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From the New York Times:

How Tough-on-Crime Prosecutors Contribute to Mass Incarceration

By David Lat
April 8, 2019

CHARGED: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration
By Emily Bazelon

… These consequences are on full display in “Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration,” by Emily Bazelon, a lecturer at Yale Law School and staff writer at The New York Times Magazine. …

To show how prosecutorial power operates in the real world, Bazelon follows two young defendants through the system: Kevin (a pseudonym), a 20-year-old from the Brownsville neighborhood of Brooklyn who is charged with illegal gun possession, and Noura Jackson, a teenager from Memphis who is accused of murdering her mother.

Their cases are very different — one involving a victimless crime, the other the most heinous crime of all — and so are the district attorneys.

I’m fascinated that violating New York City’s strict gun control laws is now described in the New York Times as “a victimless crime.”

Of course, there’s no mention in this review of Emily Bazelon’s once famous grandfather David Bazelon’s role in more than doubling the national murder rate from 1964-1975. Nor is there any mention of the last time liberals got control of the criminal justice system and left many of America’s big cities as desolate ruins.

As Talleyrand said of the Bazelon Dynasty: “They had learned nothing, and forgotten nothing.”

In The New Yorker, Adam Gopnik has a more insightful review:

Now the legal journalist and Times Magazine staff writer Emily Bazelon, in her book “Charged” (Random House), puts flesh and faces to Pfaff’s statistical and largely abstract proposition. “Charged,” though far-reaching in purpose, is above all a study of two cases in which prosecutorial misconduct or overreach put two people through hell. She tells these stories in microscopic detail, …

She has a good ear for talk, and a fine eye for detail; at one point she makes the slightly hallucinatory discovery that the recently elected Brooklyn D.A., Eric Gonzalez chose his career path after reading Tom Wolfe’s “The Bonfire of the Vanities” as a teen-ager—not an obvious book to point someone on a path toward public service. (He was fascinated not by the deep cynicism of Wolfe’s view but by the way that the D.A. in the novel is able, heroically, to even things up with a Master of the Universe—proof, again, that we find in books what we want to find in books.)

Yet, though Bazelon’s larger points about the madness of prosecutorial power are all impeccably well taken, the two central cases she uses to illustrate these points are somewhat surprising choices. It wouldn’t be hard to find, among the tens of thousands of cases that are plea-bargained in New York City alone every year, one in which a poor kid is penalized by a law that’s out of all proportion to the offense—there are kids who get locked up for drug offenses that in nearby states are no longer even misdemeanors. But Bazelon has written about a twenty-year-old black New Yorker, whom she calls Kevin, who has been arrested for the illegal possession of a loaded handgun and, given his particular charge, was subject to two years of imprisonment, the “mandatory minimum” stipulated by New York’s strict anti-handgun laws. Kevin may well have been, as he insists and as Bazelon accepts, little more than an innocent third party to the gun offense—“holding” the gun for friends rather than using it, or intending to use it, in the commission of a crime. But his prospective sentence was not simply a result of prosecutorial overreach; it was an unintended outcome of well-intended efforts at gun control. Gun violence is an especially brutal plague in poor and minority neighborhoods, and Bazelon acknowledges that Bill de Blasio, the city’s most progressive mayor in decades, has been even more rigorous than his predecessors in encouraging these mandatory-minimum gun-possession indictments.

The other case in the book is Noura Jackson of Memphis, who was convicted of murdering her mother, but got let out on prosecutorial misconduct. This sounds like another black thing, but it turns out Noura Jackson was a Great White Defendant, which perhaps explains why the Memphis DA was so intent on getting her convicted.

… Perhaps the most radical and challenging of the new approaches to incarceration involves the move to cap all prison sentences at some designated limit. Pfaff, in his book, proposed a test program in which prisoners, including those convicted of violent crime, would, after serving some years, be released when they reached the age of forty; the anti-incarceration activist Marc Mauer has made a similar case with a different figure, arguing, on a Norwegian model, that all prison sentences be capped at twenty years.

Yeah, the Norwegian model worked out well in the case of that right wing terrorist jerk who murdered all those kids and now files jailhouse complaints about having to play videogames with only an obsolete PS/2. He thinks he’s going to automatically get out after 21 years (although the Norwegians will hopefully figure out some loophole in their stupid policy to keep him locked up forever).

I’m all in favor of reforms to rein in abusive prosecutors and cops, but the instant that gets tied to blacks being imprisoned more than whites, everything catastrophically falls apart and we wind up with thousands more murder victims per year, as we saw with homicides increasing over 22% from 2014 (Ferguson) to 2016 (the year Trump won).

 
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  1. Anon[245] • Disclaimer says:

    Gosh, they noticed?

  2. Anonymous[302] • Disclaimer says:

    How ironic.

    It hardly needs me to pontificate that the self same tossers who scream the loudest about ‘gun control’ at every possible opportunity are now shilling for ‘gun rights’.

    Where’s Charlton Heston where you need him?

    • Agree: GermanReader2
    • LOL: bomag
  3. How’s this for a victimless crime? A Scot opens a box containing a toy, and gets five years for it:

    Man jailed for ordering gun on dark web

    An operation by the Organised Crime Partnership in Scotland saw him being placed under surveillance while a dummy package was sent instead…

    The judge said he noted that Mitchell said he had no intention to cause harm to anyone, but said they were serious offences…

    By David Lat

    David Lat = Tad valid.

    • Replies: @Cortes
  4. but it turns out Noura Jackson was a Great White Defendant,

    Noura Jackson’s father, Nazmi Hassanieh

    Are you sure that’s what you MENA by “white”?

    • LOL: PV van der Byl, TWS
  5. Anon[383] • Disclaimer says:

    Normal white permitted citizens flying into JFK or La Guardia with checked, declared firearms in lock boxes are arrested. New York doesn’t have firearms reciprocity. There are a bunch of law firms in New York that seem to specialize in dealing with upstanding out-of-stater pillars-of-their-communities facing 5 to 15 who where blindsided when they were arrested. This is an evergreen article for the New York Times during slow news weeks (“Dust off the guns-at-the-airport story and swap in more recent quotes!)

    • Replies: @bomag
    , @Achmed E. Newman
  6. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    she makes the slightly hallucinatory discovery that the recently elected Brooklyn D.A., Eric Gonzalez chose his career path after reading Tom Wolfe’s “The Bonfire of the Vanities” as a teen-ager—not an obvious book to point someone on a path toward public service.

    I can see Bonfire of the Vanities inspiring someone on a path to public service, as it includes honorable public servant characters, such as Bernie Fitzgibbon, Judge Kovitsky, and an honorable former public servant in Tommy Killian. But this guy was inspired by an unethical, self-aggrandizing prosecutor who railroads an essentially innocent man because his identity makes him an attractive enemy of the people.

    Gopnik is right that people see what they want to see in books (and movies, for that matter). The classic example that comes to mind is Wall Street firms posting non-ironic NYT classified ads saying “Wanted: Bud Fox” after Oliver’s Stone’s Wall Street came out. But you expect that sort of thing from Wall Street; for a district attorney to be inspired by an unethical prosecutor character is horrifying.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  7. Maybe Emily Bazelon figures the worst case scenario if her reforms are passed is a lot more dead blacks and Hispanics, so what’s the downside?

    • Replies: @Kylie
  8. Dan Hayes says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Dave Pinsen:

    Brooklyn DA Gonzalez who woefully misinterpreted Wolfe’s message currently continues on his erring ways in yielding to goo-goo political pressures in calling for the decriminalization of sex worker activities (i.e., prostitution).

    The racial evolution of Brooklyn politics: Hispanic Gonzalez was preceded by a black who in turn was preceded by an Irish-American pol. The beat goes on!

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  9. Dan Hayes says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Dave Pinson:

    Brooklyn DA Gonzalez who woefully misinterpreted Wolfe’s message currently continues on his erring ways in yielding to goo-goo political pressures in calling for the decriminalization of sex worker activities (i.e., prostitution).

    The racial evolution of Brooklyn politics: Hispanic Gonzalez was preceded by a black who in turn was preceded by an Irish-American pol. The beat goes on!

    • Replies: @David In TN
  10. Cortes says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    “The prosecutor said that Mitchell “appeared distant” and was staring into space. He said that he suffered from depression and took medication for the condition.”

    Call me naive or a feartie but I’m glad he won’t be there when I’m in Edinburgh soon. No wish to share space with an armed mentally ill zoomer, thanks. Let him work on his problem in jail, not act out in public.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  11. the Norwegians will hopefully figure out some loophole

    The only provision is that as the 21-year deadline approaches, a panel considers if the inmate would still be a danger after release. Normally there are few grounds to think so – the guy is 21 years older (so if he committed the crime at age 20, he’d be 41, less hotheaded than he was at the time he committed the crime), and of course most defendants don’t say they’d re-offend after release.

    There’s the curious case of black metal musician Varg Vikernes, who was released after serving merely 15 years of his 21-year sentence, despite trying to escape once and never showing any signs of remorse. He regularly received vacations from the prison (a privilege not afforded to Anders Breivik), so his real time served was even less and lighter.

  12. RobUK says:

    Pfaff, in his book, proposed a test program in which prisoners, including those convicted of violent crime, would, after serving some years, be released when they reached the age of forty

    Murder someone when you are 38, serve “some years” (two), out at 40.

    Phrasing of laws is important because you are dealing with lawyers.

    • Replies: @bomag
  13. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Dan Hayes

    Wolfe predicted that progression too in Bonfire. The young assistant district attorneys know that by the time they’re the age of the senior guys, NAMs will be dominating the elected top of the pyramid.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
  14. jd0 says: • Website

    I am not whyte so my automatic weapnos collection is fine. (hell, just check the “non-whyte” box. what is wrong with you???)

  15. although the Norwegians will hopefully figure out some loophole in their stupid policy

    They’ll deport him to the US. “He’ll fit right in!”

    it was an unintended outcome of well-intended efforts at gun control.

    I know that legislators are, in general, dumber than a bag of hammers, but can they really be so stupid as to not see the outcome of mandatory minimums?

    While reading up on David Bazelon, who I only knew as a name, I noticed he “assumed senior status on June 30, 1979” Wondering what “senior status” was, I searched it and discovered that Fed judges are one of the ultimate sinecures (not that this is exactly news): “A judge must be at least 65 years of age and have served in federal courts for at least 15 years to qualify, with one less year of service required for each additional year of age. When that happens, they receive the full salary of a judge, but have the option to take a reduced caseload”. Great gig, huh?

  16. She is, of course, correct.
    Name the victim.

    • Replies: @Kaganovitch
    , @Neuday
  17. @Anonymous

    I am sure they will do the same when people are resisting gun confiscations.

  18. “… Perhaps the most radical and challenging of the new approaches to incarceration involves the move to cap all prison sentences at some designated limit. Pfaff, in his book, proposed a test program in which prisoners, including those convicted of violent crime, would, after serving some years, be released when they reached the age of forty; the anti-incarceration activist Marc Mauer has made a similar case with a different figure, arguing, on a Norwegian model, that all prison sentences be capped at twenty years.”

    There are competing ideas about using models like this to reduce incarceration, but none of the people developing the models ever ask their fellow citizens what they want. While classified differently depending upon the motives of the classifier, the general goals are punishment, deterrence, incapacitation (prevention through removal from society), and rehabilitation. Academics and policy makers focus on the goal of rehabilitation. The public wants punishment, deterrence, and incapacitation. They know, in their guts, what the academic and policy makers are willfully blind to – rehabilitation doesn’t work. It never has. The idea of capping prison sentences at 20 years or at a certain age slyly recognizes the reality that the only thing that can prevent recidivism, other than incarceration, is age.

    More significantly, the public doesn’t care if rehabilitation works. People around the world who don’t commit crimes want to see criminals punished and kept from committing more crimes. Especially violent crimes. And any time police catch someone up to no good, with a gun, they have likely prevented a violent crime.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  19. @Oleaginous Outrager

    Yeah, being the top judge in the U.S. not on the Supreme Court is a great gig.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  20. Who can forgot Plaxico Burress, the NFL player who shot himself in the leg with his own handgun at a nightclub in NYC and served about 2 years for it.

  21. bgates says:
    @Oleaginous Outrager

    I know that legislators are, in general, dumber than a bag of hammers, but can they really be so stupid as to not see the outcome of mandatory minimums?

    These people confidently predict the positive outcomes of their policies to the eighth decimal place, yet they’re taken unawares when mandating a prison sentence for an activity they’ve criminalized leads to prison time for someone convicted of that activity.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
  22. David says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    He just heard there was a book about NYC prosecutors and incorporated it into his rap. Hispanics aren’t big readers.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @DCThrowback
    , @Dave Pinsen
  23. Arclight says:

    I’ve had this conversation with lefty friends after every shooting that gets social media fired up about enacting ‘common sense’ gun reform, but I always ask them if they are willing to see a bunch of black and brown people go to jail as consequence of stricter gun laws…usually that results in some dead air and repetition of a preceding talking point rather than answering the question. In the cases in which someone advocates law enforcement actively confiscating weapons, again the question is raised as to whether they’d like to see cops kicking down the doors of low income and diverse people’s homes to accomplish this, and I get blank stares.

    I do remember after Parkland there was a liberal writer or two who actually made the case the left shouldn’t be after new gun laws because it would mean locking up a hugely disproportionate number of blacks and latinos, but that didn’t gain any traction. Much of the fear around gun violence is a product of minority crime but the anti-gun people tell themselves it’s about lone wolf white mass shooters.

  24. Ed says:

    The Norwegian guy has the makeup of someone that could slaughter again upon his release. Norway better keep him locked up.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Father O'Hara
  25. Someone ask the NYT reporter how xir feels about David Koresh and Randy Weaver.

    • Agree: bomag
  26. slumber_j says:
    @Oleaginous Outrager

    By “unintended” in that sentence she must mean “intended.”

  27. . Gun violence is an especially brutal plague in poor and minority neighborhoods, and Bazelon acknowledges that Bill de Blasio, the city’s most progressive mayor in decades, has been even more rigorous than his predecessors in encouraging these mandatory-minimum gun-possession indictments.

    Guns seem to have an affinty for poor and minority neighborhoods, for it is there that the impulse plays out. I’m waiting for the report that tells me a change in momentum has occurred.

    Guns don’t kill people; tragic dirt kills people.

    Let’s have a conversation, then a march, and then stricter gun control laws, for until guns learn to obey laws …

    The disparate impact is wrong. We demand equal impact.

    It’s the white mans’ burden to control gun violent. White men are responsible for it is they who did not invent peaceful guns.

    We demand guns that respect minority rights.

    • Replies: @David In TN
  28. When guns are outlawed, only minorities will have guns.

    • LOL: Pat Kittle
    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    , @Pat Kittle
  29. bomag says:
    @Anon

    First I’ve heard of this, and I follow the gun news a little bit.

    Seems like something that could use a few disruptive protests.

    The courts are plenty anxious to use the commerce clause to expand the reach of “rights”. This looks like a prime area for such an expansion.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  30. bomag says:
    @RobUK

    …after serving some years

    I suppose the plan is to have something like a five year minimum and then release those over forty; thus making the minimum a new de facto sentence for violent crime.

    There’s no doubt some wording about prisoners deemed a threat to the public, so we’re right back to today.

  31. @MikeatMikedotMike

    Nice job! I guess that would really be a victimless crime in the same sense as any kind of overdose or harm from someone taking illegal drugs. If you do it to yourself, it’s not literally “victimless”, but it kind of goes along with that category, along with suicide.

    I don’t know if you’ve seen the following video of this gun instructor of some kind accidentally shooting himself in the foot in front of a class. It’s hilarious, and, I’ve got to say, he took it pretty damn well. (He did limp around a bit, but I’m not sure he even said any cuss words. Than, he continued on with the class! What a trooper.)

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    , @Onebelowall
  32. Paul Rise says:

    Possession of an object that the law considers banned IS a victimless crime.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    , @Harry Baldwin
    , @TWS
  33. @bomag

    I’m going by my memory of the NRA mag articles, Bomag, but I recall that there really wasn’t much the guy COULD HAVE done differently. His flight got diverted to NYC, as it was not his original destination. He had a gun (and, I assume some ammo – you’re allowed up to 11 lb(?) ) packed legitimately in checked luggage. He got stuck for the night with the intention of continuing his trip on whatever flight the airline rebooked him for in the morning.

    He had to go get his checked baggage, and that’s when the laws of NY City or State came down on his ass and locked him up with a criminal record. There was another instance with a black lady, all legal-eagle legit, as I recall, too, from the magazine. One of the instances must have been in New Jersey, I suppose Newark, as Governer Christie got involved to get the prisoner released, but not truly exonerated – I may be using the wrong legal term – hello, Jack D?

  34. @Anon

    … there are kids who get locked up for drug offenses that in nearby states are no longer even misdemeanors.

    Yep, maybe Mr. Gopnik has not have heard of the cases you describe, much less all of the millions of worried travelers, especially on the road, who must deal with the varied state laws. That’s why an overall 50-state (or as many as we can get) reciprocity agreement for transporting and bearing arms would be great.

    Possibly it’s more a case of Mr. Gopnik not wanting to hear about this or not particularly caring at all, because they’re just responsible white people who should know better.

  35. @Cortes

    Call me naive or a feartie but I’m glad he won’t be there when I’m in Edinburgh soon. No wish to share space with an armed mentally ill zoomer, thanks. Let him work on his problem in jail, not act out in public.

    Armed with a toy?

    Maybe all Scots should be in mental institutions.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @YetAnotherAnon
  36. @Ed

    The Norwegian guy has the makeup of someone that could slaughter again upon his release. Norway better keep him locked up.

    At least he chooses the right targets.

    Of course, in many states, he’d be dead by now.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  37. countenance says: • Website

    Hot air from the NYT, IMHO. NYC is not about to repeal much less ease up on its gun control laws, because it’s one of the prime tools Official New York has to help keep the elites who live in that city safe from the black and brown undertow.

    • Agree: fish
  38. “it was an unintended outcome of well-intended efforts at gun control.”

    What were the good intentions? “But, we only meant to lock up white people!”

  39. @Oleaginous Outrager

    Great gig, huh?

    Did the Donald’s sister have it?

    Or does? They never officially retire, do they?

  40. Jack D says:
    @Oleaginous Outrager

    According to the Constitution, Federal judges are appointed for life and their salary can never be reduced. If they didn’t take senior status they would keep hearing cases even if they were senile. The only way to get rid of them is to impeach them. Senior status exists to protect the public, not the judges.

  41. Jack D says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    It sounds like he THOUGHT he was ordering a real gun but they mailed him a toy for safety. When the agents trick you into making a bomb, it makes no difference if they supply you with fake explosives so long as you think they are real. When you solicit a 12 year old girl for sex on the internet, it doesn’t make a difference if you are really talking to a 40 year old cop. That’s how the law works.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  42. Dr. X says:
    @Arclight

    New York has made it a felony to possess an unregistered gun since 1911. More recently, they made it a felony to have a magazine capable of holding more than 10 rounds. You could get up to seven years for the magazine alone!!!

    These laws have zero affect on Negroes who commit homicides every singe day of the week with “unregistered” guns. Thousands of them go to prison for weapons possession, get out, and get another gun. Just life on the street, man. Prison is part of life.

    But, these laws have an enormous impact on the law-abiding, taxpaying white man who is quite effectively deprived of the ownership and use of arms.

  43. Jack D says:
    @Steve Sailer

    People don’t become Federal judges for the money. You could make a lot more as a partner in a big firm. It’s not the easiest job in the world.

  44. Steve, you starting to come around to the fact that the Left doesn’t wanna disarm you because they’re scared of armed blacks shooting their kids, but so that when they rile up the blacks and send them after you you don’t go full Roof Korean?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  45. peterike says:
    @Jack D

    People don’t become Federal judges for the money.

    That’s true. They become Federal judges to wreak havoc on society at large as a way of settling old ethnic and racial grievances.

    • LOL: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Jack D
  46. peterike says:

    Kevin may well have been, as he insists and as Bazelon accepts, little more than an innocent third party to the gun offense—“holding” the gun for friends rather than using it

    Lol! I love how Liberals will so readily believe the most obvious, self-serving lie when said by a person of color. I reckon had Kevin been picked up for drug possession, he would surely just have been “holding” the drugs for friends. Or if he was picked up for possession of an illegal, exotic pet. Just “walking it for a friend.”

    Anyway, there are surely far too many people in prison. But the solution is to bring back the original list of capital crimes from the days of the early colonies, and enforce them rigidly. If we executed everyone committing a crime on this list within a week of the crime being committed, soon there would be almost no crimes at all.

    Arson
    Piracy (update to financial crimes, fraud)
    Treason
    Murder
    Sodomy
    Burglary
    Robbery
    Rape
    Horse-stealing (update to vehicle theft)
    Counterfeiting

    • Agree: JMcG
  47. Gun control measures in the modern era have been about capturing the flag of the left’s cultural opposites rather than reducing the rate of gun violence and homicides by gun.

  48. Glaivester says: • Website

    Yeah, the Norwegian model worked out well in the case of that right wing terrorist jerk who murdered all those kids and now files jailhouse complaints about having to play videogames with only an obsolete PS/2. He thinks he’s going to automatically get out after 21 years (although the Norwegians will hopefully figure out some loophole in their stupid policy to keep him locked up forever).

    I don’t think that Breivik getting out early would be a terrible thing.

    • Agree: jim jones
    • Replies: @Jack D
  49. @Bill Jones

    This is foolish, one could make the same argument for driving under the influence. Many laws are, so to speak , prophylactic.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    , @Kratoklastes
  50. DCThrowback says: • Website
    @David

    Then why not go with a Dick Wolf “law and order” reference and credit Sam Waterston as your inspiration? Easy peasy.

    The answer is this guy was smart enough to reference an American classic in “Bonfire”, but not smart enough to have read it/understood it — why faking that he did. Infinitely worse.

  51. Tiny Duck says:

    Easy solution ONLY ban guns for white men since they commit the most crime BY FAR and allow People of Color to own guns for protection against white supremacy

    Oh and the tide is turning

    https://www.theplayerstribune.com/en-us/articles/kyle-korver-utah-jazz-nba

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Joe Stalin
  52. @Jack D

    People don’t become Federal judges for the money. You could make a lot more as a partner in a big firm. It’s not the easiest job in the world.

    Partners in Big Law (particularly big-hitter equity Partners) are rather rarely represented in Federal Judicial nominations. AUSAs, State Court Judges, etc. are more likely candidates.

    I think it’s more the case that if you’re a good technical lawyer without a big enough book of business to make it through the rounds of attrition to become a Big Law equity Partner making top tier compensation, you may rather choose the Federal Judiciary as an career off-ramp. The most important qualification for the Federal Judiciary is knowing someone with political juice to advocate for you with your home State Senator of the same party as the sitting President.

    It may not be an “easy job,” but the bulk of the Federal docket isn’t Constitutional challenges and high level complex litigation. It’s diversity cases, wage and hour claims, and relatively straight forward Federal criminal prosecutions.

    • Replies: @Pirelli
  53. I’m all in favor of reforms to rein in abusive prosecutors and cops, but the instant that gets tied to blacks being imprisoned more than whites, everything catastrophically falls apart and we wind up with thousands more murder victims per year, as we saw with homicides increasing over 22% from 2014 (Ferguson) to 2016 (the year Trump won).

    I say:

    Blacks, proportionally, commit more violent crime than do Asians or Whites because Blacks are genetically predisposed to do so.

    Brave political leaders must point this out to state clearly that Blacks are imprisoned more than Whites and Asians because they commit more violent crime than do Whites and Asians, proportionally.

    Blacks and Mestizos are innately less intelligent than Whites and Asians.

    Blacks do poorly in school and on school tests because they are highly cognitively dissimilar to Whites and Asians.

    Brave political leaders must state this to knock down the argument that external factors inhibit Blacks from doing as well as Whites and Asians in school.

    Blacks do not have the same buoyancy as do Whites and Asians because Blacks consume too much grape soda.

    The previous was the Cornell West sentence. The famous Cornell West sentence is a sentence so outrageous that Professor Cornell West would bust out laughing at the sheer exuberance of the utterance.

    Attention Steve Sailer:

    Please moderate my many, many genius comments on through that haven’t yet been moderated on through. I am told that I am on the short list to receive a $3 million dollar MacArthur Genius Grant for outstanding commenter on a blog internet site.

    Thank you,

    Your innumerate and short commenter future Genius Grant donor CP

  54. Neuday says:
    @Bill Jones

    DUI’s are victimless crimes but I don’t see much political agitation to decriminalize.

    • Replies: @fish
  55. How many Swamp City DC dwellers moved to a nicer, safer and more WHITE part of the city to avoid BLACK criminals?

    Coward boobs with no guts nor integrity won’t call out the Blacks for their crime!

    It is oftentimes BLACK people who are the ones getting raped, killed and maimed by BLACK thugs. BLACK people know damn well that if you imprison the 10 percent or so of the BLACK males committing all the crime, the neighborhood becomes livable again.

    Harsh? Too damn bad!

    Hillary Clinton and her “superpredator” talk was right on target about BLACK crime.

    If Hillary wasn’t such a complete and total baby boomer globalizer rat, I might respect her.

    Tweets from 2015:

  56. Erik Gonzales being inspired by the DA from Bonfire of the Vanities is reminiscent of my drawing inspiration from ’80s movie blonde bullies.

    • Replies: @OFWHAP
  57. @Ed

    He might attack some pro immigration pols,or God forbid,some immigrants themselves!
    By all means,keep him locked up.😇

  58. Jack D says:

    What Bazelon is missing is that (like income tax evasion for organized criminals) gun possession is often used by prosecutors as an easily provable offense to get street criminals off the street. Given that snitches get stitches (and murder witnesses tend to wake up dead) it’s often impossible to solve ghetto murders, but in order to prove a weapons offense the cops just have to catch you carrying without a permit (and good luck getting a permit in NYC if you are not a celebrity). Given the low clearance rate, if the cops catch you doing some “non-violent” offense like carrying, chances are you have committed 10 other violent crimes for which they have no evidence. This is why “stop and frisk” worked so well – over time they were able to clear the streets of the most violent criminals this way.

    The current year thinking is to stop prosecuting these offenses and to impose much shorter sentences on even violent offenders. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see that if you put more habitual criminals on the street that crime rates are going to go back up.

    In order for all of this to work, you need “prosecutorial discretion” to prosecute the street thugs with 5 priors that you catch carrying and not white businessmen flying thru JFK with home state carry permits and guns locked in their checked baggage. But of course we get the opposite.

    Maybe there is some feeling that gentrification and purging blacks from their big city power base has gone to far and we need to raise the crime rate in order to make big cities less attractive to young whites again?

  59. “there’s no mention in this review of Emily Bazelon’s once famous grandfather David Bazelon’s role in more than doubling the national murder rate from 1964-1975. Nor is there any mention of the last time liberals got control of the criminal justice system and left many of America’s big cities as desolate ruins.”

    In 1974 film Death Wish, at the height of NY’s murder rate, there’s a scene at a high end party where one guest, remarking upon the vigilante’s actions in NY, complains to another “I’ll tell ya one thing, though. The guy’s a racist. Notice he kills more blacks than whites?” To which another party guest exclaims, “Oh, for Pete’s sake Eric, more blacks are muggers than whites. What do you want us to do, increase the proportion of white muggers so we’ll have racial equality among muggers?”

    I honestly didn’t know that people talked that way back in ’74. Obviously they talk that way now. But back then? Probably David Bazelton would’ve noticed that more blacks were muggers than whites. Just like Emily.

  60. Flip says:
    @Arclight

    Blacks complain about crime in Chicago, saying that the city government is ignoring it, but when the police try to do something about it, there are complaints about locking up young, black men. They want fried ice, I guess.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  61. Jack D says:
    @Glaivester

    I don’t think that Breivik getting out early would be a terrible thing.

    • Agree: jim jones

    OK, the name checks out.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  62. @Reg Cæsar

    “Maybe all Scots should be in mental institutions.”

    The links on the BBC page led me to this

    https://www.thecourier.co.uk/fp/news/local/dundee/860908/hundreds-of-people-bring-colour-to-city-in-trans-pride-march/

    This is in Bonnie Dundee. From the pictures a majority of the marchers are young and biologically female, although I’m sure there are a few trannies among them.

    “It is only the second national trans march to take place in Scotland, with the inaugural event having taken place last year in Edinburgh.

    Last year’s event saw around 500 people join in the event with many of the same people travelling to Dundee yesterday.”

    So it’s the usual suspects in different places. I imagine Student Unions paid for the coaches.

    But what’s this?

    “In the build-up to Saturday, the event experienced some controversy as the headliner was dropped after being charged by police.

    The performer was charged in connection with a tweet in which she is alleged to have urged people to “throat punch” members of a women’s group, For Women Scotland.”

    Nothing like a man threatening to punch women in the throat.

    Story here

    https://www.thecourier.co.uk/fp/news/local/dundee/853561/headliner-pulls-out-of-trans-pride-dundee-after-calling-for-feminist-group-to-be-throat-punched/

    “Edinburgh singer-songwriter Peyton Rose Monteux, who performs under the stage name Peyton Rose, was set to top the bill at the March 30 event, a family-orientated day to celebrate visibility and tackle hatred towards people in the transgender community.

    Transgender or ‘trans’ people are those whose gender identity or expression differs in some way from the sex assigned to them at birth, although some prefer other terms (my lol).

    Ms Monteux, who is herself transgender, has now withdrawn from the performance and will not be appearing in any official capacity at Trans Pride in Dundee.

    Police Scotland confirmed a 27-year-old woman had been charged in connection with a communications offence following a threat being made on social media.”

    For Women twitter feed here. It’s come to something when radical feminists are the voice of reason (only on trans issues of course).

    https://twitter.com/forwomenscot?lang=en

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  63. Forbes says:

    To show how prosecutorial power operates in the real world, Bazelon follows two young defendants through the system

    I feel prompted to point out that data is not the plural of anecdote.

    Yet, this is how prog-lefties advance their cause. They find tear-jerk anecdotes of a purported unfairness as an alleged contradiction of the purpose of the criminal law and penalty. E.g., Kevin, the illegal gun-possessor had a pure heart, as he had no intent to use the gun–inasmuch as he confesses to conspiracy with the end-user’s criminal intent, as if such is mitigation for the crime of possession.

    Fascinating–and she lectures at Yale Law School.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Anonymous
  64. OT: Florida man murdered by PoC at Waffle House after buying meals for customers and handing out $20 bills.
    http://www.foxnews.com/us/good-samaritan-fatally-shot-after-paying-for-meals-handing-out-20-bills-at-waffle-house
    Maybe that one ought not to have been in possession of a firearm.
    Just imagine how much “gun crime” would fall, if only it were permissible to deny black males all access to firearms. But no, in America we must all live under the same laws, so those laws must be tailored to fit IQ 70 morons.
    It’s the same mentality that forces us to pay for backup cameras in our cars…

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Walsh2
  65. @Jack D

    The current year thinking is to stop prosecuting these offenses and to impose much shorter sentences on even violent offenders. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see that if you put more habitual criminals on the street that crime rates are going to go back up.

    “Incentives matter” seems to be a concept that is simply beyond the ken of the leftist brain … unless it’s stripping people of their livelihood when they speak against leftist orthodoxy. Then they miraculously get it!

  66. Anon[376] • Disclaimer says:

    I agree that Bazelon’s politics are annoying, but it’s really refreshing to have a legal reporter who has a legitimate law degree from a good school, law review, federal clerking, etc. She’s smart and wasn’t a wash out, although she never worked at a law firm or as a prosecutor.

    Most legal journalists can’t distinguish dicta from holding, and don’t realize that the “facts” of a case are what’s described in the court decisions, not what actually happened in the real world.

    One of the entertainment rags, THR?, also has a legit attorney/journalist, and his stuff really rocks.

    Now if they would only hire an epidemiologist as a medical journalist.

  67. @Dr. X

    Thousands of them go to prison for weapons possession, get out, and get another gun.

    They aren’t shooting anybody while they are in prison.

  68. Jack D says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    In most states the governor can commute your sentence without pardoning you for your crime – you remain on the books as a convicted felon but they let you out of jail.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  69. Jack D says:
    @peterike

    You can bet that Kavanaugh is really going to stick it to the Brits.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  70. Anon87 says:

    Speaking of, has anyone seen or know where to get a copy of the 1977 PBS special, “Tom Wolfe’s Los Angeles”?

    • Replies: @res
  71. So, we don’t need gun control, we need prosecutor control?

  72. @Achmed E. Newman

    There was another instance with a black lady, all legal-eagle legit, as I recall, too, from the magazine. One of the instances must have been in New Jersey, I suppose Newark, as Governer Christie got involved to get the prisoner released, but not truly exonerated – I may be using the wrong legal term – hello, Jack D?

    That was Shaneen Allen who was IIRC a CCW holder from Philadelphia who was pulled over in Atlantic County NJ and told the officer that she had her firearm with her but they jammed her up anyway.

    There are stories of cops from the Philadelphia area leaving from their precinct or station after a shift to go down the shore to meet their families and getting jammed up because they had their duty weapon with them.

    Also, there was a directive from one of the North Jersey prosecutor’s offices (IIRC, Hudson County) directed to sworn police officers that New Jersey’s new full capacity magazine ban applied to them just as if they were civilians if they were in possession of the banned magazine while not en route to or from their official police duties.

  73. Jack D says:
    @Macumazahn

    It’s the same mentality that forces us to pay for backup cameras in our cars…

    I kinda like having the cameras, as much for myself as for all the old ladies who will no longer try to back over me in parking lots. The way the gov. usually implements these safety improvements is they let the mfrs try them out for a few years as high cost options and then when their cost has come down and the tech. is proven to work, they mandate them (and the cost goes down even further). If your car already has a display screen, adding a camera costs next to nothing. Until recently when people started driving while texting, highway death rates were going down because of these gov. mandated improvements.

    • Replies: @Macumazahn
  74. istevefan says:

    I’m fascinated that violating New York City’s strict gun control laws is now described in the New York Times as “a victimless crime.”

    This just goes to show that gun control laws were never really about crime and safety, but rather to disarm the population. Or more specifically, to disarm the White population. Since the White population is the one for which the 2nd Amendment seems to fit the bill, they are a threat and must be disarmed.

    Similarly to other issues where there is a public motive that is at odds with the ulterior one. For example, we frequently hear about the perils of climate change, and how we must make changes to save the world. Yet by all accounts the biggest polluters, China and India, are often exempt. Additionally climate alarmists seem to have no concern about annually converting millions of low-carbon producing folk into high-carbon producing folk via mass immigration. It’s almost as if climate change is not really the issue, but controlling White populations is.

    We often hear about how we must reform our health care system because the costs are out of control. Or that we must increase our taxes to fund a national health care system, and even give up our private health insurance. Yet never on the chopping block is the fact that illegals routinely have access to our ERs for which they are never forced to pay. Additionally they face no deportation consequences either. It’s almost as if the cost of health care is not the issue, but rather making Whites pay more, and pay for others is.

    • Agree: Dtbb, BenKenobi
  75. @Jack D

    The current year thinking is to stop prosecuting these offenses and to impose much shorter sentences on even violent offenders. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see that if you put more habitual criminals on the street that crime rates are going to go back up.

    The last time this happened people who held farm land and other real estate in suburban counties made a killing selling to developers in order to meet the demand for housing due to white flight.

    Since I have no say in the people of the good City and County electing a radical civil rights attorney as their District Attorney, I suppose I won’t feel pangs of guilt in acquiring and holding real property to reap the rewards of impending white flight. “I told you so” doesn’t go very far with people who don’t have the experience of living in the City of Lovely Brothers during the last go-round.

  76. res says:
    @Jack D

    You are right about that, but most of us seem to be missing something even more basic about this story. Emily Bazelon appears to be one of the people advocating for more gun control in the first place: http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2014/06/columbine_aurora_newtown_isla_vista_families_of_shooting_victims_talk_about.html
    https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2012/12/newtown-tragedy-how-the-school-shooting-could-finally-change-how-americans-treat-guns.html

    How long until who, whom? becomes enshrined in law? They are trying with “only whites can be racist or commit hate crimes” type enforcement, but has anything like that formally made it into the law yet?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Almost Missouri
  77. @Jack D

    When you solicit a 12 year old girl for sex on the internet, it doesn’t make a difference if you are really talking to a 40 year old cop.

    This sort of extreme method is justifiable for protecting vulnerable children from sex predators. (Not that they were in this kind of hurry in Rotherham.)

    But for an everyday something you can get at Walmart in Little Rock? The nanny state’s tentacles need to be trimmed. What’s next? Lawn darts?

  78. Jack D says:
    @Forbes

    It’s really crazy how a single incident (preferably accompanied by a dramatic photo) can drive public opinion, which in turn drives policy. One dead baby on the beach may mean another million Muslims in Europe. Women seem particularly vulnerable to the tear jerk ploy.

    One of Trump’s strengths is that he is willing to play this game too and doesn’t leave the field to the Left – I will see your “refugee” child torn away from his parents and raise you an orphan whose mother was killed by illegal aliens. Two can play this game.

  79. @Dr. X

    New York has made it a felony to possess an unregistered gun since 1911.

    A law aimed at immigrants. Which their immigrant neighbors supported.

    The strictness of the registration varies wildly by county, and sheriff. The wilder the county, the easier the registration.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    , @Pericles
  80. @Jack D

    It’s the same problem as the gun laws. Those old ladies you mention shouldn’t be allowed to drive at all, but despite their dangerous incompetence, we can’t discriminate against them by revoking their driving privileges. So the rest of us have to pay higher prices for mandated “safety” equipment that we neither need nor want.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  81. Jack D says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Maybe you can buy a pistol like this in Little Rock but you can’t in Edinburgh. The Brits are entitled to their own laws. In American terms pistols are as common as dirt but in the UK they are highly regulated and possession is a serious crime. In Afghanistan you can buy bachi bazi boys and all the brown heroin you want at the equivalent of the Kandahar Wal-Mart but that doesn’t mean it’s OK to order them to be mailed to your house in Little Rock.

    Would it change your answer if the guy who order the gun was named Mohammed?

    • Replies: @Dr. X
    , @Reg Cæsar
  82. @YetAnotherAnon

    Staying off topic, I see twitter is quite happy to suspend feminists who don’t realise it’s the Current Year.

    https://janeclarejones.com/2019/04/09/twittered/

    Ms Jones has a “narrative history” of the Terf Wars which is worth a read, although I remember one or two of the debating points from way before the Current Century, in obscure feminist and gay rights groups. I know Steve likes to keep up to date on the latest theological twists.

    Episode 1: The First War Continues. Scene 2: Cyberspace – around 2013-14

    *Enter Intersectional Feminists from top, bottom and side of screen….*

    Intersectional feminists: THEY WILL NOT DEBATE THEIR RIGHT TO EXIST YOU FUCKING BIGOTS.

    Feminists: Hang on, we thought you were feminists. We thought you cared about female people.

    Intersectional feminists: Female people are so last century. Only White Feminists care about female people.

    Feminists: White what?

    Intersectional feminists: All the feminists before us were white middle-class women and they only cared about what white middle-class women care about and they were only interested in getting good jobs for white middle-class women and they didn’t care about Black women and were dried up whorephobic prudes who didn’t realize sex work was liberating and mostly they just wanted to kill trans people.

    Feminists: That sounds like some mad-ass caricature.

    Intersectional feminists: You would say that, you oppressive old crones. You’re just saying that to maintain your power.

    Feminists: No we’re not, we don’t have much power. We’re saying it because it sounds like bullshit. *Starts trying to explain all the things second wave feminism did to help women*

    Intersectional feminists: We’re not listening to you, you oppressive bitches.

  83. Walsh2 says:
    @Macumazahn

    That story has a very common theme – 1) black chick gets mouthy gets into argument, 2) black chick’s black man has to step in; 3) black chick and black man leave; 4) black chick badgers black man, calls him a bitch, etc and instigates black man (alternatively, black man is disrespected by proxy and acts on his own).

    I’d guess 20% – 30% of black crime could be attributed to black chicks getting riled up at being disrespected.

    • Agree: Macumazahn
    • Replies: @David In TN
  84. captflee says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    One of the great pleasures of crewing out of the Norfolk SIU hall is that any random crew member will be related either by blood or marriage (though that status certainly has diminished over the decades in tha community) to pretty much everyone else in the unlicensed crew, if not the entire Tidewater.

    Thus I had as a crew member an auxiliary member of Plaxico’s posse, much given to regaling me with tales of wild exploits at clubs and whatnot. Given what I was told over a fair stretch of time, it was a matter of “when”, not “if”, PB or one of his cronies was going to catch one.

  85. Jack D says:
    @res

    As we have seen in Chicago, it doesn’t need to be enshrined in law due to the magic of prosecutorial discretion. Ghetto boy caught carrying a gun – it’s a “non-violent offense”. Do some community service, have your record erased. White guy caught passing thru O’hare – he must have been a WN planning a massacre. He’s the Great White Defendant. Throw the book at him. Lock him up and throw away the key. There are no legal changes needed.

    Note also the Leftist obsession with long guns. Rifles are used mainly for hunting but on rare occasions for mass shootings. As a percentage of gun homicides, they are insignificant. Ghetto thugs prefer weapons that are easier to conceal. But much of the Leftist energy is directed at banning “assault weapons”. So you can write facially neutral laws that have who/whom effect without making them expressly racial.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  86. ” . . . slightly hallucinatory discovery . . .”

    I am not sure that’s a phrase that could make sense in any context other than an actual LSD trip..

  87. I’m all in favor of reforms to rein in abusive prosecutors and cops, but the instant that gets tied to blacks being imprisoned more than whites, everything catastrophically falls apart and we wind up with thousands more murder victims per year

    If every single politician in America plagiarized this sentence I would still be sad that there weren’t more.

  88. @Jack D

    It’s not leftists. The Ds love to talk gun control because it divides R donors from R voters.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  89. Whiskey says: • Website

    Steve the whole point is for all Whites to be disarmed and all Blacks to be armed. So the model of law Bazelon follows the Purge movies can be made real.

    White genocide isn’t going to happen on its own now is it?

    And that’s the official policy of the NYT.

    • Replies: @Dtbb
  90. Spangel says:
    @Dr. X

    I think you have it backward. The law has zero effect on law abiding white people in nyc because they simply register their gun and get a permit legally. It’s the blacks who buy or borrow guns illegally and then carry them around in public without carry permits.

    • Replies: @Dr. X
    , @Anonymous
  91. @Jack D

    According to the Constitution, Federal judges are appointed for life and their salary can never be reduced. If they didn’t take senior status they would keep hearing cases even if they were senile. The only way to get rid of them is to impeach them. Senior status exists to protect the public, not the judges.

    Yep. The Constitution is amazingly well done, but there are holes. And the courts–Article 3–has a bunch of them. Our courts have been flat out abusive of our Constitutional order and our status as a republic. It’s ridiculous conservatives haven’t been proposing some need changes.

    A short take:

    1) Geezers.
    Mandatory retirement age. We don’t know what medical science will bring on, so something like the greater of 70 or US life expectancy minus 20 years, with a cognitive requirement, maybe 90%tile for US on an IQ test that Congress would stipulate.

    2) Philosopher Kings I
    Term limits for the Supreme Court, with the requirement–a signed pledge–that they return to a lower court and live under the rulings they made. Reign their precious little egos in a bit. I’d argue for 15 year term so that a US president has appointed half only right at the very end of his term.

    Also bump the Supreme count up to 15–again reduce the ego. Normal operation, one is term limited out every year–say in June. Of course, death/incapicity will throw up the odd cases. So make the rule that in June of each year President must offer appointment. And if there are already 15 sitting justices, longest serving packs it in. To handle the catastrophe–terrors blows up Supreme Court–if there are less than 11, then Pres, appoints enough to reach 11. (That system tends toward steady state of 15 justices serving 15 year terms.)

    Probably need to write something to insure eventual Senate approvals.

    3) Philosopher Kings II
    Biggest problem is with judicial review. Judges fancying themselves super-legislative philosopher kings. This is the biggest threat to our republic after immigration/demographic-replacement. (Legislators screwing up we can fix by voting them out. Judges screwing up is very hard to fix.)

    Couple of options.
    — Specifically rein it in.
    A Federal Court required to clearly articulate the *specific* constitutional wording invalidating a act of Congress or the President and then Congress required to accept or rejecting it. (And face the voters on that basis.)

    — Highlight it and punish abuse.
    Judges take a solemn oath not to “make law” but only rule according to the Constitution and federal law. That if they wish to make law, they must honorably resign and run for legislative office. They are instructed to call out laws/holes in laws that they find adequate. But legislating from the bench would be impeachable offense. A petition of 10% of the US House or Senate calling a judge’s opinion illegitmate contrary to the clear instruction of the constitution or federal law would requre the House to take up impeachment. Conviction for judicial legislating would be explusion from the United States.

    ~~

    This is what’s needed. However the left has become so committed to ruling us through judges–elite rule rather than republican rule–it will be hard to get much traction. But conservatives need to at least raise the issue and start making noise.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    , @guest
  92. Lmao first I got Steve unable to wrap his head around the fact Brevik saw where this ends before any of us, and now there’s people in this thread arguing that gun control is some esoteric electoral strategy and not the Left trying to disarm you to kill you.

    The biggest brains, the most important commentariat : eye stevia dawt comma

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  93. @Jack D

    I think that’s exactly what it was. One guy got his sentence commuted with help from Gov. Christie. Thanks, Jack.

  94. @Jack D

    Good comment, Jack.

    Women seem particularly vulnerable to the tear jerk ploy.

    This is part of the reason they should have NEVER been allowed to vote. Ann Coulter agrees with me, Rosie, so take it up with her!

    • Agree: Kylie
    • Replies: @Barnard
    , @AnotherDad
  95. @James Speaks

    When guns are outlawed, only minorities will have guns.

    Pretty much what I was thinking. In the NYT’s ideal society, only black males will have guns. What could possibly go wrong?

  96. MarcB. says:

    For prosecutors and judges, ignoring federal gun statutes is rampant in Memphis courts. Shootings are prosecuted as an aggravated assault instead of attempted murder while federal gun statutes and mandatory minimums that could easily keep criminals locked up for a decade or more are ignored. The same goes for felonies committed with a handgun, ie; a robbery that did not go “wrong.” Gun laws were designed to punish and disarm otherwise law-abiding White gun owners, not keep felonious NAMs off the street.

  97. “. . .poor and minority neighborhoods. . .”

    Brought to you by the Department of Redundancy Department.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  98. Seriously folks, this is just more MACS–Minority Assessment Control System–stupidity.

    Neither Emily Bazelon nor any of these other cretins would be weeping and clutching their pearls about criminal justice/sentencing “reform” except that it’s a bunch of blacks being locked up. And blacks are the officially oppressed–how we know just how evil evil whitey is with his (my) “structural racism”.

    But as JackD points out this is just objectively stupid. All over the US, but in NYC in particular, life got much, much, much better when the politicians stopped listening to the Bazelons of this world, listened to their voters and started locking the assholes up again. (Voters are smarter than judges–especially judges named Bazelon–100% of the time.)

    The left hasn’t–or at least the emotionally addled left hasn’t–even thought this through. Locking the assholes up, basically took “crime” off the front rank agenda which was a huge, huge benefit to the Democrats … and allowed these stupid kumbaya “Diversity is our strength” narratives to flourish. You let the a-holes back out on the streets and people’s attitudes will change rapidly. Heck some dude in Hollyweird will friggin dig up Charles Bronson and have him out blasting thugs again. (Prog good-think is one thing, money is another.) A return to catch and release would be a gravy train for the right.

    Yep, just the same stupid shit i pointed out with my tortured analogy. Flying minoritarianism with blacks is inherently unstable. If it was just Jews and White Gentiles in America–wouldn’t be a big deal. Jews would be making more money and Rodney Dangerfield would be playing Augusta, but we American gentiles are cool easy going folks. But tying yourself–worse your society–into knots trying to pretend that black pathologies are because of us peasants with our pickups … does not fly.

    Bazelon Air Flight 666 … right down into midtown.

  99. res says:
    @Anon87

    Speaking of, has anyone seen or know where to get a copy of the 1977 PBS special, “Tom Wolfe’s Los Angeles”?

    Odd how little there is about that on the net. This WaPo article claimed it was a pilot for a series: https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/1977/01/10/wolfe-tv-pilot-drab/1bae84f4-1deb-492e-881e-569d795c2296/

    • Replies: @Anon87
  100. Kylie says:
    @Redneck farmer

    I don’t know about Emily but that’s how I figured it.

  101. Kylie says:
    @Paul Rise

    “Possession of an object that the law considers banned IS a victimless crime.”

    Including child pornography?

    • Replies: @snorlax
  102. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:

    Yeah, the Norwegian model worked out well in the case of that right wing terrorist jerk

    This sounds like a riff on that Norm MacDonald joke:

    • Agree: Harold
  103. sabril says:
    @Arclight

    Sure, because the point of gun control laws is to virtue-signal and to punish and humiliate the hated Red Tribe. Not to reduce crime or even to prevent mass shootings.

    The proof is that the Left could easily get “common sense gun reform’ through if they would make a few concessions, such as concealed carry reciprocity like driver licenses. But they never propose or agree to anything like this.

  104. @Jack D

    Women seem particularly vulnerable to the tear jerk ploy.

    Ya think?

    The dead baby thing was just ridiculous. (Dead, mind you because daddy jammed his family, already completely safe in Turkey, where he was driving a cab, into an inflatable raft–suitable for the beer float on the Yakima in July, not crossing the Mediterranean.)

    The hysteria. I can’t even comprehend that that is even remotely relevant to making policy about immigration–which should be done with hard logic and reason, with your eye fixed on your nation’s long term future.

    • Replies: @Macumazahn
    , @Anonymous
  105. @william munny

    More significantly, the public doesn’t care if rehabilitation works. People around the world who don’t commit crimes want to see criminals punished and kept from committing more crimes.

    Exactly. This nonsense isn’t criminal justice reform.

    Real criminal justice reform would buying, say, Greenland. Relocated the inuit. Then when some a*hole is caught doing violent stuff–just pitch ’em off in Greeland with some fishing gear. Done.

    • Replies: @Coburn
  106. Barnard says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Another part of the awful legacy of the first World War. Although it would have happened eventually anyway given the momentum liberals were gaining in the culture.

  107. OFWHAP says:
    @Hoyt Thorpe

    Erik Gonzales being inspired by the DA from Bonfire of the Vanities is reminiscent of my drawing inspiration from ’80s movie blonde bullies.

    Is Jojo still bitter that you got to take Charlotte for a test drive before he did?

  108. Dr. X says:
    @Spangel

    I think you have it backward. The law has zero effect on law abiding white people in nyc because they simply register their gun and get a permit legally.

    Wrong. Permit issuance is so restrictive, subjective, and arbitrary, white applicants are routinely denied for traffic tickets, misdemeanors, lack of “good character,” which can include employment record, and failure to show “need.” And we’re talking about permits to simply own a gun on private property — not carry in public. The process requires complete disclosure of all medical records, personal references, a police investigation, and submission of fingerprints to the FBI. Plus, the process involves hundreds of dollars and often takes in excess of a year for even limited approval. If you’re approved, cops can and will confiscate your registered firearms for so much as a DUI.

    Hundreds of thousands of white people are discouraged from completing this process. Blacks just DGAF.

  109. Dr. X says:
    @Jack D

    In American terms pistols are as common as dirt but in the UK they are highly regulated

    They’re not “highly regulated,” they were completely banned and confiscated in 1997 everywhere in the UK but Northern Ireland.

  110. @Achmed E. Newman

    Women seem particularly vulnerable to the tear jerk ploy.

    This is part of the reason they should have NEVER been allowed to vote. Ann Coulter agrees with me, Rosie, so take it up with her!

    I’m a freedom guy. Women are entiled to live in a society structured as they would like. What they are not entitled to is a society where men are forced to live in their society.

    As always–like commies locking up their people, forced busing, making people bake wedding cakes, open borders–it comes down to the same thing: freedom of association; freedom to *not* be part of someone else’s project. The right to say “no”, the right to separate–not be someone else serf–is fundamental.

    I have a pretty good idea of which folks making decisions results in a stable civilized society.

    But a reasonable program is to allow people to test it.
    — Let men setup communities, regions, nations where only they vote.
    — Let women setup communities, regions, nations where only they vote.
    — Let men and women setup communities, regions, nations where they both vote.
    These communities can accept whom they want, who wants to switch. Let it play out.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  111. @AnotherDad

    Personally, i think you can setup a system that preserves a lot of female self-respect by have essentially “responsible household voting”. Singles do not vote. You get the vote when you are married–actual marriage not the gay stuff–and supporting yourself. Maybe not even until you have a child. Then more kids more votes.

    But the vote is per family–hubby and wife–both must agree and sign. You aren’t an atomized individual but a family, with children and a responsibility to the future.

    Divorce–vote’s gone. Single mommery–no vote. Welfare, not supporting yourself–no vote. Including at the far end–if your social security runs beyond some sort of account(ing) of what you put in and you’re essentially on welfare–vote’s gone. Commit a crime–vote’s gone. (Even if we don’t get you packed off to Greenland.)

    Responsible, self-supporting families raising the next generation are those entitled to choose our representatives to govern us. No one else’s opinion is interesting.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  112. Barnard says:

    OT:Mohamed Noor trial is kicking off with the defense essentially claiming if you call 911, approach the police car from behind and tap the trunk to get the officer’s attention, you should expect to meet your maker. It is perfectly reasonable for police officers to expect to get ambushed in a neighborhood with low crime and an average home value of $450-500k.

    This MPR report has information about the makeup of the jury which sounds less than optimal. Six non whites, including one who talked about implicit bias during jury selection. The report says several talked about their experiences as immigrants.

    https://www.mprnews.org/story/2019/04/09/police-trial-shooting-justine-damond-ruszczyk-australia-noor-opening-statements

  113. @Macumazahn

    I agree they should not be mandatory, Macu, but I looked for it as an option on a fairly new vehicle. Visibility sucks now, especially out the back. It’s not the same as in your old “Country Squire” station wagon.

  114. @AnotherDad

    That’s all pretty sound, A.D., but someone’s got to make a mark on a piece of paper or click on a screen. That’d be the man, I guess. OK, deal.

    BTW, my wife wouldn’t have much of a problem about the old way, or your plan. I told her I could get her an absentee ballot, but only if she would vote for Trump. I was going to fill it out for her, just to, you know, check for mistakes and all …

  115. this is part of the new de-policing trend that the left will enforce in america soon, where africans do not have to obey most laws.

    i wonder how plaxico burress feels about this.

    technically speaking, there is such a thing as a victimless crime. a hate crime hoax that misses is a victimless crime. but the authorities have already shown years ago that they won’t prosecute.

    this de-policing initiative is something different though. here the authorities are straight up going to ignore property crime and related activity.

  116. Coburn says:
    @AnotherDad

    “Real criminal justice reform would buying, say, Greenland. Relocated the inuit. Then when some a*hole is caught doing violent stuff–just pitch ’em off in Greeland with some fishing gear. Done.”

    We already tried that. It’s called Australia.

  117. Dtbb says:
    @Whiskey

    The White Man’s lament.

  118. anon[381] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    With all due respect to your legal expertise, I don’t think she’s missing anything. The Bazelons are all alike. Armed Blacks on the streets killing other Blacks, and having gentile Whites worrying about their safety (while the bazelons are doing everything they can to disarm the latter), is a win-win for the bazelons. She knows exactly what she’s doing.

  119. MC says:
    @Jack D

    Being a federal judge isn’t “easy,” intellectually, but it’s a lot less onerous time-wise than the other elite legal jobs that you’d be a candidate for. You can let your clerks do most of the research and writing, and if you get a case wrong, the worst thing that happens is you get overturned on appeal. U.S. District Court judges do have to conduct trials, which can get pretty arduous, but appellate judges don’t even have that problem.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  120. @Arclight

    The lefties won’t admit to the black crime rate. This makes serious discussion of the subject impossible, which is fine with them.

  121. The US Congress Is An Anti-White Organized Crime Syndicate

    I hate to give credit to that baby boomer bastard, PJ O’Rourke, but he was right to call the US Congress a Parliament of Whores.

    Anti-White Jew donors such as Ham Sandwich Saban and Shelly Adelson have bought and paid for many, many politician whores, including Trump and many members of the US Congress.

  122. @Jack Hanson

    “Someone ask the NYT reporter how she feels about David Koresh and Randy Weaver.”

    The NYT reporter also should be asked to follow the defendants in the Christian-Newsom Knoxville Horror (so dubbed by my friend Nicholas Stix) torture-murders through the justice system. BTW it’s not over yet. Another trial is scheduled for August.

    I’m sure the NYT will send a reporter.

  123. @Jack D

    You can bet that Kavanaugh is really going to stick it to the Brits.

    LOL.

    But on the point, it’s certainly true that Irish Americans have done way more than their fair share of ethnic whining. And, objectively, politically we’ve been a negative for the nation.

    Truth is Irish society collapsed in the famine. Or at least large sectors of it. Potato plus PIV had over populated the joint, and its collapse as a food source immiserated a lot of people and–the Irish never haven’t been bolted down all that tight–a lot of people fell into degeneracy. When we washed up in America we weren’t in good shape as a people, and the Anglos had every right to draw negative conclusions–even beyond their issue with our Catholicism which has often been hostile to republicanism.

    On the plus side, the Irish didn’t just whine about “exclusion”. Irish churchmen got to work re-civilizing the Irish and then we went and actually built our own stuff! So instead of pouting over stories of not getting into Harvard 100 years ago, there’s Notre Dame, Boston College, Fordham, Georgetown, Villanova … etc. And then over a few generations we assimilated into the American mainstream. I’ve got Irish relatives that show the usual Irish vices–i.e. they love the bottle. But i’ve never heard a single one whine about some supposed grievance from a 100 years ago.

    So yeah, the Irish–definitely some issues. But in the ethnic grievance olympics we come in a very poor and distant 3rd.

    • Agree: Desiderius, Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @MBlanc46
  124. @James Speaks

    Gun Violence is always “breaking out” in “poor and minority neighborhoods.” Just like such neighborhoods always have “failing schools.”

  125. @Dan Hayes

    So the Brooklyn DA was inspired by Tom Wolfe’s Bonfire of the Vanities. Such people are irony-challenged.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  126. @Jack D

    In his book on the O.J. Simpson criminal trial, the late Vince Bugliosi wrote something like “Most judges are mediocre lawyers who get an appointment due to political connections.”

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Hibernian
  127. @Walsh2

    I think it was around 1990. I went to an upscale Nashville restaurant on a Sunday afternoon. A group (half a dozen or so) of well-dressed (they might have come from church) black folks were going into the restaurant ahead of me. Suddenly, two of the women started fighting each other. One threw the other down, with her heading hitting the sidewalk.

    The fight stopped and the whole group gathered over the injured woman. I walked by them into the building. When I came out after lunch it was over. A week or so later, I asked an employee what happened and was told an ambulance came and the injury wasn’t serious.

    I don’t know and the restaurant employee didn’t know why these two black females suddenly started fighting.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  128. @res

    In most “civil rights” and “hate crime” cases, who-whom is already enshrined in law.

  129. SF says:

    What does a two year sentence actually mean in New York? Maybe probation with good behavior after one year. In Sacramento, we had an armed robber named Stephon Clark who got out after 60 days. He was, unfortunately, shot by police a few weeks later during a drug-induced depressive rage when he was indiscriminately breaking car and house windows, and made a threatening gesture when confronted.

  130. @Jack D

    Its true that having an illegal gun is “victimless” insofar as nobody actually got shot.

    By that logic, however, drunk driving is also “victimless” so long as you get lucky and don’t kill anybody. And attempted murder is “victimless” if your aim is bad and you miss your intended target.

    These examples are actually consistent with the ideology of the current anti-incarceration movement. As Kim Foxx so eloquently explained, unless someone ends up raped, robbed or killed it’s pretty much “no harm, no foul.”

  131. @Anonymous

    I guess Bazalon is saying that the “invisible knapsack” of white privilege contains an unlicensed gun.

    Unfortunately for minorities, their unlicensed guns seem to be entirely visible.

  132. @Jack Hanson

    Nothing esoteric about it. If they were planning on killing you that way they wouldn’t be talking about it all the time.

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
  133. @Desiderius

    Saying that when you see what’s happening in the UK and Western Europe is really a galaxy brain take.

  134. @Hypnotoad666

    Hypno, unintented consequences of illegal guns in Buffalo, NY…54 year old black grandmother and her 17 month old grandson shot and killed on her front porch on her birthday. Two nearby POS, the intended targets (?) shot and wounded. This week an 12 year old Yemeni immigrant sitting in his family’s second story apartment, shot in the head and killed by a stray bullet fired almost 100 yards away. A 22 year old man found wounded at the site of the shooting. Even though the shooting was at 430 pm, no one saw anything. So, before the shootings, the gun holders would have been what?…the victims of “victimless crimes” if arrested for gun possession.

  135. @David In TN

    David, that upscale restaurant wasn’t a Chuck E. Cheese by any chance.

    • Replies: @David In TN
  136. Anonymous[125] • Disclaimer says:
    @Forbes

    All laws can be made to seem unjust by focusing on borderline cases.

  137. Ibound1 says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    As Kim Foxx so eloquently explained, unless someone ends up raped, robbed or killed it’s pretty much “no harm, no foul.”

    Unless there is some minute violation found in the thousands and thousands of pages in the federal code. Read the back of any cleaning bottle – because if you misuse the fluid, you violate federal law. Odd our parents did not live with failure to use cleaning fluid properly under penalty of arrest. Unless you throw a fish that is too small back into the ocean, and the feds go after you for destruction of evidence. Or if you keep $10,000 of your own lawfully earned and taxed money in a foreign bank account and don’t fill out another form. And so, so many others. Congress has made everything a federal case and they are not slowing down. And if you do any of those things, the federal government can lean on you, if it wants, with all of its weight – and it weighs a great deal.

  138. @Reg Cæsar

    Lawn darts have been banned by the Consumer Product Safety Commission since the 1980s.

  139. Anonymous[151] • Disclaimer says:

    Interesting comments thread. Kind of an “unstoppable force meets immovable object” situation: readers’ desire for unlimited gun rights meets their desire to see black men imprisoned.

  140. Not so off topic:Today’s Congressional Hearings….

    Why isn’t there a Congressional Hearing into the Democratic Party?…..A party that has open GENOCIDAL HATRED!!!!! towards Working Class Native Born White American Males

  141. @AnotherDad

    Lots of states use retention elections as a means of judicial control. Three justices of the Iowa Supreme Court lost their jobs at the next retention election when they voted to make homosexual marriage a constitutional right.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  142. @Paul Rise

    The old Scotsman was told that the dirk he wore was against the law. “It’s not against the law,” he responded, “the law is against it!

    • Agree: Hibernian
  143. @peterike

    John Derbyshire wants you to add turnstile-jumping to that list.

  144. sabril says:
    @Jack D

    People don’t become Federal judges for the money. You could make a lot more as a partner in a big firm. It’s not the easiest job in the world.

    I agree to an extent. People become federal judges because you get an immense amount of power and status and respect.

    As to which job is easier – law firm partner or federal judge — it depends what kind of partner you are. If you are a low level “service partner,” you make more than a federal judge but it’s pretty miserable work, only one step above being a law firm associate. If you are a rainmaker at the top, it’s a different story. You can spend your time wining and dining your clients; pick out the most interesting things to work on; and delegate the rest.

    I think that pretty much any federal judge can get a higher paying law firm job without a lot of actual billing to do. A lot of law firms will make that sacrifice to have a former judge on their payroll.

    For me, the worst thing about being a federal judge would be the level of scrutiny. If you get caught posting racist stuff on the internet — you’re done. If you’re seen walking down the street holding hands with some young cutie, it’s going to cause a lot of problems.

    I honestly believe it’s pretty likely that down the road most isteve posters are going to get doxxed.

  145. @Buffalo Joe

    It was a Texana Grill, which closed a few years later.

  146. @I, Libertine

    There are plenty of rich minorities. Amy Chua wrote a whole book about them.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  147. Charles Schumer Is A Jew Nationalist

  148. @Jack D

    Would it change your answer if the guy who order the gun was named Mohammed?

    If he’s in the land of the Mohammeds, why would I care? If he’s in my land, that is a problem in itself.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Jack D
  149. @peterike

    Horse-stealing (update to vehicle theft)

    Including bicycles?

  150. @Flip

    The nice black church lady wants the police to arrest that boy on the next block who mugged her, but not her grandson who mugged the old lady on the next block. It’s an unresolvable problem.

  151. fish says:
    @Neuday

    DUI’s are victimless crimes but I don’t see much political agitation to decriminalize.

    Of course not! They’re a profit center for local jurisdictions!

  152. @Jack D

    People don’t become Federal judges for the money. You could make a lot more as a partner in a big firm. It’s not the easiest job in the world.

    It’s a hell of a lot easier than private practice at any level.

  153. Civil War II is on its way!

    The anti-White scam of the White Nationalist hearings in the US Congress was a fire bell in the night for the American Empire.

    Blacks and Jews and Asian Indians and Asians and Mulattos and all sorts of other offbrands were signaling their intention to continue to attack and destroy the European Christian ancestral core of the United States.

    The English founded the United States and the US Congress, but there didn’t seem to be too many people at the White Nationalist hearings who were of English ancestry or even White.

    The Republican Party must be destroyed in order to make the battle lines clear.

    The biggest impediment to White Core Americans getting political representation in the USA is the GOP. The ruling class rats in the Republican Party must be crushed. Any politician such as Trump who takes cash from Shelly Adelson must be removed from office.

    WHITES MUST HAVE EXPLICIT REPRESENTATION AS WHITES!

  154. @Achmed E. Newman

    I’m going by my memory of the NRA mag articles, Bomag, but I recall that there really wasn’t much the guy COULD HAVE done differently. His flight got diverted to NYC, as it was not his original destination. He had a gun (and, I assume some ammo – you’re allowed up to 11 lb(?) ) packed legitimately in checked luggage. He got stuck for the night with the intention of continuing his trip on whatever flight the airline rebooked him for in the morning.

    He had to go get his checked baggage, and that’s when the laws of NY City or State came down on his ass and locked him up with a criminal record.

    1. No mens rea.
    2. Not even an actus reus!!!!!! He didn’t bring the gun to the jurisdiction.
    3. How did the police know? No matter how they found out, it means there was no crime because they failed to confiscate the gun before he took possession, i.e., it was entrapment.

    • Replies: @bomag
  155. Jack D says:
    @David In TN

    There’s a big difference between state court trial judges and Federal appellate court judges who are, as Steve points out, 1 rung below the Supreme Court.

    • Replies: @David In TN
  156. sailer wrote:
    “Yeah, the Norwegian model worked out well in the case of that right wing terrorist jerk who murdered all those kids and now files jailhouse complaints about having to play videogames with only an obsolete PS/2. He thinks he’s going to automatically get out after 21 years (although the Norwegians will hopefully figure out some loophole in their stupid policy to keep him locked up forever).”

    there is no hope…none…

    • Replies: @bomag
  157. OT

    Israel’s Swindlinger’s Cat in the Voting Box is even more funnier than American, and even less predictable than Turkish :

    “We won!” Mr. Gantz’s party announced just after 10 p.m. “The Israeli public has had their say! These elections have a clear winner and a clear loser.”

    Mr. Netanyahu, for his part, claimed a “definite victory” for the right-wing bloc in Parliament. “I thank the citizens of Israel for their trust,” he wrote on Twitter.
    “I will start by assembling a right-wing government with our natural partners tonight.”

    The pro-settler New Right party, led by Education Minister Naftali Bennett and Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked, failed to cross the threshold to be seated in Parliament, according to two of the three television networks’ exit polls.

    But the third survey showed it with four seats.

    At the far left, Raam-Balad, the weaker of two Arab-dominated parties, failed to cross the threshold in two exit polls, but won six seats in the third survey.

    If one or both of those parties is able to win seats in the Parliament when all the votes are counted, those extra seats could swing the determination of the winning coalition and thus the next prime minister.

    Which means the rest of y’all peasants will probably have to wait longer than a week to learn more about Omar’s political market index future…

  158. Paul Rise says:

    I have posted here on numerous occasions that as satisfying as the Ferguson effect is, there is another factor that has not been discussed.

    In 2013, recreational marijuana was legalized in CO and WA. Many other states (including IL) liberalized their medicinal laws.

    This undoubtably had a disruptive effect on the national market for contraband marijuana. (Think how many bales were probably unaccounted for in IL alone.)

    For two years you saw gang violence increase, virtually anywhere there were large numbers of blacks … the same areas that experienced marked increase in homicide in the 80s and 90s.

    Why did that happen back then?

    The introduction of crack in inner cities disrupted EVERY criminal enterprise in the nation. Gangs thay relied on marijuana had to fight for turf, fight off new gangs, find new things to sell.

    So if the 80s/90s wave of violence was caused by disruption to the contraband industry – why would the 2014 – 16 burst that different?

    The question isn’t- were cops doing anything? The question is – what were people killing each other over?

    Hypothesis – they were killing each other over marijuana dollars and markets, or the lack thereof!

    You would expect one epicenter of violence to be Missouri, where a great deal of illicit marijuana is grown.

    You would expect violence in Illinois, where bails of medicinal marijuana were likely falling off trucks left and right.

    You would expect increases in California, due to close proximity to legal weed in WA. (Potheads will drive all day and night to get weed. I knew potheads in college that drove from the midwest to score a large amount in San Diego.)

    Maryland? Didnt they legalize in DC in 2015 or so?

    You wouldn’t expect as large an impact in 2014 like you had in 1987 or whatever. But the increase wasn’t as marked or lengthy as the 80s and 90s. It’s just marijuana. The profit margins aren’t that large.

    As more states legalized, the number of deaths decreased too. (I would guess at least some formerly criminal enterprises diversified into legal MJ investments.)

    My point is – Ferguson effect is very pat and satisfying answer. It may be true! Part of me wants it to be true! But how often do these things really have pat and satisfying answers?

    There was something else going on than cops not doing their jobs. Maybe that exacerbated whatever was causing all these people to kill each other … but in the end they were killing each other over something – what was it?

  159. Anonymous[287] • Disclaimer says:
    @Desiderius

    Which R donors support gun control? And which leftists don’t support gun control?

  160. @Arclight

    Much of the fear around gun violence is a product of minority crime but the anti-gun people tell themselves it’s about lone wolf white mass shooters.

    Different anti-gun people are anti-gun for different/multiple reasons. See this recent extensive discussion about DR3 and gun control. (#235)

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  161. @Jack D

    Breivik and Jim Jones killed a lot of stupid hippies—and the unfortunate children of stupid hippies. Please, people—don’t be stupid hippies. For the children’s sake.

  162. @Achmed E. Newman

    Hahahahahahhaha……So typical of a black guy. Phucks up and still acts like he’s in control. They just can’t admit to their own incompetence, even when–especially when–it’s obvious to everyone else in the room.

  163. guest says:

    I always wondered how prosecution and incarceration were related. Perhaps next they’ll tell me howcome I don’t float off the face of the earth.

  164. Hibernian says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    She is foolish enough, despite graduating from law school, and/or she assumes the people are foolish enough, not to realize that criminal law was designed to keep the King’s, or in our republic, the people’s, peace, not just to punish those criminals who “succeed” in killing or severely maiming us.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  165. @bgates

    It’s exactly 3.275 inches, plus or minus a yard and a half.

  166. guest says:

    If they release prisoners upon the age of 40, wouldn’t that make 39 sort of a Purge Year for their lockup?

  167. @Kaganovitch

    A crime is when an event that damages someone happens.

    The world would be a much safer place if a prophylactic law locked up all black men.

  168. guest says:
    @AnotherDad

    Or, ya know, we could just get off our asses and impeach them for any old reason.

    Jefferson wanted to impeach Chase because he was from the other political party. True story.

  169. Anonymous[287] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack Hanson

    It’s both. Federal “assault weapon” laws are about disarming conservative whites, but urban handgun bans were clearly a reaction to black crime. It’s not a coincidence that cities with lots of blacks have the strictest gun laws.

  170. vinny says:
    @Dr. X

    In NYC there were 290 murders in 2017, versus 770 in 1997. They’re doing something right.

    • Replies: @Yak-15
  171. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    It’ll be a victimless crime until someone Important and Good gets cacked especially if the shooter is not white.

  172. @MikeatMikedotMike

    I wonder if the FBI filed that under black-on-black violence? Wait until he exacts vengeance by shooting his other leg. Rinse, repeat. It’ll become a generational ghetto vendetta (venghetto?): the H’oodiefields and the M’Koyz. Ray’Pacious and Preg’Neisha.

  173. @MC

    My Sunday school teacher years ago was a big deal corporate lawyer who took a large pay cut to go on the Federal bench for the (then) princely salary of $40k. Later he got promoted to the circuit court. He told me that more than a few of his cases were prisoners filing habeus corpus cases, including one guy who complained that there were not enough raisins in his oatmeal.

  174. OT:
    White nationalism is being debated by non-Whites. “Candace Owens and Ted Lieu face off in a hearing about white nationalism”:

  175. Fifi says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    This sort of extreme method is justifiable for protecting vulnerable children from sex predators. (Not that they were in this kind of hurry in Rotherham.)

    But for an everyday something you can get at Walmart in Little Rock? The nanny state’s tentacles need to be trimmed. What’s next? Lawn darts?

    Last I checked, Walmart didn’t sell toy silencers. He was trying to get a glock, a silencer, and ammunition. The guy needed locking up.

    Your reasoning is quite shittious in this case.

  176. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Different anti-gun people are anti-gun for different/multiple reasons. See this recent extensive discussion about DR3 and gun control. (#235)

    Yes but the prevailing issue is that a certain large subset of a powerful and influential group wants the potential Cossacks stripped of their veritable pitchforks, lest they injure the tender tuchis of this stiff-necked and self-important group.

    The rest is window dressing in the end analysis.

    Dems know that if they ditched gun control and unlimited abortion they would have the White House and both Houses, yet they won’t. That tells you a lot. There are still more “Moderate” dems, union types, etc, than most people think but they are not the powers that be because the money spigot says no.

    That the $PLC could raise the funds it did with its complete ineptitude and malice at anything but fundraising tells us who has money and is willing to spend it. And why.

  177. Dan Hayes says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Dave Pinsen:

    Judge Richard Posner initially thought “Bonfire…” to be quasi-preposterous. He later marveled at Wolfe’s prescience (Rev Al, etc, etc)!

  178. @Jack D

    Bugliosi was referring to trial judges.

  179. @Tiny Duck

    The war on men named Thabo is hardly new. Even the Guardian took glee in it:

    Mbeki Aids denial ’caused 300,000 deaths’

  180. dr syon says:

    Off-topic:

    Samantha Bee takes on classical statuary…..

    White statues have long been a tool for white supremacists to claim historical superiority but as with all things, the white supremacists are wrong. The Lucas Brothers went to The Met to see it all in color.

  181. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Thanks for that cool bit of nostalgia, Generic. It’s not like I’m nostalgic for cults (never the type to join that sort of thing), but that video sure made me remember what a country with freedom looks like. That Jonestown massacre 40 years ago gave us the oft-used phrase “drinking the Kool-Aid”. Many mistakenly think it comes from farther back:

    Kool-Aid’s big, yeah, yeah, yeah!

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  182. Pirelli says:
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    “Partners in Big Law (particularly big-hitter equity Partners) are rather rarely represented in Federal Judicial nominations.”

    I don’t think that’s true. Do you have a cite for that? (Honestly I’d be interested to know).

    I used to regularly do “forum background research,” ie reading up the judges (mostly federal) whose courts our clients were being sued in, and I remember a ton of the federal judges had previously been partners at firms. Some of the firms were regional, sure, but plenty were biglaw. I’d say it was more common than having been an AUSA or state court judge.

  183. AndrewR says:

    Why no thread on today’s anti-white Congressional hearing? Are you working on your next golf article? Jesus Christ

    • Agree: Jack Hanson
  184. @Kaganovitch

    It’s not at all foolish to make the argument that prohylactic crimes are an abomination: you’re fucking up people’s lives based on a guess at probability tilts, based on the collected opinion of a bunch of people who have no fucking idea about what probabilities are, or how they work.

    And even if there was good evidence that alcohol impairs driving ability to a level that makes crashing more likely, the idea that this can be best estimated by a bright-line “one size fits all” BAC is ludicrous. That’s “Chairman Mao Suit”-level retarded. Some people are objectively unimpaired at a BAC 3x the legal limit; others are fuckwitted at a BAC half of what’s “permitted”.

    I’ve examined the supposed statistical evidence for the assertion that driving drunk increases the risk of accident – both unconditionally, and when constrained to BAC greater than the limit (in my jurisdiction that’s 0.05%).

    The ‘evidence’ is a set of case studies in selective statistics, p-hacking, ex-post-facto endpoint selection, and the entire gamut of chicanery that has brought the research community into disrepute.

    And that’s only the studies that survive publication bias – studies that show no effect will simply not be published (and their research teams will generally find that their funding will dry up unless they get on board).

    As a general guide, you can tell ex ante if a body of research is likely to be corrupt:
    ① the people doing empirical work are True Believers; and/or
    ② there is a decent amount of money in the offing.

    Ask yourself “who wants to do empirical work in this field?”, and a very large proportion of the time, you can write down what research conclusions those people will favour. You will also get a rough answer about the likelihood that journals in the field have a ‘correct line’ ideological approach, where True Believers play “capture the flag” with the target being journal editorial boards and peer-reviewer roles. (I’m looking at you, climate ‘science’).

    A second useful question that rounds it out: “Who furnishes the funds for the empirical work in this field?” – because if you know who is funding the work, you know what answers they want, and you now that the most successful authors in the field will be the ones that reliably produce the required answers.

    DUI ‘research’ ticks both those boxes, and ticks them hard. It is government-funded, and True-Believer-dominated: its output is suspect a priori, so it’s not surprise that it’s low-quality.

    As a body of ‘evidence’ the statistical basis for DUI law is worse than the supposed statistical basis for the claim that people get ill from second-hand cigarette smoke.

    I’m a lifelong anti-smoker: I would like there to be evidence that it causes harm to third parties, because that would justify banning it in workplaces. Tough luck for me, though… because there is no statistically-decent evidence.

    The fact that the publicly-promulgated justification for the law falls apart under the slightest scrutiny, is prima facie evidence that it’s not the actual justification.

    DUI laws exist to placate the feelings of people who think that if they feel strongly about something, it must be true. Those sorts of people actually feel righteous when the law they support fucks up someone’s life, because they are fucking retards.

  185. Anon87 says:
    @res

    Thanks for the link. I could only see it for a second before the paywall came down, but it doesn’t look like their reviewer enjoyed it. Which makes me want to see it more.

    I can’t believe a torrent of it isn’t floating out there.

    • Replies: @res
  186. the Norwegians will hopefully figure out some loophole in their stupid policy to keep him locked up forever

    There is no need for any ‘loophole’, so pearl clutching about Norwegian judicial irresponsibility is a tad overblown.

    Breivik’s sentence is forvaring – a preventive detention that can be extended indefinitely. The 21 years is a headline number (as is the 10-year minimum), but if he is assessed as being an ongoing threat after 21 years, his detention will continue with a 5-year review period. See here[1].

    Breivik’s trial served one unambiguously useful purpose: it showed that psychiatric reports are horse-shit. It also showed that the legal definition of ‘sane’ is horse-shit, because anyone who did what he is said to have done is insane by any definition worth the name.

    His trial almost had an unambiguously useful result, too: for a time the Norwegians took a long hard view as to whether psychiatry should be relegated out of courtrooms with all the other charlatanry – after all, courts don’t permit homeopathic or astrological evidence, so things with the same intellectual content should go in the same bucket.

    [1] I was going to get all lambast-y, and calumniate you for not having done such a basic piece of research, however in fairness this subject arises a lot in our household so it’s generally near the front of my brain. The Lovely does a lot of cases where she’s part of judicial review of people who have been found not guilty by reason mental impairment; invariably The Lovely appears for the Department of Human Services, not the reviewee.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    , @Anonymous
  187. TWS says:

    For goodness sake, we know the Norwegians will find a way to keep their home grown terrorist in jail. If not they’ll have to deal with another atrocity. A true believer will not change just because he’s on house arrest.

  188. Anonymous[421] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad

    There was also that dust-covered Syrian kid whose house got bombed. He was all over the media when the big push for intervention was going on.

  189. TWS says:
    @Paul Rise

    You’re not even close. How much ricin is too much? Libertarians, there’s a reason you’ll never, ever get a chance to run a country. Crazier than a room full of Marxist cat ladies.

  190. @Jack D

    It’s really crazy how a single incident (preferably accompanied by a dramatic photo) can drive public opinion, which in turn drives policy. One dead baby on the beach may mean another million Muslims in Europe.

    TV is not “the press”, and it should not have the same freedom.

  191. @Reg Cæsar

    There are plenty of rich minorities. Amy Chua wrote a whole book about them.

    I think the point was that “poor” would have sufficed, but perhaps not.

  192. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Jim Jones was a not insignificant powerbroker in the San Francisco Democratic Party of the 1970’s. Willie Brown, Diane Feinstein, Harvey Milk, George Moscone and Jerry Brown all visited the People’s Temple and were quick in their praise for the cult leader. Willie Brown described Jim Jones as “What you should see every day when you look in the mirror,” a combination of Martin Luther King, Jr., Angela Davis, Albert Einstein, and Mao Tse Tung. Willie Brown always had a high opinion of himself.

    I often wonder how different the politics of the People’s Temple was from the accelerationist elements of the modern day Left. Many leftists on Twitter are likely far more radical than the People’s Temple. In fact, I think the politics of the Symbionese Liberation Army would easily fit into today’s Democratic Party.

  193. @Hibernian

    She is foolish enough, despite graduating from law school, and/or she assumes the people are foolish enough, not to realize that criminal law was designed to keep the King’s, or in our republic, the people’s, peace, not just to punish those criminals who “succeed” in killing or severely maiming us.

    That might be the law-school lesson I (as a father of young children) think about most often.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  194. New York’s current mania to roll back all of Giuliani’s “broken windows” crime enforcement will likely not end well. New York no longer enforces quality of life crimes such as subway scofflaws, urinating in public, smoking marijuana in public, drinking in public, littering and even apparently illegal loaded handgun possession because enforcement of these laws is apparently racist.

    What could possibly go wrong?

  195. Wilkey says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    I can see Bonfire of the Vanities inspiring someone on a path to public service, as it includes honorable public servant characters, such as Bernie Fitzgibbon, Judge Kovitsky, and an honorable former public servant in Tommy Killian. But this guy was inspired by an unethical, self-aggrandizing prosecutor who railroads an essentially innocent man because his identity makes him an attractive enemy of the people.

    He was inspired by a crooked “minority” D.A. who takes down an innocent WASP. Used here “Masters of the Universe” means “white guy.”

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  196. Wilkey says:
    @Jack D

    It’s really crazy how a single incident (preferably accompanied by a dramatic photo) can drive public opinion, which in turn drives policy. One dead baby on the beach may mean another million Muslims in Europe. Women seem particularly vulnerable to the tear jerk ploy.

    Indeed.

    One dead baby on a beach: massive implications for immigration policy.

    3,000 dead people in New York, D.C., and Pennsylvania: no relevance to immigration law whatsoever.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  197. istevefan says:
    @Jack D

    It’s really crazy how a single incident (preferably accompanied by a dramatic photo) can drive public opinion,

    When watching tv always remember that someone has made a deliberate decision as to what you will see, or won’t see. They’ve made this decision so as to push a particular point of view. So before you let your emotions get the best of you, it is always best to think about what the presentation of that image is trying to accomplish, and what feelings they are trying to extract from you.

    For example, it is no secret the ruling class wants to overrun the borders of Europe and her New World offshoots with non-Europeans. It’s also no secret that the natives are starting to get restless. So when given the opportunity to show the dead little boy which you referenced, the media gladly promoted this photo 24×7 knowing that it would cause a significant number of people to support the continued acceptance of non-European migrants, lest more innocent children be killed.

    Contrast that photo of dead little boy with the photos of Ebba Åkerlund. Her mutilated body lay in the street where it had been run down by a truck driven by a migrant in Sweden. Images of her body, if shown on tv 24×7, would have decreased support for continuing to accept non-Europeans into Europe. Thus, that would run counter to what the ruling class wanted. So images of her body, and the little kids who were run over in Nice, were not shown. The only reason we know about them is because some people with cell phones took their own photos and uploaded them on the internet. But even so, most people have idea those events even took place.

    So remember, always realize that the media is feeding you a pre-cooked meal when it selects what will, or will not be delivered to you.

    • Agree: GermanReader2
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    , @Dtbb
    , @Wilkey
  198. @Tiny Duck

    “Tiny Duck: You are a genius!”

  199. MBlanc46 says:
    @peterike

    As a resident of Cook County, Illinois, and former resident of Chicago, I’m quite confident that there aren’t enough people incarcerated.

  200. MBlanc46 says:
    @AnotherDad

    The O’Farrell part of me thanks you for that.

  201. @Wilkey

    Actually, both the dead child on the beach and the WTC attack had the same result on immigration policy: admission of more Muslims.

  202. benjaminl says:

    Amy Wax’s review of “Misdemeanorland” makes a nice palate cleanser after all this:

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.nationalreview.com/magazine/2019/02/25/law-and-disorder-2/amp/

    • Agree: res
  203. @istevefan

    I try to point this out to people. What is it that makes one event news and other more important events not news? Why was the shooting of Trayvon Martin, whatever the circumstances, anything but a local crime story? Why do we hear so much about events in Israel and so little about events in Mexico? People will say that the Obama administration was “scandal free,” but who decides what is a scandal and what isn’t?

    Listening to NPR and reading the New York Times in the 1970s drove me toward conservatism, because their slant seemed so apparent to me. But if someone can’t see this for themselves, perhaps they never will.

  204. Dtbb says:
    @istevefan

    Agreed. I just watched part 1 of PBS’s show on reconstruction. It is inteteresting, but I keep in mind there is an agenda. Still there is plenty to be gleaned between the lines.

  205. Why was the shooting of Trayvon Martin, whatever the circumstances, anything but a local crime story?

    Because white-on-black homicide is exceedingly rare. Man-bites-dog.

    • Replies: @David In TN
  206. @Achmed E. Newman

    First time I saw this, I figured the gun was filled with blanks (which can still cause damage if close enough) and it was staged as part of a “scared straight” type of activity. I found out later it wasn’t and he really shot himself. Why the hell would you bring a loaded gun into a class full of kids for a demonstration?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  207. @Reg Cæsar

    The MSM would have you believe white-on-black homicide happens all the time.

  208. @AndrewR

    Future Social Democrats.

    I’m not approving his methods. He deserves the death penalty.

    But neutralizing the opposition in the bud through non-violent means is a perfectly sound idea. We do some of that here, with video interviews with clueless college progressives.

  209. @Hypnotoad666

    By that logic, however, drunk driving is also “victimless” so long as you get lucky and don’t kill anybody.

    What about drowsy driving? Anyway, the highways are inherently socialist, so you have no real rights on them at all. That guy in Scotland who sent for a pistol likely had a much more dangerous automobile in his garage. But everybody winks at that kind of carnage.

  210. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Onebelowall

    Autoloading pistols require modification, temporary or permanent, to be able to cycle blanks. Revolvers had the advantage they’d feed blanks, wax bullets powered by a 209 primer, shot loads (great for snakes) and so forth.

    And blanks can be deadly at close range, depending on the style of blank and where the muzzle blast and wad or retaining plug hits.

    But the cop in that demo was a dumbass.

    • Replies: @Onebelowall
  211. @Achmed E. Newman

    Thanks for that cool bit of nostalgia, Generic.

    You’re welcome. There’s a crushing pathos to that Cults video. The upbeat music playing over scenes of joy and pain and hope and fear at the end. Haunting and strange.

  212. @James Speaks

    Anti-White minorities with guns & Whites without…

    …that is the obvious long-term goal of these smarmy (((Emily Bazelon types))), in their pursuit of White replacement, by any means necessary.

  213. I spit out half a pint of good beer when I saw that a person named Adam Gopnik exists, and even writes for the New Yorker. Shame on me for being surprised. Gopnik is a kind of pejorative slang word in modern Russian. For Russians, it evokes a dude in the country, squatting on his haunches and chewing sunflower seeds and spitting the shells (and probably a liter of vodka danger close).

    Man, that’s an unfortunate surname!

  214. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Spangel

    Unless you are wealthy, connected, or are some kind of “really needs it” person in the opinion of New York’s lawmakers, getting any kind of gun permit is a Big Deal in NYC. Lawyers make good livings handling these cases exclusively. Most people realize it is not going to happen and do not bother.

    NYC’s gun laws are a working definition of grotesque, unprecedented, bizarre and unbelievable by any standards besides, say, Singapore’s, where they simply outright ban all civilian firearms ownership.

    Singapore, of course, is a different situation. It is not made for nor a suitable place to live for white people, it’s engineered so Chinese and Malays can coexist, with Chinese in a permanent supermajority.

    However, Chicago was functionally worse than NYC in that civilians were not permitted concealed or open carry at all. In NYC you could theoretically get a permit.

    Of course, certain groups had much less issues with the NYC permit system than others. If you were in the diamond or jewelry trade, it was usually routine to be issued.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  215. Wilkey says:
    @istevefan

    When watching tv always remember that someone has made a deliberate decision as to what you will see, or won’t see.

    Inappropriate for the public to see: man plunging to his death from the World Trade Center.

    Totally appropriate to see: dead baby on beach.

  216. Jack D says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    The guy who ordered the pistol was in Scotland, not your land but you seem concerned about him.

    What if Mohamed lived in Scotland and was ordering the pistol so he could kill infidels? Is it still none of your business because Scotland is not your land?

  217. @Anonymous

    Trump had a NYC concealed carry permit, as did WFB, De Niro, and Buddy Hackett.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  218. @Reg Cæsar

    Aimed at immigrants … and blacks.

  219. @Jack D

    And clearly, that’s the only possible solution, because it’s in the Constitution. There’s no alternative except to continue to abuse taxpayers through the absurdity of “lifetime” appointment to ANY position.

  220. Pericles says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    The strictness of the registration varies wildly by county, and sheriff. The wilder the county, the easier the registration.

    And yet I’d rather walk unarmed through the wilderness than unarmed through the ghetto or projects.

    • Agree: bomag
  221. @Kratoklastes

    It also showed that the legal definition of ‘sane’ is horse-shit, because anyone who did what he is said to have done is insane by any definition worth the name.

    Not so. If it was so, then such deeds could always go unpunished: “See, I killed a bunch of people for no good reason, I must be insane!”

    At least in Hungary (but I think in other countries, too), lawyers and psychiatric experts apply the following test to check if someone could be acquitted due to insanity: if he wasn’t sane enough to understand the consequences of his deeds through no fault of his own. (So, getting drunk and then killing someone does not qualify, because you got drunk through your own fault.)

    This means that he has to understand the following:

    – understanding the physical consequences (“if I pull the trigger, this person will die, i.e. irreversibly stop moving and his body will start irreversibly decomposing”)

    – understanding the social consequences (“if I kill this person, I’ll have to hide it from other people, or kill myself, or I’ll get arrested and be convicted or I’ll get killed if I resist arrest,” “if I kill this person, the police will try to catch me” etc.)

    Breivik obviously understood both.

  222. Yak-15 says:
    @vinny

    Yes, moving out the problem people by pricing them out of real estate and frisking those that remain.

  223. @Steve Sailer

    Yeah, well, not ALL New Yorkers are movie and TV stars, or friends of iSteve. ;-}

  224. bomag says:
    @ben tillman

    I was wondering about these things and more.

    Does the airline have some culpability? They transferred the gun into a no-go zone and presented it to him via checked baggage.

    The extenuating circumstances in this case should get one exonerated by a judge or jury. Seems that there should be some acknowledgment of reciprocity in a case such as this — akin to marriage, drivers, and business licenses.

  225. @Anonymous

    Yeah, I know that blanks can be deadly at close range. When I was a kid, an actor accidentally died by playing around on set with a gun loaded with blanks (this was in the 80’s).

    Hopefully, they put some new rules in effect for demonstrations like this. Making sure that the gun is unloaded, no magazine, no rounds in the chamber, etc…

    • Replies: @David In TN
  226. @reiner Tor

    The old standard of understanding the difference between right and wrong was better. Only if you’re so psycho that you can’t grasp that should the law be lenient. Then you should be locked up for the safety of the rest of us anyway.

  227. bomag says:
    @propagandist hacker

    Don’t underestimate the modern Norwegian.

  228. Now the Cosmopolitans in Illinois want to make FINGERPRINTING a requirement for a Firearms Owner ID card because both the FOID background check and FBI “Instant Check” failed to detect a criminal.

    So for a gun controller, an FOID card, gun waiting period, all firearms purchasers must be 21 y/o are NOT enough hoops for you. Now FINGERPRINTS if the Democrats have their way. They already passed a video recording law for gun shops signed by Gov. “Jelly Belly” Pritzker.

    Get rid of the IL FOID card NOW.

    https://wgntv.com/2019/04/09/head-of-cpd-activists-back-proposal-requiring-fingerprints-for-gun-purchases/

  229. res says:
    @Anon87

    You’re welcome. Thanks for bringing the special to my attention. I was able to read the article by opening it in a private (incognito, etc.) browser with no ad blocking. It’s short so full text after the MORE.

    Agreed about being surprised there is no torrent. As far as I can tell though there is no video of it anywhere to use as a source. If anyone has contacts at PBS I wonder if they have it in their archives.

    [MORE]

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/1977/01/10/wolfe-tv-pilot-drab/1bae84f4-1deb-492e-881e-569d795c2296

    Wolfe TV Pilot: Drab

    By Tom Shales January 10, 1977

    Writer Tom Wolfe certainly has provided us with some flashes of insight now and then. But his career often has seemed to be part of the sinister plot by form to replace content on the planet Earth. The last one might have expected from Wolfe’s maiden voyage into television is a kicky kinetic surface camouflaging a paltry or empty thesis.

    But “Tom Wolfe’s Los Angeles,” the pilot project for a series shown on Channel 26 and other public TV stations at 9 o’clock tonight, has little in the way of dash or vigor, much less urgency or novelty of viewpoint.

    The hour-long film bgins with Wolfe once again celebrating his satorial eccentricity and then taking a helicopter tour of ostentatious celebrity real estate. Subsequently, in a series of inter-linked vignettes, we get a supposedly authentic but frankly fictional tour of Wolfe’s L.A., which turns out to be a wan and sunny battleground of hostile but all-knowing ehtnics who spend their lives hookwinking the poor dumb ivory-tower liberals of the world.

    This myth of street wisdom as the ultimate enlightenment is already a tired chic cliche of so-called gonzo journalism, and Wolfe, who both “created” and wrote this program, hasn’t sparked new life into it. A few episodes have funny moments, but they are clumsily developed, and the hours belongs on videotape, not firm, especially over-exposed film.

    “Tom Wolfe’s Los Angeles” is inadequate even as an anti-portratit; it’s like a cynical Ralph (“Fritz the Cat”) Bakeshi cartoon with live actors. All it really has is attitude, and even the attitude seems a little drab.

    • Replies: @Anon87
  230. Olorin says:

    As Talleyrand said of the Bazelon Dynasty: “They had learned nothing, and forgotten nothing.”

    Well heck. LA-highway-interchange-F (on a Mac keyboard) yields 0 page hits by Saileristas nabbing this for a snortly chuckle.

    So it’s up to me.

    [snort]

  231. Jack D says:
    @reiner Tor

    The legal threshold for an insanity defense is very high – you more or less have to believe that you are shooting at a space alien or a tree or there has to be an irresistible voice in your head commanding you to kill – in other words a paranoid or delusional schizophrenic. And if you somehow meet it, they just lock you in a mental institution for an indefinite period of time which may be longer than a jail sentence and pump you full of anti-psychotics, so going to jail may be the better alternative (unless you really are a bona fide schizophrenic).

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  232. res says:
    @Adam Smith

    Is there missing context, or is that tweet really as dumb as it sounds? Fat floats.

    FWIW: Buoyancy of African black and European white males.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28561485

    • Replies: @Jack D
  233. Jack D says:
    @Adam Smith

    Actually black ARE less buoyant than whites and it is because they have higher bone density. But if Trump had (fake) tweeted that hatefact, it would have been just as bad.

  234. Jack D says:
    @res

    The context is that Trump is supposed to be a stupid racist – that’s all.

  235. @Onebelowall

    Jon-Erik Hexum (1957-84).

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
  236. @reiner Tor

    Enumerating a specific version of a legal definition of insanity is simply begging the question: it is assuming that because it’s a legal definition, it’s a good definition.

    The question left hanging is whether a person who is insane by any sensible definition of the term, can still fail to meet the definition that applies in their jurisdiction.

    That is why definitions of the defence itself have changed in a lot of places.

    In my jurisdiction, the big changes happened in the late 90s, with the introduction of the Crimes (Mental Impairment and Unfitness to Be Tried) Act 1997 (“CMIA“); in particular, CMIA s6 enumerates the legal basis of a defence; CMIA s7 places the presumption in favour of the prosecution, and puts the burden of proof on the defendant (as a question of fact to be determined by a jury – but only on a balance of probabilities… why?).

    All of this politico-legal gibberish can be put to one side, since legislation is just the codification of the brain-farts of a group of sociopaths (politicians).

    It’s a far simpler question: can an individual whose brain is functioning normally, generate a decision to kill one or more people who have done that individual no direct harm?.

    I would submit that the correct answer to this is “No“. There has to be a profound failure of cognition somewhere in the chain of reasoning, for any individual to do the things ascribed to Breivik, Tarrant, McVeigh, etc.

    To begin with, consider what each person thought their actions would achieve. Where we have evidence of their expectations, it’s obvious that their acts had results that were diametrically opposed to their objectives. The results differed from their stated objectives in ways that were predictable ex ante to the average layman – which indicates that these people were not thinking properly.

    The fact that these individuals are clearly not sane (under any sensible definition of the term) does not absolve the offender; perhaps it doesn’t even mitigate.

    But it probably does change the best guess at two things –
    ① the probability that the individual can ever be reformed; and
    ② the mechanism that maximises the probability of reform.

    So then we’re down to whether the criminal justice [sic] system exists to prevent and remedy wrongs, is purely punitive, or is some weighted combination of the two.

    If the objective of the criminal justice [sic] system has any remedial/preventive component, then how those two best guesses change are relevant.

    If the aim is purely punitive (as in the US), then it’s irrelevant – as is the question of unfitness to be tried by reason of mental impairment: you’re no longer trying to teach a lesson, you’re trying to show the whole of society that you will brutalise anybody who does acts like this.

    It’s easy to mount an airtight argument that a US-style punitive system is massively socially inefficient – but that would involve another dozen pages of text and nobody wants that.

  237. @Barnard

    Thanks for mentioning this, Barnard. It’s a bizarre, disturbing, infuriating case that’s of course gaining limited media interest.

    Scott Johnson at PowerLine is attending and reporting on the trial. You can find his latest update here: LINK.

    In a sidebar story, Johnson has been trying to get a media seat at the trial. Johnson is petitioning for the seat allocated to the NY Times, who of course aren’t bothering to send a reporter to cover the trial of a Somali-American ‘cop’ who blew away an Australian woman who had just reported a crime, not committed one.

  238. Anonymous[843] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kratoklastes

    Trying to wipe out the future leadership cadres of your political enemies is evil but is hardly insane, unless you want to regard all political violence as insane. Was Guy Fawkes insane?

  239. @David In TN

    Oddly enough, his co-star Jennifer O’Neil (“Summer of ’42”) in the television series “Coverup” shot herself with a handgun, whom she was allegedly collecting to give to the police, if I recall correctly. She was charged with a crime.

  240. Anonymous[320] • Disclaimer says:
    @Diversity Heretic

    Kansas has that too, but the electorate is so cucked they won’t use it. We are a stupid and cowardly state.

  241. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @David

    That does sound likely.

  242. Anon87 says:
    @res

    Thanks for posting. I tried the private mode which usually works, but they really hate the ad blockers I guess.

    A cynical Fritz the Cat that takes on “poor dumb ivory-tower liberals”? I really need to see this now!

    Good point, why not just ask your local PBS? I’m going to try that.

  243. @Jack D

    There are so few spaces available for the criminally insane that they just wind up in the prison system or back on the street.

    A friend works with the mentally ill in one of those community clinics, and it’s a joke. They have murderers who’ve been set loose and are now “in the care of the community.” Other clients are clearly crazy and unable to care for themselves, so it’s in and out of jail, on and off the meds, etc. My state could triple or quadruple the spaces for those needing institutionalization and it still wouldn’t be enough.

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