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"National Geographic" Proves Race Does Not Exist
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The National Geographic Race issue looks like it will be a treasure chest of iSteve material. For example:

There’s No Scientific Basis for Race—It’s a Made-Up Label

It’s been used to define and separate people for millennia. But the concept of race is not grounded in genetics.

… DNA reveals what skin color obscures: We all have African ancestors.

By Elizabeth Kolbert

This story is part of The Race Issue, a special issue of National Geographic that explores how race defines, separates, and unites us. Tell us your story with #IDefineMe.

In the first half of the 19th century, one of America’s most prominent scientists was a doctor named Samuel Morton. Morton lived in Philadelphia, and he collected skulls.

Oh, boy, Samuel Morton again. Ms. Kolbert undoubtedly cribbed Morton from the late Stephen Jay Gould’s 37 year old bestseller The Mismeasure of Man, even though a 2011 replication of Morton’s study showed Gould was more biased than Morton was. (Here’s an NYT editorial making that point.)

This is the case even though what science actually has to tell us about race is just the opposite of what Morton contended. …

In June 2000, when the results were announced at a White House ceremony, Craig Venter, a pioneer of DNA sequencing, observed, “The concept of race has no genetic or scientific basis.”

Oh, boy, the 2000 Clinton Rose Garden Human Genome Project whoop-tee-doo again. It’s the Current Year, not 2000. What Venter, Collins, and Bill Clinton expounded in 2000 was obviously wrong then, but at least you could be charitable and not quote it 18 years and a vast amount of genetics later.

THERE’S MORE DIVERSITY IN AFRICA THAN ON ALL THE OTHER CONTINENTS COMBINED.

Oh, boy, that chestnut again. A I pointed out in 2000 in a short essay called “Seven Dumb Ideas about Race:”

Most of the human race’s genetic variation is among black Africans.

This chestnut is true only for junk genes, the DNA that doesn’t do anything. Junk genes are highly useful to population geneticists tracing the genealogies of racial groups, but they don’t affect anything in the real world.

Then, are black Africans highly diverse physically? Well, that depends upon who you are lumping together. There are indeed some highly unusual peoples in Africa, but almost none of them were brought to America as slaves. The most genetically distinct people in sub-Saharan Africa are the Khoisan. These are the yellowish-brown, tongue-clicking Bushmen and Hottentots of the Southern African wastelands, the remnants of a great race that once dominated most of Africa before the blacks ethnically cleansed them from the more desirable lands. The most striking contrast in Africa is between the tiny Pygmies and the ultra-tall herding tribes of East Africa. But except for the 7`7″, 190-pound basketball novelty Manute Bol, few of either group made it to America. In contrast, the West African tribes that did provide the vast majority of American slaves are relatively homogenous. [Stanford geneticist] Cavalli-Sforza sums up the situation on the ground like this, “… differences between most sub-Saharan Africans other than Khoisan and Pygmies seem rather small.”

So who is Elizabeth Kolbert? Wikipedia says she’s a staff writer for The New Yorker. Here’s the best bit from Wikipedia about her:

Kolbert spent her early childhood in the Bronx, New York; her family then relocated to Larchmont, New York, where she remained until 1979.

Whiteflighting from The Bronx to Larchmont definitely makes you an expert on Race Does Not Exist.

Larchmont is a tiny but famous village in Mamaroneck in Westchester County. It’s home of the Larchmont Yacht Club and right next to Winged Foot and Quaker Ridge Golf Clubs. From Wikipedia:

According to a 2009 estimate,[14] the median income for a household in the village was $165,375, and the median income for a family was $204,695. …

Larchmont in popular culture:

Mad Men … – Crab Colson comments to Roger Sterling et al. on how lovely it is to travel by taking a “sloop from his folks’ place in Old Lyme all the way down to Larchmont for race week.”

Wall Street – when Gordon Gekko and Bud Fox are in the change room of the health club, Gekko asks another member, “How’s Larchmont treating you?”

The West Wing – In season 3 episode 8, when speaking with President Bartlet, Bruno Gianelli says, “When I was a teenager, I crewed Larchmont to Nassau on a 58-foot (18 m) sloop called Cantice.”[18]

Notable people:

 
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  1. Coming soon to a theater near you :

    THE MULTI-CULTURAL GANGS OF LARCHMONT!

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    My (neighbors) in NYC were inordinately proud of owning a second home in Larchmont. They mentioned it nearly every time I saw them.

    PS to Steve : if you are going to refer to your article entitled "Seven Dumb Things..." be sure and get the spelling right.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. OT. Spiked on “Telford Girls – the Wrong Kind Of Victims”

    “The abuse in Telford is estimated to have involved over 1,000 girls stretching over 40 years. Young girls in the town were groomed, fed drugs and raped. They were passed between abusers like commodities. Some got pregnant, had abortions and were raped again on multiple occasions. Three women were murdered and two others died in tragedies linked to the abuse. Yet these shocking events have received relatively little coverage. Girls in Telford do not, it seems, deserve frontpage coverage in the Guardian or The Times.

    The very same newspapers that covered, at length and over many days, news that Kate Maltby’s knee may or may not have been touched by Damian Green or that Michael Fallon attempted to kiss Jane Merrick, were unable to muster up the same level of outrage for young women in Telford.

    The lack of comment on the Telford abuse scandal exposes the hypocrisy at the heart of the #MeToo movement.”

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    • Replies: @Curle
    When I searched for Telford on my iphone Safari the only news stories that popped up were from British papers. I didn't do a further iSteve-level review of the matter, but it led me to wonder whether ANY American papers are covering the story. Not news, I guess.

    OT - if Steve is reading. Though a number of iSteve comments involve media hegemony or at least cultural hegemony, I don't recall much involving who actually owns and manages these media outlets, though perhaps my memory is failing me. The subject was drawn to my attention by a Spanish friend who negatively compared media ownership in the US with Spain leading me to wonder, have other countries affirmatively limited media control by certain parties or interests?
    , @SunBakedSuburb
    The response by British authorities to the Muslim grooming gangs is further proof of the identity politics madness infecting Western countries. If this trend continues the choice will be a Stalinist totalitarian state or civil war.
    , @Obsessive Contrarian
    Sad but accords with what I remember of my dealings with Oxbridge type British people.

    My guess is that the readers of sites like this care more about those girls than the Oxbridgeites do.
    , @ATate
    #MeTelford

    Will be my reply to any and all tweets with MeToo in them.
    , @njguy73
    How many Oscar nominations do the Telford girls have? How many WB shows did they star in? How many covers of Maxim did they grace?
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  3. Sailing from Larchmont to Nassau doesn’t look logical to me. Nassau is on the other side of Long Island and there’s no good harbor to overnight.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Nassau (County) is full of harbors on Long Island's north shore.
    , @JMcG
    Bimini was one of the finalists for my honeymoon. My wife chose Venice. Wisely I think. I’m very glad to have seen it when I did.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Nassau county is the whole western 1/3 of Long Island. It has coasts on the north and south side. This guy on the show was pretending that he crewed the sloop from Larchmont to Nassau in the Bahamas. A 58 footer can go about anywhere.
    , @Jack D
    I think he meant Nassau, Bahamas. There is no one place in LI called "Nassau" - the entire western half of LI (beyond the borders of NYC) is "Nassau County".
    , @JimBonobo
    That was a joke, right?

    They are referring to Nassau in the Bahamas. And Nassau county - where I grew up - is on both coasts (north and south of Long Island), same for Suffolk county.
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  4. “DNA reveals what skin color obscures: We all have African ancestors.”

    Why do SJWs continue to press this PC dribble? I have no sub-Saharan African genes. I negate their case. It appears my prehistoric ancestors never got close to the place:

    23&Me: “You have more Neanderthal variants than 94% of 23andMe customers … [Y]our Neanderthal ancestry accounts for less than 4% of your overall DNA.”

    European
    99.9%

    South Asian
    0.0%

    Sub-Saharan African
    0.0%

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    • Replies: @RCB
    What they mean is that, since all human life began in Africa, we are all African in that sense. Obviously that proves nothing about the differences between groups that subsequently moved far away from each other, but it sounds nice.

    Similarly, since all of our genes come from the common ancestor to all life on earth, we are all from... wherever that happened...
    , @Twodees Partain
    Agreed. The whole "out of Africa" proposition is ludicrous.
    , @Little spoon
    We all have African ancestry in the sense that our Homo sapiens sapiens ancestors only left Africa within the last 100k years. But what these journalists obfuscate is that our shared African ancestry has nothing to do with modern African populations. Just as the white race originated within the last 30k years, the Bantu race originated in the last 30k years. These people, who are the bulk of modern sub Saharans, never evolved into other races and aren’t necessarily similar to our shared African ancestors. The Bantu are a separate branch of humans who don’t share recent dna with non Africans who don’t have sub Saharan dna.

    So we all came from Africa and we all have African ancestors. But some of us came from a different Africa than the one we see today.
    , @Jack D
    You're missing the point. Since homo sapiens originated in Africa, we all have African ancestors if you go back far enough. Of course if you go back really far enough, we all have fish ancestors too.
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  5. OT:

    >Australia considers fast-track visas for white South African farmers

    “Home affairs minister Peter Dutton says the group deserves ‘special attention’ due to the ‘horrific circumstances’ they face at home”

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/mar/14/dutton-considers-fast-track-visas-for-white-south-african-farmers?CMP=twt_gu

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    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    No, actually its very relevant to the topic at hand. If race really doesn't exist, then why are black South Africans attempting to steal white farmers's land? After all, its only a figment and doesn't exist.

    Thank goodness for the Aussies to offer to take them in. Wonder why Trump didn't think of doing that?
    , @Flip
    Good for Australia. Lots of ex-South Africans there already. "Packing for Perth" as they say...
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  6. @Detective Club
    Coming soon to a theater near you :
    https://youtu.be/XrEmF4SK3T4
    THE MULTI-CULTURAL GANGS OF LARCHMONT!

    My (neighbors) in NYC were inordinately proud of owning a second home in Larchmont. They mentioned it nearly every time I saw them.

    PS to Steve : if you are going to refer to your article entitled “Seven Dumb Things…” be sure and get the spelling right.

    Read More
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  7. @Foreign Expert
    Sailing from Larchmont to Nassau doesn’t look logical to me. Nassau is on the other side of Long Island and there’s no good harbor to overnight.

    Nassau (County) is full of harbors on Long Island’s north shore.

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    • Replies: @Foreign Expert
    You are correct. I didn't grow top there. Do the locals call the north shore Nassau?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. Geographic was wont to espy
    With a cold anthropologist’s eye.
    And we got a good map.
    Now it’s Narrative crap.
    The explorers have gone far awry.

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  9. In breaking news, there are no dog breeds either. A poodle and greyhound and bulldog are exactly the same. They’re all “dogs.” There is only one dog race, and their DNA is all the same.

    You’re a racist and a bigot and probably anti-dogite if you say otherwise.

    /sarcasm

    This stuff is unreal. It’s like insisting with a straight face, repeatedly, that the sea is above the clouds.

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    • Replies: @Flip
    I bet different breeds of dogs are more closely related than a European, African, and Chinese.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Moses, not different races of dogs but dogs from different countries , as in English Bull Dog, German Shepard, French poodle, Tibetan Mastiff, Irish wolfhound. It's their culture that defines that.
    , @ThreeCranes
    Not just they're all dogs but they're all wolves as well (since they can interbreed).
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  10. Do people really fall for this race denialist crap?

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  11. Read More
    • Agree: AndrewR
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  12. @Foreign Expert
    Sailing from Larchmont to Nassau doesn’t look logical to me. Nassau is on the other side of Long Island and there’s no good harbor to overnight.

    Bimini was one of the finalists for my honeymoon. My wife chose Venice. Wisely I think. I’m very glad to have seen it when I did.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  13. I used to get National Geographic, and I liked the photography and stories about out-0f-the-way places and the people who live there. I had to stop because the sjw stuff was out of control. I felt depressed and disgusted every time I read it. I hate-read it for awhile, but gave up.

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    • Replies: @Loveofknowledge
    I've had a National Geographic subscription for about five years, and I've really enjoyed the wide variety of interesting articles and great pictures. I'm depressed about what's happening now too.

    In their fairly recent "gender issue" they actually published an editorial by a 1970's feminist activist in which she flat out stated that all differences between men and women are "socially constructed". I couldn't believe they would allow such science denialism on their pages.

    At least they quoted Steven Pinker in a later article saying that of course men and women are different in ways affecting the brain, but still. They shouldn't be presenting "both sides" of an argument when one side is a preposterous lie.
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  14. @Foreign Expert
    Sailing from Larchmont to Nassau doesn’t look logical to me. Nassau is on the other side of Long Island and there’s no good harbor to overnight.

    Nassau county is the whole western 1/3 of Long Island. It has coasts on the north and south side. This guy on the show was pretending that he crewed the sloop from Larchmont to Nassau in the Bahamas. A 58 footer can go about anywhere.

    Read More
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  15. “THERE’S MORE DIVERSITY IN AFRICA THAN ON ALL THE OTHER CONTINENTS COMBINED.”

    And yet if you look at cultural diversity American whites are far more diverse than American blacks on pretty much every single metric: religious diversity, political diversity, music and artistic preferences, favorite movies and television shows, socioeconomic background, college majors, ad infinitum. In pretty much every way, there is more diversity among whites in America than among blacks, and that would probably be true even if you looked just at Americans whose ancestors came mostly just from Northwest Europe, or just from Great Britain. We are more likely to belong to different political parties, more likely to belong to different religious denominations, to prefer different types of music. Blacks in America almost invariably belong to the Democratic Party, come from a very small range of economic backgrounds, prefer a certain type of music, etc. The ancestors of most American blacks may have come here in chains from a relatively small section of Africa, but if genetic diversity were really there (and meant anything worthwhile) it eventually would have expressed itself in such differences. It hasn’t.

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    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Jolly, Diversity in Africa is defined as what? Different Tribes? I thought tribalism was verboten. Can't be because of the 54 different countries, because borders are actually racist. Can it be different shades of black, but that would be colorism. Could it be the religions that impart their own special stink. Languages? What makes Africa diverse? Honest question.
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  16. The National Geographic Race issue looks like it will be a treasure chest of iSteve material.

    You could fisk that whole issue paragraph by paragraph, and most of us here would be glad to help. It’s like a month’s worth of posts, and then we’ll see what kind of crap appears in the May issue. Plus there’s other magazines that suck even worse!

    Please include graphics. I like maps and (within reason) bare breasts, so it’ll be a good month…

    Being homo … nym-challenged, I was looking forward to the special issue of a hunting magazine one time that promised bear breasts. Yeah, it was the brown bear season. #DISAPPOINTED

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  17. Do as I say, not as I do.

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  18. Kolbert spent her early childhood in the Bronx, New York; her family then relocated to Larchmont, New York, where she remained until 1979.

    Hillary Clinton spent her childhood in Park Ridge, Illinois. Park Ridge is outside of Chicago and the internet says that it was upper middle class at the time our young Goldwater Gal Hillary Clinton was learning how to be an evil money-grubbing globalizer.

    Hillary Clinton had a baby boomer childhood in mostly White Park Ridge that was certainly racially and culturally peaceful. Hillary Clinton had a childhood of peace in the valley during the sweet spot of the baby boomer upbringing.

    Hillary Clinton has spent the last 5 or so years calling for the virtual erasure of the border between the United States and Mexico. Hillary Clinton has called for more mass legal immigration and for giving amnesty to upwards of 30 million illegal alien invaders. Hillary Clinton has attacked her fellow White people as racists and she has has attacked law enforcement for their so-called unfair treatment of Black criminals. Hillary Clinton has nothing but praise for the riotous mob that is the Black Lives Matter movement.

    Hillary Clinton, perhaps nostalgic for the racial peace of the Park Ridge of her childhood, moved to the mostly White town of Chappaqua, New York, in order to avoid having to live around Blacks, Mestizos or other non-Whites.

    The hypocrisy on racial matters by the ruling class of the American Empire is a sign of weakness and imminent collapse. The ruling class of the American Empire is using non-Whites and non-Christians as demographic weapons to crush Whites of modest means.

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  19. @TheJester

    "DNA reveals what skin color obscures: We all have African ancestors."
     
    Why do SJWs continue to press this PC dribble? I have no sub-Saharan African genes. I negate their case. It appears my prehistoric ancestors never got close to the place:

    23&Me: "You have more Neanderthal variants than 94% of 23andMe customers ... [Y]our Neanderthal ancestry accounts for less than 4% of your overall DNA."

    European
    99.9%

    South Asian
    0.0%

    Sub-Saharan African
    0.0%

    What they mean is that, since all human life began in Africa, we are all African in that sense. Obviously that proves nothing about the differences between groups that subsequently moved far away from each other, but it sounds nice.

    Similarly, since all of our genes come from the common ancestor to all life on earth, we are all from… wherever that happened…

    Read More
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  20. National Geographic devotes an entire issue to a thing which they say does not exist.

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  21. This article appears similar to other SJW pieces about race. The headline is a definitional sleight of hand.

    “Race” is a made up label screams the headline so quit distinguishing people on how they look you racist hillbillies!

    But if read past all of the usual canards, you find scientists mentioning that there are “population groups,” i.e. pockets of human populations that split off into different parts of the world and were fairly isolated for tens of thousands of years. As such, they developed various distinctive genetic mutations.

    In what was, relatively speaking, a great rush, the offspring of all these migrants dispersed around the world. By 50,000 years ago they had reached Australia. By 45,000 years ago they’d settled in Siberia, and by 15,000 years ago they’d reached South America. As they moved into different parts of the world, they formed new groups that became geographically isolated from one another and, in the process, acquired their own distinctive set of genetic mutations.

    Ok. So how are population groups with distinctive genetic mutations different from the race as it used in everyday language?

    The article then goes on to sound a lot like some HBD commenter around here.

    Most of these tweaks were neither helpful nor harmful. But occasionally a mutation arose that turned out to be advantageous in a new setting. Under the pressure of natural selection, it spread quickly through the local population. At high altitudes, for instance, oxygen levels are low, so for people moving into the Ethiopian highlands, Tibet, or the Andean Altiplano, there was a premium on mutations that helped them cope with the rarefied air. Similarly, Inuit people, who adopted a marine-based diet high in fatty acids, have genetic tweaks that helped them adapt to it.

    So wait, evolution did change us gentically, creating not necessarily different races since we can all breed with one another but different breeds of humans each adapted to its environment (and later culture).

    I guess we should stop using the word “race” and replace it with the word “breed.” Well, that makes all the difference in the world. Problem solved.

    In this passage, the article debunks the “race is only skin deep” mantra.

    At the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine, geneticist Yana Kamberov has equipped mice with the East Asian variant of EDAR in hopes of understanding what it does. “They’re cute, aren’t they?” she says, opening the cage to show me. The mice look ordinary, with sleek brown coats and shiny black eyes. But examined under a microscope, they are different from their equally cute cousins in subtle yet significant ways. Their hair strands are thicker; their sweat glands are more numerous; and the fat pads around their mammary glands are smaller.

    Kamberov’s mice help explain why some East Asians and Native Americans have thicker hair and more sweat glands . . . Genetics frequently works like this: A tiny tweak can have many disparate effects.

    Wow, one gene can make that amount of difference. We may 99.9% similar, but, apparently, that 0.1% goes a long way if even one gene can have that kind of effect.

    But hold on you racists, the article swings back to prove you wrong. Turns out that no group was completed isolated, so there was some mixture of peoples.

    There are no fixed traits associated with specific geographic locations, Reich says, because as often as isolation has created differences among populations, migration and mixing have blurred or erased them.

    Alright, but do certain traits show up more often on average among the various groups? Also, when was the last time before modern travel did we have one these big migrations and mixing, i.e. did the current population groups develop relatively isolated?

    Finally, the author tells us why were all a bunch of stupid racists.

    When people speak about race, usually they seem to be referring to skin color and, at the same time, to something more than skin color. This is the legacy of people such as Morton, who developed the “science” of race to suit his own prejudices and got the actual science totally wrong. Science today tells us that the visible differences between peoples are accidents of history. They reflect how our ancestors dealt with sun exposure, and not much else.

    First, Morton was mostly right. Second, we use skin color as a quick heuristic to determine a person’s race or population group or genetic background because as you’ve said in your own article, there are material average genetic differences among those groups and those difference matter in the real world.

    So, no, we don’t just care about skin color. If I see two men walking down the street with nearly identical darkness of skin with one being an American black and the other being a South Asian, I’m not going to assume that they are genetically the same.

    The article later goes on to show a bunch of college students being a) disappointed to not have more non-white genes or b) disappointed to have European genes. Of course, all of them are far more mixed than they thought, which doesn’t seem to fit with what Steve has written about before.

    Then the author returns again to the word “race” saying that while race doesn’t exist – remember it’s population groups you bigots – racism does, so don’t be thinking that you racist white men get off the hook.

    By far the best paragraph of the article is the final one. The author uses a quote from some SJW that completely discredits the entire story.

    “That race is a human construction doesn’t mean that we don’t fall into different groups or there’s no variation,” Foeman says. “But if we made racial categories up, maybe we can make new categories that function better.”

    So there are different groups that vary genetically in material ways that fit exactly the categories that we commonly use the term race to describe. However, you don’t like the names of those categories or maybe you think we should add or subtract one or two of the names to be more exact. Regardless, her last sentence seems to favor labeling different population groups based on their average genetic differences.

    And that’s not racist how?

    There we have it. Race is a made-up label. To solve that, we need a new made-up label.

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  22. All dogs supposedly have a common ancestor too, right? I’d rather be stuck with raising beagles than caring for rottweilers.

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  23. I hope she didn’t forget Lewontin and Levin’s The Dialectical Biologist and Lewontin, Rose, and Kamin’s Not in our Genes and Lewontin and Gould’s Spandrels of San Marcos, and Diamond’s Guns, Germs, and Steel. Every race is a social construct believing journalist must cite them all!!!

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    • Replies: @anonymous
    When in doubt, just proclaim "social construct" and all arguments are foreclosed. Blacks don't excel in the STEM subjects. Reason? They are "social constructs."
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  24. “That race is a human construction doesn’t mean that we don’t fall into different groups or there’s no variation,” Foeman says. “But if we made racial categories up, maybe we can make new categories that function better.”

    That sums it up

    the white race was created by “white” elites

    the problem is that blond hari and blue eyes look way different from normal black hair and brown eyes

    this is why we need to encourage white girls to bear Children of Color

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    • Replies: @Giant Duck
    Children of the Color. I think I saw that, back in the 80s. "He wants you too, Tiny Duck. He wants you too!"
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  25. “Larchmont is a tiny but famous village in Mamaroneck in Westchester County. It’s home of the Larchmont Yacht Club and right next to Winged Foot and Quaker Ridge Golf Clubs.”

    Yes, but is there any evidence that Kolbert’s family were able to become members of either golf club? You know, with all that talk about how race/ethnicity doesn’t exist and all there are still a lot of bummed out folks who have long memories of being shunned by the WASP country club set. And just because she grew up in Larchmont doesn’t necessarily mean that Kolbert lived a life of ease, complete with butler, maid, Rolls Royce, etc. I mean, come on. Perhaps it was the broken down poverty section of Larchmont. Just as I’m sure there are poor broken down parts of Malibu (e.g. trailer parks?).

    This particular article and subject on whether or not the existence of race is real (as well as the MSM’s continued insistence that it does not exist) appears to bring out Steve’s most acute noticing skills. Surprised that Kolbert didn’t quote from Malcolm Gladwell as an expert authority on race (as he’s not quite white/black/whatever and is useful to showing what a tri-racial person would resemble, even though race doesn’t exist).

    Sometimes its best not to go overboard. If the MSM continues down the road of “race doesn’t exist” by desperately turning to absurd if not second rate sources to try and make their point, perhaps they shouldn’t be surprised if more and more people start to notice that they’re completely full of it.

    Keep noticing, Steve.

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  26. @TheJester

    "DNA reveals what skin color obscures: We all have African ancestors."
     
    Why do SJWs continue to press this PC dribble? I have no sub-Saharan African genes. I negate their case. It appears my prehistoric ancestors never got close to the place:

    23&Me: "You have more Neanderthal variants than 94% of 23andMe customers ... [Y]our Neanderthal ancestry accounts for less than 4% of your overall DNA."

    European
    99.9%

    South Asian
    0.0%

    Sub-Saharan African
    0.0%

    Agreed. The whole “out of Africa” proposition is ludicrous.

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  27. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT. Spiked on "Telford Girls - the Wrong Kind Of Victims"

    "The abuse in Telford is estimated to have involved over 1,000 girls stretching over 40 years. Young girls in the town were groomed, fed drugs and raped. They were passed between abusers like commodities. Some got pregnant, had abortions and were raped again on multiple occasions. Three women were murdered and two others died in tragedies linked to the abuse. Yet these shocking events have received relatively little coverage. Girls in Telford do not, it seems, deserve frontpage coverage in the Guardian or The Times.

    The very same newspapers that covered, at length and over many days, news that Kate Maltby’s knee may or may not have been touched by Damian Green or that Michael Fallon attempted to kiss Jane Merrick, were unable to muster up the same level of outrage for young women in Telford.

    The lack of comment on the Telford abuse scandal exposes the hypocrisy at the heart of the #MeToo movement."
     

    When I searched for Telford on my iphone Safari the only news stories that popped up were from British papers. I didn’t do a further iSteve-level review of the matter, but it led me to wonder whether ANY American papers are covering the story. Not news, I guess.

    OT – if Steve is reading. Though a number of iSteve comments involve media hegemony or at least cultural hegemony, I don’t recall much involving who actually owns and manages these media outlets, though perhaps my memory is failing me. The subject was drawn to my attention by a Spanish friend who negatively compared media ownership in the US with Spain leading me to wonder, have other countries affirmatively limited media control by certain parties or interests?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anthony Wayne
    Russia and China with their relative closeness and state control.
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  28. @Curle
    When I searched for Telford on my iphone Safari the only news stories that popped up were from British papers. I didn't do a further iSteve-level review of the matter, but it led me to wonder whether ANY American papers are covering the story. Not news, I guess.

    OT - if Steve is reading. Though a number of iSteve comments involve media hegemony or at least cultural hegemony, I don't recall much involving who actually owns and manages these media outlets, though perhaps my memory is failing me. The subject was drawn to my attention by a Spanish friend who negatively compared media ownership in the US with Spain leading me to wonder, have other countries affirmatively limited media control by certain parties or interests?

    Russia and China with their relative closeness and state control.

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  29. Headed off to read the essay, just wanted to say that “ethnically cleansed” seems a rather charged word to use. Did Homo Sapiens “ethnically cleanse” the Neanderthals and Denisovans?

    Now I’m no expert, but I know that populations back then were much smaller than now, If I recall properly, at a certain point, we dwindled to around 10k. So then wouldn’t it more accurate to say that the population of the agricultural Bantu grew exponentially while that of the Khoisan didn’t?

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  30. From the “Race” issue:

    These Twins, One Black and One White, Will Make You Rethink Race

    Yes, prepare to have your mind blown by the fact that a child can favor one of her parents in terms of physical appearance…..

    Modern science confirms “that the visible differences between peoples are accidents of history”—the result of mutations, migrations, natural selection, the isolation of some populations, and interbreeding among others, writes science journalist Elizabeth Kolbert.

    Huh. And here I thought that the visible differences between peoples were caused by a carefully wrought masterplan…..

    They are not racial differences because the very concept of race—to quote DNA-sequencing pioneer Craig Venter—“has no genetic or scientific basis.”

    And that’s why there is no way to distinguish Koreans from Nigerians….

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/04/race-twins-black-white-biggs/

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    • Replies: @res

    Yes, prepare to have your mind blown by the fact that a child can favor one of her parents in terms of physical appearance…..
     
    It is not very likely, but who knows: https://qz.com/635040/how-can-two-twins-have-completely-different-fathers/
    It would be interesting to have a look at genetic tests for both twins and the parents (for both possible explanations).

    P.S. Quote from the end of that article:

    In the 2015 case, fertility specialist Cynthia Austin of the Cleveland Clinic Women’s Health Institute, told CBS News that twins with two different fathers might even occur more regularly, but go unnoticed.
     
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  31. How many world leaders will announce a similar pledge?

    Australia’s Home affairs minister Peter Dutton considers fast-track visas for white South African farmers.

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  32. We are all Africans, except for any non-black people living in Africa who, of course, are racist imperialist exploiters. Oh, and don’t even think of checking the African-American box, unless you’re black!

    Read More
    • Replies: @CCZ
    Proposed Delaware Education Regulation 225 Will Allow Students to "Self-Identify" Gender and Race.

    The proposed rules would allow students to self-identify their race and gender at school –– regardless of their age, even if their parents object.

    http://atlantablackstar.com/2018/03/05/delaware-schools-want-allow-children-pick-race-gender-identity/
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  33. I think it’s interesting that Mary Pickford’s description as a Larchmont resident includes that she was a co-founder of United Artists while two other residents who were co-founders (D.W. Griffith and Pickford’s husband Douglas Fairbanks) are not given that co-founder description.

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  34. Jews doing the standard Jewish bit. Even the normies are starting to catch on. My bet is, over the next few years, not only will racial realism continue to grow, but (((ethnic))) realism will as well.

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  35. @TheJester

    "DNA reveals what skin color obscures: We all have African ancestors."
     
    Why do SJWs continue to press this PC dribble? I have no sub-Saharan African genes. I negate their case. It appears my prehistoric ancestors never got close to the place:

    23&Me: "You have more Neanderthal variants than 94% of 23andMe customers ... [Y]our Neanderthal ancestry accounts for less than 4% of your overall DNA."

    European
    99.9%

    South Asian
    0.0%

    Sub-Saharan African
    0.0%

    We all have African ancestry in the sense that our Homo sapiens sapiens ancestors only left Africa within the last 100k years. But what these journalists obfuscate is that our shared African ancestry has nothing to do with modern African populations. Just as the white race originated within the last 30k years, the Bantu race originated in the last 30k years. These people, who are the bulk of modern sub Saharans, never evolved into other races and aren’t necessarily similar to our shared African ancestors. The Bantu are a separate branch of humans who don’t share recent dna with non Africans who don’t have sub Saharan dna.

    So we all came from Africa and we all have African ancestors. But some of us came from a different Africa than the one we see today.

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  36. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT. Spiked on "Telford Girls - the Wrong Kind Of Victims"

    "The abuse in Telford is estimated to have involved over 1,000 girls stretching over 40 years. Young girls in the town were groomed, fed drugs and raped. They were passed between abusers like commodities. Some got pregnant, had abortions and were raped again on multiple occasions. Three women were murdered and two others died in tragedies linked to the abuse. Yet these shocking events have received relatively little coverage. Girls in Telford do not, it seems, deserve frontpage coverage in the Guardian or The Times.

    The very same newspapers that covered, at length and over many days, news that Kate Maltby’s knee may or may not have been touched by Damian Green or that Michael Fallon attempted to kiss Jane Merrick, were unable to muster up the same level of outrage for young women in Telford.

    The lack of comment on the Telford abuse scandal exposes the hypocrisy at the heart of the #MeToo movement."
     

    The response by British authorities to the Muslim grooming gangs is further proof of the identity politics madness infecting Western countries. If this trend continues the choice will be a Stalinist totalitarian state or civil war.

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    • Replies: @Samuel Skinner
    Optimist. Stalin would be better, as would civil war. What you are going to get is genocide.
    , @Anonymous
    Whenever a diverse grooming community is discovered in the UK, a burned Russian asset must die.
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  37. Your girl:

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  38. This is embarrassing for NatGeo.

    If there is no “genetic or scientific basis” for races, what is it that is making the kids of a black mother and black father keep coming out black? Is it a virus? Room temperature at conception?

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    • Replies: @Forbes
    The inference is that differences (height, hair texture, eye color, complexion, et al.) among people are merely random--rather than genetic heredity.
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  39. Oh, boy, Samuel Morton again. Ms. Kolbert undoubtedly cribbed Morton from the late Stephen Jay Gould’s 37 year old bestseller The Mismeasure of Man, even though a 2011 replication of Morton’s study showed Gould was more biased than Morton was. (Here’s an NYT editorial making that point.)

    The Gould/Morton debate simmers on (from 2016, also see 2014-2015 references): http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.1002444

    For anyone interested, here is Gould’s original 1978 Science paper on Morton’s skulls: https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/7992/a09d112b464fda63a8cae2859877cc2e0cde.pdf
    Here is the Pubmed page for that paper. The 7 citing papers it lists don’t exactly look like an impressive collection: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/347573

    I like this footnote from page 98 of Gould’s 1996 edition of The Mismeasure of Man:

    t My original report (Gould, 1978) incorrectly listed the modern Caucasian mean as 85.3. The reason for this error is embarrassing, but instructive, for it illustrates, at my expense, the cardinal principle of this book: the social embeddedness of science and the frequent grafting of expectation upon supposed objectivity. Line 7 in Table 2.3 lists the range of Semitic skulls as 84 to 98 cubic inches for Morton’s sample of 3. However, my original paper cited a mean of 80—an obvious impossibility if the smallest skull measures 84. I was working from a Xerox of Morton’s original chart, and his correct value of 89 is smudged to look like an 80 on my copy. Nonetheless, the range of 84 to 98 is clearly indicated right alongside, and I never saw the inconsistency—presumably because a low value of 80 fit my hopes for a depressed Caucasian mean. The 80 therefore “felt” right and I never checked it. I am grateful to Dr. Irving Klotz of Northwestern University for pointing out this error to me.

    The original error can be seen in Table 5 (page 507/6) of the 1978 paper linked above. The incorrect citation in that table (34 instead of 24) is a nice additional touch. Apparently attention to detail was not Gould’s strong suit.

    If anyone wants to go back to the original source, Morton’s table can be seen on page 10 (of the PDF, it is in the front matter as unlabeled page viii) of:
    24. S. G. Morton, Catalogue of Skulls of Man and the Inferior Animals (Merrihew and Thompson, Philadelphia, 1849).
    available at https://archive.org/details/101202253.nlm.nih.gov

    It is interesting to contrast Morton’s definition of race on the following page with the language in National Geographic which Steve quotes above. Morton:

    It is necessary to explain what is here meant by the word race. Further researches into Ethnographic affinities will probably demonstrate that what are now termed the five races of men, would be more appropriately called groups; that each of these groups is again divisible into a greater or smaller number of primary races, each of which has expanded from an aboriginal nucleus or centre. Thus I conceive that there were several centres for the American group of races, of which the highest in the scale are the Toltecan nations, the lowest the Fuegians. Nor does this view conflict with the general principle, that all these nations and tribes have had, as I have elsewhere expressed it, a common origin; inasmuch as by this term is only meant an indigenous relation to the country they inhabit, and that collective identity of physical traits, mental and moral endowments, language, &c, which characterize all the American races. The same remarks are applicable to all the other human races ; but in the present infant state of Ethnographic science, the designation of these primitive centres is a task of equal delicacy and difficulty. I may here observe, that whenever I have ventured an opinion on this question, it has been in favor of the doctrine of primeval diversities among men,—an original adaptation of the several races to those varied circumstances of climate and locality, which, while congenial to the one are destructive to the other ; and subsequent investigations have confirmed me in these views.

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    • Replies: @Jack D

    Apparently attention to detail was not Gould’s strong suit.
     
    Gould was a Red Diaper Baby. If the choice is between accuracy and adhering to the Party Line, you go with the Party Line every time.
    , @Romanian
    1850 and he makes more sense than the supposedly enlightened elites of our day. How common sense, some logic and an honest spirit of observation ennobles man!
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  40. @Foreign Expert
    Sailing from Larchmont to Nassau doesn’t look logical to me. Nassau is on the other side of Long Island and there’s no good harbor to overnight.

    I think he meant Nassau, Bahamas. There is no one place in LI called “Nassau” – the entire western half of LI (beyond the borders of NYC) is “Nassau County”.

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  41. @res

    Oh, boy, Samuel Morton again. Ms. Kolbert undoubtedly cribbed Morton from the late Stephen Jay Gould’s 37 year old bestseller The Mismeasure of Man, even though a 2011 replication of Morton’s study showed Gould was more biased than Morton was. (Here’s an NYT editorial making that point.)
     
    The Gould/Morton debate simmers on (from 2016, also see 2014-2015 references): http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.1002444

    For anyone interested, here is Gould's original 1978 Science paper on Morton's skulls: https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/7992/a09d112b464fda63a8cae2859877cc2e0cde.pdf
    Here is the Pubmed page for that paper. The 7 citing papers it lists don't exactly look like an impressive collection: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/347573

    I like this footnote from page 98 of Gould's 1996 edition of The Mismeasure of Man:

    t My original report (Gould, 1978) incorrectly listed the modern Caucasian mean as 85.3. The reason for this error is embarrassing, but instructive, for it illustrates, at my expense, the cardinal principle of this book: the social embeddedness of science and the frequent grafting of expectation upon supposed objectivity. Line 7 in Table 2.3 lists the range of Semitic skulls as 84 to 98 cubic inches for Morton's sample of 3. However, my original paper cited a mean of 80—an obvious impossibility if the smallest skull measures 84. I was working from a Xerox of Morton's original chart, and his correct value of 89 is smudged to look like an 80 on my copy. Nonetheless, the range of 84 to 98 is clearly indicated right alongside, and I never saw the inconsistency—presumably because a low value of 80 fit my hopes for a depressed Caucasian mean. The 80 therefore "felt" right and I never checked it. I am grateful to Dr. Irving Klotz of Northwestern University for pointing out this error to me.
     
    The original error can be seen in Table 5 (page 507/6) of the 1978 paper linked above. The incorrect citation in that table (34 instead of 24) is a nice additional touch. Apparently attention to detail was not Gould's strong suit.

    If anyone wants to go back to the original source, Morton's table can be seen on page 10 (of the PDF, it is in the front matter as unlabeled page viii) of:
    24. S. G. Morton, Catalogue of Skulls of Man and the Inferior Animals (Merrihew and Thompson, Philadelphia, 1849).
    available at https://archive.org/details/101202253.nlm.nih.gov

    It is interesting to contrast Morton's definition of race on the following page with the language in National Geographic which Steve quotes above. Morton:

    It is necessary to explain what is here meant by the word race. Further researches into Ethnographic affinities will probably demonstrate that what are now termed the five races of men, would be more appropriately called groups; that each of these groups is again divisible into a greater or smaller number of primary races, each of which has expanded from an aboriginal nucleus or centre. Thus I conceive that there were several centres for the American group of races, of which the highest in the scale are the Toltecan nations, the lowest the Fuegians. Nor does this view conflict with the general principle, that all these nations and tribes have had, as I have elsewhere expressed it, a common origin; inasmuch as by this term is only meant an indigenous relation to the country they inhabit, and that collective identity of physical traits, mental and moral endowments, language, &c, which characterize all the American races. The same remarks are applicable to all the other human races ; but in the present infant state of Ethnographic science, the designation of these primitive centres is a task of equal delicacy and difficulty. I may here observe, that whenever I have ventured an opinion on this question, it has been in favor of the doctrine of primeval diversities among men,—an original adaptation of the several races to those varied circumstances of climate and locality, which, while congenial to the one are destructive to the other ; and subsequent investigations have confirmed me in these views.
     

    Apparently attention to detail was not Gould’s strong suit.

    Gould was a Red Diaper Baby. If the choice is between accuracy and adhering to the Party Line, you go with the Party Line every time.

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  42. NG also featured some supposed tranny kid on it’s cover last year. Leftists infiltrate everywhere and conspire to weaponize everything into vehicles for their cause. It’s time for another McCarthy style national campaign and purge to put these insidious infiltrators under a spotlight. The time is right for it.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    If a new McCarty emerges, he'll be targeting people like you, not National Geographic.

    Things are too far gone now. I'm afraid violence is inevitable.
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  43. @TheJester

    "DNA reveals what skin color obscures: We all have African ancestors."
     
    Why do SJWs continue to press this PC dribble? I have no sub-Saharan African genes. I negate their case. It appears my prehistoric ancestors never got close to the place:

    23&Me: "You have more Neanderthal variants than 94% of 23andMe customers ... [Y]our Neanderthal ancestry accounts for less than 4% of your overall DNA."

    European
    99.9%

    South Asian
    0.0%

    Sub-Saharan African
    0.0%

    You’re missing the point. Since homo sapiens originated in Africa, we all have African ancestors if you go back far enough. Of course if you go back really far enough, we all have fish ancestors too.

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    • Replies: @TheJester
    I did not miss the point. The article alleges that DNA proves that we all originated in Africa ... and, therefore, there is no genetic difference between the Bantu who currently dominate sub-Saharan Africa and us. There are only differences in skin color. However, I am not genetically related to the Bantu or their ancestors. It is more than skin color.

    The argument that, since Homo Sapiens originated in Africa, we are all one big happy genetic family with different colored skin would require folding the Neanderthals and Denisovans into the Bantu family and deny the reality of human evolution over 400,000 years ... as humans genetically adapted to local conditions. The argument also precludes the existence of current observable local genetic adaptations related to human digestion, lung capacity, arsenic tolerance, susceptibility to disease, IQ, etc. (the list is long) that highlight the ongoing reality of human evolution.

    The claim that, since we all originated in Africa, current humans differ only in skin color is vacuous, politically correct virtue signaling. It is counterfactual. The concept of race is grounded in genetics.

    , @Twodees Partain
    That's one theory (we're all African) that is only believed by those who accept the "evolved from fish" theory. I can't get behind either of them.
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  44. @syonredux
    From the “Race” issue:

    These Twins, One Black and One White, Will Make You Rethink Race

     

    Yes, prepare to have your mind blown by the fact that a child can favor one of her parents in terms of physical appearance…..

    Modern science confirms “that the visible differences between peoples are accidents of history”—the result of mutations, migrations, natural selection, the isolation of some populations, and interbreeding among others, writes science journalist Elizabeth Kolbert.

     

    Huh. And here I thought that the visible differences between peoples were caused by a carefully wrought masterplan…..

    They are not racial differences because the very concept of race—to quote DNA-sequencing pioneer Craig Venter—“has no genetic or scientific basis.”

     

    And that’s why there is no way to distinguish Koreans from Nigerians….

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/04/race-twins-black-white-biggs/

    Yes, prepare to have your mind blown by the fact that a child can favor one of her parents in terms of physical appearance…..

    It is not very likely, but who knows: https://qz.com/635040/how-can-two-twins-have-completely-different-fathers/
    It would be interesting to have a look at genetic tests for both twins and the parents (for both possible explanations).

    P.S. Quote from the end of that article:

    In the 2015 case, fertility specialist Cynthia Austin of the Cleveland Clinic Women’s Health Institute, told CBS News that twins with two different fathers might even occur more regularly, but go unnoticed.

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    • Replies: @Flip
    If a woman has multiple partners and multiple eggs, then it seems quite plausible. I bet it happens a lot more than people realize. I've read of it happening with dogs.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    res, please. You are you going to believe? Some scientist from the Cleveland Clinic or two journalists?
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  45. @Foreign Expert
    Sailing from Larchmont to Nassau doesn’t look logical to me. Nassau is on the other side of Long Island and there’s no good harbor to overnight.

    That was a joke, right?

    They are referring to Nassau in the Bahamas. And Nassau county – where I grew up – is on both coasts (north and south of Long Island), same for Suffolk county.

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  46. If there is no such thing as race the fact that white people have ruined the world must be a coincidence.

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  47. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT. Spiked on "Telford Girls - the Wrong Kind Of Victims"

    "The abuse in Telford is estimated to have involved over 1,000 girls stretching over 40 years. Young girls in the town were groomed, fed drugs and raped. They were passed between abusers like commodities. Some got pregnant, had abortions and were raped again on multiple occasions. Three women were murdered and two others died in tragedies linked to the abuse. Yet these shocking events have received relatively little coverage. Girls in Telford do not, it seems, deserve frontpage coverage in the Guardian or The Times.

    The very same newspapers that covered, at length and over many days, news that Kate Maltby’s knee may or may not have been touched by Damian Green or that Michael Fallon attempted to kiss Jane Merrick, were unable to muster up the same level of outrage for young women in Telford.

    The lack of comment on the Telford abuse scandal exposes the hypocrisy at the heart of the #MeToo movement."
     

    Sad but accords with what I remember of my dealings with Oxbridge type British people.

    My guess is that the readers of sites like this care more about those girls than the Oxbridgeites do.

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  48. Interestingly, the article never actually denies Morton’s findings for racial differences in cranial capacity. The author just calls it racist and changes the subject to genetics. Most readers probably won’t notice.

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    • Replies: @candid_observer
    Yeah, it's kind of funny how she brings up the business with Morton packing the skulls with seeds -- which Gould infamously mocked and was wrong about -- without mentioning the outcome.

    Obviously, she heard about the whole controversy Gould was embroiled with, but knew it wouldn't serve the purposes of her agenda to say anything more about it.

    Just the usual ideological hackery from the usual suspects.
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  49. I’m fond of saying that belief is powerful magic. People like this authoress really, really want to believe in the blank slate. They just know it is right. We’re all the same, except for the magic dirt and evil spirits that alter outcomes. That’s why they repeat these nonsense lines over an over. Even if you explained it to her, she would still repeat the chants.

    I recently had a conversation with an “early childhood development” expert. I had mentioned that East Africans have some of the lowest estimated IQ’s on earth. Her response was, “Is that because of the lack of schools or the structure of their education?” In other words, the possibility of it being biology was beyond her ability to comprehend.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    I mentioned the same thing to a woman friend of mine and she too cited their lack of education. She could not believe that some people are seriously deficient, through no fault of their own, in the IQ department.
    , @Anon
    I take your point, but isn't this "expert's" problem the well known effect of "professional deformation." IOW, when all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.
    , @Toddy Cat
    You could see this coming. I was a NG subscriber for decades, but dropped ny subscription in the mid-90's, when the first hints of political correctness started to seep in. It's too bad, NG was once a great publication; just watch, it'll be gone in less than a decade. And sad to say, good riddance.
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  50. Read More
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  51. Per wiki: How about that! Kolbert, like Goldberg, happens to be Jewish, too! And, wait, what’s this? So’s her husband! And she lives in Williamstown, Mass, which is even whiter than it sounds. God bless America.

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  52. National Geographic will next turn back to their core area of expertise and prove that the concept of geography is also invalid. The proof of this can be demonstrated by just one simple example. The Rocky Mountains and the Great Plains do not exist. If you measure elevations above sea level in the so-called “Rockies”, and elevations in the so-called “Great Plains” you will see that there is greater diversity in the “Rockies” than in all of the “Great Plains”. Additionally if you walk west from Kansas, is there a point at which you can point down and prove that HERE the “Great Plains” end and the “Rockies” begin? No of course you can’t, it is all a continuum of elevations.
    The new editor will no doubt shortly change the title of the magazine to National NoSuchThing. The death of the magazine will probably be all to the good, since it will prevent the anticipated National Geographic Effect catastrophe in which the Earth is spun off its rotation by the unbalanced mass of accumulated National Geographic collections.

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    • Replies: @Eustace Tilley (not)
    Brilliant comment.
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  53. Modern science confirms “that the visible differences between peoples are accidents of history”—the result of mutations, migrations, natural selection, the isolation of some populations, and interbreeding among others, writes science journalist Elizabeth Kolbert. They are not racial differences because the very concept of race—to quote DNA-sequencing pioneer Craig Venter—“has no genetic or scientific basis.”

    Likewise, modern science confirms that the tendency of objects to move towards each other is the result of the mass of each object and the distance between them.

    It’s not because of gravity because the very concept of gravity has no scientific basis.

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    • Replies: @BB753
    Indeed, you might not like the concept of "race" ("it's so 19th Century and bigoted, I swear"), or might be unable to define it (many useful scientific concepts are in fact tricky to define), but still the author acknowledges that there are real visible, quantifiable, measurable differences between populations, due to natural causes, which she enumerates in a self-defeating argument.
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  54. @Unladen Swallow
    I hope she didn't forget Lewontin and Levin's The Dialectical Biologist and Lewontin, Rose, and Kamin's Not in our Genes and Lewontin and Gould's Spandrels of San Marcos, and Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel. Every race is a social construct believing journalist must cite them all!!!

    When in doubt, just proclaim “social construct” and all arguments are foreclosed. Blacks don’t excel in the STEM subjects. Reason? They are “social constructs.”

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    • Replies: @Flip
    We obviously don't need affirmative action since there is no such thing as race.
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  55. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT. Spiked on "Telford Girls - the Wrong Kind Of Victims"

    "The abuse in Telford is estimated to have involved over 1,000 girls stretching over 40 years. Young girls in the town were groomed, fed drugs and raped. They were passed between abusers like commodities. Some got pregnant, had abortions and were raped again on multiple occasions. Three women were murdered and two others died in tragedies linked to the abuse. Yet these shocking events have received relatively little coverage. Girls in Telford do not, it seems, deserve frontpage coverage in the Guardian or The Times.

    The very same newspapers that covered, at length and over many days, news that Kate Maltby’s knee may or may not have been touched by Damian Green or that Michael Fallon attempted to kiss Jane Merrick, were unable to muster up the same level of outrage for young women in Telford.

    The lack of comment on the Telford abuse scandal exposes the hypocrisy at the heart of the #MeToo movement."
     

    #MeTelford

    Will be my reply to any and all tweets with MeToo in them.

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  56. Hey, go easy on the Larchmont Yacht Club–I had my wedding reception there in 1993. Great venue.

    Also, a library interview scene from “Reversal of Fortune” (1990) was filmed there. If memory serves, it’s a meeting between Alan Dershowitz (Ron Silver) and Claus von Bulow (Jeremy Irons).

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  57. I have to say, this essay by Kolbert displays well below the usual standard of understanding even for the SJWs who write about these issues.

    It’s obvious in every claim that this woman has no grasp of the science, or, indeed, any capacity for it. (She got her degree in English.)

    Better obfuscators, please.

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  58. @RCB
    Interestingly, the article never actually denies Morton's findings for racial differences in cranial capacity. The author just calls it racist and changes the subject to genetics. Most readers probably won't notice.

    Yeah, it’s kind of funny how she brings up the business with Morton packing the skulls with seeds — which Gould infamously mocked and was wrong about — without mentioning the outcome.

    Obviously, she heard about the whole controversy Gould was embroiled with, but knew it wouldn’t serve the purposes of her agenda to say anything more about it.

    Just the usual ideological hackery from the usual suspects.

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  59. According to Goldberg’s Nat Geo race issue and Kolbert’s article therein, DNA proves beyond a doubt that we are all the same, but the co-discoverer of DNA, James Watson, has been banished for pointing out there are still differences in people. Two journalists versus a Nobel prize winning scientist and the left will side with the writers.

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    • Replies: @Ivy
    Buckminster Fuller was another 'no such thing as race' proponent. He spoke about his domes and then drifted into observations about race and class. The college kids lapped it up however us high schoolers were admonished beforehand by our teacher to not believe everything we heard from ol' Bucky.
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  60. @Jack D
    You're missing the point. Since homo sapiens originated in Africa, we all have African ancestors if you go back far enough. Of course if you go back really far enough, we all have fish ancestors too.

    I did not miss the point. The article alleges that DNA proves that we all originated in Africa … and, therefore, there is no genetic difference between the Bantu who currently dominate sub-Saharan Africa and us. There are only differences in skin color. However, I am not genetically related to the Bantu or their ancestors. It is more than skin color.

    The argument that, since Homo Sapiens originated in Africa, we are all one big happy genetic family with different colored skin would require folding the Neanderthals and Denisovans into the Bantu family and deny the reality of human evolution over 400,000 years … as humans genetically adapted to local conditions. The argument also precludes the existence of current observable local genetic adaptations related to human digestion, lung capacity, arsenic tolerance, susceptibility to disease, IQ, etc. (the list is long) that highlight the ongoing reality of human evolution.

    The claim that, since we all originated in Africa, current humans differ only in skin color is vacuous, politically correct virtue signaling. It is counterfactual. The concept of race is grounded in genetics.

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  61. @anonymous
    When in doubt, just proclaim "social construct" and all arguments are foreclosed. Blacks don't excel in the STEM subjects. Reason? They are "social constructs."

    We obviously don’t need affirmative action since there is no such thing as race.

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  62. Nicholas Kristof in New York
    Nicholas Kristof found in Scarsdale, New York and Larchmont.

    Person
    Nicholas D Kristof, age 58
    Nocholas Kristof
    Locations
    Scarsdale, NY
    Yamhill, OR
    New York, NY
    Larchmont, NY
    Gaston, OR

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  63. @res

    Oh, boy, Samuel Morton again. Ms. Kolbert undoubtedly cribbed Morton from the late Stephen Jay Gould’s 37 year old bestseller The Mismeasure of Man, even though a 2011 replication of Morton’s study showed Gould was more biased than Morton was. (Here’s an NYT editorial making that point.)
     
    The Gould/Morton debate simmers on (from 2016, also see 2014-2015 references): http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.1002444

    For anyone interested, here is Gould's original 1978 Science paper on Morton's skulls: https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/7992/a09d112b464fda63a8cae2859877cc2e0cde.pdf
    Here is the Pubmed page for that paper. The 7 citing papers it lists don't exactly look like an impressive collection: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/347573

    I like this footnote from page 98 of Gould's 1996 edition of The Mismeasure of Man:

    t My original report (Gould, 1978) incorrectly listed the modern Caucasian mean as 85.3. The reason for this error is embarrassing, but instructive, for it illustrates, at my expense, the cardinal principle of this book: the social embeddedness of science and the frequent grafting of expectation upon supposed objectivity. Line 7 in Table 2.3 lists the range of Semitic skulls as 84 to 98 cubic inches for Morton's sample of 3. However, my original paper cited a mean of 80—an obvious impossibility if the smallest skull measures 84. I was working from a Xerox of Morton's original chart, and his correct value of 89 is smudged to look like an 80 on my copy. Nonetheless, the range of 84 to 98 is clearly indicated right alongside, and I never saw the inconsistency—presumably because a low value of 80 fit my hopes for a depressed Caucasian mean. The 80 therefore "felt" right and I never checked it. I am grateful to Dr. Irving Klotz of Northwestern University for pointing out this error to me.
     
    The original error can be seen in Table 5 (page 507/6) of the 1978 paper linked above. The incorrect citation in that table (34 instead of 24) is a nice additional touch. Apparently attention to detail was not Gould's strong suit.

    If anyone wants to go back to the original source, Morton's table can be seen on page 10 (of the PDF, it is in the front matter as unlabeled page viii) of:
    24. S. G. Morton, Catalogue of Skulls of Man and the Inferior Animals (Merrihew and Thompson, Philadelphia, 1849).
    available at https://archive.org/details/101202253.nlm.nih.gov

    It is interesting to contrast Morton's definition of race on the following page with the language in National Geographic which Steve quotes above. Morton:

    It is necessary to explain what is here meant by the word race. Further researches into Ethnographic affinities will probably demonstrate that what are now termed the five races of men, would be more appropriately called groups; that each of these groups is again divisible into a greater or smaller number of primary races, each of which has expanded from an aboriginal nucleus or centre. Thus I conceive that there were several centres for the American group of races, of which the highest in the scale are the Toltecan nations, the lowest the Fuegians. Nor does this view conflict with the general principle, that all these nations and tribes have had, as I have elsewhere expressed it, a common origin; inasmuch as by this term is only meant an indigenous relation to the country they inhabit, and that collective identity of physical traits, mental and moral endowments, language, &c, which characterize all the American races. The same remarks are applicable to all the other human races ; but in the present infant state of Ethnographic science, the designation of these primitive centres is a task of equal delicacy and difficulty. I may here observe, that whenever I have ventured an opinion on this question, it has been in favor of the doctrine of primeval diversities among men,—an original adaptation of the several races to those varied circumstances of climate and locality, which, while congenial to the one are destructive to the other ; and subsequent investigations have confirmed me in these views.
     

    1850 and he makes more sense than the supposedly enlightened elites of our day. How common sense, some logic and an honest spirit of observation ennobles man!

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  64. Speaking of applying a PC gloss to uncomfortable facts….

    From The Atlantic:

    Ancient DNA Is Rewriting Human (and Neanderthal) History
    The genomes of the long dead are turning up all sorts of unexpected and controversial findings.

    This work is not without controversy, especially as these replacements can be difficult to explain. Reich once had German collaborators drop out of a study when the initial findings seemed to mirror too closely Nazi propaganda about the Aryan race.

    Reich: Archaeology has always been political, especially in Europe. Archaeologists are very aware of the misuse of archaeology in the past, in the 20th century. There’s a very famous German archaeologist named Gustaf Kossinna, who was the first or one of the first to come up with the idea of “material culture.” Say, you see similar pots, and therefore you’re in a region where there was shared community and aspects of culture.

    He went so far as to argue that when you see the spread of these pots, you’re actually seeing a spread of people and there’s a one-to-one mapping for those things. His ideas were used by the Nazis later, in propaganda, to argue that a particular group in Europe, the Aryans, expanded in all directions across Europe. He believed that the region where these people’s material culture was located is the natural homeland of the Aryan community, and the Germans were the natural inheritors of that. This was used to justify their expansionism in the propaganda that the Germans used in the run-up to the Second World War.

    So after the Second World War, there was a very strong reaction in the European archaeological community—not just the Germans, but the broad continental European archaeological community—to the fact that their discipline had been used for these terrible political ends. And there was a retreat from the ideas of Kossinna.

    Zhang: You actually had German collaborators drop out of a study because of these exact concerns, right? One of them wrote, “We must(!) avoid … being compared with the so-called ‘siedlungsarchäologie Method’ from Gustaf Kossinna!”

    Reich: Yeah, that’s right. I think one of the things the ancient DNA is showing is actually the Corded Ware culture does correspond coherently to a group of people. [Editor’s note: The Corded Ware made pottery with cord-like ornamentation and according to ancient DNA studies, they descended from steppe ancestry.] I think that was a very sensitive issue to some of our coauthors, and one of the coauthors resigned because he felt we were returning to that idea of migration in archaeology that pots are the same as people. There have been a fair number of other coauthors from different parts of continental Europe who shared this anxiety.

    We responded to this by adding a lot of content to our papers to discuss these issues and contextualize them. Our results are actually almost diametrically opposite from what Kossina thought because these Corded Ware people come from the East, a place that Kossina would have despised as a source for them. But nevertheless it is true that there’s big population movements, and so I think what the DNA is doing is it’s forcing the hand of this discussion in archaeology, showing that in fact, major movements of people do occur. They are sometimes sharp and dramatic, and they involve large-scale population replacements over a relatively short period of time. We now can see that for the first time.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/03/ancient-dna-history/554798/

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    • Replies: @Twinkie

    His ideas were used by the Nazis later, in propaganda, to argue that a particular group in Europe, the Aryans, expanded in all directions across Europe. He believed that the region where these people’s material culture was located is the natural homeland of the Aryan community, and the Germans were the natural inheritors of that.
     
    I get your larger point here, but the Nordicism of Nazi Germany was rather far off from the modern hypotheses about the Corded Ceramic Culture, which is presumed to have contributed genes to many ethno-national groups across Eurasia, most of which are not in any way Nordic.
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  65. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    UK was always hierarchical. Hierarchy remains but the rankings have changed. When hierarchy favored whites, whites could get away with killing non-whites all over the world. Now, non-whites are favored and they are protected, and the hell with white casualties.
    It’s a snobby culture. Being ‘racist’ is deemed the ‘lowest’.

    New UK is an inversion of British rule over India. Everyone should see GANDHI. Not a great movie but instructive as to how hierarchy works. Hierarchy calls for taboos & sacred cows.

    Once, Queen & County were sacred. Now Queer and Diversity are sacred. So, patriots are the Untouchables or the Dalit in the UK. New Taboos are in effect. Diversity is a sacred cow. It cannot be violated. It must be worshiped. Just like a cow could hold up traffic in India, Diversity must be worshiped even when it runs over Britons with a truck.

    Because Diversity is sacred, those calling for White Britain are contaminated. They belong in the lowest caste.

    What UK needs is a Dalitarian revolution against the White elite snobs who now stand for Queer and Diversity.

    PS. I suppose this was okay since the women were diverse and the guys were acting African.

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/5801887/mothers-day-brawl-strippers-middlesbrough/

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  66. @The Z Blog
    I'm fond of saying that belief is powerful magic. People like this authoress really, really want to believe in the blank slate. They just know it is right. We're all the same, except for the magic dirt and evil spirits that alter outcomes. That's why they repeat these nonsense lines over an over. Even if you explained it to her, she would still repeat the chants.

    I recently had a conversation with an "early childhood development" expert. I had mentioned that East Africans have some of the lowest estimated IQ's on earth. Her response was, "Is that because of the lack of schools or the structure of their education?" In other words, the possibility of it being biology was beyond her ability to comprehend.

    I mentioned the same thing to a woman friend of mine and she too cited their lack of education. She could not believe that some people are seriously deficient, through no fault of their own, in the IQ department.

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    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Jim Bob, I agree with your friend and I propose spending Billions of dollars to close the gap. Wait, I think we already tried that.
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  67. @The Z Blog
    I'm fond of saying that belief is powerful magic. People like this authoress really, really want to believe in the blank slate. They just know it is right. We're all the same, except for the magic dirt and evil spirits that alter outcomes. That's why they repeat these nonsense lines over an over. Even if you explained it to her, she would still repeat the chants.

    I recently had a conversation with an "early childhood development" expert. I had mentioned that East Africans have some of the lowest estimated IQ's on earth. Her response was, "Is that because of the lack of schools or the structure of their education?" In other words, the possibility of it being biology was beyond her ability to comprehend.

    I take your point, but isn’t this “expert’s” problem the well known effect of “professional deformation.” IOW, when all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

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  68. @SunBakedSuburb
    The response by British authorities to the Muslim grooming gangs is further proof of the identity politics madness infecting Western countries. If this trend continues the choice will be a Stalinist totalitarian state or civil war.

    Optimist. Stalin would be better, as would civil war. What you are going to get is genocide.

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  69. @Buffalo Joe
    According to Goldberg's Nat Geo race issue and Kolbert's article therein, DNA proves beyond a doubt that we are all the same, but the co-discoverer of DNA, James Watson, has been banished for pointing out there are still differences in people. Two journalists versus a Nobel prize winning scientist and the left will side with the writers.

    Buckminster Fuller was another ‘no such thing as race’ proponent. He spoke about his domes and then drifted into observations about race and class. The college kids lapped it up however us high schoolers were admonished beforehand by our teacher to not believe everything we heard from ol’ Bucky.

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    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Ivy, thanks for jarring my memory. I remember old Bucky.
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  70. @syonredux
    Speaking of applying a PC gloss to uncomfortable facts....


    From The Atlantic:


    Ancient DNA Is Rewriting Human (and Neanderthal) History
    The genomes of the long dead are turning up all sorts of unexpected and controversial findings.

    This work is not without controversy, especially as these replacements can be difficult to explain. Reich once had German collaborators drop out of a study when the initial findings seemed to mirror too closely Nazi propaganda about the Aryan race.
     

    Reich: Archaeology has always been political, especially in Europe. Archaeologists are very aware of the misuse of archaeology in the past, in the 20th century. There’s a very famous German archaeologist named Gustaf Kossinna, who was the first or one of the first to come up with the idea of “material culture.” Say, you see similar pots, and therefore you’re in a region where there was shared community and aspects of culture.
     

    He went so far as to argue that when you see the spread of these pots, you’re actually seeing a spread of people and there’s a one-to-one mapping for those things. His ideas were used by the Nazis later, in propaganda, to argue that a particular group in Europe, the Aryans, expanded in all directions across Europe. He believed that the region where these people’s material culture was located is the natural homeland of the Aryan community, and the Germans were the natural inheritors of that. This was used to justify their expansionism in the propaganda that the Germans used in the run-up to the Second World War.
     

    So after the Second World War, there was a very strong reaction in the European archaeological community—not just the Germans, but the broad continental European archaeological community—to the fact that their discipline had been used for these terrible political ends. And there was a retreat from the ideas of Kossinna.
     

    Zhang: You actually had German collaborators drop out of a study because of these exact concerns, right? One of them wrote, “We must(!) avoid ... being compared with the so-called ‘siedlungsarchäologie Method’ from Gustaf Kossinna!”

     


    Reich: Yeah, that’s right. I think one of the things the ancient DNA is showing is actually the Corded Ware culture does correspond coherently to a group of people. [Editor’s note: The Corded Ware made pottery with cord-like ornamentation and according to ancient DNA studies, they descended from steppe ancestry.] I think that was a very sensitive issue to some of our coauthors, and one of the coauthors resigned because he felt we were returning to that idea of migration in archaeology that pots are the same as people. There have been a fair number of other coauthors from different parts of continental Europe who shared this anxiety.

     


    We responded to this by adding a lot of content to our papers to discuss these issues and contextualize them. Our results are actually almost diametrically opposite from what Kossina thought because these Corded Ware people come from the East, a place that Kossina would have despised as a source for them. But nevertheless it is true that there’s big population movements, and so I think what the DNA is doing is it’s forcing the hand of this discussion in archaeology, showing that in fact, major movements of people do occur. They are sometimes sharp and dramatic, and they involve large-scale population replacements over a relatively short period of time. We now can see that for the first time.

     

    https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/03/ancient-dna-history/554798/

    His ideas were used by the Nazis later, in propaganda, to argue that a particular group in Europe, the Aryans, expanded in all directions across Europe. He believed that the region where these people’s material culture was located is the natural homeland of the Aryan community, and the Germans were the natural inheritors of that.

    I get your larger point here, but the Nordicism of Nazi Germany was rather far off from the modern hypotheses about the Corded Ceramic Culture, which is presumed to have contributed genes to many ethno-national groups across Eurasia, most of which are not in any way Nordic.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    His ideas were used by the Nazis later, in propaganda, to argue that a particular group in Europe, the Aryans, expanded in all directions across Europe. He believed that the region where these people’s material culture was located is the natural homeland of the Aryan community, and the Germans were the natural inheritors of that.

    I get your larger point here, but the Nordicism of Nazi Germany was rather far off from the modern hypotheses about the Corded Ceramic Culture, which is presumed to have contributed genes to many ethno-national groups across Eurasia, most of which are not in any way Nordic.
     

    Sure. I'm just pointing out how "uncomfortable" some PC types are with anything that upsets the "pots-not-people" post-'45 dogma.
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  71. Elizabeth Colbert’s background is BA in literature, albeit from Yale. She also authored “The case against kids.”. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2012/04/09/the-case-against-kids#ixzz2Lko98hTE

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  72. @Alfa158
    National Geographic will next turn back to their core area of expertise and prove that the concept of geography is also invalid. The proof of this can be demonstrated by just one simple example. The Rocky Mountains and the Great Plains do not exist. If you measure elevations above sea level in the so-called “Rockies”, and elevations in the so-called “Great Plains” you will see that there is greater diversity in the “Rockies” than in all of the “Great Plains”. Additionally if you walk west from Kansas, is there a point at which you can point down and prove that HERE the “Great Plains” end and the “Rockies” begin? No of course you can’t, it is all a continuum of elevations.
    The new editor will no doubt shortly change the title of the magazine to National NoSuchThing. The death of the magazine will probably be all to the good, since it will prevent the anticipated National Geographic Effect catastrophe in which the Earth is spun off its rotation by the unbalanced mass of accumulated National Geographic collections.

    Brilliant comment.

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  73. @Twinkie

    His ideas were used by the Nazis later, in propaganda, to argue that a particular group in Europe, the Aryans, expanded in all directions across Europe. He believed that the region where these people’s material culture was located is the natural homeland of the Aryan community, and the Germans were the natural inheritors of that.
     
    I get your larger point here, but the Nordicism of Nazi Germany was rather far off from the modern hypotheses about the Corded Ceramic Culture, which is presumed to have contributed genes to many ethno-national groups across Eurasia, most of which are not in any way Nordic.

    His ideas were used by the Nazis later, in propaganda, to argue that a particular group in Europe, the Aryans, expanded in all directions across Europe. He believed that the region where these people’s material culture was located is the natural homeland of the Aryan community, and the Germans were the natural inheritors of that.

    I get your larger point here, but the Nordicism of Nazi Germany was rather far off from the modern hypotheses about the Corded Ceramic Culture, which is presumed to have contributed genes to many ethno-national groups across Eurasia, most of which are not in any way Nordic.

    Sure. I’m just pointing out how “uncomfortable” some PC types are with anything that upsets the “pots-not-people” post-’45 dogma.

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  74. Oh, boy, Samuel Morton again. Ms. Kolbert undoubtedly cribbed Morton from the late Stephen Jay Gould’s 37 year old bestseller The Mismeasure of Man, even though a 2011 replication of Morton’s study showed Gould was more biased than Morton was. (Here’s an NYT editorial making that point.)

    When it comes to race, a lot of Jews only seem to acknowledge the existence of work from their fellow race-obscurantist Jews. Or maybe it only seems that way because so many of their fellow obscurantists are Jewish. Either way, there’s a marked tendency to only acknowledge their fellow race-obscurantists.

    Everybody makes fun of the Nazis for wanting to purge “Jewish science,” but maybe this is what they meant.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Yes and no. Jew produce high levels of both fraudsters and genuine assets to humanity. The quick and dirty way to sort them is fame (quick, who first mandated hand-washing in hospitals?). In the Weimar era there were infamous sex institutes which worked to legalize and normalize pedophilia: their legit-looking peer reviewed journals were among the books consigned to the flames by Goebbels. But Primo Levi, a bright but non-genius chemistry guy, was put to work in a camp (albeit at marginally "better" conditions than the average internee), and the Nazis had a high tolerance for non-Jewish crockery, best represented in the "archaeological expeditions" to prove racist pseudo-science, and in Hanns Horbiger, the refrigerator repair man who thought the moon was an enormous ice cube and that in the near future a new ice age would engulf the Earth.
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  75. My favorite topic to broach with evolution-deniers is speciation. Then I ask them what one calls a population group in the process of speciation. Then I move on to the effect evolution-deniers have on evolution: retardation.

    Btw, I think that’s a term that needs to become widespread, if it isn’t already: evolution denier.

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    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Yes, there is some serious cognitive dissonance when people are presented with the fact that their belief in the Theory of Evolution completely opposes their belief that race doesn't exist. To prevent their heads from exploding, they fall back on the idea that there is more variation within groups than between groups. (Charles Murray always uses this as well as a form of protection.)

    While that's true, the societal impact of average differences still have massive consequences. Of course, even on the individual level, there's still that little thing called regression toward the mean, which means you can judge an individual by their race if your thinking beyond one generation.
    , @larry lurker

    Btw, I think that’s a term that needs to become widespread, if it isn’t already: evolution denier.
     
    In The Greatest Show on Earth, Richard Dawkins used the term history denier for evolution deniers. It didn't catch on quite like meme did.
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  76. @rogue-one
    OT:

    >Australia considers fast-track visas for white South African farmers

    "Home affairs minister Peter Dutton says the group deserves ‘special attention’ due to the ‘horrific circumstances’ they face at home"

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/mar/14/dutton-considers-fast-track-visas-for-white-south-african-farmers?CMP=twt_gu

    No, actually its very relevant to the topic at hand. If race really doesn’t exist, then why are black South Africans attempting to steal white farmers’s land? After all, its only a figment and doesn’t exist.

    Thank goodness for the Aussies to offer to take them in. Wonder why Trump didn’t think of doing that?

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  77. “DNA reveals what skin color obscures: We all have African ancestors.”

    I actually like this one:

    “We all have ‘missing link’ and primitive ape-like ancestors, too.”

    National Geographic devotes an entire issue to a thing which they say does not exist.

    LoL, indeed.

    Kolbert, like Goldberg, happens to be Jewish, too! And, wait, what’s this? So’s her husband!

    I’m always surprised at how often members of such a tiny minority are able to find and marry one another, in the face of the Jews’ anti-racism, anti-ethnocentrism, and “outmarriage,” all three of which I am frequently reminded of by the anti-ethnocentric conservative Jews who frequent this blog.

    We obviously don’t need affirmative action since there is no such thing as race.

    That’s why leftists go with “race is a social construct” now; we need discrimination in favor of the people constructed as black by people constructed as white, because the latter base their phantom discrimination against the former on their social constructs.

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    • Replies: @Moses

    I’m always surprised at how often members of such a tiny minority are able to find and marry one another, in the face of the Jews’ anti-racism, anti-ethnocentrism, and “outmarriage,” all three of which I am frequently reminded of by the anti-ethnocentric conservative Jews who frequent this blog.
     
    Huh. It's almost as if they really pay attention to race/ethnicity, and actively exclude mates from consideration if they don't fit certain notions of said race/ethnicity. And almost as if they've done so for 3,000 years.

    B-b-but...they *say* they're anti-ethnocentric and anti-racist. I just can't figure it out.

    Weird.

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  78. @rogue-one
    OT:

    >Australia considers fast-track visas for white South African farmers

    "Home affairs minister Peter Dutton says the group deserves ‘special attention’ due to the ‘horrific circumstances’ they face at home"

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/mar/14/dutton-considers-fast-track-visas-for-white-south-african-farmers?CMP=twt_gu

    Good for Australia. Lots of ex-South Africans there already. “Packing for Perth” as they say…

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  79. @Moses
    In breaking news, there are no dog breeds either. A poodle and greyhound and bulldog are exactly the same. They're all "dogs." There is only one dog race, and their DNA is all the same.

    You're a racist and a bigot and probably anti-dogite if you say otherwise.

    /sarcasm

    This stuff is unreal. It's like insisting with a straight face, repeatedly, that the sea is above the clouds.

    I bet different breeds of dogs are more closely related than a European, African, and Chinese.

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  80. @Svigor
    My favorite topic to broach with evolution-deniers is speciation. Then I ask them what one calls a population group in the process of speciation. Then I move on to the effect evolution-deniers have on evolution: retardation.

    Btw, I think that's a term that needs to become widespread, if it isn't already: evolution denier.

    Yes, there is some serious cognitive dissonance when people are presented with the fact that their belief in the Theory of Evolution completely opposes their belief that race doesn’t exist. To prevent their heads from exploding, they fall back on the idea that there is more variation within groups than between groups. (Charles Murray always uses this as well as a form of protection.)

    While that’s true, the societal impact of average differences still have massive consequences. Of course, even on the individual level, there’s still that little thing called regression toward the mean, which means you can judge an individual by their race if your thinking beyond one generation.

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  81. @res

    Yes, prepare to have your mind blown by the fact that a child can favor one of her parents in terms of physical appearance…..
     
    It is not very likely, but who knows: https://qz.com/635040/how-can-two-twins-have-completely-different-fathers/
    It would be interesting to have a look at genetic tests for both twins and the parents (for both possible explanations).

    P.S. Quote from the end of that article:

    In the 2015 case, fertility specialist Cynthia Austin of the Cleveland Clinic Women’s Health Institute, told CBS News that twins with two different fathers might even occur more regularly, but go unnoticed.
     

    If a woman has multiple partners and multiple eggs, then it seems quite plausible. I bet it happens a lot more than people realize. I’ve read of it happening with dogs.

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    • Replies: @Eustace Tilley (not)
    Jane bore T'Shawn and then Paddy
    And fingered poor Tom as their daddy.
    T'Shawn, we admit,
    Looks like Tom not a bit:
    Because Tom hadn't fathered him, had he?
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  82. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT. Spiked on "Telford Girls - the Wrong Kind Of Victims"

    "The abuse in Telford is estimated to have involved over 1,000 girls stretching over 40 years. Young girls in the town were groomed, fed drugs and raped. They were passed between abusers like commodities. Some got pregnant, had abortions and were raped again on multiple occasions. Three women were murdered and two others died in tragedies linked to the abuse. Yet these shocking events have received relatively little coverage. Girls in Telford do not, it seems, deserve frontpage coverage in the Guardian or The Times.

    The very same newspapers that covered, at length and over many days, news that Kate Maltby’s knee may or may not have been touched by Damian Green or that Michael Fallon attempted to kiss Jane Merrick, were unable to muster up the same level of outrage for young women in Telford.

    The lack of comment on the Telford abuse scandal exposes the hypocrisy at the heart of the #MeToo movement."
     

    How many Oscar nominations do the Telford girls have? How many WB shows did they star in? How many covers of Maxim did they grace?

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  83. @The Z Blog
    I'm fond of saying that belief is powerful magic. People like this authoress really, really want to believe in the blank slate. They just know it is right. We're all the same, except for the magic dirt and evil spirits that alter outcomes. That's why they repeat these nonsense lines over an over. Even if you explained it to her, she would still repeat the chants.

    I recently had a conversation with an "early childhood development" expert. I had mentioned that East Africans have some of the lowest estimated IQ's on earth. Her response was, "Is that because of the lack of schools or the structure of their education?" In other words, the possibility of it being biology was beyond her ability to comprehend.

    You could see this coming. I was a NG subscriber for decades, but dropped ny subscription in the mid-90′s, when the first hints of political correctness started to seep in. It’s too bad, NG was once a great publication; just watch, it’ll be gone in less than a decade. And sad to say, good riddance.

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  84. Who reads NG anyway? You buy it for the images–photos, maps and diagrams, which are often amazing.

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  85. @anonymous
    NG also featured some supposed tranny kid on it's cover last year. Leftists infiltrate everywhere and conspire to weaponize everything into vehicles for their cause. It's time for another McCarthy style national campaign and purge to put these insidious infiltrators under a spotlight. The time is right for it.

    If a new McCarty emerges, he’ll be targeting people like you, not National Geographic.

    Things are too far gone now. I’m afraid violence is inevitable.

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  86. Let’s see now a Jewish Woman is now the head honcho at Nat. Geo and yesterday she apologized for some so called racism IN THE HISTORY at the Nat. Geo. Today this women writes for Geo. that there is no such thing as race. What are the odds that she’s Jewish?

    Bingo …….100%

    It’a 24 hour job of attacking whites and Western Civilization as well as science but someone has to do it and that someone is ALWAYS A JEW.

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  87. @Moses
    In breaking news, there are no dog breeds either. A poodle and greyhound and bulldog are exactly the same. They're all "dogs." There is only one dog race, and their DNA is all the same.

    You're a racist and a bigot and probably anti-dogite if you say otherwise.

    /sarcasm

    This stuff is unreal. It's like insisting with a straight face, repeatedly, that the sea is above the clouds.

    Moses, not different races of dogs but dogs from different countries , as in English Bull Dog, German Shepard, French poodle, Tibetan Mastiff, Irish wolfhound. It’s their culture that defines that.

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    • LOL: ic1000
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  88. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    This is embarrassing for NatGeo.

    If there is no “genetic or scientific basis" for races, what is it that is making the kids of a black mother and black father keep coming out black? Is it a virus? Room temperature at conception?

    The inference is that differences (height, hair texture, eye color, complexion, et al.) among people are merely random–rather than genetic heredity.

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    • Replies: @El Dato
    If they were random, kids would randomly differ from their parents.

    Amazingly this is generally not the case.

    (One day, people may decide to splice the genome of 100 people into a new kid, but we are not there yet)
    , @stillCARealist
    What's really cool is that I have a picture of my great-grandparents on their wedding day. I can see the same nose and ear shapes from the groom when I look at myself in the mirror. My husband's grandfather looked almost exactly like my own son. You might think no intervening genes had any significance at all. Just random, I guess.
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  89. Read More
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  90. @JollyOldSoul
    "THERE’S MORE DIVERSITY IN AFRICA THAN ON ALL THE OTHER CONTINENTS COMBINED."

    And yet if you look at cultural diversity American whites are far more diverse than American blacks on pretty much every single metric: religious diversity, political diversity, music and artistic preferences, favorite movies and television shows, socioeconomic background, college majors, ad infinitum. In pretty much every way, there is more diversity among whites in America than among blacks, and that would probably be true even if you looked just at Americans whose ancestors came mostly just from Northwest Europe, or just from Great Britain. We are more likely to belong to different political parties, more likely to belong to different religious denominations, to prefer different types of music. Blacks in America almost invariably belong to the Democratic Party, come from a very small range of economic backgrounds, prefer a certain type of music, etc. The ancestors of most American blacks may have come here in chains from a relatively small section of Africa, but if genetic diversity were really there (and meant anything worthwhile) it eventually would have expressed itself in such differences. It hasn't.

    Jolly, Diversity in Africa is defined as what? Different Tribes? I thought tribalism was verboten. Can’t be because of the 54 different countries, because borders are actually racist. Can it be different shades of black, but that would be colorism. Could it be the religions that impart their own special stink. Languages? What makes Africa diverse? Honest question.

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  91. @Ivy
    Buckminster Fuller was another 'no such thing as race' proponent. He spoke about his domes and then drifted into observations about race and class. The college kids lapped it up however us high schoolers were admonished beforehand by our teacher to not believe everything we heard from ol' Bucky.

    Ivy, thanks for jarring my memory. I remember old Bucky.

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    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Does anyone under the age of 40 know who Buckminster Fuller was? He's one of those people who was a big deal during his life but is almost completely forgotten now.
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  92. @res

    Yes, prepare to have your mind blown by the fact that a child can favor one of her parents in terms of physical appearance…..
     
    It is not very likely, but who knows: https://qz.com/635040/how-can-two-twins-have-completely-different-fathers/
    It would be interesting to have a look at genetic tests for both twins and the parents (for both possible explanations).

    P.S. Quote from the end of that article:

    In the 2015 case, fertility specialist Cynthia Austin of the Cleveland Clinic Women’s Health Institute, told CBS News that twins with two different fathers might even occur more regularly, but go unnoticed.
     

    res, please. You are you going to believe? Some scientist from the Cleveland Clinic or two journalists?

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  93. @Jim Don Bob
    I mentioned the same thing to a woman friend of mine and she too cited their lack of education. She could not believe that some people are seriously deficient, through no fault of their own, in the IQ department.

    Jim Bob, I agree with your friend and I propose spending Billions of dollars to close the gap. Wait, I think we already tried that.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    I am sure all will be well as soon as we follow this babe's advice and come up with new names for "racial categories". Or something.
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  94. @Moses
    In breaking news, there are no dog breeds either. A poodle and greyhound and bulldog are exactly the same. They're all "dogs." There is only one dog race, and their DNA is all the same.

    You're a racist and a bigot and probably anti-dogite if you say otherwise.

    /sarcasm

    This stuff is unreal. It's like insisting with a straight face, repeatedly, that the sea is above the clouds.

    Not just they’re all dogs but they’re all wolves as well (since they can interbreed).

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  95. In June 2000, when the results were announced at a White House ceremony, Craig Venter, a pioneer of DNA sequencing, observed, “The concept of race has no genetic or scientific basis.”

    does the SPLC know this?

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  96. THERE’S MORE DIVERSITY IN AFRICA THAN ON ALL THE OTHER CONTINENTS COMBINED

    The diversity density field (with a strength expressed in Diversity Pokemon Points per cubic meter: ד ) permeates spacetime and its consistently high value throughout sub-saharan Africa makes this area practically the Tanden of Social Justice Wellbeing.

    Sadly, too high values of ד can lead to sudden phase changes in the diversity field, followed by forced un-diversification (“magneto-diverse reconnection”) traditionally accompanied by wielding of machetes and AKMs. So one should stay alert at all times, even during Wellbeing sessions.

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  97. @Forbes
    The inference is that differences (height, hair texture, eye color, complexion, et al.) among people are merely random--rather than genetic heredity.

    If they were random, kids would randomly differ from their parents.

    Amazingly this is generally not the case.

    (One day, people may decide to splice the genome of 100 people into a new kid, but we are not there yet)

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  98. @SunBakedSuburb
    The response by British authorities to the Muslim grooming gangs is further proof of the identity politics madness infecting Western countries. If this trend continues the choice will be a Stalinist totalitarian state or civil war.

    Whenever a diverse grooming community is discovered in the UK, a burned Russian asset must die.

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  99. @songbird
    We are all Africans, except for any non-black people living in Africa who, of course, are racist imperialist exploiters. Oh, and don't even think of checking the African-American box, unless you're black!

    Proposed Delaware Education Regulation 225 Will Allow Students to “Self-Identify” Gender and Race.

    The proposed rules would allow students to self-identify their race and gender at school –– regardless of their age, even if their parents object.

    http://atlantablackstar.com/2018/03/05/delaware-schools-want-allow-children-pick-race-gender-identity/

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  100. @Buffalo Joe
    Jim Bob, I agree with your friend and I propose spending Billions of dollars to close the gap. Wait, I think we already tried that.

    I am sure all will be well as soon as we follow this babe’s advice and come up with new names for “racial categories”. Or something.

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  101. Kudos to Dr. Irving Klotz ..I almost wrote kimonos. Well, them too.

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  102. @Buffalo Joe
    Ivy, thanks for jarring my memory. I remember old Bucky.

    Does anyone under the age of 40 know who Buckminster Fuller was? He’s one of those people who was a big deal during his life but is almost completely forgotten now.

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    • Replies: @El Dato
    Anyone who knows C60, "Buckminsterfullerene"

    I always wondered what it would do to your lungs if inhaled.
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  103. @Tiny Duck
    "That race is a human construction doesn’t mean that we don’t fall into different groups or there’s no variation,” Foeman says. “But if we made racial categories up, maybe we can make new categories that function better.”

    That sums it up

    the white race was created by "white" elites

    the problem is that blond hari and blue eyes look way different from normal black hair and brown eyes

    this is why we need to encourage white girls to bear Children of Color

    Children of the Color. I think I saw that, back in the 80s. “He wants you too, Tiny Duck. He wants you too!”

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  104. @Jack D
    You're missing the point. Since homo sapiens originated in Africa, we all have African ancestors if you go back far enough. Of course if you go back really far enough, we all have fish ancestors too.

    That’s one theory (we’re all African) that is only believed by those who accept the “evolved from fish” theory. I can’t get behind either of them.

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  105. @Svigor
    My favorite topic to broach with evolution-deniers is speciation. Then I ask them what one calls a population group in the process of speciation. Then I move on to the effect evolution-deniers have on evolution: retardation.

    Btw, I think that's a term that needs to become widespread, if it isn't already: evolution denier.

    Btw, I think that’s a term that needs to become widespread, if it isn’t already: evolution denier.

    In The Greatest Show on Earth, Richard Dawkins used the term history denier for evolution deniers. It didn’t catch on quite like meme did.

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  106. “social construct”

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    “social construct”
     
    In the case of Miss Williams, "scientific construct" is also applicable. There's a woman who likes her juice....
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson II
    Steroids work.
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  107. @Harry Baldwin
    Does anyone under the age of 40 know who Buckminster Fuller was? He's one of those people who was a big deal during his life but is almost completely forgotten now.

    Anyone who knows C60, “Buckminsterfullerene”

    I always wondered what it would do to your lungs if inhaled.

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  108. @bgates
    Modern science confirms “that the visible differences between peoples are accidents of history”—the result of mutations, migrations, natural selection, the isolation of some populations, and interbreeding among others, writes science journalist Elizabeth Kolbert. They are not racial differences because the very concept of race—to quote DNA-sequencing pioneer Craig Venter—“has no genetic or scientific basis.”

    Likewise, modern science confirms that the tendency of objects to move towards each other is the result of the mass of each object and the distance between them.

    It's not because of gravity because the very concept of gravity has no scientific basis.

    Indeed, you might not like the concept of “race” (“it’s so 19th Century and bigoted, I swear”), or might be unable to define it (many useful scientific concepts are in fact tricky to define), but still the author acknowledges that there are real visible, quantifiable, measurable differences between populations, due to natural causes, which she enumerates in a self-defeating argument.

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  109. Edward Albee grew up in Larchmont. He was adopted and his parents were quite wealthy. There is still an apartment building in Larchmont called Albee Court. He despised Larchmont, incidentally.

    Elizabeth Kolbert’s mother was a Village Trustee for many years. She also held many other volunteer posts during her years in Larchmont, such as Board of Education member and PTA president.

    Jeff Wiener, co-founder of LinkedIn grew up in Larchmont.

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  110. @eah
    "social construct"

    http://celebmafia.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/serena-williams-2014-u.s.-open-tennis-tournament-in-new-york-city-1st-round_1.jpg

    https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5696/20687454706_1a0698a92c_b.jpg

    “social construct”

    In the case of Miss Williams, “scientific construct” is also applicable. There’s a woman who likes her juice….

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    • Replies: @Twinkie
    Apparently in tennis circles, it's pretty well-known that Serena could tolerate PEDs while her sister Venus had strong reactions. I know inherited genes can be a crapshoot, but the physical difference between the two, despite shared genes and identical training in the early years, is just striking and lends evidence to the widely circulated rumor.

    Tennis in general is pretty ripe with PEDs, I think, due to very lax testing.
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  111. I got a 23andme kit for Christmas. A friend bought for me. She knew I was adopted at birth and that I might be interested in the results. I opened an email account on protonmail and used that for 23andme’s account. I make up a nonsense name for my account with no signal of my race (Filipino would have been the closest guess based on the name. Those folk have wierd names). I followed the instructions on the box.

    The result came back last weekend. 99.9% northwestern European. Just like I knew as a child by looking in the mirror. There’s a curious <0.1% east Asian in the results. Is that from Genghis Khan's army?

    There is 0% percent African, but the results do point out the source migration point from Africa for both my mother and father. So yeah, I'm 100% African.

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    • Replies: @Jack D

    There’s a curious <0.1% east Asian in the results.
     
    After 23 and me accounts for all the known DNA they randomly throw in an origin for the rest. If you are already 20% this and 10% that Heinz 57 varieties you might not even notice. But when you are 99 and 44/100ths% pure it sticks out. A Lithuanian Jewish friend came back as 99% Ashkenazi and 1% Polynesian. Ain't no Tahitians in the ghetto.
    , @Twinkie

    The result came back last weekend. 99.9% northwestern European. Just like I knew as a child by looking in the mirror. There’s a curious <0.1% east Asian in the results. Is that from Genghis Khan's army?
     
    That's not that unusual.

    Northwestern Europeans often have some fraction of Scandinavian genes, which in turn was intermixed a bit with the Finns (especially Swedes). Finns have some small Siberian genetic input (something like 5-15% I think). So, a lot of people with British, German, and Swedish ancestry end up having tiny fractions (usually around 1% or less) of something like Yakut or generic East Asian genes.
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  112. @Anonymous
    Nassau (County) is full of harbors on Long Island's north shore.

    You are correct. I didn’t grow top there. Do the locals call the north shore Nassau?

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    • Replies: @Jack D
    No, they call it the North Shore.
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  113. @jJay
    I got a 23andme kit for Christmas. A friend bought for me. She knew I was adopted at birth and that I might be interested in the results. I opened an email account on protonmail and used that for 23andme's account. I make up a nonsense name for my account with no signal of my race (Filipino would have been the closest guess based on the name. Those folk have wierd names). I followed the instructions on the box.

    The result came back last weekend. 99.9% northwestern European. Just like I knew as a child by looking in the mirror. There's a curious <0.1% east Asian in the results. Is that from Genghis Khan's army?

    There is 0% percent African, but the results do point out the source migration point from Africa for both my mother and father. So yeah, I'm 100% African.

    There’s a curious <0.1% east Asian in the results.

    After 23 and me accounts for all the known DNA they randomly throw in an origin for the rest. If you are already 20% this and 10% that Heinz 57 varieties you might not even notice. But when you are 99 and 44/100ths% pure it sticks out. A Lithuanian Jewish friend came back as 99% Ashkenazi and 1% Polynesian. Ain’t no Tahitians in the ghetto.

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    • Replies: @Twinkie

    A Lithuanian Jewish friend came back as 99% Ashkenazi and 1% Polynesian. Ain’t no Tahitians in the ghetto.
     
    That's not what that means.

    It's not that some Lithuanian Jew had a Tahitian ancestry, but that he has genes that are found among some Tahitians today. There could be lots of variations of reasons why that might be the case.

    A lot of Koreans currently tested by 23andme come out as significantly Japanese. That doesn't mean that they are descended from the Japanese, but more likely that whatever genes that were flagged as Japanese by 23andme are found in both populations and were termed so by 23andme under the "speculative" mode. (DNAland doesn't even separate Koreans and Japanese for that reason.)

    I came out as 99.9% East Asian in a 23andme test and 0.1% Native American. Again, it doesn't mean I had a Native American ancestor - merely that I have a very tiny fraction of genes that are commonly found among Native Americans TODAY.

    If you want a more accurate description of your genes, tone down the speculative mode in 23andme (but you'll get much more vague answers) or put in your raw data into something like DNAland, which has a different set of data and categorizes origins a bit differently. For example, I came out as about 10% generic East Asian in 23andme, and DNAland further clarified that as 10% Mongolian.
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  114. @Foreign Expert
    You are correct. I didn't grow top there. Do the locals call the north shore Nassau?

    No, they call it the North Shore.

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  115. @Svigor

    Oh, boy, Samuel Morton again. Ms. Kolbert undoubtedly cribbed Morton from the late Stephen Jay Gould’s 37 year old bestseller The Mismeasure of Man, even though a 2011 replication of Morton’s study showed Gould was more biased than Morton was. (Here’s an NYT editorial making that point.)
     
    When it comes to race, a lot of Jews only seem to acknowledge the existence of work from their fellow race-obscurantist Jews. Or maybe it only seems that way because so many of their fellow obscurantists are Jewish. Either way, there's a marked tendency to only acknowledge their fellow race-obscurantists.

    Everybody makes fun of the Nazis for wanting to purge "Jewish science," but maybe this is what they meant.

    Yes and no. Jew produce high levels of both fraudsters and genuine assets to humanity. The quick and dirty way to sort them is fame (quick, who first mandated hand-washing in hospitals?). In the Weimar era there were infamous sex institutes which worked to legalize and normalize pedophilia: their legit-looking peer reviewed journals were among the books consigned to the flames by Goebbels. But Primo Levi, a bright but non-genius chemistry guy, was put to work in a camp (albeit at marginally “better” conditions than the average internee), and the Nazis had a high tolerance for non-Jewish crockery, best represented in the “archaeological expeditions” to prove racist pseudo-science, and in Hanns Horbiger, the refrigerator repair man who thought the moon was an enormous ice cube and that in the near future a new ice age would engulf the Earth.

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  116. @eah
    "social construct"

    http://celebmafia.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/serena-williams-2014-u.s.-open-tennis-tournament-in-new-york-city-1st-round_1.jpg

    https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5696/20687454706_1a0698a92c_b.jpg

    Steroids work.

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  117. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Ah, sigh. I don’t know where you find the strength to keep doing it, Steve. The silly falsehoods of Gould and Lewontin had been objectively and rigorously proven wrong a hundred times over. The Lysenkoists just keep ignoring 100% of it and repeat the same lies over, and over, and over. It’s tiresome.

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  118. @Svigor

    “DNA reveals what skin color obscures: We all have African ancestors.”
     
    I actually like this one:

    "We all have 'missing link' and primitive ape-like ancestors, too."

    National Geographic devotes an entire issue to a thing which they say does not exist.
     
    LoL, indeed.

    Kolbert, like Goldberg, happens to be Jewish, too! And, wait, what’s this? So’s her husband!
     
    I'm always surprised at how often members of such a tiny minority are able to find and marry one another, in the face of the Jews' anti-racism, anti-ethnocentrism, and "outmarriage," all three of which I am frequently reminded of by the anti-ethnocentric conservative Jews who frequent this blog.

    We obviously don’t need affirmative action since there is no such thing as race.
     
    That's why leftists go with "race is a social construct" now; we need discrimination in favor of the people constructed as black by people constructed as white, because the latter base their phantom discrimination against the former on their social constructs.

    I’m always surprised at how often members of such a tiny minority are able to find and marry one another, in the face of the Jews’ anti-racism, anti-ethnocentrism, and “outmarriage,” all three of which I am frequently reminded of by the anti-ethnocentric conservative Jews who frequent this blog.

    Huh. It’s almost as if they really pay attention to race/ethnicity, and actively exclude mates from consideration if they don’t fit certain notions of said race/ethnicity. And almost as if they’ve done so for 3,000 years.

    B-b-but…they *say* they’re anti-ethnocentric and anti-racist. I just can’t figure it out.

    Weird.

    Read More
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  119. @syonredux

    “social construct”
     
    In the case of Miss Williams, "scientific construct" is also applicable. There's a woman who likes her juice....

    Apparently in tennis circles, it’s pretty well-known that Serena could tolerate PEDs while her sister Venus had strong reactions. I know inherited genes can be a crapshoot, but the physical difference between the two, despite shared genes and identical training in the early years, is just striking and lends evidence to the widely circulated rumor.

    Tennis in general is pretty ripe with PEDs, I think, due to very lax testing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @larry lurker

    Tennis in general is pretty ripe with PEDs, I think, due to very lax testing.
     
    Could that be because in tennis PEDs are more likely to be used by women than by men?

    In men's tennis you probably don't need to get much more jacked than, say, Rafael Nadal to obtain your optimal tennis physique, which is something most men can achieve without using PEDs. But in women's tennis, PEDs might give the player a massive advantage.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  120. @jJay
    I got a 23andme kit for Christmas. A friend bought for me. She knew I was adopted at birth and that I might be interested in the results. I opened an email account on protonmail and used that for 23andme's account. I make up a nonsense name for my account with no signal of my race (Filipino would have been the closest guess based on the name. Those folk have wierd names). I followed the instructions on the box.

    The result came back last weekend. 99.9% northwestern European. Just like I knew as a child by looking in the mirror. There's a curious <0.1% east Asian in the results. Is that from Genghis Khan's army?

    There is 0% percent African, but the results do point out the source migration point from Africa for both my mother and father. So yeah, I'm 100% African.

    The result came back last weekend. 99.9% northwestern European. Just like I knew as a child by looking in the mirror. There’s a curious <0.1% east Asian in the results. Is that from Genghis Khan's army?

    That’s not that unusual.

    Northwestern Europeans often have some fraction of Scandinavian genes, which in turn was intermixed a bit with the Finns (especially Swedes). Finns have some small Siberian genetic input (something like 5-15% I think). So, a lot of people with British, German, and Swedish ancestry end up having tiny fractions (usually around 1% or less) of something like Yakut or generic East Asian genes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @jJay
    That kinda makes sense. I was actually a bit surprised that I had zilch in the way of southern European genetic ancestry. My thick black hair must be Neanderthal. I rung up high on that genetic test.
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  121. @Jack D

    There’s a curious <0.1% east Asian in the results.
     
    After 23 and me accounts for all the known DNA they randomly throw in an origin for the rest. If you are already 20% this and 10% that Heinz 57 varieties you might not even notice. But when you are 99 and 44/100ths% pure it sticks out. A Lithuanian Jewish friend came back as 99% Ashkenazi and 1% Polynesian. Ain't no Tahitians in the ghetto.

    A Lithuanian Jewish friend came back as 99% Ashkenazi and 1% Polynesian. Ain’t no Tahitians in the ghetto.

    That’s not what that means.

    It’s not that some Lithuanian Jew had a Tahitian ancestry, but that he has genes that are found among some Tahitians today. There could be lots of variations of reasons why that might be the case.

    A lot of Koreans currently tested by 23andme come out as significantly Japanese. That doesn’t mean that they are descended from the Japanese, but more likely that whatever genes that were flagged as Japanese by 23andme are found in both populations and were termed so by 23andme under the “speculative” mode. (DNAland doesn’t even separate Koreans and Japanese for that reason.)

    I came out as 99.9% East Asian in a 23andme test and 0.1% Native American. Again, it doesn’t mean I had a Native American ancestor – merely that I have a very tiny fraction of genes that are commonly found among Native Americans TODAY.

    If you want a more accurate description of your genes, tone down the speculative mode in 23andme (but you’ll get much more vague answers) or put in your raw data into something like DNAland, which has a different set of data and categorizes origins a bit differently. For example, I came out as about 10% generic East Asian in 23andme, and DNAland further clarified that as 10% Mongolian.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    It’s not that some Lithuanian Jew had a Tahitian ancestry, but that he has genes that are found among some Tahitians today. There could be lots of variations of reasons why that might be the case.
     
    This is an important distinction that I don't think the DNA testing companies do enough to explain.

    It's not descent, but rather common DNA markers from some point in history that it's connecting. The Lithuanian Jew probably had some distant maternal French/Med ancestor whose descendant drifted into a diasporic Ashkenazi population before making its way into Eastern Europe on his branch, and the maternal ancestor had another descendant who was involved in colonizing Tahiti and knocked up a Polynesian girl at some point on another branch. It doesn't make the Lithuanian Jew part Tahitian nor the Tahitian part Lithuanian Jew. It's probably just some ancient Med DNA that made its way into the Ashkenazi population through marriage to local girls in Roman times, and into Tahiti via French colonization of the South Pacific.

    One suspects that this misimpression could be intentional, if you presume that the people running these DNA testing outfits are like other Silicon Valley tech companies in outlook and see social and political utility in leading people to believe that they're 4% Jewish or 1% Tahitian or some fraction Subsaharan African. This seems to square with the multicultural dogma, so I wouldn't rule it out.
    , @Jack D

    A lot of Koreans currently tested by 23andme come out as significantly Japanese. That doesn’t mean that they are descended from the Japanese, but more likely that whatever genes that were flagged as Japanese by 23andme are found in both populations and were termed so by 23andme under the “speculative” mode.
     
    I'm guessing that the reason these genes are "found" among the Japanese is that many Japanese are actually Koreans "passing" as Japanese, just as light skinned blacks would "cross the color line" and pass as white. Now to us they may all look the same but having your daughter marry a Japanese and having her marry a Korean were two different things. Koreans were (before WWII) the racially inferior colonial people who took menial jobs. People would research prospective spouses to make sure they were really Japanese, etc.
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  122. @Twinkie
    Apparently in tennis circles, it's pretty well-known that Serena could tolerate PEDs while her sister Venus had strong reactions. I know inherited genes can be a crapshoot, but the physical difference between the two, despite shared genes and identical training in the early years, is just striking and lends evidence to the widely circulated rumor.

    Tennis in general is pretty ripe with PEDs, I think, due to very lax testing.

    Tennis in general is pretty ripe with PEDs, I think, due to very lax testing.

    Could that be because in tennis PEDs are more likely to be used by women than by men?

    In men’s tennis you probably don’t need to get much more jacked than, say, Rafael Nadal to obtain your optimal tennis physique, which is something most men can achieve without using PEDs. But in women’s tennis, PEDs might give the player a massive advantage.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Twinkie

    In men’s tennis you probably don’t need to get much more jacked than, say, Rafael Nadal to obtain your optimal tennis physique, which is something most men can achieve without using PEDs.
     
    It's not just about physique. As with any serious physical activity, you have to train A LOT to be good at tennis. That in turn leads to frequent repetitive injuries (esp. knees, ankles, elbows, wrists). PEDs help you recover faster and allow you to train more hours a day.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  123. @larry lurker

    Tennis in general is pretty ripe with PEDs, I think, due to very lax testing.
     
    Could that be because in tennis PEDs are more likely to be used by women than by men?

    In men's tennis you probably don't need to get much more jacked than, say, Rafael Nadal to obtain your optimal tennis physique, which is something most men can achieve without using PEDs. But in women's tennis, PEDs might give the player a massive advantage.

    In men’s tennis you probably don’t need to get much more jacked than, say, Rafael Nadal to obtain your optimal tennis physique, which is something most men can achieve without using PEDs.

    It’s not just about physique. As with any serious physical activity, you have to train A LOT to be good at tennis. That in turn leads to frequent repetitive injuries (esp. knees, ankles, elbows, wrists). PEDs help you recover faster and allow you to train more hours a day.

    Read More
    • Replies: @larry lurker
    Ah, I forgot about that property of PEDs. Yeah, that'd be quite an advantage for both sexes.
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  124. @Twinkie

    The result came back last weekend. 99.9% northwestern European. Just like I knew as a child by looking in the mirror. There’s a curious <0.1% east Asian in the results. Is that from Genghis Khan's army?
     
    That's not that unusual.

    Northwestern Europeans often have some fraction of Scandinavian genes, which in turn was intermixed a bit with the Finns (especially Swedes). Finns have some small Siberian genetic input (something like 5-15% I think). So, a lot of people with British, German, and Swedish ancestry end up having tiny fractions (usually around 1% or less) of something like Yakut or generic East Asian genes.

    That kinda makes sense. I was actually a bit surprised that I had zilch in the way of southern European genetic ancestry. My thick black hair must be Neanderthal. I rung up high on that genetic test.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Twinkie

    That kinda makes sense. I was actually a bit surprised that I had zilch in the way of southern European genetic ancestry. My thick black hair must be Neanderthal. I rung up high on that genetic test.
     
    You should be cautious about assigning particular origins for your phenotypical traits. These traits are pretty widespread in many populations. And even when they are not expressed physically "lie dormant" recessively in many peoples.

    For example, I have 99.9% East Asian markers and 0.1% Native American markers. I have strands of red/copper facial hair. When I grew my beard out while staying in a certain part of the world (per the local style AND my co-workers at the time) and put sun glasses on, people I assumed I was something other than East Asian, because of my full beard and its color!

    23andme's report states that, although I have 99.9% East Asian markers, I am several times more likely than the average East Asian 23andme test subject to have lighter hair color and lighter eye color. One of my children have GREEN eyes (my wife has 99.9% Northern European, that is English-German-Swedish, markers and has green eyes). The same child is also red-headed.
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  125. @Flip
    If a woman has multiple partners and multiple eggs, then it seems quite plausible. I bet it happens a lot more than people realize. I've read of it happening with dogs.

    Jane bore T’Shawn and then Paddy
    And fingered poor Tom as their daddy.
    T’Shawn, we admit,
    Looks like Tom not a bit:
    Because Tom hadn’t fathered him, had he?

    Read More
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  126. @Forbes
    The inference is that differences (height, hair texture, eye color, complexion, et al.) among people are merely random--rather than genetic heredity.

    What’s really cool is that I have a picture of my great-grandparents on their wedding day. I can see the same nose and ear shapes from the groom when I look at myself in the mirror. My husband’s grandfather looked almost exactly like my own son. You might think no intervening genes had any significance at all. Just random, I guess.

    Read More
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  127. @Twinkie

    A Lithuanian Jewish friend came back as 99% Ashkenazi and 1% Polynesian. Ain’t no Tahitians in the ghetto.
     
    That's not what that means.

    It's not that some Lithuanian Jew had a Tahitian ancestry, but that he has genes that are found among some Tahitians today. There could be lots of variations of reasons why that might be the case.

    A lot of Koreans currently tested by 23andme come out as significantly Japanese. That doesn't mean that they are descended from the Japanese, but more likely that whatever genes that were flagged as Japanese by 23andme are found in both populations and were termed so by 23andme under the "speculative" mode. (DNAland doesn't even separate Koreans and Japanese for that reason.)

    I came out as 99.9% East Asian in a 23andme test and 0.1% Native American. Again, it doesn't mean I had a Native American ancestor - merely that I have a very tiny fraction of genes that are commonly found among Native Americans TODAY.

    If you want a more accurate description of your genes, tone down the speculative mode in 23andme (but you'll get much more vague answers) or put in your raw data into something like DNAland, which has a different set of data and categorizes origins a bit differently. For example, I came out as about 10% generic East Asian in 23andme, and DNAland further clarified that as 10% Mongolian.

    It’s not that some Lithuanian Jew had a Tahitian ancestry, but that he has genes that are found among some Tahitians today. There could be lots of variations of reasons why that might be the case.

    This is an important distinction that I don’t think the DNA testing companies do enough to explain.

    It’s not descent, but rather common DNA markers from some point in history that it’s connecting. The Lithuanian Jew probably had some distant maternal French/Med ancestor whose descendant drifted into a diasporic Ashkenazi population before making its way into Eastern Europe on his branch, and the maternal ancestor had another descendant who was involved in colonizing Tahiti and knocked up a Polynesian girl at some point on another branch. It doesn’t make the Lithuanian Jew part Tahitian nor the Tahitian part Lithuanian Jew. It’s probably just some ancient Med DNA that made its way into the Ashkenazi population through marriage to local girls in Roman times, and into Tahiti via French colonization of the South Pacific.

    One suspects that this misimpression could be intentional, if you presume that the people running these DNA testing outfits are like other Silicon Valley tech companies in outlook and see social and political utility in leading people to believe that they’re 4% Jewish or 1% Tahitian or some fraction Subsaharan African. This seems to square with the multicultural dogma, so I wouldn’t rule it out.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Twinkie

    It’s probably just some ancient Med DNA that made its way into the Ashkenazi population through marriage to local girls in Roman times, and into Tahiti via French colonization of the South Pacific.
     
    It's possible, but in that case, it'd show up as something else.

    The thing the testing companies don't really explain well is that, 1) as you pointed out, they fail to explain that these percentages are NOT ancestry, but genetic markers found in populations world-wide and 2) that markers are often called something based on their frequency in a particular geographic region TODAY.

    see social and political utility in leading people to believe that they’re 4% Jewish or 1% Tahitian or some fraction Subsaharan African. This seems to square with the multicultural dogma, so I wouldn’t rule it out.
     
    Or because there is a profit-motive in "surprising" the customers with something unexpected and different. People like to be unique and special and just love finding out that they might be something a little exotic.
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  128. @Twinkie

    A Lithuanian Jewish friend came back as 99% Ashkenazi and 1% Polynesian. Ain’t no Tahitians in the ghetto.
     
    That's not what that means.

    It's not that some Lithuanian Jew had a Tahitian ancestry, but that he has genes that are found among some Tahitians today. There could be lots of variations of reasons why that might be the case.

    A lot of Koreans currently tested by 23andme come out as significantly Japanese. That doesn't mean that they are descended from the Japanese, but more likely that whatever genes that were flagged as Japanese by 23andme are found in both populations and were termed so by 23andme under the "speculative" mode. (DNAland doesn't even separate Koreans and Japanese for that reason.)

    I came out as 99.9% East Asian in a 23andme test and 0.1% Native American. Again, it doesn't mean I had a Native American ancestor - merely that I have a very tiny fraction of genes that are commonly found among Native Americans TODAY.

    If you want a more accurate description of your genes, tone down the speculative mode in 23andme (but you'll get much more vague answers) or put in your raw data into something like DNAland, which has a different set of data and categorizes origins a bit differently. For example, I came out as about 10% generic East Asian in 23andme, and DNAland further clarified that as 10% Mongolian.

    A lot of Koreans currently tested by 23andme come out as significantly Japanese. That doesn’t mean that they are descended from the Japanese, but more likely that whatever genes that were flagged as Japanese by 23andme are found in both populations and were termed so by 23andme under the “speculative” mode.

    I’m guessing that the reason these genes are “found” among the Japanese is that many Japanese are actually Koreans “passing” as Japanese, just as light skinned blacks would “cross the color line” and pass as white. Now to us they may all look the same but having your daughter marry a Japanese and having her marry a Korean were two different things. Koreans were (before WWII) the racially inferior colonial people who took menial jobs. People would research prospective spouses to make sure they were really Japanese, etc.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    . . . or it could be the fact that the founder population of Japan originated in Korea during the Jomon period.

    In other words, Japanese and Koreans share a common ancestral population, and their genes show this. It needn't be a matter of Koreans pretending to have been Japanese.
    , @Twinkie
    As Alec Leamas mentioned, in this particularly case, the reason many Koreans tested by 23andme come out as fractionally Japanese (in the low confidence level "speculative mode") is because early Japanese sampling had a high frequency of certain genetic markers.

    Later, when some Koreans had some of these markers, voila!, "you are part Japanese!" When in reality, it's likely from shared genetic markers (some fractionally shared descent).

    Now, you might not be entirely wrong about the hidden Korean ancestry (as a COMPLETELY SEPARATE matter). The official Japanese statistics claim a VERY LOW percentage of Japanese with recent Korean ancestry, but the long-held prejudice in Japan makes the accurate counting of this very difficult. Not only was the Korean Peninsula a major source point of one of the founding Japanese populations, there were subsequent streams of migrations (whenever a Korean kingdom was wiped out), all the way down to the Japanese occupation of Korea when hundreds of thousands of Koreans were brought to Japan.

    People would research prospective spouses to make sure they were really Japanese, etc.
     
    Yup. That happened a lot until the recent decades.

    Koreans were (before WWII) the racially inferior colonial people who took menial jobs.
     
    Successful ethnic Koreans in Japan were heavily pressured to take Japanese names, only speak Japanese, and generally hide and extinguish their Korean-ness. Those who did not comply frequently suffered discrimination and semi-official sanctions.

    All of which is rather hilarious in retrospect, given that the Japanese Imperial Family acknowledged some years ago that they are partially descended from Koreans (indeed, many Japanese noble families have identifiable Korean ancestors, the knowledge of which was rather heavy-handedly suppressed by the Japanese government, including PNGing foreign researchers who dared to publish such works, until quite recently).
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  129. @Jack D

    A lot of Koreans currently tested by 23andme come out as significantly Japanese. That doesn’t mean that they are descended from the Japanese, but more likely that whatever genes that were flagged as Japanese by 23andme are found in both populations and were termed so by 23andme under the “speculative” mode.
     
    I'm guessing that the reason these genes are "found" among the Japanese is that many Japanese are actually Koreans "passing" as Japanese, just as light skinned blacks would "cross the color line" and pass as white. Now to us they may all look the same but having your daughter marry a Japanese and having her marry a Korean were two different things. Koreans were (before WWII) the racially inferior colonial people who took menial jobs. People would research prospective spouses to make sure they were really Japanese, etc.

    . . . or it could be the fact that the founder population of Japan originated in Korea during the Jomon period.

    In other words, Japanese and Koreans share a common ancestral population, and their genes show this. It needn’t be a matter of Koreans pretending to have been Japanese.

    Read More
    • Agree: MEH 0910, Twinkie
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  130. @Twinkie

    In men’s tennis you probably don’t need to get much more jacked than, say, Rafael Nadal to obtain your optimal tennis physique, which is something most men can achieve without using PEDs.
     
    It's not just about physique. As with any serious physical activity, you have to train A LOT to be good at tennis. That in turn leads to frequent repetitive injuries (esp. knees, ankles, elbows, wrists). PEDs help you recover faster and allow you to train more hours a day.

    Ah, I forgot about that property of PEDs. Yeah, that’d be quite an advantage for both sexes.

    Read More
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  131. @jJay
    That kinda makes sense. I was actually a bit surprised that I had zilch in the way of southern European genetic ancestry. My thick black hair must be Neanderthal. I rung up high on that genetic test.

    That kinda makes sense. I was actually a bit surprised that I had zilch in the way of southern European genetic ancestry. My thick black hair must be Neanderthal. I rung up high on that genetic test.

    You should be cautious about assigning particular origins for your phenotypical traits. These traits are pretty widespread in many populations. And even when they are not expressed physically “lie dormant” recessively in many peoples.

    For example, I have 99.9% East Asian markers and 0.1% Native American markers. I have strands of red/copper facial hair. When I grew my beard out while staying in a certain part of the world (per the local style AND my co-workers at the time) and put sun glasses on, people I assumed I was something other than East Asian, because of my full beard and its color!

    23andme’s report states that, although I have 99.9% East Asian markers, I am several times more likely than the average East Asian 23andme test subject to have lighter hair color and lighter eye color. One of my children have GREEN eyes (my wife has 99.9% Northern European, that is English-German-Swedish, markers and has green eyes). The same child is also red-headed.

    Read More
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  132. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    It’s not that some Lithuanian Jew had a Tahitian ancestry, but that he has genes that are found among some Tahitians today. There could be lots of variations of reasons why that might be the case.
     
    This is an important distinction that I don't think the DNA testing companies do enough to explain.

    It's not descent, but rather common DNA markers from some point in history that it's connecting. The Lithuanian Jew probably had some distant maternal French/Med ancestor whose descendant drifted into a diasporic Ashkenazi population before making its way into Eastern Europe on his branch, and the maternal ancestor had another descendant who was involved in colonizing Tahiti and knocked up a Polynesian girl at some point on another branch. It doesn't make the Lithuanian Jew part Tahitian nor the Tahitian part Lithuanian Jew. It's probably just some ancient Med DNA that made its way into the Ashkenazi population through marriage to local girls in Roman times, and into Tahiti via French colonization of the South Pacific.

    One suspects that this misimpression could be intentional, if you presume that the people running these DNA testing outfits are like other Silicon Valley tech companies in outlook and see social and political utility in leading people to believe that they're 4% Jewish or 1% Tahitian or some fraction Subsaharan African. This seems to square with the multicultural dogma, so I wouldn't rule it out.

    It’s probably just some ancient Med DNA that made its way into the Ashkenazi population through marriage to local girls in Roman times, and into Tahiti via French colonization of the South Pacific.

    It’s possible, but in that case, it’d show up as something else.

    The thing the testing companies don’t really explain well is that, 1) as you pointed out, they fail to explain that these percentages are NOT ancestry, but genetic markers found in populations world-wide and 2) that markers are often called something based on their frequency in a particular geographic region TODAY.

    see social and political utility in leading people to believe that they’re 4% Jewish or 1% Tahitian or some fraction Subsaharan African. This seems to square with the multicultural dogma, so I wouldn’t rule it out.

    Or because there is a profit-motive in “surprising” the customers with something unexpected and different. People like to be unique and special and just love finding out that they might be something a little exotic.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  133. @Jack D

    A lot of Koreans currently tested by 23andme come out as significantly Japanese. That doesn’t mean that they are descended from the Japanese, but more likely that whatever genes that were flagged as Japanese by 23andme are found in both populations and were termed so by 23andme under the “speculative” mode.
     
    I'm guessing that the reason these genes are "found" among the Japanese is that many Japanese are actually Koreans "passing" as Japanese, just as light skinned blacks would "cross the color line" and pass as white. Now to us they may all look the same but having your daughter marry a Japanese and having her marry a Korean were two different things. Koreans were (before WWII) the racially inferior colonial people who took menial jobs. People would research prospective spouses to make sure they were really Japanese, etc.

    As Alec Leamas mentioned, in this particularly case, the reason many Koreans tested by 23andme come out as fractionally Japanese (in the low confidence level “speculative mode”) is because early Japanese sampling had a high frequency of certain genetic markers.

    Later, when some Koreans had some of these markers, voila!, “you are part Japanese!” When in reality, it’s likely from shared genetic markers (some fractionally shared descent).

    Now, you might not be entirely wrong about the hidden Korean ancestry (as a COMPLETELY SEPARATE matter). The official Japanese statistics claim a VERY LOW percentage of Japanese with recent Korean ancestry, but the long-held prejudice in Japan makes the accurate counting of this very difficult. Not only was the Korean Peninsula a major source point of one of the founding Japanese populations, there were subsequent streams of migrations (whenever a Korean kingdom was wiped out), all the way down to the Japanese occupation of Korea when hundreds of thousands of Koreans were brought to Japan.

    People would research prospective spouses to make sure they were really Japanese, etc.

    Yup. That happened a lot until the recent decades.

    Koreans were (before WWII) the racially inferior colonial people who took menial jobs.

    Successful ethnic Koreans in Japan were heavily pressured to take Japanese names, only speak Japanese, and generally hide and extinguish their Korean-ness. Those who did not comply frequently suffered discrimination and semi-official sanctions.

    All of which is rather hilarious in retrospect, given that the Japanese Imperial Family acknowledged some years ago that they are partially descended from Koreans (indeed, many Japanese noble families have identifiable Korean ancestors, the knowledge of which was rather heavy-handedly suppressed by the Japanese government, including PNGing foreign researchers who dared to publish such works, until quite recently).

    Read More
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  134. @william munny
    I used to get National Geographic, and I liked the photography and stories about out-0f-the-way places and the people who live there. I had to stop because the sjw stuff was out of control. I felt depressed and disgusted every time I read it. I hate-read it for awhile, but gave up.

    I’ve had a National Geographic subscription for about five years, and I’ve really enjoyed the wide variety of interesting articles and great pictures. I’m depressed about what’s happening now too.

    In their fairly recent “gender issue” they actually published an editorial by a 1970′s feminist activist in which she flat out stated that all differences between men and women are “socially constructed”. I couldn’t believe they would allow such science denialism on their pages.

    At least they quoted Steven Pinker in a later article saying that of course men and women are different in ways affecting the brain, but still. They shouldn’t be presenting “both sides” of an argument when one side is a preposterous lie.

    Read More
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