the two supposedly divergent definitions, they aren't, really. That's the point. If the definition has expanded from "black" spook organizations to extra-political bureaucracies in general, it's because both are considered beyond the control of the legitimate government. The legitimate government being elected officials and the bodies they create under the Constitution.
    , @guest
    "but unfortunately, subsequently massively ignored"

    The deep state chicanery of groups with known disrespect for the law, like the CIA, FBI, NSA, etc., were not entirely ignored, because their misdeeds are periodically publicized. But they have been largely ignored. Does that make them legitimate? If not, why does ignoring the extra-constitutionality of the federal bureaucracy as a whole make them legitimate? What's the difference?

    I mean, aside from the fact that the former group has more guns.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  159. @AM
    I know. Christian fasts are actual fasts, although they wisely encourage drinking enough fluids. If it's just a "hold off the party until sunset" what's the point?

    And upscale Arabs hold lavish banquets (iftar and sohour) at night, consuming and wasting more food than in a typical non-fast day. (In the Gulf, upscale hotels hold these in their “tents” and they are lots of fun. They become corporate events, complete with VIP sections, etc.)

    Some Muslims say one of the purposes of the fast is to engender empathy for poor people who actually go hungry. I am not sure that this is the main reason*, but if so, the hypocrisy is amusing.

    *It seems to me that the main purpose of the fast is that the faster is thinking about it (and therefore about his faith) hours a day for a month. Your entire life revolves around the fast for that month; you’re hungry and thirsty and tired, you have to plan your routine while avoiding temptation, etc. Typical Islamic (“submission”) thinking. I had one Ramadan in Saudi Arabia which was not pleasant; in the other Gulf countries the inconvenience to a non-faster is less; in Turkey and Lebanon, practically not at all.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  160. @Buffalo Joe
    olorin, I went back and found an article from 2013 in the Huffington Post that says 47% of Detroit's adults are functionally illiterate, meaning that they can barely read or perform basic math. Trust me on this, I don't want anyone here to have to read anything on the Huffpo. I will now go rinse my eyes with bleach.

    The truly depressing part about literacy rates in Detroit, Baltimore, and New Orleans is that they are typically lower than literacy rates in sub-Saharan Africa. I’ll let that sink in for a bit, along with 14 of Baltimore’s wards having a lower life expectancy than North Korea.

    It gets even worse when you realize that your typical illiterate African peasant is still nonetheless multilingual. They usually know some combination of the old colonial language (English, French, Portuguese, German, and occasionally Arabic in the northern Muslim areas, too) as well as a couple of local ones. His illiteracy is genuinely due to grinding poverty of the sort that few in the West can envision. Here, it is due to catastrophically bad educational management in the inner cities.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    nebu, Point this out in the company of SJWs and you will be called a racist, even though you are comparing blacks to blacks.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  161. @Jack D
    OT - Here is a very iStevish chart of pastimes ranked by income distribution:

    https://raw.githubusercontent.com/halhen/viz-pub/master/pastime-income/pastime.png

    Golf wins as the #1 upscale pastime.

    Running and yoga are reported as the two most popular pastimes in the highest income bracket. This makes the entire chart highly suspect.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  162. @Jack Hanson
    Being shot in the pelvic girdle is one of two shots considered a 'stopping' shot, the other being a bullet placed into the inverted triangle formed by the eyes and the nose.

    So yes. Its pretty critical when its right up there with being shot in the face.

    Sure Jack, getting shot in the triangle formed by the Adam’s apple and nipples doesn’t stop anyone.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  163. @nebulafox
    The truly depressing part about literacy rates in Detroit, Baltimore, and New Orleans is that they are typically lower than literacy rates in sub-Saharan Africa. I'll let that sink in for a bit, along with 14 of Baltimore's wards having a lower life expectancy than North Korea.

    It gets even worse when you realize that your typical illiterate African peasant is still nonetheless multilingual. They usually know some combination of the old colonial language (English, French, Portuguese, German, and occasionally Arabic in the northern Muslim areas, too) as well as a couple of local ones. His illiteracy is genuinely due to grinding poverty of the sort that few in the West can envision. Here, it is due to catastrophically bad educational management in the inner cities.

    nebu, Point this out in the company of SJWs and you will be called a racist, even though you are comparing blacks to blacks.

    Read More
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    I could also add that if you go to your typical racially mixed working or lower middle class exurb of the sort that dot the areas around Texas urban centers, black literacy rates and educational attainment tends to be just fine. Black middle-class suburbs of the sort that you see in and around Atlanta are naturally further better off, befitting their bourgeois status. Compare that to the invariably depressing racial equality statistics in most major blue cities, and you have a bit of a problem for The Narrative.

    I *never* get tired of watching bien-pensant heads explode over that one. I've lived in both red and blue America, and believe me, bicoastal progressives don't have the right to lecture anybody in the red states on de facto segregation and racial inequality. Sailer covers this topic at length-he specifically tackles Berkeley, CA, which has some of the worst racial inequality in the nation.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  164. @Achmed E.Newman
    Nope, I don't agree. Here's the difference: The huge bureaucracy in government(s) is not usually illegitimate, guest. It does it's own thing, mostly always with a ststist bent, naturally. That's not illegal per the way our Feral gov't is set up.The problem is. that this huge mass of enforcers and sometime decision-makers* is out of control only when the chief executive and his direct minions do not EXERT enough control. The whole lot of them can be fired any day of the week (did you read my link?). Trump doesn't seem to have the guts to do anything like that.

    The "off the books collection of agencies", as you aptly put it, is truly out of control, barring an internal hot war of some kind, because they are the kind that have people killed in broad daylight or just shot with a .22 mag to teach them a quick lesson.

    As I wrote in the article linked to, the first definition (new to me) is mostly just a big mass of stupid with an evil crust of cream at the top. The latter definition is more like focused evil.


    * Unconstitutional, mind you, as their "rulemaking" is NOT voted upon by any elected officials, hence the 10th Amendment was written, but ufortunately, subsequently massively ignored.

    I believe it is illegal, but that’s not really the point. We’re in a sorta Beyond Lawful and Unlawful realm, here. But I didn’t bring up legality; I was talking about legitimacy. And in a purported democracy, legitimacy derives from public perception, among other things. The public knows about politicians, who are the PR front for our government. If it has no idea that the majority of the government operates without the control, consent, and often knowledge of politicians, how can you consider that government legitimate?

    I’m not just talking here about, say, an army camp on the fringes of Indian territory, which naturally would have been back in the day semi-autonomous, making its own decisions. I’m talking entire buildings, right under the capitol/White House’s nose in Washington, which they don’t oversee directly for years. That happens.

    Anyway, the two supposedly divergent definitions, they aren’t, really. That’s the point. If the definition has expanded from “black” spook organizations to extra-political bureaucracies in general, it’s because both are considered beyond the control of the legitimate government. The legitimate government being elected officials and the bodies they create under the Constitution.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Anyway, the two supposedly divergent definitions, they aren’t, really. That’s the point. If the definition has expanded from “black” spook organizations to extra-political bureaucracies in general, it’s because both are considered beyond the control of the legitimate government. The legitimate government being elected officials and the bodies they create under the Constitution.
     
    What extra-political bureaucracies do you mean? My point was ( and I'll agree with your term "legitimate" ) that whole departments can be cleaned out. These people are acting out of control because chief executives and cabinet haven't made an effort to clean house and control them. All these Federal bureaucracies are under the control of the president and his various secretaries.

    With the spook agencies it's the almost other way around. They can exert control over the big shots in all branches of government. That is because long ago they were empowered to spy do all kinds of subterfuge to "help defend" our nation. They have turned a lot of it inward, especially since 9/11 (as an excuse). They can have the goods on anyone who is not ready for Sainthood, and there are exactly ZERO politicians in that crowd. These people are the deep state.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  165. @Achmed E.Newman
    Nope, I don't agree. Here's the difference: The huge bureaucracy in government(s) is not usually illegitimate, guest. It does it's own thing, mostly always with a ststist bent, naturally. That's not illegal per the way our Feral gov't is set up.The problem is. that this huge mass of enforcers and sometime decision-makers* is out of control only when the chief executive and his direct minions do not EXERT enough control. The whole lot of them can be fired any day of the week (did you read my link?). Trump doesn't seem to have the guts to do anything like that.

    The "off the books collection of agencies", as you aptly put it, is truly out of control, barring an internal hot war of some kind, because they are the kind that have people killed in broad daylight or just shot with a .22 mag to teach them a quick lesson.

    As I wrote in the article linked to, the first definition (new to me) is mostly just a big mass of stupid with an evil crust of cream at the top. The latter definition is more like focused evil.


    * Unconstitutional, mind you, as their "rulemaking" is NOT voted upon by any elected officials, hence the 10th Amendment was written, but ufortunately, subsequently massively ignored.

    “but unfortunately, subsequently massively ignored”

    The deep state chicanery of groups with known disrespect for the law, like the CIA, FBI, NSA, etc., were not entirely ignored, because their misdeeds are periodically publicized. But they have been largely ignored. Does that make them legitimate? If not, why does ignoring the extra-constitutionality of the federal bureaucracy as a whole make them legitimate? What’s the difference?

    I mean, aside from the fact that the former group has more guns.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Again, because the bureaucrats can be fired. On paper, maybe the spooks can, but like you said, they've got more guns. More importantly, they've got the goods on whomever they want to, let's say, "influence". There's a lot of storage space in that server farm in Utah.

    I don't argue that both groups are completely un-constitutional, but most of the bureaucracy is legitimate in the eyes of the political crowd. In my opinion, they are not the "deep state". They are the "deadbeat state".

    Hey, I hope you read my link on this.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  166. @Buffalo Joe
    nebu, Point this out in the company of SJWs and you will be called a racist, even though you are comparing blacks to blacks.

    I could also add that if you go to your typical racially mixed working or lower middle class exurb of the sort that dot the areas around Texas urban centers, black literacy rates and educational attainment tends to be just fine. Black middle-class suburbs of the sort that you see in and around Atlanta are naturally further better off, befitting their bourgeois status. Compare that to the invariably depressing racial equality statistics in most major blue cities, and you have a bit of a problem for The Narrative.

    I *never* get tired of watching bien-pensant heads explode over that one. I’ve lived in both red and blue America, and believe me, bicoastal progressives don’t have the right to lecture anybody in the red states on de facto segregation and racial inequality. Sailer covers this topic at length-he specifically tackles Berkeley, CA, which has some of the worst racial inequality in the nation.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome


    middle class exurb ... black literacy rates and educational attainment tends to be just fine

     

    Sure they do.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  167. @guest
    I believe it is illegal, but that's not really the point. We're in a sorta Beyond Lawful and Unlawful realm, here. But I didn't bring up legality; I was talking about legitimacy. And in a purported democracy, legitimacy derives from public perception, among other things. The public knows about politicians, who are the PR front for our government. If it has no idea that the majority of the government operates without the control, consent, and often knowledge of politicians, how can you consider that government legitimate?

    I'm not just talking here about, say, an army camp on the fringes of Indian territory, which naturally would have been back in the day semi-autonomous, making its own decisions. I'm talking entire buildings, right under the capitol/White House's nose in Washington, which they don't oversee directly for years. That happens.

    Anyway, the two supposedly divergent definitions, they aren't, really. That's the point. If the definition has expanded from "black" spook organizations to extra-political bureaucracies in general, it's because both are considered beyond the control of the legitimate government. The legitimate government being elected officials and the bodies they create under the Constitution.

    Anyway, the two supposedly divergent definitions, they aren’t, really. That’s the point. If the definition has expanded from “black” spook organizations to extra-political bureaucracies in general, it’s because both are considered beyond the control of the legitimate government. The legitimate government being elected officials and the bodies they create under the Constitution.

    What extra-political bureaucracies do you mean? My point was ( and I’ll agree with your term “legitimate” ) that whole departments can be cleaned out. These people are acting out of control because chief executives and cabinet haven’t made an effort to clean house and control them. All these Federal bureaucracies are under the control of the president and his various secretaries.

    With the spook agencies it’s the almost other way around. They can exert control over the big shots in all branches of government. That is because long ago they were empowered to spy do all kinds of subterfuge to “help defend” our nation. They have turned a lot of it inward, especially since 9/11 (as an excuse). They can have the goods on anyone who is not ready for Sainthood, and there are exactly ZERO politicians in that crowd. These people are the deep state.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    "What extra-political bureaucracies do you mean?"

    Any part of the bureaucracy that is beyond the supervision of elected officials, either in Congress or the White House. Which could be a couple of guys working in tandem (if their collusion is significant; I'm not talking about a conspiracy to smuggle paperclips or sneak out if work early) or entire departments.

    By the way, I think Deep State is better thought of in J. Edgar Hoover terms. But whether it's secretly surveiling ideological enemies or secretly setting wetlands policy, it's all outside the control of the real givers.

    Also, I did read your Peak Stupidity link.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  168. @guest
    "but unfortunately, subsequently massively ignored"

    The deep state chicanery of groups with known disrespect for the law, like the CIA, FBI, NSA, etc., were not entirely ignored, because their misdeeds are periodically publicized. But they have been largely ignored. Does that make them legitimate? If not, why does ignoring the extra-constitutionality of the federal bureaucracy as a whole make them legitimate? What's the difference?

    I mean, aside from the fact that the former group has more guns.

    Again, because the bureaucrats can be fired. On paper, maybe the spooks can, but like you said, they’ve got more guns. More importantly, they’ve got the goods on whomever they want to, let’s say, “influence”. There’s a lot of storage space in that server farm in Utah.

    I don’t argue that both groups are completely un-constitutional, but most of the bureaucracy is legitimate in the eyes of the political crowd. In my opinion, they are not the “deep state”. They are the “deadbeat state”.

    Hey, I hope you read my link on this.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    "because the bureaucrats can be fired"

    Can be, theoretically. But they aren't. At least not all at once, and not deliberately to deprive them of the power they enjoy outside of the supervision of politicians.

    Likewise, we could line up members of the CIA and shoot them, but we don't. Occasionally some of them go to jail.
    , @guest
    Spooks have guns, but it would require a coup for them to outgun the legitimate government. The military as a whole hasn't gone black, and unlike other executive cliques can be called to order by politicians.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  169. … grievously wounding Representative Gabby Giffords and killing six people, including a 9-year-old girl, …

    What kind of sick person treats wounding a person – even “grievously” – as more important than SIX MURDERS?

    Basic tabloid practice would be to put the beautiful, innnocent 9-year-old girl front and center, and only mentioning the second-tier congress person in the second paragraph.

    Instead, we have relentless hammering and building of The Narrative.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  170. @Anon
    The Times is still a money-losing paper doing what it can to nibble away at Slim's fortune. I'm curious to know how much money he's lost by choosing to invest in the paper.

    Anyway, getting rid of the omsbudsman is what you do when you want to go full tilt to into screeching libtardism. I'm kind of looking forward to the NYT falling to the circulation of The Nation. At the very least, I expect it to shrink to the Village Voice level.

    Slim (aka Saleem) is a stooge for the Deep State.

    The deal is this: the Slim blog (formerly known as the New York Times) turns its entire publishing effort to pushing the Deep State Narrative. In return, Slims monopolies get to plunder Mexico and the U.S.

    The real aim of the Deep State is to create an America and a world that is congenial to pedophile billionaires and a narrow “elite” Aztec-style priesthood LITERALLY feeding on subject peoples. A few eggs will need to be cracked to make this omelette. The agenda involves exterminating some 95% of the world’s population, and enslaving another 4% to serve the elite’s every need.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  171. @Achmed E. Newman
    Again, because the bureaucrats can be fired. On paper, maybe the spooks can, but like you said, they've got more guns. More importantly, they've got the goods on whomever they want to, let's say, "influence". There's a lot of storage space in that server farm in Utah.

    I don't argue that both groups are completely un-constitutional, but most of the bureaucracy is legitimate in the eyes of the political crowd. In my opinion, they are not the "deep state". They are the "deadbeat state".

    Hey, I hope you read my link on this.

    “because the bureaucrats can be fired”

    Can be, theoretically. But they aren’t. At least not all at once, and not deliberately to deprive them of the power they enjoy outside of the supervision of politicians.

    Likewise, we could line up members of the CIA and shoot them, but we don’t. Occasionally some of them go to jail.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  172. @Achmed E. Newman
    Again, because the bureaucrats can be fired. On paper, maybe the spooks can, but like you said, they've got more guns. More importantly, they've got the goods on whomever they want to, let's say, "influence". There's a lot of storage space in that server farm in Utah.

    I don't argue that both groups are completely un-constitutional, but most of the bureaucracy is legitimate in the eyes of the political crowd. In my opinion, they are not the "deep state". They are the "deadbeat state".

    Hey, I hope you read my link on this.

    Spooks have guns, but it would require a coup for them to outgun the legitimate government. The military as a whole hasn’t gone black, and unlike other executive cliques can be called to order by politicians.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  173. @Achmed E. Newman

    Anyway, the two supposedly divergent definitions, they aren’t, really. That’s the point. If the definition has expanded from “black” spook organizations to extra-political bureaucracies in general, it’s because both are considered beyond the control of the legitimate government. The legitimate government being elected officials and the bodies they create under the Constitution.
     
    What extra-political bureaucracies do you mean? My point was ( and I'll agree with your term "legitimate" ) that whole departments can be cleaned out. These people are acting out of control because chief executives and cabinet haven't made an effort to clean house and control them. All these Federal bureaucracies are under the control of the president and his various secretaries.

    With the spook agencies it's the almost other way around. They can exert control over the big shots in all branches of government. That is because long ago they were empowered to spy do all kinds of subterfuge to "help defend" our nation. They have turned a lot of it inward, especially since 9/11 (as an excuse). They can have the goods on anyone who is not ready for Sainthood, and there are exactly ZERO politicians in that crowd. These people are the deep state.

    “What extra-political bureaucracies do you mean?”

    Any part of the bureaucracy that is beyond the supervision of elected officials, either in Congress or the White House. Which could be a couple of guys working in tandem (if their collusion is significant; I’m not talking about a conspiracy to smuggle paperclips or sneak out if work early) or entire departments.

    By the way, I think Deep State is better thought of in J. Edgar Hoover terms. But whether it’s secretly surveiling ideological enemies or secretly setting wetlands policy, it’s all outside the control of the real givers.

    Also, I did read your Peak Stupidity link.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  174. @nebulafox
    I could also add that if you go to your typical racially mixed working or lower middle class exurb of the sort that dot the areas around Texas urban centers, black literacy rates and educational attainment tends to be just fine. Black middle-class suburbs of the sort that you see in and around Atlanta are naturally further better off, befitting their bourgeois status. Compare that to the invariably depressing racial equality statistics in most major blue cities, and you have a bit of a problem for The Narrative.

    I *never* get tired of watching bien-pensant heads explode over that one. I've lived in both red and blue America, and believe me, bicoastal progressives don't have the right to lecture anybody in the red states on de facto segregation and racial inequality. Sailer covers this topic at length-he specifically tackles Berkeley, CA, which has some of the worst racial inequality in the nation.

    middle class exurb … black literacy rates and educational attainment tends to be just fine

    Sure they do.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  175. @Twinkie
    It's a classic case of the Leftist strategy/mantra of "Heads I win, tails you lose."

    A deranged person wounds a Democrat, and it's the vile Republican hatred and incitement that led to the assault. An actual Democratic activist shoots a Republican, and it's this "nonviolent" person who was driven to this madness by the divisive atmosphere, to which everyone - including Republicans - contributed.

    In a similar vein, read this editorial from the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-shooting-at-a-gop-baseball-practice-was-an-assault-on-democracy/2017/06/14/06587d9a-5131-11e7-91eb-9611861a988f_story.html

    Who knows what mixture of madness and circumstance causes someone to pick up a gun and go on a rampage?
     
    Translation: who knows, indeed? Nobody. Surely, not the leftist incitements against the President and the Republicans.

    Mr. Trump struck exactly the right tone. “We may have our differences, but we do well, in times like these, to remember that everyone who serves in our nation’s capital is here because, above all, they love our country,” he said from the White House.
     
    Translation: since there was a tragedy, Republicans must talk about unity and give up their partisan rancor.

    We think Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) was correct in not shying away from the issue of gun control when asked at a news conference if he was worried about the safety of politicians. He said he was concerned about all Americans’ safety from gun violence, not just politicians: “This is not what today is about, but we have too many guns on the street.”
     
    Translation: Democrats, this is no time for "unity" - keep pushing our agenda.

    By the way, what's missing from the Washington Post's selective quote of McAuliffe: "We lose 93 million Americans a day to gun violence." He repeated this several times today. Pack your bags, the country will be devoid of people in four days due to gun violence.

    Reminds me of how “[right-wing] hate” in Dallas killed JFK, rather than a Castro-loving Marxist who once defected to the Soviet Union.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  176. @J1234

    Before the shooting, Sarah Palin’s political action committee circulated a map of targeted electoral districts that put Ms. Giffords and 19 other Democrats under stylized cross hairs.
     
    As I recall, Loughner had a long standing obsession of (and resentment towards) Gifford that predated Sarah Palin's benign ad by several years, and had almost nothing to do with political philosophy and everything to do with psychological delusion and dysfunction. He had actually met Giffords 3 or 4 years before he had shot her and murdered those other people, and that's about the time his obsession started. He had books by both Hitler and Marx, so he - like a lot of crazy people - developed an incoherent extremism that didn't operate on the standard left/right paradigm.

    Or maybe all of that was all fake news.

    “[Loughner] had books by both Hitler and Marx, so he – like a lot of crazy people – developed an incoherent extremism that didn’t operate on the standard left/right paradigm.”

    That’s two varieties of Socialist. What part of Loughner’s extremism was not “left”?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The major media overlooked Communist spies and Madoff’s fraud. What are they missing today?
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
The evidence is clear — but often ignored