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NYT: Cryptocurrencies Are Sexist
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From the New York Times:

Women in Cryptocurrencies Push Back Against ‘Blockchain Bros’
By NELLIE BOWLES FEB. 25, 2018

PALO ALTO, Calif. — … Virtual currencies and blockchain, the digital ledger that forms the basis of the cryptocurrencies, were intended to be democratizing and equalizing forces, buoyed by a utopian exuberance. But women who have been trying to participate in the gold rush are finding a lopsided gender divide. And some say the culture is getting worse, with the male-dominated culture buoyed by a new fleet of wealthy crypto speculators known as “blockchain bros.”

Cryptocurrencies are sexist. Attractive young women are unable to get a break in an industry where no ones knows your identity. On the Internet, nobody knows you’re not a dog. And that’s just not fair.

Obviously, crypto-currencies (which may blow up the world or make it much better, don’t ask me, I don’t know) are totally sexist.

The only reason Satoshi Nakamoto’s idea has swept the world is because his strong handshake, curly blond hair, red beard, green eyes, mole on his upper lip, Heidelberg dueling scar on his left cheek, gold tooth, missing last joint of his left ring finger, discreet skull & bones 322 tattoo on his right wrist, and deep gravelly voice with a Frisian accent gives Satoshi his White Male Privilege.

That means the budding world is already in danger of looking like the rest of the technology industry, where women are decidedly a minority. Some studies estimate that women account for only 4 percent to 6 percent of blockchain investors. That imbalance matters because the early days of an industry are often when the fortunes are made — and those big winners then choose whom to invest in and what to build next, launching a cascade of consequences.

It’s almost as if a woman had wanted to become a billionaire for inventing bitcoin, she should have, you know, invented bitcoin.

Now, some early female investors and entrepreneurs are beginning to sound the alarm and push back.

“Women, consider crypto,” Alexia Bonatsos, a venture capitalist, wrote on Twitter. “Otherwise the men are going to get all the wealth, again.”

Commenter Mr. Anon explains:

Yeah, woman-up and invest in some digitial-tulip-based currency that Alexia Bonatsos is flogging. Alexia needs some suckers. You won’t get rich, but Alexia will. And that’s what’s really important: not that women get rich, but that women like Alexia Bonatsos – and, especially, Alexia Bonatsos herself – get rich.

Also, how come Nigerian princes are getting all the email money? Where are the Nigerian princesses?

Fortunately, the government of Venezuela, fresh off their other recent economic triumphs, such as the Venezuelan Weight Loss Program, has unveiled its own cryptocurrency. Commenter Buzz Mohawk explains:

I don’t always buy cryptocurrency, but when I do, I buy it from this man:

 
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  1. Another investing contra-indicator. Perhaps there is a fund that incorporates some inverse Bonatso advice?

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  2. Sounds like a pump and dump scam. There must be a man behind this push to get women into cryptos.

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  3. Read More
    • Agree: International Jew
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    The cited article is baloney. It may be that, ceteris parabus women invest more wisely than men, just as Steve pointed out earlier that, domicilius paribus, California is more lucrative than Ohio.

    Trouble is, the ceteris are anything but paribus: most women don't invest at all. They spend. Like drunken sailors. What's more, they far less often are even productive enough to face a decision about whether to invest or spend, much less a decision about whether to invest in this or that.

    The writers of this study – unsurprisingly being feted in Forbes – have once again tiresomely assumed a can-opener.
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  4. Note also that Loretta Lee who is suing Google for sexual harassment or something was actually fired for “poor performance” and I doubt they could have gotten away with referring to her sexual performance!

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5433107/Female-software-engineer-Google-sues-tech-giant.html

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  5. Es un mundo de hombres.

    I don’t always buy cryptocurrency, but when I do, I buy it from this man.

    Ladies, you can line up to buy your petros in Venezuela. They are strong like bull.

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    • LOL: bomag
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  6. Also, how come Nigerian princes are getting all the email money? Where are the Nigerian princesses?

    iSteve asking the questions no one else is asking! It’s what keeps me coming back.

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  7. Something completely decentralized and with no barrier to entry still ends up being 95% male.

    The logical conclusion is that women are inherently inferior when it comes to complicated quantitative subjects.

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    • Agree: Abe
    • Replies: @sabril

    The logical conclusion is that women are inherently inferior when it comes to complicated quantitative subjects.
     
    Either that or women are naturally risk averse. Which is a nice way of saying that they are genetically programmed to sit on the sidelines and fall in love with the winners. In general, I think more needs to be said about the risks men take. What percentage of failed startups had men as their founders? Is this a gap that needs to be closed? Is our society better off if more women start spending 5 or 10 of the best years of their lives on startups which turn out to have been a complete waste of time and money?

    By the way, this reminds me of an article I read a couple weeks ago arguing that people should show their support for Trump by buying Bitcoin. Basically it seems people who have already invested are on a search for Greater Fools.
    , @Abe

    Something completely decentralized and with no barrier to entry still ends up being 95% male.
     
    Right. This is the point I always make when the on-cue whining starts about the dearth of women in whatever's the hot, new startup field du jour (saw a kissin'-cousin of this article recently, but it was on the lack of women in virtual reality).

    There is no barrier to entry and unlike the very first Internet bubble where you'd be sorely tempted to fork over 4 or more figures to Netscape to get this new-fangled technology called a 'web server', the software and tools are all literally free now.

    So I guess the narrative must now be that while all the start-up 'bro's' rise from nothing, and have to push past a literal old boys network of established CEO's whose fortunes and reputations they'll eventually ruin if they are to really make it (Steve Ballmer's miscall on the iPhone has become his corporate epitaph, the middle-brow version of the 'dance, monkey boy' videos circulating about him 15 years ago), these old boys somehow fight extra hard when it's women coming after them.

    For to paraphrase Mark Steyn's brilliant quip about Moselms fretting over backlash from tomorrow's terrorist attack: Women's groups decry gender imbalances in next year's hot, new technology some skinny white or Asian dude will bother to go through the formality of actually inventing.

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  8. Women will never, ever be more than 5% of the real innovators in any important, disruptive technology. This will not change.

    It is inherently not how women are wired. Plus, being a tech luminary does far less for a woman’s social status than it does for a man’s (her looks still supercede all), so tech entrepreneurship is not even really a good use of a woman’s time even in the unlikely event that she has the aptitude.

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    • Replies: @sabril
    I agree, but as I mentioned in my last comment, we also need to pay attention to the issue of risk. Of the men (and women) who get involved early in a new disruptive technology, less than 10% will succeed in a big way. And of the 90% who don't, a substantial percentage will have worked night and day for years and end up having totally wasted their time.

    Probably there are hundreds of guys like Mark Zuckerberg, Jeff Bezos, etc. with comparable products that failed for one reason or another, often just due to bad luck.

    Feminists want women to enjoy the benefits reaped by these guys without having taken the risks faced by all of the failures. Which in fact women can do -- by marrying rich tech guys -- but feminists think it's horrific for women to assume a traditional role.
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  9. Bitcoin has a number of flaws which will keep it niche, at best. Others have described the issues better, but the major ones are: slow transaction rate and high transaction cost preclude its use for buying, say, a coffee. Energy used in verifying transactions is enormous. Also it is deflationary by design which is not good–a very low, stable rate of inflation seems to be the sweet spot for a currency to be practically useful. No recourse whatsoever if you are the victim of theft or fraud. Once your identity has been linked to one transaction all of your transactions forever are then known, making it less than ideal for clandestine activity; and if you are completely above board why bother with it? Overall it appears Satoshi was a better computer scientist than economist.

    Could a different cryptocurrency fix Bitcoin’s shortcomings and displace the current system of fiat currency? It would be a major, major economic event: barter/sharing/primitive economies -> standardized money based on precious metals -> fiat currencies -> cryptocurrencies.

    But I’m somewhat skeptical…fiat currency works so well because it is backed not by gold or silver but by dudes with guns. Try to make an unauthorized expansion of the money supply by printing up some Benjamins in your basement and see how long it takes the Secret Service to show up. Try to pay your taxes or other debts with Disney Dollars or Steve Sailer Pesos and they will put you in a metal cage. One of the central functions of a modern state is central banking a.k.a. managing the money supply, as well as whipping up a whole legal framework around how that money can be moved around and who gets it if there is a dispute; a.k.a. corporate law, contract law, etc. And it’s all backed by the state’s monopoly on violence, in the form of your local Sheriff, or FBI, or local police, or BATF, what have you. Dudes with guns.

    Do you genuinely believe you going to replace all that with some computer code? This seems like the sort of escapist libertarian fantasy that NW Euros in general and Americans in particular always indulge in. Instead of fixing the State we’re going to make something totally new and leave the State behind. Using cryptocurrency!

    Satoshi is definitely white and probably American because this is not how the Japanese roll. We on the other hand are a nation of run-awayers. Running away across the Atlantic worked out well. So we keep doing it. We ran from the cities to the suburbs, and east to west. Now we’re running from our dysfunctional democracy. Elon Musk’s people were/are getting run out of South Africa, so he ran to Canada, then to the U.S., but it’s happening again, and now he wants to run to Mars. Runrunrun. That’s what we do. Castles in the sky.

    Having said that, there are certainly going to be some niche applications of cryptocurrencies/blockchain, and people who figure out even a small niche are going to become fabulously wealthy.

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    • Agree: Luke Lea
    • Replies: @Maciano
    Your comment shows you really don't know anything about bitcoin. In every thread on crypto I've seen ppl like you.

    I stopped being annoyed by it, bc unlike issues like third world immigration, it matters for your personal wealth to not get crypto. So pls, get left behind. Stick with dollars, stocks , gold.
    , @AnotherDad

    But I’m somewhat skeptical…fiat currency works so well because it is backed not by gold or silver but by dudes with guns.
     
    Simple, the rest of your paragraph fleshes it out, but this is the gist of it.
    , @Steve in Greensboro
    "Fiat works because it is backed not by gold or silver, but by dudes with guns."

    Thought experiment: You want to buy my dining room table and pay me with fiat. I will not accept fiat, but will accept a gold coin. Will the "dudes with guns" drop by and force me to accept the fiat?

    You can see real world examples of how this works in "When Money Dies" by Adam Ferguson.

    I don't think the cryptocurrencies will be what will succeed fiat, but that doesn't mean fiat will survive for much longer. Fiat has been around for only "the blink of an eye" in terms of financial history and given how Central Banks manage it, it won't be around for too much longer (in those terms).
    , @TomSchmidt
    Your points about escapist fantasy are on target.

    barter/sharing/primitive economies -> standardized money

    On this one, I'll recommend the book Debt, by David Graeber. Graeber traces the history of the idea that barter evolved to currency (because 2 chickens for a pair of boots doesn't compute), and shows it to be a fantasy constructed of whole cloth by Adam Smith. Whom he later shows plagiarized the pin factory story.

    Graeber makes the point that money as gold coin never evolved that way in the market, but was made the medium of exchange by men with spears and swords.
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  10. Crypto Currencies are this decade’s Chia Pets. The problem with Bitcoin is that it is very traceable, already SJW are doing just that to figure out who donated what to say, Steve Sailer, or VDARE, or anyone else they don’t like. And get said donors fired, like they are doing trawling donation lists for candidates and propositions that got Brendan Eich fired from Mozilla.

    Secondly, there is no barrier to entry to creating a crypto currency. If you have enough cryptographic mathematical background, you can create your own. If you don’t even have that, you can fork Bitcoin (there are IIRC at least four forks of Bitcoin) or Etherium or Doge Coin or what have you.

    Thirdly, Bitcoin and other crypto currencies require enormous amounts of electricity to create them, i.e. “mine” them, and that is even less sustainable than gold mines. Far more dollar amount value of electricity is required for a dollar amount of Bitcoin even at today’s inflated prices. [Remember there is no real barrier to entry in crypto -- competition is real.]

    Fourth, is Sovereign nations and central banks being hostile to crypto currencies. While Bitcoin is very traceable by design, others are not, and are an ideal way for really rich people to evade the Tsar in Russia or Emperor in China and taxation/extortion demands, or rich industrialists in Europe to make bribes or evade taxes as well. Russia and China are already hostile to crypto currency and are likely to ban it inside their nations — with the nationwide computerized surveillance network to make it stick.

    Fifth, Crypto is horrifically vulnerable to hack attacks that steal your crypto currencies held in either your own storage or on online exchanges. If Western banks are very bad at security, and they are, they are at least insured up to certain amounts on deposits. Meaning if some crooks drain your account or run up lots of charges (happened to my brother’s account on Black Friday) you can get restoration within a reasonable amount of business days. There is no such government backed deposit insurance and fraud regulations around crypto — meaning as a medium of exchange its not very consumer friendly.

    Where crypto shines is a record of transactions, but those are computationally expensive and slow, meaning as practical matter some database records the initial clearing exchange and the crypto blockchain is updated in the background. Banks and financial institutions are looking at block chain technology as essentially an unhackable ledger of transactions which is very handy indeed for back office operations and reporting but not earth changing.

    Something like Bitcoin is valuable in places with no effective currency such as Venezuela, or subject to bad inflation like Argentina, or subject to embargoes like North Korea or Iran. But that’s not a revolution like the internet or personal computer or smart phone.

    Women looking for a big break would be advised to come up with workable general purpose AI that can run on fairly limited hardware without a giant cloud background. Applications in robotics and automation come to mind and whoever can crack it first in the marketplace will make Apple loads of money.

    [Imagine a great working general purpose AI dependent on the cloud running on a medical care robot when it suddenly loses internet connection. You get the idea. This is why driverless cars are not on the market yet -- even network latency is a problem let alone loss of signal.]

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    • Replies: @Jack D

    Women looking for a big break would be advised to come up with workable general purpose AI that can run on fairly limited hardware without a giant cloud background.
     
    What this country REALLY needs is a good 5 cent cigar!

    1st of all, very few women (very few of any gender) have the mathematical chops to come up with a workable AI period - the math behind AI is hard. Most modern AI depends on neural networks. From the wiki: The study of non-learning artificial neural networks began in the decade before the field of AI research was founded, in the work of Walter Pitts and Warren McCullouch. Frank Rosenblatt invented the perceptron, a learning network with a single layer, similar to the old concept of linear regression. Early pioneers also include Alexey Grigorevich Ivakhnenko, Teuvo Kohonen, Stephen Grossberg, Kunihiko Fukushima, Christoph von der Malsburg, David Willshaw, Shun-Ichi Amari, Bernard Widrow, John Hopfield, Eduardo R. Caianiello, and others. Guess which gender every last one of these guys is?

    2nd the nature of neural networks is that they have to be solved on massively parallel arrays (not unlike Bitcoin mining) - the same skills that would allow a gal to be a cryptocurrency big wig would also allow her to do AI (and vice versa). The best bet for these kind of tasks (other than Google's TPU's (tensor processing units) are the graphics chips used for video cards - gamers are kvetching because the bitcoin miners have bought up every GPU in sight.

    Nowadays TPU pods are the size of old fashioned mainframes but they will surely shrink in size:

    https://qzprod.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/tpu_person_forwebonly_final-e1494968056259.jpg

    There's a chick in the photo but I would bet that she is there mainly for decoration and 95% of the Google crew working on this stuff is geeky guys like Damore.
    , @AnotherDad
    Women looking for a big break would be advised to come up with workable general purpose AI that can run on fairly limited hardware without a giant cloud background. Applications in robotics and automation come to mind and whoever can crack it first in the marketplace will make Apple loads of money.

    LOL.

    Whatever she does for a career, a woman looking for a "big break", should behave in a manner that will help them land a high quality guy. Then find one, marry him, have his children. Having children is what will help give them a happy and satisfied life.

    Working on AI--for the tiny, tiny fraction that have the skill set--great. But that's just a job. If a women devotes herself to it as her "life's work", she'll likely be unhappy and who knows may even become abusive to her cats.
    , @eric
    you allege cryptos are traceable (point #1) but can be used to launder via being untraceable (#4). Choose one.

    They use a lot of electricity, but everyone is moving to a system that won't (proof of stake).

    There are no barriers to entry in the same way search engines do not have barriers to entry. They have network effects, and so need users. Theoretically, everyone could adopt a new crypto overnight, in practice that takes some marketing or special sauce.

    To the extent 'immutability' is the key point, it's rather trivial to create a database that by contstruction logs every edit. If that was its key, it is inefficient
    , @Paleo Liberal

    Thirdly, Bitcoin and other crypto currencies require enormous amounts of electricity to create them, i.e. “mine” them, and that is even less sustainable than gold mines. Far more dollar amount value of electricity is required for a dollar amount of Bitcoin even at today’s inflated prices. [Remember there is no real barrier to entry in crypto -- competition is real.]
     
    This.

    The cryptocurrency miners in China use more electricity than many nations.


    The Sierra Club may be hypocritical in its refusal to address the bad environmental effects of immigration, but at least they aren't taking Bitcoin. Yet.
    , @peterike

    Meaning if some crooks drain your account or run up lots of charges (happened to my brother’s account on Black Friday)

     

    Whiskey has a brother? What's his name? Rye?
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  11. “The men will get all the wealth again,”…and they’ll give it to the PRETTY girls!!

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    • Agree: 27 year old, NickG
    • LOL: The Alarmist
    • Replies: @CK
    The pretty, THIN girls.
    Except for Bobby DiNero, and the Mayor of NYC.
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  12. Do you genuinely believe you going to replace all that with some computer code?

    Yes, at least until the Chinese or somebody else develop quantum computing far enough to crack public-key cryptography. Fiat currencies work because of a massive (and massively expensive) investment by the government in force. Cryptocurrencies work based on the algorithms, and on nobody being able to gain control over more than 50% of the servers. Math and code are a lot more reliable, not to mention a lot cheaper, than hundreds of billions invested in “defense” and law enforcement.

    Keep in mind that fiat currency has only been dominant for less than 50 years, since the U.S. ended convertibility of dollars to gold in 1971, two years before public-key cryptography was invented.

    Satoshi is definitely white and probably American because this is not how the Japanese roll.

    Pretty much everyone who’s read him and looked at his code agrees he’s not Japanese.

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    • Replies: @Silva
    Hold on - his code? How do Japanese code differently?
    , @MG
    We know Satoshi isn’t Indian either. No Indian would want to be anonymous. Incidentally there is not a single Indian behind any fundamental idea in crypto. But you can bet Indians will arrive just in time to take credit.
    , @SimpleSong

    Fiat currencies work because of a massive (and massively expensive) investment by the government in force.
     
    Replace 'fiat currency' with 'States'. That is what the state is: an entity that claims a monopoly on violence within some territory. As Mao put it, political power comes from the barrel of a gun. The local currency, like the legal system, the military, etc. is just an appendage of the state. You are not going to create a new parallel currency that the state doesn't like any more than you are going to create a new parallel legal system or military that the state doesn't like. If you want to create a new currency you might as well just go for a complete coup.

    Cryptocurrencies work based on the algorithms, and on nobody being able to gain control over more than 50% of the servers.
     
    Of course that would never happen. It would be unthinkable, like a country managing to place its entire domestic internet behind a censorious great firewall.

    Math and code are a lot more reliable, not to mention a lot cheaper, than hundreds of billions invested

     

    That money is not invested as there is no return on it. That is the overhead cost of running a state and it does not go away if you change the local currency.

    in “defense” and law enforcement.
     
    Which is all totally unnecessary and can be replaced by some Java. For example the Sicilian Mafia has a lot of success enforcing their contracts because their algorithms are top-notch.

    Keep in mind that fiat currency has only been dominant for less than 50 years, since the U.S. ended convertibility of dollars to gold in 1971, two years before public-key cryptography was invented.
     
    Recently dominant, yes, now that all the kinks are worked out, but paper currency goes back to the Tang dynasty; and as pointed out up the thread, historically precious metal coins were a sort of 'soft' or 'halfway' fiat currency enforced by the state.

    TL;DR, I get the impression you grew up in a really safe neighborhood.
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  13. “Women, consider crypto,” Alexia Bonatsos, a venture capitalist, wrote on Twitter. “Otherwise the men are going to get all the wealth, again.”

    Yeah, woman-up and invest in some digitial-tulip-based currency that Alexia Bonatsos is flogging. Alexia needs some suckers. You won’t get rich, but Alexia will. And that’s what’s really important: not that women get rich, but that women like Alexia Bonatsos – and, especially, Alexia Bonatsos herself – get rich.

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    • Replies: @ic1000
    > And that’s what’s really important: not that women get rich, but that women like Alexia Bonatsos – and, especially, Alexia Bonatsos herself – get rich.

    After investing in Ms. Bonatsos' tulipchain startup, women must remember to contribute to the Clinton Foundation. And then vote for Kamala, and Elizabeth, and Kirsten. Same compelling reasoning.
    , @Abe

    Yeah, woman-up and invest in some digitial-tulip-based currency that Alexia Bonatsos is flogging. Alexia needs some suckers.
     
    At the intersection of extreme hype and a large, intellectually subpar customer-base, great fortunes can be made. OK, not great, but good enough for a mansion with a swimming pool and a McLaren F1 parked out front by the time it all blows up.

    Enter:

    BLACK-CHAIN!
    WAKANDA-COIN!

    Don't you wanna invest in the King of crypto-currencies... brutha?

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  14. A bit OT,but it seems like the guy with the aggressively Jewish name,who reminds no one of Andy Griffith, Scott Israel, is breaking bad on the blacketty black who wouldn’t go in the school.
    He’s all hey,if the dudes a coward it’s on him not me.
    I would be looking into this guy’s relationships,if any,with the shiksa police ladies. Just sayin’.

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  15. Not sure people (be it readers here or the general public) understand how absolutely ridiculous some of these crypto currency Ponzi schemes are.

    Here is a snippet of some youtubers lampooning the opening of the “Annual BitConnect Conference”. That stuff is catnip for the less intelligent.

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  16. @SimpleSong
    Bitcoin has a number of flaws which will keep it niche, at best. Others have described the issues better, but the major ones are: slow transaction rate and high transaction cost preclude its use for buying, say, a coffee. Energy used in verifying transactions is enormous. Also it is deflationary by design which is not good--a very low, stable rate of inflation seems to be the sweet spot for a currency to be practically useful. No recourse whatsoever if you are the victim of theft or fraud. Once your identity has been linked to one transaction all of your transactions forever are then known, making it less than ideal for clandestine activity; and if you are completely above board why bother with it? Overall it appears Satoshi was a better computer scientist than economist.

    Could a different cryptocurrency fix Bitcoin's shortcomings and displace the current system of fiat currency? It would be a major, major economic event: barter/sharing/primitive economies -> standardized money based on precious metals -> fiat currencies -> cryptocurrencies.

    But I'm somewhat skeptical...fiat currency works so well because it is backed not by gold or silver but by dudes with guns. Try to make an unauthorized expansion of the money supply by printing up some Benjamins in your basement and see how long it takes the Secret Service to show up. Try to pay your taxes or other debts with Disney Dollars or Steve Sailer Pesos and they will put you in a metal cage. One of the central functions of a modern state is central banking a.k.a. managing the money supply, as well as whipping up a whole legal framework around how that money can be moved around and who gets it if there is a dispute; a.k.a. corporate law, contract law, etc. And it's all backed by the state's monopoly on violence, in the form of your local Sheriff, or FBI, or local police, or BATF, what have you. Dudes with guns.

    Do you genuinely believe you going to replace all that with some computer code? This seems like the sort of escapist libertarian fantasy that NW Euros in general and Americans in particular always indulge in. Instead of fixing the State we're going to make something totally new and leave the State behind. Using cryptocurrency!

    Satoshi is definitely white and probably American because this is not how the Japanese roll. We on the other hand are a nation of run-awayers. Running away across the Atlantic worked out well. So we keep doing it. We ran from the cities to the suburbs, and east to west. Now we're running from our dysfunctional democracy. Elon Musk's people were/are getting run out of South Africa, so he ran to Canada, then to the U.S., but it's happening again, and now he wants to run to Mars. Runrunrun. That's what we do. Castles in the sky.

    Having said that, there are certainly going to be some niche applications of cryptocurrencies/blockchain, and people who figure out even a small niche are going to become fabulously wealthy.

    Your comment shows you really don’t know anything about bitcoin. In every thread on crypto I’ve seen ppl like you.

    I stopped being annoyed by it, bc unlike issues like third world immigration, it matters for your personal wealth to not get crypto. So pls, get left behind. Stick with dollars, stocks , gold.

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    • Replies: @Neoconned
    I don't think Bitcoin will supplant the dollar but to wave it off as merely a pump and dumper scheme is horribly naive
    , @SimpleSong
    Well, if you develop a cryptocurrency that dominates some niche, even a small one, a fortune will be made. If you invent a cryptocurrency that ends up used only for trading powder cocaine from three small towns in Columbia you will still become quite rich.

    But I'm talking about the bigger picture. Currency facilitates trade. The thing that makes a currency 'good' is that its value is stable with respect to real physical goods and services. A dozen eggs costs about the same in dollars as it did last year. This is good. A dozen eggs costs a very different amount of bitcoin compared to last year. This is bad. Any rational person will see this and want to trade in dollars and not bitcoin. What use is bitcoin if it does not facilitate trade?

    A dozen eggs costs the same as it did last year in dollars because the central bank is constantly fine tuning the amount of money in circulation, either by printing more of it, or removing it from circulation and burning it (this used to be literally true but I'm not sure if it still is.) Like it or not, centralized authority is what keeps prices stable. There is zero evidence to date that a decentralized cryptocurrency system can maintain price stability.

    I know this is the sort of site where people love to rag on central banks, but here is a list of things that I have not experienced in my lifetime that happened with some frequency in the 19th - early 20th century:

    1.) Bank run
    2.) Typhoid
    3.) Lost savings due to bank failure
    4.) Polio
    5.) Hyperinflation
    6.) Child labor
    7.) Deflation making a manageable debt into a crushing debt (crucified on a cross of gold!)
    8.) Pellagra, beriberi
    9.) Paper currency becoming worthless (hello, CSA!)
    10.) Rickets

    1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 have gone the way of polio due to improvements in the technology of central banking, although like polio they can still be found in Africa.
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  17. Women are completely free to invest in or develop their own cryptocurrencies and always have been. There are absolutely no barriers of race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, or party affiliation.

    “Women, consider crypto,” Alexia Bonatsos, a venture capitalist, wrote on Twitter.

    So, the same bandwagon everyone else has been jumping on for the last 3 months, with the word “women” added on at the beginning. Women are very good at jumping on bandwagons.

    “Otherwise the men are going to get all the wealth, again.”

    Not all of them, just about 1% of them. But to an innumerate (idiot) leftist, 1% = 100%. Oh yeah and I’m sure those male 1%-ers don’t share at all with their female loved ones and descendants. They just keep it all for themselves.

    Read More
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  18. Rag Mama Rag – The Band

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve in Greensboro
    "Women push back on men in cryptocurrencies."

    And by "push back", they mean whine piercingly.
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  19. Titcoin!

    Read More
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    Ok, I laughed. Sue me.
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  20. Also, how come Nigerian princes are getting all the email money? Where are the Nigerian princesses?

    With Boko Haram, awaiting their ransom.

    Do Boko take bitcoin?

    Read More
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  21. Women have been using titcoin on us for centuries. It’s our turn now.

    Read More
    • LOL: JMcG
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  22. “Women, consider crypto,” Alexia Bonatsos, a venture capitalist, wrote on Twitter. “Otherwise the men are going to get all the wealth, again.”

    The amazing stupidity of this statement is stunning.

    Oh, and Alexia Bonatsos (nee Tsotsis) is not a Venture Capitalist :

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexia_Tsotsis

    What firm is she a VC with? The stupid woman writing the article doesn’t even know how to vet such a basic statement.

    Read More
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  23. Check the board of directors here:

    https://www.bitwiseinvestments.com/about

    Bros not even hiding it.

    Read More
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  24. @Whiskey
    Crypto Currencies are this decade's Chia Pets. The problem with Bitcoin is that it is very traceable, already SJW are doing just that to figure out who donated what to say, Steve Sailer, or VDARE, or anyone else they don't like. And get said donors fired, like they are doing trawling donation lists for candidates and propositions that got Brendan Eich fired from Mozilla.

    Secondly, there is no barrier to entry to creating a crypto currency. If you have enough cryptographic mathematical background, you can create your own. If you don't even have that, you can fork Bitcoin (there are IIRC at least four forks of Bitcoin) or Etherium or Doge Coin or what have you.

    Thirdly, Bitcoin and other crypto currencies require enormous amounts of electricity to create them, i.e. "mine" them, and that is even less sustainable than gold mines. Far more dollar amount value of electricity is required for a dollar amount of Bitcoin even at today's inflated prices. [Remember there is no real barrier to entry in crypto -- competition is real.]

    Fourth, is Sovereign nations and central banks being hostile to crypto currencies. While Bitcoin is very traceable by design, others are not, and are an ideal way for really rich people to evade the Tsar in Russia or Emperor in China and taxation/extortion demands, or rich industrialists in Europe to make bribes or evade taxes as well. Russia and China are already hostile to crypto currency and are likely to ban it inside their nations -- with the nationwide computerized surveillance network to make it stick.

    Fifth, Crypto is horrifically vulnerable to hack attacks that steal your crypto currencies held in either your own storage or on online exchanges. If Western banks are very bad at security, and they are, they are at least insured up to certain amounts on deposits. Meaning if some crooks drain your account or run up lots of charges (happened to my brother's account on Black Friday) you can get restoration within a reasonable amount of business days. There is no such government backed deposit insurance and fraud regulations around crypto -- meaning as a medium of exchange its not very consumer friendly.

    Where crypto shines is a record of transactions, but those are computationally expensive and slow, meaning as practical matter some database records the initial clearing exchange and the crypto blockchain is updated in the background. Banks and financial institutions are looking at block chain technology as essentially an unhackable ledger of transactions which is very handy indeed for back office operations and reporting but not earth changing.

    Something like Bitcoin is valuable in places with no effective currency such as Venezuela, or subject to bad inflation like Argentina, or subject to embargoes like North Korea or Iran. But that's not a revolution like the internet or personal computer or smart phone.

    Women looking for a big break would be advised to come up with workable general purpose AI that can run on fairly limited hardware without a giant cloud background. Applications in robotics and automation come to mind and whoever can crack it first in the marketplace will make Apple loads of money.

    [Imagine a great working general purpose AI dependent on the cloud running on a medical care robot when it suddenly loses internet connection. You get the idea. This is why driverless cars are not on the market yet -- even network latency is a problem let alone loss of signal.]

    Women looking for a big break would be advised to come up with workable general purpose AI that can run on fairly limited hardware without a giant cloud background.

    What this country REALLY needs is a good 5 cent cigar!

    1st of all, very few women (very few of any gender) have the mathematical chops to come up with a workable AI period – the math behind AI is hard. Most modern AI depends on neural networks. From the wiki: The study of non-learning artificial neural networks began in the decade before the field of AI research was founded, in the work of Walter Pitts and Warren McCullouch. Frank Rosenblatt invented the perceptron, a learning network with a single layer, similar to the old concept of linear regression. Early pioneers also include Alexey Grigorevich Ivakhnenko, Teuvo Kohonen, Stephen Grossberg, Kunihiko Fukushima, Christoph von der Malsburg, David Willshaw, Shun-Ichi Amari, Bernard Widrow, John Hopfield, Eduardo R. Caianiello, and others. Guess which gender every last one of these guys is?

    2nd the nature of neural networks is that they have to be solved on massively parallel arrays (not unlike Bitcoin mining) – the same skills that would allow a gal to be a cryptocurrency big wig would also allow her to do AI (and vice versa). The best bet for these kind of tasks (other than Google’s TPU’s (tensor processing units) are the graphics chips used for video cards – gamers are kvetching because the bitcoin miners have bought up every GPU in sight.

    Nowadays TPU pods are the size of old fashioned mainframes but they will surely shrink in size:

    There’s a chick in the photo but I would bet that she is there mainly for decoration and 95% of the Google crew working on this stuff is geeky guys like Damore.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    There’s a chick in the photo but I would bet that she is there mainly for decoration and 95% of the Google crew working on this stuff is geeky guys like Damore.
     
    You've come a long way, baby.

    https://kc0eiuhlnmqwdxy1ylzte9ii-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/uk/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2017/01/ENIAC-programmers.jpg
    , @Lurker
    Hidden hourglass figures.
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  25. I posted this before, but it is pretty impressive. The author is a Harvard and Oxford grad with a PhD from Rutgers, so she is probably much smarter about this kind of thing than I am.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/patriarchal-race-colonize-mars-just-another-example-male-entitlement-ncna849681

    http://gender.stanford.edu/people/marcie-bianco

    Another blogger reminded his readers of this:

    If civilization had been left in female hands we would still be living in grass huts.

    Camille Paglia

    Read More
    • Replies: @wren
    This list of computing pioneers includes an impressive amount of women:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_pioneers_in_computer_science

    Most predate affirmative action or other political involvement, and seem to be genuine pioneers.

    The number of Japanese on the list is also impressive.
    , @Tom-in-VA
    If only it had been Elaine Musk’s company that launched Falcon Heavy, all of that would have been moot.
    , @Peripatetic commenter

    If civilization had been left in female hands we would still be living in grass huts.

    Camille Paglia

     

    That racist sexist drivel needs to be updated:

    If civilization had been left in black hands, we wud be kangs now!

     

    , @silviosilver

    https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/patriarchal-race-colonize-mars-just-another-example-male-entitlement-ncna849681
     
    There is a hilarious poll near the end of that article, asking whether, Yes, humans should explore other planets or, No, that we'd just destroy them as we did this one.

    After everything the article said against the idea, a whopping 92% (!) of the over 10,000 people who responded answered Yes.

    Hahaha.

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  26. @Jack D

    Women looking for a big break would be advised to come up with workable general purpose AI that can run on fairly limited hardware without a giant cloud background.
     
    What this country REALLY needs is a good 5 cent cigar!

    1st of all, very few women (very few of any gender) have the mathematical chops to come up with a workable AI period - the math behind AI is hard. Most modern AI depends on neural networks. From the wiki: The study of non-learning artificial neural networks began in the decade before the field of AI research was founded, in the work of Walter Pitts and Warren McCullouch. Frank Rosenblatt invented the perceptron, a learning network with a single layer, similar to the old concept of linear regression. Early pioneers also include Alexey Grigorevich Ivakhnenko, Teuvo Kohonen, Stephen Grossberg, Kunihiko Fukushima, Christoph von der Malsburg, David Willshaw, Shun-Ichi Amari, Bernard Widrow, John Hopfield, Eduardo R. Caianiello, and others. Guess which gender every last one of these guys is?

    2nd the nature of neural networks is that they have to be solved on massively parallel arrays (not unlike Bitcoin mining) - the same skills that would allow a gal to be a cryptocurrency big wig would also allow her to do AI (and vice versa). The best bet for these kind of tasks (other than Google's TPU's (tensor processing units) are the graphics chips used for video cards - gamers are kvetching because the bitcoin miners have bought up every GPU in sight.

    Nowadays TPU pods are the size of old fashioned mainframes but they will surely shrink in size:

    https://qzprod.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/tpu_person_forwebonly_final-e1494968056259.jpg

    There's a chick in the photo but I would bet that she is there mainly for decoration and 95% of the Google crew working on this stuff is geeky guys like Damore.

    There’s a chick in the photo but I would bet that she is there mainly for decoration and 95% of the Google crew working on this stuff is geeky guys like Damore.

    You’ve come a long way, baby.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Women are actually very good at these needlework type tasks that require attention to detail and following a set of detailed instructions. Men get bored, their minds wander, they start to improvise and take shortcuts (some of the shortcuts lead to breakthrus but most don't), they fall asleep, start to play pranks on each other to relieve the boredom, etc.

    One of the earliest developments in the steam engine was (at least according to legend) invented by a little kid. In those days crude and slow steam engines were used to dewater coal mines and the valves to allow steam into and out of the cylinders were manually controlled by a little kid whose job it was to stand there all day and open and close the valves over and over again all day. Some kid figured out that he could rig up a bunch of strings and pulleys, etc. and use the motion of the engine itself to open and close the valves so he could read comic books (or whatever kids in 18th century England did with their free time) while the engine did its thing. A woman would have just dutifully done what she was told to do.
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  27. @wren
    I posted this before, but it is pretty impressive. The author is a Harvard and Oxford grad with a PhD from Rutgers, so she is probably much smarter about this kind of thing than I am.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/patriarchal-race-colonize-mars-just-another-example-male-entitlement-ncna849681

    http://gender.stanford.edu/people/marcie-bianco

    Another blogger reminded his readers of this:


    If civilization had been left in female hands we would still be living in grass huts.

    Camille Paglia
     

    This list of computing pioneers includes an impressive amount of women:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_pioneers_in_computer_science

    Most predate affirmative action or other political involvement, and seem to be genuine pioneers.

    The number of Japanese on the list is also impressive.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bretd
    New here huh?
    , @TelfoedJohn
    To be a computer pioneer, it helps to be either a Jew, Anglo, or a Scandinavian. For instance, the language that runs unz.com is PHP - invented by a Dane and extended by Israelis. PHP is running on top of Linux, invented by Linus Torvalds - a Finn of Swedish background. Linux itself was based on Unix, created mainly by Anglos.
    , @Seth Largo
    I wouldn't mind reading a detailed and neutral history of women in computing. It seems that a) women were much more represented in the field in the 50s - 70s, but also that b) the work of computer programming changed substantively with the rise of personal computers.
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  28. Read More
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  29. Just yesterday I read that, after the mudslides in Vargas state, Venezuela which killed tens of thousands of people in 1999, the US sent a ship with aid to Venezuela, after getting their defense minister to sign off on it, but Chavez made the minister tell the Americans to stay away in order to “maintain the sovereignty” of Venezuela.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vargas_tragedy

    Anyone who has ever supported Chavez or Maduro is either evil or retarded.

    Read More
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  30. The only crypto currencies worth using are Nano and Monero.

    Nano is instant with no fees, and Monero is anonymous. Bitcoin is ludicrous – who wants to spend a $5 additional fee in order to send $20? And have that transaction take several hours?

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  31. @Thomm
    Something completely decentralized and with no barrier to entry still ends up being 95% male.

    The logical conclusion is that women are inherently inferior when it comes to complicated quantitative subjects.

    The logical conclusion is that women are inherently inferior when it comes to complicated quantitative subjects.

    Either that or women are naturally risk averse. Which is a nice way of saying that they are genetically programmed to sit on the sidelines and fall in love with the winners. In general, I think more needs to be said about the risks men take. What percentage of failed startups had men as their founders? Is this a gap that needs to be closed? Is our society better off if more women start spending 5 or 10 of the best years of their lives on startups which turn out to have been a complete waste of time and money?

    By the way, this reminds me of an article I read a couple weeks ago arguing that people should show their support for Trump by buying Bitcoin. Basically it seems people who have already invested are on a search for Greater Fools.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Yep, starting a business is hugely risky. The vast majority fail for one reason or the other - just as often bad luck. Of the successful ones, only a tiny fraction of them become huge. These feminists who decry that women don't benefit from successful start-ups never think of that in the same way that they never decry the lack of women in high-paying but dangerous (and dirty jobs) such as working on a fishing boat.

    Feminists are as unrealistic as any five-year-old girl who dreams of being a princess.

    Also, as you say, just how much benefit does a woman get from grinding for 60-80 hours a week for four or five years in her late 20s and early 30s? Even if by some miracle, she's part of a successful start-up, what does her life look like? Yeah, she's rich, but the odds aren't great that she'll marry and even worse that she'll have kids. Oh, lucky her.

    Normal men don't much care if a woman is rich. Sure, all other things being equal, rich is better than poor. And, of course, her ability to become rich shows a lot of great attributes that would be good to have in your children. However, most reasonably successful guys don't want to be married to some hyper-competitive Type-A woman. No amount of money is worth that. I don't need you to pay my way in life so I'm looking at you as a partner (and someone to nuture my children) not a provider.

    We truly live in a ridiculous world. The fact that this garbage is taken seriously and that we even have to talk about it shows that we're screwed. How long this silliness can last, I can't say, but eventually, a society (even one as wealthy as ours) built on this level of lies can't last. We're the equivalent of a trust fund kid who is slowly burning through his inheritance.
    , @L Woods
    Yes, somehow the male losers (which inevitably greatly outnumber the male winners) never factor into feminist grifting. After all, they're losers: they don't count. All that matters is that the apex has something I want, so gimme.
    , @Polynikes
    This is the impression that I get from current (over the last year or so) enthusiasts.

    I wish I had gotten in early, obviously. I didn't. The current sales pitch makes me want to stay far away.
    , @Brutusale
    A Formula 1 official got in trouble a few years ago for saying that women are inherently too cautious to win in F1.

    It's funny that the motor sports of the proles, NASCAR and NHRA, have had women racing and, in drag racing, succeeding.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brittany_Force

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Courtney_Force

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashley_Force_Hood

    Pretty impressive, huh? Why are they so successful?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Force

    He's the 68-year old Force having a bad day at the office.

    https://jalopnik.com/nhra-legend-john-force-released-from-hospital-after-bru-1823326160

    His opponent miraculously saved him from further carnage by hitting the brakes/chutes in time.

    Here's how daughter Brittany started the season.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpMlAk6BaSs

    It all dovetails quite nicely with iSteve tropes. The girls got the skills and the balls-out gene from Daddy, and nobody told them that they couldn't do it.
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  32. @Thomm
    Women will never, ever be more than 5% of the real innovators in any important, disruptive technology. This will not change.

    It is inherently not how women are wired. Plus, being a tech luminary does far less for a woman's social status than it does for a man's (her looks still supercede all), so tech entrepreneurship is not even really a good use of a woman's time even in the unlikely event that she has the aptitude.

    I agree, but as I mentioned in my last comment, we also need to pay attention to the issue of risk. Of the men (and women) who get involved early in a new disruptive technology, less than 10% will succeed in a big way. And of the 90% who don’t, a substantial percentage will have worked night and day for years and end up having totally wasted their time.

    Probably there are hundreds of guys like Mark Zuckerberg, Jeff Bezos, etc. with comparable products that failed for one reason or another, often just due to bad luck.

    Feminists want women to enjoy the benefits reaped by these guys without having taken the risks faced by all of the failures. Which in fact women can do — by marrying rich tech guys — but feminists think it’s horrific for women to assume a traditional role.

    Read More
    • Replies: @L Woods
    They want to extract resources from beta men without having to give up sex to them (that's for 70 IQ club bouncers, etc). Same old story. I'd say that these professional parasites are simply too ugly to secure commitment from the tech titans in question, but Zuck's wife kind of belies that.
    , @Redneck farmer
    No, It's that they'll marry a guy, instead of a nice lesbian gender studies professor.
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  33. @wren
    This list of computing pioneers includes an impressive amount of women:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_pioneers_in_computer_science

    Most predate affirmative action or other political involvement, and seem to be genuine pioneers.

    The number of Japanese on the list is also impressive.

    New here huh?

    Read More
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  34. @wren
    This list of computing pioneers includes an impressive amount of women:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_pioneers_in_computer_science

    Most predate affirmative action or other political involvement, and seem to be genuine pioneers.

    The number of Japanese on the list is also impressive.

    To be a computer pioneer, it helps to be either a Jew, Anglo, or a Scandinavian. For instance, the language that runs unz.com is PHP – invented by a Dane and extended by Israelis. PHP is running on top of Linux, invented by Linus Torvalds – a Finn of Swedish background. Linux itself was based on Unix, created mainly by Anglos.

    Read More
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  35. @Jack D

    Women looking for a big break would be advised to come up with workable general purpose AI that can run on fairly limited hardware without a giant cloud background.
     
    What this country REALLY needs is a good 5 cent cigar!

    1st of all, very few women (very few of any gender) have the mathematical chops to come up with a workable AI period - the math behind AI is hard. Most modern AI depends on neural networks. From the wiki: The study of non-learning artificial neural networks began in the decade before the field of AI research was founded, in the work of Walter Pitts and Warren McCullouch. Frank Rosenblatt invented the perceptron, a learning network with a single layer, similar to the old concept of linear regression. Early pioneers also include Alexey Grigorevich Ivakhnenko, Teuvo Kohonen, Stephen Grossberg, Kunihiko Fukushima, Christoph von der Malsburg, David Willshaw, Shun-Ichi Amari, Bernard Widrow, John Hopfield, Eduardo R. Caianiello, and others. Guess which gender every last one of these guys is?

    2nd the nature of neural networks is that they have to be solved on massively parallel arrays (not unlike Bitcoin mining) - the same skills that would allow a gal to be a cryptocurrency big wig would also allow her to do AI (and vice versa). The best bet for these kind of tasks (other than Google's TPU's (tensor processing units) are the graphics chips used for video cards - gamers are kvetching because the bitcoin miners have bought up every GPU in sight.

    Nowadays TPU pods are the size of old fashioned mainframes but they will surely shrink in size:

    https://qzprod.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/tpu_person_forwebonly_final-e1494968056259.jpg

    There's a chick in the photo but I would bet that she is there mainly for decoration and 95% of the Google crew working on this stuff is geeky guys like Damore.

    Hidden hourglass figures.

    Read More
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  36. Hos before cryptos.

    Read More
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  37. Misleading title … and text. It’s not about crytocurrencies. It’s just another thing about VCs investing in tech startups, most of which have male founders.

    The opening anecdote is about a hoax, I believe. I don’t think there was ever such a company, and not being a company, it could not “shut down.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @sabril
    Even if the opening anecdote is real, suppose that the final message had been "vagina" instead of "penis." Would that have placated this woman? Of course not.

    The real problem is that a small number of people, primarily men, get extremely rich from new technologies. And women want a piece of that wealth without taking any risks or providing sexual/domestic services or being dependent on men or doing anything else.

    In other words, it's just typical female narcissism combined with a stunning lack of maturity. They want to be showered with wealth simply because they have vaginas. But without lifting a finger to actually please a man.
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  38. Crypto currencies involve serious math, and like Teen Barbie once said, “Math class is tough!” Then there was Computer Engineer Barbie, who, IIRC, infected the compters with viruses and needed her male colleagues to fix anything.

    Read More
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  39. “Virtual currencies and blockchain, the digital ledger that forms the basis of the cryptocurrencies, were intended to be democratizing and equalizing forces, buoyed by a utopian exuberance.”

    I thought virtual currencies and blockchain were about making money, avoiding excessive credit costs and personal privacy.

    Excuse me for missing the point.

    Read More
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  40. @wren
    I posted this before, but it is pretty impressive. The author is a Harvard and Oxford grad with a PhD from Rutgers, so she is probably much smarter about this kind of thing than I am.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/patriarchal-race-colonize-mars-just-another-example-male-entitlement-ncna849681

    http://gender.stanford.edu/people/marcie-bianco

    Another blogger reminded his readers of this:


    If civilization had been left in female hands we would still be living in grass huts.

    Camille Paglia
     

    If only it had been Elaine Musk’s company that launched Falcon Heavy, all of that would have been moot.

    Read More
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  41. @newrouter
    Rag Mama Rag - The Band

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHy_XeBMagU

    “Women push back on men in cryptocurrencies.”

    And by “push back”, they mean whine piercingly.

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird
    It would be amusing to flip a switch so that all the male innovators in history were women. Would these feminists be campaigning for men in tech? Might rather be living like Amazons, killing all the boys before they could turn into men.
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  42. Has the Time become a woman’s magazine? With the paywall who is paying for the Times? I suspect women that are paying for the Style and Lifestyle section, so the rest of the paper has to appeal to an older Jewish New York City sort of woman.

    Read More
    • Replies: @27 year old

    Has the Time become a woman’s magazine?
     
    I believe that probably all magazines are woman's magazines at this point.

    I got a gift sub to Popular Mechanics, which is not explicitly male, but pretty close.

    Anyway, it comes off very womanlike. Every photo is accompanied by a description and price of all the clothing shown. The segments on American "makers" are about hipster food products and ultra high end living room furniture. It's written and staffed by limp wristed urbanite bugman types. I think they had a how-to guide on changing a tire and jump starting a car.
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  43. @Chris Marsk
    Misleading title ... and text. It's not about crytocurrencies. It's just another thing about VCs investing in tech startups, most of which have male founders.

    The opening anecdote is about a hoax, I believe. I don't think there was ever such a company, and not being a company, it could not "shut down."

    Even if the opening anecdote is real, suppose that the final message had been “vagina” instead of “penis.” Would that have placated this woman? Of course not.

    The real problem is that a small number of people, primarily men, get extremely rich from new technologies. And women want a piece of that wealth without taking any risks or providing sexual/domestic services or being dependent on men or doing anything else.

    In other words, it’s just typical female narcissism combined with a stunning lack of maturity. They want to be showered with wealth simply because they have vaginas. But without lifting a finger to actually please a man.

    Read More
    • Agree: L Woods
    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    In other words, it’s just typical female narcissism combined with a stunning lack of maturity. They want to be showered with wealth simply because they have vaginas. But without lifting a finger to actually please a man.
     
    Yep. And this is also the gist of feminism. There was an initial "we want to be able to use our talents" element that was reasonable. But, of course, men's and women's talents and interests are not at all identical so that doesn't produce "equality". Modern feminism is pretty much "men must give us stuff."

    Of course, there was a fair and civilized way for women to share in men's greater strength, greater interest in things and material alteration of the world--i.e. greater material productivity. It's called marriage. Men and women sharing their complementary traits. But, of course, in marriage women are supposed to give something--sex, children, child nursing and raising, homemaking--in return for what men produce.

    But women having to give something to get something ... the horror!
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  44. @Mr. Anon

    “Women, consider crypto,” Alexia Bonatsos, a venture capitalist, wrote on Twitter. “Otherwise the men are going to get all the wealth, again.”
     
    Yeah, woman-up and invest in some digitial-tulip-based currency that Alexia Bonatsos is flogging. Alexia needs some suckers. You won't get rich, but Alexia will. And that's what's really important: not that women get rich, but that women like Alexia Bonatsos - and, especially, Alexia Bonatsos herself - get rich.

    > And that’s what’s really important: not that women get rich, but that women like Alexia Bonatsos – and, especially, Alexia Bonatsos herself – get rich.

    After investing in Ms. Bonatsos’ tulipchain startup, women must remember to contribute to the Clinton Foundation. And then vote for Kamala, and Elizabeth, and Kirsten. Same compelling reasoning.

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  45. I’d say way more men than women have lost a hefty amount of money since the crypto-mania got going. Women value stability more and tend to invest more conservatively. That’s actually a comparative strength women have.

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  46. Yet again, a multi-hundred billion dollar industry with revolutionary technology to change our lives for the better springs from the earth and falls into the laps of white/Asian males. Does their privilege know any bounds?

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  47. @SimpleSong
    Bitcoin has a number of flaws which will keep it niche, at best. Others have described the issues better, but the major ones are: slow transaction rate and high transaction cost preclude its use for buying, say, a coffee. Energy used in verifying transactions is enormous. Also it is deflationary by design which is not good--a very low, stable rate of inflation seems to be the sweet spot for a currency to be practically useful. No recourse whatsoever if you are the victim of theft or fraud. Once your identity has been linked to one transaction all of your transactions forever are then known, making it less than ideal for clandestine activity; and if you are completely above board why bother with it? Overall it appears Satoshi was a better computer scientist than economist.

    Could a different cryptocurrency fix Bitcoin's shortcomings and displace the current system of fiat currency? It would be a major, major economic event: barter/sharing/primitive economies -> standardized money based on precious metals -> fiat currencies -> cryptocurrencies.

    But I'm somewhat skeptical...fiat currency works so well because it is backed not by gold or silver but by dudes with guns. Try to make an unauthorized expansion of the money supply by printing up some Benjamins in your basement and see how long it takes the Secret Service to show up. Try to pay your taxes or other debts with Disney Dollars or Steve Sailer Pesos and they will put you in a metal cage. One of the central functions of a modern state is central banking a.k.a. managing the money supply, as well as whipping up a whole legal framework around how that money can be moved around and who gets it if there is a dispute; a.k.a. corporate law, contract law, etc. And it's all backed by the state's monopoly on violence, in the form of your local Sheriff, or FBI, or local police, or BATF, what have you. Dudes with guns.

    Do you genuinely believe you going to replace all that with some computer code? This seems like the sort of escapist libertarian fantasy that NW Euros in general and Americans in particular always indulge in. Instead of fixing the State we're going to make something totally new and leave the State behind. Using cryptocurrency!

    Satoshi is definitely white and probably American because this is not how the Japanese roll. We on the other hand are a nation of run-awayers. Running away across the Atlantic worked out well. So we keep doing it. We ran from the cities to the suburbs, and east to west. Now we're running from our dysfunctional democracy. Elon Musk's people were/are getting run out of South Africa, so he ran to Canada, then to the U.S., but it's happening again, and now he wants to run to Mars. Runrunrun. That's what we do. Castles in the sky.

    Having said that, there are certainly going to be some niche applications of cryptocurrencies/blockchain, and people who figure out even a small niche are going to become fabulously wealthy.

    But I’m somewhat skeptical…fiat currency works so well because it is backed not by gold or silver but by dudes with guns.

    Simple, the rest of your paragraph fleshes it out, but this is the gist of it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    Large standing armies. Founding fathers get heebie jeebies just thing about them. Norman aristocrats don't like King getting an army by taxing them. Power concentration. What if he uses army to wipe them out? 10th Amendment twats won't just admit that the printing press nullifies there nonsense. What power does federal government have that states don't? Cash conjuring on a scale never before seen.

    Government workers vote Democrat? The provisioning and arming of the US military is the answer to cat lady agenda of Democrat public school monopoly. Trumpy bribing the government workers but good, just like Democrats do.

    Debt and demography will take out the American Empire and the Chinese Communist Party at the same time. Interesting era to live in.
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  48. @sabril
    Even if the opening anecdote is real, suppose that the final message had been "vagina" instead of "penis." Would that have placated this woman? Of course not.

    The real problem is that a small number of people, primarily men, get extremely rich from new technologies. And women want a piece of that wealth without taking any risks or providing sexual/domestic services or being dependent on men or doing anything else.

    In other words, it's just typical female narcissism combined with a stunning lack of maturity. They want to be showered with wealth simply because they have vaginas. But without lifting a finger to actually please a man.

    In other words, it’s just typical female narcissism combined with a stunning lack of maturity. They want to be showered with wealth simply because they have vaginas. But without lifting a finger to actually please a man.

    Yep. And this is also the gist of feminism. There was an initial “we want to be able to use our talents” element that was reasonable. But, of course, men’s and women’s talents and interests are not at all identical so that doesn’t produce “equality”. Modern feminism is pretty much “men must give us stuff.”

    Of course, there was a fair and civilized way for women to share in men’s greater strength, greater interest in things and material alteration of the world–i.e. greater material productivity. It’s called marriage. Men and women sharing their complementary traits. But, of course, in marriage women are supposed to give something–sex, children, child nursing and raising, homemaking–in return for what men produce.

    But women having to give something to get something … the horror!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chris Marsk
    There's nothing wrong with women working in startups and making money. The problem is the idea that if their representation isn't 50 percent, that something is wrong and discrimination of some sort must be going on.

    This applies to any discrete human groups.
    , @27 year old

    Of course, there was a fair and civilized way for women to share in men’s greater strength, greater interest in things and material alteration of the world–i.e. greater material productivity. It’s called marriage. Men and women sharing their complementary traits. But, of course, in marriage women are supposed to give something–sex, children, child nursing and raising, homemaking–in return for what men produce
     
    Based on Internet horror stories, it seems like even many "traditional" women who grasp and accept this concept of marriage eventually come to reject the idea that they should have to give sex or even general politeness to their husbands. The cucky churches seem to promote this somehow.
    , @Thomm

    There was an initial “we want to be able to use our talents” element that was reasonable.
     
    I question whether this group ever really existing, other than just as a first step for endless incrementalism.
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  49. @SimpleSong
    Bitcoin has a number of flaws which will keep it niche, at best. Others have described the issues better, but the major ones are: slow transaction rate and high transaction cost preclude its use for buying, say, a coffee. Energy used in verifying transactions is enormous. Also it is deflationary by design which is not good--a very low, stable rate of inflation seems to be the sweet spot for a currency to be practically useful. No recourse whatsoever if you are the victim of theft or fraud. Once your identity has been linked to one transaction all of your transactions forever are then known, making it less than ideal for clandestine activity; and if you are completely above board why bother with it? Overall it appears Satoshi was a better computer scientist than economist.

    Could a different cryptocurrency fix Bitcoin's shortcomings and displace the current system of fiat currency? It would be a major, major economic event: barter/sharing/primitive economies -> standardized money based on precious metals -> fiat currencies -> cryptocurrencies.

    But I'm somewhat skeptical...fiat currency works so well because it is backed not by gold or silver but by dudes with guns. Try to make an unauthorized expansion of the money supply by printing up some Benjamins in your basement and see how long it takes the Secret Service to show up. Try to pay your taxes or other debts with Disney Dollars or Steve Sailer Pesos and they will put you in a metal cage. One of the central functions of a modern state is central banking a.k.a. managing the money supply, as well as whipping up a whole legal framework around how that money can be moved around and who gets it if there is a dispute; a.k.a. corporate law, contract law, etc. And it's all backed by the state's monopoly on violence, in the form of your local Sheriff, or FBI, or local police, or BATF, what have you. Dudes with guns.

    Do you genuinely believe you going to replace all that with some computer code? This seems like the sort of escapist libertarian fantasy that NW Euros in general and Americans in particular always indulge in. Instead of fixing the State we're going to make something totally new and leave the State behind. Using cryptocurrency!

    Satoshi is definitely white and probably American because this is not how the Japanese roll. We on the other hand are a nation of run-awayers. Running away across the Atlantic worked out well. So we keep doing it. We ran from the cities to the suburbs, and east to west. Now we're running from our dysfunctional democracy. Elon Musk's people were/are getting run out of South Africa, so he ran to Canada, then to the U.S., but it's happening again, and now he wants to run to Mars. Runrunrun. That's what we do. Castles in the sky.

    Having said that, there are certainly going to be some niche applications of cryptocurrencies/blockchain, and people who figure out even a small niche are going to become fabulously wealthy.

    “Fiat works because it is backed not by gold or silver, but by dudes with guns.”

    Thought experiment: You want to buy my dining room table and pay me with fiat. I will not accept fiat, but will accept a gold coin. Will the “dudes with guns” drop by and force me to accept the fiat?

    You can see real world examples of how this works in “When Money Dies” by Adam Ferguson.

    I don’t think the cryptocurrencies will be what will succeed fiat, but that doesn’t mean fiat will survive for much longer. Fiat has been around for only “the blink of an eye” in terms of financial history and given how Central Banks manage it, it won’t be around for too much longer (in those terms).

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    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Thought experiment: You want to buy my dining room table and pay me with fiat. I will not accept fiat …
     
    For my current dining room table I would accept this Fiat Alfa in Quadrifoglio denomination(s). A little flashy, sure, but whaddaya whaddaya vrrooom vrrooom dat ass.

    http://st.automobilemag.com/uploads/sites/11/2017/07/2017-Alfa-Romeo-Giulia-Quadrifoglio-rear-three-quarter-in-motion-06.jpg
    , @SimpleSong

    Thought experiment: You want to buy my dining room table and pay me with fiat. I will not accept fiat, but will accept a gold coin. Will the “dudes with guns” drop by and force me to accept the fiat?
     
    Nah, because barter (table for gold) is legal. In fact it's also legal to create and use your own fiat currencies, as some local municipalities have done.

    However if you turn a profit selling your table for gold, the IRS claims a right to part of that income, and they want to be paid in dollars. Also if there is some problem with the transaction and one side sues the other for breach of contract, damages will be awarded in dollars, and must be paid in dollars.

    So I suppose you could de-dollarize, if you're OK with never having income, and being ripped off all the time.
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  50. @Whiskey
    Crypto Currencies are this decade's Chia Pets. The problem with Bitcoin is that it is very traceable, already SJW are doing just that to figure out who donated what to say, Steve Sailer, or VDARE, or anyone else they don't like. And get said donors fired, like they are doing trawling donation lists for candidates and propositions that got Brendan Eich fired from Mozilla.

    Secondly, there is no barrier to entry to creating a crypto currency. If you have enough cryptographic mathematical background, you can create your own. If you don't even have that, you can fork Bitcoin (there are IIRC at least four forks of Bitcoin) or Etherium or Doge Coin or what have you.

    Thirdly, Bitcoin and other crypto currencies require enormous amounts of electricity to create them, i.e. "mine" them, and that is even less sustainable than gold mines. Far more dollar amount value of electricity is required for a dollar amount of Bitcoin even at today's inflated prices. [Remember there is no real barrier to entry in crypto -- competition is real.]

    Fourth, is Sovereign nations and central banks being hostile to crypto currencies. While Bitcoin is very traceable by design, others are not, and are an ideal way for really rich people to evade the Tsar in Russia or Emperor in China and taxation/extortion demands, or rich industrialists in Europe to make bribes or evade taxes as well. Russia and China are already hostile to crypto currency and are likely to ban it inside their nations -- with the nationwide computerized surveillance network to make it stick.

    Fifth, Crypto is horrifically vulnerable to hack attacks that steal your crypto currencies held in either your own storage or on online exchanges. If Western banks are very bad at security, and they are, they are at least insured up to certain amounts on deposits. Meaning if some crooks drain your account or run up lots of charges (happened to my brother's account on Black Friday) you can get restoration within a reasonable amount of business days. There is no such government backed deposit insurance and fraud regulations around crypto -- meaning as a medium of exchange its not very consumer friendly.

    Where crypto shines is a record of transactions, but those are computationally expensive and slow, meaning as practical matter some database records the initial clearing exchange and the crypto blockchain is updated in the background. Banks and financial institutions are looking at block chain technology as essentially an unhackable ledger of transactions which is very handy indeed for back office operations and reporting but not earth changing.

    Something like Bitcoin is valuable in places with no effective currency such as Venezuela, or subject to bad inflation like Argentina, or subject to embargoes like North Korea or Iran. But that's not a revolution like the internet or personal computer or smart phone.

    Women looking for a big break would be advised to come up with workable general purpose AI that can run on fairly limited hardware without a giant cloud background. Applications in robotics and automation come to mind and whoever can crack it first in the marketplace will make Apple loads of money.

    [Imagine a great working general purpose AI dependent on the cloud running on a medical care robot when it suddenly loses internet connection. You get the idea. This is why driverless cars are not on the market yet -- even network latency is a problem let alone loss of signal.]

    Women looking for a big break would be advised to come up with workable general purpose AI that can run on fairly limited hardware without a giant cloud background. Applications in robotics and automation come to mind and whoever can crack it first in the marketplace will make Apple loads of money.

    LOL.

    Whatever she does for a career, a woman looking for a “big break”, should behave in a manner that will help them land a high quality guy. Then find one, marry him, have his children. Having children is what will help give them a happy and satisfied life.

    Working on AI–for the tiny, tiny fraction that have the skill set–great. But that’s just a job. If a women devotes herself to it as her “life’s work”, she’ll likely be unhappy and who knows may even become abusive to her cats.

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    • Replies: @KM32
    Whatever she does for a career, a woman looking for a “big break”, should behave in a manner that will help them land a high quality guy. Then find one, marry him, have his children. Having children is what will help give them a happy and satisfied life.

    My wife loves her job, makes $145,000 plus options, and has four kids. Feminism, properly done, gives women options. The problem is that nobody is ever satisfied with that.
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  51. @SimpleSong
    Bitcoin has a number of flaws which will keep it niche, at best. Others have described the issues better, but the major ones are: slow transaction rate and high transaction cost preclude its use for buying, say, a coffee. Energy used in verifying transactions is enormous. Also it is deflationary by design which is not good--a very low, stable rate of inflation seems to be the sweet spot for a currency to be practically useful. No recourse whatsoever if you are the victim of theft or fraud. Once your identity has been linked to one transaction all of your transactions forever are then known, making it less than ideal for clandestine activity; and if you are completely above board why bother with it? Overall it appears Satoshi was a better computer scientist than economist.

    Could a different cryptocurrency fix Bitcoin's shortcomings and displace the current system of fiat currency? It would be a major, major economic event: barter/sharing/primitive economies -> standardized money based on precious metals -> fiat currencies -> cryptocurrencies.

    But I'm somewhat skeptical...fiat currency works so well because it is backed not by gold or silver but by dudes with guns. Try to make an unauthorized expansion of the money supply by printing up some Benjamins in your basement and see how long it takes the Secret Service to show up. Try to pay your taxes or other debts with Disney Dollars or Steve Sailer Pesos and they will put you in a metal cage. One of the central functions of a modern state is central banking a.k.a. managing the money supply, as well as whipping up a whole legal framework around how that money can be moved around and who gets it if there is a dispute; a.k.a. corporate law, contract law, etc. And it's all backed by the state's monopoly on violence, in the form of your local Sheriff, or FBI, or local police, or BATF, what have you. Dudes with guns.

    Do you genuinely believe you going to replace all that with some computer code? This seems like the sort of escapist libertarian fantasy that NW Euros in general and Americans in particular always indulge in. Instead of fixing the State we're going to make something totally new and leave the State behind. Using cryptocurrency!

    Satoshi is definitely white and probably American because this is not how the Japanese roll. We on the other hand are a nation of run-awayers. Running away across the Atlantic worked out well. So we keep doing it. We ran from the cities to the suburbs, and east to west. Now we're running from our dysfunctional democracy. Elon Musk's people were/are getting run out of South Africa, so he ran to Canada, then to the U.S., but it's happening again, and now he wants to run to Mars. Runrunrun. That's what we do. Castles in the sky.

    Having said that, there are certainly going to be some niche applications of cryptocurrencies/blockchain, and people who figure out even a small niche are going to become fabulously wealthy.

    Your points about escapist fantasy are on target.

    barter/sharing/primitive economies -> standardized money

    On this one, I’ll recommend the book Debt, by David Graeber. Graeber traces the history of the idea that barter evolved to currency (because 2 chickens for a pair of boots doesn’t compute), and shows it to be a fantasy constructed of whole cloth by Adam Smith. Whom he later shows plagiarized the pin factory story.

    Graeber makes the point that money as gold coin never evolved that way in the market, but was made the medium of exchange by men with spears and swords.

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  52. @Len
    Titcoin!

    Ok, I laughed. Sue me.

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  53. @Thomm
    Something completely decentralized and with no barrier to entry still ends up being 95% male.

    The logical conclusion is that women are inherently inferior when it comes to complicated quantitative subjects.

    Something completely decentralized and with no barrier to entry still ends up being 95% male.

    Right. This is the point I always make when the on-cue whining starts about the dearth of women in whatever’s the hot, new startup field du jour (saw a kissin’-cousin of this article recently, but it was on the lack of women in virtual reality).

    There is no barrier to entry and unlike the very first Internet bubble where you’d be sorely tempted to fork over 4 or more figures to Netscape to get this new-fangled technology called a ‘web server’, the software and tools are all literally free now.

    So I guess the narrative must now be that while all the start-up ‘bro’s’ rise from nothing, and have to push past a literal old boys network of established CEO’s whose fortunes and reputations they’ll eventually ruin if they are to really make it (Steve Ballmer’s miscall on the iPhone has become his corporate epitaph, the middle-brow version of the ‘dance, monkey boy’ videos circulating about him 15 years ago), these old boys somehow fight extra hard when it’s women coming after them.

    For to paraphrase Mark Steyn’s brilliant quip about Moselms fretting over backlash from tomorrow’s terrorist attack: Women’s groups decry gender imbalances in next year’s hot, new technology some skinny white or Asian dude will bother to go through the formality of actually inventing.

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    • Replies: @Thomm
    Not just that, but women aren't even interested in any advanced technologies at all.

    Rather, the female brain is hardwired around the realities of prehistoric times. The violent thug generated gina tingles, while the introvert was low-status.

    This is why women write love letters to serial killers even today, but get apoplectic that some nerd has money. The tech industry is particularly vexing to women, as their brain cannot compute why money is appearing in the hands of men they are not attracted to.

    In other words, the brain-vagina interface of women is obsolete. This obsolesence will become increasingly pronounced in coming years and decades.
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  54. @George
    Has the Time become a woman's magazine? With the paywall who is paying for the Times? I suspect women that are paying for the Style and Lifestyle section, so the rest of the paper has to appeal to an older Jewish New York City sort of woman.

    Has the Time become a woman’s magazine?

    I believe that probably all magazines are woman’s magazines at this point.

    I got a gift sub to Popular Mechanics, which is not explicitly male, but pretty close.

    Anyway, it comes off very womanlike. Every photo is accompanied by a description and price of all the clothing shown. The segments on American “makers” are about hipster food products and ultra high end living room furniture. It’s written and staffed by limp wristed urbanite bugman types. I think they had a how-to guide on changing a tire and jump starting a car.

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    • LOL: Autochthon
    • Replies: @CK
    The great magazines have all fallen.
    Scientific American is now edited by a disbeliever in science.
    Pop Sci and Pop Mech are style mags for singles.
    Pop Mech was for over 65 years a magazine for the working family man. It used to have the motto Easy Ways to do Hard Things. Now the hardest thing it helps you do is spend money.
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  55. Stop the distaff bashing, dammit! We either repeal the 19th Amendment or we deal with the female voter birdbrains! You bastards are too busy laughing at Ethel Merman slipping on the banana peel to recognize that the Democrats are baloney slicing vital portions of the White female electorate away from the Republicans.

    If you ain’t in favor of repealing the 19th Amendment, then shut the hell up with your damn snide comments about the gals. I say repeal that 19th Amendment horseshit as soon as possible, but the rest of you ain’t got the onions to go out in public and argue that.

    WHITE WOMEN MORE IMMIGRATION RESTRICTIONIST THAN WHITE MEN

    Is this true? Might be, and there are simple reasons why it might be so.

    As Ann Coulter so bracingly put it, women are the ones getting raped by the foreigner invaders flooding into European Christian nations. The GOP Cheap Labor Faction don’t give a shit if White women are raped by foreigners as long as they can get their cheap labor and high rents and high real estate prices.

    White women can be allies in the immigration limitationist movement, or they can be horrible foes. Let us try to win their vote.

    Once more:

    Mass immigration lowers wages, increases housing costs, swamps schools, overwhelms hospitals and harms the environment.

    Mass immigration brings Islamic terrorism to the USA, increases income inequality, creates multicultural mayhem and destroys cultural cohesion.

    White women will respond positively if you ask for their vote and explain why limiting immigration will increase their safety, security and ability to enjoy a tranquil civil order. White women voters know that limiting mass immigration will boost AFFORDABLE FAMILY FORMATION.

    It is White men in the GOP Cheap Labor Faction who are the dirtbags that need to be rhetorically destroyed and crushed. Mitt Romney, Jeff Flake, Marco Rubio, Lindsey Graham, Lamar Alexander, Ron Johnson and all the rest of the GOP Cheap Labor Faction are the enemies to be rhetorically stomped on, not the average White lady voter.

    White women would love to see some White men rhetorically pound the snot out of the White cuck scum in the GOP Cheap Labor Faction.

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  56. @AnotherDad

    In other words, it’s just typical female narcissism combined with a stunning lack of maturity. They want to be showered with wealth simply because they have vaginas. But without lifting a finger to actually please a man.
     
    Yep. And this is also the gist of feminism. There was an initial "we want to be able to use our talents" element that was reasonable. But, of course, men's and women's talents and interests are not at all identical so that doesn't produce "equality". Modern feminism is pretty much "men must give us stuff."

    Of course, there was a fair and civilized way for women to share in men's greater strength, greater interest in things and material alteration of the world--i.e. greater material productivity. It's called marriage. Men and women sharing their complementary traits. But, of course, in marriage women are supposed to give something--sex, children, child nursing and raising, homemaking--in return for what men produce.

    But women having to give something to get something ... the horror!

    There’s nothing wrong with women working in startups and making money. The problem is the idea that if their representation isn’t 50 percent, that something is wrong and discrimination of some sort must be going on.

    This applies to any discrete human groups.

    Read More
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  57. @AnotherDad

    But I’m somewhat skeptical…fiat currency works so well because it is backed not by gold or silver but by dudes with guns.
     
    Simple, the rest of your paragraph fleshes it out, but this is the gist of it.

    Large standing armies. Founding fathers get heebie jeebies just thing about them. Norman aristocrats don’t like King getting an army by taxing them. Power concentration. What if he uses army to wipe them out? 10th Amendment twats won’t just admit that the printing press nullifies there nonsense. What power does federal government have that states don’t? Cash conjuring on a scale never before seen.

    Government workers vote Democrat? The provisioning and arming of the US military is the answer to cat lady agenda of Democrat public school monopoly. Trumpy bribing the government workers but good, just like Democrats do.

    Debt and demography will take out the American Empire and the Chinese Communist Party at the same time. Interesting era to live in.

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  58. @AnotherDad
    Women looking for a big break would be advised to come up with workable general purpose AI that can run on fairly limited hardware without a giant cloud background. Applications in robotics and automation come to mind and whoever can crack it first in the marketplace will make Apple loads of money.

    LOL.

    Whatever she does for a career, a woman looking for a "big break", should behave in a manner that will help them land a high quality guy. Then find one, marry him, have his children. Having children is what will help give them a happy and satisfied life.

    Working on AI--for the tiny, tiny fraction that have the skill set--great. But that's just a job. If a women devotes herself to it as her "life's work", she'll likely be unhappy and who knows may even become abusive to her cats.

    Whatever she does for a career, a woman looking for a “big break”, should behave in a manner that will help them land a high quality guy. Then find one, marry him, have his children. Having children is what will help give them a happy and satisfied life.

    My wife loves her job, makes $145,000 plus options, and has four kids. Feminism, properly done, gives women options. The problem is that nobody is ever satisfied with that.

    Read More
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  59. @AnotherDad

    In other words, it’s just typical female narcissism combined with a stunning lack of maturity. They want to be showered with wealth simply because they have vaginas. But without lifting a finger to actually please a man.
     
    Yep. And this is also the gist of feminism. There was an initial "we want to be able to use our talents" element that was reasonable. But, of course, men's and women's talents and interests are not at all identical so that doesn't produce "equality". Modern feminism is pretty much "men must give us stuff."

    Of course, there was a fair and civilized way for women to share in men's greater strength, greater interest in things and material alteration of the world--i.e. greater material productivity. It's called marriage. Men and women sharing their complementary traits. But, of course, in marriage women are supposed to give something--sex, children, child nursing and raising, homemaking--in return for what men produce.

    But women having to give something to get something ... the horror!

    Of course, there was a fair and civilized way for women to share in men’s greater strength, greater interest in things and material alteration of the world–i.e. greater material productivity. It’s called marriage. Men and women sharing their complementary traits. But, of course, in marriage women are supposed to give something–sex, children, child nursing and raising, homemaking–in return for what men produce

    Based on Internet horror stories, it seems like even many “traditional” women who grasp and accept this concept of marriage eventually come to reject the idea that they should have to give sex or even general politeness to their husbands. The cucky churches seem to promote this somehow.

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    • Replies: @L Woods
    Women are as grateful and fair-minded as they are forced to be. QED

    And yes, the churches are utterly worthless. The more conservative denominations still promote a facade of male leadership, but the underlying reality is (like everything else in this rotting husk of a country) a sad joke.

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  60. @Father O'Hara
    "The men will get all the wealth again,"...and they'll give it to the PRETTY girls!!

    The pretty, THIN girls.
    Except for Bobby DiNero, and the Mayor of NYC.

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  61. @Whiskey
    Crypto Currencies are this decade's Chia Pets. The problem with Bitcoin is that it is very traceable, already SJW are doing just that to figure out who donated what to say, Steve Sailer, or VDARE, or anyone else they don't like. And get said donors fired, like they are doing trawling donation lists for candidates and propositions that got Brendan Eich fired from Mozilla.

    Secondly, there is no barrier to entry to creating a crypto currency. If you have enough cryptographic mathematical background, you can create your own. If you don't even have that, you can fork Bitcoin (there are IIRC at least four forks of Bitcoin) or Etherium or Doge Coin or what have you.

    Thirdly, Bitcoin and other crypto currencies require enormous amounts of electricity to create them, i.e. "mine" them, and that is even less sustainable than gold mines. Far more dollar amount value of electricity is required for a dollar amount of Bitcoin even at today's inflated prices. [Remember there is no real barrier to entry in crypto -- competition is real.]

    Fourth, is Sovereign nations and central banks being hostile to crypto currencies. While Bitcoin is very traceable by design, others are not, and are an ideal way for really rich people to evade the Tsar in Russia or Emperor in China and taxation/extortion demands, or rich industrialists in Europe to make bribes or evade taxes as well. Russia and China are already hostile to crypto currency and are likely to ban it inside their nations -- with the nationwide computerized surveillance network to make it stick.

    Fifth, Crypto is horrifically vulnerable to hack attacks that steal your crypto currencies held in either your own storage or on online exchanges. If Western banks are very bad at security, and they are, they are at least insured up to certain amounts on deposits. Meaning if some crooks drain your account or run up lots of charges (happened to my brother's account on Black Friday) you can get restoration within a reasonable amount of business days. There is no such government backed deposit insurance and fraud regulations around crypto -- meaning as a medium of exchange its not very consumer friendly.

    Where crypto shines is a record of transactions, but those are computationally expensive and slow, meaning as practical matter some database records the initial clearing exchange and the crypto blockchain is updated in the background. Banks and financial institutions are looking at block chain technology as essentially an unhackable ledger of transactions which is very handy indeed for back office operations and reporting but not earth changing.

    Something like Bitcoin is valuable in places with no effective currency such as Venezuela, or subject to bad inflation like Argentina, or subject to embargoes like North Korea or Iran. But that's not a revolution like the internet or personal computer or smart phone.

    Women looking for a big break would be advised to come up with workable general purpose AI that can run on fairly limited hardware without a giant cloud background. Applications in robotics and automation come to mind and whoever can crack it first in the marketplace will make Apple loads of money.

    [Imagine a great working general purpose AI dependent on the cloud running on a medical care robot when it suddenly loses internet connection. You get the idea. This is why driverless cars are not on the market yet -- even network latency is a problem let alone loss of signal.]

    you allege cryptos are traceable (point #1) but can be used to launder via being untraceable (#4). Choose one.

    They use a lot of electricity, but everyone is moving to a system that won’t (proof of stake).

    There are no barriers to entry in the same way search engines do not have barriers to entry. They have network effects, and so need users. Theoretically, everyone could adopt a new crypto overnight, in practice that takes some marketing or special sauce.

    To the extent ‘immutability’ is the key point, it’s rather trivial to create a database that by contstruction logs every edit. If that was its key, it is inefficient

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    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal

    They use a lot of electricity, but everyone is moving to a system that won’t (proof of stake).
     
    Could you elaborate on this? I mean this as a serious question. I am not trying to sea lion you. I really am concerned about the electricity use of crypto currencies.
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  62. The Times is also trying to compete with, free, Vice.com .

    Somewhere off the coast of Bangladesh, one of the many cuisines (and nationality of illegal alien) available recently in Brooklyn NY, there is a brothel on a sandbar being slowly washed away by climate change. Think about that next time you fire up your BBQ. If I had to name the most woke thing I ever read, this might be it.

    The Sinking Brothel

    The sex workers of Banishanta, an island on Bangladesh’s southwestern coast, stand to be washed away by rising sea levels.

    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/4374zq/sex-workers-sinking-brothel-bangladesh-climate-change

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  63. @27 year old

    Has the Time become a woman’s magazine?
     
    I believe that probably all magazines are woman's magazines at this point.

    I got a gift sub to Popular Mechanics, which is not explicitly male, but pretty close.

    Anyway, it comes off very womanlike. Every photo is accompanied by a description and price of all the clothing shown. The segments on American "makers" are about hipster food products and ultra high end living room furniture. It's written and staffed by limp wristed urbanite bugman types. I think they had a how-to guide on changing a tire and jump starting a car.

    The great magazines have all fallen.
    Scientific American is now edited by a disbeliever in science.
    Pop Sci and Pop Mech are style mags for singles.
    Pop Mech was for over 65 years a magazine for the working family man. It used to have the motto Easy Ways to do Hard Things. Now the hardest thing it helps you do is spend money.

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  64. ”of blockchain investors” Cryptocurrencies are NOT ”an investment”! Neither are precious metals. A store of value (possilbly, in the case of cryptos) yes, but not an investment. Precious metals or cryptos don’t have any return on them. Sure, they may rise in value, but that’s speculation – pure betting.

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  65. @sabril

    The logical conclusion is that women are inherently inferior when it comes to complicated quantitative subjects.
     
    Either that or women are naturally risk averse. Which is a nice way of saying that they are genetically programmed to sit on the sidelines and fall in love with the winners. In general, I think more needs to be said about the risks men take. What percentage of failed startups had men as their founders? Is this a gap that needs to be closed? Is our society better off if more women start spending 5 or 10 of the best years of their lives on startups which turn out to have been a complete waste of time and money?

    By the way, this reminds me of an article I read a couple weeks ago arguing that people should show their support for Trump by buying Bitcoin. Basically it seems people who have already invested are on a search for Greater Fools.

    Yep, starting a business is hugely risky. The vast majority fail for one reason or the other – just as often bad luck. Of the successful ones, only a tiny fraction of them become huge. These feminists who decry that women don’t benefit from successful start-ups never think of that in the same way that they never decry the lack of women in high-paying but dangerous (and dirty jobs) such as working on a fishing boat.

    Feminists are as unrealistic as any five-year-old girl who dreams of being a princess.

    Also, as you say, just how much benefit does a woman get from grinding for 60-80 hours a week for four or five years in her late 20s and early 30s? Even if by some miracle, she’s part of a successful start-up, what does her life look like? Yeah, she’s rich, but the odds aren’t great that she’ll marry and even worse that she’ll have kids. Oh, lucky her.

    Normal men don’t much care if a woman is rich. Sure, all other things being equal, rich is better than poor. And, of course, her ability to become rich shows a lot of great attributes that would be good to have in your children. However, most reasonably successful guys don’t want to be married to some hyper-competitive Type-A woman. No amount of money is worth that. I don’t need you to pay my way in life so I’m looking at you as a partner (and someone to nuture my children) not a provider.

    We truly live in a ridiculous world. The fact that this garbage is taken seriously and that we even have to talk about it shows that we’re screwed. How long this silliness can last, I can’t say, but eventually, a society (even one as wealthy as ours) built on this level of lies can’t last. We’re the equivalent of a trust fund kid who is slowly burning through his inheritance.

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  66. @Mr. Anon

    “Women, consider crypto,” Alexia Bonatsos, a venture capitalist, wrote on Twitter. “Otherwise the men are going to get all the wealth, again.”
     
    Yeah, woman-up and invest in some digitial-tulip-based currency that Alexia Bonatsos is flogging. Alexia needs some suckers. You won't get rich, but Alexia will. And that's what's really important: not that women get rich, but that women like Alexia Bonatsos - and, especially, Alexia Bonatsos herself - get rich.

    Yeah, woman-up and invest in some digitial-tulip-based currency that Alexia Bonatsos is flogging. Alexia needs some suckers.

    At the intersection of extreme hype and a large, intellectually subpar customer-base, great fortunes can be made. OK, not great, but good enough for a mansion with a swimming pool and a McLaren F1 parked out front by the time it all blows up.

    Enter:

    BLACK-CHAIN!
    WAKANDA-COIN!

    Don’t you wanna invest in the King of crypto-currencies… brutha?

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    • LOL: Clyde
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    At the intersection of extreme hype and a large, intellectually sub-par customer-base, great fortunes can be made.

    I see Steve Jobs faked death to escape Skeletor and Mexinchifornia. He now spends his days in Brunei amid a harem of women who actually have breasts and hips, laconically posting to iSteve.
    , @silviosilver

    BLACK-CHAIN!
     
    A cool new technology optimized for extracting reparations.
    , @Mr. Anon

    Enter:

    BLACK-CHAIN!
     
    Good name, but - whoa, now - that's a little too insensitive. Dick Durbin might be offended.

    Bling-Coin.
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  67. Otherwise the men are going to get all the wealth, again.

    Rubbish. This harpy writes as though men and women are opposing armies or alien races fighting a desperate war for limited resources, in the vein of Tolkien’s elves and orcs. Of course, the fact is women consume the vast majority of even that wealth nominally controlled by men, as any married or dating man can attest.

    Relatedly, females are profligate spendthrifts terrible at savings and planning for the future. Hence they buy stupid shit like a tenth pair of “cute shoes” long past the point at which a male will have recognised the negligible marginal utility of a tenth pair of shoes, cute or otherwise. This is why television, so-called social media, and other media rooted in advertising seek most to target advertisements at females and most value the data mined about females (by Google, Friendface, and such; to in turn target advertisements, of course…).

    It’s also why, despite being infinitely less innovative and productive than men, women live healthier, happier lives, are far less often homeless, incarcerated, hungry, etc.

    Humans, male and female, but especially male, coddle and care for females altruistically, even to the point of sacrificing the provider’s own well-being, for reasons anyone bothering to read an introductory essay about sociobiology and evolution knows perfectly well. It’s as fundamental and unchanging a thing as sexual desire and activity, thirst, hunger, and the compulsion to breathe. But here comes this vapid bitch doomsaying that unless we Do Something, Real Soon Now men are going to monopolise and abscond with all the resources. (And…what, exactly? Masturbate in the forest or fellate each other incessantly, freed at last from the hated females they’ve so far plotted unsuccessfully to flee and avoid despite millennia of attempts?! Well, maybe a certain, small group of men light in the loafers, but those are not the same group doing all the inventing and producing, the occasional exception like Wilde or Turing acknowledged….)

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    • Replies: @Thomm
    You are right. Read 'The Misandry Bubble', within which there is a section called 'The Fabric of Humanity Will Tear'. It blew my mind when I read it :

    http://www.singularity2050.com/2010/01/the-misandry-bubble.html

    This overvaluation of women could get reversed, for the first time ever in human existence.

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  68. @Whiskey
    Crypto Currencies are this decade's Chia Pets. The problem with Bitcoin is that it is very traceable, already SJW are doing just that to figure out who donated what to say, Steve Sailer, or VDARE, or anyone else they don't like. And get said donors fired, like they are doing trawling donation lists for candidates and propositions that got Brendan Eich fired from Mozilla.

    Secondly, there is no barrier to entry to creating a crypto currency. If you have enough cryptographic mathematical background, you can create your own. If you don't even have that, you can fork Bitcoin (there are IIRC at least four forks of Bitcoin) or Etherium or Doge Coin or what have you.

    Thirdly, Bitcoin and other crypto currencies require enormous amounts of electricity to create them, i.e. "mine" them, and that is even less sustainable than gold mines. Far more dollar amount value of electricity is required for a dollar amount of Bitcoin even at today's inflated prices. [Remember there is no real barrier to entry in crypto -- competition is real.]

    Fourth, is Sovereign nations and central banks being hostile to crypto currencies. While Bitcoin is very traceable by design, others are not, and are an ideal way for really rich people to evade the Tsar in Russia or Emperor in China and taxation/extortion demands, or rich industrialists in Europe to make bribes or evade taxes as well. Russia and China are already hostile to crypto currency and are likely to ban it inside their nations -- with the nationwide computerized surveillance network to make it stick.

    Fifth, Crypto is horrifically vulnerable to hack attacks that steal your crypto currencies held in either your own storage or on online exchanges. If Western banks are very bad at security, and they are, they are at least insured up to certain amounts on deposits. Meaning if some crooks drain your account or run up lots of charges (happened to my brother's account on Black Friday) you can get restoration within a reasonable amount of business days. There is no such government backed deposit insurance and fraud regulations around crypto -- meaning as a medium of exchange its not very consumer friendly.

    Where crypto shines is a record of transactions, but those are computationally expensive and slow, meaning as practical matter some database records the initial clearing exchange and the crypto blockchain is updated in the background. Banks and financial institutions are looking at block chain technology as essentially an unhackable ledger of transactions which is very handy indeed for back office operations and reporting but not earth changing.

    Something like Bitcoin is valuable in places with no effective currency such as Venezuela, or subject to bad inflation like Argentina, or subject to embargoes like North Korea or Iran. But that's not a revolution like the internet or personal computer or smart phone.

    Women looking for a big break would be advised to come up with workable general purpose AI that can run on fairly limited hardware without a giant cloud background. Applications in robotics and automation come to mind and whoever can crack it first in the marketplace will make Apple loads of money.

    [Imagine a great working general purpose AI dependent on the cloud running on a medical care robot when it suddenly loses internet connection. You get the idea. This is why driverless cars are not on the market yet -- even network latency is a problem let alone loss of signal.]

    Thirdly, Bitcoin and other crypto currencies require enormous amounts of electricity to create them, i.e. “mine” them, and that is even less sustainable than gold mines. Far more dollar amount value of electricity is required for a dollar amount of Bitcoin even at today’s inflated prices. [Remember there is no real barrier to entry in crypto -- competition is real.]

    This.

    The cryptocurrency miners in China use more electricity than many nations.

    The Sierra Club may be hypocritical in its refusal to address the bad environmental effects of immigration, but at least they aren’t taking Bitcoin. Yet.

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    • Replies: @Jack D
    NOT this. If it took more than $1 worth of electricity to mine $1 worth of bitcoin, people wouldn't be doing it, at least not for long. That being said, it's still a colossal waste of resources but then you could say the same thing about the resources spent pulling gold out of the ground.
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  69. @eric
    you allege cryptos are traceable (point #1) but can be used to launder via being untraceable (#4). Choose one.

    They use a lot of electricity, but everyone is moving to a system that won't (proof of stake).

    There are no barriers to entry in the same way search engines do not have barriers to entry. They have network effects, and so need users. Theoretically, everyone could adopt a new crypto overnight, in practice that takes some marketing or special sauce.

    To the extent 'immutability' is the key point, it's rather trivial to create a database that by contstruction logs every edit. If that was its key, it is inefficient

    They use a lot of electricity, but everyone is moving to a system that won’t (proof of stake).

    Could you elaborate on this? I mean this as a serious question. I am not trying to sea lion you. I really am concerned about the electricity use of crypto currencies.

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    • Replies: @eric
    Everyone in the community sees this as a big problem. No one expected it to become this big, so consensus 'proof of work' mechanism was based on using CPU as a 'marker' that would then give one a chance of adding the next block in a blockchain. It was a great beginning idea, because initial enthusiasts could program their computers and play this game. By the time it became well known, people started doing this more efficiently, however, so CPU is really just a stand-in for $ because you can buy CPU, specialized chips, and the experts to write the algorithm.

    A change from CPU to 'proof of stake' is rather innocuous theoretically, because money can buy CPU, or be 'staked'. But it does get complicated in various edge cases, etc., so one can't simply change overnight. It's a priority for Ethereum, and will not merely get rid of the CPU/electricity issue, but also make it faster (due out with Casper, maybe in 2018, or 2019). Bitcoin knows they have to fix this, but it will be harder due to their governance, but they will get there. Dash, Neo, currently use POS, and I'm sure all big coins will in 5 years.
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  70. @anony-mouse
    I suppose this is one example where sexism benefits women.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/jennagoudreau/2011/06/27/warren-buffett-invests-like-a-girl/#8b9c4ae68450

    The cited article is baloney. It may be that, ceteris parabus women invest more wisely than men, just as Steve pointed out earlier that, domicilius paribus, California is more lucrative than Ohio.

    Trouble is, the ceteris are anything but paribus: most women don’t invest at all. They spend. Like drunken sailors. What’s more, they far less often are even productive enough to face a decision about whether to invest or spend, much less a decision about whether to invest in this or that.

    The writers of this study – unsurprisingly being feted in Forbes – have once again tiresomely assumed a can-opener.

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  71. @Mr. Anon

    There’s a chick in the photo but I would bet that she is there mainly for decoration and 95% of the Google crew working on this stuff is geeky guys like Damore.
     
    You've come a long way, baby.

    https://kc0eiuhlnmqwdxy1ylzte9ii-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/uk/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2017/01/ENIAC-programmers.jpg

    Women are actually very good at these needlework type tasks that require attention to detail and following a set of detailed instructions. Men get bored, their minds wander, they start to improvise and take shortcuts (some of the shortcuts lead to breakthrus but most don’t), they fall asleep, start to play pranks on each other to relieve the boredom, etc.

    One of the earliest developments in the steam engine was (at least according to legend) invented by a little kid. In those days crude and slow steam engines were used to dewater coal mines and the valves to allow steam into and out of the cylinders were manually controlled by a little kid whose job it was to stand there all day and open and close the valves over and over again all day. Some kid figured out that he could rig up a bunch of strings and pulleys, etc. and use the motion of the engine itself to open and close the valves so he could read comic books (or whatever kids in 18th century England did with their free time) while the engine did its thing. A woman would have just dutifully done what she was told to do.

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    • Replies: @Thomm

    Women are actually very good at these needlework type tasks that require attention to detail and following a set of detailed instructions.
     
    It sounds like womens' jobs are the ones that are going to be taken by artificial intelligence.
    , @Old Palo Altan
    Thank you for that first paragraph Jack.
    Pure gold.
    , @Anonymous
    A woman would have just dutifully done what she was told to do.

    For what it’s worth, women and girls tend to get in trouble for not following directions - strongly rebuked. I don’t think they like getting in trouble, so they develop a tendency to follow directions, and I think people expect them to do things in a more or less prescribed, dependable manner.

    , @Peripatetic commenter
    We are told, elsewhere, that it is a fable that 'boys' were used to operate the valves:

    The most popular fable arose when a writer was told that the valves were regulated by a buoy-which was the term for a float actuator. In some versions of the story, this was interpreted to mean that a "boy" was manipulating the valves and this misinformation has been immortalized. Tales are still told raising this (probably) nonexistent boy to the same status as Jack in the story about the beanstalk. He has even been given a name, Humphry Potter, and we are informed that he invented valve actuators by tying strings to the valves because he was too lazy to cycle them manually.
     
    http://ethw.org/Thomas_Newcomen_and_the_Steam_Engine

    That does not negate the other part of your claim that men tend to get bored of routine work.
    , @Anonymous
    The electronics industry uses almost exclusively women for assembly, rework and automated test operation. Look at any picture of consuler , industrial, commercial or military electronics production, it's been all female since the twenties.

    They rarely get the idea to move up to the next level, technician, or the one above that, engineer. Female techs are mostly vo-tech types looking for 'something different' or trying to feed a family post-divorce: female engineers are occasionally lesbians but much more frequently Quinn Dunki tomboy types whose daddies wanted a boy but only had girls. So one of the girls becomes the substitute son. Or they are flunkee mathematicians or in one case I know a woman that got kicked out of pharmacy school (actually, not kicked out, but told she was unlicensable, for her involvement in a casino scam).
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  72. @Abe

    Yeah, woman-up and invest in some digitial-tulip-based currency that Alexia Bonatsos is flogging. Alexia needs some suckers.
     
    At the intersection of extreme hype and a large, intellectually subpar customer-base, great fortunes can be made. OK, not great, but good enough for a mansion with a swimming pool and a McLaren F1 parked out front by the time it all blows up.

    Enter:

    BLACK-CHAIN!
    WAKANDA-COIN!

    Don't you wanna invest in the King of crypto-currencies... brutha?

    At the intersection of extreme hype and a large, intellectually sub-par customer-base, great fortunes can be made.

    I see Steve Jobs faked death to escape Skeletor and Mexinchifornia. He now spends his days in Brunei amid a harem of women who actually have breasts and hips, laconically posting to iSteve.

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  73. @wren
    This list of computing pioneers includes an impressive amount of women:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_pioneers_in_computer_science

    Most predate affirmative action or other political involvement, and seem to be genuine pioneers.

    The number of Japanese on the list is also impressive.

    I wouldn’t mind reading a detailed and neutral history of women in computing. It seems that a) women were much more represented in the field in the 50s – 70s, but also that b) the work of computer programming changed substantively with the rise of personal computers.

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    • Agree: wren
    • Replies: @bretd
    Knitting and weaving as Jack D said. Women evolved doing this. Typing and even secretarial, i.e. filing. When operating a computer wasn't much harder than a typewriter, no problem.
    , @Jack D
    Perhaps we can get Damore to write it - I hear he has some free time on his hands. Otherwise don't hold your breath - Computing was invented by Hidden Figures. Women, specifically black women. I saw a movie that says so. If they didn't invent it they would have, if they had not been held back by sexist, racist white men. Anything else is just lies by fascists.

    In the early days of programming, it was a nice clean 9 to 5 job in government or in large bureaucratic corporations like big banks. Women like jobs like that. Later it became more of a Wild West show and women were scarce in the Wild West.
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  74. @sabril

    The logical conclusion is that women are inherently inferior when it comes to complicated quantitative subjects.
     
    Either that or women are naturally risk averse. Which is a nice way of saying that they are genetically programmed to sit on the sidelines and fall in love with the winners. In general, I think more needs to be said about the risks men take. What percentage of failed startups had men as their founders? Is this a gap that needs to be closed? Is our society better off if more women start spending 5 or 10 of the best years of their lives on startups which turn out to have been a complete waste of time and money?

    By the way, this reminds me of an article I read a couple weeks ago arguing that people should show their support for Trump by buying Bitcoin. Basically it seems people who have already invested are on a search for Greater Fools.

    Yes, somehow the male losers (which inevitably greatly outnumber the male winners) never factor into feminist grifting. After all, they’re losers: they don’t count. All that matters is that the apex has something I want, so gimme.

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  75. @sabril
    I agree, but as I mentioned in my last comment, we also need to pay attention to the issue of risk. Of the men (and women) who get involved early in a new disruptive technology, less than 10% will succeed in a big way. And of the 90% who don't, a substantial percentage will have worked night and day for years and end up having totally wasted their time.

    Probably there are hundreds of guys like Mark Zuckerberg, Jeff Bezos, etc. with comparable products that failed for one reason or another, often just due to bad luck.

    Feminists want women to enjoy the benefits reaped by these guys without having taken the risks faced by all of the failures. Which in fact women can do -- by marrying rich tech guys -- but feminists think it's horrific for women to assume a traditional role.

    They want to extract resources from beta men without having to give up sex to them (that’s for 70 IQ club bouncers, etc). Same old story. I’d say that these professional parasites are simply too ugly to secure commitment from the tech titans in question, but Zuck’s wife kind of belies that.

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  76. @27 year old

    Of course, there was a fair and civilized way for women to share in men’s greater strength, greater interest in things and material alteration of the world–i.e. greater material productivity. It’s called marriage. Men and women sharing their complementary traits. But, of course, in marriage women are supposed to give something–sex, children, child nursing and raising, homemaking–in return for what men produce
     
    Based on Internet horror stories, it seems like even many "traditional" women who grasp and accept this concept of marriage eventually come to reject the idea that they should have to give sex or even general politeness to their husbands. The cucky churches seem to promote this somehow.

    Women are as grateful and fair-minded as they are forced to be. QED

    And yes, the churches are utterly worthless. The more conservative denominations still promote a facade of male leadership, but the underlying reality is (like everything else in this rotting husk of a country) a sad joke.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    And yes, the churches are utterly worthless.
     
    Yep. The latest local Catholic Herald, published by a supposedly conservative Catholic diocese, urged Catholics to support DACA.
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  77. @wren
    I posted this before, but it is pretty impressive. The author is a Harvard and Oxford grad with a PhD from Rutgers, so she is probably much smarter about this kind of thing than I am.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/patriarchal-race-colonize-mars-just-another-example-male-entitlement-ncna849681

    http://gender.stanford.edu/people/marcie-bianco

    Another blogger reminded his readers of this:


    If civilization had been left in female hands we would still be living in grass huts.

    Camille Paglia
     

    If civilization had been left in female hands we would still be living in grass huts.

    Camille Paglia

    That racist sexist drivel needs to be updated:

    If civilization had been left in black hands, we wud be kangs now!

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  78. I am not sure what it is, but the rise of the PC may be part of it.

    The first woman on that list accomplished some genuine breakthroughs.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kathleen_Booth

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    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter
    It seems assemblers were old hat by then (1958):

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Nathaniel_Rochester_(computer_scientist)
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  79. @Abe

    Something completely decentralized and with no barrier to entry still ends up being 95% male.
     
    Right. This is the point I always make when the on-cue whining starts about the dearth of women in whatever's the hot, new startup field du jour (saw a kissin'-cousin of this article recently, but it was on the lack of women in virtual reality).

    There is no barrier to entry and unlike the very first Internet bubble where you'd be sorely tempted to fork over 4 or more figures to Netscape to get this new-fangled technology called a 'web server', the software and tools are all literally free now.

    So I guess the narrative must now be that while all the start-up 'bro's' rise from nothing, and have to push past a literal old boys network of established CEO's whose fortunes and reputations they'll eventually ruin if they are to really make it (Steve Ballmer's miscall on the iPhone has become his corporate epitaph, the middle-brow version of the 'dance, monkey boy' videos circulating about him 15 years ago), these old boys somehow fight extra hard when it's women coming after them.

    For to paraphrase Mark Steyn's brilliant quip about Moselms fretting over backlash from tomorrow's terrorist attack: Women's groups decry gender imbalances in next year's hot, new technology some skinny white or Asian dude will bother to go through the formality of actually inventing.

    Not just that, but women aren’t even interested in any advanced technologies at all.

    Rather, the female brain is hardwired around the realities of prehistoric times. The violent thug generated gina tingles, while the introvert was low-status.

    This is why women write love letters to serial killers even today, but get apoplectic that some nerd has money. The tech industry is particularly vexing to women, as their brain cannot compute why money is appearing in the hands of men they are not attracted to.

    In other words, the brain-vagina interface of women is obsolete. This obsolesence will become increasingly pronounced in coming years and decades.

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    • Replies: @L Woods

    In other words, the brain-vagina interface of women is obsolete. This obsolesence will become increasingly pronounced in coming years and decades.
     
    I wouldn't be so sure. Women are clearly determined to wield their grossly underserved power and status to throw civilization back into a dark age more amenable to their sensibilities. Their chances of success seem pretty good at this juncture.
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  80. @Thomm
    Not just that, but women aren't even interested in any advanced technologies at all.

    Rather, the female brain is hardwired around the realities of prehistoric times. The violent thug generated gina tingles, while the introvert was low-status.

    This is why women write love letters to serial killers even today, but get apoplectic that some nerd has money. The tech industry is particularly vexing to women, as their brain cannot compute why money is appearing in the hands of men they are not attracted to.

    In other words, the brain-vagina interface of women is obsolete. This obsolesence will become increasingly pronounced in coming years and decades.

    In other words, the brain-vagina interface of women is obsolete. This obsolesence will become increasingly pronounced in coming years and decades.

    I wouldn’t be so sure. Women are clearly determined to wield their grossly underserved power and status to throw civilization back into a dark age more amenable to their sensibilities. Their chances of success seem pretty good at this juncture.

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  81. @Thomas

    Do you genuinely believe you going to replace all that with some computer code?
     
    Yes, at least until the Chinese or somebody else develop quantum computing far enough to crack public-key cryptography. Fiat currencies work because of a massive (and massively expensive) investment by the government in force. Cryptocurrencies work based on the algorithms, and on nobody being able to gain control over more than 50% of the servers. Math and code are a lot more reliable, not to mention a lot cheaper, than hundreds of billions invested in "defense" and law enforcement.

    Keep in mind that fiat currency has only been dominant for less than 50 years, since the U.S. ended convertibility of dollars to gold in 1971, two years before public-key cryptography was invented.

    Satoshi is definitely white and probably American because this is not how the Japanese roll.
     
    Pretty much everyone who's read him and looked at his code agrees he's not Japanese.

    Hold on – his code? How do Japanese code differently?

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    How do Japanese code differently?
     
    It's slanted.
    , @anon
    I don't know about Satoshi in particular, but I've read foreign code and all the variables are in the foreign language, e.g. windowNumber = 5 in English vs. fensterNummer = 5 in German
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  82. Thirdly, Bitcoin and other crypto currencies require enormous amounts of electricity to create them, i.e. “mine” them, and that is even less sustainable than gold mines. Far more dollar amount value of electricity is required for a dollar amount of Bitcoin even at today’s inflated prices. [Remember there is no real barrier to entry in crypto -- competition is real.]

    That’s not what I read from the hardware sites. I read that mining is still profitable. Not as profitable as it was at the peak, but still profitable. And that’s counting in the price of the equipment, not just the electricity (note: it takes months or a year to get your money back; it obviously depends on how much you spend).

    Russia and China are already hostile to crypto currency and are likely to ban it inside their nations — with the nationwide computerized surveillance network to make it stick.

    More of your bullshit. There’s no such thing as a way to “make it stick” on networks. There’s only degrees of success, to be attenuated by the response from the other side.

    gamers are kvetching because the bitcoin miners have bought up every GPU in sight.

    The price of GPUs seems to have more than doubled. That’s an enormous price swing in the PC parts market, where prices are traditionally pretty stable. They were already a big share of the cost of a gaming rig.

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  83. @wren
    I am not sure what it is, but the rise of the PC may be part of it.

    The first woman on that list accomplished some genuine breakthroughs.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kathleen_Booth

    It seems assemblers were old hat by then (1958):

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Nathaniel_Rochester_(computer_scientist)

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    • Replies: @wren
    She did it in 1947, so gets the credit in Wikipedia.

    Use of assembly language[edit]

    Historical perspective[edit]

    Assembly languages, and the use of the word assembly, date to the introduction of the stored-program computer. The first assembly language was developed in 1947 by Kathleen Booth for the ARC2 at Birkbeck, University of London following work with John von Neumann and Herman Goldstine at the Institute for Advanced Study.[20][21] The Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator (EDSAC) had an assembler called initial orders featuring one-letter mnemonics in 1949.[22] SOAP (Symbolic Optimal Assembly Program) was an assembly language for the IBM 650 computer written by Stan Poley in 1955.[23]
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assembly_language#Historical_perspective

    She later got a PhD in math and the fact that she visited von Neumann in the US to work with him shows that she probably knew what she was doing.
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  84. @Jack D
    Women are actually very good at these needlework type tasks that require attention to detail and following a set of detailed instructions. Men get bored, their minds wander, they start to improvise and take shortcuts (some of the shortcuts lead to breakthrus but most don't), they fall asleep, start to play pranks on each other to relieve the boredom, etc.

    One of the earliest developments in the steam engine was (at least according to legend) invented by a little kid. In those days crude and slow steam engines were used to dewater coal mines and the valves to allow steam into and out of the cylinders were manually controlled by a little kid whose job it was to stand there all day and open and close the valves over and over again all day. Some kid figured out that he could rig up a bunch of strings and pulleys, etc. and use the motion of the engine itself to open and close the valves so he could read comic books (or whatever kids in 18th century England did with their free time) while the engine did its thing. A woman would have just dutifully done what she was told to do.

    Women are actually very good at these needlework type tasks that require attention to detail and following a set of detailed instructions.

    It sounds like womens’ jobs are the ones that are going to be taken by artificial intelligence.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    When was the last time you spoke to a telephone operator?
    , @L Woods
    The "jobs" of the future are socially-oriented make work -- they'll be just fine.
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  85. @Autochthon

    Otherwise the men are going to get all the wealth, again.
     
    Rubbish. This harpy writes as though men and women are opposing armies or alien races fighting a desperate war for limited resources, in the vein of Tolkien's elves and orcs. Of course, the fact is women consume the vast majority of even that wealth nominally controlled by men, as any married or dating man can attest.

    Relatedly, females are profligate spendthrifts terrible at savings and planning for the future. Hence they buy stupid shit like a tenth pair of "cute shoes" long past the point at which a male will have recognised the negligible marginal utility of a tenth pair of shoes, cute or otherwise. This is why television, so-called social media, and other media rooted in advertising seek most to target advertisements at females and most value the data mined about females (by Google, Friendface, and such; to in turn target advertisements, of course...).

    It's also why, despite being infinitely less innovative and productive than men, women live healthier, happier lives, are far less often homeless, incarcerated, hungry, etc.

    Humans, male and female, but especially male, coddle and care for females altruistically, even to the point of sacrificing the provider's own well-being, for reasons anyone bothering to read an introductory essay about sociobiology and evolution knows perfectly well. It's as fundamental and unchanging a thing as sexual desire and activity, thirst, hunger, and the compulsion to breathe. But here comes this vapid bitch doomsaying that unless we Do Something, Real Soon Now men are going to monopolise and abscond with all the resources. (And...what, exactly? Masturbate in the forest or fellate each other incessantly, freed at last from the hated females they've so far plotted unsuccessfully to flee and avoid despite millennia of attempts?! Well, maybe a certain, small group of men light in the loafers, but those are not the same group doing all the inventing and producing, the occasional exception like Wilde or Turing acknowledged....)

    You are right. Read ‘The Misandry Bubble’, within which there is a section called ‘The Fabric of Humanity Will Tear’. It blew my mind when I read it :

    http://www.singularity2050.com/2010/01/the-misandry-bubble.html

    This overvaluation of women could get reversed, for the first time ever in human existence.

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    • Replies: @Autochthon
    I generally enjoy what I've read at The Futurist though I don't think iVe read this particular essay, so I am taking a look at it now. Thank you.

    I expect I will agree with what seems to be the main thesis. As I have written myself in these very comments before, the harpies are going to get what they seek, good and hard, when they are again reduced to chattel for warlords come the downfall of civilisation they so desperately strive for. Ghengis, Xerxes, Shaka, Hammurabi, Atilla, and whatever variation of Immortan Joe or Mustafa Mond comes down the pike – none gave nor will give a hoot in Hell about putting women on a pedestal. Oh, sure, they'll be valued, the same as I value my motorcycle, my firearms, and my skis – the thing is, I don't give a damn about whether those things are happy in their service to me, and if and when they wear out or I tire of them, they are cast off; at best, they are traded up for newer models. Whatever different treatment women have received has been a mere anomalous blip in the great scheme of things, the millennia of relations between the sexes....

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  86. @Paleo Liberal

    Thirdly, Bitcoin and other crypto currencies require enormous amounts of electricity to create them, i.e. “mine” them, and that is even less sustainable than gold mines. Far more dollar amount value of electricity is required for a dollar amount of Bitcoin even at today’s inflated prices. [Remember there is no real barrier to entry in crypto -- competition is real.]
     
    This.

    The cryptocurrency miners in China use more electricity than many nations.


    The Sierra Club may be hypocritical in its refusal to address the bad environmental effects of immigration, but at least they aren't taking Bitcoin. Yet.

    NOT this. If it took more than $1 worth of electricity to mine $1 worth of bitcoin, people wouldn’t be doing it, at least not for long. That being said, it’s still a colossal waste of resources but then you could say the same thing about the resources spent pulling gold out of the ground.

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    • Replies: @Johann Ricke

    That being said, it’s still a colossal waste of resources but then you could say the same thing about the resources spent pulling gold out of the ground.
     
    You can use gold to make ornaments and any number of industrial goods. I've yet to hear of a non-monetary use for bitcoin.
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  87. @L Woods
    Women are as grateful and fair-minded as they are forced to be. QED

    And yes, the churches are utterly worthless. The more conservative denominations still promote a facade of male leadership, but the underlying reality is (like everything else in this rotting husk of a country) a sad joke.

    And yes, the churches are utterly worthless.

    Yep. The latest local Catholic Herald, published by a supposedly conservative Catholic diocese, urged Catholics to support DACA.

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    • Replies: @Fredrik
    Do you not see there's a particular reason why the Catholic churches would support DACA or other immigration schemes that benefit those from Latin America?
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  88. @AnotherDad

    In other words, it’s just typical female narcissism combined with a stunning lack of maturity. They want to be showered with wealth simply because they have vaginas. But without lifting a finger to actually please a man.
     
    Yep. And this is also the gist of feminism. There was an initial "we want to be able to use our talents" element that was reasonable. But, of course, men's and women's talents and interests are not at all identical so that doesn't produce "equality". Modern feminism is pretty much "men must give us stuff."

    Of course, there was a fair and civilized way for women to share in men's greater strength, greater interest in things and material alteration of the world--i.e. greater material productivity. It's called marriage. Men and women sharing their complementary traits. But, of course, in marriage women are supposed to give something--sex, children, child nursing and raising, homemaking--in return for what men produce.

    But women having to give something to get something ... the horror!

    There was an initial “we want to be able to use our talents” element that was reasonable.

    I question whether this group ever really existing, other than just as a first step for endless incrementalism.

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  89. @Abe

    Yeah, woman-up and invest in some digitial-tulip-based currency that Alexia Bonatsos is flogging. Alexia needs some suckers.
     
    At the intersection of extreme hype and a large, intellectually subpar customer-base, great fortunes can be made. OK, not great, but good enough for a mansion with a swimming pool and a McLaren F1 parked out front by the time it all blows up.

    Enter:

    BLACK-CHAIN!
    WAKANDA-COIN!

    Don't you wanna invest in the King of crypto-currencies... brutha?

    BLACK-CHAIN!

    A cool new technology optimized for extracting reparations.

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  90. @wren
    I posted this before, but it is pretty impressive. The author is a Harvard and Oxford grad with a PhD from Rutgers, so she is probably much smarter about this kind of thing than I am.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/patriarchal-race-colonize-mars-just-another-example-male-entitlement-ncna849681

    http://gender.stanford.edu/people/marcie-bianco

    Another blogger reminded his readers of this:


    If civilization had been left in female hands we would still be living in grass huts.

    Camille Paglia
     

    https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/patriarchal-race-colonize-mars-just-another-example-male-entitlement-ncna849681

    There is a hilarious poll near the end of that article, asking whether, Yes, humans should explore other planets or, No, that we’d just destroy them as we did this one.

    After everything the article said against the idea, a whopping 92% (!) of the over 10,000 people who responded answered Yes.

    Hahaha.

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  91. @Seth Largo
    I wouldn't mind reading a detailed and neutral history of women in computing. It seems that a) women were much more represented in the field in the 50s - 70s, but also that b) the work of computer programming changed substantively with the rise of personal computers.

    Knitting and weaving as Jack D said. Women evolved doing this. Typing and even secretarial, i.e. filing. When operating a computer wasn’t much harder than a typewriter, no problem.

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  92. @Paleo Liberal

    They use a lot of electricity, but everyone is moving to a system that won’t (proof of stake).
     
    Could you elaborate on this? I mean this as a serious question. I am not trying to sea lion you. I really am concerned about the electricity use of crypto currencies.

    Everyone in the community sees this as a big problem. No one expected it to become this big, so consensus ‘proof of work’ mechanism was based on using CPU as a ‘marker’ that would then give one a chance of adding the next block in a blockchain. It was a great beginning idea, because initial enthusiasts could program their computers and play this game. By the time it became well known, people started doing this more efficiently, however, so CPU is really just a stand-in for $ because you can buy CPU, specialized chips, and the experts to write the algorithm.

    A change from CPU to ‘proof of stake’ is rather innocuous theoretically, because money can buy CPU, or be ‘staked’. But it does get complicated in various edge cases, etc., so one can’t simply change overnight. It’s a priority for Ethereum, and will not merely get rid of the CPU/electricity issue, but also make it faster (due out with Casper, maybe in 2018, or 2019). Bitcoin knows they have to fix this, but it will be harder due to their governance, but they will get there. Dash, Neo, currently use POS, and I’m sure all big coins will in 5 years.

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  93. I’ve long been in favor of multiple currencies. Maduroites should be paid in Madurocoin. Obamaites in Obamacoin. Should be interesting to see what coin all those people who say inflation doesn’t matter decide to hold their money in. I’m betting it isn’t either.

    There is exactly one idea I like as foreign aid. Create a way some Joe Smoe in Zimbabwe can save in real money, which can’t be expropriated. But that’s basically it. I’m not sure the result would be good, but it is a heck of a better idea than what we have spent over $2 trillion trying to do.

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  94. @Seth Largo
    I wouldn't mind reading a detailed and neutral history of women in computing. It seems that a) women were much more represented in the field in the 50s - 70s, but also that b) the work of computer programming changed substantively with the rise of personal computers.

    Perhaps we can get Damore to write it – I hear he has some free time on his hands. Otherwise don’t hold your breath – Computing was invented by Hidden Figures. Women, specifically black women. I saw a movie that says so. If they didn’t invent it they would have, if they had not been held back by sexist, racist white men. Anything else is just lies by fascists.

    In the early days of programming, it was a nice clean 9 to 5 job in government or in large bureaucratic corporations like big banks. Women like jobs like that. Later it became more of a Wild West show and women were scarce in the Wild West.

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    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    Cat house lady agenda is better than cat lady agenda.

    Ladies were out West, I seen 'em in movies about the West. Actresses, including smarty pants pal of Mel Gibson, Jodie Foster, love to play those parts about ladies in the West.

    Colleen Dewhurst had some dew on the melons in one of those lady-in-the-west movies.
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  95. @Thomm

    Women are actually very good at these needlework type tasks that require attention to detail and following a set of detailed instructions.
     
    It sounds like womens' jobs are the ones that are going to be taken by artificial intelligence.

    When was the last time you spoke to a telephone operator?

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    • Replies: @Thomm

    When was the last time you spoke to a telephone operator?
     
    I may have when I was six, but I am not sure. Certainly not post-1986 or so.

    Now, a lot of people say that male jobs (truckdriver, forklift operator) are more vulnerable, but I disagree about the aggregate. Women, by definition, go toward rote, predictable, repetitive jobs. Those, by definition, are the most easy to automate. Even among lawyers, the courtroom arguments are done by men, and female lawyers do document review, etc. Guess which is more easy to automate?

    Most female jobs are make-work anyway. If AI is about zapping low-productivity jobs, then women have a lot more to worry about than men.

    , @Thomm
    Actually, speaking of telephone operators and having interacted with them when I was six, you have just reminded me of one of my favorite songs from that age :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0M75m7vHf0

    Needless to say, modern feminists would get quite triggered at seeing the 'harassment' contained therein.
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  96. @Jack D
    Women are actually very good at these needlework type tasks that require attention to detail and following a set of detailed instructions. Men get bored, their minds wander, they start to improvise and take shortcuts (some of the shortcuts lead to breakthrus but most don't), they fall asleep, start to play pranks on each other to relieve the boredom, etc.

    One of the earliest developments in the steam engine was (at least according to legend) invented by a little kid. In those days crude and slow steam engines were used to dewater coal mines and the valves to allow steam into and out of the cylinders were manually controlled by a little kid whose job it was to stand there all day and open and close the valves over and over again all day. Some kid figured out that he could rig up a bunch of strings and pulleys, etc. and use the motion of the engine itself to open and close the valves so he could read comic books (or whatever kids in 18th century England did with their free time) while the engine did its thing. A woman would have just dutifully done what she was told to do.

    Thank you for that first paragraph Jack.
    Pure gold.

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  97. @Jack D
    Perhaps we can get Damore to write it - I hear he has some free time on his hands. Otherwise don't hold your breath - Computing was invented by Hidden Figures. Women, specifically black women. I saw a movie that says so. If they didn't invent it they would have, if they had not been held back by sexist, racist white men. Anything else is just lies by fascists.

    In the early days of programming, it was a nice clean 9 to 5 job in government or in large bureaucratic corporations like big banks. Women like jobs like that. Later it became more of a Wild West show and women were scarce in the Wild West.

    Cat house lady agenda is better than cat lady agenda.

    Ladies were out West, I seen ‘em in movies about the West. Actresses, including smarty pants pal of Mel Gibson, Jodie Foster, love to play those parts about ladies in the West.

    Colleen Dewhurst had some dew on the melons in one of those lady-in-the-west movies.

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  98. @Jack D
    Women are actually very good at these needlework type tasks that require attention to detail and following a set of detailed instructions. Men get bored, their minds wander, they start to improvise and take shortcuts (some of the shortcuts lead to breakthrus but most don't), they fall asleep, start to play pranks on each other to relieve the boredom, etc.

    One of the earliest developments in the steam engine was (at least according to legend) invented by a little kid. In those days crude and slow steam engines were used to dewater coal mines and the valves to allow steam into and out of the cylinders were manually controlled by a little kid whose job it was to stand there all day and open and close the valves over and over again all day. Some kid figured out that he could rig up a bunch of strings and pulleys, etc. and use the motion of the engine itself to open and close the valves so he could read comic books (or whatever kids in 18th century England did with their free time) while the engine did its thing. A woman would have just dutifully done what she was told to do.

    A woman would have just dutifully done what she was told to do.

    For what it’s worth, women and girls tend to get in trouble for not following directions – strongly rebuked. I don’t think they like getting in trouble, so they develop a tendency to follow directions, and I think people expect them to do things in a more or less prescribed, dependable manner.

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    • Replies: @L Woods

    For what it’s worth
     
    Not much, now that you ask.

    Women choose document review? Is this for real? Could it be that women lawyers are shunted into that horribly tedious-sounding role?
     
    The horror of comparative advantage strikes again.
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  99. @Jack D
    NOT this. If it took more than $1 worth of electricity to mine $1 worth of bitcoin, people wouldn't be doing it, at least not for long. That being said, it's still a colossal waste of resources but then you could say the same thing about the resources spent pulling gold out of the ground.

    That being said, it’s still a colossal waste of resources but then you could say the same thing about the resources spent pulling gold out of the ground.

    You can use gold to make ornaments and any number of industrial goods. I’ve yet to hear of a non-monetary use for bitcoin.

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    • Agree: Autochthon
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  100. @Thomm

    Women are actually very good at these needlework type tasks that require attention to detail and following a set of detailed instructions.
     
    It sounds like womens' jobs are the ones that are going to be taken by artificial intelligence.

    The “jobs” of the future are socially-oriented make work — they’ll be just fine.

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  101. During the time of pulps, the editor of Wonder Stories (etc.) would pitch some crazy idea to whatever writer he thought could best handle it. This is how a lot of the best ideas of the golden age of sci-fi like Asimov’s three laws of robotics were formed.

    I’m beginning to wonder if the NYT works similarly, with the main creative talent invested in one person who is the editor. And the “reporters” are just people who flesh out the pitch. This story isn’t something an investigator could uncover. It is clearly just a crazy pitch.

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  102. OT: this story reports on scientists who worry that “space aliens might send messages that worm their way into human society — not to steal our passwords but to bring down our culture.”

    https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/science/should-we-fear-cyberattacks-space-aliens-ncna849941

    I wonder whether anyone has noticed any signs that the space aliens might already have arrived?

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  103. @Jack D
    When was the last time you spoke to a telephone operator?

    When was the last time you spoke to a telephone operator?

    I may have when I was six, but I am not sure. Certainly not post-1986 or so.

    Now, a lot of people say that male jobs (truckdriver, forklift operator) are more vulnerable, but I disagree about the aggregate. Women, by definition, go toward rote, predictable, repetitive jobs. Those, by definition, are the most easy to automate. Even among lawyers, the courtroom arguments are done by men, and female lawyers do document review, etc. Guess which is more easy to automate?

    Most female jobs are make-work anyway. If AI is about zapping low-productivity jobs, then women have a lot more to worry about than men.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Even among lawyers, the courtroom arguments are done by men, and female lawyers do document review, etc.

    Women choose document review? Is this for real? Could it be that women lawyers are shunted into that horribly tedious-sounding role?

    , @Anonymous
    Women, by definition, go toward rote, predictable, repetitive jobs.

    I think you’re making some pretty broad generalizations. Women can be pretty crafty and good at strategizing to achieve their goals, whether those goals be personal or professional.
    , @sabril

    Most female jobs are make-work anyway. If AI is about zapping low-productivity jobs, then women have a lot more to worry about than men.
     
    I think it's a bit early to say. Consider the job of "doorman at a fancy building." At a lot of Manhattan buildings, this guy's main job is literally to open the door for people. (There is a desk clerk who actually signs people in and out of the building; signs for packages, etc.)

    This is one of the easiest jobs to automate and yet it is one of the safest jobs from automation. Because people love the status boost that comes from having a well-dressed real person open the door for them and say "good morning." People love the feeling of giving him a fat tip at Christmas for a job well done.

    For more middle-class guys like me, it's really nice to go to a bar and have a pretty girl in her 20s wearing a little skirt bringing me my beer and nachos. A lot of jobs for women are like that -- it's not openly stated, but the woman's real job is to let her male boss have the nice feeling that comes from having a subordinate woman at his beck and call.

    So I could easily envision a future where pretty much all jobs are automated and most of the remaining jobs are for women.
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  104. Here’s a conversation from the 2000 film Boiler Room, in which a stockbroker trains his protege:

    Greg Weinstein: Now there’s two rules you have to remember as a trainee, number one, we don’t pitch the bitch here.
    Seth Davis: What?
    Greg Weinstein: We don’t sell stock to women. I don’t care who it is, we don’t do it. Nancy Sinatra calls, you tell her you’re sorry. They’re a constant pain in the ass and you’re never going to hear the end of it alright? They’re going to call you every fucking day wanting to know why the stock is dropping and God forbid the stock should go up, you’re going to hear from them every fucking 15 minutes. It’s just not worth it, don’t pitch the bitch.

    It makes it seem like women are careful with their money, that they consider their money to be their families’ lifeblood, and that someone looking to sell risky investments would be wise to stay away from them.

    Well, we can’t portray women as being concerned with families, can be? Not on your life! That would be sexist.

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  105. @Thomm

    When was the last time you spoke to a telephone operator?
     
    I may have when I was six, but I am not sure. Certainly not post-1986 or so.

    Now, a lot of people say that male jobs (truckdriver, forklift operator) are more vulnerable, but I disagree about the aggregate. Women, by definition, go toward rote, predictable, repetitive jobs. Those, by definition, are the most easy to automate. Even among lawyers, the courtroom arguments are done by men, and female lawyers do document review, etc. Guess which is more easy to automate?

    Most female jobs are make-work anyway. If AI is about zapping low-productivity jobs, then women have a lot more to worry about than men.

    Even among lawyers, the courtroom arguments are done by men, and female lawyers do document review, etc.

    Women choose document review? Is this for real? Could it be that women lawyers are shunted into that horribly tedious-sounding role?

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  106. @Maciano
    Your comment shows you really don't know anything about bitcoin. In every thread on crypto I've seen ppl like you.

    I stopped being annoyed by it, bc unlike issues like third world immigration, it matters for your personal wealth to not get crypto. So pls, get left behind. Stick with dollars, stocks , gold.

    I don’t think Bitcoin will supplant the dollar but to wave it off as merely a pump and dumper scheme is horribly naive

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  107. @Anonymous
    A woman would have just dutifully done what she was told to do.

    For what it’s worth, women and girls tend to get in trouble for not following directions - strongly rebuked. I don’t think they like getting in trouble, so they develop a tendency to follow directions, and I think people expect them to do things in a more or less prescribed, dependable manner.

    For what it’s worth

    Not much, now that you ask.

    Women choose document review? Is this for real? Could it be that women lawyers are shunted into that horribly tedious-sounding role?

    The horror of comparative advantage strikes again.

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    • Agree: Thomm
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    You sound like a swell guy.
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  108. @Thomm

    When was the last time you spoke to a telephone operator?
     
    I may have when I was six, but I am not sure. Certainly not post-1986 or so.

    Now, a lot of people say that male jobs (truckdriver, forklift operator) are more vulnerable, but I disagree about the aggregate. Women, by definition, go toward rote, predictable, repetitive jobs. Those, by definition, are the most easy to automate. Even among lawyers, the courtroom arguments are done by men, and female lawyers do document review, etc. Guess which is more easy to automate?

    Most female jobs are make-work anyway. If AI is about zapping low-productivity jobs, then women have a lot more to worry about than men.

    Women, by definition, go toward rote, predictable, repetitive jobs.

    I think you’re making some pretty broad generalizations. Women can be pretty crafty and good at strategizing to achieve their goals, whether those goals be personal or professional.

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    • Replies: @sabril

    Women can be pretty crafty and good at strategizing to achieve their goals, whether those goals be personal or professional.
     
    Not any more than a child is crafty and good at convincing his parents to buy him a certain toy for Christmas. Which is to say that he is somewhat crafty and good at strategizing, but the main thing is that the parents care a great deal about the child.

    In the same way, men are programmed to seek validation from women, especially young women. This is reflected a wider society which bends over backwards to accommodate, protect, please, pander to, and pamper women. So that with a little bit of craftiness and strategizing, a woman can leverage this to get what she wants. But we shouldn't make the mistake of comparing her accomplishments to the accomplishments of a typical young man who starts off with society not giving a s*** about him.
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  109. It is funny how anything desirable or lucrative, that is not 50% women, is automatically ‘sexist’. No mention at all about women not having participated in the early stages, or even studied the appropriate subjects in college. None of that could ever by the reason.

    When cryptos crash and lose 90% of their value, suddenly, they will not be of interest (except in terms of a woman losing money).

    By contrast, anything bad that is overwhelmingly male (suicide, workplace deaths, troop deaths, homelessness) should stay as it is.

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  110. @Steve in Greensboro
    "Women push back on men in cryptocurrencies."

    And by "push back", they mean whine piercingly.

    It would be amusing to flip a switch so that all the male innovators in history were women. Would these feminists be campaigning for men in tech? Might rather be living like Amazons, killing all the boys before they could turn into men.

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  111. @Whiskey
    Crypto Currencies are this decade's Chia Pets. The problem with Bitcoin is that it is very traceable, already SJW are doing just that to figure out who donated what to say, Steve Sailer, or VDARE, or anyone else they don't like. And get said donors fired, like they are doing trawling donation lists for candidates and propositions that got Brendan Eich fired from Mozilla.

    Secondly, there is no barrier to entry to creating a crypto currency. If you have enough cryptographic mathematical background, you can create your own. If you don't even have that, you can fork Bitcoin (there are IIRC at least four forks of Bitcoin) or Etherium or Doge Coin or what have you.

    Thirdly, Bitcoin and other crypto currencies require enormous amounts of electricity to create them, i.e. "mine" them, and that is even less sustainable than gold mines. Far more dollar amount value of electricity is required for a dollar amount of Bitcoin even at today's inflated prices. [Remember there is no real barrier to entry in crypto -- competition is real.]

    Fourth, is Sovereign nations and central banks being hostile to crypto currencies. While Bitcoin is very traceable by design, others are not, and are an ideal way for really rich people to evade the Tsar in Russia or Emperor in China and taxation/extortion demands, or rich industrialists in Europe to make bribes or evade taxes as well. Russia and China are already hostile to crypto currency and are likely to ban it inside their nations -- with the nationwide computerized surveillance network to make it stick.

    Fifth, Crypto is horrifically vulnerable to hack attacks that steal your crypto currencies held in either your own storage or on online exchanges. If Western banks are very bad at security, and they are, they are at least insured up to certain amounts on deposits. Meaning if some crooks drain your account or run up lots of charges (happened to my brother's account on Black Friday) you can get restoration within a reasonable amount of business days. There is no such government backed deposit insurance and fraud regulations around crypto -- meaning as a medium of exchange its not very consumer friendly.

    Where crypto shines is a record of transactions, but those are computationally expensive and slow, meaning as practical matter some database records the initial clearing exchange and the crypto blockchain is updated in the background. Banks and financial institutions are looking at block chain technology as essentially an unhackable ledger of transactions which is very handy indeed for back office operations and reporting but not earth changing.

    Something like Bitcoin is valuable in places with no effective currency such as Venezuela, or subject to bad inflation like Argentina, or subject to embargoes like North Korea or Iran. But that's not a revolution like the internet or personal computer or smart phone.

    Women looking for a big break would be advised to come up with workable general purpose AI that can run on fairly limited hardware without a giant cloud background. Applications in robotics and automation come to mind and whoever can crack it first in the marketplace will make Apple loads of money.

    [Imagine a great working general purpose AI dependent on the cloud running on a medical care robot when it suddenly loses internet connection. You get the idea. This is why driverless cars are not on the market yet -- even network latency is a problem let alone loss of signal.]

    Meaning if some crooks drain your account or run up lots of charges (happened to my brother’s account on Black Friday)

    Whiskey has a brother? What’s his name? Rye?

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Irish.
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  112. There is a hilarious poll near the end of that article, asking whether, Yes, humans should explore other planets or, No, that we’d just destroy them as we did this one.

    After everything the article said against the idea, a whopping 92% (!) of the over 10,000 people who responded answered Yes.

    Hahaha.

    Space colonization will solve a lot of human problems. (But I think space habitats look way more interesting than planets do)

    OT: this story reports on scientists who worry that “space aliens might send messages that worm their way into human society — not to steal our passwords but to bring down our culture.”

    https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/science/should-we-fear-cyberattacks-space-aliens-ncna849941

    I wonder whether anyone has noticed any signs that the space aliens might already have arrived?

    space aliens

    FIFT.

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  113. http://www.singularity2050.com/2010/01/the-misandry-bubble.html

    WOG drops link to transhumanism written by WOG, news at 11.

    Apparently it doesn’t take much to blow your mind.

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  114. @Silva
    Hold on - his code? How do Japanese code differently?

    How do Japanese code differently?

    It’s slanted.

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  115. More of this genuis’ wisdom, written in January of 2018:

    http://www.singularity2050.com/

    The most crude and uninformed arguments against accelerating technological progress are either of a “Word processing is no better than in 1993, so Moore’s Law no longer matters” or “People can’t eat computers, so the progress in their efficiency is useless” nature. However, the improvements in semiconductor and similar technologies endlessly finds ways into previously low-tech products, which is the most inherent ATOM principle.

    Moore’s Law has ended (or gone on a very long hiatus) for CPUs. I just bought a CPU for roughly what I paid for a CPU in 2012; the former is 40% faster than the latter, according to benchmarks (IIRC; I’m definitely in the ballpark). A doubling every 18 months, it ain’t. Moore’s Law was Moore’s (admittedly long-lived) Trend.

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    • Replies: @Thomm
    Swigger,

    Your comment does not rebut the quote you excerpted. You obviously don't even understand his point.

    He did not say that Moore's Law has not ended. He says 'A', and you rebut 'B'.


    You are way, way, way out of your league. You are the epitome of the Dunning-Kruger effect.
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  116. @peterike

    Meaning if some crooks drain your account or run up lots of charges (happened to my brother’s account on Black Friday)

     

    Whiskey has a brother? What's his name? Rye?

    Irish.

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  117. @Steve in Greensboro
    "Fiat works because it is backed not by gold or silver, but by dudes with guns."

    Thought experiment: You want to buy my dining room table and pay me with fiat. I will not accept fiat, but will accept a gold coin. Will the "dudes with guns" drop by and force me to accept the fiat?

    You can see real world examples of how this works in "When Money Dies" by Adam Ferguson.

    I don't think the cryptocurrencies will be what will succeed fiat, but that doesn't mean fiat will survive for much longer. Fiat has been around for only "the blink of an eye" in terms of financial history and given how Central Banks manage it, it won't be around for too much longer (in those terms).

    Thought experiment: You want to buy my dining room table and pay me with fiat. I will not accept fiat …

    For my current dining room table I would accept this Fiat Alfa in Quadrifoglio denomination(s). A little flashy, sure, but whaddaya whaddaya vrrooom vrrooom dat ass.

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    • LOL: wren
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  118. @L Woods

    For what it’s worth
     
    Not much, now that you ask.

    Women choose document review? Is this for real? Could it be that women lawyers are shunted into that horribly tedious-sounding role?
     
    The horror of comparative advantage strikes again.

    You sound like a swell guy.

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  119. @Thomm
    You are right. Read 'The Misandry Bubble', within which there is a section called 'The Fabric of Humanity Will Tear'. It blew my mind when I read it :

    http://www.singularity2050.com/2010/01/the-misandry-bubble.html

    This overvaluation of women could get reversed, for the first time ever in human existence.

    I generally enjoy what I’ve read at The Futurist though I don’t think iVe read this particular essay, so I am taking a look at it now. Thank you.

    I expect I will agree with what seems to be the main thesis. As I have written myself in these very comments before, the harpies are going to get what they seek, good and hard, when they are again reduced to chattel for warlords come the downfall of civilisation they so desperately strive for. Ghengis, Xerxes, Shaka, Hammurabi, Atilla, and whatever variation of Immortan Joe or Mustafa Mond comes down the pike – none gave nor will give a hoot in Hell about putting women on a pedestal. Oh, sure, they’ll be valued, the same as I value my motorcycle, my firearms, and my skis – the thing is, I don’t give a damn about whether those things are happy in their service to me, and if and when they wear out or I tire of them, they are cast off; at best, they are traded up for newer models. Whatever different treatment women have received has been a mere anomalous blip in the great scheme of things, the millennia of relations between the sexes….

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  120. @Jack D
    When was the last time you spoke to a telephone operator?

    Actually, speaking of telephone operators and having interacted with them when I was six, you have just reminded me of one of my favorite songs from that age :

    Needless to say, modern feminists would get quite triggered at seeing the ‘harassment’ contained therein.

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  121. @Silva
    Hold on - his code? How do Japanese code differently?

    I don’t know about Satoshi in particular, but I’ve read foreign code and all the variables are in the foreign language, e.g. windowNumber = 5 in English vs. fensterNummer = 5 in German

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  122. @Svigor
    More of this genuis' wisdom, written in January of 2018:

    http://www.singularity2050.com/

    The most crude and uninformed arguments against accelerating technological progress are either of a "Word processing is no better than in 1993, so Moore's Law no longer matters" or "People can't eat computers, so the progress in their efficiency is useless" nature. However, the improvements in semiconductor and similar technologies endlessly finds ways into previously low-tech products, which is the most inherent ATOM principle.
     
    Moore's Law has ended (or gone on a very long hiatus) for CPUs. I just bought a CPU for roughly what I paid for a CPU in 2012; the former is 40% faster than the latter, according to benchmarks (IIRC; I'm definitely in the ballpark). A doubling every 18 months, it ain't. Moore's Law was Moore's (admittedly long-lived) Trend.

    Swigger,

    Your comment does not rebut the quote you excerpted. You obviously don’t even understand his point.

    He did not say that Moore’s Law has not ended. He says ‘A’, and you rebut ‘B’.

    You are way, way, way out of your league. You are the epitome of the Dunning-Kruger effect.

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  123. @Jack D
    Women are actually very good at these needlework type tasks that require attention to detail and following a set of detailed instructions. Men get bored, their minds wander, they start to improvise and take shortcuts (some of the shortcuts lead to breakthrus but most don't), they fall asleep, start to play pranks on each other to relieve the boredom, etc.

    One of the earliest developments in the steam engine was (at least according to legend) invented by a little kid. In those days crude and slow steam engines were used to dewater coal mines and the valves to allow steam into and out of the cylinders were manually controlled by a little kid whose job it was to stand there all day and open and close the valves over and over again all day. Some kid figured out that he could rig up a bunch of strings and pulleys, etc. and use the motion of the engine itself to open and close the valves so he could read comic books (or whatever kids in 18th century England did with their free time) while the engine did its thing. A woman would have just dutifully done what she was told to do.

    We are told, elsewhere, that it is a fable that ‘boys’ were used to operate the valves:

    The most popular fable arose when a writer was told that the valves were regulated by a buoy-which was the term for a float actuator. In some versions of the story, this was interpreted to mean that a “boy” was manipulating the valves and this misinformation has been immortalized. Tales are still told raising this (probably) nonexistent boy to the same status as Jack in the story about the beanstalk. He has even been given a name, Humphry Potter, and we are informed that he invented valve actuators by tying strings to the valves because he was too lazy to cycle them manually.

    http://ethw.org/Thomas_Newcomen_and_the_Steam_Engine

    That does not negate the other part of your claim that men tend to get bored of routine work.

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  124. That means the budding world is already in danger of looking like the rest of the technology industry,

    Look at the normality of hysteria. An aspect of the technology field is in danger of resembling the technology field. See also “the crisis of capitalism.”

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  125. Your comment does not rebut the quote you excerpted. You obviously don’t even understand his point.

    You twit, it obviates the term he was throwing around, which is obsolete, an historical relic.

    His writing is too boring and bloated to be interesting enough to refute.

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    • Agree: silviosilver
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  126. @sabril
    I agree, but as I mentioned in my last comment, we also need to pay attention to the issue of risk. Of the men (and women) who get involved early in a new disruptive technology, less than 10% will succeed in a big way. And of the 90% who don't, a substantial percentage will have worked night and day for years and end up having totally wasted their time.

    Probably there are hundreds of guys like Mark Zuckerberg, Jeff Bezos, etc. with comparable products that failed for one reason or another, often just due to bad luck.

    Feminists want women to enjoy the benefits reaped by these guys without having taken the risks faced by all of the failures. Which in fact women can do -- by marrying rich tech guys -- but feminists think it's horrific for women to assume a traditional role.

    No, It’s that they’ll marry a guy, instead of a nice lesbian gender studies professor.

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  127. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    Women are actually very good at these needlework type tasks that require attention to detail and following a set of detailed instructions. Men get bored, their minds wander, they start to improvise and take shortcuts (some of the shortcuts lead to breakthrus but most don't), they fall asleep, start to play pranks on each other to relieve the boredom, etc.

    One of the earliest developments in the steam engine was (at least according to legend) invented by a little kid. In those days crude and slow steam engines were used to dewater coal mines and the valves to allow steam into and out of the cylinders were manually controlled by a little kid whose job it was to stand there all day and open and close the valves over and over again all day. Some kid figured out that he could rig up a bunch of strings and pulleys, etc. and use the motion of the engine itself to open and close the valves so he could read comic books (or whatever kids in 18th century England did with their free time) while the engine did its thing. A woman would have just dutifully done what she was told to do.

    The electronics industry uses almost exclusively women for assembly, rework and automated test operation. Look at any picture of consuler , industrial, commercial or military electronics production, it’s been all female since the twenties.

    They rarely get the idea to move up to the next level, technician, or the one above that, engineer. Female techs are mostly vo-tech types looking for ‘something different’ or trying to feed a family post-divorce: female engineers are occasionally lesbians but much more frequently Quinn Dunki tomboy types whose daddies wanted a boy but only had girls. So one of the girls becomes the substitute son. Or they are flunkee mathematicians or in one case I know a woman that got kicked out of pharmacy school (actually, not kicked out, but told she was unlicensable, for her involvement in a casino scam).

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  128. @Peripatetic commenter
    It seems assemblers were old hat by then (1958):

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Nathaniel_Rochester_(computer_scientist)

    She did it in 1947, so gets the credit in Wikipedia.

    Use of assembly language[edit]

    Historical perspective[edit]

    Assembly languages, and the use of the word assembly, date to the introduction of the stored-program computer. The first assembly language was developed in 1947 by Kathleen Booth for the ARC2 at Birkbeck, University of London following work with John von Neumann and Herman Goldstine at the Institute for Advanced Study.[20][21] The Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator (EDSAC) had an assembler called initial orders featuring one-letter mnemonics in 1949.[22] SOAP (Symbolic Optimal Assembly Program) was an assembly language for the IBM 650 computer written by Stan Poley in 1955.[23]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assembly_language#Historical_perspective

    She later got a PhD in math and the fact that she visited von Neumann in the US to work with him shows that she probably knew what she was doing.

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    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter
    Only a mere neophyte (or other word that starts with M) relies on Wikipedia.

    I did a search and found the following:

    * http://www.edwardbosworth.com/My3121Textbook_HTM/MyText3121_Ch01_V01.htm which credits Wilkes, Wheeler and Gill with the invention of Assembly language.

    * https://www.thocp.net/timeline/1947.htm which claimed that Univac introduced the first assembler

    * http://www.thocp.net/biographies/wheeler_david.htm which credits Wheeler with helping to develop assembly language

    Perhaps more importantly, I found this book by Andrew D Booth and Kathleen H. V. Booth, Automatic Digital Calculators: https://archive.org/details/AutomaticDigitalCalculators

    That seems to be the third edition, published in '65, however, it has introductions from '53 nd '55.

    While it uses mnemonics for instructions, there is no mention of assemblers. However, it does mention an interpreter and the Fortran compiler, and I assume they were added in the third edition.

    Frankly, I think you are guilty of wanting to believe in Wakanda!

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  129. @Steve in Greensboro
    "Fiat works because it is backed not by gold or silver, but by dudes with guns."

    Thought experiment: You want to buy my dining room table and pay me with fiat. I will not accept fiat, but will accept a gold coin. Will the "dudes with guns" drop by and force me to accept the fiat?

    You can see real world examples of how this works in "When Money Dies" by Adam Ferguson.

    I don't think the cryptocurrencies will be what will succeed fiat, but that doesn't mean fiat will survive for much longer. Fiat has been around for only "the blink of an eye" in terms of financial history and given how Central Banks manage it, it won't be around for too much longer (in those terms).

    Thought experiment: You want to buy my dining room table and pay me with fiat. I will not accept fiat, but will accept a gold coin. Will the “dudes with guns” drop by and force me to accept the fiat?

    Nah, because barter (table for gold) is legal. In fact it’s also legal to create and use your own fiat currencies, as some local municipalities have done.

    However if you turn a profit selling your table for gold, the IRS claims a right to part of that income, and they want to be paid in dollars. Also if there is some problem with the transaction and one side sues the other for breach of contract, damages will be awarded in dollars, and must be paid in dollars.

    So I suppose you could de-dollarize, if you’re OK with never having income, and being ripped off all the time.

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  130. @Thomas

    Do you genuinely believe you going to replace all that with some computer code?
     
    Yes, at least until the Chinese or somebody else develop quantum computing far enough to crack public-key cryptography. Fiat currencies work because of a massive (and massively expensive) investment by the government in force. Cryptocurrencies work based on the algorithms, and on nobody being able to gain control over more than 50% of the servers. Math and code are a lot more reliable, not to mention a lot cheaper, than hundreds of billions invested in "defense" and law enforcement.

    Keep in mind that fiat currency has only been dominant for less than 50 years, since the U.S. ended convertibility of dollars to gold in 1971, two years before public-key cryptography was invented.

    Satoshi is definitely white and probably American because this is not how the Japanese roll.
     
    Pretty much everyone who's read him and looked at his code agrees he's not Japanese.

    We know Satoshi isn’t Indian either. No Indian would want to be anonymous. Incidentally there is not a single Indian behind any fundamental idea in crypto. But you can bet Indians will arrive just in time to take credit.

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  131. @Maciano
    Your comment shows you really don't know anything about bitcoin. In every thread on crypto I've seen ppl like you.

    I stopped being annoyed by it, bc unlike issues like third world immigration, it matters for your personal wealth to not get crypto. So pls, get left behind. Stick with dollars, stocks , gold.

    Well, if you develop a cryptocurrency that dominates some niche, even a small one, a fortune will be made. If you invent a cryptocurrency that ends up used only for trading powder cocaine from three small towns in Columbia you will still become quite rich.

    But I’m talking about the bigger picture. Currency facilitates trade. The thing that makes a currency ‘good’ is that its value is stable with respect to real physical goods and services. A dozen eggs costs about the same in dollars as it did last year. This is good. A dozen eggs costs a very different amount of bitcoin compared to last year. This is bad. Any rational person will see this and want to trade in dollars and not bitcoin. What use is bitcoin if it does not facilitate trade?

    A dozen eggs costs the same as it did last year in dollars because the central bank is constantly fine tuning the amount of money in circulation, either by printing more of it, or removing it from circulation and burning it (this used to be literally true but I’m not sure if it still is.) Like it or not, centralized authority is what keeps prices stable. There is zero evidence to date that a decentralized cryptocurrency system can maintain price stability.

    I know this is the sort of site where people love to rag on central banks, but here is a list of things that I have not experienced in my lifetime that happened with some frequency in the 19th – early 20th century:

    1.) Bank run
    2.) Typhoid
    3.) Lost savings due to bank failure
    4.) Polio
    5.) Hyperinflation
    6.) Child labor
    7.) Deflation making a manageable debt into a crushing debt (crucified on a cross of gold!)
    8.) Pellagra, beriberi
    9.) Paper currency becoming worthless (hello, CSA!)
    10.) Rickets

    1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 have gone the way of polio due to improvements in the technology of central banking, although like polio they can still be found in Africa.

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    • Replies: @SimpleSong
    Expanding on my earlier thread, we've already had a decentralized currency system and it sucked. It was called 'gold'. Just as today anyone can rig up a cryptocurrency miner and expand the supply of a cryptocurrency, back then anyone could dig a mine and attempt to expand the supply of gold. Crazy, right? I mean obviously that's a dumb system but let's just talk about why.

    One day farmer Joe took out a small loan of 10 pieces of gold to buy a piece of farm equipment, that he could easily pay off in a few seasons. A very responsible investment of the type that grows the economy. But then gold production wasn't able to keep pace with economic expansion and the value of gold spiked. Deflation. Now farmer Joe's income for an entire year is 10 pieces of gold and that debt is totally ruinous. Even though he actually made very reasonable, responsible economic decisions he is ruined because the production of a mine in god knows where petered out.

    Now take another citizen, carpenter John. After a long career carpenter John has ten pieces of gold under his mattress, and instead of just hoarding it, wants to loan it to his nephew to buy a new house. His nephew is quite honest and will pay it back with interest, and John will use the interest to support himself in retirement. Unfortunately, right after he makes the loan, gold is discovered in California and the supply of gold spikes. Gold becomes less valuable. Inflation. Now ten pieces of gold, with interest, won't come close to supporting an individual in retirement. Carpenter John starves to death, despite a lifetime of working and saving.

    These suboptimal outcomes are why a gold standard makes no sense. In a fiat currency system with a central bank, the bank would either add (in the first case) or remove (in the second case) currency from circulation to keep prices stable, and John and Joe would still be with us.

    Now, in a totally anarchic, low trust society, with a non-functional government, fiat currency ain't gonna work, and sure, gold as money is better than nothing. Cryptocurrency is like a pseudo-gold; it has all the disadvantages of gold for trade, but because it relies on a stable electrical power supply and the internet, unlike gold it is not useful in the event of state collapse. It also has no intrinsic value, unlike gold which is a useful metal. I mean it is just comical how poorly thought out this is.

    Now if you are going outside the State, a.k.a. doing something illegal, then cryptocurrency makes as much sense as anything. Bottles of detergent are sometimes used for exchange in these situations as well--maybe you could make a crypto backed by bottles of detergent? There is actually a ton of money in black markets so I am certainly not saying you won't get rich. I wish you luck facilitating the trade of fentanyl and cocaine.

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  132. @Thomas

    Do you genuinely believe you going to replace all that with some computer code?
     
    Yes, at least until the Chinese or somebody else develop quantum computing far enough to crack public-key cryptography. Fiat currencies work because of a massive (and massively expensive) investment by the government in force. Cryptocurrencies work based on the algorithms, and on nobody being able to gain control over more than 50% of the servers. Math and code are a lot more reliable, not to mention a lot cheaper, than hundreds of billions invested in "defense" and law enforcement.

    Keep in mind that fiat currency has only been dominant for less than 50 years, since the U.S. ended convertibility of dollars to gold in 1971, two years before public-key cryptography was invented.

    Satoshi is definitely white and probably American because this is not how the Japanese roll.
     
    Pretty much everyone who's read him and looked at his code agrees he's not Japanese.

    Fiat currencies work because of a massive (and massively expensive) investment by the government in force.

    Replace ‘fiat currency’ with ‘States’. That is what the state is: an entity that claims a monopoly on violence within some territory. As Mao put it, political power comes from the barrel of a gun. The local currency, like the legal system, the military, etc. is just an appendage of the state. You are not going to create a new parallel currency that the state doesn’t like any more than you are going to create a new parallel legal system or military that the state doesn’t like. If you want to create a new currency you might as well just go for a complete coup.

    Cryptocurrencies work based on the algorithms, and on nobody being able to gain control over more than 50% of the servers.

    Of course that would never happen. It would be unthinkable, like a country managing to place its entire domestic internet behind a censorious great firewall.

    Math and code are a lot more reliable, not to mention a lot cheaper, than hundreds of billions invested

    That money is not invested as there is no return on it. That is the overhead cost of running a state and it does not go away if you change the local currency.

    in “defense” and law enforcement.

    Which is all totally unnecessary and can be replaced by some Java. For example the Sicilian Mafia has a lot of success enforcing their contracts because their algorithms are top-notch.

    Keep in mind that fiat currency has only been dominant for less than 50 years, since the U.S. ended convertibility of dollars to gold in 1971, two years before public-key cryptography was invented.

    Recently dominant, yes, now that all the kinks are worked out, but paper currency goes back to the Tang dynasty; and as pointed out up the thread, historically precious metal coins were a sort of ‘soft’ or ‘halfway’ fiat currency enforced by the state.

    TL;DR, I get the impression you grew up in a really safe neighborhood.

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  133. @Anonymous
    Women, by definition, go toward rote, predictable, repetitive jobs.

    I think you’re making some pretty broad generalizations. Women can be pretty crafty and good at strategizing to achieve their goals, whether those goals be personal or professional.

    Women can be pretty crafty and good at strategizing to achieve their goals, whether those goals be personal or professional.

    Not any more than a child is crafty and good at convincing his parents to buy him a certain toy for Christmas. Which is to say that he is somewhat crafty and good at strategizing, but the main thing is that the parents care a great deal about the child.

    In the same way, men are programmed to seek validation from women, especially young women. This is reflected a wider society which bends over backwards to accommodate, protect, please, pander to, and pamper women. So that with a little bit of craftiness and strategizing, a woman can leverage this to get what she wants. But we shouldn’t make the mistake of comparing her accomplishments to the accomplishments of a typical young man who starts off with society not giving a s*** about him.

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  134. @Thomm

    When was the last time you spoke to a telephone operator?
     
    I may have when I was six, but I am not sure. Certainly not post-1986 or so.

    Now, a lot of people say that male jobs (truckdriver, forklift operator) are more vulnerable, but I disagree about the aggregate. Women, by definition, go toward rote, predictable, repetitive jobs. Those, by definition, are the most easy to automate. Even among lawyers, the courtroom arguments are done by men, and female lawyers do document review, etc. Guess which is more easy to automate?

    Most female jobs are make-work anyway. If AI is about zapping low-productivity jobs, then women have a lot more to worry about than men.

    Most female jobs are make-work anyway. If AI is about zapping low-productivity jobs, then women have a lot more to worry about than men.

    I think it’s a bit early to say. Consider the job of “doorman at a fancy building.” At a lot of Manhattan buildings, this guy’s main job is literally to open the door for people. (There is a desk clerk who actually signs people in and out of the building; signs for packages, etc.)

    This is one of the easiest jobs to automate and yet it is one of the safest jobs from automation. Because people love the status boost that comes from having a well-dressed real person open the door for them and say “good morning.” People love the feeling of giving him a fat tip at Christmas for a job well done.

    For more middle-class guys like me, it’s really nice to go to a bar and have a pretty girl in her 20s wearing a little skirt bringing me my beer and nachos. A lot of jobs for women are like that — it’s not openly stated, but the woman’s real job is to let her male boss have the nice feeling that comes from having a subordinate woman at his beck and call.

    So I could easily envision a future where pretty much all jobs are automated and most of the remaining jobs are for women.

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  135. @Abe

    Yeah, woman-up and invest in some digitial-tulip-based currency that Alexia Bonatsos is flogging. Alexia needs some suckers.
     
    At the intersection of extreme hype and a large, intellectually subpar customer-base, great fortunes can be made. OK, not great, but good enough for a mansion with a swimming pool and a McLaren F1 parked out front by the time it all blows up.

    Enter:

    BLACK-CHAIN!
    WAKANDA-COIN!

    Don't you wanna invest in the King of crypto-currencies... brutha?

    Enter:

    BLACK-CHAIN!

    Good name, but – whoa, now – that’s a little too insensitive. Dick Durbin might be offended.

    Bling-Coin.

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  136. @sabril

    The logical conclusion is that women are inherently inferior when it comes to complicated quantitative subjects.
     
    Either that or women are naturally risk averse. Which is a nice way of saying that they are genetically programmed to sit on the sidelines and fall in love with the winners. In general, I think more needs to be said about the risks men take. What percentage of failed startups had men as their founders? Is this a gap that needs to be closed? Is our society better off if more women start spending 5 or 10 of the best years of their lives on startups which turn out to have been a complete waste of time and money?

    By the way, this reminds me of an article I read a couple weeks ago arguing that people should show their support for Trump by buying Bitcoin. Basically it seems people who have already invested are on a search for Greater Fools.

    This is the impression that I get from current (over the last year or so) enthusiasts.

    I wish I had gotten in early, obviously. I didn’t. The current sales pitch makes me want to stay far away.

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  137. Anything that prevents women from getting their hands on men’s money is sexist.

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    • Agree: Thomm
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  138. @SimpleSong
    Well, if you develop a cryptocurrency that dominates some niche, even a small one, a fortune will be made. If you invent a cryptocurrency that ends up used only for trading powder cocaine from three small towns in Columbia you will still become quite rich.

    But I'm talking about the bigger picture. Currency facilitates trade. The thing that makes a currency 'good' is that its value is stable with respect to real physical goods and services. A dozen eggs costs about the same in dollars as it did last year. This is good. A dozen eggs costs a very different amount of bitcoin compared to last year. This is bad. Any rational person will see this and want to trade in dollars and not bitcoin. What use is bitcoin if it does not facilitate trade?

    A dozen eggs costs the same as it did last year in dollars because the central bank is constantly fine tuning the amount of money in circulation, either by printing more of it, or removing it from circulation and burning it (this used to be literally true but I'm not sure if it still is.) Like it or not, centralized authority is what keeps prices stable. There is zero evidence to date that a decentralized cryptocurrency system can maintain price stability.

    I know this is the sort of site where people love to rag on central banks, but here is a list of things that I have not experienced in my lifetime that happened with some frequency in the 19th - early 20th century:

    1.) Bank run
    2.) Typhoid
    3.) Lost savings due to bank failure
    4.) Polio
    5.) Hyperinflation
    6.) Child labor
    7.) Deflation making a manageable debt into a crushing debt (crucified on a cross of gold!)
    8.) Pellagra, beriberi
    9.) Paper currency becoming worthless (hello, CSA!)
    10.) Rickets

    1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 have gone the way of polio due to improvements in the technology of central banking, although like polio they can still be found in Africa.

    Expanding on my earlier thread, we’ve already had a decentralized currency system and it sucked. It was called ‘gold’. Just as today anyone can rig up a cryptocurrency miner and expand the supply of a cryptocurrency, back then anyone could dig a mine and attempt to expand the supply of gold. Crazy, right? I mean obviously that’s a dumb system but let’s just talk about why.

    One day farmer Joe took out a small loan of 10 pieces of gold to buy a piece of farm equipment, that he could easily pay off in a few seasons. A very responsible investment of the type that grows the economy. But then gold production wasn’t able to keep pace with economic expansion and the value of gold spiked. Deflation. Now farmer Joe’s income for an entire year is 10 pieces of gold and that debt is totally ruinous. Even though he actually made very reasonable, responsible economic decisions he is ruined because the production of a mine in god knows where petered out.

    Now take another citizen, carpenter John. After a long career carpenter John has ten pieces of gold under his mattress, and instead of just hoarding it, wants to loan it to his nephew to buy a new house. His nephew is quite honest and will pay it back with interest, and John will use the interest to support himself in retirement. Unfortunately, right after he makes the loan, gold is discovered in California and the supply of gold spikes. Gold becomes less valuable. Inflation. Now ten pieces of gold, with interest, won’t come close to supporting an individual in retirement. Carpenter John starves to death, despite a lifetime of working and saving.

    These suboptimal outcomes are why a gold standard makes no sense. In a fiat currency system with a central bank, the bank would either add (in the first case) or remove (in the second case) currency from circulation to keep prices stable, and John and Joe would still be with us.

    Now, in a totally anarchic, low trust society, with a non-functional government, fiat currency ain’t gonna work, and sure, gold as money is better than nothing. Cryptocurrency is like a pseudo-gold; it has all the disadvantages of gold for trade, but because it relies on a stable electrical power supply and the internet, unlike gold it is not useful in the event of state collapse. It also has no intrinsic value, unlike gold which is a useful metal. I mean it is just comical how poorly thought out this is.

    Now if you are going outside the State, a.k.a. doing something illegal, then cryptocurrency makes as much sense as anything. Bottles of detergent are sometimes used for exchange in these situations as well–maybe you could make a crypto backed by bottles of detergent? There is actually a ton of money in black markets so I am certainly not saying you won’t get rich. I wish you luck facilitating the trade of fentanyl and cocaine.

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  139. So I could easily envision a future where pretty much all jobs are automated and most of the remaining jobs are for women.

    You are assuming all women are young, attractive women. Those are only a small fraction of the adult female population.

    Beyond that, you are assuming that businesses will waste a lot of money on needless jobs. This only happens in very rare instances (such as the doorman you mention). There is certainly no chance of this being wholesale across the entire economy (where all jobs are automated and only women have make-work jobs).

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    • Replies: @sabril

    You are assuming all women are young, attractive women.
     
    "Most jobs are for women" is not the same as "Most women have jobs"

    Beyond that, you are assuming that businesses will waste a lot of money on needless jobs. This only happens in very rare instances (such as the doorman you mention)
     
    I disagree, it happens frequently even in today's economy. If customers are willing to pay for services they don't actually need, businesses will have a tendency to try to satisfy such demands by hiring people to do needless jobs.
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  140. @Jim Don Bob

    And yes, the churches are utterly worthless.
     
    Yep. The latest local Catholic Herald, published by a supposedly conservative Catholic diocese, urged Catholics to support DACA.

    Do you not see there’s a particular reason why the Catholic churches would support DACA or other immigration schemes that benefit those from Latin America?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Other than that Catholic Charities makes a lot of money in the immigration racket, no.

    So, please. Enlighten me.
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  141. @Fredrik
    Do you not see there's a particular reason why the Catholic churches would support DACA or other immigration schemes that benefit those from Latin America?

    Other than that Catholic Charities makes a lot of money in the immigration racket, no.

    So, please. Enlighten me.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Fredrik
    I suppose you're trying to make a point by refusing to acknowledge that Mexicans are Catholics but such things rarely work on the internet.
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  142. @wren
    She did it in 1947, so gets the credit in Wikipedia.

    Use of assembly language[edit]

    Historical perspective[edit]

    Assembly languages, and the use of the word assembly, date to the introduction of the stored-program computer. The first assembly language was developed in 1947 by Kathleen Booth for the ARC2 at Birkbeck, University of London following work with John von Neumann and Herman Goldstine at the Institute for Advanced Study.[20][21] The Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator (EDSAC) had an assembler called initial orders featuring one-letter mnemonics in 1949.[22] SOAP (Symbolic Optimal Assembly Program) was an assembly language for the IBM 650 computer written by Stan Poley in 1955.[23]
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assembly_language#Historical_perspective

    She later got a PhD in math and the fact that she visited von Neumann in the US to work with him shows that she probably knew what she was doing.

    Only a mere neophyte (or other word that starts with M) relies on Wikipedia.

    I did a search and found the following:

    * http://www.edwardbosworth.com/My3121Textbook_HTM/MyText3121_Ch01_V01.htm which credits Wilkes, Wheeler and Gill with the invention of Assembly language.

    * https://www.thocp.net/timeline/1947.htm which claimed that Univac introduced the first assembler

    * http://www.thocp.net/biographies/wheeler_david.htm which credits Wheeler with helping to develop assembly language

    Perhaps more importantly, I found this book by Andrew D Booth and Kathleen H. V. Booth, Automatic Digital Calculators: https://archive.org/details/AutomaticDigitalCalculators

    That seems to be the third edition, published in ’65, however, it has introductions from ’53 nd ’55.

    While it uses mnemonics for instructions, there is no mention of assemblers. However, it does mention an interpreter and the Fortran compiler, and I assume they were added in the third edition.

    Frankly, I think you are guilty of wanting to believe in Wakanda!

    Read More
    • Replies: @sabril
    Yeah, most inventions are the result of the work of dozens or hundreds of people. The SJW game is to find a woman or non-white who was peripherally involved and claim that they are the main inventor. They write articles about it and then try to get their propaganda into Wikipedia.

    So whenever someone claims that something was invented by a woman, a black person, etc., I am extremely skeptical. SJWs are the real cultural thieves.
    , @wren
    Wheeler worked on the EDSAC, which started operating in May, 1949, right?

    After working with von Neumann with the ENIAC, Britten wrote a short paper (Coding for the ARC) about programming the computer her future husband was building, the ARC (Automatic Relay Computer). This computer contained the world's first hard drive, as I understand it.

    I can not find the "Coding for the ARC" paper, but did find a brief paper they wrote together about it, from 1947. I don't know if this is the same paper.

    http://mt-archive.info/Booth-1947.pdf

    Notice section 0.4 "The Input and the Output" where they describe "the programming, by the machine of its own conversions."

    The ARC first started operating in May, 1948, using these "conversions," so that the input did not need to be made in binary digits.

    That's a year before Wheeler's computer.

    If you have issues with this, perhaps you could spearhead an effort to change the numerous Wikipedia articles about assembly language and computer language that credit Booth, not to mention other articles.

    For example, here is another:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_programming_languages

    Wilkes and Booth both show up there.
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  143. @Jim Don Bob
    Other than that Catholic Charities makes a lot of money in the immigration racket, no.

    So, please. Enlighten me.

    I suppose you’re trying to make a point by refusing to acknowledge that Mexicans are Catholics but such things rarely work on the internet.

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  144. @Thomm

    So I could easily envision a future where pretty much all jobs are automated and most of the remaining jobs are for women.
     
    You are assuming all women are young, attractive women. Those are only a small fraction of the adult female population.

    Beyond that, you are assuming that businesses will waste a lot of money on needless jobs. This only happens in very rare instances (such as the doorman you mention). There is certainly no chance of this being wholesale across the entire economy (where all jobs are automated and only women have make-work jobs).

    You are assuming all women are young, attractive women.

    “Most jobs are for women” is not the same as “Most women have jobs”

    Beyond that, you are assuming that businesses will waste a lot of money on needless jobs. This only happens in very rare instances (such as the doorman you mention)

    I disagree, it happens frequently even in today’s economy. If customers are willing to pay for services they don’t actually need, businesses will have a tendency to try to satisfy such demands by hiring people to do needless jobs.

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  145. @Peripatetic commenter
    Only a mere neophyte (or other word that starts with M) relies on Wikipedia.

    I did a search and found the following:

    * http://www.edwardbosworth.com/My3121Textbook_HTM/MyText3121_Ch01_V01.htm which credits Wilkes, Wheeler and Gill with the invention of Assembly language.

    * https://www.thocp.net/timeline/1947.htm which claimed that Univac introduced the first assembler

    * http://www.thocp.net/biographies/wheeler_david.htm which credits Wheeler with helping to develop assembly language

    Perhaps more importantly, I found this book by Andrew D Booth and Kathleen H. V. Booth, Automatic Digital Calculators: https://archive.org/details/AutomaticDigitalCalculators

    That seems to be the third edition, published in '65, however, it has introductions from '53 nd '55.

    While it uses mnemonics for instructions, there is no mention of assemblers. However, it does mention an interpreter and the Fortran compiler, and I assume they were added in the third edition.

    Frankly, I think you are guilty of wanting to believe in Wakanda!

    Yeah, most inventions are the result of the work of dozens or hundreds of people. The SJW game is to find a woman or non-white who was peripherally involved and claim that they are the main inventor. They write articles about it and then try to get their propaganda into Wikipedia.

    So whenever someone claims that something was invented by a woman, a black person, etc., I am extremely skeptical. SJWs are the real cultural thieves.

    Read More
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  146. @sabril

    The logical conclusion is that women are inherently inferior when it comes to complicated quantitative subjects.
     
    Either that or women are naturally risk averse. Which is a nice way of saying that they are genetically programmed to sit on the sidelines and fall in love with the winners. In general, I think more needs to be said about the risks men take. What percentage of failed startups had men as their founders? Is this a gap that needs to be closed? Is our society better off if more women start spending 5 or 10 of the best years of their lives on startups which turn out to have been a complete waste of time and money?

    By the way, this reminds me of an article I read a couple weeks ago arguing that people should show their support for Trump by buying Bitcoin. Basically it seems people who have already invested are on a search for Greater Fools.

    A Formula 1 official got in trouble a few years ago for saying that women are inherently too cautious to win in F1.

    It’s funny that the motor sports of the proles, NASCAR and NHRA, have had women racing and, in drag racing, succeeding.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brittany_Force

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Courtney_Force

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashley_Force_Hood

    Pretty impressive, huh? Why are they so successful?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Force

    He’s the 68-year old Force having a bad day at the office.

    https://jalopnik.com/nhra-legend-john-force-released-from-hospital-after-bru-1823326160

    His opponent miraculously saved him from further carnage by hitting the brakes/chutes in time.

    Here’s how daughter Brittany started the season.

    It all dovetails quite nicely with iSteve tropes. The girls got the skills and the balls-out gene from Daddy, and nobody told them that they couldn’t do it.

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  147. @Peripatetic commenter
    Only a mere neophyte (or other word that starts with M) relies on Wikipedia.

    I did a search and found the following:

    * http://www.edwardbosworth.com/My3121Textbook_HTM/MyText3121_Ch01_V01.htm which credits Wilkes, Wheeler and Gill with the invention of Assembly language.

    * https://www.thocp.net/timeline/1947.htm which claimed that Univac introduced the first assembler

    * http://www.thocp.net/biographies/wheeler_david.htm which credits Wheeler with helping to develop assembly language

    Perhaps more importantly, I found this book by Andrew D Booth and Kathleen H. V. Booth, Automatic Digital Calculators: https://archive.org/details/AutomaticDigitalCalculators

    That seems to be the third edition, published in '65, however, it has introductions from '53 nd '55.

    While it uses mnemonics for instructions, there is no mention of assemblers. However, it does mention an interpreter and the Fortran compiler, and I assume they were added in the third edition.

    Frankly, I think you are guilty of wanting to believe in Wakanda!

    Wheeler worked on the EDSAC, which started operating in May, 1949, right?

    After working with von Neumann with the ENIAC, Britten wrote a short paper (Coding for the ARC) about programming the computer her future husband was building, the ARC (Automatic Relay Computer). This computer contained the world’s first hard drive, as I understand it.

    I can not find the “Coding for the ARC” paper, but did find a brief paper they wrote together about it, from 1947. I don’t know if this is the same paper.

    http://mt-archive.info/Booth-1947.pdf

    Notice section 0.4 “The Input and the Output” where they describe “the programming, by the machine of its own conversions.”

    The ARC first started operating in May, 1948, using these “conversions,” so that the input did not need to be made in binary digits.

    That’s a year before Wheeler’s computer.

    If you have issues with this, perhaps you could spearhead an effort to change the numerous Wikipedia articles about assembly language and computer language that credit Booth, not to mention other articles.

    For example, here is another:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_programming_languages

    Wilkes and Booth both show up there.

    Read More
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