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NYT Complains Trump Doesn't Submit to the Narrative: "Under His Presidency, the American Dream Would be Primarily Reserved for Americans."
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From the New York Times:

For Trump, an America That Is Not a Nation of Nations
By JULIA PRESTON JULY 22, 2016

With all the political orthodoxy that Donald J. Trump tore up in his convention speech on Thursday night, he set aside a core tenet of the American narrative on immigration: that the United States is a nation of nations, built on the sweat and initiative of people who came from other countries.

Using even darker language than he had on the campaign trail, Mr. Trump did not include even a boilerplate mention of positive contributions by immigrants. He described foreigners who came to the United States illegally and became killers of American citizens and drug dealers. More forcefully than he had before, Mr. Trump said he would also impose new restrictions on legal immigration to protect American workers from lower-paid competition in the labor market.

Under his presidency, the American dream would be primarily reserved for Americans.

I can’t even.

“The American people will come first once again,” he said.

Wow. Just. Wow.

Trump’s Anti-American Hate Rhetoric is obviously modeled on Nazi documents like this one:

We the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

As we all know, that’s Not Who We Are.

Oh, wait … never mind …

Back to the NYT:

Historians and legal scholars struggled to recall when a presidential candidate had departed so radically from the traditional view that America’s welcome for immigrants was a prime reason for its exceptional innovation and prosperity.

But if you keep repeating The Narrative over and over for enough decades, it can be shocking when some heretic doesn’t bow down to it.

Seriously, as I’ve mentioned before, I’m old enough to remember before The Narrative became “the traditional view that America’s welcome for immigrants was a prime reason for its exceptional innovation and prosperity.” From watching cowboy movies in the 1960s, I absorbed the previous Narrative that the pioneering spirit of the settlers was a prime reason for its exceptional innovation and prosperity.

That slowly began to change during the 1970s as cowboy movies faded and gangster movies rose. You can see a ham-handed early attempt to retcon American history to make Ellis Island immigrants central in the late Michael Cimino’s 1980 cocaine-fueled cowboy epic Heaven’s Gate,

in which Wyoming is inexplicably full of vast columns of trudging Old World huddled masses:

Where are they going? Why are they in the middle of nowhere?

Martin Scorsese tried to pull off a similar ethnocentric rewrite of American history in his 2002 big-budget Gangs of New York. As I wrote in my review in VDARE:

By churning out countless Westerns in the mid-20th Century, Hollywood helped validate the idea that America was made by settlers, especially the cowboys of the Great Plains.

Around 1970, however, some brilliant young Italian-American directors and actors such as Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, Al Pacino, and Robert De Niro asserted a new vision of American history. America, they implied, was made not by settlers, but by Catholic and Jewish immigrants, especially the gangsters of the big cities.

Gangster movies had long been popular for the same reasons as cowboy movies: both mobsters and frontiersmen live in a Hobbesian state of nature, beyond the reaches of the law. Their life is thus full of interest.

But the notion that 20th Century urban gangsters were central to American identity probably never occurred to anybody before “The Godfather” films. Obviously, America had been around for a long, long time before Lucky Luciano got off the boat from Sicily. Indeed, historian David Hackett Fischer’s great book Albion`s Seed: Four British Folkways in America shows how much of American culture was transplanted intact from Britain in the 17th Century. Much of what’s distinctive about the American character today was already visible to de Tocqueville 170 years ago – before mass immigration began.

Scorsese, maker of Mean Streets and Casino, seems to have been bothered by this objection. So, he has spent over 30 years and more than $100 million to film the 1928 book “Gangs of New York” to give his mobcentric theory of America some credibility by pushing it back to the mid-19th Century.

The film’s slogan: “America Was Born In The Streets.” To Scorsese, who grew up in New York City’s Little Italy, the most important event of 1863 was not the Battle of Gettysburg, but the New York Draft Riots.

Despite a high potential cast — Leonardo DiCaprio, a memorable Daniel Day-Lewis, Liam Neeson, Brendan Gleeson, Jim Broadbent, John C. Reilly, Cameron Diaz — Gangs of New York, like Heaven’s Gate, doesn’t really work, in part because the central ethnocentric conceit is kind of silly.

Personally, I don’t blame Cimino and Scorsese for their ethic loyalty. I think it’s natural and fairly healthy. But it’s also healthy for others to be allowed to notice patterns of ethnic bias and point them out. Fortunately, we can more or less make fun of Italian-Americans for their prejudices without our careers being in too much danger.

By the way, at the EphBlog, there are suggestions for some hashtags that would be sure to be denounced as “controversial,” such as #AmericanLivesMatter, #AmericansMatter, and #AmericaMatters. What do you think?

 
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  1. Mmm … unalloyed nativist message. [Homer drool]

  2. Apparently no moderate-to- liberal Democrat can point out that the economy is far better than after the Bush disaster, or that crime is actually far less than eight years ago, or that energy/fuel costs are less, or that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning. Or that your 401K holding your pension assets has more than doubled under Obama. Or that tens of millions more people have employment. Or that 30 million have health insurance than prior to that terrible Obamacare so hated by the Far Left and every Republican.

    After all, Democrats, with their 60 day Congressional majority and in the face of eight years of total Republican obstruction, did not bring in the Nirvana/Utopia demanded by all the armchair leftists hanging out here who so loathe Krugman and Clinton. Y’all starting to remind me of the lunatic demanding Clinton be executed for treason. All you have accomplished so far is increasing the likelihood of electing America’s first fascist President.

    • Replies: @Forbes

    electing America’s first fascist President.
     
    Because everyone to the right of a progressive-left Democrat is a fascist. Okaaay.
    , @anon
    obama increased our debt from 9 trillion to 20 trillion. failure.
    , @Jack D

    your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning.
     
    In Colonial times, taller buildings such as churches and barns were struck by lightning quite often, until Benjamin Franklin invented the lightning rod to safely carry the electrical charge away.

    Wouldn't it be wonderful if we had something like lightning rods, but for terrorists?

    The old American attitude was that we did not have to be fatalistic, in even the face of what used to be called "Acts of God", but could use our brains and our ingenuity to protect ourselves.

    The new liberal attitude is that we should act in the face of terrorism the same way a flock of sheep act in a thunderstorm - just keep munching away.

    Crazy Arabs are just an inevitable part of nature. Just as we can't have grass-nurturing rain without the occasional lightning bolt that takes out one of our fellow sheep (what are the odds, anyway?), we can't have delicious falafel and kebabs (CHICKEN kebabs please) without the occasional jihadist. Just gotta learn to live (or sometimes not) with it.

    No reason to get excited - there are plenty of (minimum wage) jobs for new college grads and they should have their loans paid off well before retirement. Under Hillary, some American may make as much as FIFTEEN DOLLARS per hour at Starbucks - can you imagine such prosperity?

    , @IA

    or that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning.
     
    Yes, we can't control "terrorism" anymore than lightning, pajama boy.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    Some context I included in a letter to the FT in February ( https://next.ft.com/content/f44029ec-cf44-11e5-92a1-c5e23ef99c77 )

    The widely quoted US unemployment rate (currently 4.9 per cent) doesn’t count those who have fallen out of the labour force. According to St Louis Fed data, there are now 94m Americans out of the labour force; when President Obama took office, that figure was under 81m.

    Similarly, statistics regarding health insurance costs are bleak. The Affordable Care Act expanded coverage, but did so at steeply higher costs for average workers. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, from 2010 to 2015 employer-sponsored health insurance premiums rose 27 per cent and deductibles rose 67 per cent on average.
     
    , @Wilkey
    Apparently no moderate-to- liberal Democrat can point out that the economy is far better than after the Bush disaster...

    And the economy was better before the Bush disaster, and is great now while we careen towards our next disaster. Workforce participation rates are down, incomes are stagnant, and federal debt is way, way up. While I was busy maxing out my credit cards my lifestyle was super groovy, as well.

    or that crime is actually far less than eight years ago

    Violent crime rates have been going down for two decades. The problem is that there are two Americas - the non-black America where crime is still going down, and black America, where violent crime has suddenly shot up thanks to Obama inciting hatred of the police.

    or that energy/fuel costs are less

    Thanks to a domestic energy boom that Obama has done absolutely nothing to encourage.

    or that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning

    Deaths due to lightning strikes have averaged 51 per year over the last two decades. 49 people were killed in the Pulse shooting alone. You better hope there's not another terrorist attack in the US this year or else that lightning deaths go way up.

    Actually even that wouldn't help. Terrorists killed 2,977 people in America on 9/11 alone. Just that attack and Pulse put average deaths due to terrorism at over 150 per year over the last 20 years.

    More importantly, what angers people about terrorism is the massive impact it has on our culture and our civil liberties. The government didn't create a slew of laws and agencies to waste our time and strip us of our privacy rights after a few too many Americans died from lightning strikes.


    Or that your 401K holding your pension assets has more than doubled under Obama.

    The Dow peaked around 14,000 in 2007. Today it closed at 18,570. That's a less than 33% increase over the last 8-9 years. Such returns are hardly all that impressive.

    Or that tens of millions more people have employment.

    Measuring trough to peak, from the nadir in late 2009 to now, the number of employed people is up 13 million, so hardly "tens of millions." In fact job growth has only slightly outpaced population growth. But from the employment peak of 2007 (146 million employed) to now (151 million) only 5 million jobs have been added, versus around 15 million new Americans.

    The trouble with your claim of 'tens of millions of new jobs' is that we have no idea where we have no idea where we currently are in the business cycle until sometime in the future. Out current situation could be the peak right before the recession (which history suggests it probably is) or we could still be growing. No one ever knows until after the fact.

    , @candid_observer
    Oh, things are going swimmingly of course -- now that it's electorally convenient to pretend so. But for some unknowable reason, the electorate couldn't be more convinced otherwise.

    Here's one chart that may give you an idea as to why:

    https://img.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/files/2016/01/Inequality-and-Trump.jpg

    But who cares about the white middle and working class? Not the Democrats, who are 100% sure (are they ever less sure?) that 100% of them are 100% racist.

    You might think that, say, a "progressive" economist like Krugman would be aware of and care about this glaring inequality. But no, things are wonderful for Krugman on the Upper West Side, so they are wonderful everywhere he cares about. Flyover country is racist country.

    , @Anonymous
    “economy is far better than after the Bush disaster”

    Easily false. Real median household income has declined since 2008. Average GDP growth is lower during Obama’s term. Bush does not deserve praise, but there has been no recovery on main street.

    “crime is actually far less than eight years ago”

    Violent crime rates started their descent in the late 90s. They are greater in 2016 than in 2015 - trending in the wrong direction as Obama closes out.

    “energy/fuel costs are less”

    Correct, but that has nothing to do with Obama.

    “that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning”

    That was already the case, and right now, the chances of being killed by a terrorist are increasing

    “that your 401K holding your pension assets has more than doubled under Obama”

    Bernanke/Yellen 2016.

    You can start your financial education now by googling “Quantitative Easing”

    “tens of millions more people have employment”

    As population increases, the aggregate number of employed increases. That is not a new phenomenon, nor a dispositive criteria for measuring the health of the labor market. The number of breadwinner jobs has declined, the number of part time jobs increased. Most importantly, the number of total hours being worked has stagnated. The last eight years represents a shift to a part time economy as people increasingly settle for part time jobs in the face of a stagnant commercial economy.

    “Or that 30 million have health insurance than prior to that terrible Obamacare so hated by the Far Left and every Republican”

    Yes, increasing the insurance pool by forced cross-subsidization. The price has been annual increased costs for everyone else.

    To be fair, these trends would still have continued if McCain were elected. But don't be naive - the main street economy remains in decline - and in the meantime, central banks have managed to inflate asset markets, decoupling them from any rational economic criteria.

    Here is the sad verdict for Obama disciples:

    Hope and change was a lie
    Main street has been abandoned
    Wealth inequality has soared due to central bank market manipulation

    Obama was simply a stand in, a puppet sent to lecture us on social leftism while the bankers continued their fraud.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Apparently no moderate-to- liberal Democrat can point out that the economy is far better than after the Bush disaster…
     
    Democrats let Bush assert that Islam is peaceful and that Mexico has healthy family values. It was their duty to call him on such nonsense. The only reason they didn't is their own purely cynical political calculation.

    Why would anyone listen to such people?

    Trump did call him out.

    that crime is actually far less than eight years ago…
     
    Crime has been decreasing (proportionally) for decades. But if Obama is so successful at stopping it, why his and other Democrats' obsession with gun control?

    Because they know their voters!

    All you have accomplished so far is increasing the likelihood of electing America’s first fascist President.
     
    It's 1932 again?

    Stopping fascism is one of the reasons for supporting Trump.
  3. Nothing Trump is talking about, including making America White again will happen. Life won’t get better for people for whom technology, not trade has taken their jobs. What there needs to be is a combination of government and entrepreneurship. Only the Democrats offer anything like that.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Life won’t get better for people for whom technology, not trade has taken their jobs

    Sure it will, if we get returned to us the millions of service jobs in the country that have been stolen by illegal immigrants.
    , @No_0ne
    So you're arguing that, because automation/ technology have resulted in in the elimination of millions of jobs for unskilled laborers, we need to continue to import tens of millions more Third World unskilled laborers to fill those now-vanished jobs, and the millions more that will be lost to automation in the next couple of decades?
    Hmm...
    , @Daniel H
    This comment was lifted word for word from the comments section of the previously referenced Krugman article.
    , @Anon7
    Apparently I spend too much time here, because I'm really good at the "first time commenter" game.
    , @Former Darfur
    Combining government and entrepreneurship has a name: National Socialism.

    To be fair, it worked in the short term once. Germany went from penury to a high living standard not matched again in (the non-Communist part of) that country until the 1970s inthree or four years. But the experiment probably wouldn't have ended all that well even if it hadn't been ended abruptly.
    , @JohnnyWalker123
    Hello, "Donut."
    , @Bill

    Life won’t get better for people for whom technology, not trade has taken their jobs.
     
    All those factories relocated to China and Mexico because China and Mexico have better robots.
  4. In 35 years of living in Cleveland and an inner-ring suburb, I’ve come to realize that there is a significant population of mostly white, mostly middle or lower middle class suburbanites who are so completely estranged from the life of their central city that they simply will not believe that things could possibly be better or safer. They don’t come downtown, they disbelieve or dismiss any positive media coverage about the city, and it is always and forever 1968, or, here in Cleveland, 1966, the year of the Hough riots. There are also a lot of people working to reverse this stereotype, but the folks who are so deeply invested in their fear of the city and the people who live there form a natural audience for Trump’s dystopian vision.

    • Replies: @Percy Gryce

    I’ve come to realize that there is a significant population of mostly white, mostly middle or lower middle class suburbanites who are so completely estranged from the life of their central city that they simply will not believe that things could possibly be better or safer.
     
    I can't tell if you're blaming them or not, but as Steve recently pointed out those people are displaced persons, ethnically cleansed by crime, and, what in other contexts would be called, internal refugees.
    , @Daniel H
    This comment, too, was lifted word for word from the comments section of the previously referenced Krugman article.
    , @No_0ne
    Perhaps because you central city types managed to relocate a lot of your violent crime to their areas via Section 8? Naw, couldn't be that. It's not as if Ferguson was 90+% White, with low crime, just 3 decades ago, or anything...

    By the way, why is it that none of you leftists are complaining about the ethnic cleansing of Blacks from San Francisco? 13% in the 80s, 6% now. Sounds like a serious loss of valuable diversity. Don't you think an emergency Section 8 program is indicated? I'd even be willing to sacrifice some of the priceless diversity of my own city to help out those (obviously ignorant and bigoted) San Franciscans. Who could do more than that?
    , @IA

    but the folks who are so deeply invested in their fear of the city and the people who live there form a natural audience for Trump’s dystopian vision.
     
    Curiously, Trump is a big city guy.
    , @Wilbur Hassenfus
    West Philly, North Philly, Detroit, Baltimore, Atlanta, dozens of others...

    All safe, huh? What a strange, fantastic world you live in.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Howie, Three children and three grand children all living in a first ring Cleveland suburb. I read the Plains Dealer on line (Cleveland.com) daily. To say that there is a utopia awaiting in Downtown Cleveland is to be disingenuous . Yes, areas of downtown are improving, the theatre district for one, but the "Flats" are regressing and Tremont, the newest hipster area, is now seeing violent criminal acts, including murder. So, for the readers here who are not from Cleveland, Cleveland's murder rate is Third World high. Last year Howie, a five year old boy, a three year old boy and a five month old girls were all shot and killed in Cleveland. This year, last week, a two year old girl shot in the head. Trump isn't providing a fear scenario, certain people in Cleveland are. Oh, and one more thing the Cleveland Police Department is now operating under a DOJ mandate.
    , @Forbes
    It's more likely Trump's vision is to avoid a dystopian future.
  5. Book idea: compilation of hysterical predictions about presidential candidates who then won.

    That period is a litte hazy for me, but I can remember George W. Bush not instituting a theocratic dictatorship.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    I can remember George W. Bush starting a war in the Middle East that was nothing but a boon for radical Islam.

    Bush was every bit as bad as anyone ever thought he'd be, and worse - a truly awful president who brought us not only another Vietnam but another Great Depression. (Steve has written at length about how Bush's encouraging banks to grant mortgages to unqualified minority applicants helped fuel the housing bubble.) He plowed the fields on which Obama planted his poisonous seeds.

    I take your point that what is being said about Trump is pure, unadulterated bullshit, but George W. Bush was a train wreck of a politician who never should have been allowed to set foot in Washington, let alone take up residence in the White House.

    I remember watching the live TV coverage of Bush taking the oath of office, and thinking that it was almost unreal that a man of such base mediocrity should ascend to the highest office in the land. (I was in high school at the time.)

    Any political system that allows men such as Bush and Obama to rise to the top is nearly beyond all hope of repair.

  6. “He dwelled on the murders of Kate Steinle and Sarah Root, Americans who were killed by illegal border crossers with criminal records.”

    You’re only allowed to ‘dwell’ on Lives that Matter.

    • Replies: @Johanus de Morgateroyde
    Is dwelling the new noticing?
  7. “Historians and legal scholars struggled to recall when a presidential candidate had departed so radically from the traditional view that America’s welcome for immigrants ”

    1) Harding/Coolidge 1924
    2) Jefferson bans Arican immigration 1808
    3) Chester Arthur 1882 Chinese exclusion. Btw, Arthur is America’s first civil rights lawyer.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chester_A._Arthur#Early_career

    See also
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_Restriction_League

    • Replies: @syonredux
    Alien and Sedition Acts:

    Congress specifically passed four measures – the Naturalization Act, the Alien Friends Act, the Alien Enemies Act and the Sedition Act. These statutes were designed to mitigate the threat of secessionists by disallowing their most extreme firebrands. The Naturalization Act increased to 14 years the period of residence required for an immigrant to attain American citizenship (naturalized citizens tended to vote for the Democratic-Republicans.) The Alien Friends Act and the Alien Enemies Act allowed the president to deport any foreigner (from friendly and hostile nations, respectively) which he considered dangerous to the country.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Adams#Alien_and_Sedition_Acts
  8. At this point, I can’t tell if the NY Times guys don’t understand how small their audience is in comparison to the rest of the country, or whether they assume that they, like their heroes at Pravda, must relentlessly publish the party line merely for appearances sake.

    I mean, seriously. If these guys are so delusional that they think they influence a majority of America, they belong in the loony bin.

    • Replies: @donut
    Their audience isn't small , Sailer's audience is small . The vast majority of the NYT's audience is made up of middle class professionals whose only interest is maintaining their status . As you well know to deviate from the party line is at best professional and social suicide. These highly "educated" sheep have internalized the Marxist message and will shitcan friends and family in order to maintain their shitty little clock punching positions and their "relationships" with others like themselves . Stalin and Dr. Goebbels were early pioneers of the system we live in now and they would envy the control over public discourse that the progressive masters have now. The opposition is so ineffectual that there isn't even any reason to lock them up . Their only cocern is guns . As Jughashvil said once :

    "Ideas are more powerful than guns. We would not let our enemies have guns, why should we let them have ideas."
    , @Olorin
    Surely you realize that the currency of today's MSM is clicks. That is what drives ad revenues.

    Advertisers don't care whether the clickers are left or right, R or D, red or blue, or anything else. They care that you clicked. Period. They got your eyeballs, so the formulas go.

    Every time someone of a conservative, or alt right, or dark enlightenment, or shitlord, or new dissident, or whatever you want to call it clicks on the NYT or MSNBC or CNN or whatever American Pravda sites, those outlets make money.

    At this juncture I'd bet that what's sustaining these hemorrhaging outlets is in fact the clicks of those who hate them most. If you start viewing their most bat-guano insane SJW stuff as a clickbait literary genre, it all makes more sense. (The fact that so many SJWs believe what they publish is just one more indication of their Eloi gullibility.)

    I get my NYT topics from our host, so that when such things come up in conversation I'm not as clueless as I would dearly like to be.

    I refuse to go there and click on anything. I only go to sites that don't take ads. Ones that panhandle openly for their income.

    , @Frau Katze
    I'm afraid the audience for NYT and its like is far too large.

    I mainly use Facebook to keep up with relatives (kids and grandkids), but I have a few other Facebook friends. I had to unfollow one of them yesterday after about a dozen anti-Trump posts one after the other (and we are all Canadians who can't vote in the US election).

    Why Trump Derangement Syndrome is hitting so many Canadians I don't know.
  9. anon • Disclaimer says:

    The American dream only for Americans? The horror! The horror!

    Also the “traditional view” that immigration is just wonderful was very far from traditional. Immigration to America was subject to big swings up and down for many times in its history. It was not a constant or steady flow at all. In 1924 it was virtually curtailed for 41 years. America got by just fine.

    • Replies: @guest
    "Tradition" is where the left last pushed it. Right now you are a thought criminal if you go back before the 60s, for sure. But it's not just a chronological thing. The general tendency is for us to drift further left as time goes by. But what it means to be correct keeps changing, always changing, never resting.

    That's Permanent Revolution. It won't do for instance, for Republicans to try, as they do, to out-black the Democrats. "Dems Are the Real Racists" is a loser. All that nonsense trying to convince the nation that Trump is for Women, Gays, and so forth last night was a waste of time.

    "Hey, idiot, the game's over here now. You lose again," says the leftist.
  10. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    "He dwelled on the murders of Kate Steinle and Sarah Root, Americans who were killed by illegal border crossers with criminal records."

    You're only allowed to 'dwell' on Lives that Matter.

    Is dwelling the new noticing?

    • Replies: @Forbes
    One sentence is noticing. Any more than that is dwelling.
  11. John Derbyshire has a good description of the attitude displayed by the New York Times: Ellis Island romanticism. Immigration always had its problems (Japan has done just fine with almost no immigration). I’m beginning to think the Know-Nothings had a point.

    • Replies: @Barnard

    “Our national identity is anchored in the notion that we are a permanently evolving people, where the other becomes us and we are strengthened by it,” said Frank Sharry, executive director of America’s Voice, a pro-immigration group.
     
    Anyone who said this during the revolution would have been tarred and feathered.

    How can Sharry make the argument that "the other becomes us" with a straight face.

    , @Tracy
    Me, too. And I'm Catholic.
  12. Not a fair fight – Trump uses hard statistics and concrete examples to support his arguments. The NYT’s Julia Preston retreats into her childhood safe space of pink castles and unicorns with an occasional quote from a useless, disconnected professor promoting the false appeal to authority while Obama the Strawman never fails to keep failing.

  13. It was America that made the immigrants great, not the immigrants that made America great. Correcting the arrow of causation can provide a great deal of clarity.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @anon
    Then do so. It was Europeans that made America great.
    , @iSteveFan

    It was America that made the immigrants great, not the immigrants that made America great. Correcting the arrow of causation can provide a great deal of clarity.
     
    That's a good point. As a New World nation America took in immigrants just like Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and the rest of the New World. But why did America turn out so much better? Germans, Italians, Poles and Jews went to Latin America, but didn't turn those places into dynamos. So why should we assume they were responsible for turning America into a dynamo? Maybe it was America and her original stock with their established institutions that had the greater effect on the immigrants.

    BTW, it is interesting that our fellow English New World nations, Canada, Oz and NZ, had similar positive effects on immigrants.
    , @Bill
    Indeed. If North America had been populated entirely by Indios, it would still have been great. Now, if only you and I could gather some empirical evidence of what a North American populated exclusively by Indios would have been like . . .
  14. Yes, of course “all of the political orthodoxy” means whatever the NYT deems to be orthodox. These sort of articles are becoming so boringly common, I can’t imagine spending any time with these sort of thinkers. And to Peter J. Spiro, Professor of Immigration Law, there are laws concerning immigration, that’s what you teach, so is there a Professor of Illegal Immigration, which is what Trump was speaking about.

  15. “Using even darker language than he had on the campaign trail…”

    Whoa. Isn’t that racist? Shouldn’t it be “Using even whiter language…”?

  16. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    There was the “rural purge” beginning in 1970, where CBS and other major networks started “killing everything with a tree in it”, as the actor who played Mr. Haney on Green Acres described it.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rural_purge

    The “rural purge” of American television networks (in particular CBS) was a series of cancellations in the early 1970s of still-popular rural-themed shows with demographically skewed audiences, the majority of which occurred at the end of the 1970–71 television season. One of the earliest efforts at channel drift, CBS in particular saw a dramatic change in direction with the shift, moving away from shows with rural themes and toward ones with more appeal to urban and suburban audiences.

    • Replies: @Louis Renault
    Looks like a business opportunity for any non-SJW in the industry.
    , @Anonymous
    That "Rural Purge" Wikipedia article contains a mention of Pat Buttram, who became a minor star of the Steve-o-sphere several years ago when Google was caught out being particularly evil. Small world!
  17. I agree that Gangs of New York didn’t work, partly because the two things it tried to tie together: street fights between nativists and the foreign hordes and the draft riots, didn’t fit together. I didn’t pay much attention to the “hands that built America” theme. What stuck out to me was the excellent Bill the Butcher character, who was able to speak unspeakable truths owing to the fact that he was the villain.

    Also, and more importantly, through him we got a wonderful depiction of the Culture of Honor, which is present in all good gangster films. The way he respected the memory of the Liam Neeson character, and how he spared Leo because he hadn’t yet earned a death at his hands, that was great. I love the conversation he had about how he lost his eye, which had dishonored him by looking away after losing a fight. A bit ridiculous, but again an excellent depiction of Honor.

    He was like a character out of the Iliad. Though on a much lower artistic level, of course.

    The movie was typical Miramax Oscar bait, which bores me.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    What stuck out to me was the excellent Bill the Butcher character, who was able to speak unspeakable truths owing to the fact that he was the villain.
     
    You can make a good argument that he's the hero of the picture.
    , @London Broil
    Gangs of New York would have been a superb film with a completely different plot and characters.

    The vignettes depicting the weirdness of old New York are fascinating, like a Rick Steves travelogue into the past. Unfortunately, there's negligible emotional connection between the audience and the characters- not just because they are morally repugnant, but because their motivations and actions rarely make much logical sense within the plot. Morever, there's little indication until nearly the end that anything of importance hangs on the outcome of DiCaprio's convoluted revenge scheme. Watching Gangs, you can almost hear Mr. Plinkett's voice intoning "After this, a bunch of meaningless s**t happens to a bunch of people we don't care about, for reasons we don't remember, the potential consequences of which are never clearly explained". At no point during the film's entire running time did did it really seem to matter who would emerge "the winner", nor could I have explicated the obscure motivations behind half of their actions. And as others have remarked, neither Bill the Butcher nor DiCaprio's character clearly stands out as the obvious protagonist, which is particularly problematic when the audience is stuck in a strange and unfamiliar city and century.

    Something simpler and more conventional, like a Horatio Alger plot, would have been a better way to showcase ordinary life in 1860s New York and the immigrant experience there, without losing the audience along the way. Maybe a poor immigrant orphan boy shows up in NYC with nothing, fights and hustles his way out of the gang-ridden slums, then builds his fortune until he finally buys a house on Park Avenue (or whatever the richest neighborhood was in the 19th century), hoping thereby to prove his worth to his lady love, or some such intelligible motivation. Of course, that would completely undermine Scorcese's intended message by reminding the audience that 19th-century America was a really great place that gave hard-working immigrants unprecedented opportunities for success.
  18. Trump’s grandfather was both an Old World immigrant and a frontiersman-like “settler”, if only for a while.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Grandpa Trump ran a whorehouse in a goldmining town?
  19. Maybe Trump can force divestment of the NYT from Salim’s portfolio. America’s paper of record should be controlled by Americans.

    It is great to see the writhing of all the creatures dwelling beneath the rocks as Trump rolls the rocks over and the sun beams down. Landslide.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    I agree with forcing Salim to divest. Maybe seize his share entirely and use the proceeds to pay for the wall. He truly is a vile man.
    , @TheJester
    The headlines and stories attacking Trump from the Washington Post, New York Times, LA Times, Huffington Post, Salon, Atlantic, etc. border on hysteria. "The sky is falling ... the sky is falling ... quick, take cover, the sky is falling."

    Other media have it right. Trump followers recognize the hype and hysteria and ignore the MSM. Indeed, the hysteria on the part of the MSM make their case for Trump.

    However, as someone in his late 60s and an avid "news hound" for decades, I can't recall the MSM being this distorted before the age of alternative media. Was it just as bad before and I didn't notice it ... or, is the MSM becoming more partisan and hostile as it fades into irrelevance?
  20. @Diversity Heretic
    John Derbyshire has a good description of the attitude displayed by the New York Times: Ellis Island romanticism. Immigration always had its problems (Japan has done just fine with almost no immigration). I'm beginning to think the Know-Nothings had a point.

    “Our national identity is anchored in the notion that we are a permanently evolving people, where the other becomes us and we are strengthened by it,” said Frank Sharry, executive director of America’s Voice, a pro-immigration group.

    Anyone who said this during the revolution would have been tarred and feathered.

    How can Sharry make the argument that “the other becomes us” with a straight face.

  21. Donald Trump, the DARK Lord.

  22. @IHTG
    Trump's grandfather was both an Old World immigrant and a frontiersman-like "settler", if only for a while.

    Grandpa Trump ran a whorehouse in a goldmining town?

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    I wish you hadn't written that, because it will be a NYT headline RSN.
  23. I’ve read three different articles today on Trump’s speech: one at Bloomberg, another at the Washington Post, and the last at the New York Times. All three articles, though written by three different people, used the word “dark” to describe Trump’s speech. Are these reporters coordinating their message? or did they all choose the same adjective by accident? It’s almost like the press is pushing a consensus opinion.

    • Replies: @Michael Brennick
    @Victor:

    There was a woman commentator during their PBS coverage, I believe from the Hill, haircut like Maddow on MSNBC. She telegraphed on Tuesday what the Left media's talking point was going to be. Early on they were working with the adjective "negative", eventually it morphed into "darkness" .
    , @Almost Missouri
    Like I keep telling y'all, Journolist and the other lefty conspirings and self-dealings ever continue. Don't be deceived just because they've gotten better at staying hidden.
    , @ben tillman

    I’ve read three different articles today on Trump’s speech: one at Bloomberg, another at the Washington Post, and the last at the New York Times. All three articles, though written by three different people, used the word “dark” to describe Trump’s speech. Are these reporters coordinating their message? or did they all choose the same adjective by accident?
     
    Of course, they didn't choose it "by accident", nor could it have been an honest opinion. They either coordinated their choice of words or simply went with the narrative someone else had come up with.
    , @CJ
    Of course the "dark" thing is a coordinated talking point. It calls out for the Rush Limbaugh treatment of compiling dozens of short clips of different media droids repeating the same word or phrase as they "report" on a news story (if Limbaugh and his staff haven't already done it of course). Check out this Google search just for the lulz.

    Google search: Trump+dark

    BTW you can add me to the list of readers who first thought the Onion-like headline above was Steve's creation, not the actual NYT wording.
  24. I’ve never heard the phrase “nation of nations” before, to my knowledge. So why do I care if someone denies it? Then again, I don’t remember hearing “American Exceptionalism” until people started mocking neocons with it. I’m not connected to the world in which such phrases are bandied.

    • Replies: @Rob McX

    I’ve never heard the phrase “nation of nations” before, to my knowledge.
     
    It's an oxymoron. The whole point of a nation is that it's homogeneous. The poisonous concept of a "proposition nation" is gradually seeping into political discourse in Europe now too. Whites get to have the proposition, while non-whites have the nation.
    , @Chris
    There's a word for a "nation of nations": an imperium. I know this is what the left wants, and to some measure what the US is, but it's strange to see the NYT nakedly promote it without even a nod to the consent of the governed. What will they pump for next, the abolition of voting?
    , @Anoni
    Nation of Nations is awkward, I think we have a shorter word for that idea.
    Empire.
  25. That slowly began to change during the 1970s

    I don’t think so. The year is 1960. You might not have noticed it, but your brain did. (to quote Red Letter Media)

    I’m I don’t know happened mentally that year, but after crossing it nothing is safe anymore. Eventually, they’ll come to the part about how evil you are.

    In an early sixties western I saw recently in the second scene a woman mentions for no reason that, this being the bad old days and she being of the inferior sex, she of course can’t read. That’s how she said it.

    She really should have turned to the camera and made the Jon Steward “that shit is ca-razy” face.

  26. P.S. The comments appear to be suffering from an infestation of liberal trolls.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    It's like someone on the left has discovered where Trump has gotten a lot of his ideas ultimately from, and by attacking the source, they think they can shut it down. The horse has already bolted. Lol.

    All that is going to happen is that a few of the trolls stay. After a few months, mostly they eventually get converted too it seems.
    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "P.S. The comments appear to be suffering from an infestation of liberal trolls."

    Damn straight. And they're that really bland $12.25/hour Organizing Against America caliber of troll.

    Why publish such drivel, Steve? The anti-White, heterophobic Left can and does do better than this. They're so bad, they're not worth responding to.
  27. If times were better, people would vote Clinton. After all, Obama attracted a not insignificant amount of White votes both times. People vote pocketbook and pocketbook expectations most of the time.

    And its even worse for Hillary. She has no plan and no public expectation of putting more people (as opposed to low paid foreigners) to work. Nothing for infrastructure, nothing for manufacturing, nothing for anyone interested in working for more money than they get now. That’s remarkable, Bill Clinton in 1992 ran on putting Americans back to work after the 1991 recession, with big public works projects he promised to fund. Hillary has … more shakedowns and cronyism with Goldman Sachs (the FT has a Big Read on the Clintons involvement in For Profit Education — $22 million total compared to Donald Trump’s $5 million) and identity politics.

    Plus Hillary is both corrupt and incompetent (Libya, Syria, etc.) She couldn’t run a hot dog stand (email server).

    Trump is an egotistic blowhard interested mostly in himself. But he’s not Hillary. And he seems to care about protectionist tariffs, higher wages, and not being overrun with foreigners (who’d vote themselves his property). Bill Gates and Buffett have their wealth in highly liquid and concealed financial assets. Good luck seizing that. Trump Tower, not so much.

    If Hillary! would make my life one iota better I’d vote for her. As it is, she seems to be readying Executive Order 666, for immediate castration of all Straight White males (starting with Bill). No thanks.

  28. …was a prime reason for its exceptional innovation and prosperity.

    Prosperity? I’ve lost track, is this supposed to be Recovery Summer 6.0 or 7.0?

    Maybe millions of undocumented aliens are diverting resources (time, money, manpower) from actual Americans who aspire to participate in the American Dream…

  29. Off topic but part of the ‘narrative’: looking around for an exact number of unarmed black people killed by police I stumbled on this site that attempts to chronical exactly who those 102 unarmed black people were and how they died in 2015.

    http://mappingpoliceviolence.org/unarmed/

    Don’t know who put this together, if it’s accurate or their ultimate agenda.
    I did not bother to read all the 102 descriptions but looking at the first 20 I see:
    2 were killed by their cop boy friend/girl friend
    3 were killed accidentally by police cars responding to a crime
    2 died of medical problems fighting cops
    2 pointed toy guns
    3 died trying to take gun
    1 killed by security guard
    1 died when he tried to take an off duty cops car at car wash. Oops.
    Unfortunately the race of cop not supplied

    • Replies: @Wally
    But .....

    'Analysis of Washington Post police-shootings data reveals surprising result – nearly 2x more whites than blacks shot by police'

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2016/07/18/analysis-of-washington-post-police-shootings-data-reveals-surprising-result/
    , @Whoiwasthelasttime
    Right. What surprised me about the website I linked was:
    1) the number killed was 102 (out of 40,000,ooo black Americans)
    2) how broad the 'unarmed black man' category is. I mean traffic accidents count? Pointing toy guns count? Perps dying from supposedly non leathal force while resisting arrest count? Reading the descriptions few seem to fit the 'coalhouse walker' innocent black guy meme I hear daily on NPR. It was an eye opener (I'm naive)how truly manufactured this 'epidemic' of police violence in the black community really is.
    , @yowza
    Seems like "The Talk" blacks enjoy bragging about either isn't recited correctly, or the kids just ain't listening.

    Maybe many urban blacks are simply too stupid to function through a police investigation, turning what would normally be a tedious and annoying experience that most police stops are, into an existential endgame for morons.

    Witness this silly woman going "Full Zulu" on a routine traffic stop. Nothing but willful stupidity answers for this incident:

    http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=538_1469149880
  30. @Johanus de Morgateroyde
    Is dwelling the new noticing?

    One sentence is noticing. Any more than that is dwelling.

  31. @anon
    The American dream only for Americans? The horror! The horror!

    Also the "traditional view" that immigration is just wonderful was very far from traditional. Immigration to America was subject to big swings up and down for many times in its history. It was not a constant or steady flow at all. In 1924 it was virtually curtailed for 41 years. America got by just fine.

    “Tradition” is where the left last pushed it. Right now you are a thought criminal if you go back before the 60s, for sure. But it’s not just a chronological thing. The general tendency is for us to drift further left as time goes by. But what it means to be correct keeps changing, always changing, never resting.

    That’s Permanent Revolution. It won’t do for instance, for Republicans to try, as they do, to out-black the Democrats. “Dems Are the Real Racists” is a loser. All that nonsense trying to convince the nation that Trump is for Women, Gays, and so forth last night was a waste of time.

    “Hey, idiot, the game’s over here now. You lose again,” says the leftist.

    • Replies: @No_0ne
    You assume that the role of the Republican Party in our system is to oppose the Left, rather than to police those who end up beyond the right edge of the Overton window as it drifts ever leftward. This assumption might be, as the progs say, "problematic."
    , @ben tillman

    “Tradition” is where the left last pushed it. Right now you are a thought criminal if you go back before the 60s, for sure. But it’s not just a chronological thing. The general tendency is for us to drift further left as time goes by. But what it means to be correct keeps changing, always changing, never resting.

    That’s Permanent Revolution.
     
    It's entropy.
  32. Along with Westerns, the Civil War used to be very present in popular culture (F-Troop, for example). That said, the overall American culture prior to mass immigration tends to be hypocognized. There isn’t even a name for it, so in a Sapir-Whorf sense, we can’t even think about it. People mistakenly call it the WASP culture, which is too narrow, or the White culture, which is too broad. I would propose we call it America’s traditional Hamiltonian culture. Think that could work?

    • Replies: @guest
    We don't need a name to think about it, but it's much, much harder. We know it largely because it is, or was, the main enemy of leftism: the dragon they're always slaying, like in a Passion play. (They're also fighting rightists who grew up in leftist culture and don't know the original America. These they call fascists.) But that's a negative way to know it. It's not enough.

    I've noticed that they talk incessantly about minority cultures: their music, their food, and so forth, and how we "appropriate" it. But they act as if there's no such thing as culture amongst white people. Unless they're part of specific groups, like Italians or the Irish. The dominant American ethnic group in U.S. culture were and are the English. But we so take them for granted it's as if their influence isn't there, even though blacks, for instance, have "appropriated" more of it than we could ever hope to appropriate of theirs should we try.

    A similar fate befell German culture. I guess the Irish survived because they were oppressed, or whatever. But there's a whimsical quality to Irish-American culture, which I find artificial. Anyway, the point is that mainstream American culture is there, while people brought up in its slain yet undying influence pretend it isn't.

    , @Hibernian
    America's traditional Jacksonian culture.
  33. The NYT stays one step ahead of satire.

  34. The bimbo said:

    Under his presidency, the American dream would be primarily reserved for Americans.

    Well duh!! That’s exactly how it should be.

    No more free rides at our expense.

    More forcefully than he had before, Mr. Trump said he would also impose new restrictions on legal immigration to protect American workers from lower-paid competition in the labor market.

    Indeed.
    Increase the labor supply and wages necessarily go down. Econ 101.

    Vote Trump!!

  35. @guest
    I've never heard the phrase "nation of nations" before, to my knowledge. So why do I care if someone denies it? Then again, I don't remember hearing "American Exceptionalism" until people started mocking neocons with it. I'm not connected to the world in which such phrases are bandied.

    I’ve never heard the phrase “nation of nations” before, to my knowledge.

    It’s an oxymoron. The whole point of a nation is that it’s homogeneous. The poisonous concept of a “proposition nation” is gradually seeping into political discourse in Europe now too. Whites get to have the proposition, while non-whites have the nation.

    • Replies: @kihowi
    It might be called that because usually after you get propositioned, you get fucked.
  36. @Victor
    I've read three different articles today on Trump's speech: one at Bloomberg, another at the Washington Post, and the last at the New York Times. All three articles, though written by three different people, used the word "dark" to describe Trump's speech. Are these reporters coordinating their message? or did they all choose the same adjective by accident? It's almost like the press is pushing a consensus opinion.

    There was a woman commentator during their PBS coverage, I believe from the Hill, haircut like Maddow on MSNBC. She telegraphed on Tuesday what the Left media’s talking point was going to be. Early on they were working with the adjective “negative”, eventually it morphed into “darkness” .

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    nah, the PBS guest got the message earlier from someone else. the whole thing is co-ordinated
  37. @Tiny Duck
    Apparently no moderate-to- liberal Democrat can point out that the economy is far better than after the Bush disaster, or that crime is actually far less than eight years ago, or that energy/fuel costs are less, or that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning. Or that your 401K holding your pension assets has more than doubled under Obama. Or that tens of millions more people have employment. Or that 30 million have health insurance than prior to that terrible Obamacare so hated by the Far Left and every Republican.

    After all, Democrats, with their 60 day Congressional majority and in the face of eight years of total Republican obstruction, did not bring in the Nirvana/Utopia demanded by all the armchair leftists hanging out here who so loathe Krugman and Clinton. Y'all starting to remind me of the lunatic demanding Clinton be executed for treason. All you have accomplished so far is increasing the likelihood of electing America's first fascist President.

    electing America’s first fascist President.

    Because everyone to the right of a progressive-left Democrat is a fascist. Okaaay.

  38. I actually liked “Gangs of New York.” It worked for me. As you pointed out in your review, the movie portrayed Irish immigrants pretty badly.

    Here’s the ending, which I thought was well-done.

    • Replies: @Chriscom
    I enjoyed Gangs of New York even though it didn't feel like it worked from start to finish. Yep, good sobering ending. If they ran out the last frame just a little bit more, they could remove the Twin Towers.
    , @al gore rhythms
    I'm not sure what you are supposed to feel watching that scene, but all I could think was 'I'm glad my home town wasn't covered in a succession of bigger and bigger skyscrapers over the last hundred years'.p
  39. @Rob McX

    I’ve never heard the phrase “nation of nations” before, to my knowledge.
     
    It's an oxymoron. The whole point of a nation is that it's homogeneous. The poisonous concept of a "proposition nation" is gradually seeping into political discourse in Europe now too. Whites get to have the proposition, while non-whites have the nation.

    It might be called that because usually after you get propositioned, you get fucked.

  40. Trump sang the praises of his mother, an immigrant from the island of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. She was white and legal, guess it doesn’t count. She was also a native Gaelic speaker, a minority language, oppressed by the English. Still white though.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    She was also a native Gaelic speaker, a minority language, oppressed by the English.
     
    Oppressed mostly by Scots.
  41. The Placated Proles
    The Proles — the lower-class people who make up the majority of the US population — are largely ignored by the government. They don’t face the same kind of indoctrination that the Inner and Outer Party members do and for the most part they’re kept under control by rumors spread by the Thought Police and easy access to various vices.

    Heavy physical work, the care of home and children, petty quarrels with neighbors, films, football, beer, and above all, gambling, fill up the horizon of their minds. They’re also placated with easy access to Party-produced porn and certain crimes — including prostitution, drug-dealing and racketeering — go pretty much unchecked in the prole portions of town. Basically, the idea is to keep the proles placated and distracted, so that they don’t pay any attention to the political machinations moving the world around them.

  42. @Anonym
    Maybe Trump can force divestment of the NYT from Salim's portfolio. America's paper of record should be controlled by Americans.

    It is great to see the writhing of all the creatures dwelling beneath the rocks as Trump rolls the rocks over and the sun beams down. Landslide.

    I agree with forcing Salim to divest. Maybe seize his share entirely and use the proceeds to pay for the wall. He truly is a vile man.

    • Replies: @HateCuisine
    Who is this "Salim"?

    Carlos Slim?
  43. @Anonymous
    There was the "rural purge" beginning in 1970, where CBS and other major networks started "killing everything with a tree in it", as the actor who played Mr. Haney on Green Acres described it.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rural_purge

    The "rural purge" of American television networks (in particular CBS) was a series of cancellations in the early 1970s of still-popular rural-themed shows with demographically skewed audiences, the majority of which occurred at the end of the 1970–71 television season. One of the earliest efforts at channel drift, CBS in particular saw a dramatic change in direction with the shift, moving away from shows with rural themes and toward ones with more appeal to urban and suburban audiences.
     

    Looks like a business opportunity for any non-SJW in the industry.

  44. @Whoiwasthelasttime
    Off topic but part of the 'narrative': looking around for an exact number of unarmed black people killed by police I stumbled on this site that attempts to chronical exactly who those 102 unarmed black people were and how they died in 2015.

    http://mappingpoliceviolence.org/unarmed/

    Don't know who put this together, if it's accurate or their ultimate agenda.
    I did not bother to read all the 102 descriptions but looking at the first 20 I see:
    2 were killed by their cop boy friend/girl friend
    3 were killed accidentally by police cars responding to a crime
    2 died of medical problems fighting cops
    2 pointed toy guns
    3 died trying to take gun
    1 killed by security guard
    1 died when he tried to take an off duty cops car at car wash. Oops.
    Unfortunately the race of cop not supplied

    But …..

    Analysis of Washington Post police-shootings data reveals surprising result – nearly 2x more whites than blacks shot by police

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2016/07/18/analysis-of-washington-post-police-shootings-data-reveals-surprising-result/

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    ‘Analysis of Washington Post police-shootings data reveals surprising result – nearly 2x more whites than blacks shot by police‘
     
    Of course, when we read the article we find that his numbers say that nearly ONE time more whites than blacks are shot by police.
  45. @Buddwing
    Along with Westerns, the Civil War used to be very present in popular culture (F-Troop, for example). That said, the overall American culture prior to mass immigration tends to be hypocognized. There isn't even a name for it, so in a Sapir-Whorf sense, we can't even think about it. People mistakenly call it the WASP culture, which is too narrow, or the White culture, which is too broad. I would propose we call it America's traditional Hamiltonian culture. Think that could work?

    We don’t need a name to think about it, but it’s much, much harder. We know it largely because it is, or was, the main enemy of leftism: the dragon they’re always slaying, like in a Passion play. (They’re also fighting rightists who grew up in leftist culture and don’t know the original America. These they call fascists.) But that’s a negative way to know it. It’s not enough.

    I’ve noticed that they talk incessantly about minority cultures: their music, their food, and so forth, and how we “appropriate” it. But they act as if there’s no such thing as culture amongst white people. Unless they’re part of specific groups, like Italians or the Irish. The dominant American ethnic group in U.S. culture were and are the English. But we so take them for granted it’s as if their influence isn’t there, even though blacks, for instance, have “appropriated” more of it than we could ever hope to appropriate of theirs should we try.

    A similar fate befell German culture. I guess the Irish survived because they were oppressed, or whatever. But there’s a whimsical quality to Irish-American culture, which I find artificial. Anyway, the point is that mainstream American culture is there, while people brought up in its slain yet undying influence pretend it isn’t.

    • Replies: @Buddwing
    You almost immediately fell into the Sapir-Whorf trap, talking about "white people" when you clearly intended to refer to the Hamiltonian-American community.
    , @yaqub the mad scientist
    The dominant American ethnic group in U.S. culture were and are the English. But we so take them for granted it’s as if their influence isn’t there....

    My people thank you for the shout out, as we have our achievements blotted out.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    The dominant American ethnic group in U.S. culture were and are the English
     
    Genealogist Jeane Eddy Westin claimed 82% of Americans had some English ancestry. (NB: some.) But the one-drop rule doesn't apply here; that figure would include virtually all "Native Americans" and native blacks.
  46. Obviously immigrants played a role in the settling and rise of the US but the fact remains the US became the world’s largest economy by 1890 so those who arrived afterwards were merely ‘joining the party’.

  47. @Tiny Duck
    Apparently no moderate-to- liberal Democrat can point out that the economy is far better than after the Bush disaster, or that crime is actually far less than eight years ago, or that energy/fuel costs are less, or that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning. Or that your 401K holding your pension assets has more than doubled under Obama. Or that tens of millions more people have employment. Or that 30 million have health insurance than prior to that terrible Obamacare so hated by the Far Left and every Republican.

    After all, Democrats, with their 60 day Congressional majority and in the face of eight years of total Republican obstruction, did not bring in the Nirvana/Utopia demanded by all the armchair leftists hanging out here who so loathe Krugman and Clinton. Y'all starting to remind me of the lunatic demanding Clinton be executed for treason. All you have accomplished so far is increasing the likelihood of electing America's first fascist President.

    obama increased our debt from 9 trillion to 20 trillion. failure.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Last night Trump asked what we have to show for Obama's doubling of the national debt. I could tell him. We have a stock market at record levels. Years ago, Rush Limbaugh made an astute observation: "Obama's top economic priority is preserving the wealth of the political donor class."
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    Hence, prosperity. Give me a $20T credit card and I'll have a lot of nice things around the house too.

    A friend who's a very proactive investor predicts 2018 for the Big Bust. I'm not sure I'd want to be the next President. My half-serious prediction is Trump or Hillary is the next-to-last one of the US as presently constituted.
  48. and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity

    By “ourselves”, the Founders, being men of the Enlightenment, meant all of humanity. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if every single person on earth could move here and enjoy the “American Dream” (a lifetime of government benefits just like Julia the cartoon), while at the same time not giving up their crazy religion and customs (just like Syed Farook)?

    • Replies: @syonredux

    By “ourselves”, the Founders, being men of the Enlightenment, meant all of humanity.
     
    They were thinking in a national context. And the Founders liked the fact that Anglo-America was so homogeneous:

    With equal pleasure I have as often taken notice that Providence has been pleased to give this one connected country to one united people--a people descended from the same ancestors, speaking the same language, professing the same religion, attached to the same principles of government, very similar in their manners and customs, and who, by their joint counsels, arms, and efforts, fighting side by side throughout a long and bloody war, have nobly established general liberty and independence.
     
    John Jay, Federalist Papers, No. 2
  49. @Tiny Duck
    Nothing Trump is talking about, including making America White again will happen. Life won't get better for people for whom technology, not trade has taken their jobs. What there needs to be is a combination of government and entrepreneurship. Only the Democrats offer anything like that.

    Life won’t get better for people for whom technology, not trade has taken their jobs

    Sure it will, if we get returned to us the millions of service jobs in the country that have been stolen by illegal immigrants.

  50. @Tiny Duck
    In 35 years of living in Cleveland and an inner-ring suburb, I've come to realize that there is a significant population of mostly white, mostly middle or lower middle class suburbanites who are so completely estranged from the life of their central city that they simply will not believe that things could possibly be better or safer. They don't come downtown, they disbelieve or dismiss any positive media coverage about the city, and it is always and forever 1968, or, here in Cleveland, 1966, the year of the Hough riots. There are also a lot of people working to reverse this stereotype, but the folks who are so deeply invested in their fear of the city and the people who live there form a natural audience for Trump's dystopian vision.

    I’ve come to realize that there is a significant population of mostly white, mostly middle or lower middle class suburbanites who are so completely estranged from the life of their central city that they simply will not believe that things could possibly be better or safer.

    I can’t tell if you’re blaming them or not, but as Steve recently pointed out those people are displaced persons, ethnically cleansed by crime, and, what in other contexts would be called, internal refugees.

    • Replies: @JackOH
    Thanks. Your characterization ("displaced", "ethnically cleansed", "internal refugees") of urban Whites fleeing the consequences of so-called fair housing laws seems to me not too strong at all.

    Government and its enablers essentially criminalized the customary, generally accepted behaviors of my Northern city that actually kept racial animus in check. I still half-recall adults on the front porch talking about sending their kids to parochial schools (they did), and putting their houses up for sale before prices fell (they did).

    I'm pretty sure there was mention under Steve's original post of writers who've tried to tackle the subject of urban White displacement, but I haven't read them. I'm pretty confident someone with the right skills can demonstrate how wrong so-called fair housing and other racially motivated laws were and still are. (I guess you'd need to call on experts in law, economics, modern American history, and politics to hit all the marks.) Thanks again.
  51. “Under his presidency, the American dream would be primarily reserved for Americans.”

    What the–?!

    I thought this was one of your sly witticisms. It’s from the article!

    They can’t go any lower than this. They just can’t.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Anonym
    Most people reading “Under his presidency, the American dream would be primarily reserved for Americans.” is going to be thinking "and this is a problem... how?"
    , @Rob McX
    I too thought this was Steve Sailer's sarcastic paraphrasing of the article. It's almost as if the NYT journalist anticipated this said to herself, "I'll beat him to it!"
  52. @IHTG
    P.S. The comments appear to be suffering from an infestation of liberal trolls.

    It’s like someone on the left has discovered where Trump has gotten a lot of his ideas ultimately from, and by attacking the source, they think they can shut it down. The horse has already bolted. Lol.

    All that is going to happen is that a few of the trolls stay. After a few months, mostly they eventually get converted too it seems.

    • Replies: @Mr. Blank

    All that is going to happen is that a few of the trolls stay. After a few months, mostly they eventually get converted too it seems.

     

    I think I originally found iSteve through a link to somebody who was attacking him. At the time I was mildly pro-immigration, because that was the message I'd absorbed from the culture. But I had some lingering doubts that I didn't really share with anyone...

    Anyway, I stuck around because, aside from the more taboo topics, I got a kick out of Steve's super-low-key comic sensibility. Eventually, I got converted too. Steve's trademark method of Noticing something, offering a few uncomfortable questions that EVERYBODY is thinking but nobody else will say out loud, then casually walking away whistling like Mister Rogers is pretty damn effective.
    , @neutral
    I certainly do not support leftist ideas, but one should not call everyone who has different methods of thinking a troll. A troll is someone who is simply looking to make trouble for the sake of making trouble.
  53. @Kylie
    "Under his presidency, the American dream would be primarily reserved for Americans."

    What the--?!

    I thought this was one of your sly witticisms. It's from the article!

    They can't go any lower than this. They just can't.

    Most people reading “Under his presidency, the American dream would be primarily reserved for Americans.” is going to be thinking “and this is a problem… how?”

    • Replies: @Kylie
    I pray you are right.
  54. @Tiny Duck
    Apparently no moderate-to- liberal Democrat can point out that the economy is far better than after the Bush disaster, or that crime is actually far less than eight years ago, or that energy/fuel costs are less, or that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning. Or that your 401K holding your pension assets has more than doubled under Obama. Or that tens of millions more people have employment. Or that 30 million have health insurance than prior to that terrible Obamacare so hated by the Far Left and every Republican.

    After all, Democrats, with their 60 day Congressional majority and in the face of eight years of total Republican obstruction, did not bring in the Nirvana/Utopia demanded by all the armchair leftists hanging out here who so loathe Krugman and Clinton. Y'all starting to remind me of the lunatic demanding Clinton be executed for treason. All you have accomplished so far is increasing the likelihood of electing America's first fascist President.

    your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning.

    In Colonial times, taller buildings such as churches and barns were struck by lightning quite often, until Benjamin Franklin invented the lightning rod to safely carry the electrical charge away.

    Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we had something like lightning rods, but for terrorists?

    The old American attitude was that we did not have to be fatalistic, in even the face of what used to be called “Acts of God”, but could use our brains and our ingenuity to protect ourselves.

    The new liberal attitude is that we should act in the face of terrorism the same way a flock of sheep act in a thunderstorm – just keep munching away.

    Crazy Arabs are just an inevitable part of nature. Just as we can’t have grass-nurturing rain without the occasional lightning bolt that takes out one of our fellow sheep (what are the odds, anyway?), we can’t have delicious falafel and kebabs (CHICKEN kebabs please) without the occasional jihadist. Just gotta learn to live (or sometimes not) with it.

    No reason to get excited – there are plenty of (minimum wage) jobs for new college grads and they should have their loans paid off well before retirement. Under Hillary, some American may make as much as FIFTEEN DOLLARS per hour at Starbucks – can you imagine such prosperity?

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we had something like lightning rods, but for terrorists Leftists?
     
    There FIFY.
    , @Jean Cocteausten
    Contrast this attitude with the reaction to Hurricane Katrina, an actual natural disaster that the left blamed on Bush.
    , @Forbes
    The lightening analogy is puerile. The chance of someone being killed when a terrorist strikes (a near certainty) is far higher than when lightening does--as lightening literally strikes all the time. The analogy also implies that terrorism is akin to an act of nature that mankind should just learn to live with.
  55. @JohnnyWalker123
    I actually liked "Gangs of New York." It worked for me. As you pointed out in your review, the movie portrayed Irish immigrants pretty badly.

    Here's the ending, which I thought was well-done.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p-8Lu7MRjQs

    I enjoyed Gangs of New York even though it didn’t feel like it worked from start to finish. Yep, good sobering ending. If they ran out the last frame just a little bit more, they could remove the Twin Towers.

    • Replies: @middle aged vet
    The posted clip from the "Gangs" of New York looks like a fairly good ending - copied from John Ford, probably, but from the old John Ford - the younger John Ford would never have had the courage to end one of his vintage WWII movies that way (not even the greatest WWII movie ever, They were Expendable). Old Ford had a fraction of the talent of Young Ford but Old Ford, to his credit, tried to make up for his declining talent with more artistic courage (not that anyone cares much, because the talent had seeped away) .
  56. @Tiny Duck
    Apparently no moderate-to- liberal Democrat can point out that the economy is far better than after the Bush disaster, or that crime is actually far less than eight years ago, or that energy/fuel costs are less, or that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning. Or that your 401K holding your pension assets has more than doubled under Obama. Or that tens of millions more people have employment. Or that 30 million have health insurance than prior to that terrible Obamacare so hated by the Far Left and every Republican.

    After all, Democrats, with their 60 day Congressional majority and in the face of eight years of total Republican obstruction, did not bring in the Nirvana/Utopia demanded by all the armchair leftists hanging out here who so loathe Krugman and Clinton. Y'all starting to remind me of the lunatic demanding Clinton be executed for treason. All you have accomplished so far is increasing the likelihood of electing America's first fascist President.

    or that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning.

    Yes, we can’t control “terrorism” anymore than lightning, pajama boy.

  57. @guest
    We don't need a name to think about it, but it's much, much harder. We know it largely because it is, or was, the main enemy of leftism: the dragon they're always slaying, like in a Passion play. (They're also fighting rightists who grew up in leftist culture and don't know the original America. These they call fascists.) But that's a negative way to know it. It's not enough.

    I've noticed that they talk incessantly about minority cultures: their music, their food, and so forth, and how we "appropriate" it. But they act as if there's no such thing as culture amongst white people. Unless they're part of specific groups, like Italians or the Irish. The dominant American ethnic group in U.S. culture were and are the English. But we so take them for granted it's as if their influence isn't there, even though blacks, for instance, have "appropriated" more of it than we could ever hope to appropriate of theirs should we try.

    A similar fate befell German culture. I guess the Irish survived because they were oppressed, or whatever. But there's a whimsical quality to Irish-American culture, which I find artificial. Anyway, the point is that mainstream American culture is there, while people brought up in its slain yet undying influence pretend it isn't.

    You almost immediately fell into the Sapir-Whorf trap, talking about “white people” when you clearly intended to refer to the Hamiltonian-American community.

    • Replies: @guest
    I don't know why you pick Hamilton, in particular, though his political vision did carry the day, more or less, and his lineage did trace back to the British Isles, I think. WASP is a narrow term, true, and quite much-abused and tainted one. But Aglo-American is a decent term for traditional U.S. culture. Anglo-Celtic-Dutch-German may be better, if you want to let in a few minorities. Everything on top of that came with Mass Culture, which is something else entirely and not traditional America.
  58. @whorefinder
    At this point, I can't tell if the NY Times guys don't understand how small their audience is in comparison to the rest of the country, or whether they assume that they, like their heroes at Pravda, must relentlessly publish the party line merely for appearances sake.

    I mean, seriously. If these guys are so delusional that they think they influence a majority of America, they belong in the loony bin.

    Their audience isn’t small , Sailer’s audience is small . The vast majority of the NYT’s audience is made up of middle class professionals whose only interest is maintaining their status . As you well know to deviate from the party line is at best professional and social suicide. These highly “educated” sheep have internalized the Marxist message and will shitcan friends and family in order to maintain their shitty little clock punching positions and their “relationships” with others like themselves . Stalin and Dr. Goebbels were early pioneers of the system we live in now and they would envy the control over public discourse that the progressive masters have now. The opposition is so ineffectual that there isn’t even any reason to lock them up . Their only cocern is guns . As Jughashvil said once :

    “Ideas are more powerful than guns. We would not let our enemies have guns, why should we let them have ideas.”

    • Replies: @Bill
    Stalin and the Nazis (not, I suppose, Goebbels) mostly used the "beat up, dispossess, and kill a lot of people" method of social control. The system we have now, an empire of lies kept afloat by social pressure from the top (a neat trick floating something by pressure from above, no?), is more reminiscent of Brezhnev than Stalin or Goebbels. That's why alt right types are always quoting Havel and Solzhenitsyn --- actually they tend to quote "Theodore Dalrymple" paraphrasing those guys for some reason. Though, in truth, Brezhnev killed people too.
  59. @guest
    I've never heard the phrase "nation of nations" before, to my knowledge. So why do I care if someone denies it? Then again, I don't remember hearing "American Exceptionalism" until people started mocking neocons with it. I'm not connected to the world in which such phrases are bandied.

    There’s a word for a “nation of nations”: an imperium. I know this is what the left wants, and to some measure what the US is, but it’s strange to see the NYT nakedly promote it without even a nod to the consent of the governed. What will they pump for next, the abolition of voting?

    • Replies: @guest
    That begs the question: when did the U.S. become an empire? The Civil War? When we conquered the West? Or was it when we branched out overseas? Certainly it was by the time of FDR; couldn't be before then. The immigration free-for-all is an afterthought, in a way.
    , @guest
    "the abolition of voting?"

    They don't hide their disgust of democracy, despite the pro forma hosannas they sing to its glory. Listen to how they say "playing politics," as opposed to bipartisanship or "reaching across the isle." It's unmistakable: everything "political," i.e. relating to democratic politics and the officials that voters select, is dirty and wrong and bad.
  60. in which Wyoming is inexplicably full of vast columns of trudging Old World huddled masses:

    A lot of the homesteaders were in fact immigrants (not Italians and Jews but Germans and Scandinavians and Brits).

    The craziest were the Mormon handcart pioneers

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mormon_handcart_pioneers

    The Mormon Church didn’t have the budget to pay to put the immigrants into Conestoga Wagons with oxen so they hit upon the idea that the pioneers could each push a poorly built wheelbarrow for 1,300 miles in the Wyoming winter.

    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
    John Ford could have made 'Wheelbarrow Master.'
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Jack D, There is a statue of a push cart pioneer family, on the grounds of the Temple in Salt Lake City, Utah, amazing determination . I also read that some Mormons made a good living salvaging all the heavy items discarded by other pioneers along the trails westward.
    , @tomv

    A lot of the homesteaders were in fact immigrants (not Italians and Jews but Germans and Scandinavians and Brits).
     
    Sure, everyone came from somewhere else originally, but I don't think those arrived in "trudging vast columns" as portrayed in the movie.
  61. @tanabear
    It was America that made the immigrants great, not the immigrants that made America great. Correcting the arrow of causation can provide a great deal of clarity.

    Then do so. It was Europeans that made America great.

  62. @Tiny Duck
    Nothing Trump is talking about, including making America White again will happen. Life won't get better for people for whom technology, not trade has taken their jobs. What there needs to be is a combination of government and entrepreneurship. Only the Democrats offer anything like that.

    So you’re arguing that, because automation/ technology have resulted in in the elimination of millions of jobs for unskilled laborers, we need to continue to import tens of millions more Third World unskilled laborers to fill those now-vanished jobs, and the millions more that will be lost to automation in the next couple of decades?
    Hmm…

  63. @Tiny Duck
    Nothing Trump is talking about, including making America White again will happen. Life won't get better for people for whom technology, not trade has taken their jobs. What there needs to be is a combination of government and entrepreneurship. Only the Democrats offer anything like that.

    This comment was lifted word for word from the comments section of the previously referenced Krugman article.

  64. @Tiny Duck
    In 35 years of living in Cleveland and an inner-ring suburb, I've come to realize that there is a significant population of mostly white, mostly middle or lower middle class suburbanites who are so completely estranged from the life of their central city that they simply will not believe that things could possibly be better or safer. They don't come downtown, they disbelieve or dismiss any positive media coverage about the city, and it is always and forever 1968, or, here in Cleveland, 1966, the year of the Hough riots. There are also a lot of people working to reverse this stereotype, but the folks who are so deeply invested in their fear of the city and the people who live there form a natural audience for Trump's dystopian vision.

    This comment, too, was lifted word for word from the comments section of the previously referenced Krugman article.

  65. @IHTG
    P.S. The comments appear to be suffering from an infestation of liberal trolls.

    “P.S. The comments appear to be suffering from an infestation of liberal trolls.”

    Damn straight. And they’re that really bland $12.25/hour Organizing Against America caliber of troll.

    Why publish such drivel, Steve? The anti-White, heterophobic Left can and does do better than this. They’re so bad, they’re not worth responding to.

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    Sparring partners
  66. @Whoiwasthelasttime
    Off topic but part of the 'narrative': looking around for an exact number of unarmed black people killed by police I stumbled on this site that attempts to chronical exactly who those 102 unarmed black people were and how they died in 2015.

    http://mappingpoliceviolence.org/unarmed/

    Don't know who put this together, if it's accurate or their ultimate agenda.
    I did not bother to read all the 102 descriptions but looking at the first 20 I see:
    2 were killed by their cop boy friend/girl friend
    3 were killed accidentally by police cars responding to a crime
    2 died of medical problems fighting cops
    2 pointed toy guns
    3 died trying to take gun
    1 killed by security guard
    1 died when he tried to take an off duty cops car at car wash. Oops.
    Unfortunately the race of cop not supplied

    Right. What surprised me about the website I linked was:
    1) the number killed was 102 (out of 40,000,ooo black Americans)
    2) how broad the ‘unarmed black man’ category is. I mean traffic accidents count? Pointing toy guns count? Perps dying from supposedly non leathal force while resisting arrest count? Reading the descriptions few seem to fit the ‘coalhouse walker’ innocent black guy meme I hear daily on NPR. It was an eye opener (I’m naive)how truly manufactured this ‘epidemic’ of police violence in the black community really is.

  67. “But if you keep repeating The Narrative over and over for enough decades, it can be shocking when some heretic doesn’t bow down to it.”

    Indeed. In the eyes of the Multicult anything short of orgasmic praise for immigrants and immigration is sacrilege. Any praise of this country’s initial settlers – the overwhelming majority of whom came from the British Isles – is grounds for excommunication.

    I’m not one to lightly dismiss the contributions that immigrants and non-British peoples have made to this country, but it’s been quite obvious to me since at least high school that the new rules aren’t about leveling the playing field so much as they are about pushing certain groups to the bottom while keeping others on top, and it’s not too hard which groups fit into which category.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    The Narrative for some time now has been the "immigrants" are the heroes of American history, insofar as such a thing is allowed. The pioneers and settlers who founded the country are not to be mentioned except as an object of hatred.
    , @Maj. Kong
    An observer should ask themselves why modern-day immigrants to the British Isles are supposed to be given extravagant praise by those whose lineage is of the soil for millennia.
  68. @tanabear
    It was America that made the immigrants great, not the immigrants that made America great. Correcting the arrow of causation can provide a great deal of clarity.

    It was America that made the immigrants great, not the immigrants that made America great. Correcting the arrow of causation can provide a great deal of clarity.

    That’s a good point. As a New World nation America took in immigrants just like Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and the rest of the New World. But why did America turn out so much better? Germans, Italians, Poles and Jews went to Latin America, but didn’t turn those places into dynamos. So why should we assume they were responsible for turning America into a dynamo? Maybe it was America and her original stock with their established institutions that had the greater effect on the immigrants.

    BTW, it is interesting that our fellow English New World nations, Canada, Oz and NZ, had similar positive effects on immigrants.

    • Replies: @unpc downunder
    Percentage wise, there aren't enough North West Europeans in Latin America to have a dominating effect on the culture, and Latin America was colonised at a time when Europe when still in a pre-modern stage of development and white IQs and temperaments probably weren't up to modern standards.

    Admittedly it probably is fair to say that countries run by North-West Europeans tend to be somewhat more prosperous than those run by Latins and Slavs. Germany and Sweden are more industrious than Spain and Poland, and the US is richer than Argentina or Uraguay. Slavs seem to have relatively high IQs but are prone to intellectual laziness, while Latins are smart and creative but can be a bit lazy and dishonest.

    , @Catiline

    As a New World nation America took in immigrants just like Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and the rest of the New World. But why did America turn out so much better? Germans, Italians, Poles and Jews went to Latin America, but didn’t turn those places into dynamos. So why should we assume they were responsible for turning America into a dynamo?
     
    Not to the same degree and not as early. Also, other new world nations, Brazil especially, had a higher % of "vibrants" to manage than did the Limeys. Latin America has been a de facto colony of Britain/America since the Napoleonic era, if not sooner.We assume as much because it's true.
    , @Catiline
    Why is my comment still awaiting moderation?
    , @Former Darfur
    Yhe US had minimal Latin influence, i.e., Spanish and Portuguese, and the Catholic Church wielded little power until after the basic nation was formed. Oliver correctly holds Catholicism largely responsible for the mestization of most of the New World south of the Rio Grande.
    , @Curle
    Germans turning the US into a prosperous Dynamo (and displacing the Anglo elite) was a major theme of The Education of Henry Adams a book once considered required reading.
    , @Anonymous

    BTW, it is interesting that our fellow English New World nations, Canada, Oz and NZ, had similar positive effects on immigrants.
     
    Those are fine countries, but I'm not sure I'd call them "dynamos". They've also benefited from their links and association with the British Empire and then with the English speaking US that other European countries or countries like Argentina didn't have.
    , @Anonymous
    Perhaps, but some of the most founding stock elements of the population, like white Southerners and Appalachians, have been and remain among the least dynamic.
  69. Scorsese may be the most overrated director of all time. Francis Ford Coppola, OTOH, created some of the best films ever, though he’s also made piles of garbage films.

    I’ve always liked the old narrative that pioneers like Levi Strauss built this country 😉

    I have an idea for the New York Times. Have a more diverse group of shareholders. Give tens of millions of shares to immigrants and natives. I’m sure the new shareholders will enrich the company. Somehow.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    I’ve always liked the old narrative that pioneers like Levi Strauss built this country
     
    I'll raise you Morris Lasker:


    LASKER, MORRIS (1840–1916). Morris Lasker, investor and banker, son of Daniel and Rebecca Lasker, was born in 1840 in Lask, then Polish Prussia, where his brother Eduard became a celebrated politician and author. Morris immigrated to the United States at age sixteen. He arrived by boat in Norfolk, Virginia, and took a job as a store clerk in Portsmouth, hoping to save enough money to start his own business. After several unproductive ventures in New York, Georgia, and Florida, he bought a horse, became a peddler, and worked his way to Texas. He first settled in Weatherford, where he got a job as a store clerk in early 1860. He subsequently joined Col. George W. Baylor to fight the Apache Indians and fought for the Confederate Army under Col. John S. (Rip) Ford. After the war he returned to Texas to work as a peddler again. He joined Sanger Brothers and in 1867 operated his own store, before he became associated with M. Schram in the jobbing business in Galveston. Lasker sold his interest in Schram and Lasker to start his own business in Bryan, where he stayed for two years before


    returning to Galveston in 1872. He became a partner in Marx and Kempner before joining the LeGierse Company, wholesale grocers. He sold his interest in that business in 1890. Lasker married Nettie Davis of New York in 1876, and they had eight children.

    Lasker established the Lasker Real Estate Company in 1890 but lost everything in the 1893 depression. He sent his family to Germany and began rebuilding his assets. He acquired interests in different banking firms; he founded the Citizens Loan Company and the Island City Savings Bank and served as president of both. For eighteen years he was vice president and chairman of the finance committee of the First National Bank. When Miles Crowley resigned, Lasker was elected to the Texas Senate in 1895 to serve the remainder of his term. Around 1906 he purchased the Texas Star Flour Mill, which he expanded to include properties in Wichita Falls and Waco. He also had interests in the cotton business and served as president of the Galveston Cotton Exchange. He served as a member of Galveston's Board of School Trustees and contributed heavily to Jewish and other charities. He died in Galveston in 1916.
     
    https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fla43
  70. @Tiny Duck
    In 35 years of living in Cleveland and an inner-ring suburb, I've come to realize that there is a significant population of mostly white, mostly middle or lower middle class suburbanites who are so completely estranged from the life of their central city that they simply will not believe that things could possibly be better or safer. They don't come downtown, they disbelieve or dismiss any positive media coverage about the city, and it is always and forever 1968, or, here in Cleveland, 1966, the year of the Hough riots. There are also a lot of people working to reverse this stereotype, but the folks who are so deeply invested in their fear of the city and the people who live there form a natural audience for Trump's dystopian vision.

    Perhaps because you central city types managed to relocate a lot of your violent crime to their areas via Section 8? Naw, couldn’t be that. It’s not as if Ferguson was 90+% White, with low crime, just 3 decades ago, or anything…

    By the way, why is it that none of you leftists are complaining about the ethnic cleansing of Blacks from San Francisco? 13% in the 80s, 6% now. Sounds like a serious loss of valuable diversity. Don’t you think an emergency Section 8 program is indicated? I’d even be willing to sacrifice some of the priceless diversity of my own city to help out those (obviously ignorant and bigoted) San Franciscans. Who could do more than that?

    • Replies: @granesperanzablanco
    we are still waiting for the final report

    http://sfmohcd.org/african-american-out-migration
  71. @Wilkey
    "But if you keep repeating The Narrative over and over for enough decades, it can be shocking when some heretic doesn’t bow down to it."

    Indeed. In the eyes of the Multicult anything short of orgasmic praise for immigrants and immigration is sacrilege. Any praise of this country's initial settlers - the overwhelming majority of whom came from the British Isles - is grounds for excommunication.

    I'm not one to lightly dismiss the contributions that immigrants and non-British peoples have made to this country, but it's been quite obvious to me since at least high school that the new rules aren't about leveling the playing field so much as they are about pushing certain groups to the bottom while keeping others on top, and it's not too hard which groups fit into which category.

    The Narrative for some time now has been the “immigrants” are the heroes of American history, insofar as such a thing is allowed. The pioneers and settlers who founded the country are not to be mentioned except as an object of hatred.

  72. @Tiny Duck
    In 35 years of living in Cleveland and an inner-ring suburb, I've come to realize that there is a significant population of mostly white, mostly middle or lower middle class suburbanites who are so completely estranged from the life of their central city that they simply will not believe that things could possibly be better or safer. They don't come downtown, they disbelieve or dismiss any positive media coverage about the city, and it is always and forever 1968, or, here in Cleveland, 1966, the year of the Hough riots. There are also a lot of people working to reverse this stereotype, but the folks who are so deeply invested in their fear of the city and the people who live there form a natural audience for Trump's dystopian vision.

    but the folks who are so deeply invested in their fear of the city and the people who live there form a natural audience for Trump’s dystopian vision.

    Curiously, Trump is a big city guy.

  73. @Tiny Duck
    Apparently no moderate-to- liberal Democrat can point out that the economy is far better than after the Bush disaster, or that crime is actually far less than eight years ago, or that energy/fuel costs are less, or that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning. Or that your 401K holding your pension assets has more than doubled under Obama. Or that tens of millions more people have employment. Or that 30 million have health insurance than prior to that terrible Obamacare so hated by the Far Left and every Republican.

    After all, Democrats, with their 60 day Congressional majority and in the face of eight years of total Republican obstruction, did not bring in the Nirvana/Utopia demanded by all the armchair leftists hanging out here who so loathe Krugman and Clinton. Y'all starting to remind me of the lunatic demanding Clinton be executed for treason. All you have accomplished so far is increasing the likelihood of electing America's first fascist President.

    Some context I included in a letter to the FT in February ( https://next.ft.com/content/f44029ec-cf44-11e5-92a1-c5e23ef99c77 )

    The widely quoted US unemployment rate (currently 4.9 per cent) doesn’t count those who have fallen out of the labour force. According to St Louis Fed data, there are now 94m Americans out of the labour force; when President Obama took office, that figure was under 81m.

    Similarly, statistics regarding health insurance costs are bleak. The Affordable Care Act expanded coverage, but did so at steeply higher costs for average workers. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, from 2010 to 2015 employer-sponsored health insurance premiums rose 27 per cent and deductibles rose 67 per cent on average.

  74. @guest
    "Tradition" is where the left last pushed it. Right now you are a thought criminal if you go back before the 60s, for sure. But it's not just a chronological thing. The general tendency is for us to drift further left as time goes by. But what it means to be correct keeps changing, always changing, never resting.

    That's Permanent Revolution. It won't do for instance, for Republicans to try, as they do, to out-black the Democrats. "Dems Are the Real Racists" is a loser. All that nonsense trying to convince the nation that Trump is for Women, Gays, and so forth last night was a waste of time.

    "Hey, idiot, the game's over here now. You lose again," says the leftist.

    You assume that the role of the Republican Party in our system is to oppose the Left, rather than to police those who end up beyond the right edge of the Overton window as it drifts ever leftward. This assumption might be, as the progs say, “problematic.”

  75. @whorefinder
    At this point, I can't tell if the NY Times guys don't understand how small their audience is in comparison to the rest of the country, or whether they assume that they, like their heroes at Pravda, must relentlessly publish the party line merely for appearances sake.

    I mean, seriously. If these guys are so delusional that they think they influence a majority of America, they belong in the loony bin.

    Surely you realize that the currency of today’s MSM is clicks. That is what drives ad revenues.

    Advertisers don’t care whether the clickers are left or right, R or D, red or blue, or anything else. They care that you clicked. Period. They got your eyeballs, so the formulas go.

    Every time someone of a conservative, or alt right, or dark enlightenment, or shitlord, or new dissident, or whatever you want to call it clicks on the NYT or MSNBC or CNN or whatever American Pravda sites, those outlets make money.

    At this juncture I’d bet that what’s sustaining these hemorrhaging outlets is in fact the clicks of those who hate them most. If you start viewing their most bat-guano insane SJW stuff as a clickbait literary genre, it all makes more sense. (The fact that so many SJWs believe what they publish is just one more indication of their Eloi gullibility.)

    I get my NYT topics from our host, so that when such things come up in conversation I’m not as clueless as I would dearly like to be.

    I refuse to go there and click on anything. I only go to sites that don’t take ads. Ones that panhandle openly for their income.

    • Replies: @Whiskey
    Ad fraud is so widespread advertisers are going back to tv and radio and print, so says the FT.
  76. One of the clearest illustrations I’ve ever read of the old adage: “One man’s indictment is another’s manifesto.”

  77. @Anonym
    Most people reading “Under his presidency, the American dream would be primarily reserved for Americans.” is going to be thinking "and this is a problem... how?"

    I pray you are right.

  78. @Kylie
    "Under his presidency, the American dream would be primarily reserved for Americans."

    What the--?!

    I thought this was one of your sly witticisms. It's from the article!

    They can't go any lower than this. They just can't.

    I too thought this was Steve Sailer’s sarcastic paraphrasing of the article. It’s almost as if the NYT journalist anticipated this said to herself, “I’ll beat him to it!”

  79. @Diversity Heretic
    John Derbyshire has a good description of the attitude displayed by the New York Times: Ellis Island romanticism. Immigration always had its problems (Japan has done just fine with almost no immigration). I'm beginning to think the Know-Nothings had a point.

    Me, too. And I’m Catholic.

  80. @Steve Sailer
    Grandpa Trump ran a whorehouse in a goldmining town?

    I wish you hadn’t written that, because it will be a NYT headline RSN.

  81. @iSteveFan

    It was America that made the immigrants great, not the immigrants that made America great. Correcting the arrow of causation can provide a great deal of clarity.
     
    That's a good point. As a New World nation America took in immigrants just like Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and the rest of the New World. But why did America turn out so much better? Germans, Italians, Poles and Jews went to Latin America, but didn't turn those places into dynamos. So why should we assume they were responsible for turning America into a dynamo? Maybe it was America and her original stock with their established institutions that had the greater effect on the immigrants.

    BTW, it is interesting that our fellow English New World nations, Canada, Oz and NZ, had similar positive effects on immigrants.

    Percentage wise, there aren’t enough North West Europeans in Latin America to have a dominating effect on the culture, and Latin America was colonised at a time when Europe when still in a pre-modern stage of development and white IQs and temperaments probably weren’t up to modern standards.

    Admittedly it probably is fair to say that countries run by North-West Europeans tend to be somewhat more prosperous than those run by Latins and Slavs. Germany and Sweden are more industrious than Spain and Poland, and the US is richer than Argentina or Uraguay. Slavs seem to have relatively high IQs but are prone to intellectual laziness, while Latins are smart and creative but can be a bit lazy and dishonest.

  82. Why was Heaven’s Gate “cocaine-fueled” in particular? The director? Year?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Both.
  83. Seriously, as I’ve mentioned before, I’m old enough to remember before The Narrative became “the traditional view that America’s welcome for immigrants was a prime reason for its exceptional innovation and prosperity.” From watching cowboy movies in the 1960s, I absorbed the previous Narrative that the pioneering spirit of the settlers was a prime reason for its exceptional innovation and prosperity.

    Indeed. The films of John Ford constitute a kind of epic of the settling of Anglo-America: Drums Along the Mohawk, , My Darling Clementine, Fort Apache, The Searchers, …

    , he set aside a core tenet of the American narrative on immigration: that the United States is a nation of nations, built on the sweat and initiative of people who came from other countries.

    Dunno. I always thought that America was built by native-born Anglo Americans : Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, Lincoln, Thomas Edison, JP Morgan, Morse and Vail, Elisha Collier and Samuel Colt, Josiah Willard Gibbs, Mad Anthony Wayne, etc.

    Not since the restrictionist movements in the early 20th century has a leading politician tried to galvanize Americans with such an unalloyed nativist message.

    Wait, you mean that we might actually get a 1924-65 style immigration pause? Sounds pretty good to me.

    Most of the immigrants are unaccompanied children and parents with children, largely from violence-torn countries in Central America, who are released to pursue asylum claims in immigration courts.

    Yeah, and some of those “children” are as young as 17……

    “Our national identity is anchored in the notion that we are a permanently evolving people, where the other becomes us and we are strengthened by it,” said Frank Sharry, executive director of America’s Voice, a pro-immigration group.

    And yet, somehow, pre-1965 America didn’t seem to share that view…..

  84. @iSteveFan

    It was America that made the immigrants great, not the immigrants that made America great. Correcting the arrow of causation can provide a great deal of clarity.
     
    That's a good point. As a New World nation America took in immigrants just like Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and the rest of the New World. But why did America turn out so much better? Germans, Italians, Poles and Jews went to Latin America, but didn't turn those places into dynamos. So why should we assume they were responsible for turning America into a dynamo? Maybe it was America and her original stock with their established institutions that had the greater effect on the immigrants.

    BTW, it is interesting that our fellow English New World nations, Canada, Oz and NZ, had similar positive effects on immigrants.

    As a New World nation America took in immigrants just like Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and the rest of the New World. But why did America turn out so much better? Germans, Italians, Poles and Jews went to Latin America, but didn’t turn those places into dynamos. So why should we assume they were responsible for turning America into a dynamo?

    Not to the same degree and not as early. Also, other new world nations, Brazil especially, had a higher % of “vibrants” to manage than did the Limeys. Latin America has been a de facto colony of Britain/America since the Napoleonic era, if not sooner.We assume as much because it’s true.

    • Replies: @Catiline
    Afraid of something, Stevie?
  85. @AndrewR
    I agree with forcing Salim to divest. Maybe seize his share entirely and use the proceeds to pay for the wall. He truly is a vile man.

    Who is this “Salim”?

    Carlos Slim?

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Slim is his mexican pseudonym.
  86. “Under His Presidency, the American Dream Would be Primarily Reserved for Americans.”

    I can’t even.

    Steve, when I saw the headline, I knew I’d have to make sure this wasn’t you cracking a joke before I pointed and laughed at the NYT.

    FFS, man, Manjoo just set the high water mark for punchlines printed in that rag; Preston didn’t even give him a frickin’ day before topping it.

    he set aside a core tenet of the American narrative on immigration

    Pretty sure that’s the Jewish Narrative.

    Using even darker language than he had on the campaign trail, Mr. Trump did not include even a boilerplate mention of positive contributions by immigrants.

    Sorta like how the left never mentions how dead white men invented or discovered almost everything, ever, before they go into their daily routine of talking $#!^ about white men.

    Historians and legal scholars struggled to recall when a presidential candidate had departed so radically from the traditional view that America’s welcome for immigrants was a prime reason for its exceptional innovation and prosperity.

    Except, well, the rather hostile welcome the Indians gave the Pioneers. That was definitely the Right Thing To Do, and they were definitely on The Right Side of History; the “immigrants” were bad Bad BAD.

    Just believe the opposite of everything leftists believe and say, and you’ll be in the ballpark.

  87. @Jack D

    your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning.
     
    In Colonial times, taller buildings such as churches and barns were struck by lightning quite often, until Benjamin Franklin invented the lightning rod to safely carry the electrical charge away.

    Wouldn't it be wonderful if we had something like lightning rods, but for terrorists?

    The old American attitude was that we did not have to be fatalistic, in even the face of what used to be called "Acts of God", but could use our brains and our ingenuity to protect ourselves.

    The new liberal attitude is that we should act in the face of terrorism the same way a flock of sheep act in a thunderstorm - just keep munching away.

    Crazy Arabs are just an inevitable part of nature. Just as we can't have grass-nurturing rain without the occasional lightning bolt that takes out one of our fellow sheep (what are the odds, anyway?), we can't have delicious falafel and kebabs (CHICKEN kebabs please) without the occasional jihadist. Just gotta learn to live (or sometimes not) with it.

    No reason to get excited - there are plenty of (minimum wage) jobs for new college grads and they should have their loans paid off well before retirement. Under Hillary, some American may make as much as FIFTEEN DOLLARS per hour at Starbucks - can you imagine such prosperity?

    Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we had something like lightning rods, but for terrorists Leftists?

    There FIFY.

  88. @Judah Benjamin Hur
    Scorsese may be the most overrated director of all time. Francis Ford Coppola, OTOH, created some of the best films ever, though he's also made piles of garbage films.

    I've always liked the old narrative that pioneers like Levi Strauss built this country ;)

    I have an idea for the New York Times. Have a more diverse group of shareholders. Give tens of millions of shares to immigrants and natives. I'm sure the new shareholders will enrich the company. Somehow.

    I’ve always liked the old narrative that pioneers like Levi Strauss built this country

    I’ll raise you Morris Lasker:

    LASKER, MORRIS (1840–1916). Morris Lasker, investor and banker, son of Daniel and Rebecca Lasker, was born in 1840 in Lask, then Polish Prussia, where his brother Eduard became a celebrated politician and author. Morris immigrated to the United States at age sixteen. He arrived by boat in Norfolk, Virginia, and took a job as a store clerk in Portsmouth, hoping to save enough money to start his own business. After several unproductive ventures in New York, Georgia, and Florida, he bought a horse, became a peddler, and worked his way to Texas. He first settled in Weatherford, where he got a job as a store clerk in early 1860. He subsequently joined Col. George W. Baylor to fight the Apache Indians and fought for the Confederate Army under Col. John S. (Rip) Ford. After the war he returned to Texas to work as a peddler again. He joined Sanger Brothers and in 1867 operated his own store, before he became associated with M. Schram in the jobbing business in Galveston. Lasker sold his interest in Schram and Lasker to start his own business in Bryan, where he stayed for two years before

    returning to Galveston in 1872. He became a partner in Marx and Kempner before joining the LeGierse Company, wholesale grocers. He sold his interest in that business in 1890. Lasker married Nettie Davis of New York in 1876, and they had eight children.

    Lasker established the Lasker Real Estate Company in 1890 but lost everything in the 1893 depression. He sent his family to Germany and began rebuilding his assets. He acquired interests in different banking firms; he founded the Citizens Loan Company and the Island City Savings Bank and served as president of both. For eighteen years he was vice president and chairman of the finance committee of the First National Bank. When Miles Crowley resigned, Lasker was elected to the Texas Senate in 1895 to serve the remainder of his term. Around 1906 he purchased the Texas Star Flour Mill, which he expanded to include properties in Wichita Falls and Waco. He also had interests in the cotton business and served as president of the Galveston Cotton Exchange. He served as a member of Galveston’s Board of School Trustees and contributed heavily to Jewish and other charities. He died in Galveston in 1916.

    https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fla43

  89. I suppose Ellis Island immigrants resent knowing that not only did their ancestors not do the heavy lifting in creating America, they didn’t do it anywhere else in the new world, either. Spanish, Portuguese, British, French, a few outliers here and there, that’s pretty much it.

    But claiming that they did seems like an awful way to keep the pesky hate-facts away from tender eyeballs. Sort of like crowing about the death of the white race, blaming whites for black failure, etc.

    • Replies: @Catiline
    The projection is strong in this one. One major consolation of overall white decline is the even steeper decline of Anglo-vermin. Once the Anglo-vermin are out of the way most of the rest of the European family should recover quite nicely. One step back, two forward.
    , @iSteveFan
    I've heard that sixty percent of Argentines have some Italian ancestry. Yet the Italians didn't seem to make Argentina all that great like they did for the USA. Of course there is always the chance that they weren't really responsible for the greatness of the USA in the first place.
  90. @Anonym
    It's like someone on the left has discovered where Trump has gotten a lot of his ideas ultimately from, and by attacking the source, they think they can shut it down. The horse has already bolted. Lol.

    All that is going to happen is that a few of the trolls stay. After a few months, mostly they eventually get converted too it seems.

    All that is going to happen is that a few of the trolls stay. After a few months, mostly they eventually get converted too it seems.

    I think I originally found iSteve through a link to somebody who was attacking him. At the time I was mildly pro-immigration, because that was the message I’d absorbed from the culture. But I had some lingering doubts that I didn’t really share with anyone…

    Anyway, I stuck around because, aside from the more taboo topics, I got a kick out of Steve’s super-low-key comic sensibility. Eventually, I got converted too. Steve’s trademark method of Noticing something, offering a few uncomfortable questions that EVERYBODY is thinking but nobody else will say out loud, then casually walking away whistling like Mister Rogers is pretty damn effective.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    Anyway, I stuck around because, aside from the more taboo topics, I got a kick out of Steve’s super-low-key comic sensibility. Eventually, I got converted too. Steve’s trademark method of Noticing something, offering a few uncomfortable questions that EVERYBODY is thinking but nobody else will say out loud, then casually walking away whistling like Mister Rogers is pretty damn effective.

    I've noticed the progression from trolls -> somewhat sympathetic -> converted, in what feels like most cases. It must be pretty brutal trying to maintain the goodthink when it's a constant stream of facts countering the narrative, along with the hypocrisy and vested interest exposed. It's not just Steve it's the rest of the comments section. I look forward to more of these leftists/Hillary+Soros trolls going native over time.
    , @Hunsdon
    Wait, so Steve is like the Kermit the frog drinking tea meme?
  91. @Jack D

    and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity
     
    By "ourselves", the Founders, being men of the Enlightenment, meant all of humanity. Wouldn't it be wonderful if every single person on earth could move here and enjoy the "American Dream" (a lifetime of government benefits just like Julia the cartoon), while at the same time not giving up their crazy religion and customs (just like Syed Farook)?

    By “ourselves”, the Founders, being men of the Enlightenment, meant all of humanity.

    They were thinking in a national context. And the Founders liked the fact that Anglo-America was so homogeneous:

    With equal pleasure I have as often taken notice that Providence has been pleased to give this one connected country to one united people–a people descended from the same ancestors, speaking the same language, professing the same religion, attached to the same principles of government, very similar in their manners and customs, and who, by their joint counsels, arms, and efforts, fighting side by side throughout a long and bloody war, have nobly established general liberty and independence.

    John Jay, Federalist Papers, No. 2

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt

    a people descended from the same ancestors, speaking the same language, professing the same religion, attached to the same principles of government
     
    Agitprop, 18th century style. There are millions of people alive today descended from the
    Dutch who founded New Amsterdam, as well as Swedes from New Sweden in Delaware. At the time, we hadn't had much problem with the remaining French in Detroit or Pittsburgh, who probably remained Catholic.

    A good book on this is The Island at the Center of the World, about Dutch Manhattan and its ongoing influence over American culture. For instance, the word boss and the word cookie have come to us from Dutch New York.
  92. @guest
    I agree that Gangs of New York didn't work, partly because the two things it tried to tie together: street fights between nativists and the foreign hordes and the draft riots, didn't fit together. I didn't pay much attention to the "hands that built America" theme. What stuck out to me was the excellent Bill the Butcher character, who was able to speak unspeakable truths owing to the fact that he was the villain.

    Also, and more importantly, through him we got a wonderful depiction of the Culture of Honor, which is present in all good gangster films. The way he respected the memory of the Liam Neeson character, and how he spared Leo because he hadn't yet earned a death at his hands, that was great. I love the conversation he had about how he lost his eye, which had dishonored him by looking away after losing a fight. A bit ridiculous, but again an excellent depiction of Honor.

    He was like a character out of the Iliad. Though on a much lower artistic level, of course.

    The movie was typical Miramax Oscar bait, which bores me.

    What stuck out to me was the excellent Bill the Butcher character, who was able to speak unspeakable truths owing to the fact that he was the villain.

    You can make a good argument that he’s the hero of the picture.

  93. Paging Ron Unz, paging Ron Unz, 3 of the first 4 comments are from the same sock-puppeting troll, paging Ron Unz.

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Unz only spams people if they point out he's a progressive lying about being a libertarian.

    Steve also can't approve cuckold fetishists fast enough.
  94. @George
    "Historians and legal scholars struggled to recall when a presidential candidate had departed so radically from the traditional view that America’s welcome for immigrants "

    1) Harding/Coolidge 1924
    2) Jefferson bans Arican immigration 1808
    3) Chester Arthur 1882 Chinese exclusion. Btw, Arthur is America's first civil rights lawyer.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chester_A._Arthur#Early_career

    See also
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_Restriction_League

    Alien and Sedition Acts:

    Congress specifically passed four measures – the Naturalization Act, the Alien Friends Act, the Alien Enemies Act and the Sedition Act. These statutes were designed to mitigate the threat of secessionists by disallowing their most extreme firebrands. The Naturalization Act increased to 14 years the period of residence required for an immigrant to attain American citizenship (naturalized citizens tended to vote for the Democratic-Republicans.) The Alien Friends Act and the Alien Enemies Act allowed the president to deport any foreigner (from friendly and hostile nations, respectively) which he considered dangerous to the country.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Adams#Alien_and_Sedition_Acts

  95. Surely you realize that the currency of today’s MSM is clicks. That is what drives ad revenues.

    Advertisers don’t care whether the clickers are left or right, R or D, red or blue, or anything else. They care that you clicked. Period. They got your eyeballs, so the formulas go.

    This is nonsense, of course. The alt-right could drive a zillion eyeballs to the MSM, but don’t hold your breath waiting for them to print any alt-right writers. Same thing goes for easing up on the PC policing of comments.

    You can make a good argument that he’s the hero of the picture.

    And there’s no question he dominates the film.

  96. By “ourselves”, the Founders, being men of the Enlightenment, meant all of humanity.

    Suuure. That’s why they immediately outlawed slavery, and tried so hard to accommodate and integrate the red man (who TJ had just called “savages” in the DoI).

  97. @Jack D

    your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning.
     
    In Colonial times, taller buildings such as churches and barns were struck by lightning quite often, until Benjamin Franklin invented the lightning rod to safely carry the electrical charge away.

    Wouldn't it be wonderful if we had something like lightning rods, but for terrorists?

    The old American attitude was that we did not have to be fatalistic, in even the face of what used to be called "Acts of God", but could use our brains and our ingenuity to protect ourselves.

    The new liberal attitude is that we should act in the face of terrorism the same way a flock of sheep act in a thunderstorm - just keep munching away.

    Crazy Arabs are just an inevitable part of nature. Just as we can't have grass-nurturing rain without the occasional lightning bolt that takes out one of our fellow sheep (what are the odds, anyway?), we can't have delicious falafel and kebabs (CHICKEN kebabs please) without the occasional jihadist. Just gotta learn to live (or sometimes not) with it.

    No reason to get excited - there are plenty of (minimum wage) jobs for new college grads and they should have their loans paid off well before retirement. Under Hillary, some American may make as much as FIFTEEN DOLLARS per hour at Starbucks - can you imagine such prosperity?

    Contrast this attitude with the reaction to Hurricane Katrina, an actual natural disaster that the left blamed on Bush.

  98. @Chris
    There's a word for a "nation of nations": an imperium. I know this is what the left wants, and to some measure what the US is, but it's strange to see the NYT nakedly promote it without even a nod to the consent of the governed. What will they pump for next, the abolition of voting?

    That begs the question: when did the U.S. become an empire? The Civil War? When we conquered the West? Or was it when we branched out overseas? Certainly it was by the time of FDR; couldn’t be before then. The immigration free-for-all is an afterthought, in a way.

    • Replies: @Curle
    When did the US become an Empire? http://www.lawnix.com/cases/martin-hunters-lessee.html

    Read From Union to Empire by Clyde Wilson.
    , @Curle
    When did the US become an Empire? http://www.lawnix.com/cases/martin-hunters-lessee.html

    Read From Union to Empire by Clyde Wilson.
  99. @Olorin
    Surely you realize that the currency of today's MSM is clicks. That is what drives ad revenues.

    Advertisers don't care whether the clickers are left or right, R or D, red or blue, or anything else. They care that you clicked. Period. They got your eyeballs, so the formulas go.

    Every time someone of a conservative, or alt right, or dark enlightenment, or shitlord, or new dissident, or whatever you want to call it clicks on the NYT or MSNBC or CNN or whatever American Pravda sites, those outlets make money.

    At this juncture I'd bet that what's sustaining these hemorrhaging outlets is in fact the clicks of those who hate them most. If you start viewing their most bat-guano insane SJW stuff as a clickbait literary genre, it all makes more sense. (The fact that so many SJWs believe what they publish is just one more indication of their Eloi gullibility.)

    I get my NYT topics from our host, so that when such things come up in conversation I'm not as clueless as I would dearly like to be.

    I refuse to go there and click on anything. I only go to sites that don't take ads. Ones that panhandle openly for their income.

    Ad fraud is so widespread advertisers are going back to tv and radio and print, so says the FT.

  100. @Chris
    There's a word for a "nation of nations": an imperium. I know this is what the left wants, and to some measure what the US is, but it's strange to see the NYT nakedly promote it without even a nod to the consent of the governed. What will they pump for next, the abolition of voting?

    “the abolition of voting?”

    They don’t hide their disgust of democracy, despite the pro forma hosannas they sing to its glory. Listen to how they say “playing politics,” as opposed to bipartisanship or “reaching across the isle.” It’s unmistakable: everything “political,” i.e. relating to democratic politics and the officials that voters select, is dirty and wrong and bad.

  101. Nobody is against change in principle. Nobody is against immigration in principle. It’s all about the rates. In debates with pro-immigration folks, I say, “I’m pro-immigration too. I think America would benefit from say a hundred thousand immigrants a year who could pass a test or otherwise prove they are likely to be a net benefit.” That forces the other guy to defend his position that 5 million immigrants from random hellholes is a good idea without being able to make it a moral issue. That’s impossible to do.

  102. “Historians and legal scholars struggled to recall when a presidential candidate had departed so radically from the traditional view that America’s welcome for immigrants was a prime reason for its exceptional innovation and prosperity.”

    Most presidential candidates pre-1965 from both major parties didn’t push unrestricted immigration of any kind.

    Also, Gangs of NY didn’t particularly do well at the box office. Most of Scorcese’s films have never made much of a profit. Certainly not compared to his contemporaries like Spielberg and Lucas. Aside from NY ethnics, I’ve never been entirely sure who exactly is Scorcese’s audience for his films as they tend to either flop or do mediocre.

    While on one hand it tends to make sense to make it an ethnic fight per se in Gangs of NY (The Johnny come lately Irish vs the English nativists) the great waves of Eastern and Central European immigrants hadn’t yet officially started and wouldn’t until after the Civil War say, 1870-1924. In that sense, Gangs of NY is reading back into history an ideology that really wasn’t in existence at the time of the 1863 draft riots as it was mostly the Irish who were rebelling vs being drafted.

    Taking up the vein of America as settlers and the pioneering spirit, classic Hollywood and legendary filmmaker Cecil B. DeMille made it explicit in his ’37 film The Plainsman and his ’39 film Union Pacific. The theme of both films was that the Frontier had to be conquered, tamed, and made safe via Manifest Destiny and those that forged the land and bringing civilization with them.

  103. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    When did it change? Ha … all the time, but one critical moment was the collapse of the USSR and the idea of centrally planned economies.

    First, there was a huge distrust of capitalism after WW II. It was thought, and not without some merit, that centralized planning, the new fields of OR (operations research), and our largest manufacturers were the important thing. So what we needed were more mega corporations and central planning — either public or private — it didn’t much matter to economists like J K Galbraith.

    The central argument of economists was the cause/cure of the great depression, with was centralization/regulation/planning vs capitalism based on free markets. Of course, it was never that simple, but the Freedman argument was that monetary policy was ruinous and that fiscal policy not really necessary.

    The point being that we were at a weird place in the early 199c0’s where ‘markets’ declared total victory and were fetishized. I can remember how, in 2008, it was shocking for someone to say the markets ‘failed’. That was like saying an algebraic equation ‘failed’. But there was an enormous reluctance to look at the lack of depth and liquidity in markets that were frozen or imploding. I remember someone stating with total certainty that the purpose of capital markets was to ‘provide information. Not to actually provide a mechanism to allocate capital through bond and stock offerings to real businesses.

    So what was great about the USA? We had the best, largest, and least regulated markets. Well, everyone admitted that the Cayman Islands a bit too regulation lite. Plus we had the best companies (Microsoft, Intel, etc) and were starting to crush the cheating Japs with their Industrial policy. We also had nukes and the worlds reserve currency. Etc.

    This is where I see the disconnect starting — and as usual — it was based on a successful idea pushed too far rather than a fundamentally flawed idea. So the basis of prosperity was focused on one thing … markets … and the institutional infrastructure was just taken for granted. And ignored. Plus, we figured our markets were as good as or better than anyone else’s and we would win anyplace/anytime.

    You could write a book about it. Or would need to to lay it all out.

    But the secret sauce was more than free markets.

    Meanwhile, America has hardly lost it greatness. Where are they doing better? EU? BRIC? Emerging Economies. Asia? But I am not here to criticize Trump. The notion that we can’t control our Southern border is nonsense and I am insulted every time it is mentioned. The idea that immigration of poor decreases income equality is arithmetic, not some esoteric theory. The very notion of increasing income equality (which I favor as a goal) requires borders. Global income equality? Ha. It is like asking a socialist for his wallet.

  104. @Tiny Duck
    Apparently no moderate-to- liberal Democrat can point out that the economy is far better than after the Bush disaster, or that crime is actually far less than eight years ago, or that energy/fuel costs are less, or that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning. Or that your 401K holding your pension assets has more than doubled under Obama. Or that tens of millions more people have employment. Or that 30 million have health insurance than prior to that terrible Obamacare so hated by the Far Left and every Republican.

    After all, Democrats, with their 60 day Congressional majority and in the face of eight years of total Republican obstruction, did not bring in the Nirvana/Utopia demanded by all the armchair leftists hanging out here who so loathe Krugman and Clinton. Y'all starting to remind me of the lunatic demanding Clinton be executed for treason. All you have accomplished so far is increasing the likelihood of electing America's first fascist President.

    Apparently no moderate-to- liberal Democrat can point out that the economy is far better than after the Bush disaster…

    And the economy was better before the Bush disaster, and is great now while we careen towards our next disaster. Workforce participation rates are down, incomes are stagnant, and federal debt is way, way up. While I was busy maxing out my credit cards my lifestyle was super groovy, as well.

    or that crime is actually far less than eight years ago

    Violent crime rates have been going down for two decades. The problem is that there are two Americas – the non-black America where crime is still going down, and black America, where violent crime has suddenly shot up thanks to Obama inciting hatred of the police.

    or that energy/fuel costs are less

    Thanks to a domestic energy boom that Obama has done absolutely nothing to encourage.

    or that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning

    Deaths due to lightning strikes have averaged 51 per year over the last two decades. 49 people were killed in the Pulse shooting alone. You better hope there’s not another terrorist attack in the US this year or else that lightning deaths go way up.

    Actually even that wouldn’t help. Terrorists killed 2,977 people in America on 9/11 alone. Just that attack and Pulse put average deaths due to terrorism at over 150 per year over the last 20 years.

    More importantly, what angers people about terrorism is the massive impact it has on our culture and our civil liberties. The government didn’t create a slew of laws and agencies to waste our time and strip us of our privacy rights after a few too many Americans died from lightning strikes.

    Or that your 401K holding your pension assets has more than doubled under Obama.

    The Dow peaked around 14,000 in 2007. Today it closed at 18,570. That’s a less than 33% increase over the last 8-9 years. Such returns are hardly all that impressive.

    Or that tens of millions more people have employment.

    Measuring trough to peak, from the nadir in late 2009 to now, the number of employed people is up 13 million, so hardly “tens of millions.” In fact job growth has only slightly outpaced population growth. But from the employment peak of 2007 (146 million employed) to now (151 million) only 5 million jobs have been added, versus around 15 million new Americans.

    The trouble with your claim of ‘tens of millions of new jobs’ is that we have no idea where we have no idea where we currently are in the business cycle until sometime in the future. Out current situation could be the peak right before the recession (which history suggests it probably is) or we could still be growing. No one ever knows until after the fact.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Nice dismantling of the assertions of Dishonesty Smurf. Well done, Wilkey.
  105. @Buddwing
    You almost immediately fell into the Sapir-Whorf trap, talking about "white people" when you clearly intended to refer to the Hamiltonian-American community.

    I don’t know why you pick Hamilton, in particular, though his political vision did carry the day, more or less, and his lineage did trace back to the British Isles, I think. WASP is a narrow term, true, and quite much-abused and tainted one. But Aglo-American is a decent term for traditional U.S. culture. Anglo-Celtic-Dutch-German may be better, if you want to let in a few minorities. Everything on top of that came with Mass Culture, which is something else entirely and not traditional America.

    • Replies: @Buddwing
    I chose Hamilton in a nod to the Broadway show and the sudden discovery that there may have been something admirable about the progenitors if the nation. While the culture was British in origin, it was more mixed and open than the British culture at the time. Listing contributing cultures is like naming a dish after its ingredients.
  106. @anon
    obama increased our debt from 9 trillion to 20 trillion. failure.

    Last night Trump asked what we have to show for Obama’s doubling of the national debt. I could tell him. We have a stock market at record levels. Years ago, Rush Limbaugh made an astute observation: “Obama’s top economic priority is preserving the wealth of the political donor class.”

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    The current stock market is mostly artificial bloat, and at some point it's going to pop. I was hoping it would be on Obama's watch, but it doesn't look like that is going to happen. It's probably two to five years off.
  107. @Wilkey
    Apparently no moderate-to- liberal Democrat can point out that the economy is far better than after the Bush disaster...

    And the economy was better before the Bush disaster, and is great now while we careen towards our next disaster. Workforce participation rates are down, incomes are stagnant, and federal debt is way, way up. While I was busy maxing out my credit cards my lifestyle was super groovy, as well.

    or that crime is actually far less than eight years ago

    Violent crime rates have been going down for two decades. The problem is that there are two Americas - the non-black America where crime is still going down, and black America, where violent crime has suddenly shot up thanks to Obama inciting hatred of the police.

    or that energy/fuel costs are less

    Thanks to a domestic energy boom that Obama has done absolutely nothing to encourage.

    or that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning

    Deaths due to lightning strikes have averaged 51 per year over the last two decades. 49 people were killed in the Pulse shooting alone. You better hope there's not another terrorist attack in the US this year or else that lightning deaths go way up.

    Actually even that wouldn't help. Terrorists killed 2,977 people in America on 9/11 alone. Just that attack and Pulse put average deaths due to terrorism at over 150 per year over the last 20 years.

    More importantly, what angers people about terrorism is the massive impact it has on our culture and our civil liberties. The government didn't create a slew of laws and agencies to waste our time and strip us of our privacy rights after a few too many Americans died from lightning strikes.


    Or that your 401K holding your pension assets has more than doubled under Obama.

    The Dow peaked around 14,000 in 2007. Today it closed at 18,570. That's a less than 33% increase over the last 8-9 years. Such returns are hardly all that impressive.

    Or that tens of millions more people have employment.

    Measuring trough to peak, from the nadir in late 2009 to now, the number of employed people is up 13 million, so hardly "tens of millions." In fact job growth has only slightly outpaced population growth. But from the employment peak of 2007 (146 million employed) to now (151 million) only 5 million jobs have been added, versus around 15 million new Americans.

    The trouble with your claim of 'tens of millions of new jobs' is that we have no idea where we have no idea where we currently are in the business cycle until sometime in the future. Out current situation could be the peak right before the recession (which history suggests it probably is) or we could still be growing. No one ever knows until after the fact.

    Nice dismantling of the assertions of Dishonesty Smurf. Well done, Wilkey.

  108. @Victor
    I've read three different articles today on Trump's speech: one at Bloomberg, another at the Washington Post, and the last at the New York Times. All three articles, though written by three different people, used the word "dark" to describe Trump's speech. Are these reporters coordinating their message? or did they all choose the same adjective by accident? It's almost like the press is pushing a consensus opinion.

    Like I keep telling y’all, Journolist and the other lefty conspirings and self-dealings ever continue. Don’t be deceived just because they’ve gotten better at staying hidden.

  109. Historians and legal scholars struggled to recall when a presidential candidate had departed so radically from the traditional view that America’s welcome for immigrants was a prime reason for its exceptional innovation and prosperity.

    Does this include Nazi scientist immigrants as well, NYTimes? We rarely hear of the contributions America’s Nazi immigrants made to the prosperity and innovativeness of the nation.

    Throughout its operations to 1990, Operation Paperclip imported 1,600 men, as part of the intellectual reparations owed to the United States and the UK, some $10 billion in patents and industrial processes.[20][24:Naimark. 206 (Naimark cites Gimbel, John Science Technology and Reparations: Exploitation and Plunder in Postwar Germany) The $10 billion compare to the 1948 US GDP $258 billion, and to the total Marshall plan (1948–52) expenditure of $13 billion, of which Germany received $1.4 billion (partly as loans).]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Paperclip#Scientists

    • Replies: @David In TN
    I once saw one of the scientists in the Huntsville, Alabama public library. He was at the "Foreign Section" reading a German newspaper.
  110. @Tiny Duck
    Apparently no moderate-to- liberal Democrat can point out that the economy is far better than after the Bush disaster, or that crime is actually far less than eight years ago, or that energy/fuel costs are less, or that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning. Or that your 401K holding your pension assets has more than doubled under Obama. Or that tens of millions more people have employment. Or that 30 million have health insurance than prior to that terrible Obamacare so hated by the Far Left and every Republican.

    After all, Democrats, with their 60 day Congressional majority and in the face of eight years of total Republican obstruction, did not bring in the Nirvana/Utopia demanded by all the armchair leftists hanging out here who so loathe Krugman and Clinton. Y'all starting to remind me of the lunatic demanding Clinton be executed for treason. All you have accomplished so far is increasing the likelihood of electing America's first fascist President.

    Oh, things are going swimmingly of course — now that it’s electorally convenient to pretend so. But for some unknowable reason, the electorate couldn’t be more convinced otherwise.

    Here’s one chart that may give you an idea as to why:

    But who cares about the white middle and working class? Not the Democrats, who are 100% sure (are they ever less sure?) that 100% of them are 100% racist.

    You might think that, say, a “progressive” economist like Krugman would be aware of and care about this glaring inequality. But no, things are wonderful for Krugman on the Upper West Side, so they are wonderful everywhere he cares about. Flyover country is racist country.

    • Replies: @Anon
    What's crazy is that Krugman lives in a state where 80% of the state (by area) has been in rapid decline for decades. He can drive 60 miles out of the UWS and see whites living in poverty. Fat and drug-addled, sure, but poor and hopeless nonetheless.
  111. @Tiny Duck
    Nothing Trump is talking about, including making America White again will happen. Life won't get better for people for whom technology, not trade has taken their jobs. What there needs to be is a combination of government and entrepreneurship. Only the Democrats offer anything like that.

    Apparently I spend too much time here, because I’m really good at the “first time commenter” game.

  112. @whorefinder
    At this point, I can't tell if the NY Times guys don't understand how small their audience is in comparison to the rest of the country, or whether they assume that they, like their heroes at Pravda, must relentlessly publish the party line merely for appearances sake.

    I mean, seriously. If these guys are so delusional that they think they influence a majority of America, they belong in the loony bin.

    I’m afraid the audience for NYT and its like is far too large.

    I mainly use Facebook to keep up with relatives (kids and grandkids), but I have a few other Facebook friends. I had to unfollow one of them yesterday after about a dozen anti-Trump posts one after the other (and we are all Canadians who can’t vote in the US election).

    Why Trump Derangement Syndrome is hitting so many Canadians I don’t know.

  113. @Tiny Duck
    In 35 years of living in Cleveland and an inner-ring suburb, I've come to realize that there is a significant population of mostly white, mostly middle or lower middle class suburbanites who are so completely estranged from the life of their central city that they simply will not believe that things could possibly be better or safer. They don't come downtown, they disbelieve or dismiss any positive media coverage about the city, and it is always and forever 1968, or, here in Cleveland, 1966, the year of the Hough riots. There are also a lot of people working to reverse this stereotype, but the folks who are so deeply invested in their fear of the city and the people who live there form a natural audience for Trump's dystopian vision.

    West Philly, North Philly, Detroit, Baltimore, Atlanta, dozens of others…

    All safe, huh? What a strange, fantastic world you live in.

  114. @iSteveFan

    It was America that made the immigrants great, not the immigrants that made America great. Correcting the arrow of causation can provide a great deal of clarity.
     
    That's a good point. As a New World nation America took in immigrants just like Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and the rest of the New World. But why did America turn out so much better? Germans, Italians, Poles and Jews went to Latin America, but didn't turn those places into dynamos. So why should we assume they were responsible for turning America into a dynamo? Maybe it was America and her original stock with their established institutions that had the greater effect on the immigrants.

    BTW, it is interesting that our fellow English New World nations, Canada, Oz and NZ, had similar positive effects on immigrants.

    Why is my comment still awaiting moderation?

  115. “…secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity.”

    Actually, this does now sound selfish, elitist and white supremacist. Just goes to show you that we’re in the liberal End Times. After straining for generations, they’ve finally flipped the story of the American founding all the way over.

  116. @Mr. Blank

    All that is going to happen is that a few of the trolls stay. After a few months, mostly they eventually get converted too it seems.

     

    I think I originally found iSteve through a link to somebody who was attacking him. At the time I was mildly pro-immigration, because that was the message I'd absorbed from the culture. But I had some lingering doubts that I didn't really share with anyone...

    Anyway, I stuck around because, aside from the more taboo topics, I got a kick out of Steve's super-low-key comic sensibility. Eventually, I got converted too. Steve's trademark method of Noticing something, offering a few uncomfortable questions that EVERYBODY is thinking but nobody else will say out loud, then casually walking away whistling like Mister Rogers is pretty damn effective.

    Anyway, I stuck around because, aside from the more taboo topics, I got a kick out of Steve’s super-low-key comic sensibility. Eventually, I got converted too. Steve’s trademark method of Noticing something, offering a few uncomfortable questions that EVERYBODY is thinking but nobody else will say out loud, then casually walking away whistling like Mister Rogers is pretty damn effective.

    I’ve noticed the progression from trolls -> somewhat sympathetic -> converted, in what feels like most cases. It must be pretty brutal trying to maintain the goodthink when it’s a constant stream of facts countering the narrative, along with the hypocrisy and vested interest exposed. It’s not just Steve it’s the rest of the comments section. I look forward to more of these leftists/Hillary+Soros trolls going native over time.

  117. @Chriscom
    I enjoyed Gangs of New York even though it didn't feel like it worked from start to finish. Yep, good sobering ending. If they ran out the last frame just a little bit more, they could remove the Twin Towers.

    The posted clip from the “Gangs” of New York looks like a fairly good ending – copied from John Ford, probably, but from the old John Ford – the younger John Ford would never have had the courage to end one of his vintage WWII movies that way (not even the greatest WWII movie ever, They were Expendable). Old Ford had a fraction of the talent of Young Ford but Old Ford, to his credit, tried to make up for his declining talent with more artistic courage (not that anyone cares much, because the talent had seeped away) .

  118. @candid_observer
    Oh, things are going swimmingly of course -- now that it's electorally convenient to pretend so. But for some unknowable reason, the electorate couldn't be more convinced otherwise.

    Here's one chart that may give you an idea as to why:

    https://img.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/files/2016/01/Inequality-and-Trump.jpg

    But who cares about the white middle and working class? Not the Democrats, who are 100% sure (are they ever less sure?) that 100% of them are 100% racist.

    You might think that, say, a "progressive" economist like Krugman would be aware of and care about this glaring inequality. But no, things are wonderful for Krugman on the Upper West Side, so they are wonderful everywhere he cares about. Flyover country is racist country.

    What’s crazy is that Krugman lives in a state where 80% of the state (by area) has been in rapid decline for decades. He can drive 60 miles out of the UWS and see whites living in poverty. Fat and drug-addled, sure, but poor and hopeless nonetheless.

    • Replies: @PistolPete
    To someone in NYC upstate NY is as relevant as Arizona. When nyers leave the city its to the tri-state(ct, nj, long island). We hear about the corruption in Albany but quickly forget about it, NY is too messed up to think about anywhere else. I think it might be because the train system isn't very good going towards NY state , and it isn't a terribly convenient drive. I hear it's beautiful up there tho...
  119. @guest
    We don't need a name to think about it, but it's much, much harder. We know it largely because it is, or was, the main enemy of leftism: the dragon they're always slaying, like in a Passion play. (They're also fighting rightists who grew up in leftist culture and don't know the original America. These they call fascists.) But that's a negative way to know it. It's not enough.

    I've noticed that they talk incessantly about minority cultures: their music, their food, and so forth, and how we "appropriate" it. But they act as if there's no such thing as culture amongst white people. Unless they're part of specific groups, like Italians or the Irish. The dominant American ethnic group in U.S. culture were and are the English. But we so take them for granted it's as if their influence isn't there, even though blacks, for instance, have "appropriated" more of it than we could ever hope to appropriate of theirs should we try.

    A similar fate befell German culture. I guess the Irish survived because they were oppressed, or whatever. But there's a whimsical quality to Irish-American culture, which I find artificial. Anyway, the point is that mainstream American culture is there, while people brought up in its slain yet undying influence pretend it isn't.

    The dominant American ethnic group in U.S. culture were and are the English. But we so take them for granted it’s as if their influence isn’t there….

    My people thank you for the shout out, as we have our achievements blotted out.

  120. @Tiny Duck
    Nothing Trump is talking about, including making America White again will happen. Life won't get better for people for whom technology, not trade has taken their jobs. What there needs to be is a combination of government and entrepreneurship. Only the Democrats offer anything like that.

    Combining government and entrepreneurship has a name: National Socialism.

    To be fair, it worked in the short term once. Germany went from penury to a high living standard not matched again in (the non-Communist part of) that country until the 1970s inthree or four years. But the experiment probably wouldn’t have ended all that well even if it hadn’t been ended abruptly.

  121. @Harry Baldwin
    Last night Trump asked what we have to show for Obama's doubling of the national debt. I could tell him. We have a stock market at record levels. Years ago, Rush Limbaugh made an astute observation: "Obama's top economic priority is preserving the wealth of the political donor class."

    The current stock market is mostly artificial bloat, and at some point it’s going to pop. I was hoping it would be on Obama’s watch, but it doesn’t look like that is going to happen. It’s probably two to five years off.

    • Replies: @rod1963
    Yeah it's artificial as can be. But it's supported by all the global banking concerns.

    But it was done for a reason. Ever since we off-shored industry and decimated the white blue collars and middle-class, we had to keep up the illusion of growth and wealth even though there was none to speak of. So Wall Street blew a series of bubbles in the stock, real-estate and bond markets to just that.

    So lots of people ended up believing things are a-ok on the good ship lollipop. They turned their homes into ATM's and borrowed to the hilt thinking that housing would go up forever, others borrowed against their 401K's and IRA's. Phony prosperity for the proles.

    It also kept the political/economic system from being upended by the irate masses.
  122. @Anonym
    It's like someone on the left has discovered where Trump has gotten a lot of his ideas ultimately from, and by attacking the source, they think they can shut it down. The horse has already bolted. Lol.

    All that is going to happen is that a few of the trolls stay. After a few months, mostly they eventually get converted too it seems.

    I certainly do not support leftist ideas, but one should not call everyone who has different methods of thinking a troll. A troll is someone who is simply looking to make trouble for the sake of making trouble.

  123. When actually in office Presidents rarely do more than 10% of what they said they were going to do, so I would not worry too much about what Trump will achieve. I think he is probably less likely to start disastrous foreign wars than either George W. Bush or Hillary Rodham Clinton.

  124. @iSteveFan

    It was America that made the immigrants great, not the immigrants that made America great. Correcting the arrow of causation can provide a great deal of clarity.
     
    That's a good point. As a New World nation America took in immigrants just like Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and the rest of the New World. But why did America turn out so much better? Germans, Italians, Poles and Jews went to Latin America, but didn't turn those places into dynamos. So why should we assume they were responsible for turning America into a dynamo? Maybe it was America and her original stock with their established institutions that had the greater effect on the immigrants.

    BTW, it is interesting that our fellow English New World nations, Canada, Oz and NZ, had similar positive effects on immigrants.

    Yhe US had minimal Latin influence, i.e., Spanish and Portuguese, and the Catholic Church wielded little power until after the basic nation was formed. Oliver correctly holds Catholicism largely responsible for the mestization of most of the New World south of the Rio Grande.

    • Replies: @iSteveFan
    Our leaders are busy trying to rectify that.
    , @Anonymous
    Why did Quebeckers end up less than 1% percent Amerindian?
    , @Henry Bowman

    Oliver correctly holds Catholicism largely responsible for the mestization of most of the New World south of the Rio Grande.
     
    Oliver who?
    , @syonredux

    Oliver correctly holds Catholicism largely responsible for the mestization of most of the New World south of the Rio Grande.
     
    Differing sex ratios also played a huge role. Very few European women immigrated to Latin America during the colonial period. Hence, Iberian males had to turn to Amerind and Black women for sexual release. Lots of de facto concubinage as well (the Church looked the other way)

    Mainland Anglo-America was quite different, as substantial numbers of European women came over. In the Massachusetts Bay Colony, the sex ratio was nearly equal, for example.
  125. @No_0ne
    Perhaps because you central city types managed to relocate a lot of your violent crime to their areas via Section 8? Naw, couldn't be that. It's not as if Ferguson was 90+% White, with low crime, just 3 decades ago, or anything...

    By the way, why is it that none of you leftists are complaining about the ethnic cleansing of Blacks from San Francisco? 13% in the 80s, 6% now. Sounds like a serious loss of valuable diversity. Don't you think an emergency Section 8 program is indicated? I'd even be willing to sacrifice some of the priceless diversity of my own city to help out those (obviously ignorant and bigoted) San Franciscans. Who could do more than that?

    we are still waiting for the final report

    http://sfmohcd.org/african-american-out-migration

  126. @Catiline

    As a New World nation America took in immigrants just like Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and the rest of the New World. But why did America turn out so much better? Germans, Italians, Poles and Jews went to Latin America, but didn’t turn those places into dynamos. So why should we assume they were responsible for turning America into a dynamo?
     
    Not to the same degree and not as early. Also, other new world nations, Brazil especially, had a higher % of "vibrants" to manage than did the Limeys. Latin America has been a de facto colony of Britain/America since the Napoleonic era, if not sooner.We assume as much because it's true.

    Afraid of something, Stevie?

    • Replies: @Daniel Williams

    Why is my comment still awaiting moderation?
     

    Afraid of something, Stevie?
     
    Try holding your breath until you turn blue.
  127. “The American people will come first once again,” he said.

    That bastard!

  128. How about #AmericansFirst

    Americnasfirst.org

  129. Julia Preston — a WASP name, I’d note, assuming she’s not using a pseudonym/married name — is a closet Trump supporter. That’s my bet.

    This was pretty much trolling. She didn’t even say the American Dream would be “restricted” to Americans.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    Julia Preston — a WASP name, I’d note
     


    Assuming that somebody is a WASP because they have a WASP name hasn't been a safe assumption in America for over a century. Non-WASP European immigrants have been assimilating and changing their names forever.

    Still, she was born in 1951 in Illinois and went to Yale, so she may well be one. Like you, I'm assuming Preston is her maiden name.
    , @Olorin
    Boomer Yalie with a degree in Latin American Studies who's been at NYT for 21 years.

    http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/p/julia_preston/index.html

    When you find a lucrative sinecure for a Studies Studies degree, by gum, you hang on to it BAMN.
  130. @Buddwing
    Along with Westerns, the Civil War used to be very present in popular culture (F-Troop, for example). That said, the overall American culture prior to mass immigration tends to be hypocognized. There isn't even a name for it, so in a Sapir-Whorf sense, we can't even think about it. People mistakenly call it the WASP culture, which is too narrow, or the White culture, which is too broad. I would propose we call it America's traditional Hamiltonian culture. Think that could work?

    America’s traditional Jacksonian culture.

  131. @Huperetes
    Why was Heaven's Gate "cocaine-fueled" in particular? The director? Year?

    Both.

  132. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Tiny Duck
    Apparently no moderate-to- liberal Democrat can point out that the economy is far better than after the Bush disaster, or that crime is actually far less than eight years ago, or that energy/fuel costs are less, or that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning. Or that your 401K holding your pension assets has more than doubled under Obama. Or that tens of millions more people have employment. Or that 30 million have health insurance than prior to that terrible Obamacare so hated by the Far Left and every Republican.

    After all, Democrats, with their 60 day Congressional majority and in the face of eight years of total Republican obstruction, did not bring in the Nirvana/Utopia demanded by all the armchair leftists hanging out here who so loathe Krugman and Clinton. Y'all starting to remind me of the lunatic demanding Clinton be executed for treason. All you have accomplished so far is increasing the likelihood of electing America's first fascist President.

    “economy is far better than after the Bush disaster”

    Easily false. Real median household income has declined since 2008. Average GDP growth is lower during Obama’s term. Bush does not deserve praise, but there has been no recovery on main street.

    “crime is actually far less than eight years ago”

    Violent crime rates started their descent in the late 90s. They are greater in 2016 than in 2015 – trending in the wrong direction as Obama closes out.

    “energy/fuel costs are less”

    Correct, but that has nothing to do with Obama.

    “that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning”

    That was already the case, and right now, the chances of being killed by a terrorist are increasing

    “that your 401K holding your pension assets has more than doubled under Obama”

    Bernanke/Yellen 2016.

    You can start your financial education now by googling “Quantitative Easing”

    “tens of millions more people have employment”

    As population increases, the aggregate number of employed increases. That is not a new phenomenon, nor a dispositive criteria for measuring the health of the labor market. The number of breadwinner jobs has declined, the number of part time jobs increased. Most importantly, the number of total hours being worked has stagnated. The last eight years represents a shift to a part time economy as people increasingly settle for part time jobs in the face of a stagnant commercial economy.

    “Or that 30 million have health insurance than prior to that terrible Obamacare so hated by the Far Left and every Republican”

    Yes, increasing the insurance pool by forced cross-subsidization. The price has been annual increased costs for everyone else.

    To be fair, these trends would still have continued if McCain were elected. But don’t be naive – the main street economy remains in decline – and in the meantime, central banks have managed to inflate asset markets, decoupling them from any rational economic criteria.

    Here is the sad verdict for Obama disciples:

    Hope and change was a lie
    Main street has been abandoned
    Wealth inequality has soared due to central bank market manipulation

    Obama was simply a stand in, a puppet sent to lecture us on social leftism while the bankers continued their fraud.

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    Politics and government aren't necessarily the drivers of culture, but they are an indicator. There is a reason that so much effort is put into Hillary as the "1st woman" President, even though no one cares that Margaret Thatcher became the UK PM in 1979.

    The elite have several roadblocks in their way of a total conquest of the traditional Western culture. Their number one enemy is the Stale Pale Male. En masse, we could put our feet down, and bring with it the white female vote. Wilson187 (1994) nationwide, this time for keeps. Our own Japan/Israel.

    Keeping the WCM scared and humiliated is critical for them, Trump is a monkey wrench in the engine of Cultural Marxism. By accident, the Right has regained the use of identity politics. The rest of our institutions should be taking notes, instead they are viture signaling.
  133. @celt darnell
    Julia Preston -- a WASP name, I'd note, assuming she's not using a pseudonym/married name -- is a closet Trump supporter. That's my bet.

    This was pretty much trolling. She didn't even say the American Dream would be "restricted" to Americans.

    Julia Preston — a WASP name, I’d note

    Assuming that somebody is a WASP because they have a WASP name hasn’t been a safe assumption in America for over a century. Non-WASP European immigrants have been assimilating and changing their names forever.

    Still, she was born in 1951 in Illinois and went to Yale, so she may well be one. Like you, I’m assuming Preston is her maiden name.

  134. @Tiny Duck
    Nothing Trump is talking about, including making America White again will happen. Life won't get better for people for whom technology, not trade has taken their jobs. What there needs to be is a combination of government and entrepreneurship. Only the Democrats offer anything like that.

    Hello, “Donut.”

  135. @guest
    I agree that Gangs of New York didn't work, partly because the two things it tried to tie together: street fights between nativists and the foreign hordes and the draft riots, didn't fit together. I didn't pay much attention to the "hands that built America" theme. What stuck out to me was the excellent Bill the Butcher character, who was able to speak unspeakable truths owing to the fact that he was the villain.

    Also, and more importantly, through him we got a wonderful depiction of the Culture of Honor, which is present in all good gangster films. The way he respected the memory of the Liam Neeson character, and how he spared Leo because he hadn't yet earned a death at his hands, that was great. I love the conversation he had about how he lost his eye, which had dishonored him by looking away after losing a fight. A bit ridiculous, but again an excellent depiction of Honor.

    He was like a character out of the Iliad. Though on a much lower artistic level, of course.

    The movie was typical Miramax Oscar bait, which bores me.

    Gangs of New York would have been a superb film with a completely different plot and characters.

    The vignettes depicting the weirdness of old New York are fascinating, like a Rick Steves travelogue into the past. Unfortunately, there’s negligible emotional connection between the audience and the characters- not just because they are morally repugnant, but because their motivations and actions rarely make much logical sense within the plot. Morever, there’s little indication until nearly the end that anything of importance hangs on the outcome of DiCaprio’s convoluted revenge scheme. Watching Gangs, you can almost hear Mr. Plinkett’s voice intoning “After this, a bunch of meaningless s**t happens to a bunch of people we don’t care about, for reasons we don’t remember, the potential consequences of which are never clearly explained“. At no point during the film’s entire running time did did it really seem to matter who would emerge “the winner”, nor could I have explicated the obscure motivations behind half of their actions. And as others have remarked, neither Bill the Butcher nor DiCaprio’s character clearly stands out as the obvious protagonist, which is particularly problematic when the audience is stuck in a strange and unfamiliar city and century.

    Something simpler and more conventional, like a Horatio Alger plot, would have been a better way to showcase ordinary life in 1860s New York and the immigrant experience there, without losing the audience along the way. Maybe a poor immigrant orphan boy shows up in NYC with nothing, fights and hustles his way out of the gang-ridden slums, then builds his fortune until he finally buys a house on Park Avenue (or whatever the richest neighborhood was in the 19th century), hoping thereby to prove his worth to his lady love, or some such intelligible motivation. Of course, that would completely undermine Scorcese’s intended message by reminding the audience that 19th-century America was a really great place that gave hard-working immigrants unprecedented opportunities for success.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    A "really great place"? Uh... Wtf
  136. @FKA Max

    Historians and legal scholars struggled to recall when a presidential candidate had departed so radically from the traditional view that America’s welcome for immigrants was a prime reason for its exceptional innovation and prosperity.
     
    Does this include Nazi scientist immigrants as well, NYTimes? We rarely hear of the contributions America's Nazi immigrants made to the prosperity and innovativeness of the nation.

    Throughout its operations to 1990, Operation Paperclip imported 1,600 men, as part of the intellectual reparations owed to the United States and the UK, some $10 billion in patents and industrial processes.[20][24:Naimark. 206 (Naimark cites Gimbel, John Science Technology and Reparations: Exploitation and Plunder in Postwar Germany) The $10 billion compare to the 1948 US GDP $258 billion, and to the total Marshall plan (1948–52) expenditure of $13 billion, of which Germany received $1.4 billion (partly as loans).]
     
    - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Paperclip#Scientists

    I once saw one of the scientists in the Huntsville, Alabama public library. He was at the “Foreign Section” reading a German newspaper.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "I once saw one of the scientists in the Huntsville, Alabama public library. He was at the “Foreign Section” reading a German newspaper."

    For those here who don't know, the Army's Redstone Arsenal (where Army Aviation and Missile Command is based) and NASA's Marshall center are in or around Huntsville. As such there are or were a lot of (literally) rocket scientists living there.

    My father was a pilot for Capital Airlines back in the 50's and early 60's (Capital was eventually bought by United). One of his frequent routes was Washington to Huntsville. Coming into Huntsville one day, the cotton for miles around was in full bloom. After they landed one of the German scientists (apparently arriving in Huntsville for the first time) asked my father what those endless acres of white plants were. My dad told him they were "grits bushes". He thought the guy was going to cry.

    At that time the NY Times wasn't available in Huntsville but was in Washington DC. This scientist arranged for somebody at Capital's DC offices to buy him a NYT daily and put it on the flight to Huntsville. He'd be there at the airport everyday when they taxied to the terminal, waiting for his newspaper. Most of the pilots got to know him. Dad said he was a very nice man, but terribly homesick.

  137. @Victor
    I've read three different articles today on Trump's speech: one at Bloomberg, another at the Washington Post, and the last at the New York Times. All three articles, though written by three different people, used the word "dark" to describe Trump's speech. Are these reporters coordinating their message? or did they all choose the same adjective by accident? It's almost like the press is pushing a consensus opinion.

    I’ve read three different articles today on Trump’s speech: one at Bloomberg, another at the Washington Post, and the last at the New York Times. All three articles, though written by three different people, used the word “dark” to describe Trump’s speech. Are these reporters coordinating their message? or did they all choose the same adjective by accident?

    Of course, they didn’t choose it “by accident”, nor could it have been an honest opinion. They either coordinated their choice of words or simply went with the narrative someone else had come up with.

    • Replies: @iSteveFan
    Of course they coordinate. Here is a transcript from an old Rush Limbaugh show in which he caught several media outlets using the word 'gravitas' to describe the same event. No way do so many different reporters settle upon such an obscure word without some coordination.
  138. @guest
    "Tradition" is where the left last pushed it. Right now you are a thought criminal if you go back before the 60s, for sure. But it's not just a chronological thing. The general tendency is for us to drift further left as time goes by. But what it means to be correct keeps changing, always changing, never resting.

    That's Permanent Revolution. It won't do for instance, for Republicans to try, as they do, to out-black the Democrats. "Dems Are the Real Racists" is a loser. All that nonsense trying to convince the nation that Trump is for Women, Gays, and so forth last night was a waste of time.

    "Hey, idiot, the game's over here now. You lose again," says the leftist.

    “Tradition” is where the left last pushed it. Right now you are a thought criminal if you go back before the 60s, for sure. But it’s not just a chronological thing. The general tendency is for us to drift further left as time goes by. But what it means to be correct keeps changing, always changing, never resting.

    That’s Permanent Revolution.

    It’s entropy.

  139. Militant open mindedness that squashes dissent, American dream reserved only for Americans is bad. You have to be drinking something pretty stiff before you start reading NYT articles, because you don’t strike me as someone who is naturally cynical enough to be able to do so while sober and not flip your lid afterward.

  140. @Wally
    But .....

    'Analysis of Washington Post police-shootings data reveals surprising result – nearly 2x more whites than blacks shot by police'

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2016/07/18/analysis-of-washington-post-police-shootings-data-reveals-surprising-result/

    ‘Analysis of Washington Post police-shootings data reveals surprising result – nearly 2x more whites than blacks shot by police‘

    Of course, when we read the article we find that his numbers say that nearly ONE time more whites than blacks are shot by police.

  141. @Jack D

    in which Wyoming is inexplicably full of vast columns of trudging Old World huddled masses:
     
    A lot of the homesteaders were in fact immigrants (not Italians and Jews but Germans and Scandinavians and Brits).

    The craziest were the Mormon handcart pioneers

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mormon_handcart_pioneers

    The Mormon Church didn't have the budget to pay to put the immigrants into Conestoga Wagons with oxen so they hit upon the idea that the pioneers could each push a poorly built wheelbarrow for 1,300 miles in the Wyoming winter.

    John Ford could have made ‘Wheelbarrow Master.’

  142. @Former Darfur
    Yhe US had minimal Latin influence, i.e., Spanish and Portuguese, and the Catholic Church wielded little power until after the basic nation was formed. Oliver correctly holds Catholicism largely responsible for the mestization of most of the New World south of the Rio Grande.

    Our leaders are busy trying to rectify that.

  143. @ben tillman

    I’ve read three different articles today on Trump’s speech: one at Bloomberg, another at the Washington Post, and the last at the New York Times. All three articles, though written by three different people, used the word “dark” to describe Trump’s speech. Are these reporters coordinating their message? or did they all choose the same adjective by accident?
     
    Of course, they didn't choose it "by accident", nor could it have been an honest opinion. They either coordinated their choice of words or simply went with the narrative someone else had come up with.

    Of course they coordinate. Here is a transcript from an old Rush Limbaugh show in which he caught several media outlets using the word ‘gravitas’ to describe the same event. No way do so many different reporters settle upon such an obscure word without some coordination.

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    Of course they coordinate. Here is a transcript from an old Rush Limbaugh show in which he caught several media outlets using the word ‘gravitas’ to describe the same event. No way do so many different reporters settle upon such an obscure word without some coordination.

    The question of how liberals do it-of how they seemingly instantly know which provocations to ignore and which to go ballistic at, of what phraseology they should use to dismiss or undermine critics and opponents, etc-is an old one. There does not seem to be a Central Casting, or some numbers shortwave station they get instructions from, yet they conform almost perfectly to what seems to be an arranged script.
    , @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Here is a transcript from an old Rush Limbaugh show in which he caught several media outlets using the word ‘gravitas’ to describe the same event. No way do so many different reporters settle upon such an obscure word without some coordination.
     
    You're definitely correct. I remember when Ed Rollins got in trouble for talking about having handed out "walking around money," in what I recall was Christine Todd Whitman's successful 1997 re-election campaign. Absolutely every single English-language outlet in the world, consequently used the word "braggadocio" in relation to this story. I hard that word used on TV in that week, more than in the nearly twenty years since, combined. No way was that a coincidence; the so-called "journalists" who support the Establishment, clearly coordinate their efforts, right down to the very wording.
  144. As a 4th generation New Yorker, growing up I really did think America was built by turn of the century immigrants that landed in Ellis island. Those were the only people I knew. Wasps were more of an urban legend that no one ever actually ever met. Wasnt until I became a Steve sailer reader, and found out about Albion seed that I learned there was a whole big, noncatholic, nonjewish country out there.

  145. @Catiline
    Afraid of something, Stevie?

    Why is my comment still awaiting moderation?

    Afraid of something, Stevie?

    Try holding your breath until you turn blue.

  146. @guest
    I don't know why you pick Hamilton, in particular, though his political vision did carry the day, more or less, and his lineage did trace back to the British Isles, I think. WASP is a narrow term, true, and quite much-abused and tainted one. But Aglo-American is a decent term for traditional U.S. culture. Anglo-Celtic-Dutch-German may be better, if you want to let in a few minorities. Everything on top of that came with Mass Culture, which is something else entirely and not traditional America.

    I chose Hamilton in a nod to the Broadway show and the sudden discovery that there may have been something admirable about the progenitors if the nation. While the culture was British in origin, it was more mixed and open than the British culture at the time. Listing contributing cultures is like naming a dish after its ingredients.

    • Replies: @guest
    A potential problem with piggybacking on Broadway Hamilton and trying to redirect it is that a lot of people are going to confuse Hamiltonian America with Puerto Rican America. They might assume you're talking about hip-hop culture instead of traditional U.S. culture.
  147. @guest
    I've never heard the phrase "nation of nations" before, to my knowledge. So why do I care if someone denies it? Then again, I don't remember hearing "American Exceptionalism" until people started mocking neocons with it. I'm not connected to the world in which such phrases are bandied.

    Nation of Nations is awkward, I think we have a shorter word for that idea.
    Empire.

  148. @Former Darfur
    Yhe US had minimal Latin influence, i.e., Spanish and Portuguese, and the Catholic Church wielded little power until after the basic nation was formed. Oliver correctly holds Catholicism largely responsible for the mestization of most of the New World south of the Rio Grande.

    Why did Quebeckers end up less than 1% percent Amerindian?

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    Intelligent question. Not sure.
  149. @Former Darfur
    Yhe US had minimal Latin influence, i.e., Spanish and Portuguese, and the Catholic Church wielded little power until after the basic nation was formed. Oliver correctly holds Catholicism largely responsible for the mestization of most of the New World south of the Rio Grande.

    Oliver correctly holds Catholicism largely responsible for the mestization of most of the New World south of the Rio Grande.

    Oliver who?

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    Revilo P. Oliver, the Palindromic Professor.
  150. @Michael Brennick
    Trump sang the praises of his mother, an immigrant from the island of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. She was white and legal, guess it doesn't count. She was also a native Gaelic speaker, a minority language, oppressed by the English. Still white though.

    She was also a native Gaelic speaker, a minority language, oppressed by the English.

    Oppressed mostly by Scots.

  151. @Anonymous
    Why did Quebeckers end up less than 1% percent Amerindian?

    Intelligent question. Not sure.

    • Replies: @Rapparee
    I would guess a combination of low mortality rates and more French women making the transatlantic trip (e.g., les Filles du Roi). Even Spanish and Portuguese colonists strongly preferred European brides when they could get them, but not very many European women seemed to want to live in Mexico or Brazil, and of those that did, a lot died of tropical diseases.
  152. @Henry Bowman

    Oliver correctly holds Catholicism largely responsible for the mestization of most of the New World south of the Rio Grande.
     
    Oliver who?

    Revilo P. Oliver, the Palindromic Professor.

    • Replies: @Henry Bowman
    Link to the work you talked about? How the Catholic faith is the reason for the state of the Latin area of the Americas?

    I need to make some leftist cry.
  153. @Former Darfur
    The current stock market is mostly artificial bloat, and at some point it's going to pop. I was hoping it would be on Obama's watch, but it doesn't look like that is going to happen. It's probably two to five years off.

    Yeah it’s artificial as can be. But it’s supported by all the global banking concerns.

    But it was done for a reason. Ever since we off-shored industry and decimated the white blue collars and middle-class, we had to keep up the illusion of growth and wealth even though there was none to speak of. So Wall Street blew a series of bubbles in the stock, real-estate and bond markets to just that.

    So lots of people ended up believing things are a-ok on the good ship lollipop. They turned their homes into ATM’s and borrowed to the hilt thinking that housing would go up forever, others borrowed against their 401K’s and IRA’s. Phony prosperity for the proles.

    It also kept the political/economic system from being upended by the irate masses.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    I have the same thinking about our economy and all this artificial prosperity via Federal Reserve heroin pumping that gave the American people a comfy cushion to avoid badthink about 3rd world inundation via open borders and decimation of US jobs and industry via free trade. DJT came out of nowhere to provide clarity on trade and illegal immigration. Why he even mentioned our 800 billion dollar trade deficit last night which I never hear presidential candidates bring up let alone any DC Reps and Senators.

    But there is one real world way our economy has improved. Our fracking revolution means more jobs, profits and production at home. Less buying from foreigners.
  154. @iSteveFan
    Of course they coordinate. Here is a transcript from an old Rush Limbaugh show in which he caught several media outlets using the word 'gravitas' to describe the same event. No way do so many different reporters settle upon such an obscure word without some coordination.

    Of course they coordinate. Here is a transcript from an old Rush Limbaugh show in which he caught several media outlets using the word ‘gravitas’ to describe the same event. No way do so many different reporters settle upon such an obscure word without some coordination.

    The question of how liberals do it-of how they seemingly instantly know which provocations to ignore and which to go ballistic at, of what phraseology they should use to dismiss or undermine critics and opponents, etc-is an old one. There does not seem to be a Central Casting, or some numbers shortwave station they get instructions from, yet they conform almost perfectly to what seems to be an arranged script.

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JournoList
    , @Forbes
    I think it's called cocooning. They breath the same air, patronize the same restaurants, socialize with the same people, marry each other, and drink the same Kool-Aid.
  155. @celt darnell
    Julia Preston -- a WASP name, I'd note, assuming she's not using a pseudonym/married name -- is a closet Trump supporter. That's my bet.

    This was pretty much trolling. She didn't even say the American Dream would be "restricted" to Americans.

    Boomer Yalie with a degree in Latin American Studies who’s been at NYT for 21 years.

    http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/p/julia_preston/index.html

    When you find a lucrative sinecure for a Studies Studies degree, by gum, you hang on to it BAMN.

  156. CJ says:
    @Victor
    I've read three different articles today on Trump's speech: one at Bloomberg, another at the Washington Post, and the last at the New York Times. All three articles, though written by three different people, used the word "dark" to describe Trump's speech. Are these reporters coordinating their message? or did they all choose the same adjective by accident? It's almost like the press is pushing a consensus opinion.

    Of course the “dark” thing is a coordinated talking point. It calls out for the Rush Limbaugh treatment of compiling dozens of short clips of different media droids repeating the same word or phrase as they “report” on a news story (if Limbaugh and his staff haven’t already done it of course). Check out this Google search just for the lulz.

    Google search: Trump+dark

    BTW you can add me to the list of readers who first thought the Onion-like headline above was Steve’s creation, not the actual NYT wording.

  157. @rod1963
    Yeah it's artificial as can be. But it's supported by all the global banking concerns.

    But it was done for a reason. Ever since we off-shored industry and decimated the white blue collars and middle-class, we had to keep up the illusion of growth and wealth even though there was none to speak of. So Wall Street blew a series of bubbles in the stock, real-estate and bond markets to just that.

    So lots of people ended up believing things are a-ok on the good ship lollipop. They turned their homes into ATM's and borrowed to the hilt thinking that housing would go up forever, others borrowed against their 401K's and IRA's. Phony prosperity for the proles.

    It also kept the political/economic system from being upended by the irate masses.

    I have the same thinking about our economy and all this artificial prosperity via Federal Reserve heroin pumping that gave the American people a comfy cushion to avoid badthink about 3rd world inundation via open borders and decimation of US jobs and industry via free trade. DJT came out of nowhere to provide clarity on trade and illegal immigration. Why he even mentioned our 800 billion dollar trade deficit last night which I never hear presidential candidates bring up let alone any DC Reps and Senators.

    But there is one real world way our economy has improved. Our fracking revolution means more jobs, profits and production at home. Less buying from foreigners.

  158. @kihowi
    Book idea: compilation of hysterical predictions about presidential candidates who then won.

    That period is a litte hazy for me, but I can remember George W. Bush not instituting a theocratic dictatorship.

    I can remember George W. Bush starting a war in the Middle East that was nothing but a boon for radical Islam.

    Bush was every bit as bad as anyone ever thought he’d be, and worse – a truly awful president who brought us not only another Vietnam but another Great Depression. (Steve has written at length about how Bush’s encouraging banks to grant mortgages to unqualified minority applicants helped fuel the housing bubble.) He plowed the fields on which Obama planted his poisonous seeds.

    I take your point that what is being said about Trump is pure, unadulterated bullshit, but George W. Bush was a train wreck of a politician who never should have been allowed to set foot in Washington, let alone take up residence in the White House.

    I remember watching the live TV coverage of Bush taking the oath of office, and thinking that it was almost unreal that a man of such base mediocrity should ascend to the highest office in the land. (I was in high school at the time.)

    Any political system that allows men such as Bush and Obama to rise to the top is nearly beyond all hope of repair.

    • Agree: Kylie, TomSchmidt, Bill
  159. @Anon
    What's crazy is that Krugman lives in a state where 80% of the state (by area) has been in rapid decline for decades. He can drive 60 miles out of the UWS and see whites living in poverty. Fat and drug-addled, sure, but poor and hopeless nonetheless.

    To someone in NYC upstate NY is as relevant as Arizona. When nyers leave the city its to the tri-state(ct, nj, long island). We hear about the corruption in Albany but quickly forget about it, NY is too messed up to think about anywhere else. I think it might be because the train system isn’t very good going towards NY state , and it isn’t a terribly convenient drive. I hear it’s beautiful up there tho…

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It is exceptionally beautiful in upstate New York, as objectively measured in giant waterfalls. Offhand, I can only think of remote inland Venezuela and fiord Norway as more waterfall-intensive.
  160. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "P.S. The comments appear to be suffering from an infestation of liberal trolls."

    Damn straight. And they're that really bland $12.25/hour Organizing Against America caliber of troll.

    Why publish such drivel, Steve? The anti-White, heterophobic Left can and does do better than this. They're so bad, they're not worth responding to.

    Sparring partners

  161. @Former Darfur
    Of course they coordinate. Here is a transcript from an old Rush Limbaugh show in which he caught several media outlets using the word ‘gravitas’ to describe the same event. No way do so many different reporters settle upon such an obscure word without some coordination.

    The question of how liberals do it-of how they seemingly instantly know which provocations to ignore and which to go ballistic at, of what phraseology they should use to dismiss or undermine critics and opponents, etc-is an old one. There does not seem to be a Central Casting, or some numbers shortwave station they get instructions from, yet they conform almost perfectly to what seems to be an arranged script.
  162. […] From a comment by ‘guest’ at Steve Sailer’s blog: […]

  163. @Anonymous
    “economy is far better than after the Bush disaster”

    Easily false. Real median household income has declined since 2008. Average GDP growth is lower during Obama’s term. Bush does not deserve praise, but there has been no recovery on main street.

    “crime is actually far less than eight years ago”

    Violent crime rates started their descent in the late 90s. They are greater in 2016 than in 2015 - trending in the wrong direction as Obama closes out.

    “energy/fuel costs are less”

    Correct, but that has nothing to do with Obama.

    “that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning”

    That was already the case, and right now, the chances of being killed by a terrorist are increasing

    “that your 401K holding your pension assets has more than doubled under Obama”

    Bernanke/Yellen 2016.

    You can start your financial education now by googling “Quantitative Easing”

    “tens of millions more people have employment”

    As population increases, the aggregate number of employed increases. That is not a new phenomenon, nor a dispositive criteria for measuring the health of the labor market. The number of breadwinner jobs has declined, the number of part time jobs increased. Most importantly, the number of total hours being worked has stagnated. The last eight years represents a shift to a part time economy as people increasingly settle for part time jobs in the face of a stagnant commercial economy.

    “Or that 30 million have health insurance than prior to that terrible Obamacare so hated by the Far Left and every Republican”

    Yes, increasing the insurance pool by forced cross-subsidization. The price has been annual increased costs for everyone else.

    To be fair, these trends would still have continued if McCain were elected. But don't be naive - the main street economy remains in decline - and in the meantime, central banks have managed to inflate asset markets, decoupling them from any rational economic criteria.

    Here is the sad verdict for Obama disciples:

    Hope and change was a lie
    Main street has been abandoned
    Wealth inequality has soared due to central bank market manipulation

    Obama was simply a stand in, a puppet sent to lecture us on social leftism while the bankers continued their fraud.

    Politics and government aren’t necessarily the drivers of culture, but they are an indicator. There is a reason that so much effort is put into Hillary as the “1st woman” President, even though no one cares that Margaret Thatcher became the UK PM in 1979.

    The elite have several roadblocks in their way of a total conquest of the traditional Western culture. Their number one enemy is the Stale Pale Male. En masse, we could put our feet down, and bring with it the white female vote. Wilson187 (1994) nationwide, this time for keeps. Our own Japan/Israel.

    Keeping the WCM scared and humiliated is critical for them, Trump is a monkey wrench in the engine of Cultural Marxism. By accident, the Right has regained the use of identity politics. The rest of our institutions should be taking notes, instead they are viture signaling.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    …the “1st woman” President, even though no one cares that Margaret Thatcher became the UK PM in 1979.
     
    Hell, Indira Gandhi was PM as early as 1966. That's fifty-year-old news, from a country arguably more democratic than America is now.
  164. Well, Sailer, what surprises you?

    People as good-hearted as those at the NYT, WaPo, and the troops of their minor relatives don’t want to take the American Dream only for them.

    They wish to share… starting from the Middle East, down to the whole earth.
    Mighty missionaries.

  165. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Despite a high potential cast — Leonardo DiCaprio, a memorable Daniel Day-Lewis, Liam Neeson, Brendan Gleeson, Jim Broadbent, John C. Reilly, Cameron Diaz — Gangs of New York, like Heaven’s Gate, doesn’t really work, in part because the central ethnocentric conceit is kind of silly.

    There’s a large difference between Scorsese and Cimino.
    Cimino’s authored more than a masterwork, and Heaven’t Gate may qualify for a place in the 100 best films ever made.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    They were both pretty good.
  166. @Wilkey
    "But if you keep repeating The Narrative over and over for enough decades, it can be shocking when some heretic doesn’t bow down to it."

    Indeed. In the eyes of the Multicult anything short of orgasmic praise for immigrants and immigration is sacrilege. Any praise of this country's initial settlers - the overwhelming majority of whom came from the British Isles - is grounds for excommunication.

    I'm not one to lightly dismiss the contributions that immigrants and non-British peoples have made to this country, but it's been quite obvious to me since at least high school that the new rules aren't about leveling the playing field so much as they are about pushing certain groups to the bottom while keeping others on top, and it's not too hard which groups fit into which category.

    An observer should ask themselves why modern-day immigrants to the British Isles are supposed to be given extravagant praise by those whose lineage is of the soil for millennia.

  167. @Anonymous

    Despite a high potential cast — Leonardo DiCaprio, a memorable Daniel Day-Lewis, Liam Neeson, Brendan Gleeson, Jim Broadbent, John C. Reilly, Cameron Diaz — Gangs of New York, like Heaven’s Gate, doesn’t really work, in part because the central ethnocentric conceit is kind of silly.
     
    There's a large difference between Scorsese and Cimino.
    Cimino's authored more than a masterwork, and Heaven't Gate may qualify for a place in the 100 best films ever made.

    They were both pretty good.

    • Replies: @Tex
    Heaven's Gate was loosely based on the events of the Johnson County war. It was a range war pitting big cattle operators against small nesters. A series of murders culminated in an invasion of the county by an army of hired guns who were cornered by the outraged citizens and had to be rescued by the cavalry.

    The story is best told by Helena Huntingdon Smith's "War on the Powder River." The irony here is that far from being a tale of nativist cattle barons lynching bohunk sod-busters, the trouble started when wealthy English investors started buying up Wyoming ranches. They quickly annoyed old-school American cowboys with their class-bound foreign ways. Smith illustrates the clash thus: An English moneybags-type rides up on the foreman of a ranch. The brit asks, "I say, is your master at home?" The cowboy looks him in the eye and says, "My master? The son of a bitch ain't been born yet."
  168. @PistolPete
    To someone in NYC upstate NY is as relevant as Arizona. When nyers leave the city its to the tri-state(ct, nj, long island). We hear about the corruption in Albany but quickly forget about it, NY is too messed up to think about anywhere else. I think it might be because the train system isn't very good going towards NY state , and it isn't a terribly convenient drive. I hear it's beautiful up there tho...

    It is exceptionally beautiful in upstate New York, as objectively measured in giant waterfalls. Offhand, I can only think of remote inland Venezuela and fiord Norway as more waterfall-intensive.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    The Finger Lakes region of upstate New York owes its beauty to the last ice age, when the glaciers scoured the soft shale landscape into long, parallel valleys. The lakes fill the bottom of the valleys thus formed and as streams flow down the soft shale sides of the intervening ridges, they have formed numerous waterfalls.

    I was reminded of all this, and of the exceptional beauty of the area, when I visited last summer, 35 years after living in the region for a couple of years. It's a 5-6 hours by road from New York which is a long drive by the standards of the North-East. There hasn't been a train service in decades and the small airports in the region are expensive to fly into. This may be the reason why the area is largely unknown to people in New York City.

    The area's heyday was in the 1800s when the Erie Canal system was important. Nowadays, its mostly short-growing season farmland and a few vineyards. Rochester, Syracuse and Binghamton bound the area, but are not of it. A big change I noticed was that a significant number of Amish and Mennonites have bought farmland in the area and settled in, moving from Pennsylvania and Ohio.

    It's very picturesque and for those who know, a nice summer getaway.

    http://www.asergeev.com/pictures/k/Taughannock.htm

    , @res

    waterfall-intensive
     
    Columbia River Gorge? Perhaps lacking the epic high volume falls like Niagara now that the Columbia itself is dammed, but many beautiful falls nonetheless.
    , @Former Darfur
    Aside from some people's aversion to any cold and snow, one would think upstate NY would be exactly the place you'd want for elite technology....as it indeed was once. If you can afford nice toys-snowmobiles, jet-skis, aggressive 4WD off road vehicles, seaplanes or sailplanes (indeed, it's the soaring capital of the planet), it's very fun. Summers are not exceptionally hot (that's why, in Seven Year Itch fashion, New Yorkers sent the family upstate for the summer) and while winters are cold and snowy, in most portions of the state (not Buffalo) the snow is manageable.


    Hmmmm.
  169. @HateCuisine
    Who is this "Salim"?

    Carlos Slim?

    Slim is his mexican pseudonym.

  170. @Anonym
    Maybe Trump can force divestment of the NYT from Salim's portfolio. America's paper of record should be controlled by Americans.

    It is great to see the writhing of all the creatures dwelling beneath the rocks as Trump rolls the rocks over and the sun beams down. Landslide.

    The headlines and stories attacking Trump from the Washington Post, New York Times, LA Times, Huffington Post, Salon, Atlantic, etc. border on hysteria. “The sky is falling … the sky is falling … quick, take cover, the sky is falling.”

    Other media have it right. Trump followers recognize the hype and hysteria and ignore the MSM. Indeed, the hysteria on the part of the MSM make their case for Trump.

    However, as someone in his late 60s and an avid “news hound” for decades, I can’t recall the MSM being this distorted before the age of alternative media. Was it just as bad before and I didn’t notice it … or, is the MSM becoming more partisan and hostile as it fades into irrelevance?

    • Replies: @Anonym
    However, as someone in his late 60s and an avid “news hound” for decades, I can’t recall the MSM being this distorted before the age of alternative media. Was it just as bad before and I didn’t notice it … or, is the MSM becoming more partisan and hostile as it fades into irrelevance?

    That is a good question. I think it was always this bad. Remember how journalists would keep up this holy pretence about objectivity? Now they don't even bother trying to fool anyone on that score. Similarly, I had never read the phrase "white nationalism" in the msm until say, sometime in the last five years. It was either white supremacism or neo-nazism.

    Without the internet, there is no Trump. Alternate media and readership has reached critical mass. People know about things like Rotherham now. It was there if you followed the BNP and Nick Griffin a decade ago, but the readership was too small to have an impact. So now, the msm is trying as hard as it would have done 10 years ago if someone like Trump had emerged, but their power has waned significantly. A large percentage of people are simply unreachable now to the msm spin. Ironically as they try harder, it becomes more obvious what they are doing to tbose who are able to contrast.

    Maybe we will see some reform out of this, ultimately. New media can still be bought though.
  171. @London Broil
    Gangs of New York would have been a superb film with a completely different plot and characters.

    The vignettes depicting the weirdness of old New York are fascinating, like a Rick Steves travelogue into the past. Unfortunately, there's negligible emotional connection between the audience and the characters- not just because they are morally repugnant, but because their motivations and actions rarely make much logical sense within the plot. Morever, there's little indication until nearly the end that anything of importance hangs on the outcome of DiCaprio's convoluted revenge scheme. Watching Gangs, you can almost hear Mr. Plinkett's voice intoning "After this, a bunch of meaningless s**t happens to a bunch of people we don't care about, for reasons we don't remember, the potential consequences of which are never clearly explained". At no point during the film's entire running time did did it really seem to matter who would emerge "the winner", nor could I have explicated the obscure motivations behind half of their actions. And as others have remarked, neither Bill the Butcher nor DiCaprio's character clearly stands out as the obvious protagonist, which is particularly problematic when the audience is stuck in a strange and unfamiliar city and century.

    Something simpler and more conventional, like a Horatio Alger plot, would have been a better way to showcase ordinary life in 1860s New York and the immigrant experience there, without losing the audience along the way. Maybe a poor immigrant orphan boy shows up in NYC with nothing, fights and hustles his way out of the gang-ridden slums, then builds his fortune until he finally buys a house on Park Avenue (or whatever the richest neighborhood was in the 19th century), hoping thereby to prove his worth to his lady love, or some such intelligible motivation. Of course, that would completely undermine Scorcese's intended message by reminding the audience that 19th-century America was a really great place that gave hard-working immigrants unprecedented opportunities for success.

    A “really great place”? Uh… Wtf

  172. @Percy Gryce

    I’ve come to realize that there is a significant population of mostly white, mostly middle or lower middle class suburbanites who are so completely estranged from the life of their central city that they simply will not believe that things could possibly be better or safer.
     
    I can't tell if you're blaming them or not, but as Steve recently pointed out those people are displaced persons, ethnically cleansed by crime, and, what in other contexts would be called, internal refugees.

    Thanks. Your characterization (“displaced”, “ethnically cleansed”, “internal refugees”) of urban Whites fleeing the consequences of so-called fair housing laws seems to me not too strong at all.

    Government and its enablers essentially criminalized the customary, generally accepted behaviors of my Northern city that actually kept racial animus in check. I still half-recall adults on the front porch talking about sending their kids to parochial schools (they did), and putting their houses up for sale before prices fell (they did).

    I’m pretty sure there was mention under Steve’s original post of writers who’ve tried to tackle the subject of urban White displacement, but I haven’t read them. I’m pretty confident someone with the right skills can demonstrate how wrong so-called fair housing and other racially motivated laws were and still are. (I guess you’d need to call on experts in law, economics, modern American history, and politics to hit all the marks.) Thanks again.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    If you want to learn more about "fair housing" and related topics and their detrimental impacts on residents of Northern cities, see the following:

    http://www.culturewars.com/Reviews/SlaughterReviews.html
  173. @Steve Sailer
    It is exceptionally beautiful in upstate New York, as objectively measured in giant waterfalls. Offhand, I can only think of remote inland Venezuela and fiord Norway as more waterfall-intensive.

    The Finger Lakes region of upstate New York owes its beauty to the last ice age, when the glaciers scoured the soft shale landscape into long, parallel valleys. The lakes fill the bottom of the valleys thus formed and as streams flow down the soft shale sides of the intervening ridges, they have formed numerous waterfalls.

    I was reminded of all this, and of the exceptional beauty of the area, when I visited last summer, 35 years after living in the region for a couple of years. It’s a 5-6 hours by road from New York which is a long drive by the standards of the North-East. There hasn’t been a train service in decades and the small airports in the region are expensive to fly into. This may be the reason why the area is largely unknown to people in New York City.

    The area’s heyday was in the 1800s when the Erie Canal system was important. Nowadays, its mostly short-growing season farmland and a few vineyards. Rochester, Syracuse and Binghamton bound the area, but are not of it. A big change I noticed was that a significant number of Amish and Mennonites have bought farmland in the area and settled in, moving from Pennsylvania and Ohio.

    It’s very picturesque and for those who know, a nice summer getaway.

    http://www.asergeev.com/pictures/k/Taughannock.htm

    • Replies: @Anon
    I grew up in the Finger Lakes region and went to college with mostly NY Citiers and Long Islanders. As a frat boy, I used to make my downstate pledges try to draw the outline of NYS. None could.
  174. @anon
    obama increased our debt from 9 trillion to 20 trillion. failure.

    Hence, prosperity. Give me a $20T credit card and I’ll have a lot of nice things around the house too.

    A friend who’s a very proactive investor predicts 2018 for the Big Bust. I’m not sure I’d want to be the next President. My half-serious prediction is Trump or Hillary is the next-to-last one of the US as presently constituted.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "My half-serious prediction is Trump or Hillary is the next-to-last one of the US as presently constituted."

    Outright joke is more like it. Such prognostications were made after the Civil War, during the Great Depression, after the 2008 financial meltdown. Too many of us Americans care about our country enough to let that happen.

    Besides, if you are into conspiracy theories, you really think the Jews and the banksters and the shyster lawyers do not have contingency plans to put Humpty Dumpty back together again IF the SHTF? Please...

  175. @Steve Sailer
    They were both pretty good.

    Heaven’s Gate was loosely based on the events of the Johnson County war. It was a range war pitting big cattle operators against small nesters. A series of murders culminated in an invasion of the county by an army of hired guns who were cornered by the outraged citizens and had to be rescued by the cavalry.

    The story is best told by Helena Huntingdon Smith’s “War on the Powder River.” The irony here is that far from being a tale of nativist cattle barons lynching bohunk sod-busters, the trouble started when wealthy English investors started buying up Wyoming ranches. They quickly annoyed old-school American cowboys with their class-bound foreign ways. Smith illustrates the clash thus: An English moneybags-type rides up on the foreman of a ranch. The brit asks, “I say, is your master at home?” The cowboy looks him in the eye and says, “My master? The son of a bitch ain’t been born yet.”

  176. @PiltdownMan
    The Finger Lakes region of upstate New York owes its beauty to the last ice age, when the glaciers scoured the soft shale landscape into long, parallel valleys. The lakes fill the bottom of the valleys thus formed and as streams flow down the soft shale sides of the intervening ridges, they have formed numerous waterfalls.

    I was reminded of all this, and of the exceptional beauty of the area, when I visited last summer, 35 years after living in the region for a couple of years. It's a 5-6 hours by road from New York which is a long drive by the standards of the North-East. There hasn't been a train service in decades and the small airports in the region are expensive to fly into. This may be the reason why the area is largely unknown to people in New York City.

    The area's heyday was in the 1800s when the Erie Canal system was important. Nowadays, its mostly short-growing season farmland and a few vineyards. Rochester, Syracuse and Binghamton bound the area, but are not of it. A big change I noticed was that a significant number of Amish and Mennonites have bought farmland in the area and settled in, moving from Pennsylvania and Ohio.

    It's very picturesque and for those who know, a nice summer getaway.

    http://www.asergeev.com/pictures/k/Taughannock.htm

    I grew up in the Finger Lakes region and went to college with mostly NY Citiers and Long Islanders. As a frat boy, I used to make my downstate pledges try to draw the outline of NYS. None could.

    • LOL: PiltdownMan
  177. @Maj. Kong
    Politics and government aren't necessarily the drivers of culture, but they are an indicator. There is a reason that so much effort is put into Hillary as the "1st woman" President, even though no one cares that Margaret Thatcher became the UK PM in 1979.

    The elite have several roadblocks in their way of a total conquest of the traditional Western culture. Their number one enemy is the Stale Pale Male. En masse, we could put our feet down, and bring with it the white female vote. Wilson187 (1994) nationwide, this time for keeps. Our own Japan/Israel.

    Keeping the WCM scared and humiliated is critical for them, Trump is a monkey wrench in the engine of Cultural Marxism. By accident, the Right has regained the use of identity politics. The rest of our institutions should be taking notes, instead they are viture signaling.

    …the “1st woman” President, even though no one cares that Margaret Thatcher became the UK PM in 1979.

    Hell, Indira Gandhi was PM as early as 1966. That’s fifty-year-old news, from a country arguably more democratic than America is now.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    Thanks for pointing that out. A footnote—Srimavo Bandarinaike of Ceylon was the first woman PM of a democracy, in 1960.

    It's worth highlighting that Margaret Thatcher and Theresa May, like Angela Merkel, owe absolutely nothing in their political careers to their husbands. Most people can't even name their husbands, offhand. That's healthy.

    , @syonredux

    …the “1st woman” President, even though no one cares that Margaret Thatcher became the UK PM in 1979.

    Hell, Indira Gandhi was PM as early as 1966. That’s fifty-year-old news, from a country arguably more democratic than America is now.
     
    That can be read as more of a dynastic thing, though
  178. @guest
    We don't need a name to think about it, but it's much, much harder. We know it largely because it is, or was, the main enemy of leftism: the dragon they're always slaying, like in a Passion play. (They're also fighting rightists who grew up in leftist culture and don't know the original America. These they call fascists.) But that's a negative way to know it. It's not enough.

    I've noticed that they talk incessantly about minority cultures: their music, their food, and so forth, and how we "appropriate" it. But they act as if there's no such thing as culture amongst white people. Unless they're part of specific groups, like Italians or the Irish. The dominant American ethnic group in U.S. culture were and are the English. But we so take them for granted it's as if their influence isn't there, even though blacks, for instance, have "appropriated" more of it than we could ever hope to appropriate of theirs should we try.

    A similar fate befell German culture. I guess the Irish survived because they were oppressed, or whatever. But there's a whimsical quality to Irish-American culture, which I find artificial. Anyway, the point is that mainstream American culture is there, while people brought up in its slain yet undying influence pretend it isn't.

    The dominant American ethnic group in U.S. culture were and are the English

    Genealogist Jeane Eddy Westin claimed 82% of Americans had some English ancestry. (NB: some.) But the one-drop rule doesn’t apply here; that figure would include virtually all “Native Americans” and native blacks.

  179. @syonredux

    By “ourselves”, the Founders, being men of the Enlightenment, meant all of humanity.
     
    They were thinking in a national context. And the Founders liked the fact that Anglo-America was so homogeneous:

    With equal pleasure I have as often taken notice that Providence has been pleased to give this one connected country to one united people--a people descended from the same ancestors, speaking the same language, professing the same religion, attached to the same principles of government, very similar in their manners and customs, and who, by their joint counsels, arms, and efforts, fighting side by side throughout a long and bloody war, have nobly established general liberty and independence.
     
    John Jay, Federalist Papers, No. 2

    a people descended from the same ancestors, speaking the same language, professing the same religion, attached to the same principles of government

    Agitprop, 18th century style. There are millions of people alive today descended from the
    Dutch who founded New Amsterdam, as well as Swedes from New Sweden in Delaware. At the time, we hadn’t had much problem with the remaining French in Detroit or Pittsburgh, who probably remained Catholic.

    A good book on this is The Island at the Center of the World, about Dutch Manhattan and its ongoing influence over American culture. For instance, the word boss and the word cookie have come to us from Dutch New York.

    • Replies: @Tex

    At the time, we hadn’t had much problem with the remaining French in Detroit or Pittsburgh, who probably remained Catholic.
     
    I recall from my high school history class that the Quebec Act putting the old northwest under traditional French Canadian law was a major issue for the colonists. It meant that settlers in the region west of the Appalachians and north of the Ohio were not going to be under their own British laws and that Protestantism as practiced by the Anglo-Scots settlers was in second place to Catholicism.

    New England and New France had invested a lot (eighty years war Parkman called it) in fighting each other.
    , @syonredux

    a people descended from the same ancestors, speaking the same language, professing the same religion, attached to the same principles of government

    Agitprop, 18th century style. There are millions of people alive today descended from the
    Dutch who founded New Amsterdam, as well as Swedes from New Sweden in Delaware. At the time, we hadn’t had much problem with the remaining French in Detroit or Pittsburgh, who probably remained Catholic.

    A good book on this is The Island at the Center of the World, about Dutch Manhattan and its ongoing influence over American culture. For instance, the word boss and the word cookie have come to us from Dutch New York.
     
    More like successful assimilation/absorption in action.Jay himself, after all, was of French Huguenot and Dutch descent:

    The Jays were a prominent merchant family in New York City, descended from Huguenots who had come to New York to escape religious persecution in France. In 1685 the Edict of Nantes had been revoked, thereby abolishing the rights of Protestants and confiscating their property. Among those affected was Jay's paternal grandfather, Augustus Jay. He moved from France to New York, where he built a successful merchant empire.[1] Jay's father, Peter Jay, born in New York City in 1704, became a wealthy trader in furs, wheat, timber, and other commodities.[2]
    John Jay was born on December 12, 1745, in New York City; only three months later the family moved to Rye, New York, when Peter Jay retired from business following a smallpox epidemic that had blinded two of his children.[3]
    John's mother was Mary Van Cortlandt, who had married Peter Jay in 1728, in the Dutch Church.[2] They had ten children together, seven of whom survived into adulthood.[4] Mary's father, Jacobus Van Cortlandt, had been born in New Amsterdam in 1658. Cortlandt served on the New York Assembly, was twice mayor of New York City, and also held a variety of judicial and military offices. Two of his children (the other one being his son Frederick) married into the Jay family.

     

    But that didn't matter. He had become thoroughly Anglicized.
  180. @Tiny Duck
    Apparently no moderate-to- liberal Democrat can point out that the economy is far better than after the Bush disaster, or that crime is actually far less than eight years ago, or that energy/fuel costs are less, or that your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning. Or that your 401K holding your pension assets has more than doubled under Obama. Or that tens of millions more people have employment. Or that 30 million have health insurance than prior to that terrible Obamacare so hated by the Far Left and every Republican.

    After all, Democrats, with their 60 day Congressional majority and in the face of eight years of total Republican obstruction, did not bring in the Nirvana/Utopia demanded by all the armchair leftists hanging out here who so loathe Krugman and Clinton. Y'all starting to remind me of the lunatic demanding Clinton be executed for treason. All you have accomplished so far is increasing the likelihood of electing America's first fascist President.

    Apparently no moderate-to- liberal Democrat can point out that the economy is far better than after the Bush disaster…

    Democrats let Bush assert that Islam is peaceful and that Mexico has healthy family values. It was their duty to call him on such nonsense. The only reason they didn’t is their own purely cynical political calculation.

    Why would anyone listen to such people?

    Trump did call him out.

    that crime is actually far less than eight years ago…

    Crime has been decreasing (proportionally) for decades. But if Obama is so successful at stopping it, why his and other Democrats’ obsession with gun control?

    Because they know their voters!

    All you have accomplished so far is increasing the likelihood of electing America’s first fascist President.

    It’s 1932 again?

    Stopping fascism is one of the reasons for supporting Trump.

  181. @Reg Cæsar

    …the “1st woman” President, even though no one cares that Margaret Thatcher became the UK PM in 1979.
     
    Hell, Indira Gandhi was PM as early as 1966. That's fifty-year-old news, from a country arguably more democratic than America is now.

    Thanks for pointing that out. A footnote—Srimavo Bandarinaike of Ceylon was the first woman PM of a democracy, in 1960.

    It’s worth highlighting that Margaret Thatcher and Theresa May, like Angela Merkel, owe absolutely nothing in their political careers to their husbands. Most people can’t even name their husbands, offhand. That’s healthy.

    • Agree: EriK
    • Replies: @Kylie
    "It’s worth highlighting that Margaret Thatcher and Theresa May, like Angela Merkel, owe absolutely nothing in their political careers to their husbands. Most people can’t even name their husbands, offhand. That’s healthy."

    It would be even healthier if the latter two had not come to power at all.
  182. I don’t mind the narrative that white Europeans, especially Northern Europeans created America. It’s 80-95% accurate.

    But it should always come with an asterisk.

    “White Europeans created America”*

    *After they destroyed the Indians who were there.

  183. @guest
    That begs the question: when did the U.S. become an empire? The Civil War? When we conquered the West? Or was it when we branched out overseas? Certainly it was by the time of FDR; couldn't be before then. The immigration free-for-all is an afterthought, in a way.

    When did the US become an Empire? http://www.lawnix.com/cases/martin-hunters-lessee.html

    Read From Union to Empire by Clyde Wilson.

  184. @guest
    That begs the question: when did the U.S. become an empire? The Civil War? When we conquered the West? Or was it when we branched out overseas? Certainly it was by the time of FDR; couldn't be before then. The immigration free-for-all is an afterthought, in a way.

    When did the US become an Empire? http://www.lawnix.com/cases/martin-hunters-lessee.html

    Read From Union to Empire by Clyde Wilson.

  185. @Steve Sailer
    It is exceptionally beautiful in upstate New York, as objectively measured in giant waterfalls. Offhand, I can only think of remote inland Venezuela and fiord Norway as more waterfall-intensive.

    waterfall-intensive

    Columbia River Gorge? Perhaps lacking the epic high volume falls like Niagara now that the Columbia itself is dammed, but many beautiful falls nonetheless.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    Expand the Columbia River Gorge trip to see the Oregon Cascades as there are many waterfalls very near the highways, along with other beautiful scenery.
  186. @iSteveFan

    It was America that made the immigrants great, not the immigrants that made America great. Correcting the arrow of causation can provide a great deal of clarity.
     
    That's a good point. As a New World nation America took in immigrants just like Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and the rest of the New World. But why did America turn out so much better? Germans, Italians, Poles and Jews went to Latin America, but didn't turn those places into dynamos. So why should we assume they were responsible for turning America into a dynamo? Maybe it was America and her original stock with their established institutions that had the greater effect on the immigrants.

    BTW, it is interesting that our fellow English New World nations, Canada, Oz and NZ, had similar positive effects on immigrants.

    Germans turning the US into a prosperous Dynamo (and displacing the Anglo elite) was a major theme of The Education of Henry Adams a book once considered required reading.

    • Replies: @FKA Max

    “The First Germans in America is a myth breaker. Because we speak English, we tend to assume that the English established and developed America. False, of course. Even as the Anglo-Saxon language came from Germany to England (Anglo-land) in 500 A.D., so German craftsmen and specialists came to the English colonies; for example, to Jamestown, Virginia, from 1607 on. Likewise, as the German map maker Martin Waldseemüller charted and named this continent, German settlers contributed to its development. In this book we find the truth.”
     
    —Prof. LaVern J. Rippley, Ph. D., member of the board of The Society for German-American Studies.

    https://www.amazon.com/First-Germans-America-Gary-Grassl/dp/B00437EQME


    Germans Participated in the Creation of Our Nation

    Jamestown, Virginia, was the first permanent English settlement and the birthplace of the United States.

    Germans were there from the beginning.

    v The first group of settlers to land on Jamestown Island in May 1607 included only one none British. He was Johannes Fleischer from Breslau. This German Lutheran landed in Jamestown 13 years before the Pilgrim Fathers landed in Plymouth, Mass.

    v Fleischer was the first physician and university trained botanist in English America.

    v Copper was gold for the Virginia Indians. The Jamestown settlers kept alive during the difficult first years by trading German-made copper for food.

    v German glassmakers, who arrived in 1608, produced the first “industrial-type product” in British America.

    v German woodworkers helped build a European-style house for Paramount Chief Powhatan in 1608 and lived in the same village as his daughter Pocahontas.

    v German experts ran metallurgical experiments in James Fort.

    v About a million objects have been catalogued by archaeologists who re-discovered long-lost James Fort. Less than 1 percent of these objects bear words; most are in German.
     
    - http://www.agas.us/GrasslBook2.htm
  187. From watching cowboy movies in the 1960s, I absorbed the previous Narrative

    Me too. And just to give credit where credit is due (and rarely paid on this blog) most of those westerns were produced by Jewish-owned studios.

    “Bonanza”, for instance, starring (((Lyon Himan Green))) and produced by NTA under names like (((Ely Landau))), (((Harold Goldman))), (((Charles C. Barry))), and (((Berne Tabakin))).

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    Jews were huge in the making of Westerns and also in country-western music, not so muchas performers, but on the business side. "Country music", as opposed to folk music, wasn't a thing before the spread of the DC battery radio in the twenties to mostly electricityless farms. It was invented by Jews so they could sell advertising to a rural audience. Most popular product? Laxatives.
  188. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @David In TN
    I once saw one of the scientists in the Huntsville, Alabama public library. He was at the "Foreign Section" reading a German newspaper.

    “I once saw one of the scientists in the Huntsville, Alabama public library. He was at the “Foreign Section” reading a German newspaper.”

    For those here who don’t know, the Army’s Redstone Arsenal (where Army Aviation and Missile Command is based) and NASA’s Marshall center are in or around Huntsville. As such there are or were a lot of (literally) rocket scientists living there.

    My father was a pilot for Capital Airlines back in the 50’s and early 60’s (Capital was eventually bought by United). One of his frequent routes was Washington to Huntsville. Coming into Huntsville one day, the cotton for miles around was in full bloom. After they landed one of the German scientists (apparently arriving in Huntsville for the first time) asked my father what those endless acres of white plants were. My dad told him they were “grits bushes”. He thought the guy was going to cry.

    At that time the NY Times wasn’t available in Huntsville but was in Washington DC. This scientist arranged for somebody at Capital’s DC offices to buy him a NYT daily and put it on the flight to Huntsville. He’d be there at the airport everyday when they taxied to the terminal, waiting for his newspaper. Most of the pilots got to know him. Dad said he was a very nice man, but terribly homesick.

  189. @Svigor
    Paging Ron Unz, paging Ron Unz, 3 of the first 4 comments are from the same sock-puppeting troll, paging Ron Unz.

    Unz only spams people if they point out he’s a progressive lying about being a libertarian.

    Steve also can’t approve cuckold fetishists fast enough.

  190. @Buddwing
    I chose Hamilton in a nod to the Broadway show and the sudden discovery that there may have been something admirable about the progenitors if the nation. While the culture was British in origin, it was more mixed and open than the British culture at the time. Listing contributing cultures is like naming a dish after its ingredients.

    A potential problem with piggybacking on Broadway Hamilton and trying to redirect it is that a lot of people are going to confuse Hamiltonian America with Puerto Rican America. They might assume you’re talking about hip-hop culture instead of traditional U.S. culture.

  191. @Tiny Duck
    In 35 years of living in Cleveland and an inner-ring suburb, I've come to realize that there is a significant population of mostly white, mostly middle or lower middle class suburbanites who are so completely estranged from the life of their central city that they simply will not believe that things could possibly be better or safer. They don't come downtown, they disbelieve or dismiss any positive media coverage about the city, and it is always and forever 1968, or, here in Cleveland, 1966, the year of the Hough riots. There are also a lot of people working to reverse this stereotype, but the folks who are so deeply invested in their fear of the city and the people who live there form a natural audience for Trump's dystopian vision.

    Howie, Three children and three grand children all living in a first ring Cleveland suburb. I read the Plains Dealer on line (Cleveland.com) daily. To say that there is a utopia awaiting in Downtown Cleveland is to be disingenuous . Yes, areas of downtown are improving, the theatre district for one, but the “Flats” are regressing and Tremont, the newest hipster area, is now seeing violent criminal acts, including murder. So, for the readers here who are not from Cleveland, Cleveland’s murder rate is Third World high. Last year Howie, a five year old boy, a three year old boy and a five month old girls were all shot and killed in Cleveland. This year, last week, a two year old girl shot in the head. Trump isn’t providing a fear scenario, certain people in Cleveland are. Oh, and one more thing the Cleveland Police Department is now operating under a DOJ mandate.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    I knew from other reliable sources that Cleveland has been and continues to be a dangerous place.

    Keeping your family in my prayers.
  192. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @iSteveFan

    It was America that made the immigrants great, not the immigrants that made America great. Correcting the arrow of causation can provide a great deal of clarity.
     
    That's a good point. As a New World nation America took in immigrants just like Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and the rest of the New World. But why did America turn out so much better? Germans, Italians, Poles and Jews went to Latin America, but didn't turn those places into dynamos. So why should we assume they were responsible for turning America into a dynamo? Maybe it was America and her original stock with their established institutions that had the greater effect on the immigrants.

    BTW, it is interesting that our fellow English New World nations, Canada, Oz and NZ, had similar positive effects on immigrants.

    BTW, it is interesting that our fellow English New World nations, Canada, Oz and NZ, had similar positive effects on immigrants.

    Those are fine countries, but I’m not sure I’d call them “dynamos”. They’ve also benefited from their links and association with the British Empire and then with the English speaking US that other European countries or countries like Argentina didn’t have.

  193. @iSteveFan

    It was America that made the immigrants great, not the immigrants that made America great. Correcting the arrow of causation can provide a great deal of clarity.
     
    That's a good point. As a New World nation America took in immigrants just like Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and the rest of the New World. But why did America turn out so much better? Germans, Italians, Poles and Jews went to Latin America, but didn't turn those places into dynamos. So why should we assume they were responsible for turning America into a dynamo? Maybe it was America and her original stock with their established institutions that had the greater effect on the immigrants.

    BTW, it is interesting that our fellow English New World nations, Canada, Oz and NZ, had similar positive effects on immigrants.

    Perhaps, but some of the most founding stock elements of the population, like white Southerners and Appalachians, have been and remain among the least dynamic.

    • Replies: @Curle
    A difficult proposition to establish given that talented southerners have been migrating internally for generations.
  194. @Svigor
    I suppose Ellis Island immigrants resent knowing that not only did their ancestors not do the heavy lifting in creating America, they didn't do it anywhere else in the new world, either. Spanish, Portuguese, British, French, a few outliers here and there, that's pretty much it.

    But claiming that they did seems like an awful way to keep the pesky hate-facts away from tender eyeballs. Sort of like crowing about the death of the white race, blaming whites for black failure, etc.

    The projection is strong in this one. One major consolation of overall white decline is the even steeper decline of Anglo-vermin. Once the Anglo-vermin are out of the way most of the rest of the European family should recover quite nicely. One step back, two forward.

  195. @Jack D

    in which Wyoming is inexplicably full of vast columns of trudging Old World huddled masses:
     
    A lot of the homesteaders were in fact immigrants (not Italians and Jews but Germans and Scandinavians and Brits).

    The craziest were the Mormon handcart pioneers

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mormon_handcart_pioneers

    The Mormon Church didn't have the budget to pay to put the immigrants into Conestoga Wagons with oxen so they hit upon the idea that the pioneers could each push a poorly built wheelbarrow for 1,300 miles in the Wyoming winter.

    Jack D, There is a statue of a push cart pioneer family, on the grounds of the Temple in Salt Lake City, Utah, amazing determination . I also read that some Mormons made a good living salvaging all the heavy items discarded by other pioneers along the trails westward.

  196. @res

    waterfall-intensive
     
    Columbia River Gorge? Perhaps lacking the epic high volume falls like Niagara now that the Columbia itself is dammed, but many beautiful falls nonetheless.

    Expand the Columbia River Gorge trip to see the Oregon Cascades as there are many waterfalls very near the highways, along with other beautiful scenery.

  197. @PiltdownMan
    Thanks for pointing that out. A footnote—Srimavo Bandarinaike of Ceylon was the first woman PM of a democracy, in 1960.

    It's worth highlighting that Margaret Thatcher and Theresa May, like Angela Merkel, owe absolutely nothing in their political careers to their husbands. Most people can't even name their husbands, offhand. That's healthy.

    “It’s worth highlighting that Margaret Thatcher and Theresa May, like Angela Merkel, owe absolutely nothing in their political careers to their husbands. Most people can’t even name their husbands, offhand. That’s healthy.”

    It would be even healthier if the latter two had not come to power at all.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Thatcher's husband Denis was the ideal female politician's husband: he was successful, well-connected, and highly likable, without being a major figure himself. He supported her nascent political career financially. He was enough years older than her, however, that he was in retirement during the peak of her career, and thus his business interests were largely wound down (I think) and didn't cause her many controversies over conflicts of interest.
  198. @Tiny Duck
    Nothing Trump is talking about, including making America White again will happen. Life won't get better for people for whom technology, not trade has taken their jobs. What there needs to be is a combination of government and entrepreneurship. Only the Democrats offer anything like that.

    Life won’t get better for people for whom technology, not trade has taken their jobs.

    All those factories relocated to China and Mexico because China and Mexico have better robots.

  199. @iSteveFan
    Of course they coordinate. Here is a transcript from an old Rush Limbaugh show in which he caught several media outlets using the word 'gravitas' to describe the same event. No way do so many different reporters settle upon such an obscure word without some coordination.

    Here is a transcript from an old Rush Limbaugh show in which he caught several media outlets using the word ‘gravitas’ to describe the same event. No way do so many different reporters settle upon such an obscure word without some coordination.

    You’re definitely correct. I remember when Ed Rollins got in trouble for talking about having handed out “walking around money,” in what I recall was Christine Todd Whitman’s successful 1997 re-election campaign. Absolutely every single English-language outlet in the world, consequently used the word “braggadocio” in relation to this story. I hard that word used on TV in that week, more than in the nearly twenty years since, combined. No way was that a coincidence; the so-called “journalists” who support the Establishment, clearly coordinate their efforts, right down to the very wording.

    • Replies: @guest
    I remember the chorus chanting about Bush the Younger's "hubris" when Iraq went sour. This is probably a result of coordination and talking points, but I'd just as well blame the hive mind.
  200. @Jack D

    your chance of being killed by a terrorist are less than being struck by lightning.
     
    In Colonial times, taller buildings such as churches and barns were struck by lightning quite often, until Benjamin Franklin invented the lightning rod to safely carry the electrical charge away.

    Wouldn't it be wonderful if we had something like lightning rods, but for terrorists?

    The old American attitude was that we did not have to be fatalistic, in even the face of what used to be called "Acts of God", but could use our brains and our ingenuity to protect ourselves.

    The new liberal attitude is that we should act in the face of terrorism the same way a flock of sheep act in a thunderstorm - just keep munching away.

    Crazy Arabs are just an inevitable part of nature. Just as we can't have grass-nurturing rain without the occasional lightning bolt that takes out one of our fellow sheep (what are the odds, anyway?), we can't have delicious falafel and kebabs (CHICKEN kebabs please) without the occasional jihadist. Just gotta learn to live (or sometimes not) with it.

    No reason to get excited - there are plenty of (minimum wage) jobs for new college grads and they should have their loans paid off well before retirement. Under Hillary, some American may make as much as FIFTEEN DOLLARS per hour at Starbucks - can you imagine such prosperity?

    The lightening analogy is puerile. The chance of someone being killed when a terrorist strikes (a near certainty) is far higher than when lightening does–as lightening literally strikes all the time. The analogy also implies that terrorism is akin to an act of nature that mankind should just learn to live with.

  201. @donut
    Their audience isn't small , Sailer's audience is small . The vast majority of the NYT's audience is made up of middle class professionals whose only interest is maintaining their status . As you well know to deviate from the party line is at best professional and social suicide. These highly "educated" sheep have internalized the Marxist message and will shitcan friends and family in order to maintain their shitty little clock punching positions and their "relationships" with others like themselves . Stalin and Dr. Goebbels were early pioneers of the system we live in now and they would envy the control over public discourse that the progressive masters have now. The opposition is so ineffectual that there isn't even any reason to lock them up . Their only cocern is guns . As Jughashvil said once :

    "Ideas are more powerful than guns. We would not let our enemies have guns, why should we let them have ideas."

    Stalin and the Nazis (not, I suppose, Goebbels) mostly used the “beat up, dispossess, and kill a lot of people” method of social control. The system we have now, an empire of lies kept afloat by social pressure from the top (a neat trick floating something by pressure from above, no?), is more reminiscent of Brezhnev than Stalin or Goebbels. That’s why alt right types are always quoting Havel and Solzhenitsyn — actually they tend to quote “Theodore Dalrymple” paraphrasing those guys for some reason. Though, in truth, Brezhnev killed people too.

  202. @tanabear
    It was America that made the immigrants great, not the immigrants that made America great. Correcting the arrow of causation can provide a great deal of clarity.

    Indeed. If North America had been populated entirely by Indios, it would still have been great. Now, if only you and I could gather some empirical evidence of what a North American populated exclusively by Indios would have been like . . .

  203. @Tiny Duck
    In 35 years of living in Cleveland and an inner-ring suburb, I've come to realize that there is a significant population of mostly white, mostly middle or lower middle class suburbanites who are so completely estranged from the life of their central city that they simply will not believe that things could possibly be better or safer. They don't come downtown, they disbelieve or dismiss any positive media coverage about the city, and it is always and forever 1968, or, here in Cleveland, 1966, the year of the Hough riots. There are also a lot of people working to reverse this stereotype, but the folks who are so deeply invested in their fear of the city and the people who live there form a natural audience for Trump's dystopian vision.

    It’s more likely Trump’s vision is to avoid a dystopian future.

  204. @TheJester
    The headlines and stories attacking Trump from the Washington Post, New York Times, LA Times, Huffington Post, Salon, Atlantic, etc. border on hysteria. "The sky is falling ... the sky is falling ... quick, take cover, the sky is falling."

    Other media have it right. Trump followers recognize the hype and hysteria and ignore the MSM. Indeed, the hysteria on the part of the MSM make their case for Trump.

    However, as someone in his late 60s and an avid "news hound" for decades, I can't recall the MSM being this distorted before the age of alternative media. Was it just as bad before and I didn't notice it ... or, is the MSM becoming more partisan and hostile as it fades into irrelevance?

    However, as someone in his late 60s and an avid “news hound” for decades, I can’t recall the MSM being this distorted before the age of alternative media. Was it just as bad before and I didn’t notice it … or, is the MSM becoming more partisan and hostile as it fades into irrelevance?

    That is a good question. I think it was always this bad. Remember how journalists would keep up this holy pretence about objectivity? Now they don’t even bother trying to fool anyone on that score. Similarly, I had never read the phrase “white nationalism” in the msm until say, sometime in the last five years. It was either white supremacism or neo-nazism.

    Without the internet, there is no Trump. Alternate media and readership has reached critical mass. People know about things like Rotherham now. It was there if you followed the BNP and Nick Griffin a decade ago, but the readership was too small to have an impact. So now, the msm is trying as hard as it would have done 10 years ago if someone like Trump had emerged, but their power has waned significantly. A large percentage of people are simply unreachable now to the msm spin. Ironically as they try harder, it becomes more obvious what they are doing to tbose who are able to contrast.

    Maybe we will see some reform out of this, ultimately. New media can still be bought though.

  205. @Buffalo Joe
    Howie, Three children and three grand children all living in a first ring Cleveland suburb. I read the Plains Dealer on line (Cleveland.com) daily. To say that there is a utopia awaiting in Downtown Cleveland is to be disingenuous . Yes, areas of downtown are improving, the theatre district for one, but the "Flats" are regressing and Tremont, the newest hipster area, is now seeing violent criminal acts, including murder. So, for the readers here who are not from Cleveland, Cleveland's murder rate is Third World high. Last year Howie, a five year old boy, a three year old boy and a five month old girls were all shot and killed in Cleveland. This year, last week, a two year old girl shot in the head. Trump isn't providing a fear scenario, certain people in Cleveland are. Oh, and one more thing the Cleveland Police Department is now operating under a DOJ mandate.

    I knew from other reliable sources that Cleveland has been and continues to be a dangerous place.

    Keeping your family in my prayers.

  206. @Curle
    Germans turning the US into a prosperous Dynamo (and displacing the Anglo elite) was a major theme of The Education of Henry Adams a book once considered required reading.

    “The First Germans in America is a myth breaker. Because we speak English, we tend to assume that the English established and developed America. False, of course. Even as the Anglo-Saxon language came from Germany to England (Anglo-land) in 500 A.D., so German craftsmen and specialists came to the English colonies; for example, to Jamestown, Virginia, from 1607 on. Likewise, as the German map maker Martin Waldseemüller charted and named this continent, German settlers contributed to its development. In this book we find the truth.”

    —Prof. LaVern J. Rippley, Ph. D., member of the board of The Society for German-American Studies.

    https://www.amazon.com/First-Germans-America-Gary-Grassl/dp/B00437EQME

    Germans Participated in the Creation of Our Nation

    Jamestown, Virginia, was the first permanent English settlement and the birthplace of the United States.

    Germans were there from the beginning.

    v The first group of settlers to land on Jamestown Island in May 1607 included only one none British. He was Johannes Fleischer from Breslau. This German Lutheran landed in Jamestown 13 years before the Pilgrim Fathers landed in Plymouth, Mass.

    v Fleischer was the first physician and university trained botanist in English America.

    v Copper was gold for the Virginia Indians. The Jamestown settlers kept alive during the difficult first years by trading German-made copper for food.

    v German glassmakers, who arrived in 1608, produced the first “industrial-type product” in British America.

    v German woodworkers helped build a European-style house for Paramount Chief Powhatan in 1608 and lived in the same village as his daughter Pocahontas.

    v German experts ran metallurgical experiments in James Fort.

    v About a million objects have been catalogued by archaeologists who re-discovered long-lost James Fort. Less than 1 percent of these objects bear words; most are in German.

    http://www.agas.us/GrasslBook2.htm

  207. IBC says:

    Using even darker language than he had on the campaign trail

    Is there a marketing motive (such as subconscious negative word association) in the media’s continual and overwhelming use of the word “dark” to describe Donald Trump and his supporters? For example, during NPR’s coverage of the RNC, about six different journalists used the word “dark” almost exclusively. It was liked they’d locked themselves out of part of their own brains. What about “negative,” “cynical,” or “pessimistic”? (Not that I’d use those descriptors): No, it was dark, dark, dark.

    And it’s ironic that “dark” is the media’s word of choice to describe someone they see as a white supremacist. What happened to Sapir-Whorf and Goodthink? Black lives matter, but what about adjectives?*

    *I wrote this before skimming the other comments and it sounds like I’m not the only one who noticed the media’s collective writer’s block. If Trump’s numbers improve closer to November, I can already hear David Brooks’ slightly stunned voice resorting to nuggets of wisdom from oldies radio: “the darkest hour is just before dawn…”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Nobody went to see that movie about a crime-fighting billionaire called "The Dark Knight" ...
  208. @Former Darfur
    Revilo P. Oliver, the Palindromic Professor.

    Link to the work you talked about? How the Catholic faith is the reason for the state of the Latin area of the Americas?

    I need to make some leftist cry.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    It isn't. Spain just didn't care all that much about recreating Europe in the Americas. France, also Catholic, cared enough to send enough French women over to New France to marry the colonists.
    , @Former Darfur
    Oliver is a magnificent writer, but you have to search his works. Aside from his political magna opera, Christianity and the Survival of the West and America's Decline: The Education of a Conservative, there are numerous short works and articles in the second American Mercury , in Instauration, and in Liberty Bell magazines, all now-defunct journals.

    Unfortunately, the very best writing extant of his on the subject of Latin America is probably in several booklets published via the John Birch Society during his tenure there. These are amongst the few things not readily available via a fairly simple search online, for the JBS is very much still in business and does not care to have them disseminated, despite Oliver's considerable restraint in phraseoology vis-a-vis his post-JBS writings.

    One must understand that Oliver was far from a Hispanophobe as such. He was quite fluent in Castilian Spanish and had spent time not only there but in Mexico, and apparently at some other places in Latin America as well. He states-the quote is from memory and may not be exact, "The Latins, the best of whom are fully the equal to the best of our own"... in prefacing remarks about the divergence of Latin American (sociopolitical) evolution to that of the American (he also carefully explains that "American" on its own properly refers to the United States, versus anywhere in Central or South America, or Mexico, or Canada). Apparently he had several close friends amongst the academics of Mexico's more respectable universities.

    Nevertheless-make no mistake-he is very certainly a racialist, and if not a fascist, has no particular aversion to the concept per se: furthermore, he has no love for "the versipellous tribe", and says so. His last written work, published posthumosly, was "The Jewish Strategy", and he takes no prisoners.

    From its foreword:

    In 1958 I still believed that there was a significant intellectual difference between the American bourgeoisie and the cattle that one sees peering between the slats of large trucks as they contentedly munch hay on their way to the abattoir. Since severing my connections with the Birch hoax, I have chosen to write with utter frankness on the dire plight of our race and the civilization we created. The reader has been warned.

    Emphases mine.

  209. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:

    Using even darker language than he had on the campaign trail, Mr. Trump did not include even a boilerplate mention of positive contributions by immigrants.

    How can something that is missing be dark?

    He described foreigners who came to the United States illegally and became killers of American citizens and drug dealers.

    Those seem like people we can well do without. Of course, it is hard to figure out which foreigners are going to be like that even if they are legal, so more care seems warranted.

    More forcefully than he had before, Mr. Trump said he would also impose new restrictions on legal immigration to protect American workers from lower-paid competition in the labor market.

    I think this is a damn fine idea. Other countries do the same. Japan comes to mind.

  210. @Former Darfur
    Of course they coordinate. Here is a transcript from an old Rush Limbaugh show in which he caught several media outlets using the word ‘gravitas’ to describe the same event. No way do so many different reporters settle upon such an obscure word without some coordination.

    The question of how liberals do it-of how they seemingly instantly know which provocations to ignore and which to go ballistic at, of what phraseology they should use to dismiss or undermine critics and opponents, etc-is an old one. There does not seem to be a Central Casting, or some numbers shortwave station they get instructions from, yet they conform almost perfectly to what seems to be an arranged script.

    I think it’s called cocooning. They breath the same air, patronize the same restaurants, socialize with the same people, marry each other, and drink the same Kool-Aid.

  211. @Mr. Blank

    All that is going to happen is that a few of the trolls stay. After a few months, mostly they eventually get converted too it seems.

     

    I think I originally found iSteve through a link to somebody who was attacking him. At the time I was mildly pro-immigration, because that was the message I'd absorbed from the culture. But I had some lingering doubts that I didn't really share with anyone...

    Anyway, I stuck around because, aside from the more taboo topics, I got a kick out of Steve's super-low-key comic sensibility. Eventually, I got converted too. Steve's trademark method of Noticing something, offering a few uncomfortable questions that EVERYBODY is thinking but nobody else will say out loud, then casually walking away whistling like Mister Rogers is pretty damn effective.

    Wait, so Steve is like the Kermit the frog drinking tea meme?

  212. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
  213. @Svigor
    I suppose Ellis Island immigrants resent knowing that not only did their ancestors not do the heavy lifting in creating America, they didn't do it anywhere else in the new world, either. Spanish, Portuguese, British, French, a few outliers here and there, that's pretty much it.

    But claiming that they did seems like an awful way to keep the pesky hate-facts away from tender eyeballs. Sort of like crowing about the death of the white race, blaming whites for black failure, etc.

    I’ve heard that sixty percent of Argentines have some Italian ancestry. Yet the Italians didn’t seem to make Argentina all that great like they did for the USA. Of course there is always the chance that they weren’t really responsible for the greatness of the USA in the first place.

  214. @Jack D

    in which Wyoming is inexplicably full of vast columns of trudging Old World huddled masses:
     
    A lot of the homesteaders were in fact immigrants (not Italians and Jews but Germans and Scandinavians and Brits).

    The craziest were the Mormon handcart pioneers

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mormon_handcart_pioneers

    The Mormon Church didn't have the budget to pay to put the immigrants into Conestoga Wagons with oxen so they hit upon the idea that the pioneers could each push a poorly built wheelbarrow for 1,300 miles in the Wyoming winter.

    A lot of the homesteaders were in fact immigrants (not Italians and Jews but Germans and Scandinavians and Brits).

    Sure, everyone came from somewhere else originally, but I don’t think those arrived in “trudging vast columns” as portrayed in the movie.

  215. Tex says:
    @TomSchmidt

    a people descended from the same ancestors, speaking the same language, professing the same religion, attached to the same principles of government
     
    Agitprop, 18th century style. There are millions of people alive today descended from the
    Dutch who founded New Amsterdam, as well as Swedes from New Sweden in Delaware. At the time, we hadn't had much problem with the remaining French in Detroit or Pittsburgh, who probably remained Catholic.

    A good book on this is The Island at the Center of the World, about Dutch Manhattan and its ongoing influence over American culture. For instance, the word boss and the word cookie have come to us from Dutch New York.

    At the time, we hadn’t had much problem with the remaining French in Detroit or Pittsburgh, who probably remained Catholic.

    I recall from my high school history class that the Quebec Act putting the old northwest under traditional French Canadian law was a major issue for the colonists. It meant that settlers in the region west of the Appalachians and north of the Ohio were not going to be under their own British laws and that Protestantism as practiced by the Anglo-Scots settlers was in second place to Catholicism.

    New England and New France had invested a lot (eighty years war Parkman called it) in fighting each other.

  216. @Anonymous
    There was the "rural purge" beginning in 1970, where CBS and other major networks started "killing everything with a tree in it", as the actor who played Mr. Haney on Green Acres described it.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rural_purge

    The "rural purge" of American television networks (in particular CBS) was a series of cancellations in the early 1970s of still-popular rural-themed shows with demographically skewed audiences, the majority of which occurred at the end of the 1970–71 television season. One of the earliest efforts at channel drift, CBS in particular saw a dramatic change in direction with the shift, moving away from shows with rural themes and toward ones with more appeal to urban and suburban audiences.
     

    That “Rural Purge” Wikipedia article contains a mention of Pat Buttram, who became a minor star of the Steve-o-sphere several years ago when Google was caught out being particularly evil. Small world!

  217. @JackOH
    Thanks. Your characterization ("displaced", "ethnically cleansed", "internal refugees") of urban Whites fleeing the consequences of so-called fair housing laws seems to me not too strong at all.

    Government and its enablers essentially criminalized the customary, generally accepted behaviors of my Northern city that actually kept racial animus in check. I still half-recall adults on the front porch talking about sending their kids to parochial schools (they did), and putting their houses up for sale before prices fell (they did).

    I'm pretty sure there was mention under Steve's original post of writers who've tried to tackle the subject of urban White displacement, but I haven't read them. I'm pretty confident someone with the right skills can demonstrate how wrong so-called fair housing and other racially motivated laws were and still are. (I guess you'd need to call on experts in law, economics, modern American history, and politics to hit all the marks.) Thanks again.

    If you want to learn more about “fair housing” and related topics and their detrimental impacts on residents of Northern cities, see the following:

    http://www.culturewars.com/Reviews/SlaughterReviews.html

  218. @Michael Brennick
    @Victor:

    There was a woman commentator during their PBS coverage, I believe from the Hill, haircut like Maddow on MSNBC. She telegraphed on Tuesday what the Left media's talking point was going to be. Early on they were working with the adjective "negative", eventually it morphed into "darkness" .

    nah, the PBS guest got the message earlier from someone else. the whole thing is co-ordinated

  219. @TomSchmidt

    a people descended from the same ancestors, speaking the same language, professing the same religion, attached to the same principles of government
     
    Agitprop, 18th century style. There are millions of people alive today descended from the
    Dutch who founded New Amsterdam, as well as Swedes from New Sweden in Delaware. At the time, we hadn't had much problem with the remaining French in Detroit or Pittsburgh, who probably remained Catholic.

    A good book on this is The Island at the Center of the World, about Dutch Manhattan and its ongoing influence over American culture. For instance, the word boss and the word cookie have come to us from Dutch New York.

    a people descended from the same ancestors, speaking the same language, professing the same religion, attached to the same principles of government

    Agitprop, 18th century style. There are millions of people alive today descended from the
    Dutch who founded New Amsterdam, as well as Swedes from New Sweden in Delaware. At the time, we hadn’t had much problem with the remaining French in Detroit or Pittsburgh, who probably remained Catholic.

    A good book on this is The Island at the Center of the World, about Dutch Manhattan and its ongoing influence over American culture. For instance, the word boss and the word cookie have come to us from Dutch New York.

    More like successful assimilation/absorption in action.Jay himself, after all, was of French Huguenot and Dutch descent:

    The Jays were a prominent merchant family in New York City, descended from Huguenots who had come to New York to escape religious persecution in France. In 1685 the Edict of Nantes had been revoked, thereby abolishing the rights of Protestants and confiscating their property. Among those affected was Jay’s paternal grandfather, Augustus Jay. He moved from France to New York, where he built a successful merchant empire.[1] Jay’s father, Peter Jay, born in New York City in 1704, became a wealthy trader in furs, wheat, timber, and other commodities.[2]
    John Jay was born on December 12, 1745, in New York City; only three months later the family moved to Rye, New York, when Peter Jay retired from business following a smallpox epidemic that had blinded two of his children.[3]
    John’s mother was Mary Van Cortlandt, who had married Peter Jay in 1728, in the Dutch Church.[2] They had ten children together, seven of whom survived into adulthood.[4] Mary’s father, Jacobus Van Cortlandt, had been born in New Amsterdam in 1658. Cortlandt served on the New York Assembly, was twice mayor of New York City, and also held a variety of judicial and military offices. Two of his children (the other one being his son Frederick) married into the Jay family.

    But that didn’t matter. He had become thoroughly Anglicized.

  220. @Reg Cæsar

    …the “1st woman” President, even though no one cares that Margaret Thatcher became the UK PM in 1979.
     
    Hell, Indira Gandhi was PM as early as 1966. That's fifty-year-old news, from a country arguably more democratic than America is now.

    …the “1st woman” President, even though no one cares that Margaret Thatcher became the UK PM in 1979.

    Hell, Indira Gandhi was PM as early as 1966. That’s fifty-year-old news, from a country arguably more democratic than America is now.

    That can be read as more of a dynastic thing, though

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    That can be read as more of a dynastic thing, though
     
    Just like Hillary.
  221. @Henry Bowman
    Link to the work you talked about? How the Catholic faith is the reason for the state of the Latin area of the Americas?

    I need to make some leftist cry.

    It isn’t. Spain just didn’t care all that much about recreating Europe in the Americas. France, also Catholic, cared enough to send enough French women over to New France to marry the colonists.

  222. @Former Darfur
    Yhe US had minimal Latin influence, i.e., Spanish and Portuguese, and the Catholic Church wielded little power until after the basic nation was formed. Oliver correctly holds Catholicism largely responsible for the mestization of most of the New World south of the Rio Grande.

    Oliver correctly holds Catholicism largely responsible for the mestization of most of the New World south of the Rio Grande.

    Differing sex ratios also played a huge role. Very few European women immigrated to Latin America during the colonial period. Hence, Iberian males had to turn to Amerind and Black women for sexual release. Lots of de facto concubinage as well (the Church looked the other way)

    Mainland Anglo-America was quite different, as substantial numbers of European women came over. In the Massachusetts Bay Colony, the sex ratio was nearly equal, for example.

  223. @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Here is a transcript from an old Rush Limbaugh show in which he caught several media outlets using the word ‘gravitas’ to describe the same event. No way do so many different reporters settle upon such an obscure word without some coordination.
     
    You're definitely correct. I remember when Ed Rollins got in trouble for talking about having handed out "walking around money," in what I recall was Christine Todd Whitman's successful 1997 re-election campaign. Absolutely every single English-language outlet in the world, consequently used the word "braggadocio" in relation to this story. I hard that word used on TV in that week, more than in the nearly twenty years since, combined. No way was that a coincidence; the so-called "journalists" who support the Establishment, clearly coordinate their efforts, right down to the very wording.

    I remember the chorus chanting about Bush the Younger’s “hubris” when Iraq went sour. This is probably a result of coordination and talking points, but I’d just as well blame the hive mind.

  224. I’ve heard that sixty percent of Argentines have some Italian ancestry. Yet the Italians didn’t seem to make Argentina all that great like they did for the USA. Of course there is always the chance that they weren’t really responsible for the greatness of the USA in the first place.

    Pretty great for south of the US border, though; there is that.

  225. Catiline: there’s two kinds of white people: Anglo-Vermin, and the whites who follow them around.

  226. @syonredux

    …the “1st woman” President, even though no one cares that Margaret Thatcher became the UK PM in 1979.

    Hell, Indira Gandhi was PM as early as 1966. That’s fifty-year-old news, from a country arguably more democratic than America is now.
     
    That can be read as more of a dynastic thing, though

    That can be read as more of a dynastic thing, though

    Just like Hillary.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    It's interesting to note that women who did not owe anything to a dynastic advantage and became heads of government of their countries seem to be from no single discernible type of national culture or economy.

    Margaret Thatcher, Theresa May, Angela Merkel, Tansu Ciller in Turkey, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf in Liberia, Dilma Rousseff in Brazil, to name some, are from a variety of societies, a variety of countries in various stages of economic development.

    , @syonredux

    That can be read as more of a dynastic thing, though

    Just like Hillary.
     
    Indeed. Another sign that Anglo-America is dying....
  227. @Reg Cæsar

    That can be read as more of a dynastic thing, though
     
    Just like Hillary.

    It’s interesting to note that women who did not owe anything to a dynastic advantage and became heads of government of their countries seem to be from no single discernible type of national culture or economy.

    Margaret Thatcher, Theresa May, Angela Merkel, Tansu Ciller in Turkey, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf in Liberia, Dilma Rousseff in Brazil, to name some, are from a variety of societies, a variety of countries in various stages of economic development.

  228. @IBC

    Using even darker language than he had on the campaign trail
     
    Is there a marketing motive (such as subconscious negative word association) in the media's continual and overwhelming use of the word "dark" to describe Donald Trump and his supporters? For example, during NPR's coverage of the RNC, about six different journalists used the word "dark" almost exclusively. It was liked they'd locked themselves out of part of their own brains. What about "negative," "cynical," or "pessimistic"? (Not that I'd use those descriptors): No, it was dark, dark, dark.

    And it's ironic that "dark" is the media's word of choice to describe someone they see as a white supremacist. What happened to Sapir-Whorf and Goodthink? Black lives matter, but what about adjectives?*

    *I wrote this before skimming the other comments and it sounds like I'm not the only one who noticed the media's collective writer's block. If Trump's numbers improve closer to November, I can already hear David Brooks' slightly stunned voice resorting to nuggets of wisdom from oldies radio: "the darkest hour is just before dawn..."

    Nobody went to see that movie about a crime-fighting billionaire called “The Dark Knight” …

  229. @Kylie
    "It’s worth highlighting that Margaret Thatcher and Theresa May, like Angela Merkel, owe absolutely nothing in their political careers to their husbands. Most people can’t even name their husbands, offhand. That’s healthy."

    It would be even healthier if the latter two had not come to power at all.

    Thatcher’s husband Denis was the ideal female politician’s husband: he was successful, well-connected, and highly likable, without being a major figure himself. He supported her nascent political career financially. He was enough years older than her, however, that he was in retirement during the peak of her career, and thus his business interests were largely wound down (I think) and didn’t cause her many controversies over conflicts of interest.

    • Replies: @matt

    We love you Mrs. Thatcher like your old man loves a brew.
    Such a lad your husband Denis when he's had a drink or two.
    He'll have a pint of Murphy's and a glass of Irish Mist,
    And because he sleeps with you each night no wonder he's always pissed
     
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJh0m0E7Ozg
    , @Kylie
    "Thatcher’s husband Denis was the ideal female politician’s husband: he was successful, well-connected, and highly likable, without being a major figure himself."

    That's one way of looking at it. But it's not mine.

    I think the ideal female politician's husband would be one who was successful in persuading his wife to leave politics.

    I have no problem with women having power--lots of power--in some areas. But they are unsuited to governing and establishing social policy. The rare exceptions are just that--so rare and so exceptional as to be irrelevant. Whether altruistic or self-serving, all people go into politics or government work to obtain power. Many, of both genders, are power mad. But power seems to have a more toxic effect on women. They are like Native Americans who can't metabolize alcohol the way other races can. So I think it's best for everyone if they abstain from political power altogether.
  230. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “…Latin America was colonised at a time when Europe when still in a pre-modern stage of development and white IQs and temperaments probably weren’t up to modern standards…”

    No, that wasn’t it… also, this isn’t something that historians have never thought of looking at before…


    “Differing sex ratios also played a huge role. Very few European women immigrated to Latin America during the colonial period. Hence, Iberian males had to turn to Amerind and Black women for sexual release. Lots of de facto concubinage as well (the Church looked the other way)


    Mainland Anglo-America was quite different, as substantial numbers of European women came over.”

    This is likely what made the “Anglo-settled” countries that we think of today (US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand) different from Latin American countries and other similar colonies. Regardless of who specifically settled them (French, Amish, German-Swiss gun-smiths, Scots-Irish frontiersmen), the Anglo-settlers included large numbers of women and families. These families pretty much defined the settlement. So you got a European world. Places that didn’t include a lot of European women and families didn’t end up as European.

    A lot of the Iberian men were hoping to do well in the New World and then return to Iberia to marry. This was a good bit different than getting married and then heading out to the New World were you and your new wife expected to create a new family farm. Some reading this blog have probably read that famous Spanish short story about a man who suffers innumerable hardships in the New World, finally strikes it rich, returns to Spain, sees the beautiful woman on the street that he’d always hoped to marry… and learns she is actually the woman’s daughter.

  231. @JohnnyWalker123
    I actually liked "Gangs of New York." It worked for me. As you pointed out in your review, the movie portrayed Irish immigrants pretty badly.

    Here's the ending, which I thought was well-done.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p-8Lu7MRjQs

    I’m not sure what you are supposed to feel watching that scene, but all I could think was ‘I’m glad my home town wasn’t covered in a succession of bigger and bigger skyscrapers over the last hundred years’.p

  232. @International Jew

    From watching cowboy movies in the 1960s, I absorbed the previous Narrative
     
    Me too. And just to give credit where credit is due (and rarely paid on this blog) most of those westerns were produced by Jewish-owned studios.

    "Bonanza", for instance, starring (((Lyon Himan Green))) and produced by NTA under names like (((Ely Landau))), (((Harold Goldman))), (((Charles C. Barry))), and (((Berne Tabakin))).

    Jews were huge in the making of Westerns and also in country-western music, not so muchas performers, but on the business side. “Country music”, as opposed to folk music, wasn’t a thing before the spread of the DC battery radio in the twenties to mostly electricityless farms. It was invented by Jews so they could sell advertising to a rural audience. Most popular product? Laxatives.

  233. @Steve Sailer
    It is exceptionally beautiful in upstate New York, as objectively measured in giant waterfalls. Offhand, I can only think of remote inland Venezuela and fiord Norway as more waterfall-intensive.

    Aside from some people’s aversion to any cold and snow, one would think upstate NY would be exactly the place you’d want for elite technology….as it indeed was once. If you can afford nice toys-snowmobiles, jet-skis, aggressive 4WD off road vehicles, seaplanes or sailplanes (indeed, it’s the soaring capital of the planet), it’s very fun. Summers are not exceptionally hot (that’s why, in Seven Year Itch fashion, New Yorkers sent the family upstate for the summer) and while winters are cold and snowy, in most portions of the state (not Buffalo) the snow is manageable.

    Hmmmm.

  234. @Whoiwasthelasttime
    Off topic but part of the 'narrative': looking around for an exact number of unarmed black people killed by police I stumbled on this site that attempts to chronical exactly who those 102 unarmed black people were and how they died in 2015.

    http://mappingpoliceviolence.org/unarmed/

    Don't know who put this together, if it's accurate or their ultimate agenda.
    I did not bother to read all the 102 descriptions but looking at the first 20 I see:
    2 were killed by their cop boy friend/girl friend
    3 were killed accidentally by police cars responding to a crime
    2 died of medical problems fighting cops
    2 pointed toy guns
    3 died trying to take gun
    1 killed by security guard
    1 died when he tried to take an off duty cops car at car wash. Oops.
    Unfortunately the race of cop not supplied

    Seems like “The Talk” blacks enjoy bragging about either isn’t recited correctly, or the kids just ain’t listening.

    Maybe many urban blacks are simply too stupid to function through a police investigation, turning what would normally be a tedious and annoying experience that most police stops are, into an existential endgame for morons.

    Witness this silly woman going “Full Zulu” on a routine traffic stop. Nothing but willful stupidity answers for this incident:

    http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=538_1469149880

  235. @Reg Cæsar

    That can be read as more of a dynastic thing, though
     
    Just like Hillary.

    That can be read as more of a dynastic thing, though

    Just like Hillary.

    Indeed. Another sign that Anglo-America is dying….

  236. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:

    With this doing the rounds:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=YMHOcmDVBP0

    would they even be willing to have Hillary appear at the convention?

    They have already stopped Wassserman-Schultz from appearing, it seems.

    (When is Youtube going to take that video down?)

  237. @Anonymous
    Perhaps, but some of the most founding stock elements of the population, like white Southerners and Appalachians, have been and remain among the least dynamic.

    A difficult proposition to establish given that talented southerners have been migrating internally for generations.

  238. Nobody went to see that movie about a crime-fighting billionaire called “The Dark Knight” …

    I remember about 10 years ago or more, I tumbled to the fact that “dark” is one of those words marketing types throw into video game and trashy book titles a lot. My running joke was “Darkest Dark Darkness.” I think the nerd slang “grimdark” is how this idea came out the other side of the meme machine.

  239. matt says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Thatcher's husband Denis was the ideal female politician's husband: he was successful, well-connected, and highly likable, without being a major figure himself. He supported her nascent political career financially. He was enough years older than her, however, that he was in retirement during the peak of her career, and thus his business interests were largely wound down (I think) and didn't cause her many controversies over conflicts of interest.

    We love you Mrs. Thatcher like your old man loves a brew.
    Such a lad your husband Denis when he’s had a drink or two.
    He’ll have a pint of Murphy’s and a glass of Irish Mist,
    And because he sleeps with you each night no wonder he’s always pissed

  240. @Steve Sailer
    Thatcher's husband Denis was the ideal female politician's husband: he was successful, well-connected, and highly likable, without being a major figure himself. He supported her nascent political career financially. He was enough years older than her, however, that he was in retirement during the peak of her career, and thus his business interests were largely wound down (I think) and didn't cause her many controversies over conflicts of interest.

    “Thatcher’s husband Denis was the ideal female politician’s husband: he was successful, well-connected, and highly likable, without being a major figure himself.”

    That’s one way of looking at it. But it’s not mine.

    I think the ideal female politician’s husband would be one who was successful in persuading his wife to leave politics.

    I have no problem with women having power–lots of power–in some areas. But they are unsuited to governing and establishing social policy. The rare exceptions are just that–so rare and so exceptional as to be irrelevant. Whether altruistic or self-serving, all people go into politics or government work to obtain power. Many, of both genders, are power mad. But power seems to have a more toxic effect on women. They are like Native Americans who can’t metabolize alcohol the way other races can. So I think it’s best for everyone if they abstain from political power altogether.

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    The argument against female political power is one that has been made by female commentators best, I think. The counterargument is that if men were men and not vermicious adolescents or confused neuters then women would not seek political power themselves, or at least not basically healthy ones, and in a healthy society the unhealthy ones would be regarded as cranks or obvious fools and ignored.

    I'm going to say there are persuasive arguments on both sides. However, the issue at hand is not female power in general, but the potential election to extreme power of one particular female, to wit, Hillary Rodham Clinton. No sane person can think her anything but a certain disaster, and a massive one at that. The only sane argument for her election can therefore be that of William Pierce and Harold Covington, that is to say, the final and swift end to an unsalvageable situation whose conclusion would be, at least in one sense, merciful.
  241. @Henry Bowman
    Link to the work you talked about? How the Catholic faith is the reason for the state of the Latin area of the Americas?

    I need to make some leftist cry.

    Oliver is a magnificent writer, but you have to search his works. Aside from his political magna opera, Christianity and the Survival of the West and America’s Decline: The Education of a Conservative, there are numerous short works and articles in the second American Mercury , in Instauration, and in Liberty Bell magazines, all now-defunct journals.

    Unfortunately, the very best writing extant of his on the subject of Latin America is probably in several booklets published via the John Birch Society during his tenure there. These are amongst the few things not readily available via a fairly simple search online, for the JBS is very much still in business and does not care to have them disseminated, despite Oliver’s considerable restraint in phraseoology vis-a-vis his post-JBS writings.

    One must understand that Oliver was far from a Hispanophobe as such. He was quite fluent in Castilian Spanish and had spent time not only there but in Mexico, and apparently at some other places in Latin America as well. He states-the quote is from memory and may not be exact, “The Latins, the best of whom are fully the equal to the best of our own”… in prefacing remarks about the divergence of Latin American (sociopolitical) evolution to that of the American (he also carefully explains that “American” on its own properly refers to the United States, versus anywhere in Central or South America, or Mexico, or Canada). Apparently he had several close friends amongst the academics of Mexico’s more respectable universities.

    Nevertheless-make no mistake-he is very certainly a racialist, and if not a fascist, has no particular aversion to the concept per se: furthermore, he has no love for “the versipellous tribe”, and says so. His last written work, published posthumosly, was “The Jewish Strategy”, and he takes no prisoners.

    From its foreword:

    In 1958 I still believed that there was a significant intellectual difference between the American bourgeoisie and the cattle that one sees peering between the slats of large trucks as they contentedly munch hay on their way to the abattoir. Since severing my connections with the Birch hoax, I have chosen to write with utter frankness on the dire plight of our race and the civilization we created. The reader has been warned.

    Emphases mine.

  242. @Kylie
    "Thatcher’s husband Denis was the ideal female politician’s husband: he was successful, well-connected, and highly likable, without being a major figure himself."

    That's one way of looking at it. But it's not mine.

    I think the ideal female politician's husband would be one who was successful in persuading his wife to leave politics.

    I have no problem with women having power--lots of power--in some areas. But they are unsuited to governing and establishing social policy. The rare exceptions are just that--so rare and so exceptional as to be irrelevant. Whether altruistic or self-serving, all people go into politics or government work to obtain power. Many, of both genders, are power mad. But power seems to have a more toxic effect on women. They are like Native Americans who can't metabolize alcohol the way other races can. So I think it's best for everyone if they abstain from political power altogether.

    The argument against female political power is one that has been made by female commentators best, I think. The counterargument is that if men were men and not vermicious adolescents or confused neuters then women would not seek political power themselves, or at least not basically healthy ones, and in a healthy society the unhealthy ones would be regarded as cranks or obvious fools and ignored.

    I’m going to say there are persuasive arguments on both sides. However, the issue at hand is not female power in general, but the potential election to extreme power of one particular female, to wit, Hillary Rodham Clinton. No sane person can think her anything but a certain disaster, and a massive one at that. The only sane argument for her election can therefore be that of William Pierce and Harold Covington, that is to say, the final and swift end to an unsalvageable situation whose conclusion would be, at least in one sense, merciful.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    I consider Hillary Clinton extremely dangerous.

    Rather than her serving one term as POTUS, I'd prefer Obama declare himself president for life.

    N.B. I loathed Obama at first sight (and sound).
  243. @Former Darfur
    Intelligent question. Not sure.

    I would guess a combination of low mortality rates and more French women making the transatlantic trip (e.g., les Filles du Roi). Even Spanish and Portuguese colonists strongly preferred European brides when they could get them, but not very many European women seemed to want to live in Mexico or Brazil, and of those that did, a lot died of tropical diseases.

  244. @Former Darfur
    The argument against female political power is one that has been made by female commentators best, I think. The counterargument is that if men were men and not vermicious adolescents or confused neuters then women would not seek political power themselves, or at least not basically healthy ones, and in a healthy society the unhealthy ones would be regarded as cranks or obvious fools and ignored.

    I'm going to say there are persuasive arguments on both sides. However, the issue at hand is not female power in general, but the potential election to extreme power of one particular female, to wit, Hillary Rodham Clinton. No sane person can think her anything but a certain disaster, and a massive one at that. The only sane argument for her election can therefore be that of William Pierce and Harold Covington, that is to say, the final and swift end to an unsalvageable situation whose conclusion would be, at least in one sense, merciful.

    I consider Hillary Clinton extremely dangerous.

    Rather than her serving one term as POTUS, I’d prefer Obama declare himself president for life.

    N.B. I loathed Obama at first sight (and sound).

  245. @The Anti-Gnostic
    Hence, prosperity. Give me a $20T credit card and I'll have a lot of nice things around the house too.

    A friend who's a very proactive investor predicts 2018 for the Big Bust. I'm not sure I'd want to be the next President. My half-serious prediction is Trump or Hillary is the next-to-last one of the US as presently constituted.

    “My half-serious prediction is Trump or Hillary is the next-to-last one of the US as presently constituted.”

    Outright joke is more like it. Such prognostications were made after the Civil War, during the Great Depression, after the 2008 financial meltdown. Too many of us Americans care about our country enough to let that happen.

    Besides, if you are into conspiracy theories, you really think the Jews and the banksters and the shyster lawyers do not have contingency plans to put Humpty Dumpty back together again IF the SHTF? Please…

  246. A good person to look up if you want to understand the intellectual shift from viewing America as a nation of pioneers to nation of immigrants is Oscar Handlin, the Harvard historian and author of “The Uprooted: The Epic Story of the Great Migrations That Made the American People,” which won the 1952 Pulitzer for history.

    “He reoriented the whole picture of the American story,” he said, “from the view that America was built on the spirit of the Wild West, to the idea that we are a nation of immigrants.”…

    In 1965, Dr. Handlin lent his weight as the nation’s most eminent immigration scholar to the effort to pass legislation abolishing an immigration quota system, in place since the 1920s, which discriminated against many groups, including Asians. He testified before Congress, and was said to have played an important behind-the-scenes role. The legislation was adopted.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/24/us/oscar-handlin-historian-who-chronicled-united-states-immigration-dies-at-95.html

    On a interesting side note, The Zionist national story also shifted from Israel as a “Nation of Halutzim” to a “Nation of Olim”. The narrative began as one of pioneers taming a wild land and later on shifted to one of a land which received helpless Jewish refugees. The two stories coexist more there than they do here, but the parallel between the American and Israeli founding myths are striking.

  247. So which “narrative” accounts for the fact that Trump’s (almost) entire executive team is a who’s who of Ellis Island all-stars? Neither Steve’s nor Julia’s would be my guess.

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