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Do you ever get the impression that the standards for being considered “innovative” in the San Francisco Bay Area really aren’t all that high?

From the San Jose Mercury-News:

A Bay Area developer’s innovative commute hack: live, work in one building

Marisa Kendall July 6, 2018 at 10:49 am

The proposed building at 4th and Bryant streets in San Francisco, which would combine co-living and co-working space, with a goal of eliminating grueling commutes, is pictured in a rendering. (Courtesy of Realtex)

SAN FRANCISCO — As soul-sucking commutes become synonymous with Bay Area living, one local real estate developer has proposed an innovative solution — a project that would allow hundreds of employees to live and work in the same building.

The 13-story development at 4th and Bryant streets in San Francisco’s SoMa neighborhood would provide housing for at least 400 residents and office space for about half that many. It appears to be the Bay Area’s first large-scale building to combine co-living and co-working space, according to the developer, San Francisco-based Realtex. But it might not be the last, as developers continue to experiment with creative ways to fulfill a growing demand to bring housing and jobs closer together.

Realtex is proposing 400 small studio apartments, each with a bathroom and basic kitchen. Residents would share larger communal kitchens

The tech industry is bringing America 1975 Leningrad levels of domestic comfort.

and lounges — as they do in properties by OpenDoor, Starcity and other trendy co-living spaces that are taking the housing market by storm.

Do you ever get the impression that standards of living in San Francisco, the richest city in America, aren’t really all that high?

About 25,000 square feet of the 4th and Bryant project would be dedicated to co-working office space — enough room to serve about half of the building’s residents, said Cody Fornari, CEO of Realtex. He envisions other amenities inside, such as a theater, gym and market

You could owe your soul to the company store. Pretty soon, living in San Francisco in 2018 could be like living in a West Virginia coal mining company town in 1918.

or restaurant. The result would be so all-inclusive that “you really don’t need to leave the building,” he said.

After all, the ferocious San Francisco weather is too hot and/or cold to step outside into. That’s why there are no homeless in San Francisco. They all died from the heat or cold.

“We’re trying to put forward a very innovative approach to what we think is a big need,” Fornari said. “There’s a lot of people who are commuting two hours on Google buses.”

I’ve got this even crazier idea to cut down on long commutes: Internet companies could use this thing called the Internet.

Nah, forget I ever mentioned it.

The project addresses the problem at the crux of the Bay Area’s crippling housing shortage and traffic woes — there aren’t enough homes in the region’s job centers.

Obviously, Internet firms can only locate their jobs on top of the vast natural underground Internet deposits in Palo Alto.

… Other companies are taking it upon themselves to create new housing for their workers — Facebook is planning to build 1,500 homes on its expanded Willow Campus in Menlo Park, and Google is backing a 10,000-home development in North Bayshore in Mountain View.

The 4th and Bryant project seeks to take the concept a step further by putting housing and work together in one massive building.

Realtex is exploring selling or leasing the entire building to one large employer, which could use the co-working space as an office and the apartments to house its employees.

When you get fired, Security would escort you not only out of your cubicle but out of your apartment in succession. Keep a lot of cardboard boxes around at all times so your personal effects won’t wind up sitting on the curb outside The Complex.

Coming next: innovative live-work underground sugar caves.

 
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  1. istevefan says:

    I don’t think it posted, but I tried to link to a series of tweets discussing the same topic as this post concerning the conditions of the Bay Area. In case it didn’t post, this series of tweets compares contemporary Silicon Valley to the former USSR.

    Read More
    • Agree: 27 year old
    • Replies: @bored identity



    The tech industry is bringing America 1975 Leningrad levels of domestic comfort.

     

    1975....Leningrad....all the comfort that коммуналка offers...

    Please, just stop Uncle Ernest, bored identity is getting too mushy:

    https://youtu.be/lh_h-KdbBrE

    Although, bored identity finds it laughable to compare Санкт-Ленинбург's Resilience to San Francisco's... Resistance :

    https://youtu.be/OGyUuSZGKPI

    In conclusion, bored identity sees only one, or maybe two solutions to the problem :

    https://youtu.be/Jrg0X9H6FGU

    https://youtu.be/jaU1OVs1fP4
    , @WowJustWow
    https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1014974099930714115.html
    , @Seamus Padraig
    By coincidence, I just posted that tweet yesterday on another of Steve's threads: http://www.unz.com/isteve/austrian-leader-proposes-sensible-compromise-nyt-aghast/#comment-2405653
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
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  2. snorlax says:

    You’re on fire today, Steve!

    Read More
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  3. Anon[167] • Disclaimer says:

    The latest update in the continuing insanity that is SF is that bedrooms are now too expensive for a single programmer to afford, and thus programmers making $100K/year in their first job out of college live with actual roommates, and not apartmentmates.

    When I tell people to come join us in NYC for the affordability, I can’t say that I’m joking.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Space Ghost
    > programmers making $100K/year in their first job out of college

    That's literally poverty level in San Francisco[1]

    Software developers just out of good schools working at the various BigCos in the San Francisco Bay Area are *starting* at 150K + superb benefits + 40K/year stock grant + 50K-60K bonus.


    [1] https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2017/04/24/bay-area-low-income-100000-san-francisco-san-mateo-county-hud/

    , @Anonymous

    programmers making $100K/year in their first job out of college
     
    If that's a real number. Wow.

    I remember the code I wrote when out of college. Wouldn't want to wipe my bum with it now.

    No wonder software is stinkingly unaffordable and abysmally bad (with horrendous design design hidden gracefully behind colorful "UX") unless crowd-tested (and even then, crashing, burning and data leaks galore are the new normal).

    Have some Uncle Bob:

    https://youtu.be/BSaAMQVq01E?t=4019

    , @The Alarmist
    When I first moved to NYC, there were a couple huge buildings on the Upper East Side affectionately known as the Dorms. Room-sharing was how many young grads got their toe in the Manhattan market.

    As for this SF complex, it sounds like they are closer to 1980s USAF enlisted barracks or bachelor officer quarters.
    , @prusmc
    Has anyonr thought of really cutting living quarters expenses by "hot bunking".
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  4. Anon[121] • Disclaimer says:

    As soul-sucking commutes become synonymous with Bay Area living, one local real estate developer has proposed an innovative solution — a project that would allow hundreds of employees to live and work in the same building.

    This sounds saner:

    As soul-sucking mass migrations become synonymous with globalism, one patriot has proposed a traditional solution — a project that would allow 100s of millions of peoples to live and work in their own nations.

    But according to globalist logic, commuting several miles between home and work is a bigger hassle than moving 10,000s of miles around the world to lose entire identities and change entire demographies.

    PS. There is a Big Bus solution. Imagine an office that is always on the move.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Luke Lea
    "As soul-sucking commutes become synonymous with Bay Area living, one local real estate developer has proposed an innovative solution — a project that would allow hundreds of employees to live and work in the same building."

    There is the golf-cart solution:

    https://www.amazon.com/Notes-Towards-New-Life-America-ebook/dp/B076J9D9C5/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1513548423&sr=1-1
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  5. Perfect for H1b Indians who can’t switch jobs. Complete with rooftop open-air defecation spaces. Indoor plumbing optional..

    Read More
    • Replies: @ThirdWorldSteveReader
    Absolutely. The more I think about this worship of immigration, the more it looks like a clever way to quietly recreate the servant class.
    , @Neuday
    Indoor plumbing is racist and reeks of toxic masculinity. #plumberssowhite
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  6. Anon[274] • Disclaimer says:

    I can’t wait for the sexual harassment lawsuits that will result from employee-residents socializing after work, at work. Every apartment will need a KGB-HR officer assigned to it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @njguy73

    I can’t wait for the sexual harassment lawsuits that will result from employee-residents socializing after work, at work. Every apartment will need a KGB-HR officer assigned to it.
     
    That will be the job of PalAlt MiniResp (Palo Alto Ministry of Respect.)
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  7. Dumbo says:

    Hey but you have to admire their creativity in inventing new words to sell bad stuff.

    living in dorms = “co-living environment”

    not being able to purchase your own things = “sharing economy”

    underpaid workers = “new economy”

    chaos and strife = “vibrancy”

    Read More
    • Replies: @JMcG
    You forgot the best one; “Gig economy.” Stringing together 6 or 7 part time jobs to scrape by.
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  8. It won’t be long until they have us all toiling in the radium furnaces of Ming the Merciless. Thanks Silicon Valley!

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    That's the Official propaganda version of the Silicon Valley Scene. This is the ugly truth:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRguZr0xCOc
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  9. Propaganda is so funny. Living in the company barracks or in the floor above your workshop is as old as bricks and mortar, and happened to be practical in those old times when transportation was difficult and building was expensive. As soon as people could live away from the noise and smoke and crowding of workplace, they did.

    Now they are adding some buzzwords to the old living-on-site thing (Silicon Valley! Innovative! Community-building! Environment-friendly) to sell it as brand new genius stuff to people who, due to city overcrowding, have to make a virtue out of necessity.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Propaganda is so funny. Living in the company barracks or in the floor above your workshop is as old as bricks and mortar, and happened to be practical in those old times when transportation was difficult and building was expensive. As soon as people could live away from the noise and smoke and crowding of workplace, they did.
     
    And they’re able to get lots of young college-educated females to forgo motherhood and relinquish family and re-locate to expensive cities were they have to live like rats for glorified secretarial jobs. Oh, I mean “knowledge worker” jobs with fancy job titles.
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  10. Every day the San Francisco Chronicle has an article on SF’s homeless problem. Everyday. Conventions are cancelling because of the deplorable condition of the streets, littered with needles, smelling of urine and piles of steaming shit. If I lived in San Francisco I think I would want to live and work in the same building, order take out meals and catch some sun and a view from the roof.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    If I lived in current-day San Franciso, the first thing I'd do would be to get on my amazing high-speed shared internet workstation and look up "U-Haul + 1-way".
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  11. Achilles says:

    These kinds of innovative living and work arrangements will need to spark commensurate legal innovations in labor contracts.

    In particular in respect of immigrant workers, the employer-landlords will need some legal way to recoup the cost of transporting workers from India or elsewhere to the Bay area as well as the cost of amortization and depreciation charges on the work/residence structure and fixtures, not to mention ongoing expenses for utilities and other services provided.

    The logical solution would be to bind such workers to the employer-landlord for a period of years. For example, in consideration of the employer-landlord’s payment of transportation to the location and room and board, the worker would bind himself to the employer for a period of time, say seven years, after which the worker would be free to negotiate an arm’s-length wage or move on to other employment.

    A variation on this may be necessary for special cases. For example, in the case of immigrants who were prisoners in their homeland and for which the employer-landlord paid a sum of money for the release to it of such prisoners, it may be appropriate to extend the indenture of binding to the entire natural life of the worker. (Obviously, the question of the legal status of any offspring of such workers is a detail that would need to addressed.)

    Facebook, Google and other Bay area tech companies may want to raise these ideas with their lobbyists. There are likely also business opportunities that might appeal to Zuckerberg and the other tech moguls with respect to creating markets for the legal rights to such workers.

    Read More
    • LOL: Rob McX
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    It took me 4 paragraphs to "see what you did there", Achilles. If slavery does start up again, I want you to be my legal counsel ... whatever side of the electric fence I'm on. Do you take pay-pal?
    , @Big Bill
    Achilles, you are behind the curve. Check out the GATS Treaty (1995) here:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Agreement_on_Trade_in_Services

    In a few years an Indian company will buy a SF "co-living" building, hire Indian workers for Indian wages, bring them to SF, plop them in the building, and work them like coolies.

    It is called "Supply Mode 4": "Presence of a [foreign] natural person." "Service delivered within the territory of the Member, with supplier present as a natural person."
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  12. Barnard says:

    The average person has to find the thought of being required to live in close quarters with his coworkers not worth any price. The turnover rate would resemble a fast food restaurant.

    Read More
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  13. @Stan d Mute
    Perfect for H1b Indians who can’t switch jobs. Complete with rooftop open-air defecation spaces. Indoor plumbing optional..

    Absolutely. The more I think about this worship of immigration, the more it looks like a clever way to quietly recreate the servant class.

    Read More
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  14. This all reminds me of something I heard Mike Enoch say the other day. Be wary of an employer providing you with free stuff, free dinners, a work fridge full of tasty food and beer available after 5:00 pm, overnight hotel accommodation, etc. They’re just looking to suck as much out of you as possible and turn you into a soulless drone devoid of a social life.

    Read More
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  15. GLT says:

    I’m happy to see SROs rebranded, I think it’s a great setup for that first decade away from home.

    Read More
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  16. When you get fired, Security would escort you not only out of your cubicle but out of your apartment in succession.

    It’ll be great! HR will complete divorce and eviction paperwork on your behalf in addition to the COBRA forms.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Heh! Kind of like the guy above said, HR will be the HR broad, landlord, resident advisor, magistrate, and family court rolled into one. Efficiency! She will report to the supreme Soviet downtown in that pyramid.

    However, at "the end of the day", as they like to say in this corporate environment, going out into the sunshine will be like being reborn. One can then live on the street in that nice climate or hang out at Golden Gate Park, and live completely off of those taxpaying people in those dormitories who don't know what a "sun" is other than from the sunshine app on their shared phones.

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  17. Gman says:

    Yes but I bet the West Virginia coal mining stores did not carry organic kombucha

    Read More
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  18. Luke Lea says:
    @Anon
    As soul-sucking commutes become synonymous with Bay Area living, one local real estate developer has proposed an innovative solution — a project that would allow hundreds of employees to live and work in the same building.

    This sounds saner:

    As soul-sucking mass migrations become synonymous with globalism, one patriot has proposed a traditional solution -- a project that would allow 100s of millions of peoples to live and work in their own nations.

    But according to globalist logic, commuting several miles between home and work is a bigger hassle than moving 10,000s of miles around the world to lose entire identities and change entire demographies.

    PS. There is a Big Bus solution. Imagine an office that is always on the move.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rstLAwFsmk

    “As soul-sucking commutes become synonymous with Bay Area living, one local real estate developer has proposed an innovative solution — a project that would allow hundreds of employees to live and work in the same building.”

    There is the golf-cart solution:

    https://www.amazon.com/Notes-Towards-New-Life-America-ebook/dp/B076J9D9C5/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1513548423&sr=1-1

    Read More
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  19. This brilliant mad genius has invented
    The dormitory.
    I can’t wait for the IPO and the Franchising of this miracle of post-modern technology.
    Next up – a bed that folds away to make more of your 10 sq meter space.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Next, there will be an app with an ironic name like Board that will put you in contact with landladies who not only will provide you with a room but also with 2 cooked meals per day.
    , @Faraday's Bobcat
    Not a dormitory - a monastery. They will live a life of silent devotion to the company mission statement. Like the monks of old made expensive liqueurs for outsiders, the new ascetics will leverage collaborative paradigms to speed the deployment of decentralized platforms for delivery of porn and cat videos.
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  20. “trendy co-living spaces”

    I know some people who joined a bohemian bourgeoisie “co-housing” community back in the hippie-resuscitating grunge era. Two decades later, the co-housers are notably less enthusiastic about the communal aspects of their community.

    When residents move out, the vacated units often have to be marketed as standard condos while soft-pedaling the communal aspects to backfill them. Too bad they all sacrificed private square footage to get the communal stuff.

    On a positive note, with their clustered-living/separate-parking arrangement, I haven’t heard of anyone backing over children in a cul-de-sac as is supposedly common in suburbs.

    Read More
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  21. @SigismundFraud
    This brilliant mad genius has invented
    The dormitory.
    I can’t wait for the IPO and the Franchising of this miracle of post-modern technology.
    Next up - a bed that folds away to make more of your 10 sq meter space.

    Next, there will be an app with an ironic name like Board that will put you in contact with landladies who not only will provide you with a room but also with 2 cooked meals per day.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alec Leamas

    Next, there will be an app with an ironic name like Board that will put you in contact with landladies who not only will provide you with a room but also with 2 cooked meals per day.
     
    Coming to a San Francisco near you:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fTkGDXRnR9I
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  22. TheBoom says:

    ” The result would be so all-inclusive that “you really don’t need to leave the building,” he said. “

    Once upon a time people who never left the building they lived in were considered “shut ins” and pitied. Such progress.

    How much of the building will be devoted to safe spaces?

    Will there be regular group criticism sessions to combat such crucial issues as micro aggressions, manspreading and eye rape?

    Will the building need to be segregated by race to relieve non whites from the constant presence of toxic whiteness?

    What happens if the building ends up being mainly white and Asian males just like the workforces? Will they need to recruit some non employees?

    Sounds like a fun life.

    Read More
    • Replies: @njguy73

    How much of the building will be devoted to safe spaces?

    Will there be regular group criticism sessions to combat such crucial issues as micro aggressions, manspreading and eye rape?

    Will the building need to be segregated by race to relieve non whites from the constant presence of toxic whiteness?

    What happens if the building ends up being mainly white and Asian males just like the workforces? Will they need to recruit some non employees?
     
    They shall abolish the orgasm. Their coders are at work upon it now, developing the UnOrgasm app. There will be no loyalty, except loyalty towards the Corporation. There will be no love, except the love of Big Bezos. There will be no laughter, except the laugh of triumph over an SNL spoofing Emmanuel Trump. There will be no art, no literature, no science. There will be no curiosity, no enjoyment of the process of life. All competing pleasures will be destroyed. But always — do not forget this, TheBoom — always there will be the intoxication of power, constantly increasing and constantly growing subtler. Always, at every moment, there will be the thrill of victory, the sensation of trampling on an enemy who is helpless. If you want a picture of the future, imagine a screen shoved in front of a human face — forever.
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  23. Do you ever get the impression that standards of living in San Francisco, the richest city in America, aren’t really all that high?

    This.

    I guess it’s all what you like, but really what’s so wonderful down further south where (tech) masters of the universe like. Ok, it’s always great if you’re rich. But what if you’re just some guy. What’s so great about the joint? Insanely unaffordable housing. The thrill of being stuck in traffic on the 101. An hour–even in off hours–just to get *out* of the joint to anywhere where you can breathe.

    Read More
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  24. So instead of bringing the call centers to the prisons, they’re bringing the prisons to the call centers. (sure, they say you could leave the building if you want to…)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    (sure, they say you could leave the building if you want to…)
     
    You can leave the building (and grounds) of a minimum-security prison too, with no problem. It's only a problem for the next time, when you get placed in the more secure facility for having left the previous one. Yeah, a friend told me how it works.
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  25. njguy73 says:
    @Anon
    I can't wait for the sexual harassment lawsuits that will result from employee-residents socializing after work, at work. Every apartment will need a KGB-HR officer assigned to it.

    I can’t wait for the sexual harassment lawsuits that will result from employee-residents socializing after work, at work. Every apartment will need a KGB-HR officer assigned to it.

    That will be the job of PalAlt MiniResp (Palo Alto Ministry of Respect.)

    Read More
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  26. njguy73 says:
    @TheBoom

    " The result would be so all-inclusive that “you really don’t need to leave the building,” he said. "
     
    Once upon a time people who never left the building they lived in were considered "shut ins" and pitied. Such progress.

    How much of the building will be devoted to safe spaces?

    Will there be regular group criticism sessions to combat such crucial issues as micro aggressions, manspreading and eye rape?

    Will the building need to be segregated by race to relieve non whites from the constant presence of toxic whiteness?

    What happens if the building ends up being mainly white and Asian males just like the workforces? Will they need to recruit some non employees?

    Sounds like a fun life.

    How much of the building will be devoted to safe spaces?

    Will there be regular group criticism sessions to combat such crucial issues as micro aggressions, manspreading and eye rape?

    Will the building need to be segregated by race to relieve non whites from the constant presence of toxic whiteness?

    What happens if the building ends up being mainly white and Asian males just like the workforces? Will they need to recruit some non employees?

    They shall abolish the orgasm. Their coders are at work upon it now, developing the UnOrgasm app. There will be no loyalty, except loyalty towards the Corporation. There will be no love, except the love of Big Bezos. There will be no laughter, except the laugh of triumph over an SNL spoofing Emmanuel Trump. There will be no art, no literature, no science. There will be no curiosity, no enjoyment of the process of life. All competing pleasures will be destroyed. But always — do not forget this, TheBoom — always there will be the intoxication of power, constantly increasing and constantly growing subtler. Always, at every moment, there will be the thrill of victory, the sensation of trampling on an enemy who is helpless. If you want a picture of the future, imagine a screen shoved in front of a human face — forever.

    Read More
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  27. MEH 0910 says:

    Read More
    • LOL: Thomas
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  28. black sea says:

    Assuming a decent female-to-male ratio, I could see how this set up might not be so bad for those in their first job out of college. Of course, the potential for adverse consequences would be high, but that’s generally the case with intra-office romances.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Neuday
    You don't know IT, the bay area, or 2018. Romance is a dead white hetero construct.

    Just call 'em internet coolies.
    , @Mr. Anon

    Assuming a decent female-to-male ratio, I could see how this set up might not be so bad for those in their first job out of college.
     
    Maybe they could build these dorms in abandoned mine-shafts.
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  29. Not Raul says:

    “When you get fired, Security would escort you not only out of your cubicle but out of your apartment in succession.“

    I bet the plan is to fill the apartments with bunk beds full of H1-Bs.

    I wonder if the companies considering buying such buildings include Cognizant, or Infosys.

    Read More
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  30. @Anon
    The latest update in the continuing insanity that is SF is that bedrooms are now too expensive for a single programmer to afford, and thus programmers making $100K/year in their first job out of college live with actual roommates, and not apartmentmates.

    When I tell people to come join us in NYC for the affordability, I can't say that I'm joking.

    > programmers making $100K/year in their first job out of college

    That’s literally poverty level in San Francisco[1]

    Software developers just out of good schools working at the various BigCos in the San Francisco Bay Area are *starting* at 150K + superb benefits + 40K/year stock grant + 50K-60K bonus.

    [1] https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2017/04/24/bay-area-low-income-100000-san-francisco-san-mateo-county-hud/

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  31. Neuday says:
    @Stan d Mute
    Perfect for H1b Indians who can’t switch jobs. Complete with rooftop open-air defecation spaces. Indoor plumbing optional..

    Indoor plumbing is racist and reeks of toxic masculinity. #plumberssowhite

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan d Mute

    Indoor plumbing is racist and reeks of toxic masculinity. #plumberssowhite

     

    So that’s what toxic masculinity smells like. Who knew?

    https://thumbs.dreamstime.com/z/plumber-crack-142669.jpg
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  32. Living at your place of work is something poor people do, historically speaking.

    Poverty is not measured by the (nominal) size of your salary or wealth, but by what it can afford you.

    Most people in SF are obviously, then, very poor people, since they cannot afford homes.

    Thats quite the “progressive paradise” the left has constructed out there, isnt it? Can’t wait till Zuck and Co try to go national with it.

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  33. istevefan says:

    Here is a NYT piece from 2012 that maybe tells us what the Silicon Valley execs really want in a workforce.

    Apple executives say that going overseas, at this point, is their only option. One former executive described how the company relied upon a Chinese factory to revamp iPhone manufacturing just weeks before the device was due on shelves. Apple had redesigned the iPhone’s screen at the last minute, forcing an assembly line overhaul. New screens began arriving at the plant near midnight.

    A foreman immediately roused 8,000 workers inside the company’s dormitories, according to the executive. Each employee was given a biscuit and a cup of tea, guided to a workstation and within half an hour started a 12-hour shift fitting glass screens into beveled frames. Within 96 hours, the plant was producing over 10,000 iPhones a day.

    “The speed and flexibility is breathtaking,” the executive said. “There’s no American plant that can match that.”

    I like the part about giving the workers a biscuit and a cup of tea before they began an unscheduled 12-hour shift.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bored identity
    And Some Proverbial, Yet Real Connor is too busy making retarded videos to figure out that fifteen years from now, his new owner, Ming the Merciless, will have that same biscuit & tea arrangement ready for him :


    https://youtu.be/KJ6tfDopW6w

    https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2018/07/04/asia-pacific/chinas-military-reforms-aimed-offshore-expansion-communist-party-document-says#.Wz_IydVKjIg
    , @jim jones
    Businesses should be run for the benefit of customers, not the staff
    , @SonOfStrom
    When do the “Antijumping Nets” get installed:

    https://blogs.wsj.com/chinarealtime/2010/08/03/foxconn-installs-antijumping-nets-at-hebei-plants/

    Or I suppose they could cit those out to cut costs? (And improve aesthetics!)
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  34. Just beware the fact that people who willingly live and work in such arrangements, or who deliberately impose them upon their employees, will quite naturally show no concern for your property, privacy or dignity, either. The same assumptions, the same basic style of life, is built into who they are and everything that they do. Thus, all the emanations from Silicon Valley—from social media to the retail disruptors to sharing services like Uber and Airbnb—are but reflections of this spirit, and their effect is to reproduce the same chaotic conditions wherever they take hold.

    Really, what is Facebook but an online dormitory where everybody is all up in each other’s business all the time? What is Uber but a concretization of that attitude of “Hey, you weren’t using it, so…” that one finds among young people living 5 to a house?

    This is generally considered to be the opposite of what it is desirable to achieve in life. It should be at most a temporary stage that one must endure in youth before attaining one’s own respectability and position. But now that the masters of the universe seek to install it as the permanent and preferred condition of all mankind, we have reached the point where defending the very concepts of property, of quiet dignity, of inward nobility and superiority, requires that we not participate in this madness.

    I for one do not use social media nor have I ever used a sharing service. I believe these things should be denounced and fought against so that normalcy can be restored. I would take it as one of the laws of sociology, as something firmly established in Pareto’s sense, that experiments in “communal living,” and impulses and imperatives there toward, are always associated with misrule and dysfunction; and these things are the outward expression of a decayed soul. As soon as Silicon Valley begins to totter financially it should be given a hard kick philosophically, hopefully to send it forever down the precipice of failed Utopianisms.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rob McX
    I wouldn't put Uber in that category, as it seems to be simply a way of using your car to make extra cash (if I understand it rightly). But the whole social media phenomenon is is hugely intrusive. It amuses me to remember how "going ex-directory" was fashionable among middle-class people 15 or 20 years ago, i.e. making your phone number private, whereas it would otherwise be included in the directory by default. Now the very same people are posting every last detail of their private lives on Facebook several times a day.
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  35. mal says:

    There are 30,000 unoccupied apartments in San Fransisco.

    Not kidding. One lawmaker wants to tax landlords who leave apartments vacant. Web search it. Its an hysterically funny rent-control-hard-to-evict-tenants-keep-prices-high-zoning-speculation-mishmash-trainwreck.

    I first read about it in Spectator.org. Apparently there are armies of homeless people/feces/trash/needles in public spaces due to magnetizing policies.

    I see a big Section 8 opportunity here.

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  36. Back in the ’80s, the now-defunct WordPerfect Corporation (based in Orem, Utah) built a subdivision of single-family homes next to its office park and sold them at cost to its employees:

    http://www.wordplace.com/ap/ap_chap07.shtml

    We were, however, to a point where we could afford to begin building a complex that would bring the company together again. The site which was most promising was the research park in northeast Orem. Orem City had purchased a 110 acre orchard in a residential section of the city and had used federal matching funds to put in the improvements for a business park. In spite of the objections of the surrounding residents, the city officials intended to build and lease office buildings in the park and use the profits from the venture to increase the city’s tax base. We liked the location, but when they offered us space in 1985, we did not like the terms. Instead of offering incentives to move in, as some neighboring cities did, Orem was requiring a very long lease at what we thought was a high price. No other companies were interested either. Novell, which had been the most sought after company for the park, had moved to Provo instead. The orchard had a beautiful infrastructure, with streets, sidewalks, streetlights, electricity, water, and a sewer system, but no tenants. Except for the fruit, the primary benefit of the research park was to give local teenagers a secluded place to park late at night.

    Late in the summer of 1986, I decided to call the city to see if they were desperate enough to abandon the lease requirements and sell us a few acres outright. I offered to pay $25,000 per acre if we could own the land. After some negotiating, they agreed to let us buy 22 acres for about $22,000 per acre, if we would agree to certain other conditions. We would eventually purchase about 95% of the park and build a number of buildings on the site, though we would add buildings only as we had the money.

    [...]

    January of 1989 marked the end of our crisis growth era, when we moved the last departments of the company into the research park. We now had enough money in the bank to plan and build for the future. Soon we added a cafeteria, which Bruce named the Hard Disk Cafe, and a conference center to the complex.

    At this same time we were also building a residential subdivision adjacent to the research park. We purchased 45 acres of an old orchard next door and subdivided it into 40 home sites. We sold most of the lots to WordPerfect employees at cost with attractive financing. My wife and I purchased a lot right next to WordPerfect’s property, just a few hundred feet from customer support. I liked the idea of walking to work and expected to work at WordPerfect as long as I could push my walker to the office.

    He was fired a few years later.

    Novell purchased WordPerfect (for $1.4 billion) in 1994, then sold the company (for $145 million) to Corel two years later. In 1998, Corel shut down the Utah campus and laid off nearly all of its American-based employees.

    Are any of those houses still standing? If so, are any of them still owned by former WordPerfect employees? It would be interesting to find out.

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  37. @istevefan
    I don't think it posted, but I tried to link to a series of tweets discussing the same topic as this post concerning the conditions of the Bay Area. In case it didn't post, this series of tweets compares contemporary Silicon Valley to the former USSR.

    The tech industry is bringing America 1975 Leningrad levels of domestic comfort.

    1975….Leningrad….all the comfort that коммуналка offers…

    Please, just stop Uncle Ernest, bored identity is getting too mushy:

    Although, bored identity finds it laughable to compare Санкт-Ленинбург’s Resilience to San Francisco’s… Resistance :

    In conclusion, bored identity sees only one, or maybe two solutions to the problem :

    Read More
    • Replies: @duncsbaby
    I still don't know why the Leningrad Cowboys weren't super huge. If there's anything the world was crying out for in the early 90's it was Finnish doofuses in stupid hair playing covers of 70's southern rock songs w/the Red Army Choir.
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  38. Anon[415] • Disclaimer says:

    Other companies are taking it upon themselves to create new housing for their workers

    This is a tactic used by the Unification Church to prevent defections. Your housing is cult controlled, and your job is for some local branch of a South Korean business owned by the cult. They also take all your money, marry you to a fellow cultist, and encourage you to cut off relations with your family. Silicon Valley has not gone that far.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Yet.
    , @Thomas

    Your housing is cult controlled, and your job is for some local branch of a South Korean business owned by the cult. They also take all your money, marry you to a fellow cultist, and encourage you to cut off relations with your family. Silicon Valley has not gone that far.
     
    This is also basically Singapore. More than 80% of all Singaporeans live in public housing, and each building has "Residence Committees" that are the lowest rung of the government. If you're singled out as some sort of troublemaker, malcontent, or are just not patriotic enough, you might start having problems living where you want to, keeping your job, getting promoted, etc. They also maintain strict affirmative action so no building turns into an ethnic enclave, promote living next to your elderly parents so the government doesn't wind up taking care of them, etc.
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  39. Thomas says:

    I predicted something like this not long ago, that the IT industry in the Bay Area would eventually get into the real estate business and put its workers in company-owned dormitories (and knock at least a third off their paychecks). It works if they can leverage various advantages (i.e., economies of scale, cutting down on transportation costs by having everyone take the same shuttle to work, long tenure which keeps property taxes down under California’s Proposition 13, etc.) Having everybody work in the same building too and forget the shuttle bus is the next logical step.

    If you’re an American, you may think this is a crappy way to live, but if you’re a 26 year-old code coolie from India or China on an H-1B visa, living in your own little 300 square foot studio is a step up.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    How long until they develop Microsoft™ Brand Soylent with the correct mix of insect-derived protein, sanitary recycled human waste, and amphetamines as the perfect coding source diet? An entire pre-fab life brought to you by the loving Tech Overlords.
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  40. @Anon

    Other companies are taking it upon themselves to create new housing for their workers
     
    This is a tactic used by the Unification Church to prevent defections. Your housing is cult controlled, and your job is for some local branch of a South Korean business owned by the cult. They also take all your money, marry you to a fellow cultist, and encourage you to cut off relations with your family. Silicon Valley has not gone that far.

    Yet.

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  41. Millennials might like it. They’ve been socialized to sit together, kindergarten style, even if they’re all wearing headphones all the time and not actually listening to each other. They seem to take to those gay communal picnic tables in the bars and restaurants they like to frequent.

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  42. Neuday says:
    @black sea
    Assuming a decent female-to-male ratio, I could see how this set up might not be so bad for those in their first job out of college. Of course, the potential for adverse consequences would be high, but that's generally the case with intra-office romances.

    You don’t know IT, the bay area, or 2018. Romance is a dead white hetero construct.

    Just call ‘em internet coolies.

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  43. Anon[680] • Disclaimer says:

    Sounds like Bournville, the suburb that Cadbury built for its factory workers like 100 years ago

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rob McX
    There were lots of genuinely benevolent employers who built accommodation for workers, e.g. Port Sunlight near Liverpool. Nowadays it seems to be a way of making employees more dependent on the company.
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  44. Thomas says:

    Even though they’re not headquartered in SF, Amazon would be one to watch on this. Out of the FAANG companies, they’re the one that has the biggest investment in the physical world, and they’re four times as large as the next one (Apple) by headcount. They’ve already physically rebuilt much of Seattle into a company town (Seattle’s South Lake Union and Belltown neighborhoods are basically a giant live/work campus for Amazon in practice already) and now they’re picking a new company town to set up a second headquarters. It would be interesting to see if they adopt this idea without the constraints of California’s expenses and land-use restrictions.

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  45. @istevefan
    Here is a NYT piece from 2012 that maybe tells us what the Silicon Valley execs really want in a workforce.

    Apple executives say that going overseas, at this point, is their only option. One former executive described how the company relied upon a Chinese factory to revamp iPhone manufacturing just weeks before the device was due on shelves. Apple had redesigned the iPhone’s screen at the last minute, forcing an assembly line overhaul. New screens began arriving at the plant near midnight.

    A foreman immediately roused 8,000 workers inside the company’s dormitories, according to the executive. Each employee was given a biscuit and a cup of tea, guided to a workstation and within half an hour started a 12-hour shift fitting glass screens into beveled frames. Within 96 hours, the plant was producing over 10,000 iPhones a day.

    “The speed and flexibility is breathtaking,” the executive said. “There’s no American plant that can match that.”
     
    I like the part about giving the workers a biscuit and a cup of tea before they began an unscheduled 12-hour shift.

    And Some Proverbial, Yet Real Connor is too busy making retarded videos to figure out that fifteen years from now, his new owner, Ming the Merciless, will have that same biscuit & tea arrangement ready for him :

    https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2018/07/04/asia-pacific/chinas-military-reforms-aimed-offshore-expansion-communist-party-document-says#.Wz_IydVKjIg

    Read More
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  46. gunner29 says:

    20 years ago I bought my Bridgeport mill and South Bend lathe from a company at 2nd and Bryant; two blocks north of where this high rise is going up. They had been at this address for 25 years and where being forced to Oakland as the landlord was going to convert to lofts.

    It was only a couple of stories, so I suspect somebody is looking to do another tower…

    The obvious fix is letting them live outside the Bay Area and telecommute. But the managers will never go for that, one of the perks of being a manager is the opportunity to jerk around your underlings….

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alice
    We moved to the Triangle area, NC, USA. Husband works for the same Bay area company he did in 2002. Managers don't care. Our 3800 sqft on 1 acre exurb house is a dream @600k, but not for people who feel contempt for normal USA, where there's a chik fil A next to a Starbucks next to a Target.

    There's only a couple bespoke knitted onesies for cats stores here next to the Commie Fixie repair cooperative, and the people who own them might go to church or have come from some college you'd never heard of.

    Honest, it's just smugness on their part that they'd rather live in a hellhole then be seen in one of these places--places that as soon as they could, they fled. They're typically grown children themselves, unmarried and without kids, but some even have a child or two. They're still sure they're better than us losers.

    But most of the folks with kids left for green pastures. Husband's got colleagues in Georgia, SC, NH, NC, CO, TX, TN and the metro North corridor of NY/CT as well as the fools who won't leave the bay area.

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  47. Thomas says:
    @Anon

    Other companies are taking it upon themselves to create new housing for their workers
     
    This is a tactic used by the Unification Church to prevent defections. Your housing is cult controlled, and your job is for some local branch of a South Korean business owned by the cult. They also take all your money, marry you to a fellow cultist, and encourage you to cut off relations with your family. Silicon Valley has not gone that far.

    Your housing is cult controlled, and your job is for some local branch of a South Korean business owned by the cult. They also take all your money, marry you to a fellow cultist, and encourage you to cut off relations with your family. Silicon Valley has not gone that far.

    This is also basically Singapore. More than 80% of all Singaporeans live in public housing, and each building has “Residence Committees” that are the lowest rung of the government. If you’re singled out as some sort of troublemaker, malcontent, or are just not patriotic enough, you might start having problems living where you want to, keeping your job, getting promoted, etc. They also maintain strict affirmative action so no building turns into an ethnic enclave, promote living next to your elderly parents so the government doesn’t wind up taking care of them, etc.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    They also maintain strict affirmative action so no building turns into an ethnic enclave...
     
    They do that by mandating that you cannot sell your condominium apartment to someone other than from your own ethnic and language group. It's pretty hard on the Tamils, who form less than 8% of the population, while the Chinese majority enjoys a liquid market.

    Singapore's "public housing" is quite different from that which we know here in America.

    From the 1960s to the 1980s, the government razed villages and slums, and built high-rise condominiums in their place, giving each former resident of an old-style traditional hut or dwelling compensation in the form of the equity down payment in the brand new replacement apartment.

    They still had to take on a mortgage to pay for the difference in valuation between the new apartment and the old shanty.

    According to Lee Kuan Yew, the first Prime Minister, this ensured that everyone, especially the poorer classes, immediately acquired a keen interest in seeking and holding onto steady salaried jobs, and concentrated their minds on staying on the straight and narrow in life. It also made sure that they learned public virtues such as cleanliness and pride in their civic surroundings, because that boosts property values.

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  48. Mr. Anon says:

    So now you can go to college for four years to get a degree so that you can……………move into a dorm-room.

    It does have the advantage that you never have to set foot outside the building and risk stepping on a used syringe or slipping on a huge pile of human excrement.

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  49. JA says:

    Isn’t this exactly how the Hancock Tower is Chicago was hyped?

    Read More
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  50. I visit Silicon Valley a few times a year, and okay, the salaries, but Jeesh, the rent!

    I know they’re geniuses, but the Real Estate people are drinking the tech folks’ milkshake.

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  51. jim jones says:
    @istevefan
    Here is a NYT piece from 2012 that maybe tells us what the Silicon Valley execs really want in a workforce.

    Apple executives say that going overseas, at this point, is their only option. One former executive described how the company relied upon a Chinese factory to revamp iPhone manufacturing just weeks before the device was due on shelves. Apple had redesigned the iPhone’s screen at the last minute, forcing an assembly line overhaul. New screens began arriving at the plant near midnight.

    A foreman immediately roused 8,000 workers inside the company’s dormitories, according to the executive. Each employee was given a biscuit and a cup of tea, guided to a workstation and within half an hour started a 12-hour shift fitting glass screens into beveled frames. Within 96 hours, the plant was producing over 10,000 iPhones a day.

    “The speed and flexibility is breathtaking,” the executive said. “There’s no American plant that can match that.”
     
    I like the part about giving the workers a biscuit and a cup of tea before they began an unscheduled 12-hour shift.

    Businesses should be run for the benefit of customers, not the staff

    Read More
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  52. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    I had a great-uncle that died before I was born, but I heard a lot of stories about him. He lived in the same building where he worked. he also got three hot meals a day, free clothing, medical care (such as it was) and all other needed services.

    Five days a week, ten hours a day with a half hour lunch, he went to work. He was making license plates.

    From what I have heard, he didn’t like the arrangement very much, but had little choice in the matter.

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  53. The military already has “co-living, co-working” establishments. They’re called bases. Or warships.

    But why would one wish to reside – to “co-live” – among one’s co-workers? The whole idea behind getting out of work seems to me to be getting the hell away from the preponderance of co-workers you can’t stand that you were forced to toil among – er, “interact with” – all damned day long.

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  54. Anonymous[157] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    The latest update in the continuing insanity that is SF is that bedrooms are now too expensive for a single programmer to afford, and thus programmers making $100K/year in their first job out of college live with actual roommates, and not apartmentmates.

    When I tell people to come join us in NYC for the affordability, I can't say that I'm joking.

    programmers making $100K/year in their first job out of college

    If that’s a real number. Wow.

    I remember the code I wrote when out of college. Wouldn’t want to wipe my bum with it now.

    No wonder software is stinkingly unaffordable and abysmally bad (with horrendous design design hidden gracefully behind colorful “UX”) unless crowd-tested (and even then, crashing, burning and data leaks galore are the new normal).

    Have some Uncle Bob:

    Read More
    • Replies: @That same Anon
    By now, it is, if anything, low.

    At this point, you probably start out at $120K, with another $60K in stock (which will double or triple by year 3/4, so congrats on the $300,000 payday at age 25 as a junior employee), plus the bennies. Get a promotion, add $50K cash/$25K stock to that. Did I mention that this is an industry where 5 years rounds to senior?

    And since startups cannot match that in any way*, the Silicon Valley startup scene is about to implode and all that will be left is FAANG.

    * To be fair, the twin issues are that they don't pay you enough to make rent, and that they pay you so much that they run out of money before getting another funding round (which takes a year from the point they start searching for funding).
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  55. Anonymous[537] • Disclaimer says:

    Apparently, the news making the internet rounds this week is the ‘astonishing fact’ that a large burlap sack filled to the brim with 100 lb of human excrement was found ‘deposited’ on an upmarket street in downtown San Francisco.

    - I never knew that The Economist editorial board has decamped en masse to San Francisco.

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  56. Alfa158 says:

    There’s nothing new about the concept of working, living, shopping etc in a limited area but making it work in a single structure has no chance unless you scale it up to a megastructure. You have to have enough volume for decent sized residences and a wide spectrum of places to work, shop, eat, recreate etc. Buckminster Fuller envisioned these self contained megastructures decades ago and the Italian architect Paolo Soleri named them arcologies. Fuller’s idea was for something that looked like an enormous sports stadium with an interior that sloped down from the perimeter to the center in order to maximize the exposure to open sky, air and light for the inhabitants. If large enough you could have decent housing, select a suitable place of employment, have a wide variety of recreational, service and support providers but still get to work in a few minutes.
    Jerry Pournelle and Larry Niven wrote the novel Oath of Fealty about such an arcology called Todos Santos located in south central LA. After a race riot ended in a Dresden type fire storm that annihilated South LA, a Swiss company built an arcology a mile across and 1000 feet high in the middle of the devastated area and surrounded it with green open wilderness areas. It turned out to be problematical. The residents had a better life than most Angelenos and very little interaction with the outside which resulted in festering resentment, distrust and ultimately violence between the Saints and regular Angelenos.

    Read More
    • Replies: @cthulhu


    Jerry Pournelle and Larry Niven wrote the novel Oath of Fealty about such an arcology called Todos Santos located in south central LA.

     

    A pretty good book BTW; I have an autographed copy.
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  57. @Thomas

    Your housing is cult controlled, and your job is for some local branch of a South Korean business owned by the cult. They also take all your money, marry you to a fellow cultist, and encourage you to cut off relations with your family. Silicon Valley has not gone that far.
     
    This is also basically Singapore. More than 80% of all Singaporeans live in public housing, and each building has "Residence Committees" that are the lowest rung of the government. If you're singled out as some sort of troublemaker, malcontent, or are just not patriotic enough, you might start having problems living where you want to, keeping your job, getting promoted, etc. They also maintain strict affirmative action so no building turns into an ethnic enclave, promote living next to your elderly parents so the government doesn't wind up taking care of them, etc.

    They also maintain strict affirmative action so no building turns into an ethnic enclave…

    They do that by mandating that you cannot sell your condominium apartment to someone other than from your own ethnic and language group. It’s pretty hard on the Tamils, who form less than 8% of the population, while the Chinese majority enjoys a liquid market.

    Singapore’s “public housing” is quite different from that which we know here in America.

    From the 1960s to the 1980s, the government razed villages and slums, and built high-rise condominiums in their place, giving each former resident of an old-style traditional hut or dwelling compensation in the form of the equity down payment in the brand new replacement apartment.

    They still had to take on a mortgage to pay for the difference in valuation between the new apartment and the old shanty.

    According to Lee Kuan Yew, the first Prime Minister, this ensured that everyone, especially the poorer classes, immediately acquired a keen interest in seeking and holding onto steady salaried jobs, and concentrated their minds on staying on the straight and narrow in life. It also made sure that they learned public virtues such as cleanliness and pride in their civic surroundings, because that boosts property values.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Karl
    57 PiltdownMan > It’s pretty hard on the Tamils

    there's ways to game the system. Singapore doesn't have any real aggressive system of enforcing ethnic identity as against (e.g.) your desire to be a "Chinese". If you can crack jokes in Hokkien at the after-work beer festivities in a Chinese-dominated restaurant, you're mostly in like Flynn

    Singapore ==is== a police state, but the cops are your working-class neighbors. And even your own kids - National Service requirement can be satisfied by choosing conscription into the police
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  58. @Buffalo Joe
    Every day the San Francisco Chronicle has an article on SF's homeless problem. Everyday. Conventions are cancelling because of the deplorable condition of the streets, littered with needles, smelling of urine and piles of steaming shit. If I lived in San Francisco I think I would want to live and work in the same building, order take out meals and catch some sun and a view from the roof.

    If I lived in current-day San Franciso, the first thing I’d do would be to get on my amazing high-speed shared internet workstation and look up “U-Haul + 1-way”.

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    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Ach, funny guy.
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  59. @Achilles
    These kinds of innovative living and work arrangements will need to spark commensurate legal innovations in labor contracts.

    In particular in respect of immigrant workers, the employer-landlords will need some legal way to recoup the cost of transporting workers from India or elsewhere to the Bay area as well as the cost of amortization and depreciation charges on the work/residence structure and fixtures, not to mention ongoing expenses for utilities and other services provided.

    The logical solution would be to bind such workers to the employer-landlord for a period of years. For example, in consideration of the employer-landlord's payment of transportation to the location and room and board, the worker would bind himself to the employer for a period of time, say seven years, after which the worker would be free to negotiate an arm's-length wage or move on to other employment.

    A variation on this may be necessary for special cases. For example, in the case of immigrants who were prisoners in their homeland and for which the employer-landlord paid a sum of money for the release to it of such prisoners, it may be appropriate to extend the indenture of binding to the entire natural life of the worker. (Obviously, the question of the legal status of any offspring of such workers is a detail that would need to addressed.)

    Facebook, Google and other Bay area tech companies may want to raise these ideas with their lobbyists. There are likely also business opportunities that might appeal to Zuckerberg and the other tech moguls with respect to creating markets for the legal rights to such workers.

    It took me 4 paragraphs to “see what you did there”, Achilles. If slavery does start up again, I want you to be my legal counsel … whatever side of the electric fence I’m on. Do you take pay-pal?

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  60. Didn’t Charlie Brooker already present a compelling prototype design for this lifestyle?

    “Black miror – 15 milion merits” on #Vimeo

    Urban Dorm Life is probably also the future for lonely middle aged singles who either opted out of relationships or never launched.

    For it to succeed, they’re going to need a ruthless door / velvet rope policy to keep out the creepy incels & other pests nobody wants….

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/04/technology/dorm-living-grown-ups-san-francisco.html

    https://slate.com/technology/2018/03/dorms-for-grown-ups-are-good-even-in-san-francisco.html

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    CEO and co-founder Jon Dishotsky, on the roof of a dorm room building.
     
    I'd be willing to bet that Jon Dishotsky doesn't live in a dorm room.
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  61. @Daniel Williams

    When you get fired, Security would escort you not only out of your cubicle but out of your apartment in succession.
     
    It'll be great! HR will complete divorce and eviction paperwork on your behalf in addition to the COBRA forms.

    Heh! Kind of like the guy above said, HR will be the HR broad, landlord, resident advisor, magistrate, and family court rolled into one. Efficiency! She will report to the supreme Soviet downtown in that pyramid.

    However, at “the end of the day”, as they like to say in this corporate environment, going out into the sunshine will be like being reborn. One can then live on the street in that nice climate or hang out at Golden Gate Park, and live completely off of those taxpaying people in those dormitories who don’t know what a “sun” is other than from the sunshine app on their shared phones.

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  62. The article fails to note that Realtex has already completed a slightly more space-efficient and affordable residential housing configuration for Silicon Valley’s H-1B technology employees, whose budget constraints are somewhat more stringent.

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  63. @Anon
    The latest update in the continuing insanity that is SF is that bedrooms are now too expensive for a single programmer to afford, and thus programmers making $100K/year in their first job out of college live with actual roommates, and not apartmentmates.

    When I tell people to come join us in NYC for the affordability, I can't say that I'm joking.

    When I first moved to NYC, there were a couple huge buildings on the Upper East Side affectionately known as the Dorms. Room-sharing was how many young grads got their toe in the Manhattan market.

    As for this SF complex, it sounds like they are closer to 1980s USAF enlisted barracks or bachelor officer quarters.

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    • Replies: @Alec Leamas

    When I first moved to NYC, there were a couple huge buildings on the Upper East Side affectionately known as the Dorms. Room-sharing was how many young grads got their toe in the Manhattan market.
     
    Sometimes you had to cross-dress to get into one of the female only buildings.
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  64. @contriturated anon
    So instead of bringing the call centers to the prisons, they're bringing the prisons to the call centers. (sure, they say you could leave the building if you want to...)

    (sure, they say you could leave the building if you want to…)

    You can leave the building (and grounds) of a minimum-security prison too, with no problem. It’s only a problem for the next time, when you get placed in the more secure facility for having left the previous one. Yeah, a friend told me how it works.

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  65. @Another Canadian
    It won't be long until they have us all toiling in the radium furnaces of Ming the Merciless. Thanks Silicon Valley!

    https://youtu.be/kf4eu5y0418

    That’s the Official propaganda version of the Silicon Valley Scene. This is the ugly truth:

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    • Replies: @Clyde
    This is Devo 1977 so this means punk arse David Byrne ripped this guy off. Mark Mothersbaugh.
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  66. Let me comment on the post itself for a change:

    Since I wrote about China earlier, this sounds just like the way of factory work there. The one significant difference I see would be the food. The Chinese must have, without fail, rice, for a company meal to be considered a meal. In San Francisco, I suppose it could be Rice-a-Roni:

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  67. Anonymous[126] • Disclaimer says:

    Due to hook up culture, these communal living arrangements are awesome. This critique about falling living standards doesn’t resonate at all.

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  68. Rob McX says:
    @Intelligent Dasein
    Just beware the fact that people who willingly live and work in such arrangements, or who deliberately impose them upon their employees, will quite naturally show no concern for your property, privacy or dignity, either. The same assumptions, the same basic style of life, is built into who they are and everything that they do. Thus, all the emanations from Silicon Valley---from social media to the retail disruptors to sharing services like Uber and Airbnb---are but reflections of this spirit, and their effect is to reproduce the same chaotic conditions wherever they take hold.

    Really, what is Facebook but an online dormitory where everybody is all up in each other's business all the time? What is Uber but a concretization of that attitude of "Hey, you weren't using it, so..." that one finds among young people living 5 to a house?

    This is generally considered to be the opposite of what it is desirable to achieve in life. It should be at most a temporary stage that one must endure in youth before attaining one's own respectability and position. But now that the masters of the universe seek to install it as the permanent and preferred condition of all mankind, we have reached the point where defending the very concepts of property, of quiet dignity, of inward nobility and superiority, requires that we not participate in this madness.

    I for one do not use social media nor have I ever used a sharing service. I believe these things should be denounced and fought against so that normalcy can be restored. I would take it as one of the laws of sociology, as something firmly established in Pareto's sense, that experiments in "communal living," and impulses and imperatives there toward, are always associated with misrule and dysfunction; and these things are the outward expression of a decayed soul. As soon as Silicon Valley begins to totter financially it should be given a hard kick philosophically, hopefully to send it forever down the precipice of failed Utopianisms.

    I wouldn’t put Uber in that category, as it seems to be simply a way of using your car to make extra cash (if I understand it rightly). But the whole social media phenomenon is is hugely intrusive. It amuses me to remember how “going ex-directory” was fashionable among middle-class people 15 or 20 years ago, i.e. making your phone number private, whereas it would otherwise be included in the directory by default. Now the very same people are posting every last detail of their private lives on Facebook several times a day.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I wouldn’t put Uber in that category, as it seems to be simply a way of using your car to make extra cash.....
     
    It's a a way of using your car to make extra cash for Uber.
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  69. Rob McX says:
    @Anon
    Sounds like Bournville, the suburb that Cadbury built for its factory workers like 100 years ago

    There were lots of genuinely benevolent employers who built accommodation for workers, e.g. Port Sunlight near Liverpool. Nowadays it seems to be a way of making employees more dependent on the company.

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    • Replies: @Cortes
    Agreed. In a more paternalistic age, many large employers provided affordable accommodation opportunities close to their employees’ places of work. Housing in the vicinity of hub rail junctions in the UK, for example, was built by the railway companies themselves. Until recently, large teaching hospitals had fairly big stocks of flats for student doctors and nurses.

    The tenor of many replies here seems like a confirmation that in this case, as so often, Pohl and Kornbluth

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Space_Merchants

    were almost prescient in their depiction of the widespread hiring out of overnight sleep space (and only sleep space) in the stairways of large buildings for the use of the urban poor.

    Or maybe that’s the next step in San Francisco realtor innovation?

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  70. Rob McX says:

    Maybe the answer to this question is obvious, but why does tech workers’ physical location matter that much? The whole point of the tech revolution is making geographical distance irrelevant. Why do they even need to bring these workers to America?

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    • Replies: @L Woods
    Because the extroverted bullshitter types in management have a compelling interest in maintaining an ecosystem in which they can continue to leverage said qualities. Normalized telecommuting would lend itself to workers who just want to work and be done with it, rather than sit in meetings all day, posture etc. Moreover, having a physical stable of peons to command just makes them feel important, which is after all at the end of the day what it's all really about.
    , @Alfa158
    Human nature, which hasn’t changed significantly, dictates that you want to have your subordinates somewhere that you can keep an eye on them. Of course the rationalization for having people in one place is that it fosters teamwork and innovation. That was the one used at a tech startup I worked at that got new management and eliminated telecommuting and remote working. Their next move was to open a huge engineering center in India.
    Telecommuting might be allowed if you allow your company to set up surveillance cameras in your house.
    , @TheJester
    Working "virtually" (at home) has its limitations.

    I managed a team of software programmers for 14 years. We eventually migrated to a "virtual" environment to keep costs low and win contracts. My rules were that everyone had to be at their desks at home within a core time from 9 AM to 4 PM to accommodate those who are "morning people" and those who are "evening people". Everyone had to be contactable within five minutes within that core time.

    However, hiring an employee and allowing them to immediately start working from home did not work out, especially for women. "Hey, why sit at my desk all day? Why not do the laundry, make a cake, or watch soap operas on TV until my boss gives me a call to check up on me. Maybe I'll take the afternoon off and go to my son's baseball game. Who cares as long as I get my work done." (Real examples ... and, yes, I did come to the attention of HR for firing a number of women in quick succession. Indeed, one female used that as the basis for a discrimination suit against me. I won! )

    We eventually decided that all new employees had to work out of the corporate office for at least a year before they transitioned to a "virtual" work environment. This gave them an opportunity to learn the corporate culture as well as having "face time" with the administrative and support staff.

    Without that year at the corporate office, the programmers worked in isolation and were not really part of an effective "virtual team".

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  71. utu says:

    The Fuggerei is the world’s oldest social housing complex still in use. It is a walled enclave within the city of Augsburg, Bavaria. It takes its name from the Fugger family and was founded in 1516 by Jakob Fugger the Younger (known as “Jakob Fugger the Rich”) as a place where the needy citizens of Augsburg could be housed.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuggerei

    The rent was and is still one Rheinischer Gulden per year (equivalent to 0.88 euros), as well as three daily prayers for the current owners of the Fuggerei — the Lord’s Prayer, Hail Mary, and the Nicene Creed. The conditions to live there remain the same as they were 480 years ago: one must have lived at least two years in Augsburg, be of the Catholic faith and have become indigent without debt. The five gates are still locked every day at 10 PM.

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  72. In addition to “shit hole countries” Trump might want to mention a certain “shit hole” city, Nancy Pelosi’s San Francisco. With the hordes of the homeless on the streets comes mountains of, well ……

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  73. @SigismundFraud
    This brilliant mad genius has invented
    The dormitory.
    I can’t wait for the IPO and the Franchising of this miracle of post-modern technology.
    Next up - a bed that folds away to make more of your 10 sq meter space.

    Not a dormitory – a monastery. They will live a life of silent devotion to the company mission statement. Like the monks of old made expensive liqueurs for outsiders, the new ascetics will leverage collaborative paradigms to speed the deployment of decentralized platforms for delivery of porn and cat videos.

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    • LOL: Triumph104
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  74. Reading this I thought of neither Soviet Russia nor Appalachian coal country, but rather some future dystopia like in Logan’s Run. The downside of having Farrah Fawcett as your neighbor is that get terminated when you turn 30:

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    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome


    get terminated when you turn 30

     

    In the book it's 21.
    Also more antiquated 70s era overpopulation concern.


    The introduction to the book states:

    The seeds of the Little War were planted in a restless summer during the mid-1960s, with sit-ins and student demonstrations as youth tested its strength. By the early 1970s over 75 percent of the people living on Earth were under 21 years of age. The population continued to climb—and with it the youth percentage.
    In the 1980s the figure was 79.7 percent.
    In the 1990s, 82.4 percent.
    In the year 2000—critical mass.

     

    , @cthulhu
    I much prefer Jenny Agutter; see also An American Werewolf in London.
    , @Mr. Anon
    Jenny Agutter, Farah fawcett,.......... Too bad the future has never managed to look as good as promised.

    At least THX 1138 got the ugliness right.
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  75. Cortes says:
    @Rob McX
    There were lots of genuinely benevolent employers who built accommodation for workers, e.g. Port Sunlight near Liverpool. Nowadays it seems to be a way of making employees more dependent on the company.

    Agreed. In a more paternalistic age, many large employers provided affordable accommodation opportunities close to their employees’ places of work. Housing in the vicinity of hub rail junctions in the UK, for example, was built by the railway companies themselves. Until recently, large teaching hospitals had fairly big stocks of flats for student doctors and nurses.

    The tenor of many replies here seems like a confirmation that in this case, as so often, Pohl and Kornbluth

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Space_Merchants

    were almost prescient in their depiction of the widespread hiring out of overnight sleep space (and only sleep space) in the stairways of large buildings for the use of the urban poor.

    Or maybe that’s the next step in San Francisco realtor innovation?

    Read More
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  76. @Neuday
    Indoor plumbing is racist and reeks of toxic masculinity. #plumberssowhite

    Indoor plumbing is racist and reeks of toxic masculinity. #plumberssowhite

    So that’s what toxic masculinity smells like. Who knew?

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  77. George says:

    “When you get fired, Security would escort you not only out of your cubicle but out of your apartment in succession. Keep a lot of cardboard boxes around at all times so your personal effects won’t wind up sitting on the curb outside The Complex.”

    Queue Midnight Train to Georgia. You were going to to be a star, but you didn’t get far.

    Your employer will create a reserve for “unforeseen relocation expense”.

    But the current reality is if a worker is renting, it is much the same thing only the employer is doing the evictions. So why pretend?

    What happens if an employee gets an opportunity with a different employer in SF?

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  78. @istevefan
    Here is a NYT piece from 2012 that maybe tells us what the Silicon Valley execs really want in a workforce.

    Apple executives say that going overseas, at this point, is their only option. One former executive described how the company relied upon a Chinese factory to revamp iPhone manufacturing just weeks before the device was due on shelves. Apple had redesigned the iPhone’s screen at the last minute, forcing an assembly line overhaul. New screens began arriving at the plant near midnight.

    A foreman immediately roused 8,000 workers inside the company’s dormitories, according to the executive. Each employee was given a biscuit and a cup of tea, guided to a workstation and within half an hour started a 12-hour shift fitting glass screens into beveled frames. Within 96 hours, the plant was producing over 10,000 iPhones a day.

    “The speed and flexibility is breathtaking,” the executive said. “There’s no American plant that can match that.”
     
    I like the part about giving the workers a biscuit and a cup of tea before they began an unscheduled 12-hour shift.

    When do the “Antijumping Nets” get installed:

    https://blogs.wsj.com/chinarealtime/2010/08/03/foxconn-installs-antijumping-nets-at-hebei-plants/

    Or I suppose they could cit those out to cut costs? (And improve aesthetics!)

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  79. AndrewR says:

    Your blog would be much better if you cut down on the incessant sarcasm. You’re not in middle school. You don’t look cool by being a constant smartass. You look like a jaded and miserable borderline-elderly man. Say what you mean.

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    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    I like to think of myself as a sober, serious person. So it has only been gradually and reluctantly that I have come to accept the outsize effect that ridicule can have, especially on public figures who are sensitive about their image (most of them).

    So...

    Rave on, you magnificent bastard!
    , @ScarletNumber
    Lighten up, Francis.
    , @BB753
    Sarcasm is the ultimate political weapon (short of an actual weapon).
    , @Mr. Anon

    Your blog would be much better if you cut down on the incessant sarcasm.
     
    I like Steve's sarcasm. However, this blog would be better without many (perhaps most) of your posts. And don't worry - I'm not being sarcastic.
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  80. L Woods says:
    @Rob McX
    Maybe the answer to this question is obvious, but why does tech workers' physical location matter that much? The whole point of the tech revolution is making geographical distance irrelevant. Why do they even need to bring these workers to America?

    Because the extroverted bullshitter types in management have a compelling interest in maintaining an ecosystem in which they can continue to leverage said qualities. Normalized telecommuting would lend itself to workers who just want to work and be done with it, rather than sit in meetings all day, posture etc. Moreover, having a physical stable of peons to command just makes them feel important, which is after all at the end of the day what it’s all really about.

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  81. @Percy Gryce
    Reading this I thought of neither Soviet Russia nor Appalachian coal country, but rather some future dystopia like in Logan's Run. The downside of having Farrah Fawcett as your neighbor is that get terminated when you turn 30:

    http://www.electricsheepmagazine.co.uk/reviews/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/review_logan.jpg

    get terminated when you turn 30

    In the book it’s 21.
    Also more antiquated 70s era overpopulation concern.

    The introduction to the book states:

    The seeds of the Little War were planted in a restless summer during the mid-1960s, with sit-ins and student demonstrations as youth tested its strength. By the early 1970s over 75 percent of the people living on Earth were under 21 years of age. The population continued to climb—and with it the youth percentage.
    In the 1980s the figure was 79.7 percent.
    In the 1990s, 82.4 percent.
    In the year 2000—critical mass.

    Read More
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  82. @Achmed E. Newman
    If I lived in current-day San Franciso, the first thing I'd do would be to get on my amazing high-speed shared internet workstation and look up "U-Haul + 1-way".

    Ach, funny guy.

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  83. Realtex is exploring selling or leasing the entire building to one large employer, which could use the co-working space as an office and the apartments to house its employees.

    I wouldn’t bother moving in until Realtex’s vaporware Succubus 3000™ Upright Workstation finally makes it to meatspace if you know what I mean.

    The tech industry is bringing America 1975 Leningrad levels of domestic comfort.

    This Leningrad girl is living the ‘high life’ in San Francisco. She likes to talk.

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  84. Karl says:
    @PiltdownMan

    They also maintain strict affirmative action so no building turns into an ethnic enclave...
     
    They do that by mandating that you cannot sell your condominium apartment to someone other than from your own ethnic and language group. It's pretty hard on the Tamils, who form less than 8% of the population, while the Chinese majority enjoys a liquid market.

    Singapore's "public housing" is quite different from that which we know here in America.

    From the 1960s to the 1980s, the government razed villages and slums, and built high-rise condominiums in their place, giving each former resident of an old-style traditional hut or dwelling compensation in the form of the equity down payment in the brand new replacement apartment.

    They still had to take on a mortgage to pay for the difference in valuation between the new apartment and the old shanty.

    According to Lee Kuan Yew, the first Prime Minister, this ensured that everyone, especially the poorer classes, immediately acquired a keen interest in seeking and holding onto steady salaried jobs, and concentrated their minds on staying on the straight and narrow in life. It also made sure that they learned public virtues such as cleanliness and pride in their civic surroundings, because that boosts property values.

    57 PiltdownMan > It’s pretty hard on the Tamils

    there’s ways to game the system. Singapore doesn’t have any real aggressive system of enforcing ethnic identity as against (e.g.) your desire to be a “Chinese”. If you can crack jokes in Hokkien at the after-work beer festivities in a Chinese-dominated restaurant, you’re mostly in like Flynn

    Singapore ==is== a police state, but the cops are your working-class neighbors. And even your own kids – National Service requirement can be satisfied by choosing conscription into the police

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  85. cthulhu says:
    @Alfa158
    There’s nothing new about the concept of working, living, shopping etc in a limited area but making it work in a single structure has no chance unless you scale it up to a megastructure. You have to have enough volume for decent sized residences and a wide spectrum of places to work, shop, eat, recreate etc. Buckminster Fuller envisioned these self contained megastructures decades ago and the Italian architect Paolo Soleri named them arcologies. Fuller’s idea was for something that looked like an enormous sports stadium with an interior that sloped down from the perimeter to the center in order to maximize the exposure to open sky, air and light for the inhabitants. If large enough you could have decent housing, select a suitable place of employment, have a wide variety of recreational, service and support providers but still get to work in a few minutes.
    Jerry Pournelle and Larry Niven wrote the novel Oath of Fealty about such an arcology called Todos Santos located in south central LA. After a race riot ended in a Dresden type fire storm that annihilated South LA, a Swiss company built an arcology a mile across and 1000 feet high in the middle of the devastated area and surrounded it with green open wilderness areas. It turned out to be problematical. The residents had a better life than most Angelenos and very little interaction with the outside which resulted in festering resentment, distrust and ultimately violence between the Saints and regular Angelenos.

    Jerry Pournelle and Larry Niven wrote the novel Oath of Fealty about such an arcology called Todos Santos located in south central LA.

    A pretty good book BTW; I have an autographed copy.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I asked Jerry if his giant building in "Oath of Fealty" was a good idea or not. He said that was up to the reader to decide.
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  86. cthulhu says:
    @Percy Gryce
    Reading this I thought of neither Soviet Russia nor Appalachian coal country, but rather some future dystopia like in Logan's Run. The downside of having Farrah Fawcett as your neighbor is that get terminated when you turn 30:

    http://www.electricsheepmagazine.co.uk/reviews/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/review_logan.jpg

    I much prefer Jenny Agutter; see also An American Werewolf in London.

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    • Replies: @Cortes
    Agutter was fantastic in “Walkabout”, a phenomenal film.

    She’s also done magnificent work for charities related to Cystic Fibrosis.

    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/aug/22/jenny-agutter-my-family-values-railway-children
    , @Mr. Anon

    I much prefer Jenny Agutter; see also An American Werewolf in London.
     
    Ditto. Not only was she a rare beauty in her day, she aged very well.
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  87. Anon7 says:

    This kind of architecture reminds me of the terrafoam welfare dorms from Marshall Brain’s Manna series:

    The building we exited was another one of the terrafoam projects. Terrafoam was a super-low-cost building material, and all of the welfare dorms were made out of it. They took a clay-like mud, aerated it into a thick foam, formed it into large panels and fired it like a brick with a mobile furnace. It was cheap and it allowed them to erect large buildings quickly. The robots had put up the building next to ours in a week…

    Terrafoam buildings were not pretty, but they were incredibly inexpensive to build and were designed for maximum occupancy. They clustered the buildings on trash land well away from urban centers so no one had to look at them. It was a lot like an old-style college dorm. Each person got a 5 foot by 10 foot room with a bed and a TV — the world’s best pacifier. During the day the bed was a couch and people sat on the bedspread, which also served as a sheet and the blanket. At night the bed was a bed…

    Because no one had a window, they could really pack people into these buildings. Each terrafoam dorm building had a four-acre foot print. It was a perfect 417 foot by 417 foot by 417 foot solid brown cube. Each cube originally held exactly 76,800 people…

    https://www.marshallbrain.com/manna4.htm

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  88. @Steve Sailer
    Next, there will be an app with an ironic name like Board that will put you in contact with landladies who not only will provide you with a room but also with 2 cooked meals per day.

    Next, there will be an app with an ironic name like Board that will put you in contact with landladies who not only will provide you with a room but also with 2 cooked meals per day.

    Coming to a San Francisco near you:

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    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    Allow me to edit to add another positive for the Tech Oligarchs of their coolie coders getting home-cooked tiffin lunches delivered to their sleeping quarters/workplace/masturbation dens is that it justifies visas for the delivery service and the coders' own mothers. It's a veritable three-for-one.
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  89. @The Alarmist
    When I first moved to NYC, there were a couple huge buildings on the Upper East Side affectionately known as the Dorms. Room-sharing was how many young grads got their toe in the Manhattan market.

    As for this SF complex, it sounds like they are closer to 1980s USAF enlisted barracks or bachelor officer quarters.

    When I first moved to NYC, there were a couple huge buildings on the Upper East Side affectionately known as the Dorms. Room-sharing was how many young grads got their toe in the Manhattan market.

    Sometimes you had to cross-dress to get into one of the female only buildings.

    Read More
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  90. Alfa158 says:
    @Rob McX
    Maybe the answer to this question is obvious, but why does tech workers' physical location matter that much? The whole point of the tech revolution is making geographical distance irrelevant. Why do they even need to bring these workers to America?

    Human nature, which hasn’t changed significantly, dictates that you want to have your subordinates somewhere that you can keep an eye on them. Of course the rationalization for having people in one place is that it fosters teamwork and innovation. That was the one used at a tech startup I worked at that got new management and eliminated telecommuting and remote working. Their next move was to open a huge engineering center in India.
    Telecommuting might be allowed if you allow your company to set up surveillance cameras in your house.

    Read More
    • Replies: @L Woods

    Of course the rationalization for having people in one place is that it fosters teamwork and innovation.
     
    Which it 100% BS. The complete opposite is true: group settings stifle innovation and foster brainless conformity. This is incredibly evident almost everywhere.
    , @Jeff
    As a Director, I never did like having employees that worked remotely. Inevitably, I'd send an email and it would be hours to get a simple response. That always makes one think - is that person actually working for the company during they day as they should? Some folks would say, oh I was out doing an errand, so I'll be working later tonight. Right.

    I eventually decided that working remotely was more important to me than climbing the corporate ladder. It was a small company and I made sure that I knew how much income my work generated, as did the CEO, and thus I didn't worry much about my security. I had 20+ years in doing what I did, so that seems like a good mix. (remote work + visibility to company's bottom line + no need for training/supervision) There are lots of people working remotely that aren't putting in an honest day...

    And hey, if you only want to actually work 30 hours a week, if you're valuable enough to your employer, ask them for that arrangement.

    -------------------------

    Company dorms, what an extraordinarily bad way to live, but that's what I think of most of Frisco regardless.
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  91. Mr. Anon says:
    @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    Didn't Charlie Brooker already present a compelling prototype design for this lifestyle?

    “Black miror - 15 milion merits” on #Vimeo

    https://vimeo.com/37627309

    Urban Dorm Life is probably also the future for lonely middle aged singles who either opted out of relationships or never launched.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DhNvCg-XUAA1CMl.jpg

    For it to succeed, they're going to need a ruthless door / velvet rope policy to keep out the creepy incels & other pests nobody wants....

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/04/technology/dorm-living-grown-ups-san-francisco.html

    https://slate.com/technology/2018/03/dorms-for-grown-ups-are-good-even-in-san-francisco.html

    CEO and co-founder Jon Dishotsky, on the roof of a dorm room building.

    I’d be willing to bet that Jon Dishotsky doesn’t live in a dorm room.

    Read More
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  92. Mr. Anon says:
    @Rob McX
    I wouldn't put Uber in that category, as it seems to be simply a way of using your car to make extra cash (if I understand it rightly). But the whole social media phenomenon is is hugely intrusive. It amuses me to remember how "going ex-directory" was fashionable among middle-class people 15 or 20 years ago, i.e. making your phone number private, whereas it would otherwise be included in the directory by default. Now the very same people are posting every last detail of their private lives on Facebook several times a day.

    I wouldn’t put Uber in that category, as it seems to be simply a way of using your car to make extra cash…..

    It’s a a way of using your car to make extra cash for Uber.

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  93. prusmc says:
    @Anon
    The latest update in the continuing insanity that is SF is that bedrooms are now too expensive for a single programmer to afford, and thus programmers making $100K/year in their first job out of college live with actual roommates, and not apartmentmates.

    When I tell people to come join us in NYC for the affordability, I can't say that I'm joking.

    Has anyonr thought of really cutting living quarters expenses by “hot bunking”.

    Read More
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  94. Svigor says:

    Obviously, Internet firms can only locate their jobs on top of the vast natural underground Internet deposits in Palo Alto.

    LOL

    Read More
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  95. Mr. Anon says:
    @Percy Gryce
    Reading this I thought of neither Soviet Russia nor Appalachian coal country, but rather some future dystopia like in Logan's Run. The downside of having Farrah Fawcett as your neighbor is that get terminated when you turn 30:

    http://www.electricsheepmagazine.co.uk/reviews/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/review_logan.jpg

    Jenny Agutter, Farah fawcett,………. Too bad the future has never managed to look as good as promised.

    At least THX 1138 got the ugliness right.

    Read More
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  96. @Thomas
    I predicted something like this not long ago, that the IT industry in the Bay Area would eventually get into the real estate business and put its workers in company-owned dormitories (and knock at least a third off their paychecks). It works if they can leverage various advantages (i.e., economies of scale, cutting down on transportation costs by having everyone take the same shuttle to work, long tenure which keeps property taxes down under California's Proposition 13, etc.) Having everybody work in the same building too and forget the shuttle bus is the next logical step.

    If you're an American, you may think this is a crappy way to live, but if you're a 26 year-old code coolie from India or China on an H-1B visa, living in your own little 300 square foot studio is a step up.

    How long until they develop Microsoft™ Brand Soylent with the correct mix of insect-derived protein, sanitary recycled human waste, and amphetamines as the perfect coding source diet? An entire pre-fab life brought to you by the loving Tech Overlords.

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  97. L Woods says:
    @Alfa158
    Human nature, which hasn’t changed significantly, dictates that you want to have your subordinates somewhere that you can keep an eye on them. Of course the rationalization for having people in one place is that it fosters teamwork and innovation. That was the one used at a tech startup I worked at that got new management and eliminated telecommuting and remote working. Their next move was to open a huge engineering center in India.
    Telecommuting might be allowed if you allow your company to set up surveillance cameras in your house.

    Of course the rationalization for having people in one place is that it fosters teamwork and innovation.

    Which it 100% BS. The complete opposite is true: group settings stifle innovation and foster brainless conformity. This is incredibly evident almost everywhere.

    Read More
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  98. It’s hilarious to witness (what I assume to be) the predominantly blue-collar readership of this site flailing impotently at the altar of the Silicon Valley temple birthing the future.

    It’s certainly a recurring theme and it reminds me of a scene where I can imagine the last stone-ager waving his flint-tipped spear at the foot of an Iron Age city – denouncing their excesses but, in reality, mainly bemoaning his own inability to join the new vanguard.

    Read More
    • Troll: L Woods
    • Replies: @Faraday's Bobcat

    It’s hilarious to witness (what I assume to be) the predominantly blue-collar readership of this site flailing impotently at the altar of the Silicon Valley temple birthing the future.
     
    subroutine snark(commenter)

    implicit none
    character(len=*), intent(in) :: commenter

    if (commenter.eq.'ElitistSettler') then
    print*,'Eat my ass'
    end if

    end subroutine snark
    , @Mr. Anon

    It’s hilarious to witness (what I assume to be) the predominantly blue-collar readership of this site flailing impotently at the altar of the Silicon Valley temple birthing the future.
     
    That's funny. I assumed you to be a sockless, problem-glasses-wearing soy-boy.
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  99. Jeff says:
    @Alfa158
    Human nature, which hasn’t changed significantly, dictates that you want to have your subordinates somewhere that you can keep an eye on them. Of course the rationalization for having people in one place is that it fosters teamwork and innovation. That was the one used at a tech startup I worked at that got new management and eliminated telecommuting and remote working. Their next move was to open a huge engineering center in India.
    Telecommuting might be allowed if you allow your company to set up surveillance cameras in your house.

    As a Director, I never did like having employees that worked remotely. Inevitably, I’d send an email and it would be hours to get a simple response. That always makes one think – is that person actually working for the company during they day as they should? Some folks would say, oh I was out doing an errand, so I’ll be working later tonight. Right.

    I eventually decided that working remotely was more important to me than climbing the corporate ladder. It was a small company and I made sure that I knew how much income my work generated, as did the CEO, and thus I didn’t worry much about my security. I had 20+ years in doing what I did, so that seems like a good mix. (remote work + visibility to company’s bottom line + no need for training/supervision) There are lots of people working remotely that aren’t putting in an honest day…

    And hey, if you only want to actually work 30 hours a week, if you’re valuable enough to your employer, ask them for that arrangement.

    ————————-

    Company dorms, what an extraordinarily bad way to live, but that’s what I think of most of Frisco regardless.

    Read More
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  100. Clyde says:
    @The Alarmist
    That's the Official propaganda version of the Silicon Valley Scene. This is the ugly truth:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRguZr0xCOc

    This is Devo 1977 so this means punk arse David Byrne ripped this guy off. Mark Mothersbaugh.

    Read More
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  101. @ElitistSettler
    It's hilarious to witness (what I assume to be) the predominantly blue-collar readership of this site flailing impotently at the altar of the Silicon Valley temple birthing the future.

    It's certainly a recurring theme and it reminds me of a scene where I can imagine the last stone-ager waving his flint-tipped spear at the foot of an Iron Age city - denouncing their excesses but, in reality, mainly bemoaning his own inability to join the new vanguard.

    It’s hilarious to witness (what I assume to be) the predominantly blue-collar readership of this site flailing impotently at the altar of the Silicon Valley temple birthing the future.

    subroutine snark(commenter)

    implicit none
    character(len=*), intent(in) :: commenter

    if (commenter.eq.’ElitistSettler’) then
    print*,’Eat my ass’
    end if

    end subroutine snark

    Read More
    • Replies: @cthulhu
    Fortran 90? All of my hundreds of thousands of lines of Fortran are F77...

    Now redo it in C :-) (one of the dirty secrets of C is that its string handling is much worse than Fortran, even F77)

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  102. @istevefan
    I don't think it posted, but I tried to link to a series of tweets discussing the same topic as this post concerning the conditions of the Bay Area. In case it didn't post, this series of tweets compares contemporary Silicon Valley to the former USSR.
    Read More
    • Replies: @istevefan
    Thanks.
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  103. Big Bill says:
    @Achilles
    These kinds of innovative living and work arrangements will need to spark commensurate legal innovations in labor contracts.

    In particular in respect of immigrant workers, the employer-landlords will need some legal way to recoup the cost of transporting workers from India or elsewhere to the Bay area as well as the cost of amortization and depreciation charges on the work/residence structure and fixtures, not to mention ongoing expenses for utilities and other services provided.

    The logical solution would be to bind such workers to the employer-landlord for a period of years. For example, in consideration of the employer-landlord's payment of transportation to the location and room and board, the worker would bind himself to the employer for a period of time, say seven years, after which the worker would be free to negotiate an arm's-length wage or move on to other employment.

    A variation on this may be necessary for special cases. For example, in the case of immigrants who were prisoners in their homeland and for which the employer-landlord paid a sum of money for the release to it of such prisoners, it may be appropriate to extend the indenture of binding to the entire natural life of the worker. (Obviously, the question of the legal status of any offspring of such workers is a detail that would need to addressed.)

    Facebook, Google and other Bay area tech companies may want to raise these ideas with their lobbyists. There are likely also business opportunities that might appeal to Zuckerberg and the other tech moguls with respect to creating markets for the legal rights to such workers.

    Achilles, you are behind the curve. Check out the GATS Treaty (1995) here:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Agreement_on_Trade_in_Services

    In a few years an Indian company will buy a SF “co-living” building, hire Indian workers for Indian wages, bring them to SF, plop them in the building, and work them like coolies.

    It is called “Supply Mode 4″: “Presence of a [foreign] natural person.” “Service delivered within the territory of the Member, with supplier present as a natural person.”

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  104. TheJester says:
    @Rob McX
    Maybe the answer to this question is obvious, but why does tech workers' physical location matter that much? The whole point of the tech revolution is making geographical distance irrelevant. Why do they even need to bring these workers to America?

    Working “virtually” (at home) has its limitations.

    I managed a team of software programmers for 14 years. We eventually migrated to a “virtual” environment to keep costs low and win contracts. My rules were that everyone had to be at their desks at home within a core time from 9 AM to 4 PM to accommodate those who are “morning people” and those who are “evening people”. Everyone had to be contactable within five minutes within that core time.

    However, hiring an employee and allowing them to immediately start working from home did not work out, especially for women. “Hey, why sit at my desk all day? Why not do the laundry, make a cake, or watch soap operas on TV until my boss gives me a call to check up on me. Maybe I’ll take the afternoon off and go to my son’s baseball game. Who cares as long as I get my work done.” (Real examples … and, yes, I did come to the attention of HR for firing a number of women in quick succession. Indeed, one female used that as the basis for a discrimination suit against me. I won! )

    We eventually decided that all new employees had to work out of the corporate office for at least a year before they transitioned to a “virtual” work environment. This gave them an opportunity to learn the corporate culture as well as having “face time” with the administrative and support staff.

    Without that year at the corporate office, the programmers worked in isolation and were not really part of an effective “virtual team”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alec Leamas

    However, hiring an employee and allowing them to immediately start working from home did not work out, especially for women. “Hey, why sit at my desk all day? Why not do the laundry, make a cake, or watch soap operas on TV until my boss gives me a call to check up on me. Maybe I’ll take the afternoon off and go to my son’s baseball game. Who cares as long as I get my work done.” (Real examples … and, yes, I did come to the attention of HR for firing a number of women in quick succession. Indeed, one female used that as the basis for a discrimination suit against me. I won! )
     
    Speaking as someone who has managed female employees (attorneys at that), they still pull this stuff even when there is no "virtual commute."

    One of the watershed moments seems to be the leave for the first baby, after which they're ever in both worlds but fully in neither. In a way it is charming that even the most irascible of the female sex fall deeply in maternal love with their babies - this is probably as it should be. It's just that society doesn't permit us to be honest about this, and both mother and employer therefore need to play a game of charades after this fact with the employer risking quite a bit for acting on the obvious truth.
    , @njguy73

    watch soap operas on TV
     
    Wow, that must have been ancient times ;)
    , @Rob McX
    Thanks for your reply, they're things I hadn't thought of (thanks also to Alfa and L Woods).
    , @ScarletNumber
    To be fair, a 7 hour core time to be chained to one's desk at home seems excessive.
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  105. @Anonymous

    programmers making $100K/year in their first job out of college
     
    If that's a real number. Wow.

    I remember the code I wrote when out of college. Wouldn't want to wipe my bum with it now.

    No wonder software is stinkingly unaffordable and abysmally bad (with horrendous design design hidden gracefully behind colorful "UX") unless crowd-tested (and even then, crashing, burning and data leaks galore are the new normal).

    Have some Uncle Bob:

    https://youtu.be/BSaAMQVq01E?t=4019

    By now, it is, if anything, low.

    At this point, you probably start out at $120K, with another $60K in stock (which will double or triple by year 3/4, so congrats on the $300,000 payday at age 25 as a junior employee), plus the bennies. Get a promotion, add $50K cash/$25K stock to that. Did I mention that this is an industry where 5 years rounds to senior?

    And since startups cannot match that in any way*, the Silicon Valley startup scene is about to implode and all that will be left is FAANG.

    * To be fair, the twin issues are that they don’t pay you enough to make rent, and that they pay you so much that they run out of money before getting another funding round (which takes a year from the point they start searching for funding).

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  106. JMcG says:
    @Dumbo
    Hey but you have to admire their creativity in inventing new words to sell bad stuff.

    living in dorms = "co-living environment"

    not being able to purchase your own things = "sharing economy"

    underpaid workers = "new economy"

    chaos and strife = "vibrancy"

    You forgot the best one; “Gig economy.” Stringing together 6 or 7 part time jobs to scrape by.

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  107. @cthulhu


    Jerry Pournelle and Larry Niven wrote the novel Oath of Fealty about such an arcology called Todos Santos located in south central LA.

     

    A pretty good book BTW; I have an autographed copy.

    I asked Jerry if his giant building in “Oath of Fealty” was a good idea or not. He said that was up to the reader to decide.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Haxo Angmark
    as far as anti-socialist Utopias go, Jack Vance's Wyst: Alastor 1716 puts them all to shame. Little Tanzel's fate, during a bonterfest, is particularly horrific. @

    http://goodreads.com/book/show/1902268.Wyst
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  108. Cortes says:
    @cthulhu
    I much prefer Jenny Agutter; see also An American Werewolf in London.

    Agutter was fantastic in “Walkabout”, a phenomenal film.

    She’s also done magnificent work for charities related to Cystic Fibrosis.

    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/aug/22/jenny-agutter-my-family-values-railway-children

    Read More
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  109. @istevefan
    I don't think it posted, but I tried to link to a series of tweets discussing the same topic as this post concerning the conditions of the Bay Area. In case it didn't post, this series of tweets compares contemporary Silicon Valley to the former USSR.

    By coincidence, I just posted that tweet yesterday on another of Steve’s threads: http://www.unz.com/isteve/austrian-leader-proposes-sensible-compromise-nyt-aghast/#comment-2405653

    Read More
    • Replies: @istevefan
    I did not mean to take your comment. But I too found that tweet storm hilarious and somewhat factual.
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  110. @Steve Sailer
    I asked Jerry if his giant building in "Oath of Fealty" was a good idea or not. He said that was up to the reader to decide.

    as far as anti-socialist Utopias go, Jack Vance’s Wyst: Alastor 1716 puts them all to shame. Little Tanzel’s fate, during a bonterfest, is particularly horrific. @

    http://goodreads.com/book/show/1902268.Wyst

    Read More
    • Replies: @Haxo Angmark
    here's a good precis and review of Wyst, @

    http://orthosphere.wordpress.com/2018/04/10/jack-vances-wyst-alastor-1716-a-socialist-dystopia
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  111. Anonymous[346] • Disclaimer says:
    @ThirdWorldSteveReader
    Propaganda is so funny. Living in the company barracks or in the floor above your workshop is as old as bricks and mortar, and happened to be practical in those old times when transportation was difficult and building was expensive. As soon as people could live away from the noise and smoke and crowding of workplace, they did.

    Now they are adding some buzzwords to the old living-on-site thing (Silicon Valley! Innovative! Community-building! Environment-friendly) to sell it as brand new genius stuff to people who, due to city overcrowding, have to make a virtue out of necessity.

    Propaganda is so funny. Living in the company barracks or in the floor above your workshop is as old as bricks and mortar, and happened to be practical in those old times when transportation was difficult and building was expensive. As soon as people could live away from the noise and smoke and crowding of workplace, they did.

    And they’re able to get lots of young college-educated females to forgo motherhood and relinquish family and re-locate to expensive cities were they have to live like rats for glorified secretarial jobs. Oh, I mean “knowledge worker” jobs with fancy job titles.

    Read More
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  112. @Alec Leamas

    Next, there will be an app with an ironic name like Board that will put you in contact with landladies who not only will provide you with a room but also with 2 cooked meals per day.
     
    Coming to a San Francisco near you:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fTkGDXRnR9I

    Allow me to edit to add another positive for the Tech Oligarchs of their coolie coders getting home-cooked tiffin lunches delivered to their sleeping quarters/workplace/masturbation dens is that it justifies visas for the delivery service and the coders’ own mothers. It’s a veritable three-for-one.

    Read More
    • LOL: BB753
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  113. @TheJester
    Working "virtually" (at home) has its limitations.

    I managed a team of software programmers for 14 years. We eventually migrated to a "virtual" environment to keep costs low and win contracts. My rules were that everyone had to be at their desks at home within a core time from 9 AM to 4 PM to accommodate those who are "morning people" and those who are "evening people". Everyone had to be contactable within five minutes within that core time.

    However, hiring an employee and allowing them to immediately start working from home did not work out, especially for women. "Hey, why sit at my desk all day? Why not do the laundry, make a cake, or watch soap operas on TV until my boss gives me a call to check up on me. Maybe I'll take the afternoon off and go to my son's baseball game. Who cares as long as I get my work done." (Real examples ... and, yes, I did come to the attention of HR for firing a number of women in quick succession. Indeed, one female used that as the basis for a discrimination suit against me. I won! )

    We eventually decided that all new employees had to work out of the corporate office for at least a year before they transitioned to a "virtual" work environment. This gave them an opportunity to learn the corporate culture as well as having "face time" with the administrative and support staff.

    Without that year at the corporate office, the programmers worked in isolation and were not really part of an effective "virtual team".

    However, hiring an employee and allowing them to immediately start working from home did not work out, especially for women. “Hey, why sit at my desk all day? Why not do the laundry, make a cake, or watch soap operas on TV until my boss gives me a call to check up on me. Maybe I’ll take the afternoon off and go to my son’s baseball game. Who cares as long as I get my work done.” (Real examples … and, yes, I did come to the attention of HR for firing a number of women in quick succession. Indeed, one female used that as the basis for a discrimination suit against me. I won! )

    Speaking as someone who has managed female employees (attorneys at that), they still pull this stuff even when there is no “virtual commute.”

    One of the watershed moments seems to be the leave for the first baby, after which they’re ever in both worlds but fully in neither. In a way it is charming that even the most irascible of the female sex fall deeply in maternal love with their babies – this is probably as it should be. It’s just that society doesn’t permit us to be honest about this, and both mother and employer therefore need to play a game of charades after this fact with the employer risking quite a bit for acting on the obvious truth.

    Read More
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  114. Wow Steve – you memory holed my reply to ElitistSettler? I though it was pretty benign compared to some of the comments here.

    Read More
    • Replies: @L Woods
    He likes to coddle our leftoid trolls for some reason
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  115. Mr. Anon says:
    @ElitistSettler
    It's hilarious to witness (what I assume to be) the predominantly blue-collar readership of this site flailing impotently at the altar of the Silicon Valley temple birthing the future.

    It's certainly a recurring theme and it reminds me of a scene where I can imagine the last stone-ager waving his flint-tipped spear at the foot of an Iron Age city - denouncing their excesses but, in reality, mainly bemoaning his own inability to join the new vanguard.

    It’s hilarious to witness (what I assume to be) the predominantly blue-collar readership of this site flailing impotently at the altar of the Silicon Valley temple birthing the future.

    That’s funny. I assumed you to be a sockless, problem-glasses-wearing soy-boy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    Why does he assume the isteve readership is blue-collar?
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Curious where "sockless" meme comes from.
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  116. Mr. Anon says:
    @cthulhu
    I much prefer Jenny Agutter; see also An American Werewolf in London.

    I much prefer Jenny Agutter; see also An American Werewolf in London.

    Ditto. Not only was she a rare beauty in her day, she aged very well.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dwb
    Unfortunately, her career didn't.

    Last thing I saw her in was one of the sequels of the "Child's Play" movies - those horror/comedy flicks where a doll tries to kill people.
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  117. Mr. Anon says:
    @black sea
    Assuming a decent female-to-male ratio, I could see how this set up might not be so bad for those in their first job out of college. Of course, the potential for adverse consequences would be high, but that's generally the case with intra-office romances.

    Assuming a decent female-to-male ratio, I could see how this set up might not be so bad for those in their first job out of college.

    Maybe they could build these dorms in abandoned mine-shafts.

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  118. istevefan says:
    @Seamus Padraig
    By coincidence, I just posted that tweet yesterday on another of Steve's threads: http://www.unz.com/isteve/austrian-leader-proposes-sensible-compromise-nyt-aghast/#comment-2405653

    I did not mean to take your comment. But I too found that tweet storm hilarious and somewhat factual.

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  119. istevefan says:
    @WowJustWow
    https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1014974099930714115.html

    Thanks.

    Read More
    • Replies: @WowJustWow
    Nah, I just posted it because your I'd already visited the thread before and so your link was too dark to distinguish from regular text.
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  120. njguy73 says:
    @TheJester
    Working "virtually" (at home) has its limitations.

    I managed a team of software programmers for 14 years. We eventually migrated to a "virtual" environment to keep costs low and win contracts. My rules were that everyone had to be at their desks at home within a core time from 9 AM to 4 PM to accommodate those who are "morning people" and those who are "evening people". Everyone had to be contactable within five minutes within that core time.

    However, hiring an employee and allowing them to immediately start working from home did not work out, especially for women. "Hey, why sit at my desk all day? Why not do the laundry, make a cake, or watch soap operas on TV until my boss gives me a call to check up on me. Maybe I'll take the afternoon off and go to my son's baseball game. Who cares as long as I get my work done." (Real examples ... and, yes, I did come to the attention of HR for firing a number of women in quick succession. Indeed, one female used that as the basis for a discrimination suit against me. I won! )

    We eventually decided that all new employees had to work out of the corporate office for at least a year before they transitioned to a "virtual" work environment. This gave them an opportunity to learn the corporate culture as well as having "face time" with the administrative and support staff.

    Without that year at the corporate office, the programmers worked in isolation and were not really part of an effective "virtual team".

    watch soap operas on TV

    Wow, that must have been ancient times ;)

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  121. @AndrewR
    Your blog would be much better if you cut down on the incessant sarcasm. You're not in middle school. You don't look cool by being a constant smartass. You look like a jaded and miserable borderline-elderly man. Say what you mean.

    I like to think of myself as a sober, serious person. So it has only been gradually and reluctantly that I have come to accept the outsize effect that ridicule can have, especially on public figures who are sensitive about their image (most of them).

    So…

    Rave on, you magnificent bastard!

    Read More
    • Replies: @ben tillman

    So…

    Rave on, you magnificent bastard!
     

    More like, "Shine on, you crazy diamond!"
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  122. L Woods says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike
    Wow Steve - you memory holed my reply to ElitistSettler? I though it was pretty benign compared to some of the comments here.

    He likes to coddle our leftoid trolls for some reason

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  123. @Almost Missouri
    I like to think of myself as a sober, serious person. So it has only been gradually and reluctantly that I have come to accept the outsize effect that ridicule can have, especially on public figures who are sensitive about their image (most of them).

    So...

    Rave on, you magnificent bastard!

    So…

    Rave on, you magnificent bastard!

    More like, “Shine on, you crazy diamond!”

    Read More
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  124. Not so much 1975 Leningrad levels of comfort, but 1975 second-rate state university dorms (long story, but I used to stay at dorms at places like what is now JMU when they were having Spring Break in the late 70s)…

    Read More
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  125. @Haxo Angmark
    as far as anti-socialist Utopias go, Jack Vance's Wyst: Alastor 1716 puts them all to shame. Little Tanzel's fate, during a bonterfest, is particularly horrific. @

    http://goodreads.com/book/show/1902268.Wyst
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  126. @istevefan
    Thanks.

    Nah, I just posted it because your I’d already visited the thread before and so your link was too dark to distinguish from regular text.

    Read More
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  127. Rob McX says:
    @TheJester
    Working "virtually" (at home) has its limitations.

    I managed a team of software programmers for 14 years. We eventually migrated to a "virtual" environment to keep costs low and win contracts. My rules were that everyone had to be at their desks at home within a core time from 9 AM to 4 PM to accommodate those who are "morning people" and those who are "evening people". Everyone had to be contactable within five minutes within that core time.

    However, hiring an employee and allowing them to immediately start working from home did not work out, especially for women. "Hey, why sit at my desk all day? Why not do the laundry, make a cake, or watch soap operas on TV until my boss gives me a call to check up on me. Maybe I'll take the afternoon off and go to my son's baseball game. Who cares as long as I get my work done." (Real examples ... and, yes, I did come to the attention of HR for firing a number of women in quick succession. Indeed, one female used that as the basis for a discrimination suit against me. I won! )

    We eventually decided that all new employees had to work out of the corporate office for at least a year before they transitioned to a "virtual" work environment. This gave them an opportunity to learn the corporate culture as well as having "face time" with the administrative and support staff.

    Without that year at the corporate office, the programmers worked in isolation and were not really part of an effective "virtual team".

    Thanks for your reply, they’re things I hadn’t thought of (thanks also to Alfa and L Woods).

    Read More
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  128. Alice says:
    @gunner29
    20 years ago I bought my Bridgeport mill and South Bend lathe from a company at 2nd and Bryant; two blocks north of where this high rise is going up. They had been at this address for 25 years and where being forced to Oakland as the landlord was going to convert to lofts.

    It was only a couple of stories, so I suspect somebody is looking to do another tower...

    The obvious fix is letting them live outside the Bay Area and telecommute. But the managers will never go for that, one of the perks of being a manager is the opportunity to jerk around your underlings....

    We moved to the Triangle area, NC, USA. Husband works for the same Bay area company he did in 2002. Managers don’t care. Our 3800 sqft on 1 acre exurb house is a dream @600k, but not for people who feel contempt for normal USA, where there’s a chik fil A next to a Starbucks next to a Target.

    There’s only a couple bespoke knitted onesies for cats stores here next to the Commie Fixie repair cooperative, and the people who own them might go to church or have come from some college you’d never heard of.

    Honest, it’s just smugness on their part that they’d rather live in a hellhole then be seen in one of these places–places that as soon as they could, they fled. They’re typically grown children themselves, unmarried and without kids, but some even have a child or two. They’re still sure they’re better than us losers.

    But most of the folks with kids left for green pastures. Husband’s got colleagues in Georgia, SC, NH, NC, CO, TX, TN and the metro North corridor of NY/CT as well as the fools who won’t leave the bay area.

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  129. BB753 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    It’s hilarious to witness (what I assume to be) the predominantly blue-collar readership of this site flailing impotently at the altar of the Silicon Valley temple birthing the future.
     
    That's funny. I assumed you to be a sockless, problem-glasses-wearing soy-boy.

    Why does he assume the isteve readership is blue-collar?

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  130. cthulhu says:
    @Faraday's Bobcat

    It’s hilarious to witness (what I assume to be) the predominantly blue-collar readership of this site flailing impotently at the altar of the Silicon Valley temple birthing the future.
     
    subroutine snark(commenter)

    implicit none
    character(len=*), intent(in) :: commenter

    if (commenter.eq.'ElitistSettler') then
    print*,'Eat my ass'
    end if

    end subroutine snark

    Fortran 90? All of my hundreds of thousands of lines of Fortran are F77…

    Now redo it in C :-) (one of the dirty secrets of C is that its string handling is much worse than Fortran, even F77)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    C was never designed to be a general purpose programming language, but it was the only thing that ran decently on early PCs. And don't get me started on the abomination that is C++.
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  131. @TheJester
    Working "virtually" (at home) has its limitations.

    I managed a team of software programmers for 14 years. We eventually migrated to a "virtual" environment to keep costs low and win contracts. My rules were that everyone had to be at their desks at home within a core time from 9 AM to 4 PM to accommodate those who are "morning people" and those who are "evening people". Everyone had to be contactable within five minutes within that core time.

    However, hiring an employee and allowing them to immediately start working from home did not work out, especially for women. "Hey, why sit at my desk all day? Why not do the laundry, make a cake, or watch soap operas on TV until my boss gives me a call to check up on me. Maybe I'll take the afternoon off and go to my son's baseball game. Who cares as long as I get my work done." (Real examples ... and, yes, I did come to the attention of HR for firing a number of women in quick succession. Indeed, one female used that as the basis for a discrimination suit against me. I won! )

    We eventually decided that all new employees had to work out of the corporate office for at least a year before they transitioned to a "virtual" work environment. This gave them an opportunity to learn the corporate culture as well as having "face time" with the administrative and support staff.

    Without that year at the corporate office, the programmers worked in isolation and were not really part of an effective "virtual team".

    To be fair, a 7 hour core time to be chained to one’s desk at home seems excessive.

    Read More
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  132. @AndrewR
    Your blog would be much better if you cut down on the incessant sarcasm. You're not in middle school. You don't look cool by being a constant smartass. You look like a jaded and miserable borderline-elderly man. Say what you mean.

    Lighten up, Francis.

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  133. @cthulhu
    Fortran 90? All of my hundreds of thousands of lines of Fortran are F77...

    Now redo it in C :-) (one of the dirty secrets of C is that its string handling is much worse than Fortran, even F77)

    C was never designed to be a general purpose programming language, but it was the only thing that ran decently on early PCs. And don’t get me started on the abomination that is C++.

    Read More
    • Replies: @cthulhu
    The classic essay on how C came to dominate programming for quite a while:
    https://www.jwz.org/doc/worse-is-better.html

    I can deal with C++ as long as it’s treated as a “better C”, but most of it is heavy duty second-system-syndrome.

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  134. BB753 says:
    @AndrewR
    Your blog would be much better if you cut down on the incessant sarcasm. You're not in middle school. You don't look cool by being a constant smartass. You look like a jaded and miserable borderline-elderly man. Say what you mean.

    Sarcasm is the ultimate political weapon (short of an actual weapon).

    Read More
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  135. @Mr. Anon

    It’s hilarious to witness (what I assume to be) the predominantly blue-collar readership of this site flailing impotently at the altar of the Silicon Valley temple birthing the future.
     
    That's funny. I assumed you to be a sockless, problem-glasses-wearing soy-boy.

    Curious where “sockless” meme comes from.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stationary Feast
    No-show socks are popular.
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  136. dwb says:
    @Mr. Anon

    I much prefer Jenny Agutter; see also An American Werewolf in London.
     
    Ditto. Not only was she a rare beauty in her day, she aged very well.

    Unfortunately, her career didn’t.

    Last thing I saw her in was one of the sequels of the “Child’s Play” movies – those horror/comedy flicks where a doll tries to kill people.

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  137. @Daniel Chieh
    Curious where "sockless" meme comes from.

    No-show socks are popular.

    Read More
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  138. dwb says:

    Strangely, there is a significant number of “millennials” who are prime targets for this. As others say, they have never lived the grown-up lifestyle, do not make friends organically, and lack face to face social skills.

    It also dovetails with the current psychobabble about “emerging adulthood” that is trying to claim that you are still essentially a child until you are into your 30s.

    Think about it – it’s basically like college, save for they pay you. You go from mom and dad’s care, to the dean, to Mark Zuckerberg. Work in the “collective spaces on the lower floors,” and when you’re done, it’s a big pyjama party upstairs. Just like college.

    Given how ridiculously expensive it is in the Bay Area, this helps solve that “problem” too.

    It’s win-win. The company gets you on site, 24/7. THEY own the land and benefit from the appreciation of the dirt (and Proposition 13 tax benefits), and the companies can pitch it as some sort of “perk” to the clueless Eloi who come when the sirens sound.

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  139. Mr. Anon says:
    @AndrewR
    Your blog would be much better if you cut down on the incessant sarcasm. You're not in middle school. You don't look cool by being a constant smartass. You look like a jaded and miserable borderline-elderly man. Say what you mean.

    Your blog would be much better if you cut down on the incessant sarcasm.

    I like Steve’s sarcasm. However, this blog would be better without many (perhaps most) of your posts. And don’t worry – I’m not being sarcastic.

    Read More
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  140. cthulhu says:
    @Jim Don Bob
    C was never designed to be a general purpose programming language, but it was the only thing that ran decently on early PCs. And don't get me started on the abomination that is C++.

    The classic essay on how C came to dominate programming for quite a while:

    https://www.jwz.org/doc/worse-is-better.html

    I can deal with C++ as long as it’s treated as a “better C”, but most of it is heavy duty second-system-syndrome.

    Read More
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  141. donut says:

    Maybe they could look to the Maritime industry as a model . At my last job we (the unlicensed) worked 60 days on and 37 off w/pay . The company paid transportation to and from your home , the food was good , we each had our own stateroom . We wanted to work 12 hour days because OT . I never minded the schedule . The company could write off the room and board and travel . You could live wherever you liked but you only got reimbursed to the nearest US airport . I knew guys who lived in Mexico , Honduras and Costa Rico .

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  142. @Alec Leamas
    How long until they develop Microsoft™ Brand Soylent with the correct mix of insect-derived protein, sanitary recycled human waste, and amphetamines as the perfect coding source diet? An entire pre-fab life brought to you by the loving Tech Overlords.
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  143. duncsbaby says:
    @bored identity



    The tech industry is bringing America 1975 Leningrad levels of domestic comfort.

     

    1975....Leningrad....all the comfort that коммуналка offers...

    Please, just stop Uncle Ernest, bored identity is getting too mushy:

    https://youtu.be/lh_h-KdbBrE

    Although, bored identity finds it laughable to compare Санкт-Ленинбург's Resilience to San Francisco's... Resistance :

    https://youtu.be/OGyUuSZGKPI

    In conclusion, bored identity sees only one, or maybe two solutions to the problem :

    https://youtu.be/Jrg0X9H6FGU

    https://youtu.be/jaU1OVs1fP4

    I still don’t know why the Leningrad Cowboys weren’t super huge. If there’s anything the world was crying out for in the early 90′s it was Finnish doofuses in stupid hair playing covers of 70′s southern rock songs w/the Red Army Choir.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bored identity
    ( Arghh, Unz's cookie & data-cream policy is so atrociously invasive...)

    ********************************************************************************************

    You know your 90′s very well, and bored identity salutes your refined poli-aesthetical affinities.

    Yet, the Old Europe is cheerfully Facing The Sea , eager to meet Her Reanimators :

    https://youtu.be/shqJu9M0tAc
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  144. You know your 90′s very well, and bored identity salutes your refined poli-aesthetical affinities.

    Yet, the Old Europe is cheerfully Facing The Sea , eager to meet Her Reanimators :

    Because it worked so well for the Balkans.

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  145. @duncsbaby
    I still don't know why the Leningrad Cowboys weren't super huge. If there's anything the world was crying out for in the early 90's it was Finnish doofuses in stupid hair playing covers of 70's southern rock songs w/the Red Army Choir.

    ( Arghh, Unz’s cookie & data-cream policy is so atrociously invasive…)

    ********************************************************************************************

    You know your 90′s very well, and bored identity salutes your refined poli-aesthetical affinities.

    Yet, the Old Europe is cheerfully Facing The Sea , eager to meet Her Reanimators :

    Read More
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