The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 iSteve BlogTeasers
New "Decolonized" Map in Boston Public Schools Reveals Tiny Europe Has No Room for Migrants from Giant Africa & Latin America
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments

From The Guardian:

Boston public schools map switch aims to amend 500 years of distortion

A district will drop the Mercator projection, which physically diminished Africa and South America, for the Peters, which cut the developed world down to size

The Gall-Peters projection, which shows land masses in their correct proportions by area, puts the relative sizes of Africa and North America in perspective.

When Boston public schools introduced a new standard map of the world this week, some young students’ felt their jaws drop. In an instant, their view of the world had changed.

Or they could have looked at the globe in their classroom.

The USA was small. Europe too had suddenly shrunk. Africa and South America appeared narrower but also much larger than usual. …

Mercator’s distortions affect continents as well as nations. For example, South America is made to look about the same size as Europe, when in fact it is almost twice as large, and Greenland looks roughly the size of Africa when it is actually about 14 times smaller.

Alaska looks bigger than Mexico and Germany is in the middle of the picture, not to the north – because Mercator moved the equator.

Three days ago, Boston’s public schools began phasing in the lesser-known Peters projection, which cuts the US, Britain and the rest of Europe down to size. …

“This is the start of a three-year effort to decolonize the curriculum in our public schools,” said Colin Rose, assistant superintendent of opportunity and achievement gaps for Boston public schools.

Yup, that’s his job title. Here’s the press release announcing his hiring:

Colin Rose has been appointed Assistant Superintendent of Opportunity and Achievement Gaps for the Boston Public Schools. In his new role, Rose will attack cultural and structural barriers and promote culturally sustaining practices enabling traditionally marginalized students to engage in rigorous curriculums and pedagogy in Boston’s schools, thus creating opportunity and access they need to close performance gaps.

Back to The Guardian:

The district has 125 schools and 57,000 students, 86% of whom are non-white, with the largest groups being Latino and black. After changing the maps, Rose said, educators plan to look at other subjects and shift away from presenting white history as the dominant perspective….

The respective merits of the Mercator and the Peters maps have long been debated. A spirited discussion about their implications even featured on an episode of the West Wing, in which characters argued for the Peters map to be used in US public schools and told the administration the Mercator projection had “fostered European imperialist attitudes for centuries”, creating an “ethical bias” for “western civilization” against the developing world.

Curriculum chiefs consulted map experts at the Boston public library and were directed to ODT, a company in Amherst, Massachusetts, that is the exclusive North American publisher of Peters projection maps.

Can’t get much more multicultural than Amherst, MA.

It doesn’t seem to occur to anybody involved that the Peters Projection demonstrates how there is plenty of land in Africa for Africans and plenty of land in Latin America for Latinos.

So it doesn’t make much sense for African and Latino migrants to overrun the smaller lands of the North.

Are the woke folk really that dumb that they don’t notice this?

Yes.

By the way, why is Boston still in thrall to Northern Supremacism?

 
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>
    []
  1. Steve,

    In a better world, you would have been hired by a variety of smart comedy producers as a writer. I can imagine you and a more open-minded Tina Fey (yeah, I know that you say that she’s more aware than she lets on) would make great comedy music together. Also, you would have been great as a writer for Colin Quinn when he was the SNL Weekend Update guy.

    Are you secretly known/appreciated in that world, i.e. comedy writers, political satire, etc.?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Yeah.

    I'm good at noticing the raw materials of what might be funny, but I'm a tier or two down from professional comedy writers at finishing jokes.

    Real comedy writers are really, really funny.

    , @Lurker
    I'm certain that the "Family Guy" and "American Dad" writers pick up some ideas from Steve.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    http://www.unz.com/isteve/new-decolonized-map-in-boston-public-schools-reveal-europe-has-no-room-for-migrants-from-giant-africa-latin-america/#comment-1807850
    More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. The Mercator projection world map is about to become a form of hate speech.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers
    Make way for obfuscator projection.
    , @Not Raul
    A German cartographer!

    I didn't even know that the Nazis were in charge of cartography back then.

    We need to burn all those Nazi maps now!

    I'm sure ODT will provide the right type of maps at a reasonable price. Monopolies tend to charge reasonable prices, right?
  3. “This is the start of a three-year effort to decolonize the curriculum in our public schools,” said Colin Rose, assistant superintendent of opportunity and achievement gaps for Boston public schools.

    The district has 125 schools and 57,000 students, 86% of whom are non-white, with the largest groups being Latino and black. After changing the maps, Rose said, educators plan to look at other subjects and shift away from presenting white history as the dominant perspective….

    Well, let’s start by “decolonizing” the sciences. From now on, Blacks and Hispanics will no longer be taught things that were invented/discovered by Europeans: Calculus, the Theory of Relativity, Natural Selection, the Double Helix, Maxwell’s Equations, Statistical Mechanics, etc

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    ...no longer be taught things that were invented/discovered by Europeans
     
    I'm sure they will get around to discovering all the "hidden figures" behind the discoveries in the sciences.


    shift away from presenting white history as the dominant perspective….
     
    Note how this goes:

    1) acknowledge that the Other had contributions
    2) agree that the Other had equal contributions
    3) finally realize that the Other was really the best and brightest all along; they built and contributed the most; so just turn it over to them already.
    , @anonymous
    After the 3-year decolonization project has been completed, I guess Colin Rose will have to find a new job?
    , @guest
    You think they're learning all that stuff, anyway? Maybe natural selection, and presumably there are calculus classes. But come on.
    , @AnAnon
    "From now on, Blacks and Hispanics will no longer be taught things that were invented/discovered by Europeans: Calculus, the Theory of Relativity, Natural Selection, the Double Helix, Maxwell’s Equations, Statistical Mechanics, etc" - they are way ahead of you on that.
    , @Lex Corvus
    You kid, but this is already a Thing:

    https://youtu.be/C9SiRNibD14
  4. “Or they could look at the globe in their classroom”

    very good Mr. Sailer!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lugash
    Or Google Earth on their iDevice.
    , @Trelane
    This is what a modern map looks like (use your mouse). The assistant superintendent for nonmeritocratic Boston education is 20 years behind the times.
  5. I’m surprised that in Boston, they could make a map with with such a tiny Ireland.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    I’m surprised that in Boston, they could make a map with with such a tiny Ireland.
     
    Proof that the Irish really are White.
    , @jcd1974
    Public schools are 86% non-white, a legacy of busing and immigration.

    The last time I was in Boston I was surprised by the frequency of which I heard Spanish spoken. Even some of the notices on public transit were bilingual.
    , @Brutusale
    "...tiny Ireland". You have heard of the "Curse of the Irish", right?
  6. In other news: “New Map Projection Reveals How Such A Small Area of the Globe Produced Almost All Scientists and Inventors”

    Read More
  7. The Peterson map makes Europe and North American look much further away from Sub Saharan Africa and South America. This is good. I suggest we put out another map that makes the distance greater and the land now dominated by YT smaller. After all, no person of color would know the difference. Was there an African that knew that Africa was a thing until a white person told him so?

    Read More
  8. You know what they say about guys with big continents . . .

    Seriously, this entire thing is tantamount to dick measuring. If anything, it makes one even more impressed that such a tiny little insignificant island changed the world.

    Read More
  9. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Steve,

    In a better world, you would have been hired by a variety of smart comedy producers as a writer. I can imagine you and a more open-minded Tina Fey (yeah, I know that you say that she's more aware than she lets on) would make great comedy music together. Also, you would have been great as a writer for Colin Quinn when he was the SNL Weekend Update guy.

    Are you secretly known/appreciated in that world, i.e. comedy writers, political satire, etc.?

    Yeah.

    I’m good at noticing the raw materials of what might be funny, but I’m a tier or two down from professional comedy writers at finishing jokes.

    Real comedy writers are really, really funny.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Perhaps. But they're hampered by their environment, and, possibly, their own thoughtcrime minds.

    For example, my wife likes to watch SNL, but I just can't. Even when it's funny, it's completely unoriginal. It's a bit like a really good restaurant that makes only one meal. Sure, they're expert at making that dish, but it gets old eating exact same meal every single night.

    I kind of feel for comedians these days. They won't get sent to the gulag, but they have to know that their careers are toast if they don't stick to the party line. That has to be frustrating for a group that prides itself on being gadflies.
    , @Karl
    11 iSteve > but I’m a tier or two down from professional comedy writers at finishing jokes.

    Waitress, please send a glass of borscht over to Mr Sailer's table, on my tab.
    , @Karl
    11 iSteve > but I’m a tier or two down from professional comedy writers at finishing jokes.

    Waitress, please send a glass of borscht over to Mr Sailer's table, on my tab.
    , @Karl
    11 iSteve > but I’m a tier or two down from professional comedy writers at finishing jokes.

    Waitress, please send a glass of borscht over to Mr Sailer's table, on my tab.
    , @Olorin
    THREE glasses of borscht?

    Take care, host. Someone is trying to rubinate you.

    Oops, I meant rubricate.

    Seriously though, this was a very nice entry in the Progressive Dada Machine files. The ability of the left to draw up short of logical conclusions is an amazing phenomenon. Right up there with other fundamentalists'.

    , @Lagertha
    please don't fuck with our Steve....it is too late.
  10. There has been a picture floating around for a few years that demonstrates that Africa is so large it could contain the entire continental US, all of Europe W of Russia, China, India, Japan, and so on. I will link to the image and then the article containing it in a minute.

    On balance I like the Gall Peters projection but just eyeballing it one can see that it sacrifices reality in its own way. I still think a globe is the way to go, but then again maybe that’s too hard for students to follow. One thing for sure, making Africa huge but slender is not going to be increasing anyone’s sense of self-worth or test scores. IOW, it’s just a PC waste of time.

    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/10/05/article-2445615-188A8AA500000578-349_964x681.jpg

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2445615/True-size-Africa-continent-big-China-India-US-Europe-together.html

    Read More
  11. Three days ago, Boston’s public schools began phasing in the lesser-known Peters projection, which cuts the US, Britain and the rest of Europe down to size.

    The entire purpose of the exercise.

    Of course some smart kids might wonder how the tiny island of Britain was able to colonize most of the continent of Africa and draw their own conclusions.

    Read More
    • Agree: syonredux
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    There was a time when the the sun literally never set on the British Empire. Quite an accomplishment for such a small country.
    , @Frau Katze
    The PTB might find the new map raising all sorts of questions.

    But, on the whole, I doubt it will change anything at all. Africans and South Americans don't seem very good at noticing things like the points you raised.

    If they notice anything at all, it will that those small areas are ripe for plunder.

    Especially once the population of Africa goes through another generation of sky-high increase.
  12. Bo-ring. They had one of those in the classroom when I was a kid and that was some time ago lemmetellya. And it was old then. I remember the legenda included an emotional article, much like this one, about how this was going to make the world better.

    Even then it was agreed upon that this would never catch on because it distorts the real shape of the continents so horribly, which is why we had the old maps in the first place. The “what’s the most acceptable 2d representation of the globe” discussion is very, very old and what we had was the most reasonable compromise.

    In other words, a reheated discussion from the 80s which was a reheated discussion from centuries ago. Yay, news!

    Read More
    • Agree: jtgw
    • Replies: @jtgw
    And they never actually produce evidence that Mercator deliberately designed the map to make Europe look bigger than Africa, or that this projection in any way caused Europe to colonize the Africans. And that's no doubt because there isn't evidence, because the distorted sizes are pure artifacts of the rules of the projection, i.e. to keep angles of latitude on longitude constant, which means that areas appear relatively larger towards the poles. In what way is increasing the relative size of Greenland against Africa supposed to express the superiority of the colonizing powers, when Greenland has never been a colonizer and is indeed still a dependency of Denmark (more or less)?

    Note that the Wikipedia article on the Mercator projection doesn't mention the controversy at all. That is a strong indication that it's total BS, if even Wikipedia's liberal and PC editors don't mention it.
  13. Isn’t anyone here entrepreneurial? Make a world map where Europe (including Russia), Australia and North America are really, really tiny and Asia, Africa and Latin America are huge. Then sell it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @International Jew
    Better yet, make a map with Europe and North America in the wrong places, or missing entirely, and post it all over the Third World.
  14. assistant superintendent of opportunity and achievement gaps

    Make his salary inversely proportionate to the size of the gap and watch the fun begin.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Marty T
    I wonder if the white student population in a district like Boston is bimodal, with some very smart magnet school kids and most of the rest the kind of Southie trash that can't even get into a mediocre Catholic school.
  15. It’s useful to understand how big geographic territories really are. For example, I always thought of Japan as being rather small until I’ve seen it superimposed over maps of Europe and Eastern US.

    Read More
  16. @JohnnyWalker123
    I'm surprised that in Boston, they could make a map with with such a tiny Ireland.

    I’m surprised that in Boston, they could make a map with with such a tiny Ireland.

    Proof that the Irish really are White.

    Read More
  17. @JohnnyWalker123
    I'm surprised that in Boston, they could make a map with with such a tiny Ireland.

    Public schools are 86% non-white, a legacy of busing and immigration.

    The last time I was in Boston I was surprised by the frequency of which I heard Spanish spoken. Even some of the notices on public transit were bilingual.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    In Miami, the signs (and even some of the ads) on buses and trains are trilingual: English, Spanish, and Haitian Creole:
    https://preview.ibb.co/jRDxgF/miami119.jpg

    (Many buses still have these plaques, some 12 years after they were installed to commemorate her death.)

    Years ago, most airport signs were quintilingual: English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, and German:
    https://preview.ibb.co/gaaoov/3472.jpg

    But the newer ones are only bilingual:
    https://preview.ibb.co/fGSJov/2095952.jpg
  18. Europe is really very small. If you leave Paris and fly east for the same distance as San Francisco is from New York, you will fly over 7 or 8 countries and land somewhere in Kazakhstan.

    As for Africa, this map gives you an idea of how enormous it is:

    http://geographical.co.uk/images/articles/opinion/2016/4_Africa_is_big.png

    Read More
  19. @countenance
    The Mercator projection world map is about to become a form of hate speech.

    Make way for obfuscator projection.

    Read More
  20. Speaking of maps and travel….UCLA Bruins next NCAA March Madness game is in Memphis, Tennessee . The problem is that California passed a law banning travel by state schools to states with “Bathroom Laws.” Those are the laws that say you must use a bathroom that matches your gender. They are trying to get around it by saying UCLA didn’t plan this trip. Ok and I say , prove your PC-SJW values and boycott the game. If you can propose to curtail travel to Iowa, you can actually refuse to travel to Tennessee. Years ago the University of Buffalo (pre SUNY system) decided not to play in a football bowl game because of Jim Crow laws at the bowl site. OK, Californians, put your money where your mouth is.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    Joe, are you telling me California instituted a travel ban?
    , @res
    I wonder if the people who planned the schedule realized this. That would be a magnificent troll.
    , @Pericles
    This is worth disseminating to a wider audience. While it appears the law (AB 1887) has exemptions for important stuff like sports, it also appears the NCAA relocated games from North Carolina to more PC locations. So even if UCLA could go, they obviously shouldn't go. Remember, social justice tastes better than winning ever would.

    http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/the-state-worker/article139666758.html

    http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article122451809.html

    http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article104533396.html

    http://www.eqca.org/ab1887-2/
  21. I had a 1926 globe lamp with a World Atlas inserted in the base. The majority of African country names were different from today. Decolonize indeed.

    Read More
  22. @Steve Sailer
    Yeah.

    I'm good at noticing the raw materials of what might be funny, but I'm a tier or two down from professional comedy writers at finishing jokes.

    Real comedy writers are really, really funny.

    Perhaps. But they’re hampered by their environment, and, possibly, their own thoughtcrime minds.

    For example, my wife likes to watch SNL, but I just can’t. Even when it’s funny, it’s completely unoriginal. It’s a bit like a really good restaurant that makes only one meal. Sure, they’re expert at making that dish, but it gets old eating exact same meal every single night.

    I kind of feel for comedians these days. They won’t get sent to the gulag, but they have to know that their careers are toast if they don’t stick to the party line. That has to be frustrating for a group that prides itself on being gadflies.

    Read More
    • Agree: ic1000
    • Replies: @Pericles
    Yeah, SNL is one of those inexplicable shows to a non-American. I've heard it used to be funny in the 70s or something? Regarding comedy, someone said it has changed from the audience laughing at the jokes to the audience clapping at the jokes.

    Hey have you heard the one about DRUMPF, he's stupid amirite? (Standing ovation for five minutes.)
    , @Anonymous
    I don't really feel sorry for comedians. They thought they were much smarter than ol' Ma and Pa Kettle, the White people they liked to sneer at.
  23. God help this pathetic country.

    Read More
    • Agree: Kyle McKenna
    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    You're just noticing that.

    I'm literally trying to figure out what country my kids should emigrate to when they are adults. Ten years ago, I would have laughed my ass off at such a thought.
  24. The 57,000 students comprise only 8.5% of the population of Boston, yet the public school budget eats up 35% of the city’s total budget.

    Despite this, the city plans a few initiatives for next year, including 1 million dollars directed to the needs of the alleged 2,500-3,000 homeless students in the system. This money can be used for a variety of purposes, including “establishing a clothes closet, food pantry or supply of hygiene items or providing a stipend to an existing staff member to give direct support to a homeless student and their family” (Bay State Banner, 2/01/17), i.e. rent, transportation, etc.. Because, of course, the city and state don’t offer any such types of assistance/sarc.

    This BPS program will be run by a freshly hired Director of the newly created Opportunity Youth Dept., which has been delegated in the hierarchy to the Office of Socioemotional Learning and Wellness. What, no love for the new(ish) Dept. of Opportunity and Achievement Gaps?!

    Read More
  25. The new map might cause some to ponder what qualities the people of a relatively small area possessed that have allowed them to dominate the much larger parts of the globe. Could be a triggering event.

    Read More
  26. @anony-mouse
    Isn't anyone here entrepreneurial? Make a world map where Europe (including Russia), Australia and North America are really, really tiny and Asia, Africa and Latin America are huge. Then sell it.

    Better yet, make a map with Europe and North America in the wrong places, or missing entirely, and post it all over the Third World.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Kind of like the maps that the Russians used to publish during the Cold War.

    Or even today if you go to China with an American GPS device, everything is several blocks off even if you have the Chinese map files (rendering the device worthless) - the Chinese intentionally obfuscate their map coordinates vs. the GPS system.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restrictions_on_geographic_data_in_China#GCJ-02

    Meanwhile, the Soviets made (it's not clear how) incredibly detailed maps of the US down to the building level. Google them - they are fantastic. Not just military sites but EVERYTHING is shown. Everything you would have needed to occupy the country. They are as good as Google maps are today. The effort involved would have been enormous.

    , @Tom-in-VA
    That's so crazy it just might work!
  27. Since many of your USian children now play soccer, and many of the rest play basketball, surely you should just print maps of the world on all those: kickable, throwable globes. Job done.

    Read More
  28. @Jack D
    Europe is really very small. If you leave Paris and fly east for the same distance as San Francisco is from New York, you will fly over 7 or 8 countries and land somewhere in Kazakhstan.

    As for Africa, this map gives you an idea of how enormous it is:

    http://geographical.co.uk/images/articles/opinion/2016/4_Africa_is_big.png

    Is that truly accurate?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Yes, absolutely. Mind boggling, isn't it?

    The area of Africa is 11.73 million mi².

    The area of the continental US is 3.12 million mi²

    The area of China is 3.80 million mi²

    The area of India is 1.27 million mi², etc.

    The driving distance from Tangier to Cape Town is 7,300 miles. From Anchorage, Alaska to Mexico City it's only 4,800 miles.
  29. Poor Antartica, still so oppressed by even the Peters projection that it’s not even on the map!

    Read More
  30. It’s not the square mileage they need it’s the inherent ‘magicness’ of our Northern dirt they so desperately want.

    Read More
  31. I recently read that Greenland was the third largest country in the North American continent, ahead of Mexico. The book was “Adventures in the Arctic” by Peter Freuchen’s wife. Like Pluto, I see Greenland has been demoted. Greenland shines boldly on a Mercator map. The book was written 50 or so years ago so it could be that the demotion was based on science. Or it could be from a nefarious lobbying effort by Mexico.

    The land mass that still strikes me, no matter how the map is presented, is Siberia with 7,510,000 square miles (of mostly open wilderness).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    This is true and not just a result of map projections. Unfortunately, most of Greenland is covered in ice, so the land is worthless. We need some global warming so that Greenland can be green again the way it was when the Vikings named it.
  32. @countenance
    The Mercator projection world map is about to become a form of hate speech.

    A German cartographer!

    I didn’t even know that the Nazis were in charge of cartography back then.

    We need to burn all those Nazi maps now!

    I’m sure ODT will provide the right type of maps at a reasonable price. Monopolies tend to charge reasonable prices, right?

    Read More
  33. Even if (as Steve points out) all Boston school globes have always provided the true relative sizes of continents, they still put the Black Man down!

    How?

    They put giant Africa on the BOTTOM of the globe, way down where you can’t see it unless you bend way over.

    And don’t tell me that was “accidental”, either. We know what the Blue-Eyed Devil is up to!

    I want Boston to start the “Global” Revolution by ordering globes with the South Pole (and Africa) ON TOP!

    Yeah! Damn straight! Let the white man get a taste of his OWN medicine! Free the Globes!

    Read More
  34. @Buffalo Joe
    Speaking of maps and travel....UCLA Bruins next NCAA March Madness game is in Memphis, Tennessee . The problem is that California passed a law banning travel by state schools to states with "Bathroom Laws." Those are the laws that say you must use a bathroom that matches your gender. They are trying to get around it by saying UCLA didn't plan this trip. Ok and I say , prove your PC-SJW values and boycott the game. If you can propose to curtail travel to Iowa, you can actually refuse to travel to Tennessee. Years ago the University of Buffalo (pre SUNY system) decided not to play in a football bowl game because of Jim Crow laws at the bowl site. OK, Californians, put your money where your mouth is.

    Joe, are you telling me California instituted a travel ban?

    Read More
  35. @kihowi
    Bo-ring. They had one of those in the classroom when I was a kid and that was some time ago lemmetellya. And it was old then. I remember the legenda included an emotional article, much like this one, about how this was going to make the world better.

    Even then it was agreed upon that this would never catch on because it distorts the real shape of the continents so horribly, which is why we had the old maps in the first place. The "what's the most acceptable 2d representation of the globe" discussion is very, very old and what we had was the most reasonable compromise.

    In other words, a reheated discussion from the 80s which was a reheated discussion from centuries ago. Yay, news!

    And they never actually produce evidence that Mercator deliberately designed the map to make Europe look bigger than Africa, or that this projection in any way caused Europe to colonize the Africans. And that’s no doubt because there isn’t evidence, because the distorted sizes are pure artifacts of the rules of the projection, i.e. to keep angles of latitude on longitude constant, which means that areas appear relatively larger towards the poles. In what way is increasing the relative size of Greenland against Africa supposed to express the superiority of the colonizing powers, when Greenland has never been a colonizer and is indeed still a dependency of Denmark (more or less)?

    Note that the Wikipedia article on the Mercator projection doesn’t mention the controversy at all. That is a strong indication that it’s total BS, if even Wikipedia’s liberal and PC editors don’t mention it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alfa158
    The Mercator projection was used purely because of its usefulness as a navigation tool. If you draw a line between two points, and measure the angle you can hold that heading ( rhumb line or constant heading) through the whole voyage to your destination. The northern hemisphere was exaggerated in size relative to the southern, because more navigation was being done in the northern oceans. Modern navigation systems are now accurate enough to use great circle routes that get you there in the shortest distance but require precise knowledge of your position because you have to continuously change your heading dependent on where you. are. My father in law brought back US Navy maps from WWII that were made before the war and used a weird looking great circle projection I haven't seen anywhere else. They allowed the Navy to navigate the shorter routes. It is fun looking at those maps and ferreting out the little dots like Tarawa and Bikini Island and Guadalcanal that were insignificant when the maps were drawn, but loom in our history now.
    With the Mercator though, no one was intentionally trying to use maps to make the north look more important. Northern people were able to do that just fine through their accomplishments.
  36. They should have replaced the Mercator with an authentic Sub-Saharan projection: a flat stretch of sand with lines drawn by a stick representing “us”, “the beyond-the-hill people” and “the far-far-away people.”

    Read More
  37. @EmpireOfLies
    God help this pathetic country.

    You’re just noticing that.

    I’m literally trying to figure out what country my kids should emigrate to when they are adults. Ten years ago, I would have laughed my ass off at such a thought.

    Read More
  38. @Ripple Earthdevil
    Is that truly accurate?

    Yes, absolutely. Mind boggling, isn’t it?

    The area of Africa is 11.73 million mi².

    The area of the continental US is 3.12 million mi²

    The area of China is 3.80 million mi²

    The area of India is 1.27 million mi², etc.

    The driving distance from Tangier to Cape Town is 7,300 miles. From Anchorage, Alaska to Mexico City it’s only 4,800 miles.

    Read More
  39. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    You're just noticing that.

    I'm literally trying to figure out what country my kids should emigrate to when they are adults. Ten years ago, I would have laughed my ass off at such a thought.

    Uruguay is pretty lit.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Yeah. I've heard that before. I think the Derb mentioned it first.

    Was thinking New Zealand or Australia, but they seem infected by the same disease, just a generation or so behind us. Maybe they'll wake up before it's too late. Not having a very long land border with a 2nd world country is a big advantage.
  40. Massachusetts is a pretty white state, so if 86% of the school kids in Boston are non-white, then there’s really no hope. It’s really over for white people in America. They just have to wait a little while longer for the old white folks to die and then it’s theirs. I’m sure they will turn it to sh*t like every other non-white country outside of E. Asia, but it’s over, I’m sad to say. I don’t want to sound doom and gloomish, but facts are facts.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Joe Walker
    I think it is 86% of the kids in Boston public schools who are non-white. Most of the Boston white kids would go to private schools.
    , @Triumph104
    There are 77,900 school-age children living in Boston: 56,650 attend Boston Public School and the rest, 20,780, attend private, parochial, public charter, out-of-district schools, or are home-schooled.

    Boston Public Schools (56,650)
    41% Hispanic
    35% Black
    14% White
    9% Asian
    1% Other/Multiracial

    Students who do not attend BPS (20,780)
    45% Black
    30% White
    18% Hispanic
    4% Asian
    4% Other

    http://www.bostonpublicschools.org/cms/lib07/MA01906464/Centricity/Domain/4/BPS%20at%20a%20Glance%2015-1109.pdf
    , @DerSohndesAllvaters
    That is pretty much my prognosis. The baby boomers are going to have one helluva time in the old folks home.
    , @MBlanc46
    Whites have decided to not reproduce at even the replacement rate. So have the Japs. I suspect that the Han Chinese won't be far behind. I feel a certain pity for the blacks and browns who will inherit the Earth from us but without us. But not much.
  41. Once they’ve done with a deployment of the new “decolonized” maps, issuing some 5-6 billions of Self-Esteem Passports should be next logical step:

    http://www.odt.org/SelfEsteemPassport.htm

    Read More
  42. @JohnnyWalker123
    I'm surprised that in Boston, they could make a map with with such a tiny Ireland.

    “…tiny Ireland”. You have heard of the “Curse of the Irish”, right?

    Read More
  43. The Peters projection makes this headline even more amazing.

    “Norway displaced Denmark as the world’s happiest country” …

    Denmark, Iceland, Switzerland, Finland, Netherlands, Canada, New Zealand, Australia and Sweden rounded out the top ten countries.”

    More of that Magic Dirt.

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/norway-unseats-denmark-worlds-happiest-country-report-060821781.html

    Read More
  44. Africa is 20.4% of the entire land surface of the Earth. But, if you were to take out places that are not habitable like Antarctica, Greenland, Siberia, and Northern Canada, Africa might be as much as 45% of the habitable land (Just a guess).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    A big chunk of Africa is uninhabitable, but the sub-Saharan area is really immense.
  45. @Name Withheld
    Africa is 20.4% of the entire land surface of the Earth. But, if you were to take out places that are not habitable like Antarctica, Greenland, Siberia, and Northern Canada, Africa might be as much as 45% of the habitable land (Just a guess).

    A big chunk of Africa is uninhabitable, but the sub-Saharan area is really immense.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    So why is Rwanda so crowded?

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/africa-up-in-smoke/

    That was a cause of the genocide, according to Jared Diamond in his book "Collapse."
    , @Anonymous
    With the price of solar cells tumbling - electricity generated from solar arrays is now cheaper than energy produced by conventional means, the desert nations of the Sahara are sitting on a potential gold mine, with 'clean' power hungry Europe on their doorstop.

    Only trouble is no one trusts the Magrehbis to be honorable with their energy once they've got the upper hand, so to speak.
  46. @International Jew
    Better yet, make a map with Europe and North America in the wrong places, or missing entirely, and post it all over the Third World.

    Kind of like the maps that the Russians used to publish during the Cold War.

    Or even today if you go to China with an American GPS device, everything is several blocks off even if you have the Chinese map files (rendering the device worthless) – the Chinese intentionally obfuscate their map coordinates vs. the GPS system.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restrictions_on_geographic_data_in_China#GCJ-02

    Meanwhile, the Soviets made (it’s not clear how) incredibly detailed maps of the US down to the building level. Google them – they are fantastic. Not just military sites but EVERYTHING is shown. Everything you would have needed to occupy the country. They are as good as Google maps are today. The effort involved would have been enormous.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    The things we learn on iSteve...

    https://www.wired.com/2015/07/secret-cold-war-maps/
    https://www.sovietmaps.com/
    https://www.amazon.com/Red-Atlas-Soviet-Secretly-Mapped/dp/022638957X

    Thanks, Jack!
    , @utu
    Soviet maps... Fascinating! Thanks.
    , @utu
    Soviet maps... Fascinating! Thanks.
  47. @newrouter
    "Or they could look at the globe in their classroom"

    very good Mr. Sailer!

    Or Google Earth on their iDevice.

    Read More
  48. @jJay
    I recently read that Greenland was the third largest country in the North American continent, ahead of Mexico. The book was "Adventures in the Arctic" by Peter Freuchen's wife. Like Pluto, I see Greenland has been demoted. Greenland shines boldly on a Mercator map. The book was written 50 or so years ago so it could be that the demotion was based on science. Or it could be from a nefarious lobbying effort by Mexico.

    The land mass that still strikes me, no matter how the map is presented, is Siberia with 7,510,000 square miles (of mostly open wilderness).

    This is true and not just a result of map projections. Unfortunately, most of Greenland is covered in ice, so the land is worthless. We need some global warming so that Greenland can be green again the way it was when the Vikings named it.

    Read More
  49. This is so dumb. England pretty much dominated the world at one point, despite being just a small island.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    England is very small indeed. It's smaller than Iowa, for example. The whole UK is smaller than Colorado.

    The accomplishments of the people inhabiting such a limited area really are remarkable.

    , @Anonymous
    It's not just that England is small. Their population was not very large either. In 1775, it is estimated there were 8 million people in the United Kingdom. I think that included Ireland. France had 24 million at that time.

    So for a small nation with a small population to exert that much control is indeed impressive.
  50. Boston Public Schools — Facts and Figures — reading between the lines and spotting the left-handed compliments they give themselves is (largely) left as an exercise — but here are a few small hints to get you started: Boston students’ performance is on par with the national average for all public schoolsOur 2015 4-year graduation rate of 70.7 percent was the highest it has ever been — etc — per their own demographic data, BPS is 42% Hispanic and 35% Black.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ed
    The Latinization of Boston & parts of New England is one of the least commented upon demographic shifts in the country.

    I guess it's because white liberals that dominate find it just glorious openly and are removed from its impact
  51. @International Jew
    Better yet, make a map with Europe and North America in the wrong places, or missing entirely, and post it all over the Third World.

    That’s so crazy it just might work!

    Read More
  52. OT: What do you make of TNC cutting his multi-thousand $ speech early and requesting granola bars?

    His contract for the engagement, which also outlines reimbursements for travel, lodging and a request for Nature Valley Oats ‘n’ Dark Chocolate Granola Bars, was approved by both parties in April 2016.

    http://www.dailyemerald.com/2017/03/10/ta-nehisi-coates-41500-uo-speech-ended-early/

    Maybe this is why tuition is out of control?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    He can't afford to buy his own granola bars?
    , @Ferdinand Vanhalen
    The Nature Valley brand isn't really exorbitant, just $10 at Amazon for a box of a dozen; as a performer condition it's certainly easier discharged than having to remove all the green M&Ms. So if that's the worst contract rider they could find on him... OTOH, it's not very Black(tm) either. The problematic ramifications of Ta and his consumption of granola bars could surely serve as media grist until the next time, I dunno, when Apple releases a phone, or Kellyanne Conway does something
  53. Geez, that’s a stupid projection to use. When I was a kid half a century ago we had the Mercator projection in the classroom and also the Goode projection. The Goode projection cuts the earth into regional section like pieces of orange peel. Imagine taking that globe, cutting out sections of the surface around the continents and leaving the out flat.It leaves blank gaps between the sections but more accurately represents the relative sizes while leaving the shapes closer to true. This new one totally distorts the shape of everything.

    Read More
  54. @Boomstick
    https://xkcd.com/977/

    I might be being dense here, but why “I Hate You” for the Gall-Peters projection?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Boomstick
    Peter's projection was from the start SJW fodder when he introduced/used it circa 1973. It's been annoying progressive lecturing from the beginning.
  55. @Buffalo Joe
    Speaking of maps and travel....UCLA Bruins next NCAA March Madness game is in Memphis, Tennessee . The problem is that California passed a law banning travel by state schools to states with "Bathroom Laws." Those are the laws that say you must use a bathroom that matches your gender. They are trying to get around it by saying UCLA didn't plan this trip. Ok and I say , prove your PC-SJW values and boycott the game. If you can propose to curtail travel to Iowa, you can actually refuse to travel to Tennessee. Years ago the University of Buffalo (pre SUNY system) decided not to play in a football bowl game because of Jim Crow laws at the bowl site. OK, Californians, put your money where your mouth is.

    I wonder if the people who planned the schedule realized this. That would be a magnificent troll.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    res, Sadly, the NCAA cancelled tournament games scheduled for North Carolina
  56. @jtgw
    And they never actually produce evidence that Mercator deliberately designed the map to make Europe look bigger than Africa, or that this projection in any way caused Europe to colonize the Africans. And that's no doubt because there isn't evidence, because the distorted sizes are pure artifacts of the rules of the projection, i.e. to keep angles of latitude on longitude constant, which means that areas appear relatively larger towards the poles. In what way is increasing the relative size of Greenland against Africa supposed to express the superiority of the colonizing powers, when Greenland has never been a colonizer and is indeed still a dependency of Denmark (more or less)?

    Note that the Wikipedia article on the Mercator projection doesn't mention the controversy at all. That is a strong indication that it's total BS, if even Wikipedia's liberal and PC editors don't mention it.

    The Mercator projection was used purely because of its usefulness as a navigation tool. If you draw a line between two points, and measure the angle you can hold that heading ( rhumb line or constant heading) through the whole voyage to your destination. The northern hemisphere was exaggerated in size relative to the southern, because more navigation was being done in the northern oceans. Modern navigation systems are now accurate enough to use great circle routes that get you there in the shortest distance but require precise knowledge of your position because you have to continuously change your heading dependent on where you. are. My father in law brought back US Navy maps from WWII that were made before the war and used a weird looking great circle projection I haven’t seen anywhere else. They allowed the Navy to navigate the shorter routes. It is fun looking at those maps and ferreting out the little dots like Tarawa and Bikini Island and Guadalcanal that were insignificant when the maps were drawn, but loom in our history now.
    With the Mercator though, no one was intentionally trying to use maps to make the north look more important. Northern people were able to do that just fine through their accomplishments.

    Read More
    • Agree: Foreign Expert
    • Replies: @jJay
    The northern hemisphere was exaggerated in size relative to the southern, because more navigation was being done in the northern oceans.

    I'm calling bullshit on that. Why was the size of the mostly uncharted southern hemisphere equally exaggerated?
    , @Jack D
    Mercator doesn't exaggerate the Northern Hemisphere vs. the Southern. Rather it exaggerates the polar regions in relation to the equatorial.

    Here are Tissot's indicators applied to the Mercator projection.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/87/Tissot_mercator.png

    If a projection is accurate, then the circles would all be the same size and round. You can see that the Mercator enlarges the polar regions.

    Here is the Peters:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gall%E2%80%93Peters_projection#/media/File:Tissot_indicatrix_world_map_Gall-Peters_equal-area_proj.svg

    It does a good job with area but it distorts the shapes - equatorial regions are stretched vertically and polar regions are stretched horizontally.

    There is no perfect map projection because it's impossible to project a spherical object onto a rectangular grid.

    , @Smokestack Lightning

    My father in law brought back US Navy maps from WWII that were made before the war and used a weird looking great circle projection I haven’t seen anywhere else. They allowed the Navy to navigate the shorter routes.
     
    Those maps probably used the gnomonic projection. A gnomonic map projection displays all great circles as straight lines, resulting in any straight line segment on a gnomonic map showing the shortest route between the segment's two endpoints.

    I've seen some gnomonic maps. With a gnomonic map extending from Japan to the U.S. West Coast, for example, a navigator could use a straightedge to draw a line from Tokyo to San Francisco, and that line would represent a great circle route, or the shortest distance between the two ports.
  57. 1. The Gall-Peters projection looks kinda droopy and sad.

    2. My math instincts might be off, but it strikes me that if you latitudinally (horizontally) expanded the Gall-Peters map by, say, 50%, you’d still preserve the area relationships.

    3. A globe with removable countries stuck on like refrigerator magnets would be a good idea. It would make it easy to compare the areas of countries and regions. Of course, schoolkids would lose or hide all the pieces.

    4. That Aussie map of the world actually seems to have gotten the relative areas of countries and continents right, albeit exaggerating the size of Australia itself somewhat.

    5. The Boston Schools should have hired this Colin Rose. He might actually have made a difference.

    http://www.howtolearn.com/experts/colin-rose/

    Read More
  58. @Jack D
    Kind of like the maps that the Russians used to publish during the Cold War.

    Or even today if you go to China with an American GPS device, everything is several blocks off even if you have the Chinese map files (rendering the device worthless) - the Chinese intentionally obfuscate their map coordinates vs. the GPS system.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restrictions_on_geographic_data_in_China#GCJ-02

    Meanwhile, the Soviets made (it's not clear how) incredibly detailed maps of the US down to the building level. Google them - they are fantastic. Not just military sites but EVERYTHING is shown. Everything you would have needed to occupy the country. They are as good as Google maps are today. The effort involved would have been enormous.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    res,

    I was going to follow Jack D's suggestion of googling about the Soviet maps but you saved me the trouble.

    Thanks Jack D and thank you, res.

    It's really amazing what the Soviets did at that time.
  59. @syonredux

    “This is the start of a three-year effort to decolonize the curriculum in our public schools,” said Colin Rose, assistant superintendent of opportunity and achievement gaps for Boston public schools.
     

    The district has 125 schools and 57,000 students, 86% of whom are non-white, with the largest groups being Latino and black. After changing the maps, Rose said, educators plan to look at other subjects and shift away from presenting white history as the dominant perspective….
     
    Well, let's start by "decolonizing" the sciences. From now on, Blacks and Hispanics will no longer be taught things that were invented/discovered by Europeans: Calculus, the Theory of Relativity, Natural Selection, the Double Helix, Maxwell's Equations, Statistical Mechanics, etc

    …no longer be taught things that were invented/discovered by Europeans

    I’m sure they will get around to discovering all the “hidden figures” behind the discoveries in the sciences.

    shift away from presenting white history as the dominant perspective….

    Note how this goes:

    1) acknowledge that the Other had contributions
    2) agree that the Other had equal contributions
    3) finally realize that the Other was really the best and brightest all along; they built and contributed the most; so just turn it over to them already.

    Read More
  60. @Anon
    "Money, that's what I want"

    World Map by wealth:

    http://www.worldmapper.org/images/largepng/169.png

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FiKWOt-8Qzc

    Read More
  61. @res
    I wonder if the people who planned the schedule realized this. That would be a magnificent troll.

    res, Sadly, the NCAA cancelled tournament games scheduled for North Carolina

    Read More
  62. @Jack D
    Massachusetts is a pretty white state, so if 86% of the school kids in Boston are non-white, then there's really no hope. It's really over for white people in America. They just have to wait a little while longer for the old white folks to die and then it's theirs. I'm sure they will turn it to sh*t like every other non-white country outside of E. Asia, but it's over, I'm sad to say. I don't want to sound doom and gloomish, but facts are facts.

    I think it is 86% of the kids in Boston public schools who are non-white. Most of the Boston white kids would go to private schools.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    See Triumph's numbers. There are about 7,800 white kids in the public schools plus another 6,200 in the private schools (which is not most). So the 14,000 total white kids are a whopping 18% of the total # of kids rather than 14% of the public school student. In other words, we are still really f*cked.
    , @Brutusale
    Well, 2,400 mostly whites and Asians are hiding out at Boston Latin.
  63. @Brutusale
    "...tiny Ireland". You have heard of the "Curse of the Irish", right?

    Would that be living anywhere near you?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Yeah, I was surrounded by them in my youth, which is why the colleens liked to go big with us Mediterranean types.
  64. Honestly I think these diversity “executives” just come up with this crap to justify their jobs & high salaries.

    They can’t possibly believe any of this will close the so called achievement gap.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    The problem is that this projection just doesn't go far enough. I think they should come up with an even better projection that shows Africa as the center of the universe and completely erases England. Black self esteem will skyrocket and THAT will finally close the gap.
    , @PSR
    Knowing that your job can't possibly ever be successfully done would give a mindless drone a real sense of security, not to mention a stress level of nil.
    , @NOTA
    Suppose you know the gap can't be closed, but it is still your job to do something about the gap. I suppose you'd do cosmetic stuff like this, knowing it wouldn't help but also confident that it would look like something was being done, and also that at least you weren't doing any *harm*. This is probably the best we can hope for from someone with this job.
  65. Years ago my wife, a Travel Agent, taught Travel and Tourism at a local community college. She was discussing international travel, using a world map, and a student said, “Wow, England’s an island.” You wonder how some kids make it through HS.

    Read More
  66. @eah
    Boston Public Schools -- Facts and Figures -- reading between the lines and spotting the left-handed compliments they give themselves is (largely) left as an exercise -- but here are a few small hints to get you started: Boston students’ performance is on par with the national average for all public schools -- Our 2015 4-year graduation rate of 70.7 percent was the highest it has ever been -- etc -- per their own demographic data, BPS is 42% Hispanic and 35% Black.

    The Latinization of Boston & parts of New England is one of the least commented upon demographic shifts in the country.

    I guess it’s because white liberals that dominate find it just glorious openly and are removed from its impact

    Read More
  67. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @syonredux

    “This is the start of a three-year effort to decolonize the curriculum in our public schools,” said Colin Rose, assistant superintendent of opportunity and achievement gaps for Boston public schools.
     

    The district has 125 schools and 57,000 students, 86% of whom are non-white, with the largest groups being Latino and black. After changing the maps, Rose said, educators plan to look at other subjects and shift away from presenting white history as the dominant perspective….
     
    Well, let's start by "decolonizing" the sciences. From now on, Blacks and Hispanics will no longer be taught things that were invented/discovered by Europeans: Calculus, the Theory of Relativity, Natural Selection, the Double Helix, Maxwell's Equations, Statistical Mechanics, etc

    After the 3-year decolonization project has been completed, I guess Colin Rose will have to find a new job?

    Read More
  68. @anonymous
    After the 3-year decolonization project has been completed, I guess Colin Rose will have to find a new job?

    No doubt, The Gap will be all gone by then.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    No comment on the newish BPS super, Tommy Chang, formerly the LAUSD Local Instructional Superintendent, Intensive Support & Innovation Center? Did he do anything for the LA schools worthy of note?
  69. @Alfa158
    The Mercator projection was used purely because of its usefulness as a navigation tool. If you draw a line between two points, and measure the angle you can hold that heading ( rhumb line or constant heading) through the whole voyage to your destination. The northern hemisphere was exaggerated in size relative to the southern, because more navigation was being done in the northern oceans. Modern navigation systems are now accurate enough to use great circle routes that get you there in the shortest distance but require precise knowledge of your position because you have to continuously change your heading dependent on where you. are. My father in law brought back US Navy maps from WWII that were made before the war and used a weird looking great circle projection I haven't seen anywhere else. They allowed the Navy to navigate the shorter routes. It is fun looking at those maps and ferreting out the little dots like Tarawa and Bikini Island and Guadalcanal that were insignificant when the maps were drawn, but loom in our history now.
    With the Mercator though, no one was intentionally trying to use maps to make the north look more important. Northern people were able to do that just fine through their accomplishments.

    The northern hemisphere was exaggerated in size relative to the southern, because more navigation was being done in the northern oceans.

    I’m calling bullshit on that. Why was the size of the mostly uncharted southern hemisphere equally exaggerated?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Most wall maps are centered somewhere in the northern hemisphere because there is more land in the northern hemisphere and more at high latitudes.

    In the 18th Century it was widely assumed that there had to be a giant southern continent to keep the world from tipping over. Enlightenment thinkers assumed that the known map of the world was incorrectly Nordocentric out of local bias. Captain Cook was sent out to discover the vast Southern Continent for Britain, but, while he discovered much, he reported back that most of the Southern Hemisphere was indeed empty ocean.

  70. @res
    The things we learn on iSteve...

    https://www.wired.com/2015/07/secret-cold-war-maps/
    https://www.sovietmaps.com/
    https://www.amazon.com/Red-Atlas-Soviet-Secretly-Mapped/dp/022638957X

    Thanks, Jack!

    res,

    I was going to follow Jack D’s suggestion of googling about the Soviet maps but you saved me the trouble.

    Thanks Jack D and thank you, res.

    It’s really amazing what the Soviets did at that time.

    Read More
  71. This sounds nice in theory: the idea that a Europe pereceived as smaller won’t bear the burden of letting the entire Third World move in with them. But of course England is a teeny tiny country and yet it’s obliged to let all of Africa and Pakistan move in.

    There is no set of circumstances that will be allowed to let the West off the hook.

    Read More
  72. @jJay
    The northern hemisphere was exaggerated in size relative to the southern, because more navigation was being done in the northern oceans.

    I'm calling bullshit on that. Why was the size of the mostly uncharted southern hemisphere equally exaggerated?

    Most wall maps are centered somewhere in the northern hemisphere because there is more land in the northern hemisphere and more at high latitudes.

    In the 18th Century it was widely assumed that there had to be a giant southern continent to keep the world from tipping over. Enlightenment thinkers assumed that the known map of the world was incorrectly Nordocentric out of local bias. Captain Cook was sent out to discover the vast Southern Continent for Britain, but, while he discovered much, he reported back that most of the Southern Hemisphere was indeed empty ocean.

    Read More
  73. @Alfa158
    The Mercator projection was used purely because of its usefulness as a navigation tool. If you draw a line between two points, and measure the angle you can hold that heading ( rhumb line or constant heading) through the whole voyage to your destination. The northern hemisphere was exaggerated in size relative to the southern, because more navigation was being done in the northern oceans. Modern navigation systems are now accurate enough to use great circle routes that get you there in the shortest distance but require precise knowledge of your position because you have to continuously change your heading dependent on where you. are. My father in law brought back US Navy maps from WWII that were made before the war and used a weird looking great circle projection I haven't seen anywhere else. They allowed the Navy to navigate the shorter routes. It is fun looking at those maps and ferreting out the little dots like Tarawa and Bikini Island and Guadalcanal that were insignificant when the maps were drawn, but loom in our history now.
    With the Mercator though, no one was intentionally trying to use maps to make the north look more important. Northern people were able to do that just fine through their accomplishments.

    Mercator doesn’t exaggerate the Northern Hemisphere vs. the Southern. Rather it exaggerates the polar regions in relation to the equatorial.

    Here are Tissot’s indicators applied to the Mercator projection.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/87/Tissot_mercator.png

    If a projection is accurate, then the circles would all be the same size and round. You can see that the Mercator enlarges the polar regions.

    Here is the Peters:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gall%E2%80%93Peters_projection#/media/File:Tissot_indicatrix_world_map_Gall-Peters_equal-area_proj.svg

    It does a good job with area but it distorts the shapes – equatorial regions are stretched vertically and polar regions are stretched horizontally.

    There is no perfect map projection because it’s impossible to project a spherical object onto a rectangular grid.

    Read More
  74. Better yet, make a map with Europe and North America in the wrong places, or missing entirely, and post it all over the Third World.

    Thread-winner.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The Soviet Union's maps of the Soviet Union had distortions like that built in.
  75. @Steve Sailer
    Yeah.

    I'm good at noticing the raw materials of what might be funny, but I'm a tier or two down from professional comedy writers at finishing jokes.

    Real comedy writers are really, really funny.

    11 iSteve > but I’m a tier or two down from professional comedy writers at finishing jokes.

    Waitress, please send a glass of borscht over to Mr Sailer’s table, on my tab.

    Read More
  76. @g-man
    OT: What do you make of TNC cutting his multi-thousand $ speech early and requesting granola bars?

    His contract for the engagement, which also outlines reimbursements for travel, lodging and a request for Nature Valley Oats ‘n’ Dark Chocolate Granola Bars, was approved by both parties in April 2016.

    http://www.dailyemerald.com/2017/03/10/ta-nehisi-coates-41500-uo-speech-ended-early/

    Maybe this is why tuition is out of control?

    He can’t afford to buy his own granola bars?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    It's quite common for contracts for "talent" to include specifications as to snacks, drinks, etc. Part of it is just ego tripping - once you were a nerd who was chased by the neighborhood bullies but now you're a big dick and people will do whatever you ask them. One quart of peeled grapes! Red ones! At room temperature!

    But part of it is practical. You're really not going to fly around the country with a sack of granola bars . Hosts do want to be hospitable and provide refreshments to their guests. Rather than leaving it to guesswork and having the guest end up with something that he detests, specifying the snacks actually makes it easier for both parties.

  77. @res
    I might be being dense here, but why "I Hate You" for the Gall-Peters projection?

    Peter’s projection was from the start SJW fodder when he introduced/used it circa 1973. It’s been annoying progressive lecturing from the beginning.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    Thanks for the background. The wiki has more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gall%E2%80%93Peters_projection

    It is named after James Gall, who is credited with creating the projection in 1855 and who formally published it in 1885,[1] and Arno Peters, who brought the projection to a wider audience beginning in the early 1970s (although he initially claimed to have invented the projection himself; see below for more details). The name "Gall–Peters projection" seems to have been used first by Arthur H. Robinson in a pamphlet put out by the American Cartographic Association in 1986.[2]
    ...
    The Gall-Peters projection achieved considerable notoriety in the late 20th century as the centerpiece of a controversy about the political implications of map design.
     
    Perhaps we should refer to it as "Gall's orthographic projection"? And be sure to remind the SJWs of the attempt at credit stealing.
  78. @JohnnyD
    This is so dumb. England pretty much dominated the world at one point, despite being just a small island.

    England is very small indeed. It’s smaller than Iowa, for example. The whole UK is smaller than Colorado.

    The accomplishments of the people inhabiting such a limited area really are remarkable.

    Read More
    • Replies: @JohnnyD
    ,
    Exactly. It's not the size of your country that matters, it's the accomplishments of your people.
    , @Expletive Deleted
    England proper is the size of Alabama (4.9 mill.), or Denmark (5.75 mill.). It has 54.8 millions (plus an unknown number of EU transients and global illegals). Ten times the density.

    The magicality of the dirt is not in question, as there are no signs of the famine and civil war that such demographics would inevitably engender anywhere else on the globe, even in ethnically and culturally homogenous countries. So why not send a few billion 3rd worlders there? They'll just be swallowed up by the TARDIS-like, spooky little island nation, and disappear from history like the Knights of the Round Table. Problem solved. It's certainly what the rest of Europe believes, particularly the French.

    The rest of Britain is basically uninhabited. Even the supposedly desperate "refugees" complain bitterly about being GuLagged in the rocky, chilly, dark and rain-lashed celtic wastelands, and decamp a.s.a.p. for the fleshpots of Middlesbrough and Slough.
    , @Buck Turgidson
    Nigel Farage may be the UK's Steve King
  79. Can’t get much more multicultural than Amherst, MA.

    Well that’s the plan.

    Who better to rule the world than the deracinated?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ganderson
    Amherst- and all of the four counties of Western MA are more diverse than you'd think. The SJWs don't live near 'me, though.
  80. @Steve Sailer
    Yeah.

    I'm good at noticing the raw materials of what might be funny, but I'm a tier or two down from professional comedy writers at finishing jokes.

    Real comedy writers are really, really funny.

    11 iSteve > but I’m a tier or two down from professional comedy writers at finishing jokes.

    Waitress, please send a glass of borscht over to Mr Sailer’s table, on my tab.

    Read More
  81. World maps in Japan split the earth down the center of the Atlantic (which is quite good because there is a line that cuts no land) and as a result Japan is at the center, where it truly belongs, of course.

    Read More
  82. @Steve Sailer
    Yeah.

    I'm good at noticing the raw materials of what might be funny, but I'm a tier or two down from professional comedy writers at finishing jokes.

    Real comedy writers are really, really funny.

    11 iSteve > but I’m a tier or two down from professional comedy writers at finishing jokes.

    Waitress, please send a glass of borscht over to Mr Sailer’s table, on my tab.

    Read More
  83. @Jack D
    Massachusetts is a pretty white state, so if 86% of the school kids in Boston are non-white, then there's really no hope. It's really over for white people in America. They just have to wait a little while longer for the old white folks to die and then it's theirs. I'm sure they will turn it to sh*t like every other non-white country outside of E. Asia, but it's over, I'm sad to say. I don't want to sound doom and gloomish, but facts are facts.

    There are 77,900 school-age children living in Boston: 56,650 attend Boston Public School and the rest, 20,780, attend private, parochial, public charter, out-of-district schools, or are home-schooled.

    Boston Public Schools (56,650)
    41% Hispanic
    35% Black
    14% White
    9% Asian
    1% Other/Multiracial

    Students who do not attend BPS (20,780)
    45% Black
    30% White
    18% Hispanic
    4% Asian
    4% Other

    http://www.bostonpublicschools.org/cms/lib07/MA01906464/Centricity/Domain/4/BPS%20at%20a%20Glance%2015-1109.pdf

    Read More
    • Replies: @dcthrowback
    it's de facto segregation s/ most of the whites live in the 'burbs...and for now, it works
  84. @syonredux

    “This is the start of a three-year effort to decolonize the curriculum in our public schools,” said Colin Rose, assistant superintendent of opportunity and achievement gaps for Boston public schools.
     

    The district has 125 schools and 57,000 students, 86% of whom are non-white, with the largest groups being Latino and black. After changing the maps, Rose said, educators plan to look at other subjects and shift away from presenting white history as the dominant perspective….
     
    Well, let's start by "decolonizing" the sciences. From now on, Blacks and Hispanics will no longer be taught things that were invented/discovered by Europeans: Calculus, the Theory of Relativity, Natural Selection, the Double Helix, Maxwell's Equations, Statistical Mechanics, etc

    You think they’re learning all that stuff, anyway? Maybe natural selection, and presumably there are calculus classes. But come on.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    You think they’re learning all that stuff, anyway? Maybe natural selection, and presumably there are calculus classes. But come on.
     
    Well, I said that that kind of stuff would no longer be taught......I made no claims as to how much was currently being learned....
  85. @Svigor

    Better yet, make a map with Europe and North America in the wrong places, or missing entirely, and post it all over the Third World.
     
    Thread-winner.

    The Soviet Union’s maps of the Soviet Union had distortions like that built in.

    Read More
  86. @jcd1974

    Three days ago, Boston’s public schools began phasing in the lesser-known Peters projection, which cuts the US, Britain and the rest of Europe down to size.
     
    The entire purpose of the exercise.

    Of course some smart kids might wonder how the tiny island of Britain was able to colonize most of the continent of Africa and draw their own conclusions.

    There was a time when the the sun literally never set on the British Empire. Quite an accomplishment for such a small country.

    Read More
  87. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Steve,

    In a better world, you would have been hired by a variety of smart comedy producers as a writer. I can imagine you and a more open-minded Tina Fey (yeah, I know that you say that she's more aware than she lets on) would make great comedy music together. Also, you would have been great as a writer for Colin Quinn when he was the SNL Weekend Update guy.

    Are you secretly known/appreciated in that world, i.e. comedy writers, political satire, etc.?

    I’m certain that the “Family Guy” and “American Dad” writers pick up some ideas from Steve.

    Read More
  88. @Joe Walker
    I think it is 86% of the kids in Boston public schools who are non-white. Most of the Boston white kids would go to private schools.

    See Triumph’s numbers. There are about 7,800 white kids in the public schools plus another 6,200 in the private schools (which is not most). So the 14,000 total white kids are a whopping 18% of the total # of kids rather than 14% of the public school student. In other words, we are still really f*cked.

    Read More
  89. @Ed
    Honestly I think these diversity "executives" just come up with this crap to justify their jobs & high salaries.

    They can't possibly believe any of this will close the so called achievement gap.

    The problem is that this projection just doesn’t go far enough. I think they should come up with an even better projection that shows Africa as the center of the universe and completely erases England. Black self esteem will skyrocket and THAT will finally close the gap.

    Read More
  90. @The Last Real Calvinist
    England is very small indeed. It's smaller than Iowa, for example. The whole UK is smaller than Colorado.

    The accomplishments of the people inhabiting such a limited area really are remarkable.

    ,
    Exactly. It’s not the size of your country that matters, it’s the accomplishments of your people.

    Read More
  91. @newrouter
    "Or they could look at the globe in their classroom"

    very good Mr. Sailer!

    This is what a modern map looks like (use your mouse). The assistant superintendent for nonmeritocratic Boston education is 20 years behind the times.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Oh no he's not! He's in lock step with the times. The purpose of the map change is Gap Closure, so your digital things just won't do.

    Also, a globe opens up the whole world is not flat can of worms...
    , @Jack D
    Hell, over 50 years ago when I was in elementary school, they had a 3 dimensional spherical map in every classroom. You could even spin it on its axis. It was a perfect projection of the earth onto a spherical surface with no distortion whatsoever. They called it a "globe".
    , @Mr. Anon
    Sure, if you actually believe all that spherical Earth nonsense. Why, next you'll be denying that the foundation of the World is Turtles.
  92. @jcd1974

    Three days ago, Boston’s public schools began phasing in the lesser-known Peters projection, which cuts the US, Britain and the rest of Europe down to size.
     
    The entire purpose of the exercise.

    Of course some smart kids might wonder how the tiny island of Britain was able to colonize most of the continent of Africa and draw their own conclusions.

    The PTB might find the new map raising all sorts of questions.

    But, on the whole, I doubt it will change anything at all. Africans and South Americans don’t seem very good at noticing things like the points you raised.

    If they notice anything at all, it will that those small areas are ripe for plunder.

    Especially once the population of Africa goes through another generation of sky-high increase.

    Read More
  93. @guest
    You think they're learning all that stuff, anyway? Maybe natural selection, and presumably there are calculus classes. But come on.

    You think they’re learning all that stuff, anyway? Maybe natural selection, and presumably there are calculus classes. But come on.

    Well, I said that that kind of stuff would no longer be taught……I made no claims as to how much was currently being learned….

    Read More
  94. @Trelane
    This is what a modern map looks like (use your mouse). The assistant superintendent for nonmeritocratic Boston education is 20 years behind the times.

    Oh no he’s not! He’s in lock step with the times. The purpose of the map change is Gap Closure, so your digital things just won’t do.

    Also, a globe opens up the whole world is not flat can of worms…

    Read More
  95. @Steve Sailer
    A big chunk of Africa is uninhabitable, but the sub-Saharan area is really immense.

    So why is Rwanda so crowded?

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/africa-up-in-smoke/

    That was a cause of the genocide, according to Jared Diamond in his book “Collapse.”

    Read More
  96. @Trelane
    This is what a modern map looks like (use your mouse). The assistant superintendent for nonmeritocratic Boston education is 20 years behind the times.

    Hell, over 50 years ago when I was in elementary school, they had a 3 dimensional spherical map in every classroom. You could even spin it on its axis. It was a perfect projection of the earth onto a spherical surface with no distortion whatsoever. They called it a “globe”.

    Read More
    • LOL: Trelane
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Hell, over 50 years ago when I was in elementary school, they had a 3 dimensional spherical map in every classroom. You could even spin it on its axis. It was a perfect projection of the earth onto a spherical surface with no distortion whatsoever. They called it a “globe”.
     
    Why, you're just a dimensionist.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Me too. But many of the country names were raaaaacist. So all the globes got thrown out.
  97. Thank you for highlighting this subject, Steve. I’ve been encouraging people to look at a globe whenever the question of Africans moving into Europe comes up in conversation. Most people have no concept of the relative sizes of the continents.

    Read More
  98. A district will drop the Mercator projection, which physically diminished Africa and South America, for the Peters, which cut the developed world down to size

    S0, The Gap began nearly 500 years ago.

    Read More
  99. @Jack D
    Hell, over 50 years ago when I was in elementary school, they had a 3 dimensional spherical map in every classroom. You could even spin it on its axis. It was a perfect projection of the earth onto a spherical surface with no distortion whatsoever. They called it a "globe".

    Hell, over 50 years ago when I was in elementary school, they had a 3 dimensional spherical map in every classroom. You could even spin it on its axis. It was a perfect projection of the earth onto a spherical surface with no distortion whatsoever. They called it a “globe”.

    Why, you’re just a dimensionist.

    Read More
  100. @Harry Baldwin
    He can't afford to buy his own granola bars?

    It’s quite common for contracts for “talent” to include specifications as to snacks, drinks, etc. Part of it is just ego tripping – once you were a nerd who was chased by the neighborhood bullies but now you’re a big dick and people will do whatever you ask them. One quart of peeled grapes! Red ones! At room temperature!

    But part of it is practical. You’re really not going to fly around the country with a sack of granola bars . Hosts do want to be hospitable and provide refreshments to their guests. Rather than leaving it to guesswork and having the guest end up with something that he detests, specifying the snacks actually makes it easier for both parties.

    Read More
  101. @Trelane
    This is what a modern map looks like (use your mouse). The assistant superintendent for nonmeritocratic Boston education is 20 years behind the times.

    Sure, if you actually believe all that spherical Earth nonsense. Why, next you’ll be denying that the foundation of the World is Turtles.

    Read More
  102. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @JohnnyD
    This is so dumb. England pretty much dominated the world at one point, despite being just a small island.

    It’s not just that England is small. Their population was not very large either. In 1775, it is estimated there were 8 million people in the United Kingdom. I think that included Ireland. France had 24 million at that time.

    So for a small nation with a small population to exert that much control is indeed impressive.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    "for a small nation with a small population to exert that much control is indeed impressive"

    Indeed. I wonder if it'll ever happen again that a numerically tiny group exerts control out of all proportion to its numbers?
  103. Here’s the website for the Office of Opportunity and Achievement Gaps: http://www.bostonpublicschools.org/Page/6535

    Dr. Rose’s colleague, Mwalimu Donkor Issa Minors, has been “able to bridge traditional canon with Hip-Hop music and culture”, which has always been the missing piece in the American education system.

    OAG’s upcoming speakers include writer/poet/activist Yvette Modestin, one of “30 Afro Latinas You Should Know”, “100 Most Influential African Diaspora Leaders”, and the Founder/Executive director of Boston’s Encuentro Diaspora Afro, as well as “the Diaspora Coordinator of the Red de Mujeres Afrolatinoamericanas, Afrocaribeñas y de la Diaspora an international network of Afro descendent women.” Busy gal! Her purpose is “to move with the intent of lifting the voices of the ancestors.”

    No doubt OAG is succeeding in its aim to eradicate cultural and structural barriers for Boston students.

    Read More
  104. Shaq is WOKE on the FEQ, The Flat Earth Question.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Yeah, but America's Great Vice President, Dick Johnson, was woke on HEQ: the Hollow Earth Question.
    , @Chris Calumny
    Hasn't Tom L. Friedman already made a fortune off the same podunk theory?
  105. @Clifford Brown
    Shaq is WOKE on the FEQ, The Flat Earth Question.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKXCBlUPJqM

    Yeah, but America’s Great Vice President, Dick Johnson, was woke on HEQ: the Hollow Earth Question.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux
    Johnson and the Hollow Earth:


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTQmYr78Toc
    , @Clifford Brown
    It's all there in Mount Shasta. One of my favorite places on the planet. I'm happy to camp and hike, and yes, there is something kind of weird to the place, but who knows... maybe Dick Johnson is right and there is more to this experience.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZANq6mBXnJs&t=1819s
  106. @Steve Sailer
    Yeah, but America's Great Vice President, Dick Johnson, was woke on HEQ: the Hollow Earth Question.

    Johnson and the Hollow Earth:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTQmYr78Toc

    Read More
  107. Surprised that no one has mentioned the icosahedral projection, also known as Fuller’s Dymaxion map.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dymaxion_map
    This is by far the best 2-D projection of the globe, IMHO.

    Read More
  108. @Steve Sailer
    Yeah, but America's Great Vice President, Dick Johnson, was woke on HEQ: the Hollow Earth Question.

    It’s all there in Mount Shasta. One of my favorite places on the planet. I’m happy to camp and hike, and yes, there is something kind of weird to the place, but who knows… maybe Dick Johnson is right and there is more to this experience.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZANq6mBXnJs&t=1819s

    Read More
  109. When I saw the last map – the one with south at the top – I thought that it was great because my country (Australia) was large and in a dominant position. Then several commenters said that western countries should be small and inconspicuous, so that migrants would not be attracted to them. The commenters are right, so please make Australia small and hide it away somewhere! Or leave it out entirely, and pretend that you though that it was the same country as Austria.

    Read More
  110. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Sailer, where do you stand on the whole B.C./A.D., B.C.E/C.E. what-for; I think these chronology justice-warriors in the latter camp have a point, insofar as A.D. dating doesn’t actually proceed from an event (it’s off by a few years for the birth of Jesus of Nazareth). Partially you could save it by just retconning “A.D.” to “Arbitrary Date” but I can’t think of a good one for the terminus ante quem extent.

    You seem to have a lot of time on your hands– any ideas?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    What % of people know what BCE stands for? Before Current Era? But what does "Before Current Era" mean? Does that mean Before Today? Does that mean Before 2000 AD? Or does that before Before 1 AD? If I say that wheat was domesticated about 9500 BCE, does that mean it was 9500 years ago or 11,500 years ago?

    It means the latter, but I really don't think that's obvious to most people.

    So this is another of the ways of making people dumber that have become popular over my lifetime.

    , @Expletive Deleted
    [edit; Ha! ninja'd by WATTYBT@#128]
    Ab urbe condita. Or 753 BCE, in modernist money. The only date any civilized person should reckon from.
    Making the current year (that we're always being reminded that we're in, by social media Pink Guards) about 2770 AUC (not sure because popes and the like are constantly messing about with Time).
    , @Old fogey
    One of the few things I remember clearly from college was that a sure way to tell an intelligent person from a dullard was how he used dates in history. An educated person would put the "A.D." before the date, since it stands for "In the year of our Lord" while an uneducated person would put the "A.D." after the date because he never learned the meaning of "anno domini."

    No one needed to be told that "B.C." stood for "before Christ" at that time and therefore that was not a problem for any one. I wonder why we don't fight to keep to our Christian calendar the way we are finally fighting to maintain the right to say "Merry Christmas."
  111. @Clifford Brown
    Shaq is WOKE on the FEQ, The Flat Earth Question.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKXCBlUPJqM

    Hasn’t Tom L. Friedman already made a fortune off the same podunk theory?

    Read More
  112. @Buffalo Joe
    Speaking of maps and travel....UCLA Bruins next NCAA March Madness game is in Memphis, Tennessee . The problem is that California passed a law banning travel by state schools to states with "Bathroom Laws." Those are the laws that say you must use a bathroom that matches your gender. They are trying to get around it by saying UCLA didn't plan this trip. Ok and I say , prove your PC-SJW values and boycott the game. If you can propose to curtail travel to Iowa, you can actually refuse to travel to Tennessee. Years ago the University of Buffalo (pre SUNY system) decided not to play in a football bowl game because of Jim Crow laws at the bowl site. OK, Californians, put your money where your mouth is.

    This is worth disseminating to a wider audience. While it appears the law (AB 1887) has exemptions for important stuff like sports, it also appears the NCAA relocated games from North Carolina to more PC locations. So even if UCLA could go, they obviously shouldn’t go. Remember, social justice tastes better than winning ever would.

    http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/the-state-worker/article139666758.html

    http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article122451809.html

    http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article104533396.html

    http://www.eqca.org/ab1887-2/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Pericles, Well I thought posting it here would help spread it to a wider audience. We'll see.
  113. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Perhaps. But they're hampered by their environment, and, possibly, their own thoughtcrime minds.

    For example, my wife likes to watch SNL, but I just can't. Even when it's funny, it's completely unoriginal. It's a bit like a really good restaurant that makes only one meal. Sure, they're expert at making that dish, but it gets old eating exact same meal every single night.

    I kind of feel for comedians these days. They won't get sent to the gulag, but they have to know that their careers are toast if they don't stick to the party line. That has to be frustrating for a group that prides itself on being gadflies.

    Yeah, SNL is one of those inexplicable shows to a non-American. I’ve heard it used to be funny in the 70s or something? Regarding comedy, someone said it has changed from the audience laughing at the jokes to the audience clapping at the jokes.

    Hey have you heard the one about DRUMPF, he’s stupid amirite? (Standing ovation for five minutes.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Humor in general does not travel well, especially verbal humor and double especially political humor.

    But even for American audiences, SNL has not aged well IMHO. Lorne Michaels (a very rich man) says that the audience for SNL is young people and there is always a fresh crop of young people, but to me (an old person) this does not explain it. The classic, Belushi era SNL WAS really funny, the current SNL just isn't. 99% of the skits fall totally flat or they are one joke painfully stretched to 10 minutes. Portraying Hillary as a much younger, attractive woman less than half her age (although accurately as a Lesbian) instead of a tottering old lady with cankles was the last straw for me.
    , @Oleaginous Outrager
    Having recently watched some of the earliest days of SNL, I have to say, it never was really that brilliant, except in very brief spots. Much of the humor was simply lame, and there were always a lot of bits that relied on very-quick-to-date topical references to people who have disappeared from the public mind (why is saying "Hamilton Jordan" funny?).
  114. @g-man
    OT: What do you make of TNC cutting his multi-thousand $ speech early and requesting granola bars?

    His contract for the engagement, which also outlines reimbursements for travel, lodging and a request for Nature Valley Oats ‘n’ Dark Chocolate Granola Bars, was approved by both parties in April 2016.

    http://www.dailyemerald.com/2017/03/10/ta-nehisi-coates-41500-uo-speech-ended-early/

    Maybe this is why tuition is out of control?

    The Nature Valley brand isn’t really exorbitant, just $10 at Amazon for a box of a dozen; as a performer condition it’s certainly easier discharged than having to remove all the green M&Ms. So if that’s the worst contract rider they could find on him… OTOH, it’s not very Black(tm) either. The problematic ramifications of Ta and his consumption of granola bars could surely serve as media grist until the next time, I dunno, when Apple releases a phone, or Kellyanne Conway does something

    Read More
    • Replies: @Weltanschauung
    It was brown M&Ms, and the point of the whimsical snack spec was that it was easy to check. A brown M&M in the candy dish would alert Van Halen to the likelihood of overloaded circuits or collapsing floors.

    Not sure if the engineering requirements for a successful speech by TNC are equally stringent.
  115. Shame on those racists at Google, Bing and the rest of Silicon Valley who use a Mercator variant for their mapping software. Those bigots from Silicon Valley need to stop engaging in Cartographic imperialism.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_Mercator

    Read More
  116. @Anon
    Sailer, where do you stand on the whole B.C./A.D., B.C.E/C.E. what-for; I think these chronology justice-warriors in the latter camp have a point, insofar as A.D. dating doesn't actually proceed from an event (it's off by a few years for the birth of Jesus of Nazareth). Partially you could save it by just retconning "A.D." to "Arbitrary Date" but I can't think of a good one for the terminus ante quem extent.

    You seem to have a lot of time on your hands-- any ideas?

    What % of people know what BCE stands for? Before Current Era? But what does “Before Current Era” mean? Does that mean Before Today? Does that mean Before 2000 AD? Or does that before Before 1 AD? If I say that wheat was domesticated about 9500 BCE, does that mean it was 9500 years ago or 11,500 years ago?

    It means the latter, but I really don’t think that’s obvious to most people.

    So this is another of the ways of making people dumber that have become popular over my lifetime.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    It's 'Before Common Era'; it was changed no doubt to get the 'Domini' out of the name.

    But in some ways BCE is even more white privilege-y, since it's based on the assumption that measuring time in the western way is 'common' to all people. It's filthy temporal imperialism, I tell you!

    I'm sure the SJWs would love to eliminate the BCE/CE division altogether, since no matter how you label it, it's still based on the birth of Jesus. But it would be tough for all of them to agree on a starting date for a single continuous measure of years. What would they choose? The first date recorded by the Sumerians? The beginning of the first Egyptian dynasty? Which culture deserves to be privileged in this way? It would be fun to watch them scrap over it.

    , @Jack D
    All attempts at restarting the clock have failed because it's just too convenient to have a common numbering system. But AD = "In the year of our Lord" really is a bit much for non-Christians.
    , @Foreign Expert
    It's not obvious to Americans but there's a lot of people on earth that don't use the "Christian " dating system. (Japan, Thailand, etc. ).
  117. @Steve Sailer
    What % of people know what BCE stands for? Before Current Era? But what does "Before Current Era" mean? Does that mean Before Today? Does that mean Before 2000 AD? Or does that before Before 1 AD? If I say that wheat was domesticated about 9500 BCE, does that mean it was 9500 years ago or 11,500 years ago?

    It means the latter, but I really don't think that's obvious to most people.

    So this is another of the ways of making people dumber that have become popular over my lifetime.

    It’s ‘Before Common Era’; it was changed no doubt to get the ‘Domini’ out of the name.

    But in some ways BCE is even more white privilege-y, since it’s based on the assumption that measuring time in the western way is ‘common’ to all people. It’s filthy temporal imperialism, I tell you!

    I’m sure the SJWs would love to eliminate the BCE/CE division altogether, since no matter how you label it, it’s still based on the birth of Jesus. But it would be tough for all of them to agree on a starting date for a single continuous measure of years. What would they choose? The first date recorded by the Sumerians? The beginning of the first Egyptian dynasty? Which culture deserves to be privileged in this way? It would be fun to watch them scrap over it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin
    They could use AUC, Ab Urbe Condita, based on the year of founding of Rome, 753BC. So this year is 2770 AUC

    But seriously it would probably based around a year zero, like in Cambodia.
    , @The Q Entity
    1789 will probably be made Year 1 if they ever get serious about it.
    , @Sauron's Idiot Nephew
    It started as a Jewish thing (in the '50s, I think) because they didn't like the Christian reference. Now it's become pretty much universal in academia, though I think most people in the "real world" have never heard of it.

    Used to bother me, but no more. Common era, schmommon era. It stands for "Christian era" and "Before the Christian era". The commies can make of it what they will.
    , @Olorin
    I break history into two general eras:

    Before and after the lapstrake hull.
  118. “By the way, why is Boston still in thrall to Northern Supremacism?”

    Why, because overcoming Northern supremacism will be the **next** decade´s big SJW map-crusade.

    Gotta keep Colin Rose busy, or else he would need to get a real job.

    Read More
  119. Can’t get much more multicultural than Amherst, MA.

    Ah, good old Amherst, the epicenter of everything’s that’s wrong in the US today. I grew up in that town, it forever inoculated me against the politically correct, multi-cultural and, well, anything associated with the word “liberal”. I eventually moved to Russia to get as far away from that bullshit as I could. I do enjoy my biannual family visits, though, for contrast, especially the last one during the first two weeks of November.

    Read More
  120. @The Last Real Calvinist
    It's 'Before Common Era'; it was changed no doubt to get the 'Domini' out of the name.

    But in some ways BCE is even more white privilege-y, since it's based on the assumption that measuring time in the western way is 'common' to all people. It's filthy temporal imperialism, I tell you!

    I'm sure the SJWs would love to eliminate the BCE/CE division altogether, since no matter how you label it, it's still based on the birth of Jesus. But it would be tough for all of them to agree on a starting date for a single continuous measure of years. What would they choose? The first date recorded by the Sumerians? The beginning of the first Egyptian dynasty? Which culture deserves to be privileged in this way? It would be fun to watch them scrap over it.

    They could use AUC, Ab Urbe Condita, based on the year of founding of Rome, 753BC. So this year is 2770 AUC

    But seriously it would probably based around a year zero, like in Cambodia.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    If we changed the Year One to something else, then everybody would be dumber about history, which would probably be considered a Good Thing these days.
    , @Pericles

    But seriously it would probably based around a year zero, like in Cambodia.

     

    Every year would be year zero.
  121. @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin
    They could use AUC, Ab Urbe Condita, based on the year of founding of Rome, 753BC. So this year is 2770 AUC

    But seriously it would probably based around a year zero, like in Cambodia.

    If we changed the Year One to something else, then everybody would be dumber about history, which would probably be considered a Good Thing these days.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    Duh, that's what the Neocons did. Year One now begins in what used to be called by the unenlightened 9/11/2001.
    , @syonredux
    Well, since SJWs live in Hitler's shadow, maybe this dating system would work:

    BH: Before Hitler (prior to 1933)

    AH: After Hitler (1933 on)
  122. @The Last Real Calvinist
    It's 'Before Common Era'; it was changed no doubt to get the 'Domini' out of the name.

    But in some ways BCE is even more white privilege-y, since it's based on the assumption that measuring time in the western way is 'common' to all people. It's filthy temporal imperialism, I tell you!

    I'm sure the SJWs would love to eliminate the BCE/CE division altogether, since no matter how you label it, it's still based on the birth of Jesus. But it would be tough for all of them to agree on a starting date for a single continuous measure of years. What would they choose? The first date recorded by the Sumerians? The beginning of the first Egyptian dynasty? Which culture deserves to be privileged in this way? It would be fun to watch them scrap over it.

    1789 will probably be made Year 1 if they ever get serious about it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    1789 will probably be made Year 1 if they ever get serious about it.
     
    Too Eurocentric.
    , @Weltanschauung
    The French revolutionaries actually did almost this, but their Year One wasn't 1789 (too much talk), but 1792, when the king went to the guillotine.
  123. @Jose Habib
    Poor Antartica, still so oppressed by even the Peters projection that it's not even on the map!

    That’s because it’s too white.

    Read More
  124. @Steve Sailer
    If we changed the Year One to something else, then everybody would be dumber about history, which would probably be considered a Good Thing these days.

    Duh, that’s what the Neocons did. Year One now begins in what used to be called by the unenlightened 9/11/2001.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    In most of the world, 9/11 would have been 11/9. Doesn't have the same ring to it, does it?

    I go with year-month-day myself: 2001-09-11.
  125. So based on size, migrant flows should be directly from Africa to South America and vice versa, right?

    Read More
  126. Africa will need all that land when the birth explosion hits in the coming 15 years and billions need a space to starve in …

    Read More
    • Replies: @europeasant
    Africa would not have had that many people currently if it wasn't for ^&** white people sending them medicine, food and money. If we had let nature take itz course then the population of Sub-Saharan Africa would probably be only about 100 million.
  127. @AndrewR
    Uruguay is pretty lit.

    Yeah. I’ve heard that before. I think the Derb mentioned it first.

    Was thinking New Zealand or Australia, but they seem infected by the same disease, just a generation or so behind us. Maybe they’ll wake up before it’s too late. Not having a very long land border with a 2nd world country is a big advantage.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Indeed. Turkey and Mexico are very similar: both conduits for easy mass third world immigration into first world
  128. I’ve read that the Egyptians from the way back viewed the world upside down, with south being “up.” From their perspective, the Nile flowed down, toward the Mediterranean, making the upper Nile, up in their schematic.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pericles
    We also have the medieval T-O maps, which give yet another perspective.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T_and_O_map
  129. I’m not sure of the relative merits of a true perspective when it comes to global map projections.

    Look at how small Europe is … and look what it has accomplished. Look how large Africa is … and notice how little it has accomplished.

    Wow! Got to be careful here. Noticing these differences might have a negative impact on Black African self-esteem. “We’re the biggest chunk on the map and still ….”

    Read More
  130. @The Last Real Calvinist
    England is very small indeed. It's smaller than Iowa, for example. The whole UK is smaller than Colorado.

    The accomplishments of the people inhabiting such a limited area really are remarkable.

    England proper is the size of Alabama (4.9 mill.), or Denmark (5.75 mill.). It has 54.8 millions (plus an unknown number of EU transients and global illegals). Ten times the density.

    The magicality of the dirt is not in question, as there are no signs of the famine and civil war that such demographics would inevitably engender anywhere else on the globe, even in ethnically and culturally homogenous countries. So why not send a few billion 3rd worlders there? They’ll just be swallowed up by the TARDIS-like, spooky little island nation, and disappear from history like the Knights of the Round Table. Problem solved. It’s certainly what the rest of Europe believes, particularly the French.

    The rest of Britain is basically uninhabited. Even the supposedly desperate “refugees” complain bitterly about being GuLagged in the rocky, chilly, dark and rain-lashed celtic wastelands, and decamp a.s.a.p. for the fleshpots of Middlesbrough and Slough.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    Argh. Denmark is actually a third of the land area of Englandshire. That'll teach me to wing it. Just had the idea they were somehow equivalent floating about.
  131. @Steve Sailer
    What % of people know what BCE stands for? Before Current Era? But what does "Before Current Era" mean? Does that mean Before Today? Does that mean Before 2000 AD? Or does that before Before 1 AD? If I say that wheat was domesticated about 9500 BCE, does that mean it was 9500 years ago or 11,500 years ago?

    It means the latter, but I really don't think that's obvious to most people.

    So this is another of the ways of making people dumber that have become popular over my lifetime.

    All attempts at restarting the clock have failed because it’s just too convenient to have a common numbering system. But AD = “In the year of our Lord” really is a bit much for non-Christians.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TheJester
    In 2016, for commercial purposes, Saudi Arabia dropped the Islamic lunar calendar and adopted the Western Gregorian calendar.

    The Gregorian calendar was named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582. So, in a sense, it is a Western religious calendar ... albeit the calendar by which the industrialized world demarcates the days, months, and seasons. Convenience has a lot to say for itself.

    When I run across someone using "BCE" instead of "AD", I dismiss it as an attempt at virtue signaling. If the Saudis and Protestants have no problem with the Gregorian calendar, I would think "AD" could be used in a similar vein. Since Jesus is a prophet in Islam and Buddhists seem polytheistic (I've seen shrines to the Blessed Virgin in Thailand), that captures the majority of humankind.
    , @Pericles
    The Japanese still have eras, e.g., Showa Era, Heisei Era (ongoing). They don't even have to correspond to our years.

    "Thus, 1989 corresponds to Shōwa 64 until 7 January and Heisei 1 (平成元年 Heisei gannen?, gannen means "first year") since 8 January."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heisei_period

    This approach appears to be known as the Nengo calendar: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_era_name

    Being Japanese, they of course have multiple calendar systems. They also have leap years, by imperial edict, but not the same as ours.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_calendar

  132. @Desiderius

    Can’t get much more multicultural than Amherst, MA.
     
    Well that's the plan.

    Who better to rule the world than the deracinated?

    Amherst- and all of the four counties of Western MA are more diverse than you’d think. The SJWs don’t live near ‘me, though.

    Read More
  133. @Anon
    Sailer, where do you stand on the whole B.C./A.D., B.C.E/C.E. what-for; I think these chronology justice-warriors in the latter camp have a point, insofar as A.D. dating doesn't actually proceed from an event (it's off by a few years for the birth of Jesus of Nazareth). Partially you could save it by just retconning "A.D." to "Arbitrary Date" but I can't think of a good one for the terminus ante quem extent.

    You seem to have a lot of time on your hands-- any ideas?

    [edit; Ha! ninja'd by WATTYBT@#128]
    Ab urbe condita. Or 753 BCE, in modernist money. The only date any civilized person should reckon from.
    Making the current year (that we’re always being reminded that we’re in, by social media Pink Guards) about 2770 AUC (not sure because popes and the like are constantly messing about with Time).

    Read More
  134. @Expletive Deleted
    England proper is the size of Alabama (4.9 mill.), or Denmark (5.75 mill.). It has 54.8 millions (plus an unknown number of EU transients and global illegals). Ten times the density.

    The magicality of the dirt is not in question, as there are no signs of the famine and civil war that such demographics would inevitably engender anywhere else on the globe, even in ethnically and culturally homogenous countries. So why not send a few billion 3rd worlders there? They'll just be swallowed up by the TARDIS-like, spooky little island nation, and disappear from history like the Knights of the Round Table. Problem solved. It's certainly what the rest of Europe believes, particularly the French.

    The rest of Britain is basically uninhabited. Even the supposedly desperate "refugees" complain bitterly about being GuLagged in the rocky, chilly, dark and rain-lashed celtic wastelands, and decamp a.s.a.p. for the fleshpots of Middlesbrough and Slough.

    Argh. Denmark is actually a third of the land area of Englandshire. That’ll teach me to wing it. Just had the idea they were somehow equivalent floating about.

    Read More
  135. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    “Superintendent of Opportunity and Achievement Gaps”

    Some titles simply invite ridicule. This is one of them. No further comment necessary.

    Read More
  136. @The Last Real Calvinist
    England is very small indeed. It's smaller than Iowa, for example. The whole UK is smaller than Colorado.

    The accomplishments of the people inhabiting such a limited area really are remarkable.

    Nigel Farage may be the UK’s Steve King

    Read More
  137. @Triumph104
    There are 77,900 school-age children living in Boston: 56,650 attend Boston Public School and the rest, 20,780, attend private, parochial, public charter, out-of-district schools, or are home-schooled.

    Boston Public Schools (56,650)
    41% Hispanic
    35% Black
    14% White
    9% Asian
    1% Other/Multiracial

    Students who do not attend BPS (20,780)
    45% Black
    30% White
    18% Hispanic
    4% Asian
    4% Other

    http://www.bostonpublicschools.org/cms/lib07/MA01906464/Centricity/Domain/4/BPS%20at%20a%20Glance%2015-1109.pdf

    it’s de facto segregation s/ most of the whites live in the ‘burbs…and for now, it works

    Read More
  138. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Yeah. I've heard that before. I think the Derb mentioned it first.

    Was thinking New Zealand or Australia, but they seem infected by the same disease, just a generation or so behind us. Maybe they'll wake up before it's too late. Not having a very long land border with a 2nd world country is a big advantage.

    Indeed. Turkey and Mexico are very similar: both conduits for easy mass third world immigration into first world

    Read More
  139. @Boomstick
    Peter's projection was from the start SJW fodder when he introduced/used it circa 1973. It's been annoying progressive lecturing from the beginning.

    Thanks for the background. The wiki has more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gall%E2%80%93Peters_projection

    It is named after James Gall, who is credited with creating the projection in 1855 and who formally published it in 1885,[1] and Arno Peters, who brought the projection to a wider audience beginning in the early 1970s (although he initially claimed to have invented the projection himself; see below for more details). The name “Gall–Peters projection” seems to have been used first by Arthur H. Robinson in a pamphlet put out by the American Cartographic Association in 1986.[2]

    The Gall-Peters projection achieved considerable notoriety in the late 20th century as the centerpiece of a controversy about the political implications of map design.

    Perhaps we should refer to it as “Gall’s orthographic projection”? And be sure to remind the SJWs of the attempt at credit stealing.

    Read More
  140. @Jack D
    All attempts at restarting the clock have failed because it's just too convenient to have a common numbering system. But AD = "In the year of our Lord" really is a bit much for non-Christians.

    In 2016, for commercial purposes, Saudi Arabia dropped the Islamic lunar calendar and adopted the Western Gregorian calendar.

    The Gregorian calendar was named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582. So, in a sense, it is a Western religious calendar … albeit the calendar by which the industrialized world demarcates the days, months, and seasons. Convenience has a lot to say for itself.

    When I run across someone using “BCE” instead of “AD”, I dismiss it as an attempt at virtue signaling. If the Saudis and Protestants have no problem with the Gregorian calendar, I would think “AD” could be used in a similar vein. Since Jesus is a prophet in Islam and Buddhists seem polytheistic (I’ve seen shrines to the Blessed Virgin in Thailand), that captures the majority of humankind.

    Read More
  141. @Alfa158
    The Mercator projection was used purely because of its usefulness as a navigation tool. If you draw a line between two points, and measure the angle you can hold that heading ( rhumb line or constant heading) through the whole voyage to your destination. The northern hemisphere was exaggerated in size relative to the southern, because more navigation was being done in the northern oceans. Modern navigation systems are now accurate enough to use great circle routes that get you there in the shortest distance but require precise knowledge of your position because you have to continuously change your heading dependent on where you. are. My father in law brought back US Navy maps from WWII that were made before the war and used a weird looking great circle projection I haven't seen anywhere else. They allowed the Navy to navigate the shorter routes. It is fun looking at those maps and ferreting out the little dots like Tarawa and Bikini Island and Guadalcanal that were insignificant when the maps were drawn, but loom in our history now.
    With the Mercator though, no one was intentionally trying to use maps to make the north look more important. Northern people were able to do that just fine through their accomplishments.

    My father in law brought back US Navy maps from WWII that were made before the war and used a weird looking great circle projection I haven’t seen anywhere else. They allowed the Navy to navigate the shorter routes.

    Those maps probably used the gnomonic projection. A gnomonic map projection displays all great circles as straight lines, resulting in any straight line segment on a gnomonic map showing the shortest route between the segment’s two endpoints.

    I’ve seen some gnomonic maps. With a gnomonic map extending from Japan to the U.S. West Coast, for example, a navigator could use a straightedge to draw a line from Tokyo to San Francisco, and that line would represent a great circle route, or the shortest distance between the two ports.

    Read More
  142. “Rose will attack cultural and structural barriers and promote culturally sustaining practices enabling traditionally marginalized students to engage in rigorous curriculums and pedagogy in Boston’s schools, thus creating opportunity and access they need to close performance gaps.”

    This is DiversitySpeak at its finest with the usual buzz-words — “sustaining”, “enabling”, “marginalized” etc. Where is George Orwell when we need him? “Rose will attack….”, yes, you can bet he he will be on the “attack”, and what will those “traditionally marginalized students” be when the likes of Rose are done with them other than be more full of resentment and completely devoid of the basics of mathematics, English grammar and American history?

    Read More
  143. @The Q Entity
    1789 will probably be made Year 1 if they ever get serious about it.

    1789 will probably be made Year 1 if they ever get serious about it.

    Too Eurocentric.

    Read More
  144. @Steve Sailer
    If we changed the Year One to something else, then everybody would be dumber about history, which would probably be considered a Good Thing these days.

    Well, since SJWs live in Hitler’s shadow, maybe this dating system would work:

    BH: Before Hitler (prior to 1933)

    AH: After Hitler (1933 on)

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Well, since SJWs live in Hitler’s shadow, maybe this dating system would work:

    BH: Before Hitler (prior to 1933)

    AH: After Hitler (1933 on)
     
    Hmmmmm.

    Maybe a third age is needed:

    LHaaT: Literally Hitler all the Time (January 20, 1981, i.e. Reagan's inauguration, onward)
  145. My guess is that the time is ripe for someone to found a private “Western” elementary / high school and possible a college where the curriculum would cater exclusively to those who want a traditional education. It would go without saying that whites would be front and center. My guess is that it would be quite successful because it is beginning to dawn on even the least enlightened among us that multiculturalism is a disaster. It would also be quite hip. When I was growing up, being white was cool. I see no reason why that won’t happen again.

    Read More
  146. There are two main advantages to the Mercator projection. As has been stated before, the Mercator projection is useful to navigators in that a straight line is a line of equal bearing, or rhumb line. Ship captains preferred to keep their ship on a constant course for hours, with course changes at predefined waypoints.

    But for the general public, the Mercator projection has the additional advantage of being conformal. That means that, throughout the map, small areas retain their correct shapes. So Iceland on a Mercator map has almost the same shape as Iceland on the globe. Likewise, Kenya on a Mercator map has almost the same shape as Kenya on the globe. Of course, Kenya is greatly reduced in size in comparison to Iceland on the same Mercator map. But still there are obvious advantages to maps which show countries and smaller regions in their correct shapes. That advantage is totally lost with the Peters projection.

    There was one additional objection made against the Mercator projection in the 1980s. It exaggerated the size of the high-latitude Soviet Union. It made the USSR appear to totally dominate the rest of Europe and Asia. This was wrong, from the point of view of the Peters projection supporters, because it added to Americans’ fear of the Soviet Union. In the oft-used phrase of the 1980s, the Mercator projection, in effect, helped to “fan the flames of the Cold War.”

    The Peters projection totally distorts the shapes of most countries and continents throughout the world, which makes it of limited practical use. And in the process it makes South America and Africa look like wet laundry hanging on the line. We definitely need to keep this “improved” projection out of our schools.

    Read More
  147. the map also shows the failure of Subsaharan Africans to make use of those vast resources. It is striking how such a big region accomplished so little.

    Read More
  148. @jcd1974
    Public schools are 86% non-white, a legacy of busing and immigration.

    The last time I was in Boston I was surprised by the frequency of which I heard Spanish spoken. Even some of the notices on public transit were bilingual.

    In Miami, the signs (and even some of the ads) on buses and trains are trilingual: English, Spanish, and Haitian Creole:
    https://preview.ibb.co/jRDxgF/miami119.jpg

    (Many buses still have these plaques, some 12 years after they were installed to commemorate her death.)

    Years ago, most airport signs were quintilingual: English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, and German:
    https://preview.ibb.co/gaaoov/3472.jpg

    But the newer ones are only bilingual:
    https://preview.ibb.co/fGSJov/2095952.jpg

    Read More
  149. @Bill Jones
    Duh, that's what the Neocons did. Year One now begins in what used to be called by the unenlightened 9/11/2001.

    In most of the world, 9/11 would have been 11/9. Doesn’t have the same ring to it, does it?

    I go with year-month-day myself: 2001-09-11.

    Read More
  150. @Steve Sailer
    Yeah.

    I'm good at noticing the raw materials of what might be funny, but I'm a tier or two down from professional comedy writers at finishing jokes.

    Real comedy writers are really, really funny.

    THREE glasses of borscht?

    Take care, host. Someone is trying to rubinate you.

    Oops, I meant rubricate.

    Seriously though, this was a very nice entry in the Progressive Dada Machine files. The ability of the left to draw up short of logical conclusions is an amazing phenomenon. Right up there with other fundamentalists’.

    Read More
  151. BTW, one thing that the “upside down” map makes clear is how big Australia is – almost as big as the continental US, but it only has 23 million people – less than Texas. Now most of it is uninhabitable semi-desert but even the well watered and temperate south coast is largely empty. From Melbourne to Sydney is about the same distance as NY to Charlotte, NC but there are no significant coastal cities in between and inland there is only the artificial capital of Canberra with only 350k people. There are several spots on the coast with natural harbors, rivers, etc. that could easily support large cities but they were just never built. Instead of 3 or 4 cities in between with millions of people you have little villages with 10 or 15,000 people.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    Some interesting geology in the North and West which explains at least why there's so little up there.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Australia#Soils

    Except in the Lake Eyre Basin and adjacent areas to the east, the soils of Northern Australia are quite remarkable in global terms for their low fertility and difficulty of working. Most of them consist chiefly of hard laterite developed during period of climate much more humid than even that of Darwin today. Since there has been no mountain building in the region since the Precambrian and no glaciation since the Carboniferous, the region's soils have generally been under continuous weathering without renewal for over 250 million years, as against less than ten thousand for most soils in Europe, Asia, North America and New Zealand which have been formed from recent mountain building or glacial scouring of the land.

    This immensely long weathering time means that nutrient levels in Northern Australian soils are exceptionally low because practically all soluble minerals have long been weathered out. The major constituents of most soils in Northern Australia are iron and aluminium oxides, both of which are not only very insoluble but also serve to reduce the soil pH and remove phosphorus from the soil as insoluble iron and aluminium phosphates. The insolubility of these metal oxides also serves, under the extremely harsh conditions during the dry season in the north and generally in the south, to create massive sheets which are impossible to plough.
     
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    That sounds good on paper, Jack. If they would just go ahead and change the gun laws to conform to my arsenal, quit allowing the Chinese to buy up the whole country, and bring back Bon Scott, I'd be on the next plane.
  152. @The Last Real Calvinist
    It's 'Before Common Era'; it was changed no doubt to get the 'Domini' out of the name.

    But in some ways BCE is even more white privilege-y, since it's based on the assumption that measuring time in the western way is 'common' to all people. It's filthy temporal imperialism, I tell you!

    I'm sure the SJWs would love to eliminate the BCE/CE division altogether, since no matter how you label it, it's still based on the birth of Jesus. But it would be tough for all of them to agree on a starting date for a single continuous measure of years. What would they choose? The first date recorded by the Sumerians? The beginning of the first Egyptian dynasty? Which culture deserves to be privileged in this way? It would be fun to watch them scrap over it.

    It started as a Jewish thing (in the ’50s, I think) because they didn’t like the Christian reference. Now it’s become pretty much universal in academia, though I think most people in the “real world” have never heard of it.

    Used to bother me, but no more. Common era, schmommon era. It stands for “Christian era” and “Before the Christian era”. The commies can make of it what they will.

    Read More
  153. @The Last Real Calvinist
    It's 'Before Common Era'; it was changed no doubt to get the 'Domini' out of the name.

    But in some ways BCE is even more white privilege-y, since it's based on the assumption that measuring time in the western way is 'common' to all people. It's filthy temporal imperialism, I tell you!

    I'm sure the SJWs would love to eliminate the BCE/CE division altogether, since no matter how you label it, it's still based on the birth of Jesus. But it would be tough for all of them to agree on a starting date for a single continuous measure of years. What would they choose? The first date recorded by the Sumerians? The beginning of the first Egyptian dynasty? Which culture deserves to be privileged in this way? It would be fun to watch them scrap over it.

    I break history into two general eras:

    Before and after the lapstrake hull.

    Read More
  154. Hey Jack D – Suddenly your powers of historical discernment are failing you buddy . A.D. = ” Year of OUR Lord ” not ” Year of THE Lord , ( Whom you must worship too ) . But let’s not split hairs here . I’d guess it’s the Lord part that sticks in your craw .

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Right, but if I have to write "in the year of OUR Lord", they I'm lying because he ain't mine.

    I could write 2017 ADT - anno Domini tui - in the year of YOUR Lord.

    Would you be OK writing "in the year of OUR Prophet (Mohamed)?

    I have no problem with the idea of a Lord , or even that Jesus is YOUR Lord, but he ain't mine.
  155. @Ed
    Honestly I think these diversity "executives" just come up with this crap to justify their jobs & high salaries.

    They can't possibly believe any of this will close the so called achievement gap.

    Knowing that your job can’t possibly ever be successfully done would give a mindless drone a real sense of security, not to mention a stress level of nil.

    Read More
  156. @Anonymous
    It's not just that England is small. Their population was not very large either. In 1775, it is estimated there were 8 million people in the United Kingdom. I think that included Ireland. France had 24 million at that time.

    So for a small nation with a small population to exert that much control is indeed impressive.

    “for a small nation with a small population to exert that much control is indeed impressive”

    Indeed. I wonder if it’ll ever happen again that a numerically tiny group exerts control out of all proportion to its numbers?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    You get 10 bonus points for omitting the parentheses.

    Is certified-kosher Coca-Cola sold everywhere, or only in my local supermarket?

    I was on hold with a major corporation earlier, listening to some moronic pop song. When I heard the lyric snippet "everything you need," for a second I thought I was hearing "everything Jew need." What, if anything, that means, I know not.
  157. @Jack D
    Kind of like the maps that the Russians used to publish during the Cold War.

    Or even today if you go to China with an American GPS device, everything is several blocks off even if you have the Chinese map files (rendering the device worthless) - the Chinese intentionally obfuscate their map coordinates vs. the GPS system.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restrictions_on_geographic_data_in_China#GCJ-02

    Meanwhile, the Soviets made (it's not clear how) incredibly detailed maps of the US down to the building level. Google them - they are fantastic. Not just military sites but EVERYTHING is shown. Everything you would have needed to occupy the country. They are as good as Google maps are today. The effort involved would have been enormous.

    Soviet maps… Fascinating! Thanks.

    Read More
  158. @Jack D
    Kind of like the maps that the Russians used to publish during the Cold War.

    Or even today if you go to China with an American GPS device, everything is several blocks off even if you have the Chinese map files (rendering the device worthless) - the Chinese intentionally obfuscate their map coordinates vs. the GPS system.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restrictions_on_geographic_data_in_China#GCJ-02

    Meanwhile, the Soviets made (it's not clear how) incredibly detailed maps of the US down to the building level. Google them - they are fantastic. Not just military sites but EVERYTHING is shown. Everything you would have needed to occupy the country. They are as good as Google maps are today. The effort involved would have been enormous.

    Soviet maps… Fascinating! Thanks.

    Read More
  159. @Ed
    Honestly I think these diversity "executives" just come up with this crap to justify their jobs & high salaries.

    They can't possibly believe any of this will close the so called achievement gap.

    Suppose you know the gap can’t be closed, but it is still your job to do something about the gap. I suppose you’d do cosmetic stuff like this, knowing it wouldn’t help but also confident that it would look like something was being done, and also that at least you weren’t doing any *harm*. This is probably the best we can hope for from someone with this job.

    Read More
  160. @Jack D
    BTW, one thing that the "upside down" map makes clear is how big Australia is - almost as big as the continental US, but it only has 23 million people - less than Texas. Now most of it is uninhabitable semi-desert but even the well watered and temperate south coast is largely empty. From Melbourne to Sydney is about the same distance as NY to Charlotte, NC but there are no significant coastal cities in between and inland there is only the artificial capital of Canberra with only 350k people. There are several spots on the coast with natural harbors, rivers, etc. that could easily support large cities but they were just never built. Instead of 3 or 4 cities in between with millions of people you have little villages with 10 or 15,000 people.

    Some interesting geology in the North and West which explains at least why there’s so little up there.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Australia#Soils

    Except in the Lake Eyre Basin and adjacent areas to the east, the soils of Northern Australia are quite remarkable in global terms for their low fertility and difficulty of working. Most of them consist chiefly of hard laterite developed during period of climate much more humid than even that of Darwin today. Since there has been no mountain building in the region since the Precambrian and no glaciation since the Carboniferous, the region’s soils have generally been under continuous weathering without renewal for over 250 million years, as against less than ten thousand for most soils in Europe, Asia, North America and New Zealand which have been formed from recent mountain building or glacial scouring of the land.

    This immensely long weathering time means that nutrient levels in Northern Australian soils are exceptionally low because practically all soluble minerals have long been weathered out. The major constituents of most soils in Northern Australia are iron and aluminium oxides, both of which are not only very insoluble but also serve to reduce the soil pH and remove phosphorus from the soil as insoluble iron and aluminium phosphates. The insolubility of these metal oxides also serves, under the extremely harsh conditions during the dry season in the north and generally in the south, to create massive sheets which are impossible to plough.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    The north is not a great place to live for many reasons, but the south coast is similar in climate to California or the Mediterranean, with vineyards to prove it. Any place where vinifera grapes (and olives) can grow (which BTW excludes most of the US outside the West Coast) is pretty much guarantied to be very hospitable to humans.
  161. @Jack D
    Massachusetts is a pretty white state, so if 86% of the school kids in Boston are non-white, then there's really no hope. It's really over for white people in America. They just have to wait a little while longer for the old white folks to die and then it's theirs. I'm sure they will turn it to sh*t like every other non-white country outside of E. Asia, but it's over, I'm sad to say. I don't want to sound doom and gloomish, but facts are facts.

    That is pretty much my prognosis. The baby boomers are going to have one helluva time in the old folks home.

    Read More
  162. @Anonymous Nephew
    "for a small nation with a small population to exert that much control is indeed impressive"

    Indeed. I wonder if it'll ever happen again that a numerically tiny group exerts control out of all proportion to its numbers?

    You get 10 bonus points for omitting the parentheses.

    Is certified-kosher Coca-Cola sold everywhere, or only in my local supermarket?

    I was on hold with a major corporation earlier, listening to some moronic pop song. When I heard the lyric snippet “everything you need,” for a second I thought I was hearing “everything Jew need.” What, if anything, that means, I know not.

    Read More
  163. @Ferdinand Vanhalen
    The Nature Valley brand isn't really exorbitant, just $10 at Amazon for a box of a dozen; as a performer condition it's certainly easier discharged than having to remove all the green M&Ms. So if that's the worst contract rider they could find on him... OTOH, it's not very Black(tm) either. The problematic ramifications of Ta and his consumption of granola bars could surely serve as media grist until the next time, I dunno, when Apple releases a phone, or Kellyanne Conway does something

    It was brown M&Ms, and the point of the whimsical snack spec was that it was easy to check. A brown M&M in the candy dish would alert Van Halen to the likelihood of overloaded circuits or collapsing floors.

    Not sure if the engineering requirements for a successful speech by TNC are equally stringent.

    Read More
  164. @Pericles
    This is worth disseminating to a wider audience. While it appears the law (AB 1887) has exemptions for important stuff like sports, it also appears the NCAA relocated games from North Carolina to more PC locations. So even if UCLA could go, they obviously shouldn't go. Remember, social justice tastes better than winning ever would.

    http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/the-state-worker/article139666758.html

    http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article122451809.html

    http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article104533396.html

    http://www.eqca.org/ab1887-2/

    Pericles, Well I thought posting it here would help spread it to a wider audience. We’ll see.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pericles
    Better to troll the innocents on FB than inform the hard cases here.
  165. @Anon
    Sailer, where do you stand on the whole B.C./A.D., B.C.E/C.E. what-for; I think these chronology justice-warriors in the latter camp have a point, insofar as A.D. dating doesn't actually proceed from an event (it's off by a few years for the birth of Jesus of Nazareth). Partially you could save it by just retconning "A.D." to "Arbitrary Date" but I can't think of a good one for the terminus ante quem extent.

    You seem to have a lot of time on your hands-- any ideas?

    One of the few things I remember clearly from college was that a sure way to tell an intelligent person from a dullard was how he used dates in history. An educated person would put the “A.D.” before the date, since it stands for “In the year of our Lord” while an uneducated person would put the “A.D.” after the date because he never learned the meaning of “anno domini.”

    No one needed to be told that “B.C.” stood for “before Christ” at that time and therefore that was not a problem for any one. I wonder why we don’t fight to keep to our Christian calendar the way we are finally fighting to maintain the right to say “Merry Christmas.”

    Read More
  166. @Jack D
    Massachusetts is a pretty white state, so if 86% of the school kids in Boston are non-white, then there's really no hope. It's really over for white people in America. They just have to wait a little while longer for the old white folks to die and then it's theirs. I'm sure they will turn it to sh*t like every other non-white country outside of E. Asia, but it's over, I'm sad to say. I don't want to sound doom and gloomish, but facts are facts.

    Whites have decided to not reproduce at even the replacement rate. So have the Japs. I suspect that the Han Chinese won’t be far behind. I feel a certain pity for the blacks and browns who will inherit the Earth from us but without us. But not much.

    Read More
  167. @The Q Entity
    1789 will probably be made Year 1 if they ever get serious about it.

    The French revolutionaries actually did almost this, but their Year One wasn’t 1789 (too much talk), but 1792, when the king went to the guillotine.

    Read More
  168. traditionally marginalized students to engage in rigorous curriculums and pedagogy in Boston’s schools

    Not holding my breath for the implementation of this part of the plan.

    Read More
  169. I always read CE as Christan Era and BCE as Before the Christian Era.

    Read More
  170. @Anonymous Nephew
    Some interesting geology in the North and West which explains at least why there's so little up there.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Australia#Soils

    Except in the Lake Eyre Basin and adjacent areas to the east, the soils of Northern Australia are quite remarkable in global terms for their low fertility and difficulty of working. Most of them consist chiefly of hard laterite developed during period of climate much more humid than even that of Darwin today. Since there has been no mountain building in the region since the Precambrian and no glaciation since the Carboniferous, the region's soils have generally been under continuous weathering without renewal for over 250 million years, as against less than ten thousand for most soils in Europe, Asia, North America and New Zealand which have been formed from recent mountain building or glacial scouring of the land.

    This immensely long weathering time means that nutrient levels in Northern Australian soils are exceptionally low because practically all soluble minerals have long been weathered out. The major constituents of most soils in Northern Australia are iron and aluminium oxides, both of which are not only very insoluble but also serve to reduce the soil pH and remove phosphorus from the soil as insoluble iron and aluminium phosphates. The insolubility of these metal oxides also serves, under the extremely harsh conditions during the dry season in the north and generally in the south, to create massive sheets which are impossible to plough.
     

    The north is not a great place to live for many reasons, but the south coast is similar in climate to California or the Mediterranean, with vineyards to prove it. Any place where vinifera grapes (and olives) can grow (which BTW excludes most of the US outside the West Coast) is pretty much guarantied to be very hospitable to humans.

    Read More
  171. @Waylon 347
    Hey Jack D - Suddenly your powers of historical discernment are failing you buddy . A.D. = " Year of OUR Lord " not " Year of THE Lord , ( Whom you must worship too ) . But let's not split hairs here . I'd guess it's the Lord part that sticks in your craw .

    Right, but if I have to write “in the year of OUR Lord”, they I’m lying because he ain’t mine.

    I could write 2017 ADT – anno Domini tui – in the year of YOUR Lord.

    Would you be OK writing “in the year of OUR Prophet (Mohamed)?

    I have no problem with the idea of a Lord , or even that Jesus is YOUR Lord, but he ain’t mine.

    Read More
  172. @syonredux

    “This is the start of a three-year effort to decolonize the curriculum in our public schools,” said Colin Rose, assistant superintendent of opportunity and achievement gaps for Boston public schools.
     

    The district has 125 schools and 57,000 students, 86% of whom are non-white, with the largest groups being Latino and black. After changing the maps, Rose said, educators plan to look at other subjects and shift away from presenting white history as the dominant perspective….
     
    Well, let's start by "decolonizing" the sciences. From now on, Blacks and Hispanics will no longer be taught things that were invented/discovered by Europeans: Calculus, the Theory of Relativity, Natural Selection, the Double Helix, Maxwell's Equations, Statistical Mechanics, etc

    “From now on, Blacks and Hispanics will no longer be taught things that were invented/discovered by Europeans: Calculus, the Theory of Relativity, Natural Selection, the Double Helix, Maxwell’s Equations, Statistical Mechanics, etc” – they are way ahead of you on that.

    Read More
  173. @Jack D
    BTW, one thing that the "upside down" map makes clear is how big Australia is - almost as big as the continental US, but it only has 23 million people - less than Texas. Now most of it is uninhabitable semi-desert but even the well watered and temperate south coast is largely empty. From Melbourne to Sydney is about the same distance as NY to Charlotte, NC but there are no significant coastal cities in between and inland there is only the artificial capital of Canberra with only 350k people. There are several spots on the coast with natural harbors, rivers, etc. that could easily support large cities but they were just never built. Instead of 3 or 4 cities in between with millions of people you have little villages with 10 or 15,000 people.

    That sounds good on paper, Jack. If they would just go ahead and change the gun laws to conform to my arsenal, quit allowing the Chinese to buy up the whole country, and bring back Bon Scott, I’d be on the next plane.

    Read More
  174. @Pericles
    Yeah, SNL is one of those inexplicable shows to a non-American. I've heard it used to be funny in the 70s or something? Regarding comedy, someone said it has changed from the audience laughing at the jokes to the audience clapping at the jokes.

    Hey have you heard the one about DRUMPF, he's stupid amirite? (Standing ovation for five minutes.)

    Humor in general does not travel well, especially verbal humor and double especially political humor.

    But even for American audiences, SNL has not aged well IMHO. Lorne Michaels (a very rich man) says that the audience for SNL is young people and there is always a fresh crop of young people, but to me (an old person) this does not explain it. The classic, Belushi era SNL WAS really funny, the current SNL just isn’t. 99% of the skits fall totally flat or they are one joke painfully stretched to 10 minutes. Portraying Hillary as a much younger, attractive woman less than half her age (although accurately as a Lesbian) instead of a tottering old lady with cankles was the last straw for me.

    Read More
  175. @inertial
    assistant superintendent of opportunity and achievement gaps

    Make his salary inversely proportionate to the size of the gap and watch the fun begin.

    I wonder if the white student population in a district like Boston is bimodal, with some very smart magnet school kids and most of the rest the kind of Southie trash that can’t even get into a mediocre Catholic school.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Foreign Expert
    There's a lot quality private schools in the Boston area. Check out Roxbury Latin's Harvard acceptance rate. Noble & Greenough is not in Boston but very nearby.
  176. @syonredux

    “This is the start of a three-year effort to decolonize the curriculum in our public schools,” said Colin Rose, assistant superintendent of opportunity and achievement gaps for Boston public schools.
     

    The district has 125 schools and 57,000 students, 86% of whom are non-white, with the largest groups being Latino and black. After changing the maps, Rose said, educators plan to look at other subjects and shift away from presenting white history as the dominant perspective….
     
    Well, let's start by "decolonizing" the sciences. From now on, Blacks and Hispanics will no longer be taught things that were invented/discovered by Europeans: Calculus, the Theory of Relativity, Natural Selection, the Double Helix, Maxwell's Equations, Statistical Mechanics, etc

    You kid, but this is already a Thing:

    https://youtu.be/C9SiRNibD14

    Read More
  177. @Pericles
    Yeah, SNL is one of those inexplicable shows to a non-American. I've heard it used to be funny in the 70s or something? Regarding comedy, someone said it has changed from the audience laughing at the jokes to the audience clapping at the jokes.

    Hey have you heard the one about DRUMPF, he's stupid amirite? (Standing ovation for five minutes.)

    Having recently watched some of the earliest days of SNL, I have to say, it never was really that brilliant, except in very brief spots. Much of the humor was simply lame, and there were always a lot of bits that relied on very-quick-to-date topical references to people who have disappeared from the public mind (why is saying “Hamilton Jordan” funny?).

    Read More
  178. @syonredux
    Well, since SJWs live in Hitler's shadow, maybe this dating system would work:

    BH: Before Hitler (prior to 1933)

    AH: After Hitler (1933 on)

    Well, since SJWs live in Hitler’s shadow, maybe this dating system would work:

    BH: Before Hitler (prior to 1933)

    AH: After Hitler (1933 on)

    Hmmmmm.

    Maybe a third age is needed:

    LHaaT: Literally Hitler all the Time (January 20, 1981, i.e. Reagan’s inauguration, onward)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Romanian
    In the very smart, yet ultraliberal "Transmetropolitan" comic book series, the main character, gonzo journalist Spider Jerusalem, reveals that the City doesn't use objective time keeping anymore. They may have it for archival purposes, but everything is referenced with the present day in mind. I paid no attention to the tidbit at the time, but I'm thinking that this would be a very interesting way of screwing up the collective memory of a people and their common cultural reference points.
  179. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Well, since SJWs live in Hitler’s shadow, maybe this dating system would work:

    BH: Before Hitler (prior to 1933)

    AH: After Hitler (1933 on)
     
    Hmmmmm.

    Maybe a third age is needed:

    LHaaT: Literally Hitler all the Time (January 20, 1981, i.e. Reagan's inauguration, onward)

    In the very smart, yet ultraliberal “Transmetropolitan” comic book series, the main character, gonzo journalist Spider Jerusalem, reveals that the City doesn’t use objective time keeping anymore. They may have it for archival purposes, but everything is referenced with the present day in mind. I paid no attention to the tidbit at the time, but I’m thinking that this would be a very interesting way of screwing up the collective memory of a people and their common cultural reference points.

    Read More
  180. This is a an absolutely terrible projection. It wildly distorts the *shapes* of the tropical continents\countries in order to do equal areas. (At least the Mercator wildly distorted the poles–a bunch of territory no one cares about much.)

    It’s a particularly stupid choice for a teaching aid because one of the things that kids should walk away from glancing at a map is “this is what Africa looks like” or “this what South America looks like”.

    My kids grew up looking at a National Geographic world map on our kitchen wall, which easily handles this by having the lines of longitude curve (except the prime meridian). Sure, there’s still stretching in the polar regions, but it gets things “close enough” and the curved lines and overall shape convey continually to the kid’s brain that … it’s really a sphere. (Probably a Robinson projection: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robinson_projection)

    *Everything about is better educationally than this new PC POS map. So of course, the “educators”–what a joke name for these people–are foisting POS maps on the kids.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    The absolute best teaching tool for kids is a globe. Paper maps work well for small areas, even continents but the only good way to represent the whole planet is as a ball because it is a ball. Imagine having to teach kids basketball using a rectangular paper representation of a basketball. Thing like great circle routes, or why you should leave New York and head directly north if you want to get to steamy Bangkok, which make no sense at all on most paper maps, are perfectly obvious with a globe and a piece of string.

    http://www.greatcirclemapper.net/en/great-circle-mapper.html?route=KJFK-VTBS%2C&aircraft=&speed=
  181. @Steve Sailer
    Yeah.

    I'm good at noticing the raw materials of what might be funny, but I'm a tier or two down from professional comedy writers at finishing jokes.

    Real comedy writers are really, really funny.

    please don’t fuck with our Steve….it is too late.

    Read More
  182. you, Steve are such a fighter! I always go back to Jersey these days, I have told my sons about jersey situations, and I just live and hope that people are rebels these days.

    Read More
  183. @AnotherDad
    This is a an absolutely terrible projection. It wildly distorts the *shapes* of the tropical continents\countries in order to do equal areas. (At least the Mercator wildly distorted the poles--a bunch of territory no one cares about much.)

    It's a particularly stupid choice for a teaching aid because one of the things that kids should walk away from glancing at a map is "this is what Africa looks like" or "this what South America looks like".

    My kids grew up looking at a National Geographic world map on our kitchen wall, which easily handles this by having the lines of longitude curve (except the prime meridian). Sure, there's still stretching in the polar regions, but it gets things "close enough" and the curved lines and overall shape convey continually to the kid's brain that ... it's really a sphere. (Probably a Robinson projection: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robinson_projection)

    *Everything about is better educationally than this new PC POS map. So of course, the "educators"--what a joke name for these people--are foisting POS maps on the kids.

    The absolute best teaching tool for kids is a globe. Paper maps work well for small areas, even continents but the only good way to represent the whole planet is as a ball because it is a ball. Imagine having to teach kids basketball using a rectangular paper representation of a basketball. Thing like great circle routes, or why you should leave New York and head directly north if you want to get to steamy Bangkok, which make no sense at all on most paper maps, are perfectly obvious with a globe and a piece of string.

    http://www.greatcirclemapper.net/en/great-circle-mapper.html?route=KJFK-VTBS%2C&aircraft=&speed=

    Read More
  184. A salient fact to bear in mind is that the Northern Hemisphere has a lot more land than the Southern, and is therefore more of interest to terrestrial beings such as we are.

    Read More
  185. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    We are told that immigrants are a blessing for the national economy.

    In that case, progressive immigration should be like progressive taxation.

    Now, under progressive taxation, the lower classes pay little or nothing and instead receive much of the revenues.

    Likewise, under progressive immigration, poor nations should receive most of the blessing of immigration.

    We are told that more immigration will lead to more economic growth because immigrants are so hardworking, intelligent, motivated, and enterprising. They are wonders for any national economy.
    Well, rich nations don’t deserve such blessings since they are rich already. Why should they take in immigrants to make their big economies even bigger?
    After all, the worst teams in sports get the first draft picks since best teams got the best players.
    It makes no sense to send more great players to an already great team.

    So, progressive immigration should bless the poorest nations with mass immigration. And since immigrants claim to be ‘progressive’ and ‘leftist’, they should want to help the poor than the rich. If immigrants say they want to go to nations that are already rich and help grow the economies, that’d be like helping the rich to become even richer. We don’t want that.
    We want all that immigrant energy and ingenuity to be used to help poor nations develop into richer ones.

    So, I think progressive immigration should be about sending most immigrants to the poorest nations where the new arrivals will use their skills and energy to grow their economies there. Why help rich nations grow richer? Why not help poor nations grow rich too?

    So, send all the Mexicans, Chinese, Indians, Arabs, and Africans to the poorest nations on Earth. Now, that is truly progressive in blessing the poorest nations with human capital of talent, spirit, and industry that will do wonders for the economies.

    And if the would-be immigrants are already in poor nations, they should summon their great spirit, intelligence, and skills to build their OWN economies. They should help expand the economy in their poor nations than go to rich nations to make the already rich even richer.

    Read More
  186. @Jack D
    Hell, over 50 years ago when I was in elementary school, they had a 3 dimensional spherical map in every classroom. You could even spin it on its axis. It was a perfect projection of the earth onto a spherical surface with no distortion whatsoever. They called it a "globe".

    Me too. But many of the country names were raaaaacist. So all the globes got thrown out.

    Read More
  187. yeah…get it, Steve, you don’t need to nudge me, but WTF: …please, all of you, just GET IT.

    Read More
  188. The irony of the Peters projection as an SJW projection is that shapes are least distorted on it where Europe is. The twice as wide (and older) Lambert projection has its smallest distortion at the Equator; so it is even less Eurocentric and more Afrocentric than the Peters projection.

    Read More
  189. […] Peters projection to be used in Boston schools. Personally, I prefer the exactly twice as wide Lambert projection, which is undistorted at the […]

    Read More
  190. @Steve Sailer
    What % of people know what BCE stands for? Before Current Era? But what does "Before Current Era" mean? Does that mean Before Today? Does that mean Before 2000 AD? Or does that before Before 1 AD? If I say that wheat was domesticated about 9500 BCE, does that mean it was 9500 years ago or 11,500 years ago?

    It means the latter, but I really don't think that's obvious to most people.

    So this is another of the ways of making people dumber that have become popular over my lifetime.

    It’s not obvious to Americans but there’s a lot of people on earth that don’t use the “Christian ” dating system. (Japan, Thailand, etc. ).

    Read More
  191. @Marty T
    I wonder if the white student population in a district like Boston is bimodal, with some very smart magnet school kids and most of the rest the kind of Southie trash that can't even get into a mediocre Catholic school.

    There’s a lot quality private schools in the Boston area. Check out Roxbury Latin’s Harvard acceptance rate. Noble & Greenough is not in Boston but very nearby.

    Read More
  192. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Steve Sailer
    A big chunk of Africa is uninhabitable, but the sub-Saharan area is really immense.

    With the price of solar cells tumbling – electricity generated from solar arrays is now cheaper than energy produced by conventional means, the desert nations of the Sahara are sitting on a potential gold mine, with ‘clean’ power hungry Europe on their doorstop.

    Only trouble is no one trusts the Magrehbis to be honorable with their energy once they’ve got the upper hand, so to speak.

    Read More
  193. @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin
    They could use AUC, Ab Urbe Condita, based on the year of founding of Rome, 753BC. So this year is 2770 AUC

    But seriously it would probably based around a year zero, like in Cambodia.

    But seriously it would probably based around a year zero, like in Cambodia.

    Every year would be year zero.

    Read More
  194. @Bryan
    I've read that the Egyptians from the way back viewed the world upside down, with south being "up." From their perspective, the Nile flowed down, toward the Mediterranean, making the upper Nile, up in their schematic.

    We also have the medieval T-O maps, which give yet another perspective.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T_and_O_map

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The medieval T-O maps put Jerusalem at the center of the world, which, judging by news coverage per capita, might still be true.

    Seriously, the idea of the Levant / Fertile Crescent as the junction/fulcrum of the three continents of the Old World has some validity.

    , @Olorin

    The medieval T-O maps put Jerusalem at the center of the world, which, judging by news coverage per capita, might still be true.
     
    Damn. Our host beat me to it. :D

    I hope he got more laughs than I did the first time I said it, long ago teaching a unit on cartography as part of never mind what never mind where. It was one of my early lessons in how Certain Things And People Are Not To Be Noticed Never Mind Chuckled At.

    Maybe that's all the "virtue of a long life" comes down to: eventually, you can laugh at what used to be forbidden/punished.

  195. @Jack D
    All attempts at restarting the clock have failed because it's just too convenient to have a common numbering system. But AD = "In the year of our Lord" really is a bit much for non-Christians.

    The Japanese still have eras, e.g., Showa Era, Heisei Era (ongoing). They don’t even have to correspond to our years.

    “Thus, 1989 corresponds to Shōwa 64 until 7 January and Heisei 1 (平成元年 Heisei gannen?, gannen means “first year”) since 8 January.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heisei_period

    This approach appears to be known as the Nengo calendar: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_era_name

    Being Japanese, they of course have multiple calendar systems. They also have leap years, by imperial edict, but not the same as ours.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_calendar

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    You're absolutely right. Just this week I was looking at a Heisei 28 Toyota . No, wait, I wasn't. In reality the Japanese use the Western calendar for most purposes. Jews also have their own calendar but even in Israel they mostly use the Western dating system (sometimes in parallel to their own).

    It's very convenient for everyone to use the same calendar (and clock). It doesn't even appear that Jesus was born in the year 0 or 1. The only objectionable part is having to say "our Lord", thus the less objectionable CE.
  196. Only trouble is no one trusts the Magrehbis to be honorable with their energy once they’ve got the upper hand, so to speak.

    There was an ambitious German-led project called Desertec which collapsed a few years back. It was probably never a viable plan, but political instability and/or the threat of terrorism certainly didn’t help.

    Read More
  197. I’d like to thank the people who truly want to show others the significance of the USA feeding the rest of the world is. Mercator did NOT due us any justice at all, made it appear a country of = land mass was helping out another country of = land mass. The smaller was helping the larger! Finally the rest of the world will now understand.

    Read More
  198. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Maybe making Europe and America look smaller – which is a more accurate picture – will make Whites aware of how perilous their condition really is.

    Read More
  199. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Perhaps. But they're hampered by their environment, and, possibly, their own thoughtcrime minds.

    For example, my wife likes to watch SNL, but I just can't. Even when it's funny, it's completely unoriginal. It's a bit like a really good restaurant that makes only one meal. Sure, they're expert at making that dish, but it gets old eating exact same meal every single night.

    I kind of feel for comedians these days. They won't get sent to the gulag, but they have to know that their careers are toast if they don't stick to the party line. That has to be frustrating for a group that prides itself on being gadflies.

    I don’t really feel sorry for comedians. They thought they were much smarter than ol’ Ma and Pa Kettle, the White people they liked to sneer at.

    Read More
  200. @Pericles
    We also have the medieval T-O maps, which give yet another perspective.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T_and_O_map

    The medieval T-O maps put Jerusalem at the center of the world, which, judging by news coverage per capita, might still be true.

    Seriously, the idea of the Levant / Fertile Crescent as the junction/fulcrum of the three continents of the Old World has some validity.

    Read More
  201. @Pericles
    We also have the medieval T-O maps, which give yet another perspective.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T_and_O_map

    The medieval T-O maps put Jerusalem at the center of the world, which, judging by news coverage per capita, might still be true.

    Damn. Our host beat me to it. :D

    I hope he got more laughs than I did the first time I said it, long ago teaching a unit on cartography as part of never mind what never mind where. It was one of my early lessons in how Certain Things And People Are Not To Be Noticed Never Mind Chuckled At.

    Maybe that’s all the “virtue of a long life” comes down to: eventually, you can laugh at what used to be forbidden/punished.

    Read More
  202. I’ve been championing an upside-down Peters since the ’90s. One of my favorite books is Mark Monmonnier’s How to Lie With Maps.

    Mexico’s relation to her northern neighbor on such a projection reminds me of this Gary Larson classic.

    Read More
  203. @Buffalo Joe
    Pericles, Well I thought posting it here would help spread it to a wider audience. We'll see.

    Better to troll the innocents on FB than inform the hard cases here.

    Read More
  204. @fitzGetty
    Africa will need all that land when the birth explosion hits in the coming 15 years and billions need a space to starve in ...

    Africa would not have had that many people currently if it wasn’t for ^&** white people sending them medicine, food and money. If we had let nature take itz course then the population of Sub-Saharan Africa would probably be only about 100 million.

    Read More
  205. @Pericles
    The Japanese still have eras, e.g., Showa Era, Heisei Era (ongoing). They don't even have to correspond to our years.

    "Thus, 1989 corresponds to Shōwa 64 until 7 January and Heisei 1 (平成元年 Heisei gannen?, gannen means "first year") since 8 January."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heisei_period

    This approach appears to be known as the Nengo calendar: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_era_name

    Being Japanese, they of course have multiple calendar systems. They also have leap years, by imperial edict, but not the same as ours.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_calendar

    You’re absolutely right. Just this week I was looking at a Heisei 28 Toyota . No, wait, I wasn’t. In reality the Japanese use the Western calendar for most purposes. Jews also have their own calendar but even in Israel they mostly use the Western dating system (sometimes in parallel to their own).

    It’s very convenient for everyone to use the same calendar (and clock). It doesn’t even appear that Jesus was born in the year 0 or 1. The only objectionable part is having to say “our Lord”, thus the less objectionable CE.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pericles
    Do you live in Japan? It looks from wikipedia like official correspondence uses the nengo calendar, though possibly not universally.

    Sure it's convenient to have the same calendar and clock system, but the real world interferes. I give you the pleasure of time zones, for instance. Or normalizing historical dates and times, of course. We also have the same kind of problem with valid names, valid addresses, and indeed written characters (delve into the joy of unicode).
  206. @Joe Walker
    I think it is 86% of the kids in Boston public schools who are non-white. Most of the Boston white kids would go to private schools.

    Well, 2,400 mostly whites and Asians are hiding out at Boston Latin.

    Read More
  207. @Joe Walker
    Would that be living anywhere near you?

    Yeah, I was surrounded by them in my youth, which is why the colleens liked to go big with us Mediterranean types.

    Read More
  208. @Steve Sailer
    No doubt, The Gap will be all gone by then.

    No comment on the newish BPS super, Tommy Chang, formerly the LAUSD Local Instructional Superintendent, Intensive Support & Innovation Center? Did he do anything for the LA schools worthy of note?

    Read More
  209. @Jack D
    You're absolutely right. Just this week I was looking at a Heisei 28 Toyota . No, wait, I wasn't. In reality the Japanese use the Western calendar for most purposes. Jews also have their own calendar but even in Israel they mostly use the Western dating system (sometimes in parallel to their own).

    It's very convenient for everyone to use the same calendar (and clock). It doesn't even appear that Jesus was born in the year 0 or 1. The only objectionable part is having to say "our Lord", thus the less objectionable CE.

    Do you live in Japan? It looks from wikipedia like official correspondence uses the nengo calendar, though possibly not universally.

    Sure it’s convenient to have the same calendar and clock system, but the real world interferes. I give you the pleasure of time zones, for instance. Or normalizing historical dates and times, of course. We also have the same kind of problem with valid names, valid addresses, and indeed written characters (delve into the joy of unicode).

    Read More

Comments are closed.

PastClassics
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
While other top brass played press agents for the administration’s war, William Odom told the truth about Iraq—though few listened.
A thousand years of meritocracy shaped the Middle Kingdom.