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Nature vs. Nurture in Coldest Polynesia
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Pacific Island cultures are useful for testing theories of nature and nurture, as Jared Diamond emphasized in Guns, Germs, and Steel:

Last pureblood Moriori

Moriori and Maori constitutes a brief, small-scale natural experiment that tests how environments affect human societies. Before you read a whole book examining environmental effects on a very large scale— effects on human societies around the world for the last 13,000 years—you might reasonably want assurance, from smaller tests, that such effects really are significant. If you were a laboratory scientist studying rats, you might perform such a test by taking one rat colony, distributing groups of those ancestral rats among many cages with differing environments, and coming back many rat generations later to see what had happened. Of course, such purposeful experiments cannot be carried out on human societies. Instead, scientists must look for “natural experiments,” in which something similar befell humans in the past. Such an experiment unfolded during the settlement of Polynesia. Scattered over the Pacific Ocean beyond New Guinea and Melanesia are thousands of islands differing greatly in area, isolation, elevation, climate, productivity, and geological and biological resources. For most of human history those islands lay far beyond the reach of watercraft.

Diamond begins with the story of how in 1835, the teeming masses warlike Maoris of New Zealand invaded and conquered their pacifist hunter-gatherer cousins, the Moriori of the remote and chilly Chatham Islands. Polynesian crops wouldn’t grow on the Chatham Islands, so the settlers had centuries before become foragers. If the old stories are true, the Moriori may have been one of the few pacifist cultures in human history.

GG&S is a rather dry book, so here’s the tale as told in David Mitchell’s novel Cloud Atlas:

The origins of the Moriori of Rekohu (the native moniker for the Chathams) remain a mystery to this day. Mr. Evans evinces the belief they are descended from the Jews expelled from Spain, citing their hooked noses and sneering lips. Mr. D’Arnoq’s preferred theorem, that the Moriori were once Maori whose canoes were wrecked upon these remotest of isles, is founded on similarities of tongue & mythology & thereby possess a higher carat of logic. What is certain is that, after centuries or millennia of living in isolation, the Moriori lived as primitive a life as their woebegone cousins of Van Diemen’s Land. Arts of boatbuilding (beyond crude woven rafts used to cross the channels betwixt islands) & navigation fell into disuse. That the terraqueous globe held other lands, trod by other feet, the Moriori dreamt not. Indeed their language lacks a word for “race” & “Moriori” means, simply, “People.” … In their virgin state, the Moriori were foragers, picking up paua shellfish, diving for crayfish, plundering bird eggs, spearing seals, gather kelp & digging for grubs & roots.

… Old Rekohu’s claim to singularity, however, lay in its unique pacific creed. Since time immemorial, the Moriori’s priestly caste dictated that whosoever spilt a man’s blood killed his own mana – his honor, his worth, his standing & his soul. No Moriori would shelter, feed, converse with, or even see the persona non grata. If the ostracized murderer survived his first winter, the desperation of solitude usually drove him to a blowhole on Cape Young, where he took his life.

Consider this, Mr. D’Arnoq urged us. Two thousand savages (Mr. Evans’s best guess) enshrine “Thou Shalt Not Kill” in word & in deed & frame an oral “Magna Carta” to create a harmony unknown elsewhere for the sixty centuries since Adam first tasted the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge. War was as alien a concept to the Moriori as the telescope is to the Pygmy. …

All those misfortunes the Moriori might have endured, however, were it not for reports arriving in New Zealand depicting the Chathams as a veritable Canaan of eel-stuffed lagoons, shellfish-carpeted coves & inhabitants who understand neither combat nor weapons. To the ears of the Ngati Tama & Ngati Mutunga, two clans of the Taranaki Te Ati Awa Maori …, these rumors promised compensation for the tracts of their ancestral estates lost during the recent “Musket Wars.” … The tattooed Maori conquistadores found their single-barked armada in Captain Harewood of the brig Rodney, who in the dying months of 1835, agreed to transport nine hundred Maori & seven war canoes in two voyages, in guerno for seed potatoes, firearms, pigs, a great supply of scraped flax & a cannon. (Mr. D’Arnoq encountered Harewood five years ago, penurious in a Bay of Islands tavern. He at first denied being the Rodney’s Harewood, then swore he had been coerced into conveying the Blacks, but was unclear how this coercion had been worked upon him.) …

… Fourteen years ago, the Moriori men held on that sacred ground a parliament. Three days it lasted, its object to settle this question: Would the spillage of Maori blood also destroy one’s mana? Younger men argued the creed of Peace did not encompass foreign cannibals of whom their ancestors knew nothing. The Moriori must kill or be killed. Elders urged appeasement, for as long as the Moriori preserved their mana with their land, their gods & ancestors would deliver the race from harm. “Embrace your enemy,” the elders urged, “to prevent him from striking you.” (“Embrace your enemy,” Henry quipped, “to feel his dagger tickle your kidneys.”)

The elders won the day, but it mattered little. “When lacking numerical superiority,” Mr. D’Arnoq told us, “the Maori seize an advantage by striking first & hardest, has many hapless British & French can testify from their graves.” … On Waitangi Beach fifty Moriori were beheaded, filleted, wrapped in flax leaves, then baked in a giant earth oven with yams & sweet potatoes. Not half those Moriori who had seen Old Rekohu’s last sunset were alive to see the Maori sun rise.

 
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  1. So there were no Moriori to testify to how these old cultural practices worked once the historians arrived? Small surprise.

    No human society can function without at least the threat of violence to keep order. There was plenty to fight over on that little island and population expansion could easily consume all those resources unless something was killing the excess people.

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    • Replies: @Xenophon Hendrix
    I'm speculating freely here, so don't quote me, but it's possible that infanticide through abandonment wasn't considered violence.
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  2. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    From watching the movie version of Cloud Atlas, I would have never guessed the novel was written by a man.

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    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    IIRC, in the movie version the Moriori character was changed to a Negro.

    Also, David Mitchell characterizing the non-violence dictum that the priestly caste imposed on the Moriori as a kind of "Magna Carta" shows that despite his superficial sophistication, Mitchell does not understand what Manga Carta is: a restraint on the powerful, not a mystic harmonizer.

    A genuine Magna Carta among the Moriori would have meant that those Moriori who wanted to resist the numerically inferior Maori could have done so rather than bow beneath the dead hand of their non-violence taboo and go gentle into the dark night of Maori massacre/dinner.

    , @Almost Missouri
    P.S. The movie was terrible. Expensive, sprawling, incoherent and implausible, it nevertheless managed to hit most of the ideological keys on the leftist piano: Negro sanctification, homo romanticization, cuckism, diversity fascism, all wrapped in pseudo-mystical subtext.

    On reflection, I can't understand why Hollywood wasn't more enthusiastic about it. Maybe they're better businessmen than I give them credit for after all.
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  3. ty says: • Website

    The celts were the first to get to NZ.

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  4. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    I think that Steve is, really, dropping oblique hints about the current massive immigration/refugee insanity in Europe and the appallingly naive/gullible/stupid lefty-Economist stance in meekly encouraging that massive influx.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Just the other day in England we had the appalling case in which tens of thousands of pounds in British taxpayer funded welfare money given to Arabs holding Belgian passports resident in the UK, (more proof if proof needed of the wisdom of brexit), was expressly sent by the claimants - who had, apparently, vacated the UK, to the Isis cell responsible for the Bataclan massacre and the Brussels bombing.
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  5. 5371 says:

    [Since time immemorial, the Moriori’s priestly caste dictated that whosoever spilt a man’s blood killed his own mana – his honor, his worth, his standing & his soul.]

    Time immemorial here means a couple of hundred years at most. The Moriori only got there in the fifteenth century, and even according to their own account used to fight back then. There were probably never more than three thousand of them.

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  6. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    I think that Steve is, really, dropping oblique hints about the current massive immigration/refugee insanity in Europe and the appallingly naive/gullible/stupid lefty-Economist stance in meekly encouraging that massive influx.

    Just the other day in England we had the appalling case in which tens of thousands of pounds in British taxpayer funded welfare money given to Arabs holding Belgian passports resident in the UK, (more proof if proof needed of the wisdom of brexit), was expressly sent by the claimants – who had, apparently, vacated the UK, to the Isis cell responsible for the Bataclan massacre and the Brussels bombing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Londinium
    The Financial Times yesterday reported that a fake U.S. embassy was closed after ten years in operation. Countless phony documents, along with many real visas from an Embassy connection entered circulation. Turks and Ghanians sold documents for up to $6,000. There are countless similar problems in other countries, and willing buyers and sellers.
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  7. Steve, the plural of Maori is Maori. Don’t ask why. It just is.:)

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  8. Trelane says:

    Gun, Germs and Steel was one of the best works of fiction I ever read. Imagine, a world where economic and social outcomes are determined entirely by luck. A world where merit only works against a population. What a wonderful fiction Mr. Diamond gave us and which PBS made into a 4-part television series and of which many children are required to read (and absorb) in order to graduate from high school these days.

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  9. Anonym says:

    Glad you losted this Steve. I had read about the Moriori from a link, I think from Breitbart comment. Maybe the link was this. I am not sure.

    http://alternative-right.blogspot.com/2016/03/what-west-can-learn-from-moriori.html?m=1

    Regardless, we have the Baby Boomers largely telling us that we should follow Gandhi. A passport, once granted, is inviolable. We are nations of immigrants. It’s a good thing we have a young generation of shitlords coming through. Let’s not wind up like the Moriori.

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  10. Londinium says:
    @Anonymous
    Just the other day in England we had the appalling case in which tens of thousands of pounds in British taxpayer funded welfare money given to Arabs holding Belgian passports resident in the UK, (more proof if proof needed of the wisdom of brexit), was expressly sent by the claimants - who had, apparently, vacated the UK, to the Isis cell responsible for the Bataclan massacre and the Brussels bombing.

    The Financial Times yesterday reported that a fake U.S. embassy was closed after ten years in operation. Countless phony documents, along with many real visas from an Embassy connection entered circulation. Turks and Ghanians sold documents for up to $6,000. There are countless similar problems in other countries, and willing buyers and sellers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Americans, if they wise, should regard all immigration from contemporary Britain with great caution.

    Put it this way - it's no longer the ancient Anglo-Saxon mother nation which you are dealing with.
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  11. Olorin says:

    For most of human history those islands lay far beyond the reach of watercraft.

    Nonsense. We don’t know this one way or another…though we do know from this quote that Jared Diamond is a landlubber whose noodle arms would fall off if he ever used a brace and bit or spokeshave. And who never read Capt. Slocum’s 1900 memoir.

    Or Robin Lee Graham’s of 1974.

    http://www.bluemoment.com/dove.html

    Old Rekohu’s claim to singularity, however, lay in its unique pacific creed. Since time immemorial, the Moriori’s priestly caste dictated that whosoever spilt a man’s blood killed his own mana – his honor, his worth, his standing & his soul. No Moriori would shelter, feed, converse with, or even see the persona non grata.

    Unique in the Pacific maybe. But that sounds a lot like the Outlaw judgment as detailed in the Icelandic sagas. ‘Ceptin that the Norse Outlaw’s life was forfeit to anybody who felt like taking it in any way for any reason they felt like, including none whatever.

    I’m ever amazed by how many university academics seem to think that all human history has taken place on land, with maybe a little bit of coastal activity from time to time. For, you know, digging shellfish to eat.

    I can count on one hand the number I’ve ever met who could find north without their smart phones if you put the two bear sticks in the ground for them and told them what to do.

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    • Replies: @black sea
    Dove, a book I read over and over and over again in high school. At one point, I probably spent more time thinking about Robin Lee Graham's life than my own. Of course, his life was objectively much more interesting.


    "I can count on one hand the number I’ve ever met who could find north without their smart phones if you put the two bear sticks in the ground for them and told them what to do."

    My dad was a landscape architect and when I was a kid we'd walk "raw land," as he called it, so he could figure out what he wanted to do once the planning commenced. He always seemed to know where we were relative to the cardinal directions, without any looking at a map or compass. I'm not ashamed to say I have a bit of a knack for that as well.
    , @Moshe
    Excepting the exotic exception can you point us toward more information on society's that's primarily lived at sea?

    I assume that you're referring to aquatic nomads who I would otherwise have thought had as much impact on civilization as the desert sort. Other than the rape and kidnapping of course.

    But if we're talking about any major civilization worth discussing since the Sea Peoples please point us in the right direction.

    I'm not saying this as a challenge, I'm sincerely requesting enlightenment
    , @Almost Missouri
    There's a way to find north with a smart phone?
    , @Whoever
    I love Sailing Alone Around the World!
    You're right about landlubbers not understanding that the ocean is a highway not a roadblock and that you don't need a very big boat to travel as far as you want. Give me a Norsea 27 and I'm good to go anywhere on the seven seas.
    , @EvolutionistX
    North. *points* It's over that way.
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  12. Ironically, the least war-like of the Maori tribes has arguably been the most fortunate under the rule of the white man. The small and traditionally weak South Island tribe of Ngai Tahu has done very well out of the land compensation deals struck with the New Zealand government in recent decades, while the traditionally stronger North Island tribes have had to share their more limited handouts among a much larger number of people.

    Today Maori are quite happy to receive the benefits of white man’s affirmative action policies but they didn’t have much of an AA mentality when they were in charge.

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  13. black sea says:
    @Olorin

    For most of human history those islands lay far beyond the reach of watercraft.
     
    Nonsense. We don't know this one way or another...though we do know from this quote that Jared Diamond is a landlubber whose noodle arms would fall off if he ever used a brace and bit or spokeshave. And who never read Capt. Slocum's 1900 memoir.

    Or Robin Lee Graham's of 1974.

    http://www.bluemoment.com/dove.html


    Old Rekohu’s claim to singularity, however, lay in its unique pacific creed. Since time immemorial, the Moriori’s priestly caste dictated that whosoever spilt a man’s blood killed his own mana – his honor, his worth, his standing & his soul. No Moriori would shelter, feed, converse with, or even see the persona non grata.
     
    Unique in the Pacific maybe. But that sounds a lot like the Outlaw judgment as detailed in the Icelandic sagas. 'Ceptin that the Norse Outlaw's life was forfeit to anybody who felt like taking it in any way for any reason they felt like, including none whatever.

    I'm ever amazed by how many university academics seem to think that all human history has taken place on land, with maybe a little bit of coastal activity from time to time. For, you know, digging shellfish to eat.

    I can count on one hand the number I've ever met who could find north without their smart phones if you put the two bear sticks in the ground for them and told them what to do.

    Dove, a book I read over and over and over again in high school. At one point, I probably spent more time thinking about Robin Lee Graham’s life than my own. Of course, his life was objectively much more interesting.

    “I can count on one hand the number I’ve ever met who could find north without their smart phones if you put the two bear sticks in the ground for them and told them what to do.”

    My dad was a landscape architect and when I was a kid we’d walk “raw land,” as he called it, so he could figure out what he wanted to do once the planning commenced. He always seemed to know where we were relative to the cardinal directions, without any looking at a map or compass. I’m not ashamed to say I have a bit of a knack for that as well.

    Read More
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  14. Moshe says:
    @Olorin

    For most of human history those islands lay far beyond the reach of watercraft.
     
    Nonsense. We don't know this one way or another...though we do know from this quote that Jared Diamond is a landlubber whose noodle arms would fall off if he ever used a brace and bit or spokeshave. And who never read Capt. Slocum's 1900 memoir.

    Or Robin Lee Graham's of 1974.

    http://www.bluemoment.com/dove.html


    Old Rekohu’s claim to singularity, however, lay in its unique pacific creed. Since time immemorial, the Moriori’s priestly caste dictated that whosoever spilt a man’s blood killed his own mana – his honor, his worth, his standing & his soul. No Moriori would shelter, feed, converse with, or even see the persona non grata.
     
    Unique in the Pacific maybe. But that sounds a lot like the Outlaw judgment as detailed in the Icelandic sagas. 'Ceptin that the Norse Outlaw's life was forfeit to anybody who felt like taking it in any way for any reason they felt like, including none whatever.

    I'm ever amazed by how many university academics seem to think that all human history has taken place on land, with maybe a little bit of coastal activity from time to time. For, you know, digging shellfish to eat.

    I can count on one hand the number I've ever met who could find north without their smart phones if you put the two bear sticks in the ground for them and told them what to do.

    Excepting the exotic exception can you point us toward more information on society’s that’s primarily lived at sea?

    I assume that you’re referring to aquatic nomads who I would otherwise have thought had as much impact on civilization as the desert sort. Other than the rape and kidnapping of course.

    But if we’re talking about any major civilization worth discussing since the Sea Peoples please point us in the right direction.

    I’m not saying this as a challenge, I’m sincerely requesting enlightenment

    Read More
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    Well, the Polynesians.

    And there was a sea-going Arabic culture in the Gulf states and Indian Ocean.

    The Phoenicians dominated the Mediterranean for a time. And before them the proto-Greeks/Cretans/Minoans/whatever.

    The Arab/Turkic Moslems dominated the Mediterranean for a few hundred years. Then the Venetians did the same for a shorter period.

    Japanese culture is heavily maritime, though it would be too much to call it "nomadic".

    The most current, though declining, one is the Anglo-Saxon-Jute-Norman-Viking culture, who spread by sea from what today is basically Denmark through the Baltic, North Atlantic, Mediterranean in the first millennium AD and even navigated rivers into Russia for example. In the second millennium, their descendants navigated and spread through all oceans and waterways of the world, colonizing continental landmasses of North America and Australia and established colonies, trading posts and influence throughout most of the rest of the world. I keep hearing they are imminently doomed though.
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  15. Supposedly the Maori are now roughly 10% of the population of New Zealand, or around 400,000. Due to intermarriage there are a lot more in NZ that have some Maori ancestry that don’t identify as such. At any rate, I imagine that before European settlement, there were probably more Maori than all other Polynesians combined, given the sheer size of NZ relative to all the other Polynesian islands.

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  16. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Londinium
    The Financial Times yesterday reported that a fake U.S. embassy was closed after ten years in operation. Countless phony documents, along with many real visas from an Embassy connection entered circulation. Turks and Ghanians sold documents for up to $6,000. There are countless similar problems in other countries, and willing buyers and sellers.

    Americans, if they wise, should regard all immigration from contemporary Britain with great caution.

    Put it this way – it’s no longer the ancient Anglo-Saxon mother nation which you are dealing with.

    Read More
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  17. Read More
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  18. dearieme says:

    “Polynesian crops wouldn’t grow on the Chatham Islands”: true, but then Polynesian crops largely wouldn’t grow in NZ either, apart from the sweet potato: their horticulture and orchard crops died, their pigs died and their fowl died. Tropical agriculture just doesn’t thrive in a temperate climate: only the NW peninsula was spared some of this problem. The Maori of the southern three-quarters of South Island – where the sweet potato wouldn’t grow – had become hunter-gatherers, and were themselves hunted as food by Maoris paddling their war canoes from further north. Much of NZ was permanently on the brink of starvation when European whalers and sealers turned up. Very Malthusian.

    That’s why the weaker tribes were keen on the British claim to NZ: they’d rather be British than be eaten. The introduction of temperate zone crops and animals from Europe was their saviour. On the other hand, the spread of Old World diseases killed them in large numbers.

    P.S. It’s worth looking at the WKPD article on Maoris. Presumably you have to aim off to allow for WKPD’s customary leftish political bias. But, remarkably, it mentions as fact the Medieval Warm Period and the subsequent climate deterioration. Enjoy it before the lefties eliminate it.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    On the other hand, the spread of Old World diseases killed them in large numbers.
     
    Indeed. Same old story, albeit with minor variations:

    New Zealand (1800s) 200,000
    Mark Cocker, Rivers of Blood, Rivers of Gold (1998)
    Maori pop: 240,000 (pre-contact) to 40,000 (1896)
    Clodfelter, Maori War (1860-72)
    UK, NZ: 700 k.
    Maori: 2,000
     

    Australia (1788-1921) 240,000
    Mark Cocker, Rivers of Blood, Rivers of Gold (1998)
    Australian mainland
    Ongoing frontier war: 2,000-2,500 whites and 20,000 Aborignies KIA ("best guess", probably higher)
    General population decline: from 1M (1788) to 50,000 (ca. 1890) to 30,000 (1920s)
    Jared Diamond, The Third Chimpanzee (1993)
    Decline of the Aborgines
    From 300,000 (in 1788) to 60,000 (in 1921)
    Extermination of the Tasmanians
    From 5,000 (in 1800) to 200 (in 1830) to 3 (in 1869) to none (1877)
    Clodfelter: 2,500 Eur. and 20,000 Aborignies k. in wars, 1840-1901
    Bill Bryson, In a Sunburned Country (2001): 20,000 Aboriginies intentionally killed by whites.
     

    United States, eradication of the American Indians (1775-1890) 350,000
    Russel Thornton, American Indian Holocaust and Survival (1987)
    Overall decline
    From 600,000 (in 1800) to 250,000 (in 1890s)
    Indian Wars, from a 1894 report by US Census, cited by Thornton. Includes men, woman and children killed, 1775-1890:
    Individual conflicts:
    Whites: 5,000
    Indians: 8,500
    Wars under the gov't:
    Whites: 14,000
    Indians: 30-45,000
    TOTAL:
    Whites: 19,000
    Indians: 38,500 to 53,500
     
    , @Mike1
    "Much of NZ was permanently on the brink of starvation when European whalers and sealers turned up. Very Malthusian."

    This is absolute nonsense. To cite one obvious food source the rivers and oceans are still teeming with freely available food.
    , @Anonymous
    Apparently, the only started eating each other after the moas were hunted to extinction.
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  19. @Olorin

    For most of human history those islands lay far beyond the reach of watercraft.
     
    Nonsense. We don't know this one way or another...though we do know from this quote that Jared Diamond is a landlubber whose noodle arms would fall off if he ever used a brace and bit or spokeshave. And who never read Capt. Slocum's 1900 memoir.

    Or Robin Lee Graham's of 1974.

    http://www.bluemoment.com/dove.html


    Old Rekohu’s claim to singularity, however, lay in its unique pacific creed. Since time immemorial, the Moriori’s priestly caste dictated that whosoever spilt a man’s blood killed his own mana – his honor, his worth, his standing & his soul. No Moriori would shelter, feed, converse with, or even see the persona non grata.
     
    Unique in the Pacific maybe. But that sounds a lot like the Outlaw judgment as detailed in the Icelandic sagas. 'Ceptin that the Norse Outlaw's life was forfeit to anybody who felt like taking it in any way for any reason they felt like, including none whatever.

    I'm ever amazed by how many university academics seem to think that all human history has taken place on land, with maybe a little bit of coastal activity from time to time. For, you know, digging shellfish to eat.

    I can count on one hand the number I've ever met who could find north without their smart phones if you put the two bear sticks in the ground for them and told them what to do.

    There’s a way to find north with a smart phone?

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    • Replies: @Alfa158
    iPhones at least all come with a compass app.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    There’s a way to find north with a smart phone?
     
    Yes. It's less likely to get stolen as you move away from the Equator.
    , @Yngvar
    Yes. Observe sun position; look at smartphone clock; figure out.
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  20. Alfa158 says:
    @Almost Missouri
    There's a way to find north with a smart phone?

    iPhones at least all come with a compass app.

    Read More
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  21. Yes, but what was the role of watersheds … ?

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  22. syonredux says:
    @dearieme
    "Polynesian crops wouldn’t grow on the Chatham Islands": true, but then Polynesian crops largely wouldn't grow in NZ either, apart from the sweet potato: their horticulture and orchard crops died, their pigs died and their fowl died. Tropical agriculture just doesn't thrive in a temperate climate: only the NW peninsula was spared some of this problem. The Maori of the southern three-quarters of South Island - where the sweet potato wouldn't grow - had become hunter-gatherers, and were themselves hunted as food by Maoris paddling their war canoes from further north. Much of NZ was permanently on the brink of starvation when European whalers and sealers turned up. Very Malthusian.

    That's why the weaker tribes were keen on the British claim to NZ: they'd rather be British than be eaten. The introduction of temperate zone crops and animals from Europe was their saviour. On the other hand, the spread of Old World diseases killed them in large numbers.

    P.S. It's worth looking at the WKPD article on Maoris. Presumably you have to aim off to allow for WKPD's customary leftish political bias. But, remarkably, it mentions as fact the Medieval Warm Period and the subsequent climate deterioration. Enjoy it before the lefties eliminate it.

    On the other hand, the spread of Old World diseases killed them in large numbers.

    Indeed. Same old story, albeit with minor variations:

    New Zealand (1800s) 200,000
    Mark Cocker, Rivers of Blood, Rivers of Gold (1998)
    Maori pop: 240,000 (pre-contact) to 40,000 (1896)
    Clodfelter, Maori War (1860-72)
    UK, NZ: 700 k.
    Maori: 2,000

    Australia (1788-1921) 240,000
    Mark Cocker, Rivers of Blood, Rivers of Gold (1998)
    Australian mainland
    Ongoing frontier war: 2,000-2,500 whites and 20,000 Aborignies KIA (“best guess”, probably higher)
    General population decline: from 1M (1788) to 50,000 (ca. 1890) to 30,000 (1920s)
    Jared Diamond, The Third Chimpanzee (1993)
    Decline of the Aborgines
    From 300,000 (in 1788) to 60,000 (in 1921)
    Extermination of the Tasmanians
    From 5,000 (in 1800) to 200 (in 1830) to 3 (in 1869) to none (1877)
    Clodfelter: 2,500 Eur. and 20,000 Aborignies k. in wars, 1840-1901
    Bill Bryson, In a Sunburned Country (2001): 20,000 Aboriginies intentionally killed by whites.

    United States, eradication of the American Indians (1775-1890) 350,000
    Russel Thornton, American Indian Holocaust and Survival (1987)
    Overall decline
    From 600,000 (in 1800) to 250,000 (in 1890s)
    Indian Wars, from a 1894 report by US Census, cited by Thornton. Includes men, woman and children killed, 1775-1890:
    Individual conflicts:
    Whites: 5,000
    Indians: 8,500
    Wars under the gov’t:
    Whites: 14,000
    Indians: 30-45,000
    TOTAL:
    Whites: 19,000
    Indians: 38,500 to 53,500

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux
    Interesting to note how Brazil's Amerind death-toll gets ignored:

    Indian Genocide
    Gerald Colby, Thy Will Be Done: the Conquest of the Amazon (1995)
    800,000 Indians "disappeared into extinction" since 1900.
    40,000 to 100,000 died, 1957-68.
    Robin Hanbury-Tenison, A Question of Survival (1973): The Indian population of Brazil declined from a half million in 1900 to 80 thousand in 1957 to 50 thousand in 1973.
    Robert Hitchcock & Tara Twedt: Indian population of Brazil declined from 1.0M to 0.2M between 1900 and 1957, a net loss of 800,000 (in Century of Genocide, Samuel Totten, ed., (1997))
    Porter estimates that 100,000 Brazilian Indians were victims of genocide during the 1960s.
    Darcy Ribeiro, "Indigenous Cultures and Languages in Brazil", in Indians of Brazil in the Twentieth Century, Janice Hopper, ed. (1967): 87 Indian tribes in Brazil went extinct between 1900 and 1957 (Out of an original 230) This, by the way, is the authoritative study of Brazilian Indian population, which is why every other author discussing the decline of Indian population uses 1957 as a milestone.
     
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  23. @(((Owen)))
    So there were no Moriori to testify to how these old cultural practices worked once the historians arrived? Small surprise.

    No human society can function without at least the threat of violence to keep order. There was plenty to fight over on that little island and population expansion could easily consume all those resources unless something was killing the excess people.

    I’m speculating freely here, so don’t quote me, but it’s possible that infanticide through abandonment wasn’t considered violence.

    Read More
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  24. J1234 says:

    An interesting and slightly relevant interview of Nicholas Wade by Stefan Molyneux. Posted on youtube today.

    Stefan’s post says, “Against all available evidence, many academics insist that human evolution ended in prehistory.” Including very recent evidence, like this from the BBC.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38210837

    Read More
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  25. Sean says:

    Moriori women needed white skin

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj
    Boba Fett Noooo!!
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  26. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Would you say Cloud Atlas is worth reading, Steve?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I haven't read Cloud Atlas or seen the movie. I have read David Mitchell's novel about a Dutch herchant in Nagasaki harbor around 1800. It's not bad, but it really kicks up a notch when a British sea captain arrives and tries to conquer the Dutch trading outpost. Mitchell is great at getting inside a sailing captain's head. Mitchell could take over in the Hornblower / Aubrey-Maturin lineage of top sea stories if he wanted to.
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  27. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are only available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the ‘Remember My Information’ checkbox, and may also only be used once per hour.

    @RonUnz
    Hey Ron, you sock-puppet-obsessed fascist, why the hell as an ‘anonymous’ can’t I merely agree with a comment w/o having to register my email?

    Read More
    • Replies: @TWS
    I'm not Ron. However you could use a fake email. The system works fine. Or alternatively, you could type 'agree' . I know, more work but it's worth it to remain truly anonymous.
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  28. syonredux says:
    @syonredux

    On the other hand, the spread of Old World diseases killed them in large numbers.
     
    Indeed. Same old story, albeit with minor variations:

    New Zealand (1800s) 200,000
    Mark Cocker, Rivers of Blood, Rivers of Gold (1998)
    Maori pop: 240,000 (pre-contact) to 40,000 (1896)
    Clodfelter, Maori War (1860-72)
    UK, NZ: 700 k.
    Maori: 2,000
     

    Australia (1788-1921) 240,000
    Mark Cocker, Rivers of Blood, Rivers of Gold (1998)
    Australian mainland
    Ongoing frontier war: 2,000-2,500 whites and 20,000 Aborignies KIA ("best guess", probably higher)
    General population decline: from 1M (1788) to 50,000 (ca. 1890) to 30,000 (1920s)
    Jared Diamond, The Third Chimpanzee (1993)
    Decline of the Aborgines
    From 300,000 (in 1788) to 60,000 (in 1921)
    Extermination of the Tasmanians
    From 5,000 (in 1800) to 200 (in 1830) to 3 (in 1869) to none (1877)
    Clodfelter: 2,500 Eur. and 20,000 Aborignies k. in wars, 1840-1901
    Bill Bryson, In a Sunburned Country (2001): 20,000 Aboriginies intentionally killed by whites.
     

    United States, eradication of the American Indians (1775-1890) 350,000
    Russel Thornton, American Indian Holocaust and Survival (1987)
    Overall decline
    From 600,000 (in 1800) to 250,000 (in 1890s)
    Indian Wars, from a 1894 report by US Census, cited by Thornton. Includes men, woman and children killed, 1775-1890:
    Individual conflicts:
    Whites: 5,000
    Indians: 8,500
    Wars under the gov't:
    Whites: 14,000
    Indians: 30-45,000
    TOTAL:
    Whites: 19,000
    Indians: 38,500 to 53,500
     

    Interesting to note how Brazil’s Amerind death-toll gets ignored:

    Indian Genocide
    Gerald Colby, Thy Will Be Done: the Conquest of the Amazon (1995)
    800,000 Indians “disappeared into extinction” since 1900.
    40,000 to 100,000 died, 1957-68.
    Robin Hanbury-Tenison, A Question of Survival (1973): The Indian population of Brazil declined from a half million in 1900 to 80 thousand in 1957 to 50 thousand in 1973.
    Robert Hitchcock & Tara Twedt: Indian population of Brazil declined from 1.0M to 0.2M between 1900 and 1957, a net loss of 800,000 (in Century of Genocide, Samuel Totten, ed., (1997))
    Porter estimates that 100,000 Brazilian Indians were victims of genocide during the 1960s.
    Darcy Ribeiro, “Indigenous Cultures and Languages in Brazil”, in Indians of Brazil in the Twentieth Century, Janice Hopper, ed. (1967): 87 Indian tribes in Brazil went extinct between 1900 and 1957 (Out of an original 230) This, by the way, is the authoritative study of Brazilian Indian population, which is why every other author discussing the decline of Indian population uses 1957 as a milestone.

    Read More
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  29. Mike1 says:
    @dearieme
    "Polynesian crops wouldn’t grow on the Chatham Islands": true, but then Polynesian crops largely wouldn't grow in NZ either, apart from the sweet potato: their horticulture and orchard crops died, their pigs died and their fowl died. Tropical agriculture just doesn't thrive in a temperate climate: only the NW peninsula was spared some of this problem. The Maori of the southern three-quarters of South Island - where the sweet potato wouldn't grow - had become hunter-gatherers, and were themselves hunted as food by Maoris paddling their war canoes from further north. Much of NZ was permanently on the brink of starvation when European whalers and sealers turned up. Very Malthusian.

    That's why the weaker tribes were keen on the British claim to NZ: they'd rather be British than be eaten. The introduction of temperate zone crops and animals from Europe was their saviour. On the other hand, the spread of Old World diseases killed them in large numbers.

    P.S. It's worth looking at the WKPD article on Maoris. Presumably you have to aim off to allow for WKPD's customary leftish political bias. But, remarkably, it mentions as fact the Medieval Warm Period and the subsequent climate deterioration. Enjoy it before the lefties eliminate it.

    “Much of NZ was permanently on the brink of starvation when European whalers and sealers turned up. Very Malthusian.”

    This is absolute nonsense. To cite one obvious food source the rivers and oceans are still teeming with freely available food.

    Read More
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  30. @Anonymous
    Would you say Cloud Atlas is worth reading, Steve?

    I haven’t read Cloud Atlas or seen the movie. I have read David Mitchell’s novel about a Dutch herchant in Nagasaki harbor around 1800. It’s not bad, but it really kicks up a notch when a British sea captain arrives and tries to conquer the Dutch trading outpost. Mitchell is great at getting inside a sailing captain’s head. Mitchell could take over in the Hornblower / Aubrey-Maturin lineage of top sea stories if he wanted to.

    Read More
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  31. Whoever says:
    @Olorin

    For most of human history those islands lay far beyond the reach of watercraft.
     
    Nonsense. We don't know this one way or another...though we do know from this quote that Jared Diamond is a landlubber whose noodle arms would fall off if he ever used a brace and bit or spokeshave. And who never read Capt. Slocum's 1900 memoir.

    Or Robin Lee Graham's of 1974.

    http://www.bluemoment.com/dove.html


    Old Rekohu’s claim to singularity, however, lay in its unique pacific creed. Since time immemorial, the Moriori’s priestly caste dictated that whosoever spilt a man’s blood killed his own mana – his honor, his worth, his standing & his soul. No Moriori would shelter, feed, converse with, or even see the persona non grata.
     
    Unique in the Pacific maybe. But that sounds a lot like the Outlaw judgment as detailed in the Icelandic sagas. 'Ceptin that the Norse Outlaw's life was forfeit to anybody who felt like taking it in any way for any reason they felt like, including none whatever.

    I'm ever amazed by how many university academics seem to think that all human history has taken place on land, with maybe a little bit of coastal activity from time to time. For, you know, digging shellfish to eat.

    I can count on one hand the number I've ever met who could find north without their smart phones if you put the two bear sticks in the ground for them and told them what to do.

    I love Sailing Alone Around the World!
    You’re right about landlubbers not understanding that the ocean is a highway not a roadblock and that you don’t need a very big boat to travel as far as you want. Give me a Norsea 27 and I’m good to go anywhere on the seven seas.

    Read More
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  32. @Dave Pinsen
    From watching the movie version of Cloud Atlas, I would have never guessed the novel was written by a man.

    IIRC, in the movie version the Moriori character was changed to a Negro.

    Also, David Mitchell characterizing the non-violence dictum that the priestly caste imposed on the Moriori as a kind of “Magna Carta” shows that despite his superficial sophistication, Mitchell does not understand what Manga Carta is: a restraint on the powerful, not a mystic harmonizer.

    A genuine Magna Carta among the Moriori would have meant that those Moriori who wanted to resist the numerically inferior Maori could have done so rather than bow beneath the dead hand of their non-violence taboo and go gentle into the dark night of Maori massacre/dinner.

    Read More
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  33. TWS says:
    @Anonymous

    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are only available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also only be used once per hour.
     
    @RonUnz
    Hey Ron, you sock-puppet-obsessed fascist, why the hell as an 'anonymous' can't I merely agree with a comment w/o having to register my email?

    I’m not Ron. However you could use a fake email. The system works fine. Or alternatively, you could type ‘agree’ . I know, more work but it’s worth it to remain truly anonymous.

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  34. @Almost Missouri
    There's a way to find north with a smart phone?

    There’s a way to find north with a smart phone?

    Yes. It’s less likely to get stolen as you move away from the Equator.

    Read More
    • LOL: Almost Missouri
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  35. “Cloud Atlas” sounds essentially like “Site Map 2.0″.

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  36. Maj says:
    @Sean
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MImExgV8BY

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TJ_LlGilLo

    Moriori women needed white skin

    Boba Fett Noooo!!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sean
    Maori women have epic posteriors and their skin tone is about what north European women try for by tanning, but inhibition of male aggression requires white skin.
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  37. @Olorin

    For most of human history those islands lay far beyond the reach of watercraft.
     
    Nonsense. We don't know this one way or another...though we do know from this quote that Jared Diamond is a landlubber whose noodle arms would fall off if he ever used a brace and bit or spokeshave. And who never read Capt. Slocum's 1900 memoir.

    Or Robin Lee Graham's of 1974.

    http://www.bluemoment.com/dove.html


    Old Rekohu’s claim to singularity, however, lay in its unique pacific creed. Since time immemorial, the Moriori’s priestly caste dictated that whosoever spilt a man’s blood killed his own mana – his honor, his worth, his standing & his soul. No Moriori would shelter, feed, converse with, or even see the persona non grata.
     
    Unique in the Pacific maybe. But that sounds a lot like the Outlaw judgment as detailed in the Icelandic sagas. 'Ceptin that the Norse Outlaw's life was forfeit to anybody who felt like taking it in any way for any reason they felt like, including none whatever.

    I'm ever amazed by how many university academics seem to think that all human history has taken place on land, with maybe a little bit of coastal activity from time to time. For, you know, digging shellfish to eat.

    I can count on one hand the number I've ever met who could find north without their smart phones if you put the two bear sticks in the ground for them and told them what to do.

    North. *points* It’s over that way.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Olorin
    For now.

    :D
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  38. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @dearieme
    "Polynesian crops wouldn’t grow on the Chatham Islands": true, but then Polynesian crops largely wouldn't grow in NZ either, apart from the sweet potato: their horticulture and orchard crops died, their pigs died and their fowl died. Tropical agriculture just doesn't thrive in a temperate climate: only the NW peninsula was spared some of this problem. The Maori of the southern three-quarters of South Island - where the sweet potato wouldn't grow - had become hunter-gatherers, and were themselves hunted as food by Maoris paddling their war canoes from further north. Much of NZ was permanently on the brink of starvation when European whalers and sealers turned up. Very Malthusian.

    That's why the weaker tribes were keen on the British claim to NZ: they'd rather be British than be eaten. The introduction of temperate zone crops and animals from Europe was their saviour. On the other hand, the spread of Old World diseases killed them in large numbers.

    P.S. It's worth looking at the WKPD article on Maoris. Presumably you have to aim off to allow for WKPD's customary leftish political bias. But, remarkably, it mentions as fact the Medieval Warm Period and the subsequent climate deterioration. Enjoy it before the lefties eliminate it.

    Apparently, the only started eating each other after the moas were hunted to extinction.

    Read More
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  39. @Dave Pinsen
    From watching the movie version of Cloud Atlas, I would have never guessed the novel was written by a man.

    P.S. The movie was terrible. Expensive, sprawling, incoherent and implausible, it nevertheless managed to hit most of the ideological keys on the leftist piano: Negro sanctification, homo romanticization, cuckism, diversity fascism, all wrapped in pseudo-mystical subtext.

    On reflection, I can’t understand why Hollywood wasn’t more enthusiastic about it. Maybe they’re better businessmen than I give them credit for after all.

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  40. Yngvar says:
    @Almost Missouri
    There's a way to find north with a smart phone?

    Yes. Observe sun position; look at smartphone clock; figure out.

    Read More
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  41. Sean says:
    @Maj
    Boba Fett Noooo!!

    Maori women have epic posteriors and their skin tone is about what north European women try for by tanning, but inhibition of male aggression requires white skin.

    Read More
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  42. @Moshe
    Excepting the exotic exception can you point us toward more information on society's that's primarily lived at sea?

    I assume that you're referring to aquatic nomads who I would otherwise have thought had as much impact on civilization as the desert sort. Other than the rape and kidnapping of course.

    But if we're talking about any major civilization worth discussing since the Sea Peoples please point us in the right direction.

    I'm not saying this as a challenge, I'm sincerely requesting enlightenment

    Well, the Polynesians.

    And there was a sea-going Arabic culture in the Gulf states and Indian Ocean.

    The Phoenicians dominated the Mediterranean for a time. And before them the proto-Greeks/Cretans/Minoans/whatever.

    The Arab/Turkic Moslems dominated the Mediterranean for a few hundred years. Then the Venetians did the same for a shorter period.

    Japanese culture is heavily maritime, though it would be too much to call it “nomadic”.

    The most current, though declining, one is the Anglo-Saxon-Jute-Norman-Viking culture, who spread by sea from what today is basically Denmark through the Baltic, North Atlantic, Mediterranean in the first millennium AD and even navigated rivers into Russia for example. In the second millennium, their descendants navigated and spread through all oceans and waterways of the world, colonizing continental landmasses of North America and Australia and established colonies, trading posts and influence throughout most of the rest of the world. I keep hearing they are imminently doomed though.

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  43. Olorin says:
    @EvolutionistX
    North. *points* It's over that way.

    For now.

    :D

    Read More
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