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New York Times editor Dean Baquet announced a new drinking game for readers: the name “Emmett Till” (1941-1955) will be randomly inserted into articles, especially End of the Decade retrospectives on the years 2010-2019 , and anytime readers stumble upon St. Emmett’s sacred name, they are entitled to pour themselves a stiff drink.

For example, here is the end of the decade write-up on the New York art scene:

THE DECADE IN CULTURE

A Sea Change in the Art World, Made by Black Creators

For our art critic, the greatness of black visual culture, past and present, mainstream and outsider, was repeatedly asserted during the 2010s.

By Roberta Smith
Published Nov. 24, 2019

What made the 2010s the most thrilling of all the decades I’ve spent in the New York art world was the rising presence of black artists of every ilk, on every front: in museums, commercial galleries, art magazines, private collections and public commissions.

During this exhilarating sea change new talent emerged, older talent was newly appreciated and the history of American art was suddenly up for grabs — and in dire need of rewriting.

… But if my 2010s had a hinge point, it was the firestorm around “Open Casket,” a painting by Dana Schutz in the 2017 Whitney Biennial. Ms. Schutz, who is white, had based it on famous photographs of the battered body of Emmett Till, the black teenager from Chicago who was lynched in Mississippi in 1955 on fabricated allegations of flirting with a white woman. The photograph was taken at Till’s funeral where his mother had insisted on an open coffin so that, as she said, “all the world could see.”

The arguments about the painting focused on whether a white artist should portray, much less exhibit, a subject so deeply traumatic to African-Americans, and the incendiary demand — first made in a public letter by the artist Hannah Black — that the painting be destroyed. In the end the debate over artistic freedom seemed less important than the intensity of the anger: the speed and starkness with which it illuminated white obliviousness and entitlement.

For many white people, this writer included, the furor was life-changing, as much as I disagreed with Ms. Black. Telling artists what they can and cannot do may come back to bite you. But the uproar made me see that many artists create work that they realize should not be exhibited, which probably should have been the case here. Altogether, I am grateful for the extremeness of her stance. It broke open something that had needed to be broken open for a long time. One immediate outcome was the 2019 Biennial, with its high percentage of female artists of color.

This is but the barest outline of the important changes of the 2010s for art.

Wokeness is basically a Jobs for the Black Girls program, so if you aren’t a black woman, like Roberta Smith is not, you’d better push Wokeness at all costs to hold off the day they come for you and your job.

You can tell that Roberta Smith is a holdover white woman taking up space in a sinecure that really ought to be filled by a Woman of Color because the word “hair” never appears in her article.

If you want a vision of the Woke future, imagine a Woman of Color talking about her hair – forever.

A commenter suggests that the perfect topic for an NYT oped would be:

Emmett Till’s Sister’s Hair

 
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  1. What made the 2010s the most thrilling of all the decades I’ve spent in the New York art world was the rising presence of black artists of every ilk, on every front: in museums, commercial galleries, art magazines, private collections and public commissions.

    Because the important thing is the art. That’s why we need to expend more and more for art. It is the art. There is no agenda other than art. Art for the sake of art. But it is only thrilling if it is Black Artist art.

    So more money for art.

  2. dvorak says:

    NYT’s Roberta Smith is shook.

  3. Emett till seems to be becoming one of the central figures of history rivaling people like Thomas Jefferson. Out of curiosity have you done an ngram comparison between till and other significant historical figures ?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  4. …was lynched in Mississippi in 1955 on fabricated allegations of flirting with a white woman.

    I thought we were supposed to believe Till was only flirting, but now even that is declared to have been fabricated. He must just have been lynched at random.

    In the end the debate over artistic freedom seemed less important than the intensity of the anger…

    We’re supposed to meekly surrender all rights if their exercise makes black people angry.

  5. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    OT:

    https://story.californiasunday.com/homeless-families

    This is interesting because immigration is mentioned, just not in the “wrong” way.

    They are unable to afford digs in California not because they can not earn money, but because they can not earn enough money. And they can’t earn enough money because they are mestizos in a land with an oversupply of mestizos of typical mestizo skill sets and capabilities and enough goodwhites and orientals and higher earning subcons to drive prices beyond what their skill sets provide for.

    They’re Heathkits in a Facebook world. They’re Woolworths in a WalMart stock boom world. They’re guys with normal size in a dating market with Madonna, Susan Sarandon, and Helen Mirren.

    Alinsky talks of “have-a-little-want-mores”. They have a little but a little is not enough, Mr. Brownstone. Not in California.

    Going back to their home country is not presented as an option.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  6. songbird says:

    Wonder where Emmett Till would place, if you made up a list of the most frequently mentioned black men in the NYT and eliminated those in entertainment.

    Ahead of Marion Barry and Ed Brooks, maybe?

    • Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros
  7. anon[549] • Disclaimer says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    We’re supposed to meekly surrender all rights if their exercise makes black people a single black person angry.

    FIFY.

    Roberta Smith was born in 1948. So as a leading-edge boomer it was “her turn” to be art critic. Since she’s pushing 70 in a couple of years it won’t be “her turn” anymore, but by being Woke she can prolong her privilege a bit.

    • Replies: @Laurence Whelk
  8. Orangeman says:

    Why has NYT settled on Emmitt Tillman as the essential narrative ? Any ideas ?

    • Replies: @anon
  9. Art Deco says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    He wasn’t lynched. He wasn’t charged with any offense. The notion he flirted with her is disputed. Kidnapping an adolescent and beating him to death is a rather draconian penalty for him being fresh. (There are 200-odd homicides a year in Mississippi, and easily 10,000 since 1955).

  10. Roberta Smith wrote:

    What made the 2010s the most thrilling of all the decades…

    During this exhilarating sea change…

    I sincerely wonder if this is really what “thrills” and “exhilarates” this lady.

    I mean a roller-coaster ride can be thrilling. Seeing your first-born child for the first time can be exhilarating.

    But this stuff that Roberta Smith is talking about?

    Is she just misusing the words “thrilling” and “exhilarating”? Or is she simply a very, very strange lady?

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    , @njguy73
  11. anon[549] • Disclaimer says:

    Is she just misusing the words “thrilling” and “exhilarating”? Or is she simply a very, very strange lady?

    She’s an aging liberal who landed her turn earned spot at the NYT and wants to keep it as long as she can, obviously. In the current year she must be very, very Woke to ensure it.

  12. Maybe “Knees Up” Kamala Harris can console her self by thinking about how to demonize Whitey some more and have a few drinks. Looks like her Presidential Ambitions are failing:

    “I Have Never Seen an Organization Treat Its Staff So Poorly” – Kamala Harris’s 2020 Campaign Implodes as Head Staffer Resigns

    • Agree: houston 1992
    • Replies: @houston 1992
    , @Jon
  13. @PhysicistDave

    Is she just misusing the words “thrilling” and “exhilarating”? Or is she simply a very, very strange lady?

    Her extreme reaction to “black art” shows how virtuous she is. The same art done by a white artist would be dull and boring. But the blackness of the artist makes the art so much better.

    The fact that she appreciates this marks her as one of the elect who are good and can be trusted to tell us what we are supposed to like.

    • Replies: @Dtbb
  14. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Art Deco

    No one disputes that the reaction to Till’s errant behavior was excessive and unjustified. The whites in his own day all thought that. The problem is that this one case gets regurgitated over and over and over and over, while hundreds, if not thousands of black assaults, rapes and murders are studiously and willfully subject to Dynamic Silence.

  15. HA says:

    London mayor encourages citizens to "over-report" to the police.

    (Of course, it goes without saying that if the person you decide to get all Permit-Patty about happens be non-white, then you DESERVE to have your life destroyed, you filthy racist with your fascist-judicial-system doing your bidding. So yeah, go ahead and report them. It’s your funeral.)

    • Agree: jim jones
  16. TWS says:

    Interesting they have to go back so many years to find a story to match the narrative. St Emmett will match St Mary for name recognition in the future religion.

  17. Cortes says:

    Reads like bigging up the work of Dana Schutz.

    In old money = cultural appropriation.

    Or a meringue? (Scottish joke)

  18. It’s a little late, but a great Thanksgiving topic would have been Emmett Till’s hair.

    • Agree: Couch scientist
    • LOL: Carol
  19. @Art Deco

    And since 2014, around 2500 negroes have been killed just in the city of Chicago, with another 12,000 or so shot.

    https://heyjackass.com/

    The details of the Emmett Till killing are disputed, but the details of the murders of Channon Christian and Christopher Newsom are not. Perhaps we need weekly reminders of those two victims read aloud on BET from now until the lights go out.

    Until then, I suggest you acquire a sense of proportion.

    • Agree: Nicholas Stix
    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    , @anonynous
  20. If you want a vision of the Woke future, imagine a Woman of Color talking about her hair – forever.

    Great riff on Orwell, but I worry less about a Woke future than I do about Sub-Saharan demographics… and I don’t worry about those in the least because I’m numerate.

    In the 90s my mates and I developed the rough outlines of a half-decent theory of why shit will usually turn out OK.

    Think of the ‘right way for things to be‘ as something on which people disagree – even reasonable people.

    [MORE]

    Some people disagree for good reasons; some people disagree for venal reasons; most people don’t give a fuck because they’re not affected by the issue to an extent that makes them give a fuck.

    It’s also useful to simplify everything so that the equilibrium is some constant (i.e., a horizontal line), just for exposition.

    When a bunch of things happens at once in the same direction, you wind up overshooting the equilibrium; all of a sudden the people who previously had genuine grievances have the whip hand.

    With that comes the opportunity to kick the opposition in the taint.

    The types of people who will exploit that opportunity are a mix of the most-aggrieved, and rank opportunists looking to make bank. My guess is that the latter dominate: the most-aggrieved are happy to be out from under. Al Sharpton is a good example… he was not the most put-upon negro in the US at the time, by a loooong shot.

    Now it depends how much taint-kicking there is.

    If the taint-kicking only targets the most-egregious perpetrators of the former injustice, then they get their taints kicked, whereupon everyone applauds (even people who were on the same broad ‘side’) and there’s a fairly smooth transition from the overshoot back to equilibrium.

    If the taint-kicking starts to get beyond that, it puts more people into the group who would prefer to be back closer to the old equilibrium.

    This will include people who thought that the old equilibrium was the wrong one for them, and whose preferred equilibrium was somewhere between the old and the new.

    And if it gets too far, the group of people who actively support a move back towards the old equilibrium will include people who didn’t previously give a fuck, because the effect on them gets above their “Give a fuck” range.

    So now you’ve got a reaction, and depending on how much traction it gets, that can overshoot as well.

    There will be times when these actions/reactions cause oscillations that are explosive in the short term – we’re in one of those now.

    Thing is though: we’re at the stage where it’s all quite obviously led by grifters.

    If the various varieties of taint-kickers (Zionists, PoC-grifters, ‘trans’-grifters, sexual-orientation-alphagetti-grifters) were being led by people who were not such obvious charlatans, I would be slightly worried.

    But as we are now, it’s like being lectured about being hellbound by Ted Haggard or Jim Bakker.

    The mass of Jews, gays, blacks, and women are out from under, and that’s a good thing. They’re smart enough to know that they’re happier as things are now, than they would have been even as little as 30 years ago.

    They’re not ‘activists’ or partisans for change in their own interests. That is why Western Jews have so much energy to devote to activism for change unrelated to Judaism, Jewishness, Zionism or Palestine. It’s also why Western women activists are overwhelmingly not activists for the women’s movement… that battle’s done, and women won important changes to their place in the status quo.

    And the non-grifters in each segment also know – because they’re not mentally ill – that the ‘whip hand’ is currently the purview of people that don’t even like each other.

    The grifters are doing my job for me: bringing their own cause into disrepute.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @GFHÄNDEL
  21. Dmon says:

    If you’re trying to go on the wagon, you can play the NYT “Reginald Denny Drinking Game”.

    • LOL: Hibernian
  22. Roberta Smith, who is married to another bad critic, Jerry Saltz, is a liar. If she really believed what she writes I’d have respect for her.

  23. How many times did they mention Rachel Corrie?

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  24. @Peripatetic Commenter

    astonishing that THE NEWSPAPER OF RECORD, “NOR”, would speculate on her need to drop out of the prez race in December to ensure her name is off the June 2019 CA primary ballot where she might come a distant 7th or so. NOR notes that Tom Steyer may challenge her for the 2022 senate seat race.

    (Why do CAL ballots need to be printed ~6 months in advance? What if Michelle Obama or Governor Newsom wants /needs to join the race after Super Tuesday, say?)

    Scott Adams has speculated that if/when Joe Biden drops out, that his massive African American support might migrate to KH. Adams sees them as having no where else to go…..so Adams has not sold his KH bet position.

  25. Mycale says:

    It should come as no surprise to learn that Dana Schutz is not white but fellow white, as is the the woman who blasted her, Hannah Black. Yet somehow white people are the ones who come out as the villains in this story.

  26. Arclight says:

    Having some familiarity with the art world, the white fetish for lavishing minority – and especially black – artists with praise just for existing and cranking out work with predictable subject matter has been a thing for basically the entire 21st century.

    Truth be told a lot of modern art regardless of origin are basically dressed up craft projects so there isn’t a lot to genuinely praise period…but range of interest for a lot of black (and white) artists is exceedingly narrow.

  27. Why is Emmett Till so popular with female journalist?

    Because he was so well hung.

    (Too soon?)

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  28. anon[336] • Disclaimer says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    What really happened was that St. Emmett was only washing the woman’s feet. His motives were misconstrued. Crucification ensued.

  29. MBlanc46 says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    Thank you, Mike. We must do our best to keep their names alive.

  30. @Arclight

    Tom Wolfe’s “The Painted Word” is a great introduction to the wacky world of modern art:

    Modern art is all about the “narrative”, so it a perfect fit for woke folk craziness.

    The NYT article is classic pukeworthy “journalism”.

    • Agree: Stan d Mute
    • Replies: @anonynous
    , @Dieter Kief
  31. Is Emmett Till still dead? Damn! I would have thought he would have risen by now.

  32. njguy73 says:
    @PhysicistDave

    No, she just needs a good, healthy boink fest.

  33. J.Ross says:

    This doesn’t mention Emmet Till but it’s still the dumbest journalism you will read today: police body cameras threaten the civil liberties of black and brown folks because they enable police to write more accurate reports and deny lawsuit opportunities to seditious activists.

    The vast majority of the nation’s biggest police departments allow officers to watch footage from body cameras whenever they want, including before they write their incident reports or make statements, said the report, which was released Tuesday by the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights.
    “Unrestricted footage review places civil rights at risk and undermines the goals of transparency and accountability,” said Vanita Gupta, former head of the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division and current head of the Leadership Conference, in the report’s introduction.
    Because an officer’s memory of an event may be altered by watching body camera footage, doing so will likely alter what officers write in their reports. That, in turn, can make it more difficult for investigators or courts to assess whether the officer’s actions were reasonable based on what he or she perceived at the time of the incident, states the report, “The Illusion of Accuracy: How Body-Worn Camera Footage Can Distort Evidence.”

    https://www.newsweek.com/police-body-camera-incident-report-memory-civil-rights-minority-711584?fbclid=IwAR335OHNe1OqE0uV5LsZ2RnZWpIDIrHFEizf_6mvCtvISJK0dfe1DAp0U0c

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Alfa158
    , @Joe Stalin
  34. Jim Given says:

    “And since we’re on the topic, why are all the stores OPEN on Black Friday? Shouldn’t they all be closed, out of respect for the Brothers?”

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
  35. anon[218] • Disclaimer says:
    @Orangeman

    Perhaps young Emmett was cramping Momma Till’s style up in Chicago, so she sent him to Mississippi.
    How was she supposed to know that Miss. was full of mean Whites?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  36. Maybe they like Emmett Till so much because of the prepositionish way his name ends. Till as in “until” as in “we will never stop till”. Emmett Till the end. Foot on your head till…

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  37. anon[402] • Disclaimer says:

    Emmett Till’s Sister’s Hair

    Look, but don’t touch. Amirite?

  38. @anon

    Roberta Smith was born in 1948. So as a leading-edge boomer it was “her turn” to be art critic. Since she’s pushing 70 in a couple of years it won’t be “her turn” anymore, but by being Woke she can prolong her privilege a bit.

    I just had a minor epiphany about Boomer complaints that Millennials refuse to “grow up” – to become adults. Maybe it’s because Boomers refuse to grow old.

    When I was in my 20s and 30s, people in their late 60s and 70s, if they were still alive, were old (and I mean no insult by the term; in fact, in some cultures {asian} I have lived in, being old is a badge of honor and a claim on respect from the young) and they were no longer active as workers or professionals or leaders.

    The Boomers (especially the precious white lefty ones who idealize the 1960s counterculture) refuse to get old – this Roberta woman will drop dead in her position rather than pass it along to a younger person. Even worse, she wants to pass the mantle to blacks instead of her own people, because these Boomer-Libs have to believe in their deluded ideals to the grave, rather than admit that their stupid ideas have sunk this country, and the West, and the Whites.

    • Agree: Cagey Beast, Dtbb
  39. Alden says:
    @Art Deco

    Meh, one less black criminal and young enough that he didn’t have children.

  40. Anonymous[650] • Disclaimer says:

    THE DECADE IN CULTURE

    I read this as The Decadent in Culture.

    Ok, so this is all filler text, which will be written by AI in about 3 years time in order to increase line count, but let’s discuss this seriously…

    On one level, the vibrant visibility of black artists is a sobering reminder that the racial divide that has gripped American culture for generations is alive and well. But in many other ways, it underscores the softening of the post-civil rights landscape. Gone are the days when the visibility of African Americans would have been met

    No sorry, that was actually Talk To Transformer.

    Ok, here we go:

    In the end the debate over artistic freedom seemed less important than the intensity of the anger: the speed and starkness with which it illuminated white obliviousness and entitlement.

    White people think they are entitled to Closed Caskets?

    What made the 2010s the most thrilling of all the decades I’ve spent in the New York art world was the rising presence of black artists of every ilk, on every front: in museums, commercial galleries, art magazines, private collections and public commissions.

    It was also great in that we finally started to see calls to cancel Gauguin by Samoans living in New Zealand which is like a Monty Python skit without the laugh track.

    But apart from that, is there any substance to this claim of the increasing ascendance of Black Artists of “every ilk” (rappers, taggers, bangers and gangers welcome?) My mind just manages to retrieve blacks who want others’ work of art erased because of slavery and whites who wants others’ work of art “blackened” for Great Reparations / the fabled Invisibility Which Must Be Lifted.

  41. Alden says:
    @J.Ross

    Wasn’t it the liberals and lawyers who demanded body cams so they could prove racist White police were abusing poor pathetic pitiful innocent blacks?

    Then the camera film proves the blacks are vicious criminals. Too bad Darren Wilson didn’t have a car and body camera.

    DNA was the same. The liberals assumed it would prove all those poor pathetic helpless blacks were innocent.

    They weren’t innocent

    • Replies: @byrresheim
  42. Alfa158 says:
    @J.Ross

    I think Steve is right. The Newsweek staff must be four slightly dim millennial SJWs cranking out this gibberish.
    Interesting that they pull a “Look a squirrel!” by ignoring the real reason they oppose these cams. It’s because they show cops misbehave less than they allege, and POC’s misbehave more than they believe.
    Instead they write that cams are bad because they allow cops to submit truthful reports which in turn makes it harder to persecute cops.

  43. Jon says:
    @Peripatetic Commenter

    Maybe “Knees Up” Kamala

    Knees up? She and Willie Brown were into kinkier stuff than I realized?

  44. “Open Casket,” a painting by Dana Schutz…

    It broke open something that had needed to be broken open for a long time.

    Sounds like an open-and-Schutz case.

    • Replies: @Flo
  45. black sea says:

    I’m not familiar with the work she is describing, but I suspect that it exists primarily as a vehicle for the conveyance of both status and virtue signalling simultaneously. And of course, for whoever “invests” in such work, there is the opportunity to display raw financial power as well.

    It also gives those employed in the art world something to gas on about in articles such as this, knowing full well that their in-group must occasionally pay homage to the illusion that they address an audience of anyone other than themselves.

    The art world is a bit like an Amway for those with cultural ambitions.

  46. ‘… If you want a vision of the Woke future, imagine a Woman of Color talking about her hair – forever…’

    Lol.

  47. Dtbb says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    Brings to my mind the blind auditions for orchestras. Needs to be adapted to the art world?

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  48. ‘For our art critic, the greatness of black visual culture, past and present, mainstream and outsider, was repeatedly asserted during the 2010s…’

    What a fatuous absurdity.

  49. Anon[393] • Disclaimer says:

    By the way, I like how Steve always has a thumbnail photo of the journalist or politician involved. Very Daily Mail. Forget all this Martin Luther King colorblind stuff. Race is the most important factor. We need to know the race of everyone involved in any news story, up front.

  50. Here’s what Roberta White thought of Black Art 30 years ago: “Item 1989: Roberta Smith explains to film interviewer Terry McCoy that the real problem with the art of African-Americans is that is just isn’t any good, that it would be in mainstream galleries if it were, that she’s been up to the Studio Museum a couple of time [sic] and has’t seen anything worthwhile, that it’s all too derivative, and so.”

  51. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    The art world is a bit like an Amway for those with cultural ambitions.

    I love this, because it’s true on many levels. Amway is still around because it appeals to people’s sense of-not larceny, since it’s actually a lot of work-their sense of wanting-to-be-someone they are not. Amway is a sales opportunity, and allows one to think of oneself as an entrepreneur, an independent businessmn, but in reality 1) it’s a dismal sales opportunity, any car dealership is an order of magnitude better (it’s actually worse than selling Kirby vacuums or Lowrey geriatric-organs) and 2) it’s hard to imagine a relationship less independent of a single particular company for a business owner than Amway. In a real sense it’s the Scientology of Sales.

    Of course, the art world and an Amway function would both mightily object to being compared to each other, so it’s a lot of fun to associate them, just as the MSM used to always conflate Libertarianism with Lyndon LaRouche.

    On the other hand, sometimes art was just some people having a little fun. Warhol was not heterosexual, but he liked hanging around women if they were famous or if they were impressed by him and she was.

    https://news.artnet.com/art-world/debbie-harry-andy-warhol-1696761

    I’ve been thinking about Andy Warhol and what an impact he had on my life. Andy was the master of blurring the line between art and commerce. His art played with the conventions of commerce—marketing, mass production, branding, popular culture, advertising, celebrity. He also blurred the line between serious and playful. He was very serious about his work, but he approached it with a sense of humor. His work ethic was incredible. He would wake up early every day and go to his studio and paint, break for lunch, and work all afternoon—often spending hours on the phone—then at night he would always go out and socialize. He went everywhere. In fact, I first met him—and his dazzling entourage—when I was waiting tables at Max’s. I admired Andy so much. Like Andy, I felt the influence of Marcel Duchamp and a kinship to Dada and Popism, which became foundational to what I was creating.

    To my amazement, we actually became acquainted. Chris [Stein] and I found ourselves on Andy’s invitation list. He would ask us to dinner sometimes. He didn’t eat much; he’d often cover up his plate with a napkin and take it with him and leave it on a ledge somewhere for a hungry street person. Later on, he invited us to his parties at the Factory on Union Square. Andy would invite all kinds of people from all kinds of backgrounds, uptown, downtown, artists, socialites, eccentrics, you name it. Andy, in his way, was very sociable and hung around with any-and everybody. One of his great skills was that he was a very, very good listener. He would sit there and suck all of it in. His curiosity was endless. He was also extremely supportive of new artists. Chris and I adored Andy—and to find out that he was a fan of ours was heavenly.
    Andy put me on the cover of Interview magazine and he threw a party for us at Studio 54 when “Heart of Glass” went to number one in America. Now that we weren’t on the road, we had gotten to know him a little, and the idea of Andy’s doing my portrait came up; somewhere, at some point, Andy had remarked that if he could have anyone else’s face, it would be mine.

    How it worked was that first Andy took some photos of you. He used one of those unique Big Shot Polaroid cameras that looked like a shoebox with a lens on it. The Big Shot was designed for portrait use only—and the quality of the shots was often striking. Perfect for Andy. After taking the Polaroids, he would show them to us and ask quietly—Andy was very soft-spoken—“Well, which one would you like?” I saw a couple that I thought were good but I said, “That’s really up to you.” He’s the artist; it seemed to be the safest thing to have him choose. I’ve lived with that Andy Warhol portrait for a long time now, so I’m much more used to it, but seeing all these portraits of yourself for the first time, by an artist who was so important to you, was startling. I guess I was just stunned. And humbled. Over the years, Chris and I came across a lot of those cameras from the early seventies and we would always buy them for Andy. We’d find them in junk stores at around twenty-five cents a pop. He’d always be very grateful. The portrait itself has taken on a life of its own—reproduced countless times and exhibited in numerous galleries worldwide. I still have that original Warhol. I can’t imagine parting with it. Well, I will be parting with it briefly next year, when I loan it to the Whitney for a retrospective show of Andy’s work.
    Later, Andy called and asked me to model for a portrait he was going to create live, at Lincoln Center, as a promotion for the Commodore Amiga computer. It was a pretty amazing event. They had a full orchestra and a large board set up with a bunch of technicians in lab coats. The techs programmed away with all the Warhol colors, as Andy designed and painted my portrait. I hammed it up some for the cameras, turning toward Andy, running my hand through my hair, and asking in a suggestive Marilyn voice, “Are you ready to paint me?” Andy was pretty hilarious in his usual flat-affect way, as he sparred with the Commodore host.

    I think there are only two copies of this computer-generated Warhol in existence and I have one of them.

    From Face It by Debbie Harry. Copyright 2019 by Debbie Harry. Reprinted by permission of Dey Street, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

    I’d also add that soley due to Warhol, the Big Shot is the only Polaroid camera worth anything anymore on the collectible camera market. They were fragile and the plastic lens was often busted out to make earrings.At one time I had fifteen or twenty old Polaroids, I threw all of them into the Flambeau Flowage in Wisconsin except the 110A and 180, which then had value as working cameras in New York theatrical use for continuity-of-scene actor/actress wardrobe photos and testing high power strobe setups, because they had zero market value. They no longer make pack or rollfilm Polaroid materials anyway.

  52. anon1999 says:

    They have to go back to 1955 on this but blacks have ben raping and killing whites for decades.

  53. @Alden

    There are way too many old cases where the prosecution tries its very best to prevent the introduction of DNA evidence.

    And you know that.

    • Replies: @Alden
  54. @Laurence Whelk

    People, especially Millennials, can’t seem to read history or even old novels. Complaints about old people who won’t stop working were always upper classer complaints. Then America undertook the experiement of giving that privilege to a much larger group than the traditional gentry. Now we all the fourth son of Sir Lucas.

    People historically only quit in their 50s or 60s when they had to because they did physically demanding work and simply couldn’t keep going. This modern idea that people in cushy airconditioned jobs should step aside because reasons is itself ahistorical and wildly entitled roughly on par with the old gentry classes’ monstrous sense of entitlement.

  55. @Couch scientist

    The Party does not want me to laugh. The Party does not want me to laugh….

  56. @Anonymous

    I should explain: The LOL was about the Madonna/Susan Sarandon bit (don’t know Miss Mirren).

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  57. Pardon me if my comments include extra typos tonight. I did a ctrl-F and got 20 “tills”. That’s a lot of shots of Jack Daniels. Some of these shots may have been due to the word “untill”, and some from eSteve’s writing and not this art critic, but I can’t till anymore … Oh, another one!

    • Replies: @Haruto Rat
  58. @Anonymous

    A historian would make your kind of distinctions. A propagandist less so.

    Where are the historians, if you’d need them?

    Plus I’m stunned time and time again, how this kind of category mistakes have become a routine.

  59. Hhsiii says:

    Supposedly someone offered $465k for the Till painting, but it isn’t for sale. For now.

    You could exhibit it with some Gaugains. And some of Hannah Black’s work. With a poll: which one is your favorite?

  60. AceDeuce says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    He wasn’t “flirting”, he sexually assaulted her–and the story was not “fabricated”,. That unsubstantiated allegation is the sole assertion of Timothy Tyson a rabid SJW, who was a ringleader in the Duke Lacrosse case.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Jane Plain
  61. AceDeuce says:
    @Art Deco

    He sexually assaulted her, in accordance with the legal definition of the term. That isn’t “flirting”. The “dispute” of his doing anything wrong is from a radical antiwhite SJW.

    All I have to do with cucks like you is to flip the script. If a 14 year old white kid sexually assaulted a married black woman 60 pounds lighter than him, he’d be dead meat, the blacks would circle the wagons in silence, and cucks like you, if you heard the story, would be happy for the avenging blacks.

    • Agree: Dannyboy
    • LOL: AceDeuce
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  62. @songbird

    Poor thing, you’d like to exclude only entertainment, while commenting on a blog where half of the posts are dedicated to “sports”? Inverted commas because there’s no triathlon nor biathlon – no bn to fetishize there.

  63. Hibernian says:
    @Richard of Fallbrook

    A sizeable part of their constituency, both Jewish and non-Jewish, tends to be sympathetic to the likes of Ms. Corrie. I think she’s higher on their totem pole than Mr. Denny.

  64. @Couch scientist

    “I’m just so sick and tired of being discriminated against by black Friday.”
    – Robinson Crusoe

    • LOL: Couch scientist
  65. Art Deco says:
    @anon

    IIRC, he was on a short visit to his cousins.

    • Replies: @anon
  66. Pericles says:
    @Art Deco

    #BelieveAllWomen, buddy. Now report to HR for a refresher day or two.

  67. @Arclight

    Having some familiarity with the art world, the white fetish for lavishing minority – and especially black – artists with praise just for existing and cranking out work with predictable subject matter has been a thing for basically the entire 21st century.

    It’s important to remind the NYY readership of exactly how patronizing Mrs. Smith is. In her opinion, any black artist who can tie his or her own shoes is an Old Master. (Can you still use that term?).

    • Replies: @Arclight
  68. anonynous says:

    I’m from Chicago. This endless Emmett Till guilt trip Whitey propaganda just doesn’t work on me and those like me.

    I feel absolutely zero, no guilt for what happened to Emmett Till.

    No Emmett Till didn’t deserve to be killed, but he did deserve to get a serious as* beating. The regular, decent folks in Mississippi, Black and White all agreed that Emmett Till deserved a serious as* beating for sexually harassing/insulting a married White woman, think the same would be felt about him insulting, sexually harassing a respected married Black woman.

    And where was Emmett Till’s father – who should have been around to discipline his son when he did something seriously wrong like sexually harassing, insulting a married White woman?

    Emmett Till’s father was arrested, prosecuted, convicted and then executed for raping Italian women when he was a soldier in World War II.

    Like father like son.

    • Agree: Dannyboy
  69. anonynous says:
    @Justvisiting

    I refuse to accept the term “modern art”.

    This form of “art” isn’t anything new, it’s not cutting edge, it’s not the new, exciting new, modern thing.

    This form of art is at least 100 years old. A 100 year old very old guy trying to flirt with sexy 20 somethings, that’s not “modern”, not “hip”, not “exciting” not “controversial”.

    Just old shi*.

  70. anonynous says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    What exact day where Channon Christian and Christopher Newsom tortured and murdered? We should honor this date.

  71. @J.Ross

    Instant Replay affects proper reporting.

    NFL: Great!

    Black Defense Attorneys: Bad! BAD!

  72. Paul says:

    Does anybody know how many paintings of the body of the white woman who was raped and murdered by Louis Till (the father of Emmett Till) are on public display? Has the New York Times investigated that?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  73. Mr. Anon says:
    @Arclight

    A more succinct term for “modern art” is “crap”.

    • Agree: Dannyboy
  74. Flo says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Speaking of open caskets, a photo of the busted up casket purported to be Emmett Till’s was widely featured in coverage of a black-owned Chicago funeral home scandal. These scandals seem to crop up regularly — black-owned funeral homes and mortuaries are discovered mishandling corpses, mixing them up, dumping them out back, reusing coffins and gravesites, etc. And financial chicanery too, of course.

    • Replies: @anarchyst
    , @Reg Cæsar
    , @J.Ross
  75. anarchyst says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    Here are true (corrected) stories about “icons” of the so-called “civil rights” movement . .

    There is much more to the “Emmett Till” story that is not widely known. Of course, killing him made him into a “martyr” of the black “civil-rights” movement, but–it is not generally known that Emmett Till was a strapping young man of about 160 lbs.–NOT a “little boy” as some media types tried to portray him as.

    Till was a known womanizer and attempted to take his cocky “Chicago ways” in dealing with women to the Deep South. He was sent to live with relatives in the South because his Chicago relatives could not handle him. He had a “cocky attitude” and bragged about “getting it on” with white women–not a good idea especially in the South. . .

    According to published accounts, Mr. Till did not just “whistle” at a white woman, but grabbed, manhandled and fondled a married white woman. In Southern culture, this was, and still is, the ultimate form of disrespect.

    Despite Mr. Till’s relatives’ attempts to spirit him “out of town” to avoid retribution by the woman’s relatives and townspeople, his cocky attitude “got in the way”, similar to the way that “young master Trayvon’s” attitude got him killed.

    Despite being given numerous “chances” to apologize for his behavior, he was defiant to the end. IF he had apologized for his behavior, he would still be alive today. In fact, one of his killers was a black man.

    It is interesting to note that Emmett Till’s father was executed by the U S military for multiple rapes. Maybe “the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree” . . .

    Rosa Parks was not the “ordinary” black woman that so-called historians made her to be. She was an organizer for the NAACP and was “planted” in order to advance the cause of black “civil-rights” to which she was successful.

    Approximately a year previous to Rosa Parks’ “bus ride” and refusal to vacate her seat, a REAL ordinary black woman did the same thing. This black woman received NO publicity or support from the NAACP or other black “civil-rights” organizations. You see, she was an unmarried black woman with children. According to the black civil-rights crowd, this would not do. They wanted someone who was “squeaky clean” without any “baggage”.

    In fact, the “white guy” sitting behind her was part of the “set-up”. He was a UPI reporter, contracted to “stage” the event…not only that, in the photo there is no one else on the bus. Ms. Parks could have sat wherever she wanted.
    Hence, Rosa Parks made (fabricated) history . . .

    Martin Luther (Michael) King was well-known for frequenting prostitutes, beating and abusing them while exclaiming that he “finally felt like a white man”. His own associates have stated as such. He also plagiarized his college papers and doctoral thesis. Of course, this was overlooked because of his status. King was also a communist.

    Jesse Jackson used to brag to his associates on how he would spit in the food of white patrons of the restaurant he worked at.

    There are many more fabrications of history that were used to lend “legitimacy” to the so-called “civil-rights” movement . . .

    More to come . . .

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Alden
  76. anarchyst says:
    @Flo

    There’s more to black funeral home operations.

    Blacks are notorious for not paying their bill for funeral services. As a result, many funeral home operators will hold the body for “ransom”, until the bill is paid.

    Many times, once the funeral service is over, black relatives will just leave the body with the funeral home.

    This is normal black practice…

  77. @Flo

    So Kermit Gosnell was just a variation on this theme?

  78. “No Emmett Till didn’t deserve to be killed, but he did deserve to get a serious as* beating.”

    CPD done administer a “tune up” procedure yesterday after a Black drunk spit in the mouth of a copper.

  79. anon[205] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kratoklastes

    tl;dr
    The “pendulum” theory has problems. For a start, that pendulum can keep going longer than anyone expects. The USSR lasted for 3 generations. That’s years and years of suffering for many, many people. You up for that, for reals?

    For a second, if behavior is inherited even just 40%, then importing different gene sets means your pendulum never returns to a previous state at all. Import enough Africans into a place and it becomes Africa for a very, very long time. How long has Haiti been independent? When will the pendulum turn back?

    Nice optimism. Don’t see much basis for it in the longer run, though.

  80. @Anonymous

    “No one disputes that the reaction to Till’s errant behavior was excessive and unjustified.”

    The guy to whom Art Deco responded disputed it. By the way, I do think it’s nitpicking to say he wasn’t lynched because he wasn’t strung up. He was beaten to death by a mob of adult males. What’s the difference?

    “The whites in his own day all thought that.”

    Really? Got sources?

    ” The problem is that this one case gets regurgitated over and over and over and over, while hundreds, if not thousands of black assaults, rapes and murders are studiously and willfully subject to Dynamic Silence.”

    Correct, now it is. But I don’t remember any mention of it in my childhood, and I grew up in the 50s and 60s. Bob Dylan might have written a song about it. It’s only recently that the case has become so notorious.

    I agree with you about the suppression of black violence against whites. Having been a victim of a brutal assault by two black “teens” I’m very sensitive on this subject.

    But don’t lie about what happened to Till. I survived my attack. He didn’t.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @res
    , @Bitfu
  81. @Justvisiting

    I love Tom Wolfe. But I don’t adore him – which is to say, he has the same right as everybody else to miss the point on a subject. Ok – he did here. Abstract Expressionism can be talked about as could the work of – – – – hm hm, Andy Warhol or Caspar David Friedrich. Nothing special. But these works of art do not (= do not) equal what is written or said about them. This only happens in the case of minor or useless works of art, when somebody says about them: This is utter crap – and is done.

    If I think of the flying saucers like Cy Twombly (good at times – not so good more often) or the true modern giants like Richter, Judd, Beuys etc. (Mark Rothko, Max Bill, and yes, Paul Strand and Jackson Pollock and August Sander) I can’t avoid the conclusion: This time Tome Wolfe is wrong. Doesn’t matter – nobody is perfect.

  82. anon[513] • Disclaimer says:

    Richter, Judd, Beuys etc. (Mark Rothko, Max Bill, and yes, Paul Strand and Jackson Pollock and August Sander

    Rothko was a creature of the CIA, funded for political reasons. How many other creative giants of the post WW II era were actually just sucking on a spooky teat?

    • Replies: @black sea
  83. @Achmed E. Newman

    Distilled spirits are tricky.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  84. Art Deco says:
    @AceDeuce

    he sexually assaulted her

    Chuckles.

  85. J.Ross says:
    @Flo

    The only pop cultural acknowledgement I am aware of for this constant story of corrupt black mortuaries (apart from local news, so that folks who live near a chocolate city are definitely aware of it) was in one of the Blacula sequels, where the failure of urban funeral homes was essentially attributed to white supremacy. And vampires, which are a metaphor of white supremacy.

  86. Art Deco says:
    @Paul

    Why would that be on display?

    • Replies: @Paul
  87. Anonymous[274] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    They are famous for being admitted size queens. Only the equine need apply.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  88. @Dieter Kief

    Could Jackson Pollock do this?

    No.

    Could Frank Frazetta dribble paint onto a canvas like Pollock? Of course. But he was an artist artist, not a con artist.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  89. J.Ross says:

    Possible confirmation that Steve was right about Newsweek being four teenagers in a coffee shop:
    >Newsweek clickbait drone posts now-normal attack piece about Trump: his plans for Thanksgiving concern eighteen holes and a nice stroll
    >Turns out Trump visited an American military facility in Afghanistan to serve the holiday meal
    >Newsweek, which fired nobody for claiming that Trump was KGB, fires author of the Golf Story because the way this happened makes them look bad
    >and apparently they started caring about looking bad
    This isn’t even XD chess, it’s journalists shooting themselves in a barrel.

    https://postimg.cc/fSjT5VY0

    https://postimg.cc/XpjymWX0

  90. anon[335] • Disclaimer says:
    @Art Deco

    It ended up being a short visit, but the plan was that he wouldn’t be returning to Chicago, for his own good.

    Bottom line: Emmett Till Sr. was a very dangerous man who didn’t live to be 24 years old.
    Till Jr. was a chip of the old block who didn’t make it to 15.
    The End.

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
  91. Arclight says:
    @Boy the way Glenn Miller played

    The bar is very low. There are plenty of mediocre white artists but the woke white people love to highlight mediocre black and other minority art. If it doesn’t deal with race, climate change, or gays/sexuality, it doesn’t get get attention. As the saying goes, if you subsidize something you get more of it, and it’s the same with culture.

  92. anon[335] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jane Plain

    But I don’t remember any mention of it in my childhood, and I grew up in the 50s and 60s. Bob Dylan might have written a song about it. It’s only recently that the case has become so notorious.

    That’s not right.
    I grew up in Australia in the 60s, the Emmett Till story was synonymous with Mississippi here in the Press back then, and it’s never been allowed to die.

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
    , @Nicholas Stix
  93. @the one they call Desanex

    Individualism reigns art. For reasons I don’t really get, some people think this is embarrassing. I’m no fan of Jackson Pollock, though. Frank Franzetta is nice and all, I agree on that, even though I like – ehem, Frank Zappa better, if only for onomatopoetical reasons.

    (Art is about playfulness. – And about horror and terror, too).

    https://www.albrecht-duerer-apokalypse.de/seine-zeitgenossen/matthias-gruenewald/isenheimer-altar/  

  94. Individualism reigns art. For reasons I don’t really get, some people think this is embarrassing. I’m no fan of Jackson Pollock. Frank Franzetta is nice and all, I agree on that, even though I like – ehem, Frank Zappa better, if only for onomatopoetical reasons in this case (=a certain type or kind of playfulness).

    (Art is about playfulness. – And about horror and terror, too).

    https://www.albrecht-duerer-apokalypse.de/seine-zeitgenossen/matthias-gruenewald/isenheimer-altar/  

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  95. Thomas Chatterton Williams, of whom Steve seems to be something of a fan, wrote a profile of John Edgar Wideman. He wrote a book attempting to exonerate Louis Till of his rape convictions:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/26/magazine/john-edgar-wideman-against-the-world.html?searchResultPosition=4

    I’m skeptical. It’s always a railroading.

    I thought Wideman had died a few years ago. He really is a blast from the past.

    Also, his son was likely guilty of two murders:

    http://www.nytimes.com/1988/10/16/us/writer-s-son-given-life-term-in-death-of-new-york-youth.html

    Somehow Williams wraps all of these murders up into a Grand Theory of Black Manhood. I dunno. Maybe he knows something I don’t.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  96. @anon

    Yes it is right. I’m talking about the US. I don’t know anything first hand about Australia.

    Most of that stuff was repressed until recently. Now we never hear the end of it, but there was never even a movie made about the violent reaction to the Civil Rights era until Mississippi Burning (1988), and that wasn’t a hit.

  97. @AceDeuce

    Mrs. Bryant, the original accuser, recanted her story.

    No one really knows what happened. He probably flirted with her, and set off the violent reaction that we see here, on display. It seems that there’s something about Till (the boy) that really enrages you.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Alden
    , @Nicholas Stix
  98. @anarchyst

    Martin Luther (Michael) King

    Martin Sr changed his own name from Michael, as was his right under Anglo-Saxon common law. Onomastic narcissism was so widespread among all Americans in the first half of the last century that it seems most firstborn sons were saddled with dad’s name. King had a lot of problems, but his name wasn’t one of them.

    I do object to anyone naming a child after a heretic. Still, even I was shocked when the grandchild of four Lutherans of a family I knew in college was born on Luther’s 500th birthday– and was christened Michael.

    I could have respected them had they respected their own traditions.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  99. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Put yourself in the position of a Catholic priest named Brigham.

    He and the BY of BYU were both named after a common ancestor, apparently, and his family converted to Catholicism from mainline Protestantism, not Mormonism, but it was still….unusual.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  100. @Dieter Kief

    Individualism reigns [in] art.

    And taste reins in art.

    (With help, at times, from the law.)

  101. @Jane Plain

    Also, his son was likely guilty of two murders

    Whiskey alert!

    The younger Wideman married his prison shrink. But he can’t stay with her while on parole, because she has custody of their children, and their father has seen to it that Jake the snake cannot come within so many yards of their home.

    Released Arizona killer Jacob Wideman appeals reimprisonment

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
  102. black sea says:
    @anon

    The Paris Review, which in its day carried considerable prestige, was from its inception a creature of the CIA.

  103. res says:
    @Jane Plain

    Correct, now it is. But I don’t remember any mention of it in my childhood, and I grew up in the 50s and 60s. Bob Dylan might have written a song about it. It’s only recently that the case has become so notorious.

    Look magazine had a circulation of around 4 million copies when this article was published.
    https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/till-killers-confession/
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Look_(American_magazine)#Circulation_peak

    Notice the mention on the cover:

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
  104. anon[278] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jane Plain

    She didn’t recant.
    She allegedly said Till didn’t do anything that warranted killing.

    Some SJW illegally accessed her SSN and tracked her down at the age of 82, and likely browbeat the old lady into saying what he wanted to hear.

  105. @Anonymous

    Put yourself in the position of a Catholic priest named Brigham.

    You can’t top Cardinal Sin, honored by this statue in his hometown of New Washington.

  106. @AceDeuce

    If a 14 year old white kid sexually assaulted a married black woman 60 pounds lighter than him

    …assuming he could even find one…

    • LOL: Dannyboy
  107. @Dieter Kief

    I love Tom Wolfe. But I don’t adore him

    I can’t avoid the conclusion: This time Tom Wolfe is wrong. Doesn’t matter – nobody is perfect.

    Funny, I adore Wolfe, but don’t love him.

    Modern (and postmoden) art and the “New Journalism” Wolfe specialized in had something in common– they only worked when laced with humor. The serious stuff is wretched.

    I’m reading John McWhorter’s Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue, and couldn’t help but notice– feel, even– the similarity to Wolfe. McWhorter is Wolfe seasoned with anger and frustration, but a little less wryness. (Hmm… the only writer who beats Wolfe at wryness happens to be the only one who dresses even better than him– Gay Talese. Coincidence?)

    With this thought already in mind, it was striking to see McWhorter reach for the same weapon as Wolfe to make his point: Daniel Everett.

    Wolfe drew on Everett’s work with the Pirahã to mock their common bête-noire, Noam Chomsky. McWhorter cites it to bolster his point that we create language; it doesn’t create us. He has it in for Sapir-Whorf the way Wolfe had it in for Chomsky.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  108. Alden says:
    @byrresheim

    Best thing about DNA is that it’s like fingerprints. So many old cases have been solved because of DNA matches. Almost all criminals are repeaters. So sooner or later they’ll be arrested again and old cases will be solved..

  109. Alden says:
    @Jane Plain

    Mrs Bryant didn’t recant her story She was in her 80s shortly before death, suffering from Alzheimer’s when a liberal journalist visited her and claimed she recanted.

    She had to use a gun to fight him off. That’s hardly harmless flirting. Black men don’t flirt. They make gross disgusting advances.

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
  110. @Jim Given

    “And since we’re on the topic, why are all the stores OPEN on Black Friday? Shouldn’t they all be closed, out of respect for the Brothers?”

    Actually, they have it right as-is. Black Friday is a day of mob mayhem and violence. The only thing missing is the outright looting. SWPLs sit it out at home with mom and dad, then return to work and do their shopping on Cyber Monday.

    Maybe Cyber is the new Cracker?

  111. @anon

    Bob Dylan didn’t sing any songs about it. He only wrote songs supporting black murderers.

    In America, the Till case was largely forgotten for generations.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Steve Sailer
  112. anon[316] • Disclaimer says:
    @Nicholas Stix

    Time magazine never stopped talking about Emmett Till, starting in the Fifties.

    Dylan did exploit the death of a Black bartender: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lonesome_Death_of_Hattie_Carroll

  113. @Art Deco

    They didn’t beat him to death, they shot him.

    His face was swollen, not from the beating but from having been in the water for two or three days.

    It wasn’t a lynching, because they had not planned on killing him. The plan was to beat him to a pulp, which was a righteous undertaking, considering what Till had done.

    They periodically demanded that Till apologize, but he was as shameless as his murderer-serial rapist old man, and refused. Till could have de-escalated matters, but chose otherwise.

    I’m not justifying his murder, but I am justifying his brutal beating. Some people (e.g., Rodney King, who also escalated matters) earn getting beaten to a pulp. In spite of the mitigating circumstances, they should have hanged for kidnapping and Murder Two.

    However, I shed no tears for Emmett Till. He was the author of his own death, which probably saved lives.

    • Agree: anarchyst
  114. @Jane Plain

    She never recanted. That was a hoax.

  115. @Reg Cæsar

    I laughed when I read your post. People love to look down on somewhat dumb Jack Kerouac, but he got something central perfectly right – the stuff concerning the Dharma Bums – I mean, the funny side of the Beat way of transcendentalism.

    I read Habermas’ new tome about the co-evolution of theology/metaphysics and rational thinking. Habermas loves to elaborate, but resisted his longing to argue in extenso in only one prominent 20th-century case: That of – – – Noam Chomsky. He takes Chomsky down with not more than maybe 50 words – altogether: Behaviorism might be good for rats being one example for his dry (and even humorous…) attacks on this subject.

    I go on fast (and a bit unsystematical, ok) – Habermas has a chapter in Auch eine Geschichte der Philosophy about Lau Dse. In it, he does not realize the Dharma Bum aspect of Lau Dse’s – legacy, or example. And I do think, that this is core Lau Dse (and Tchuang Dse).

    Your sentence the serious stuff is wretched hits the Friedrich-Schiller (and JWv Goethe-) claim of art as essentially playful – and therewith humanizing. And yes, there exists a central path from here to the tricksters and therapists and doctors / priests – – – and the jugglers and the clowns, who all did tricks for you (Like a Rolling Stone / Bob Dylan).

    McWhorter cites it to bolster his point that we create language; it doesn’t create us. He has it in for Sapir-Whorf the way Wolfe had it in for Chomsky.

    I think, here too, Habermas has solved the problem: One of the most important of his distinctions is this one: Language serves both purposes: It does índividualize us and at the same time – socializes us. –

    – According to Habermas it is a completely misleading idea, to apply here the either/ or mode.
    This either/or idea has caused all kinds of useless arguments and debates because the subject this is all about is not structured like either /or at all. I – adore Habermas, not least, because he has solved this core problem of Western thinking – and in such a beautiful and clear way! Our individual and our social self spring from the same origin and are thus internally and substantially related (which is NOT to say, they are the same…). –

    Seen from this perspective, Wolfe was quite good at insisting on the importance of Everett – and to put down Chomskys approach, which is – seen through the eyes of – – – Jürgen Habermas – – – just this: To separate Husserl’s life-world (= a more elaborate version of Marx’ historical materialism) and therewith to separate experience from – his clean world of the laboratory (or pure theory), in which he indeed reigns.

    Wolfe knew perfectly well, that this kind of absolutism, which Chomsky could perform on the basis of the separation of the life world of (dirty, unclear, chaotic) from the world of – – – linguistic science – – – is just one more example for the empty triumphalism of The Emperor’s New Clothes. – Since you have made the clothes-connection to Wolfe and Talese already, I don’t have to elaborate more on this subject. Chomsky’s lack of taste not least concerning clothes might be read as a reality-symbol (Ernst Bloch) for his pseudo-materialism (= utter linguistic lack of social experience).

    PS

    Hard for Everett, that Wolfe’s version of Everett’s Piraha-experience is much (!) better than his own book. Nobody beats Wolfe is making a story sound interesting – and fun! And nobody beats him in condensing stories to the perfect degree. As I said, that’s really hard.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  116. @Nicholas Stix

    Dylan wrote a song about Joey Gallo, the Mafioso murdered in “The Irishman” (although, not by the guy shown in “The Irishman,” who was just a BSer looking for a book contract).

    • Replies: @black sea
  117. Bitfu says:
    @Jane Plain

    Reductio Ad Traumanym: I suffered a trauma. Therefore, ALL of my views on this subject are correct.

  118. black sea says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Joey Gallo was something of a hipster anti-hero, though of course a brutal psychopath when you stripped away whatever rebel-poet fantasies people had about him. The fact that he looked like Hollywood’s idea of a mobster leading man must’ve helped. Gallo also tried to racially integrate organized crime gangs, though I don’t know if this payed a role in his rise to demi-celebrity status.

    Dylan had a penchant for mythologizing nasty people.

    • Agree: Nicholas Stix
  119. @Reg Cæsar

    Whiskey alert? Are you saying I’m his sock puppet? That’s beneath you.

    I brought up the Williams/Wideman business because it’s kinda depressing. It seems to me that intelligent black writers spend an awful lot of time trying to explain away black misbehavior.

    I don’t comment here a lot, but when I do it’s to point out something I think is missing, or wrong. The little boys who predominate here react like hurt babies.

    IRL I’m no liberal.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  120. @res

    Of course, the Till murder was huge news. When it happened. Then it dropped down the memory hole only to be revived recently. As Steve Sailer keeps pointing out. This is correct.

    So, this notorious murder makes worldwide headlines, and what’s on the cover? You’ve inadvertently proven my point.

    BTW, one good picture deserves another. This is what shocked people.

    And it wasn’t just Till that caused the earthquake in the US. It was the way white Southerners behaved since 1860: stubborn, arrogant, self-righteous and vicious. The 1960s was in many ways a replay of the Civil War, when a bunch of arrogant Southern cotton kings decided they were going to have things their way because King Cotton. That didn’t happen. It’s because of their arrogance that we’re in this fix.

    • Replies: @res
  121. @Alden

    She was 72 and did recant.

    https://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/emmett-accuser-exaggerated-claims-led-lynching-article-1.2957336

    She said on the stand that he grabbed and threatened her and said that he’d fucked a white woman.

    That didn’t happen.

    He probably looked at her, maybe said something and that drove her nuts and her being nuts drove her husband nuts. Women do that.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  122. @anon

    So sure of that?

    Maybe his mom sent him to MS because she thought it a more wholesome environment than Chicago.

    So, she tries to do a good thing and gets posthumously slammed? Can’t black people do anything without you interpreting it maliciously?

  123. @Harry Baldwin

    My recollection is that Till bragged that he had a white girl in Chicago and passed around a photograph.

    On a dare from his negro cousins, he went into the store and asked the white clerk, Carolyn, for a date, and put his hands on her waist. Her sister in law ran him off with a pistol.

    Both women agreed to keep the incident secret, to avoid their husbands doing anything rash. Ironically, the blacks who witnessed the assault spread the story, and that’s how it got to the husbands.

    The story was previously sanitized to “whistling at a white woman.” However, now, whistling at ANY woman is considered a heinous act of sexism, so that had to be changed to”falsely accused of flirting with a white woman.”

    Interesting side note: Till’s father was hanged by the US Army in Italy for the rape and murder of a local woman.

  124. @Dieter Kief

    the Friedrich-Schiller (and JWv Goethe-) claim of art as essentially playful – and therewith humanizing

    As a teen, I owned a copy of Huizenga’s Homo Ludens. I didn’t get that far into it, but found the theme fascinating. Alan Watts did the same with metaphysics.

    Language serves both purposes: It does índividualize us and at the same time – socializes us. –

    Churchill on architecture: “We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us.”

    http://www.fengshuilondon.net/feng-shui-books-reviews/we-shape-our-buildings-thereafter-they-shape-us-winston-churchills-thinking-and-meaning-behind-it

    Nobody beats Wolfe is making a story sound interesting

    McWhorter comes close. Especially considering the dryness of the topic– linguistic evolution. He makes a good case that the oddities of English– Why do we speak this way? What were we thinking?– bled into the language from Welsh and Cornish, where they’re normal.

    But because the Brythonic Celts were in a degraded position– as were Anglophones themselves in the Norman period– none of this change got captured in writing until it was complete. He compares it to the long coexistence of blacks and whites in the US South, and their mutual influence. (That this is the only time McWhorter, “who is black”, brings up race is itself amazing.)

    The last chapter covers informed speculation that Phoenicians made their way to the North Sea 2500 or so years ago, and this can explain phenomena in proto-Germanic which are similarly odd by Indo-European standards, but normal in Semitic languages. After a few pages in the fashion of his Welsh argument, he gives full credit to Theo Vennemann for this theory.

    Now I want to go watch that LangFocus video suggesting links between Celtic and Semitic.

  125. @Jane Plain

    Whiskey alert? Are you saying I’m his sock puppet?

    No, I was just alerting him and his fans.

    But really, you’d think a prison psychiatrist would be the last to go for an inmate. Not so.

  126. res says:
    @Jane Plain

    So, this notorious murder makes worldwide headlines, and what’s on the cover? You’ve inadvertently proven my point.

    You saw the cover text, right?

    “The shocking story of APPROVED KILLING IN MISSISSIPPI”

    I can understand using a picture of pretty girls on the cover instead, but the text about Till is there. How many articles were in that issue?

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
  127. MEH 0910 says:

    The American Conservative:

    Leftists Attack The ‘1619 Project’
    Rod Dreher
    November 29, 2019

    ‘1619 Project’ originator Nikole Hannah-Jones got generous national attention to what three top historians say is largely bunk

  128. @Nicholas Stix

    That video ended inconclusively.

    The Donham family never followed up the charge in any serious way, did they?

    Do you have anything further on the story?

    Again, to repeat, because you’re awfully slow, the then Mrs. Bryant testified that he grabbed her and spoke lasciviously to her. Somehow she managed to free herself from his paralyzing grip and ran to her car to get a gun.

    That never happened, and that’s all we know.

    I think the sanest interpretation is that, being new to the area, he didn’t realize that he was dealing with a white Southern woman, and he got a little fresh.

    Yes, the left is squeezing as much as they can from this crime because they know how to win a power struggle and the right (made up of guys like you) do not. You never miss an opportunity to miss an opportunity.

    You are obliging them by acting like a dope.

  129. @res

    Oh Lord, give me patience.

    The picture of the pretty girls took precedence over a lynching.

    If you can’t get what that means, you’re even more far gone than I thought.

    Honestly, the guys here give racists a bad name.

    • Replies: @res
  130. @Nicholas Stix

    This is a much better account:

    https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/2018/08/21/emmett-till-carolyn-bryant-donham-recant-quote-missing/1017876002/

    But I’m confused by this:

    “In 1955, she took the witness stand to testify, and the judge concluded her testimony was inadmissible.”

    I wonder why. Perhaps Jack D can help us on this.

    Because she was so unreliable that her direct testimony would not have been credible?

    In any case legally it doesn’t matter what she said. Her testimony was inadmissible.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  131. GFHÄNDEL says:
    @Kratoklastes

    “The mass of Jews, gays, blacks, and women are out from under, and that’s a good thing. They’re smart enough to know that they’re happier as things are now, than they would have been even as little as 30 years ago.”

    That such a smart chap can generate a paragraph of this kind. It gives me brief solace for not being as smart as you.

  132. @Jane Plain

    The story Mrs. Bryant told in court was common knowledge long before the trial, and which she had sought to suppress, in order to save Till.

    Her credibility is fine. Timothy Tyson’s, on the other hand, had been dubious before this hoax.
    https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/till-killers-confession/

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
  133. It’s amusing to watch educated liberal White women, grovel.

  134. @Nicholas Stix

    “The story Mrs. Bryant told in court was common knowledge long before the trial, and which she had sought to suppress, in order to save Till.”

    I’m very happy guys like you weren’t in charge of crafting our legal system.

    She changed her story several times, and a judge, no doubt sympathetic to the prosecution, ruled it inadmissible.

    Crawl away, Nick.

    You’ve lost.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
  135. res says:
    @Jane Plain

    You start off with (from comment 82):

    But I don’t remember any mention of it in my childhood, and I grew up in the 50s and 60s.

    And I point out that it was mentioned on the cover of a US magazine with circulation in the millions.

    So you move the goalposts to another article taking precedence on the cover.

    I hope there is some patience left for me.

    And what’s with the ad hominem at the end? I generally take that as a sign you have lost the argument. Or as I like to say: Ad hominems, the best way ever to tell someone arguing with you: “you win.”

    P.S. No disagreement that the Till story has become far more publicized in The Current Year, but don’t pretend it was not a big deal when it happened. Can you name any murders that year which were bigger news?

  136. @Jane Plain

    Crawl away, Nick.

    You’ve lost.

    Clearly he’s just not in your league insofar as facts, reason, and argumentation. He has no knowledge or experience with negro criminality and must bow before you.

    But that’s not why I am replying, no it isn’t. I’m here to ask what I know every other commenter and reader is too timid to ask: Won’t you please tell us everything about your hair?

    • Agree: Nicholas Stix
    • Replies: @Jane Plain
  137. @Stan d Mute

    “Clearly he’s just not in your league insofar as facts, reason, and argumentation. He has no knowledge or experience with negro criminality and must bow before you.”

    Glad you agree. I suggest that both you and he join the bizarre discussion about the aging white woman who got body-slammed by the thuggish Popeye’s employee, and stick up for the lady. A lot of the commenters there are blaming her, for some reason.

    “But that’s not why I am replying, no it isn’t. I’m here to ask what I know every other commenter and reader is too timid to ask: Won’t you please tell us everything about your hair?”

    It’s brown with a lot of red, blunt cut chin length.

    Do you have any hair left? Tell us about it!

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