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From Taki’s Magazine:

The Immigration Gambit
by Steve Sailer
May 18, 2016

I haven’t actually made up my mind about this whole Brexit thing.

The British will vote in a referendum on whether to leave the European Union on June 23, but the debate has gotten bogged down because of the limits on respectable opinion. The two allowable views are that Britain should leave because other Europeans are hateful, or that Europe should stay united so it can let in more non-Europeans.

The notion that Europeans might favor each other over outsiders (its founding idea) is today unthinkably racist.

Yet the main problems driving support for Britain exiting are immigration and the English fear that the EU is increasingly a mask for German mastery, hand in glove with Germany’s Great War ally Turkey.

Read the whole thing there.

 
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  1. Interesting column. Here’s a complication to consider for a future one.

    Stephen F. Cohen said on John Batchelor’s radio show a few hours ago that the Obama administration is essentially risking a repeat of the Cuban Missile Crisis in Europe. He said they were demanding Germany supply troops to station on Russia’s border near some new missile installation, and Germany is objecting because they think having German troops on Russia’s border might raise unpleasant memories.

    He also said that the Obama administration was planning a joint exercise in Georgia, and to treat Georgia and Ukraine as de facto NATO members, over the objections of Germany and other NATO members.

    When asked about whether Trump was backtracking on his previous comments about getting along with Russia due to a quote of Trump saying none of Putin’s compliments about him would make him go easy on Trump in negotiations, Cohen said, first, that Putin really wasn’t that complimentary about Trump, but, second, that he was encouraged by Trump’s use of the “negotiations”, because there are no such negotiations being conducted now.

    Related, the FT over the weekend quoted Turkey’s president warning his NATO allies that the Black Sea was becoming “a Russian lake”, and of the need to confront Russia.

    So, to recap:

    – Germany has welcomed millions of Muslims into Europe.

    – London just elected a Muslim mayor.

    – We have a new Cold War with Russia — and are, apparently, risking a hot war in Ukraine — in part to bolster Turkey, which is also being bribed by Germany over migration.

    Maybe the real power in Europe isn’t Germany but Turkey?

    • Replies: @Marty
    But since this was the Batchelor show, what's the Israel angle?
    , @Lurker
    Boris Johnson is supposedly in charge of the 'leave' campaign in Britain. He's always favoured the EU - until now.

    And he is of Turkish origin. And not just any old Turk, his background is Donmeh (see many previous iSteve articles).
    , @RonaldB
    News of Obama's adventures in Europe, and specifically his tweaking the nose of Russia, are chilling.

    I think it's pretty well established by now that Obama in no way has the best interests of the US at heart...or in mind. So, the question is, what's to be gained by provoking Russia in an area very vital to Russia's security, but marginal to non-existent with regards to US security?

    I can't help thinking back to the origins of Islam, where the Byzantine and the Persian empire wore themselves out fighting each other, leaving the military preeminence to the emerging Arab armies of the desert, who may or may not have been following Islam at the time. The needless and destructive wars between Persia and the West, both bastions of civilization and even of human rights, opened the entire Middle East, Western Asia, and Eastern Europe, to Muslim conquest.

    Obama's actions are perfectly consistent with the concept of weakening the US and Europe through a war with Russia, combined with Muslim penetration of the US through unrestricted Muslim immigration.
    , @Jack D
    On the one hand, you say that Germany doesn't want to get into a confrontation with Russia.

    Then you say that Turkey DOES want more confrontation with Russia.

    Then you say that Germany does whatever Turkey tells it to do.

    So at least one of these statements is not true.
    , @Clyde
    Obama's passive-aggressive pajama boys have been trying to get one over on Bad Vlad ever since Vlad showed them how its done in Syria to obliterate ISIS. Ever notice all the wacky lefty females working at State? They are always trying to even up the score with Vlad who knows and shows what a joke Obama is. What a sick joke his State Department is, thrusting their gay ambassadors (Dem party donors) onto various third world nations. Plus promoting the gay agenda in many foreign lands that want nothing to do with it.
  2. Anti-E.U sentiment is the closest you’ll get to European solidarity these days. The E.U does NOT represent Europe “stay(ing).. united”!

  3. And here’s some rap on the subject, from Wales. Pro-Brexit, I suppose, in that it mocks all the “without the EU we wouldn’t have trade or travel with the Continent” scaremongering that my British friends on Facebook seem so fond of. No more Ikea!

    • Agree: Luke Lea
  4. 5371 says:

    Britons worried about the EU have historically been far more worried about the things France does in it than the things Germany does. Just as from 1919-33 (at least) they were much more hostile to France than to Germany.
    As for the outlandish nonsense of “Sean”, Germany’s “traditional desire to dominate Europe” was a misinterpretation of her attempts to cope with her unfavourable strategic position, whereas the only threat to Germany’s security now is from the migrants themselves.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Britain has been more or less continuously allied with France since at least 1933 (and I'm not sure it's accurate to say that they were really more hostile to Germany during the period '19 to '33) and before that during WWI, starting with the Triple Entente of 1907. Britain was "historically" opposed to American interests as well. But that was 70+ years ago so I'm not sure what relevance it has any more, any more than the 1920s KKK has much to do with the America of 2016.

    The British were really not that wild about the Soviets leaving Germany at the end of the Cold War - a divided Germany was one less threat they had to worry about.

    , @Sean
    A German economist recently provoked uproar by claiming that the poorest 40% in Germany have less wealth than their European equivalents. By some measures Germans are not rich even compared to the Irish
    http://www.irishtimes.com/business/personal-finance/how-rich-are-the-irish-1.2649475

    http://www.dw.com/en/ifo-economist-warns-of-conflict-between-refugees-and-poorer-germans/a-18956411

    Why is the German establishment backing Merkel ? Given the risks of creating a mass organised opposition and destroying all the post war political consensus, the German elite surely think her actions are going to bring them closer to some desirable objective.

    http://archive.spectator.co.uk/article/3rd-july-1971/31/enoch-powell-on-the-balance-of-power
    A logical contradiction can be lived with, long and sometimes happily, in real life, and that is what Germany is doing with the objectives of a political integration of Western Europe and a reunification of Germany; but it cannot be rationalised, and that is what Helmut Schmidt, as a working politician writing a book, attempted to do and failed. In the end, however, the contradiction has to get itself resolved in real life: one imperative drives out the other. My bet is that German reunification will drive out Western Political unification and the EEC: some day, I don't know how, or when, I think we are going to get pattern no. 3.
     
  5. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Apropos of the idea of the British not wanting more Pakistani inbred immigrants, a new paper is out in science detailing exactly how dysgenic the Pakistani inbreeding actually is.

    http://science.sciencemag.org/content/352/6284/474

    If you read the paper and look at Figure 1a you can see that Pakistanis in England don’t even seem to fall within the range of variation amongst Europeans on how outbred they are. I.e. the least inbred Pakistani in England is more inbred than the typical European.

    And yet to suggest that people should not purposefully turn themselves into a library of knockout mice, with homozygous deletions of every known gene that isn’t embryonic lethal, is to be Islamophobic and a bigot not capable of accepting other cultures.

    • Agree: The Anti-Gnostic
    • Replies: @Marcus
    Yeah, just look at our friend Rehmat
  6. trump is already trying to backtrack on banning Muslims.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Well it was never an entirely realistic suggestion. But he moved the Overton Window which was very ballsy.
    , @RonaldB
    Well, if it's not a concrete campaign promise, like building a wall, then he won't do it (try to put a total ban on Muslims entering the country).

    I actually think that Trump's backtracking on a total Muslim ban on immigration is a good idea. The difference between rigorous enforcement of our present laws, and a total Muslim ban, is not that great. But, if he tries to push a ban, the Democrats will dig out a bunch of doe-eyed, dark-skinned children and cry about how these innocent children are being consigned to starvation and death just because they're Muslim.

    This will draw the women's vote, which is the area in which Trump is the weakest. Women as a group tend to vote emotionally and a total ban will elicit an emotional reaction that simply wanting to enforce the law won't.

    In other words, backtracking on the total ban on Muslim immigration will not lose you that much, but sticking with a ban could well lose Trump the Presidency.
    , @boogerbently
    He will just change it to banning all middle eastern/African people.
  7. Europe has got itself in a mess over Turkey. Turkey has been waiting for Accession for decades and economically inferior countries have been admitted in the meantime. And also in the meantime, Turkey has Islamised. So it would have been better to have admitted Turkey when it was still secular. But now the EU is backed into a corner, especially having just invited the rest of the world.

    My impression of the no. 1 reason for popular support for Brexit is ‘sovereignty’. Secondly, immigration and Turkey membership. But the campaign has become a means for deciding Conservative leadership. If Boris won the leadership on the back of a Brexit vote there’s a good chance he would simply turn round and make a deal with EU and dress it up as sufficient concession to quell any dissent. The Irish voted against the Treaty of Somewhere (Lisbon?) and so the name was changed, but little else, and the Irish accepted it. There’s really not that much gusto for revolution in W Europe.

    The no. 1 economic reason for Bexit is, as someone recently said, ‘the lower down the business scale one goes, from big business to small business, the more the business owners favour Brexit’.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    I'd say the Euros dodged a bullet for the time being. Turkey's slow conversion away from secularism was almost inevitable from a demographic standpoint. Did the European dithering sting the Kemalist sophisticates in the East of the country? Sure. It might even have hurt them politically. But, so long as the religious people in the Center and the East, including the Kurds, kept having more children, sponsored by the state in many cases, the outcome was not in question. The Western liberals have gotten used to the idea that they can piggyback onto other people's fertility by converting their children, and it worked for people from other classes, but of the same general culture and ethnicity. They've met their match in the new arrivals to Europe, though they are expending superhuman effort into not understanding this. The modernists of Turkey are failing in the same manner. Maybe it's just Islam that is less conducive to this sort of subversion. Or maybe our subversion worked (Enlightenment and all that) for better or worse because it came about in our midst and was tailored for our characteristics. Something like that was happening in the Middle East-North Africa region, too, tentatively, before Western intervention was added to back-to-rootsism among the Islamists to kill the new models - Arab socialism and nationalism, the Al-Nahda movement in late XIXth century and so on. I do not know where they would have led, but one can imagine.

    Gamal Abdel Nasser on the Muslim Brotherhood in the 1950s
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TX4RK8bj2W0

    That short video really is extraordinary in a hundred different ways.
    , @Lurker
    Boris Johnson has always been pro-EU. Putting him in charge of the leave campaign is blatant manipulation of the situation.
    , @Jack D

    So it would have been better to have admitted Turkey when it was still secular.
     
    Maybe you could get a job as the foreign policy advisor to the rulers of Troy. For sure open the gates and let that beautiful secular Turkish horse in. What could go wrong?
  8. Great article, Steve.

    I don’t know anyone who is planning to vote to stay in, but a headline in today’s Times informs me that women and white-collar workers will swing the vote enough to ensure that Britain remains part of the EU.

    We’ll see.

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    THEY ALLOW WOMEN TO VOTE????!!
  9. I fully support Brexit however even if the UK does secure a majority leave vote it us too late to undo the damage caused by massive non-white Third World immigrstion since the late 1940s. Mixed race is the fastest growing ethnic group and Islam the fastest growing religion. Even Northern Ireland has an increasing number of ethnic minorities; Northern Irish children are in fact the minority in one school in South Belfast! The British people should have sovereignty over their own nation without having to take orders from some bespectacled platter-face in Brussels However it will not, sadly, put brakes on the eventual and disastrous demographic demise of the white British.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    too late to undo the damage caused by massive non-white Third World immigrstion since the late 1940s
     
    No it isn't, unless you succumb to despair. Grab your bootstraps and pull yourself up.
  10. The historical policy of preventing any one power from dominating Europe is out of date now, since we are already anyway subordinate to a united continental power (the US), which technology has rendered adjacent to us in all the ways that matter. Another, much weaker, continental power on the other side is as likely to be a benefit (a balancing opportunity) as the existential threat it could have been until a century ago.

    And although there are always concerns about German dominance in Europe, I don’t see these as really driving anything here. In most issues German predominance is seen as a useful counterweight to other forces in Europe, such as the transnational bureaucracy, or the southern/French bloc (admittedly going through a weak spell at the moment, but nevertheless always a potentially malign and powerful grouping as far as the UK is concerned, and far less likely to align with British interests on most important issues).

    Immigration is indeed the key, but it is also to some extent emblematic of the wider loss of control at the national level that is inherent in the creation of any supranational authority, and particularly one as intrusive as the EU.

    The best way to view Brexit, imo, is as the main currently active European front in the same titanic nationalism versus globalism struggle that animates the Trump/establishment fight in the US. Choose your sides appropriately.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    In fact, on its best (worst?) days, it was the dream of the EUers that a united Europe could form a political/economic/military counterweight to the US - in effect replace the role of the Soviet Union. That dream lies in tatters now. The EU never had any potential as a military organization. Mao said that power comes from the barrel of a gun. The only power that the EU had was over naming rights for cheese and other such weighty matters.
  11. Being overrun by Spaniards, huge numbers have appeared in London in the past two years, might be less objectionable than being overrun by Pakistanis, but it is still preferable not to be overrun. Americans often forget Europe is peopled by a number of distinct ethnic groups and we remain German, Dutch, Italian, Welsh etc. despite EU attempts to create the new European man.

    Of course a recent phenomenon is ethnic minorities arriving in another European country then gaining citizenship, which then gives them the freedom to settle here, as has happened with Somalians from the Netherlands. Brexit is the necessary first step to getting back control of our country.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Within a generation, thousands of Englishmen will take Spanish wives, and equally, English women will take Spanish husbands.
    Count on the Spaniards to be completely assimilated within 50 years.

    As for the Pakistanis, well put it this way, I only ever saw burkahs on TV reports from Saudi Arabia until the Rushdie affair happened, and only then did they magically started popping up on the streets of London. Before then Pakistani women were too intimidated to wear them - and they have been here for a good 30 years prior to 1989.
    , @Marcus
    Spaniards have no love lost for the Brits, both tourists and expats, in their country either (they'll accept their money though).
    , @Clyde
    The demise of England via Islamic invasion started with the Pakistanis piggybacking onto Indian Hindus immigrating to the UK. The Hindus came first because they culturally got along better with the English. Following the Hindus came the Muslims from India and Pakistan.
    The main Anglo-Pakistani scam today is importing marriage partners for profit. Not marrying within the existing Anglo-Pakistani community but bringing in partners (and eventually their family) from Pakistan and getting compensated for this. Making for more effective demographic warfare against the native British. Enoch Powell predicted this 40 years ago.
  12. The catastrophic euro, which Mrs. Thatcher wisely kept Britain out of,

    Err…… No.

    I was reading this article with the vague sense that Steve Sailer doesn’t know very much about England (yes I call it England, not Britain – if you were English you’d understand), but I wasn’t expecting such an obvious confirmation.

    Have you ever wondered why so much “analysis” of European affairs on this blog consists of fisking (are Americans familiar with that term?) articles in the New York Times? It’s a shame, because, obviously, the basis thrust of the alt-right view on Europe (stop immigration or die) is obviously correct. Ideally there would be some people offering an alt-rightish analysis of European affairs (and whilst I’m at it, Israeli affairs) who were more knowledgeable on the subject. At the moment, I feel the same way reading this stuff as when I read the latest fanciful hit piece in the Telegraph on Trump.

    • Replies: @jimmyriddle
    To be fair, though John Major negotiated the Euro opt-out, the guy was such a nonentity that his administration is conflated with Thatcher's.

    Hence, British people often blame Thatcher for the disasterous privatisation of the railways.
    , @Randal

    Ideally there would be some people offering an alt-rightish analysis of European affairs (and whilst I’m at it, Israeli affairs) who were more knowledgeable on the subject.
     
    Realistically that would need British equivalents of sites like Unz and Vdare. Are there such, of any substance? Alternatively, US sites like the aforementioned would have to take the decision to host British-based writers on a regular basis.

    The problem with any British based site offering the kind of discussions you find on Unz and Vdare is that there would be a very real likelihood that the writers and owners would find themselves in prison (and I speak with some experience on this, as someone whose mere below the line political comments have resulted in my case being raised by specially connected minority lobby activists at Assistant Chief Constable level, in an attempt to get me harassed by the police and, ideally from their point of view, prosecuted - only time will tell whether they will succeed or not).
    , @RamonaQ
    Peter Hitchens seems to be in favor of Brexit but of the view that a win for remain will legitimize the pro-EU argument for decades.

    Since you seem knowledgeable, maybe you can explain why UKIP never took off like Trump did? Farage has really impressed me throughout this whole Brexit campaign as one of the only UK politicians capable of talking sense. Also, why is the loony left so much in favor of Brexit? It's all very confusing
    , @James Kabala
    Fisking as term was coined to express the belief that "Only an incompetent and effete British loser could ever think that the Iraq War is a bad idea!" So although the term was invented in America, it has kind of gone down the memory hole here. I am surprised that it lives on in Britain as you imply.
  13. There are a few pertinent facts you might not be aware of:

    1. Large numbers of the poor and criminal class of East Europe are coming over. 200,000 Roma, for example. Most of the Somalis given asylum in Holland now live in England.

    2. The British welfare state model is mostly communitarian rather than contributory. Access to the NHS, Child Benefit and social housing etc is based on need. EU rules mean EU citizens must be treated identically to the British.

    3. Low paid work is subsidised via the tax credit system.

    4. Membership of the EU puts us under the jurisdiction of an EU court that, for example, makes it impossible to deport suspected terrorists, or seriously tackle non-EU chain migration. It also makes it impossible for the UK to derogate from any article of the European Convention on Human Rights – which is enforced by a non-EU, and activist liberal, court.

    In other words, our system worked when unrestricted migration was restricted to a few equally wealthy north west European countries. Now we need to leave the EU or completely reform our welfare model.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Leaving the EU doesn't help with Pakistan though, does it? How much of 3rd world immigration to Britain is due to Commonwealth rules?
    , @Triumph104

    2. The British welfare state model is mostly communitarian rather than contributory. Access to the NHS, Child Benefit and social housing etc is based on need. EU rules mean EU citizens must be treated identically to the British.

    3. Low paid work is subsidised via the tax credit system.

     

    Due to its low birth rate, Singapore's population is now 30 percent foreigners. Many are low wage workers from India, China, and the Philippines. Needless to say, foreigners don't get any government assistance.

    Singapore has about four million citizens and permanent residents. Only 3000 households receive government cash assistance. Families members are expected to help first, only when it is documented that no family member can assist will the government step in with aid.

    About 45,000 households (a third are ethnic Malay) live in low-income subsidized rental housing. It comes in two sizes: 1-room or 2-room. The 2-room (1 bedroom) flat is for households with three or more occupants.

    This woman lives in a 2-room flat with six children:

    https://youtu.be/EQGTNyw9Rmk?t=41
    , @Pseudonymic Handle
    How does EU membership preclude the UK leaving the ECHR which as you noted is under a different organization, the Council of Europe?
  14. @Gabriel M

    The catastrophic euro, which Mrs. Thatcher wisely kept Britain out of,
     
    Err...... No.

    I was reading this article with the vague sense that Steve Sailer doesn't know very much about England (yes I call it England, not Britain - if you were English you'd understand), but I wasn't expecting such an obvious confirmation.

    Have you ever wondered why so much "analysis" of European affairs on this blog consists of fisking (are Americans familiar with that term?) articles in the New York Times? It's a shame, because, obviously, the basis thrust of the alt-right view on Europe (stop immigration or die) is obviously correct. Ideally there would be some people offering an alt-rightish analysis of European affairs (and whilst I'm at it, Israeli affairs) who were more knowledgeable on the subject. At the moment, I feel the same way reading this stuff as when I read the latest fanciful hit piece in the Telegraph on Trump.

    To be fair, though John Major negotiated the Euro opt-out, the guy was such a nonentity that his administration is conflated with Thatcher’s.

    Hence, British people often blame Thatcher for the disasterous privatisation of the railways.

  15. @jimmyriddle
    There are a few pertinent facts you might not be aware of:

    1. Large numbers of the poor and criminal class of East Europe are coming over. 200,000 Roma, for example. Most of the Somalis given asylum in Holland now live in England.

    2. The British welfare state model is mostly communitarian rather than contributory. Access to the NHS, Child Benefit and social housing etc is based on need. EU rules mean EU citizens must be treated identically to the British.

    3. Low paid work is subsidised via the tax credit system.

    4. Membership of the EU puts us under the jurisdiction of an EU court that, for example, makes it impossible to deport suspected terrorists, or seriously tackle non-EU chain migration. It also makes it impossible for the UK to derogate from any article of the European Convention on Human Rights - which is enforced by a non-EU, and activist liberal, court.

    In other words, our system worked when unrestricted migration was restricted to a few equally wealthy north west European countries. Now we need to leave the EU or completely reform our welfare model.

    Leaving the EU doesn’t help with Pakistan though, does it? How much of 3rd world immigration to Britain is due to Commonwealth rules?

    • Replies: @jimmyriddle
    It does. It removes us completely from the European Court of Justice - which has ruled against many UK immigration restricting measures.

    It also means we can more easily derogate from articles of the European Human Rights Convention.

    The Commenwealth has no rules on immigration.
    Australians and Canadians have no automatic right to settle here, unless they have British grandparents.

    , @Randal

    Leaving the EU doesn’t help with Pakistan though, does it?
     
    Indeed. The EU is relevant to the mass immigration problem, but it is not the cause of it, or even the major driving factor, which as usual is the treason of our own ruling elites. And in particular that unholy alliance between the socially liberal and internationalist left elites seeking to "rub the right's noses in diversity" and the globalist and socially liberal big business elites seeking cheaper labour and higher profits, which I believe Steve Sailer has referred to before now.
  16. Don’t worry, Philippe Legrain assures us that the refugees will double Europe’s investment in them within 5 years:

    https://www.rt.com/news/343394-eu-refugees-economy-report/

    I like the single, one-word comment in response to this article – “Nonsense.”

    • Replies: @Randal

    Philippe Legrain assures us that the refugees will double Europe’s investment in them within 5 years:
     
    I see the Guardian has put the same report prominently on its website, unsurprisingly:

    Refugees will repay EU spending almost twice over in five years - report

    "Most significantly, Legrain calculates that while the absorption of so many refugees will increase public debt by almost €69bn (£54bn) between 2015 and 2020, during the same period refugees will help GDP grow by €126.6bn – a ratio of almost two to one."

    Looks to me like the usual disingenuous confusion of gdp with something actually important to real people like gdp per capita.

    Of course the overwhelmingly important question never dealt with when the establishment's media organs talk about the benefits of mass immigration is "who, whom?", as in: "who gets the benefits and who bears the costs?"
    , @Lurker
    Legrain is an odious little shill for the elites.
    , @Anonymous
    It's economic illiteracy of the 5 year old 'Cinderella' ,' Snow White', 'Big Rock Candy Mountain' type of the highest order that should disgrace anyone with more than a room temperature IQ for giving it more than one milliseond's credence.

    So, 'refugees' sprinkle 'magic economic fairy dust' on their target nation merely by settling there and attracting 'the blessing of the gods', why, the even defecate gold coins, according to Legrain.

    Strange, therefore, that Bangladesh, a place which desperately needs this fairy dust and - the torrent of gold excrement - isn't doing its damndest to invite the gold-shitters in.
  17. @Dave Pinsen
    Leaving the EU doesn't help with Pakistan though, does it? How much of 3rd world immigration to Britain is due to Commonwealth rules?

    It does. It removes us completely from the European Court of Justice – which has ruled against many UK immigration restricting measures.

    It also means we can more easily derogate from articles of the European Human Rights Convention.

    The Commenwealth has no rules on immigration.
    Australians and Canadians have no automatic right to settle here, unless they have British grandparents.

  18. @Dave Pinsen
    Leaving the EU doesn't help with Pakistan though, does it? How much of 3rd world immigration to Britain is due to Commonwealth rules?

    Leaving the EU doesn’t help with Pakistan though, does it?

    Indeed. The EU is relevant to the mass immigration problem, but it is not the cause of it, or even the major driving factor, which as usual is the treason of our own ruling elites. And in particular that unholy alliance between the socially liberal and internationalist left elites seeking to “rub the right’s noses in diversity” and the globalist and socially liberal big business elites seeking cheaper labour and higher profits, which I believe Steve Sailer has referred to before now.

  19. @Gabriel M

    The catastrophic euro, which Mrs. Thatcher wisely kept Britain out of,
     
    Err...... No.

    I was reading this article with the vague sense that Steve Sailer doesn't know very much about England (yes I call it England, not Britain - if you were English you'd understand), but I wasn't expecting such an obvious confirmation.

    Have you ever wondered why so much "analysis" of European affairs on this blog consists of fisking (are Americans familiar with that term?) articles in the New York Times? It's a shame, because, obviously, the basis thrust of the alt-right view on Europe (stop immigration or die) is obviously correct. Ideally there would be some people offering an alt-rightish analysis of European affairs (and whilst I'm at it, Israeli affairs) who were more knowledgeable on the subject. At the moment, I feel the same way reading this stuff as when I read the latest fanciful hit piece in the Telegraph on Trump.

    Ideally there would be some people offering an alt-rightish analysis of European affairs (and whilst I’m at it, Israeli affairs) who were more knowledgeable on the subject.

    Realistically that would need British equivalents of sites like Unz and Vdare. Are there such, of any substance? Alternatively, US sites like the aforementioned would have to take the decision to host British-based writers on a regular basis.

    The problem with any British based site offering the kind of discussions you find on Unz and Vdare is that there would be a very real likelihood that the writers and owners would find themselves in prison (and I speak with some experience on this, as someone whose mere below the line political comments have resulted in my case being raised by specially connected minority lobby activists at Assistant Chief Constable level, in an attempt to get me harassed by the police and, ideally from their point of view, prosecuted – only time will tell whether they will succeed or not).

    • Replies: @Anonym
    Alternatively, US sites like the aforementioned would have to take the decision to host British-based writers on a regular basis.

    Milo Yiannopoulos?
    , @NickG

    Realistically that would need British equivalents of sites like Unz and Vdare. Are there such, of any substance?
     
    Breitbart London would be the closest candidate, and that's a section of a US site.

    Any UK dissident / Alt Right/ iSteveish/non-PeeCee site needs to be US based anyway, as there is no first amendment in the UK and it would likely elicit a visit from the Peelers - it happens to Twitter users in Blighty - as well asmuch wailing and gnashing of teeth, so would probably be shut-down. Even the British 'decent leftist' site Harry's Place* is US hosted.

    The best option for the UK is the Breitbart model, that US sites become somewhat trans-Atlanticist.

    * Harry's Place is 'decent left' because it was founded by a lefty, mugged by reality on 9/11, who managed to notice the red-green alliance in the post atrocity apologetics on the left - and the general lefty love-in for Islmofascism (a tautological term if ever there was). HP has strong Jewish ethno-nationalist sympathies.

    , @RonaldB
    "Realistically that would need British equivalents of sites like Unz and Vdare. Are there such, of any substance? Alternatively, US sites like the aforementioned would have to take the decision to host British-based writers on a regular basis."

    May I suggest you look at Gates of Vienna?
    http://gatesofvienna.net/

    This is a US-based blog of high quality with a heavy focus on European (and English/British) affairs. They have several European correspondents already, but you could certainly try your luck with them. I'm absolutely certain they would keep your identity secret, were you to become a contributor.
    , @This Is Our Home
    I'd do it but only anonymously. I don't want to be jailed.
    , @Big Bill
    I recommend The New Observer. It has wonderful English translations of largely European sources:

    Http://newobserveronline.com

    Excellent source of news on the Invasion of Europe.
  20. @unpc downunder
    Don't worry, Philippe Legrain assures us that the refugees will double Europe's investment in them within 5 years:

    https://www.rt.com/news/343394-eu-refugees-economy-report/

    I like the single, one-word comment in response to this article - "Nonsense."

    Philippe Legrain assures us that the refugees will double Europe’s investment in them within 5 years:

    I see the Guardian has put the same report prominently on its website, unsurprisingly:

    Refugees will repay EU spending almost twice over in five years – report

    Most significantly, Legrain calculates that while the absorption of so many refugees will increase public debt by almost €69bn (£54bn) between 2015 and 2020, during the same period refugees will help GDP grow by €126.6bn – a ratio of almost two to one.

    Looks to me like the usual disingenuous confusion of gdp with something actually important to real people like gdp per capita.

    Of course the overwhelmingly important question never dealt with when the establishment’s media organs talk about the benefits of mass immigration is “who, whom?”, as in: “who gets the benefits and who bears the costs?”

    • Replies: @anon
    " during the same period refugees will help GDP grow by €126.6bn"

    bahaha, increase GDP by spending welfare money (i.e. increased govt debt or wealth transfer from citzenry). MAGIC!

    , @Bies Podkrakowski
    And for me it looks like something that talking heads in TV babble happily about while aborigines are buying new, reinforced doors, alarms and join Shooting Club in order to expedite getting gun permit.
  21. @Randal

    Ideally there would be some people offering an alt-rightish analysis of European affairs (and whilst I’m at it, Israeli affairs) who were more knowledgeable on the subject.
     
    Realistically that would need British equivalents of sites like Unz and Vdare. Are there such, of any substance? Alternatively, US sites like the aforementioned would have to take the decision to host British-based writers on a regular basis.

    The problem with any British based site offering the kind of discussions you find on Unz and Vdare is that there would be a very real likelihood that the writers and owners would find themselves in prison (and I speak with some experience on this, as someone whose mere below the line political comments have resulted in my case being raised by specially connected minority lobby activists at Assistant Chief Constable level, in an attempt to get me harassed by the police and, ideally from their point of view, prosecuted - only time will tell whether they will succeed or not).

    Alternatively, US sites like the aforementioned would have to take the decision to host British-based writers on a regular basis.

    Milo Yiannopoulos?

    • Replies: @SFG
    Yeah, how does he get away with it, now that you mention it? I hope he has a US passport somehow.
    , @Randal
    Yiannopoulos does some good stuff, for sure, though he's a little excitable for my taste. I prefer things a little more old school.
  22. Nice article Steve, I like the Franklin-esque geopolitical analysis. No wonder Holland has been a nation of traders, situated as they are at the mouth of the Rhine.

    The two allowable views are that Britain should leave because other Europeans are hateful, or that Europe should stay united so it can let in more non-Europeans.

    The notion that Europeans might favor each other over outsiders (its founding idea) is today unthinkably racist.

    It beggars belief that Europeans, for all their “Third Way”, haven’t embraced this position – unity AND closed borders! My god, what genius! Free commerce, but not free movement of peoples! Instead, we have the dwarfs of intellect and intestinal fortitude, Cameron, Merkel, and Hollande, with all their wretched products.

  23. @Gabriel M

    The catastrophic euro, which Mrs. Thatcher wisely kept Britain out of,
     
    Err...... No.

    I was reading this article with the vague sense that Steve Sailer doesn't know very much about England (yes I call it England, not Britain - if you were English you'd understand), but I wasn't expecting such an obvious confirmation.

    Have you ever wondered why so much "analysis" of European affairs on this blog consists of fisking (are Americans familiar with that term?) articles in the New York Times? It's a shame, because, obviously, the basis thrust of the alt-right view on Europe (stop immigration or die) is obviously correct. Ideally there would be some people offering an alt-rightish analysis of European affairs (and whilst I'm at it, Israeli affairs) who were more knowledgeable on the subject. At the moment, I feel the same way reading this stuff as when I read the latest fanciful hit piece in the Telegraph on Trump.

    Peter Hitchens seems to be in favor of Brexit but of the view that a win for remain will legitimize the pro-EU argument for decades.

    Since you seem knowledgeable, maybe you can explain why UKIP never took off like Trump did? Farage has really impressed me throughout this whole Brexit campaign as one of the only UK politicians capable of talking sense. Also, why is the loony left so much in favor of Brexit? It’s all very confusing

    • Replies: @snorlax

    why UKIP never took off like Trump did?
     
    There was actually something of a UKIP boomlet in 2014 (they reached 25% in one poll). The reason they didn't do better is because David Cameron has more political talent in his little finger than every Republican politician combined. Seriously, watch Prime Minister's Questions on YouTube; it's astonishing how much better British politicians are at debating than American politicians are.

    Also, why is the loony left so much in favor of Brexit?
     
    The EU started off as a right-wing initiative — a free trade area (the "Common Market"). In the first referendum in 1975, Thatcher and the Tories campaigned for it while Labour was officially neutral but with the majority of the membership, led by ur-loony-leftist Tony Benn, against.

    The subsequent expansions of EU power were also right-wing; harmonization and liberalization of regulations, and the Euro, joining which was supposed to require balancing the budget and keeping inflation minimal on an indefinite basis.

    Then they added the removal of border controls and free movement, still not particularly leftist since it was still confined to Western Europe.

    And then, in the mid-90's/early 00's, Conquest's Second Law ("any organization not explicitly right-wing sooner or later becomes left-wing") came true, with the creation of the European Court of Human Rights and the expansion agenda.

    Since then, the sides have switched, with EU supporters mainly being on the left and opponents on the right. Most of the old loony leftists (such as Corbyn) are now firmly in the Remain camp, and it's just a few especially crazy types like George Galloway who still support Out. (Presumably, they're still awaiting word from Moscow that the party line has changed).

    , @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin
    Britain's parlimentry seats are elected by first-past-the-post, so the candidate who wins the most votes gets the seat. In the 2015 election UKIP came 3rd in terms of votes but because they were spread throughout the UK they only ended up with one seat. Compare the SNP who got 47 seats with 1,400,000 votes with UKIPs 1 seat with 3,800,000 votes.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom_general_election,_2015

    , @Randal

    maybe you can explain why UKIP never took off like Trump did? Farage has really impressed me throughout this whole Brexit campaign as one of the only UK politicians capable of talking sense.
     
    Well it's a matter of degree, to some extent, since our first past the post electoral system makes it extremely hard for third parties to break past the established parties, who can often continue to win seats with only 30-40% of the vote against divided opposition. If you are in third place in a seat, your vote gets "squeezed" by the top parties, each saying to hesitant voters that if they vote for the third place party they will be letting the other in.

    In fact, UKIP's achievement of getting nearly 4 million votes from such a low base was remarkably good, but since it won them only one seat it can also be painted by its enemies as utter failure. In just the same way, the Cameron "Conservative" Party is declared by its supporters to have been a great success because they are in government, but they won a lower level of support than any other government in our recent history except Blair's 2005 win - and he was out of office within a couple of years. Less than a quarter of the electorate (as opposed to the vote) actually voted for the ruling "Conservative" Party

    If UKIP can regain some momentum in the runup to the next election, they stand to make a lot of gains in actual seats, since they are now starting in second place in so many seats, where they can start to use the aforementioned "squeeze" technique against whichever party is in third place. Of course, it' anybody's guess how the EU referendum result will affect things, whichever way it goes. Probably depends on how close it is (I have always assume the vote will go against leaving - I'm a pessimist in such things).

    On the other hand, Farage clearly took a strategic decision to respond submissively to political correctness and to kowtow to it by dismissing any candidates who breached its requirements and apologising for most offending statements, whereas Trump went the other way, sticking two fingers up at it. That gave his campaign more outsider energy, but maybe Farage was correct that such an approach would not have worked in the UK, where the media establishment is more stifling than in the US.

    Also, why is the loony left so much in favor of Brexit? It’s all very confusing
     
    The old left was always mostly against the European project, which was seen (probably correctly) as a conspiracy of bosses and ruling elites aimed at bypassing the powers of the trade unions. Some of the left are still not entirely happy with the globalist alliance with big business that powers the promotion of mass immigration and other anti-national projects such as the EU. These two groups are among the reasons why UKIP has done as well in many old Labour areas as in old conservative areas.
    , @unpc downunder
    The problem with UKIP is that it has very little appeal to the white working class. It's a low tax, free trade, pro-City party. It only opposes the EU because it thinks the EU is too economically left-wing. It gets votes for it's anti-EU policies, but struggles to attract any support in general elections.

    The majority of people who oppose open borders are working class. Hence, a immigration restrictionist party has to appeal to the working class. Britian needs to start from scratch with a populist party that isn't connected to UKIP or the BNP. The new leadership of the BNP has the right idea - focus on local elections and forget national politics for the time being. However, the BNP has too much negative baggage associated with it, and its name sounds too fascist for English tastes (it needs to have the word democracy in there somewhere).
  24. Everyone I know is intending to vote “Leave”, it is seen as a rejection of the bureaucratic class.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    Paging Pauline Kael...
  25. @helena
    Europe has got itself in a mess over Turkey. Turkey has been waiting for Accession for decades and economically inferior countries have been admitted in the meantime. And also in the meantime, Turkey has Islamised. So it would have been better to have admitted Turkey when it was still secular. But now the EU is backed into a corner, especially having just invited the rest of the world.

    My impression of the no. 1 reason for popular support for Brexit is 'sovereignty'. Secondly, immigration and Turkey membership. But the campaign has become a means for deciding Conservative leadership. If Boris won the leadership on the back of a Brexit vote there's a good chance he would simply turn round and make a deal with EU and dress it up as sufficient concession to quell any dissent. The Irish voted against the Treaty of Somewhere (Lisbon?) and so the name was changed, but little else, and the Irish accepted it. There's really not that much gusto for revolution in W Europe.

    The no. 1 economic reason for Bexit is, as someone recently said, 'the lower down the business scale one goes, from big business to small business, the more the business owners favour Brexit'.

    I’d say the Euros dodged a bullet for the time being. Turkey’s slow conversion away from secularism was almost inevitable from a demographic standpoint. Did the European dithering sting the Kemalist sophisticates in the East of the country? Sure. It might even have hurt them politically. But, so long as the religious people in the Center and the East, including the Kurds, kept having more children, sponsored by the state in many cases, the outcome was not in question. The Western liberals have gotten used to the idea that they can piggyback onto other people’s fertility by converting their children, and it worked for people from other classes, but of the same general culture and ethnicity. They’ve met their match in the new arrivals to Europe, though they are expending superhuman effort into not understanding this. The modernists of Turkey are failing in the same manner. Maybe it’s just Islam that is less conducive to this sort of subversion. Or maybe our subversion worked (Enlightenment and all that) for better or worse because it came about in our midst and was tailored for our characteristics. Something like that was happening in the Middle East-North Africa region, too, tentatively, before Western intervention was added to back-to-rootsism among the Islamists to kill the new models – Arab socialism and nationalism, the Al-Nahda movement in late XIXth century and so on. I do not know where they would have led, but one can imagine.

    Gamal Abdel Nasser on the Muslim Brotherhood in the 1950s

    That short video really is extraordinary in a hundred different ways.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    In the 19th century in the US there was a religious group called the Shakers, who were advanced in many ways - they developed many clever inventions and the furniture that they made had clean simple lines. Their society was egalitarian and women had leading roles. Economically they were quite successful because the quality products that they invented and designed were well liked by the public.

    There was just one little flaw to their religion - one of its tenets was abstinence from sex, so there were never any little Shakers. This makes sense for an organization founded by women. If you are spending your time giving birth and raising children, then there is no way that you can also participate fully in other matters such as running an economically self-supporting religious cult. For a while, they got by with converts and by taking in orphans, but eventually their membership dwindled to next to nothing and their villages were abandoned or turned into museums operated by non-Shakers.

    Modern liberalism is a slightly modified version of the Shaker religion and the outcome will be the same. Hillary Clinton, who barely managed to squeeze out one child, is the perfect flag bearer for this dead end cult.
    , @utu
    We should not forger that Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and elsewhere was supported by CIA in 1950s. Religious fanatics were an American weapon of choice used to fight the Soviet influence. Then it was done in Afghanistan in 1970s and then more recently in Libya and Syria when Soviet Union was no more. The plan to refurbish Middle East (Yinon Plan and PNAC) required the destruction of functioning nation states like Iraq, Syria and Libya and replacing them with a reign of easily controlled and manipulated chaos. No body is more responsible for the muslim radicalization than CIA and Mossad. Hamas was born with a great help of the latter in order to undermine PLO of Arafat that was much more constructive and had significant international support and recognition. Who is supporting Uyghur radicals in China?
    , @Jack D
    BTW, Nasser, for all his failings (and there were many) was a great politician. Compare him to Hillary - it's like day and night. You see him up on the stage relaxed and confident and comfortable and joking and in command of his audience, convinced that history is on HIS side and that his opposition is just a bunch of hypocrites who do not practice what they preach. He's not shrilly haranguing his audience in dictator style. Trump (and I mean this as a compliment) is more like Nasser than Hillary but Nasser was much better. Despite hating 99% of Nasser's beliefs (his opposition to radical Islam was good) you just have to like the guy and his style.
    , @Desiderius
    Or it could be that secularism is a stage in a generational cycle that comes back to the spiritual (to eventually generate a new secularism) rather than an end stage.

    The secular being the fruit of the sacred, the sacred the soil in which the secular grows anew.
    , @Clifford Brown
    I have always had admiration for Nasser and his vision for the Arab world.

    Still one has to wonder how representative this video is of Egyptian society at the time. Nasser was part of the Cairo elite who came of age when Egypt was still a British protectorate. His values were likely very different from those of the village peasants who made up a majority of the population. Perhaps Arab secularism was merely a holdover from the age of European colonization and that a return to Islamic conservatism was inevitable once Europeans and European influenced Arab elites no longer had undue influence over Muslim societies.

    With Socialism no longer a global restraint and alternative in the Arab world, Islam has more free reign.
  26. Easy decision for Brexit! UK and Germany are the two poles of the EU.
    Brexit is a gamble to destroy or severely weaken the pro-migrant cabals located in the EU government and bureaucracy in Brussels. Weaken the pro-migrant cabals running Germany and the UK. UK Brexit nationalism can defeat them. The refugee pushers/profiteers will not stand when disunited. Get rid of them all!

    • Replies: @Anonym
    Maybe the Brexit will prompt the EU to do an about face on immigration. If there is one thing bureaucrats and politicians like, it is retaining their jobs.
  27. @Randal

    Philippe Legrain assures us that the refugees will double Europe’s investment in them within 5 years:
     
    I see the Guardian has put the same report prominently on its website, unsurprisingly:

    Refugees will repay EU spending almost twice over in five years - report

    "Most significantly, Legrain calculates that while the absorption of so many refugees will increase public debt by almost €69bn (£54bn) between 2015 and 2020, during the same period refugees will help GDP grow by €126.6bn – a ratio of almost two to one."

    Looks to me like the usual disingenuous confusion of gdp with something actually important to real people like gdp per capita.

    Of course the overwhelmingly important question never dealt with when the establishment's media organs talk about the benefits of mass immigration is "who, whom?", as in: "who gets the benefits and who bears the costs?"

    ” during the same period refugees will help GDP grow by €126.6bn”

    bahaha, increase GDP by spending welfare money (i.e. increased govt debt or wealth transfer from citzenry). MAGIC!

  28. “serves as an ingenious scheme to boost German exports at the expense of its less superbly industrious neighbors in the sunnier parts of Europe”

    Steve, you should replace “less superbly industrious neighbors” with “somewhat less industrious and much less efficient and organized neighbors”. Germans are not particularly industrious anymore. As an American, you would probably be highly unimpressed with the modern day German work ethic. They are still good at developing SOPs and sticking to them though, which goes a long way.

  29. And yet the Left is still insistent it can push its religion down the West’s throats and have it take.

  30. One angle I’ve not heard much about is how little experience Germany has had with successful democratic self-government. After the Kaiser came Weimar, then Hitler, followed by allied occupation in the West and Soviet rule in the east. Merkel’s democratic experience only began after she was a fully mature adult, which may help explain her naivete (if naivete it is) in the Syrian migrant crisis.

    The notion that Germany should be the dominant power in a “democratic” EU when she has had so little experience of democracy at home seems like an idea worth discussing.

    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Playing the Devil's Advocate here, it could be argued that "Germany" actually has had the longest experience with democratic self-government in Europe---if you think of the Holy Roman Empire. The HRE elected much of it's leadership, gave the "central" government limited powers, and retained a lot of local autonomy.
    , @5371
    The judgement that from 1871-1918 Britain was an example of successful democratic self-government and Germany was not is an arbitrary one.
    , @AndrewR
    Not sure what her lack of youthful experience with democrazy has to do with anything. Britain and Sweden have had democrazy since well before their leaders were born and they're really no better than Germany in terms of suicidal policies.
    , @anon
    Well, Britain is still a monarchy today. And the Kaiser's Germany wasn't less democratic than early twentieth century Britain.
    And being an "experienced democracy" didn't help when London was literally taken over by Muslims.
  31. @Randal

    Ideally there would be some people offering an alt-rightish analysis of European affairs (and whilst I’m at it, Israeli affairs) who were more knowledgeable on the subject.
     
    Realistically that would need British equivalents of sites like Unz and Vdare. Are there such, of any substance? Alternatively, US sites like the aforementioned would have to take the decision to host British-based writers on a regular basis.

    The problem with any British based site offering the kind of discussions you find on Unz and Vdare is that there would be a very real likelihood that the writers and owners would find themselves in prison (and I speak with some experience on this, as someone whose mere below the line political comments have resulted in my case being raised by specially connected minority lobby activists at Assistant Chief Constable level, in an attempt to get me harassed by the police and, ideally from their point of view, prosecuted - only time will tell whether they will succeed or not).

    Realistically that would need British equivalents of sites like Unz and Vdare. Are there such, of any substance?

    Breitbart London would be the closest candidate, and that’s a section of a US site.

    Any UK dissident / Alt Right/ iSteveish/non-PeeCee site needs to be US based anyway, as there is no first amendment in the UK and it would likely elicit a visit from the Peelers – it happens to Twitter users in Blighty – as well asmuch wailing and gnashing of teeth, so would probably be shut-down. Even the British ‘decent leftist’ site Harry’s Place* is US hosted.

    The best option for the UK is the Breitbart model, that US sites become somewhat trans-Atlanticist.

    * Harry’s Place is ‘decent left’ because it was founded by a lefty, mugged by reality on 9/11, who managed to notice the red-green alliance in the post atrocity apologetics on the left – and the general lefty love-in for Islmofascism (a tautological term if ever there was). HP has strong Jewish ethno-nationalist sympathies.

    • Replies: @Randal
    Breitbart is a little too obsessed with the islam question and too pro-Israel for my liking. I don't want muslims in my country, but I don't have any great problem with them in their own countries.

    It's also as extremely intolerant of dissent in the comment section as the Guardian, in my experience (having been banned early on at both places).

    Any UK dissident / Alt Right/ iSteveish/non-PeeCee site needs to be US based anyway, as there is no first amendment in the UK and it would likely elicit a visit from the Peelers – it happens to Twitter users in Blighty
     
    Yes, exactly (see my last paragraph for my own experience of this).

    In truth, rather than relying on the US First Amendment protections (which I suspect will be abrogated by a "hate speech exception" quite soon anyway), we need to be campaigning for our own absolutist protections for freedom of political speech. Unfortunately one preliminary step required is departure from the European "rights" structure, as that enshrines the pernicious idea that freedom of speech should be "balanced" against other supposed rights.
  32. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    In or out, the British have shown the capability to wreck their own country all by themselves. They’ve willingly saddled themselves with blacks, Pakistanis and other third worlders going back to the days of Enoch Powell. Brexit might help as a first step if they’re willing to keep going but it’s probable they won’t seeing as how they’ve elected a Muslim for mayor of London. They have no will to do anything to reverse what’s already taken place.

    • Replies: @anon
    Sadly I have to agree with you. Here in Canada we are just as bad. Our Liberal government just apologized today for sending back a boatload of Sikh illegal aliens 102 YEARS AGO! Of course Trudeau jr. just wants the Sikh vote, but it is still unbelievable how demented western countries have now become about non-whites.
  33. @Luke Lea
    One angle I've not heard much about is how little experience Germany has had with successful democratic self-government. After the Kaiser came Weimar, then Hitler, followed by allied occupation in the West and Soviet rule in the east. Merkel's democratic experience only began after she was a fully mature adult, which may help explain her naivete (if naivete it is) in the Syrian migrant crisis.

    The notion that Germany should be the dominant power in a "democratic" EU when she has had so little experience of democracy at home seems like an idea worth discussing.

    Playing the Devil’s Advocate here, it could be argued that “Germany” actually has had the longest experience with democratic self-government in Europe—if you think of the Holy Roman Empire. The HRE elected much of it’s leadership, gave the “central” government limited powers, and retained a lot of local autonomy.

  34. @Romanian
    I'd say the Euros dodged a bullet for the time being. Turkey's slow conversion away from secularism was almost inevitable from a demographic standpoint. Did the European dithering sting the Kemalist sophisticates in the East of the country? Sure. It might even have hurt them politically. But, so long as the religious people in the Center and the East, including the Kurds, kept having more children, sponsored by the state in many cases, the outcome was not in question. The Western liberals have gotten used to the idea that they can piggyback onto other people's fertility by converting their children, and it worked for people from other classes, but of the same general culture and ethnicity. They've met their match in the new arrivals to Europe, though they are expending superhuman effort into not understanding this. The modernists of Turkey are failing in the same manner. Maybe it's just Islam that is less conducive to this sort of subversion. Or maybe our subversion worked (Enlightenment and all that) for better or worse because it came about in our midst and was tailored for our characteristics. Something like that was happening in the Middle East-North Africa region, too, tentatively, before Western intervention was added to back-to-rootsism among the Islamists to kill the new models - Arab socialism and nationalism, the Al-Nahda movement in late XIXth century and so on. I do not know where they would have led, but one can imagine.

    Gamal Abdel Nasser on the Muslim Brotherhood in the 1950s
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TX4RK8bj2W0

    That short video really is extraordinary in a hundred different ways.

    In the 19th century in the US there was a religious group called the Shakers, who were advanced in many ways – they developed many clever inventions and the furniture that they made had clean simple lines. Their society was egalitarian and women had leading roles. Economically they were quite successful because the quality products that they invented and designed were well liked by the public.

    There was just one little flaw to their religion – one of its tenets was abstinence from sex, so there were never any little Shakers. This makes sense for an organization founded by women. If you are spending your time giving birth and raising children, then there is no way that you can also participate fully in other matters such as running an economically self-supporting religious cult. For a while, they got by with converts and by taking in orphans, but eventually their membership dwindled to next to nothing and their villages were abandoned or turned into museums operated by non-Shakers.

    Modern liberalism is a slightly modified version of the Shaker religion and the outcome will be the same. Hillary Clinton, who barely managed to squeeze out one child, is the perfect flag bearer for this dead end cult.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @iSteveFan

    Modern liberalism is a slightly modified version of the Shaker religion and the outcome will be the same.
     
    That's a pretty good analogy.
    , @Olorin
    You're pretty much wrong on all counts here.

    "Mother" Ann Lee's goal was to create a utopian community where members would strive for perfection through a learned, aspirational, structured set of disciplined and innovative behaviors, skills, and interactions. Not one that sought to perpetuate itself genetically. Unlike, say, Jews or Muslims or Catholics.

    She actually foresaw that the original living community numbers would drop off over time, then prophesied that when their membership dropped to 5, the sect would renew (through, as usual, outside members coming in). We shall see about that. From what I've heard, however, the Sabbath Day Shaker community in Maine (e.g.) has no trouble populating its busy schedule of seasonal events with visiting families.

    The sect's intent was educational and spiritual, not genetic. Many people joined Shaker communities for a time and left them to breed. I don't know of any study of that.

    Judging from the number of people who commission Shaker style crafts or seek to learn them themselves, her "community" may have morphed into something different than she and her followers created. Most of the clients I've had for Shaker furniture and wooden artifacts were people deeply interested in this strain of Americanism (along with the Oneida, New Harmony, and other communities), and most have children.

    This all will be difficult to understand for people whose notion of America was fed to them in the 1950s and after by the (((entertainment industry))). But not all life strategies seek to recapitulate evolution and genetically isolate and advance tribal interets. Some life strategies seek to extend extend evolution's potential by creating communities where the evolved can interact apart from and free of outside influences.

    This and their members' genomes no doubt accounts for why the original Shaker communities were so richly innovative technically.

    , @Olorin
    Excuse me, I meant to say "most of the clients I've had for Shaker STYLE furniture." Which is to say, requesting features within that design, technical, materials, or craft idiom. Which is remarkably popular along with "Scandinavian" and "Asian/Japanese" among people who like refined simple form in their interior environments.
    , @AnotherDad
    Fun analogy Jack. I'm going to steal it.

    It's the--now old--quip: "the future belongs to those who show up for it".

    Female "empowerment" (which actually entails stripping them of their natural power) and female careerism are a death cult. And Hillary is like it's goddess.

    It will be folks like the Mormons, the Muslims and the Orthodox Jews who people the next generation. Can't say i'm fond of any of them. But, I've met several quality Mormon men (a few on the job and more in Scouting) and they are good folks. Too bad there isn't some movement of just sane Western men and women to preserve our race and culture. But I guess human psychology is such that these things take--or at least work best--with some us-against-them religious element to promote group cohesion.

    Too bad, cause the highly fertile Cincinnati suburb I grew up in the 60s of 99% generic (though majority Germanic) white gentiles was a *really* nice place. Lack of diversity with the right sort of people is ... awesome!
  35. @Luke Lea
    One angle I've not heard much about is how little experience Germany has had with successful democratic self-government. After the Kaiser came Weimar, then Hitler, followed by allied occupation in the West and Soviet rule in the east. Merkel's democratic experience only began after she was a fully mature adult, which may help explain her naivete (if naivete it is) in the Syrian migrant crisis.

    The notion that Germany should be the dominant power in a "democratic" EU when she has had so little experience of democracy at home seems like an idea worth discussing.

    The judgement that from 1871-1918 Britain was an example of successful democratic self-government and Germany was not is an arbitrary one.

  36. okie says:

    I wish that the EU vote was about immigration or sovereignty or Even the EU regulatory state.
    maybe the margin for the vote either way will come from that. but the issue with any democracy is that those are 10% to 20% max , the other 80-90% are voting on personalities advocating it or party loyalty or even who has the best slogan.

    I’ve had one eye on this for a decade and peek in pretty regularly at Richard North’s EU Referendum blog, but now that we are actually on it he is spending as much time criticizing the personalities on his side as advocating what he’s worked for for decades, because he thinks if the leave side just adopts his detailed and well thought out plan they’ll sweep to victory. I find this amazing that he doesn’t understand that you need the policies to pick up enough of the talented tenth of any race, but you also need the personality and the slogans to get the others to get to 51%

  37. Brexit will probably lead to less immigration from Poland and more immigration from Nigeria.

  38. @fox
    trump is already trying to backtrack on banning Muslims.

    Well it was never an entirely realistic suggestion. But he moved the Overton Window which was very ballsy.

  39. @Luke Lea
    One angle I've not heard much about is how little experience Germany has had with successful democratic self-government. After the Kaiser came Weimar, then Hitler, followed by allied occupation in the West and Soviet rule in the east. Merkel's democratic experience only began after she was a fully mature adult, which may help explain her naivete (if naivete it is) in the Syrian migrant crisis.

    The notion that Germany should be the dominant power in a "democratic" EU when she has had so little experience of democracy at home seems like an idea worth discussing.

    Not sure what her lack of youthful experience with democrazy has to do with anything. Britain and Sweden have had democrazy since well before their leaders were born and they’re really no better than Germany in terms of suicidal policies.

    • Replies: @SFG
    All y'all eager for a king always seem to think he's going to do what you want, ignoring that the people who would most likely become king--i.e., rich people--are pretty much the ones who are responsible for the mess we're in now. Just imagine King Obama or Queen Hillary. Even King W would probably get us into more wars. How on earth would you get a King Pat Buchanan?

    Democracy is the only thing that keeps the global elite from doing even *more* damage.
  40. @Gabriel M

    The catastrophic euro, which Mrs. Thatcher wisely kept Britain out of,
     
    Err...... No.

    I was reading this article with the vague sense that Steve Sailer doesn't know very much about England (yes I call it England, not Britain - if you were English you'd understand), but I wasn't expecting such an obvious confirmation.

    Have you ever wondered why so much "analysis" of European affairs on this blog consists of fisking (are Americans familiar with that term?) articles in the New York Times? It's a shame, because, obviously, the basis thrust of the alt-right view on Europe (stop immigration or die) is obviously correct. Ideally there would be some people offering an alt-rightish analysis of European affairs (and whilst I'm at it, Israeli affairs) who were more knowledgeable on the subject. At the moment, I feel the same way reading this stuff as when I read the latest fanciful hit piece in the Telegraph on Trump.

    Fisking as term was coined to express the belief that “Only an incompetent and effete British loser could ever think that the Iraq War is a bad idea!” So although the term was invented in America, it has kind of gone down the memory hole here. I am surprised that it lives on in Britain as you imply.

  41. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “The Immigration Gambit”

    speaking of which, have you considered an immigration compromise?

    after all, we’re now in the spirit of Donald J. Trump–the negotiator, the unifier.

    liberals want more immigration and they threaten to leave the country if a conservative is elected. so why don’t we compromise? we’ll be conservative in not allowing unlimited immigration from everywhere (say, from somalia to mexico) but we’ll also be fair and allow immigration from all of the countries liberals claim we need to be more like or theyll leave us for: australia, canada, britain, holland, belgium, france, germany, switzerland, austria, denmark, norway, sweden, finland

  42. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Steve, there’s a lot more to it than that.

    Firstly, the British – Conservative – government of Harold MacMillan’s desire to enter the fledgling ‘Common Market’ way back in 1960 – which was rebuffed by De Gaulle -, must be seen in the context of loss of empire, a traumatic experience, and the rank refusal of the Eisenhower administration to support the Anglo French action in Suez in 1956. the British government, quite rightly, saw the American action as a deliberate attempt to relegate Britain as a global power in order for America to ‘fill its shoes’ and take its place. Also, back in the day the world was seen firmly as being divided between the two rival cold war power blocs, the USA and the former USSR, and the prevailing opinion was that only be unifying could the western European nations stamp their ground on the world.

    Also, during that immediate post war period, Britain was plagued by notions of slow economic growth vis a vis the continental nations, and it was thought that by joining the common market, Britain would be ‘infected’ with economic growth.

    The main objection to the EU in Britain hinges on the notion of ‘parliamentary sovereignty’, as described in the works of Dicey, the closest that Britain has got to a written constitution. In essence, the Powellite objection, the sensible objection, is that the will of the British people as expressed as their democratically elected parliamentary representatives is sovereign, in that ‘there is no higher power’ exercising control over Britain. The EU mandates that, effectively, parliament is subordinated to EU institutions, institutions that are outside of the control of the British electorate -‘and which very well might act contra to the wishes and interests of the British people. Powell had an almost religious reverence for Westminster and its ancient hard fought history.

    At bottom, it’s all about democracy – that’s why such strong passions are being aroused.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    French antipathy to Americans, and by proxy, British, stems in part from the exclusion of De Gaulle from the Big Three discussions during WWII. Monsieur thought that he was of equal stature to Winnie, Frank and Joe, and never got over the slight.

    One consequence of that, compounded by the Suez kerfuffle, was the French ejection of NATO.

    iSteve side note: There are numerous golf courses in France that were once associated with US-led bases.

    Back to Brexit. I support it. Powell was right and will be found right. There is going to be a reshuffling of the European order and the British may as well initiate a position. The eventual structure will likely take years, be sub-optimal, and result in payoffs to many, so business as usual.

  43. OT:
    Crews pull 25 bags of mail out of sewer in Northeast D.C.
    Fox11 · 12 hours ago
    In miserable weather on Tuesday morning, DC Water crews pulled piles of soggy, stinky mail out of the catch basin and …

    ***** Federal affirmative action FAIL!

  44. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @LondonBob
    Being overrun by Spaniards, huge numbers have appeared in London in the past two years, might be less objectionable than being overrun by Pakistanis, but it is still preferable not to be overrun. Americans often forget Europe is peopled by a number of distinct ethnic groups and we remain German, Dutch, Italian, Welsh etc. despite EU attempts to create the new European man.

    Of course a recent phenomenon is ethnic minorities arriving in another European country then gaining citizenship, which then gives them the freedom to settle here, as has happened with Somalians from the Netherlands. Brexit is the necessary first step to getting back control of our country.

    Within a generation, thousands of Englishmen will take Spanish wives, and equally, English women will take Spanish husbands.
    Count on the Spaniards to be completely assimilated within 50 years.

    As for the Pakistanis, well put it this way, I only ever saw burkahs on TV reports from Saudi Arabia until the Rushdie affair happened, and only then did they magically started popping up on the streets of London. Before then Pakistani women were too intimidated to wear them – and they have been here for a good 30 years prior to 1989.

  45. I just got an ear-full from my colleagues in The City to the effect that Brexit will fail (probably true, since the govt holds critical levers that drive the discussion) and why that is a good thing. I could easily rebut every point of the Remain advocates, but it all boils down to this: The Remain argument is premised on the EU continuing as a viable, relatively harmonious going concern, and that is a really bold assumption. One or two more summers like last and there will be no EU to speak of, other than a shell police state that is focused on dealing with spiraling “internal problems.”

    The UK has probably shackled itself to the Titanic.

    • Replies: @Clifford Brown

    One or two more summers like last and there will be no EU to speak of, other than a shell police state that is focused on dealing with spiraling “internal problems.”
     
    Feature or a Bug?

    Alternatively, destroying social cohesion and the long term viability of social democracy may just be why the EU was set up in the first place.
    , @Expletive Deleted
    I see the Rt Hon "Shadow Europe Minister", Ms. Fat Lass MP, has got the tenor of the debate pitch-perfect.

    She can be heard telling the reporter: "The very first person I come to is a horrible racist. I'm never coming back to wherever this is."
     
    The geezer had been bellyaching about a Polish family of (suspected) "spongers" who were allegedly getting more free stuff for nowt than him and his were.
    Classic. Remember "Just some .. bigoted woman".
  46. Interesting column, but I wonder if this is a case where things are less complicated than they seem in relation to Germany – it seems to me that cultural masochism has set in as a prime motivator in a lot of the actions take by European and North American nations.

    At least in the US the left can point to our history of absorbing large numbers of foreigners as a reason for blithely admitting loads of latinos or resettlement of Arabs (conveniently ignoring the fact that there was a lot of pressure to conform to the dominant culture rather than today’s deliberate Balkanization), but Germany has no track record whatsoever. The Turks are still largely a population apart and they are theoretically more assimilable to European ways than the more alien people of Syria, Iraq, and Afghanistan.

    It appears to me that the largest countries in Europe – and increasingly the US – don’t have the confidence to defend their cultures and the attributes that made them great in the first place. These will be replaced by cultures and practices that failed in the new arrivals’ home countries and all the while the political class will blame themselves for not being welcoming enough to these vibrant additions to the nations.

  47. utu says:
    @Romanian
    I'd say the Euros dodged a bullet for the time being. Turkey's slow conversion away from secularism was almost inevitable from a demographic standpoint. Did the European dithering sting the Kemalist sophisticates in the East of the country? Sure. It might even have hurt them politically. But, so long as the religious people in the Center and the East, including the Kurds, kept having more children, sponsored by the state in many cases, the outcome was not in question. The Western liberals have gotten used to the idea that they can piggyback onto other people's fertility by converting their children, and it worked for people from other classes, but of the same general culture and ethnicity. They've met their match in the new arrivals to Europe, though they are expending superhuman effort into not understanding this. The modernists of Turkey are failing in the same manner. Maybe it's just Islam that is less conducive to this sort of subversion. Or maybe our subversion worked (Enlightenment and all that) for better or worse because it came about in our midst and was tailored for our characteristics. Something like that was happening in the Middle East-North Africa region, too, tentatively, before Western intervention was added to back-to-rootsism among the Islamists to kill the new models - Arab socialism and nationalism, the Al-Nahda movement in late XIXth century and so on. I do not know where they would have led, but one can imagine.

    Gamal Abdel Nasser on the Muslim Brotherhood in the 1950s
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TX4RK8bj2W0

    That short video really is extraordinary in a hundred different ways.

    We should not forger that Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and elsewhere was supported by CIA in 1950s. Religious fanatics were an American weapon of choice used to fight the Soviet influence. Then it was done in Afghanistan in 1970s and then more recently in Libya and Syria when Soviet Union was no more. The plan to refurbish Middle East (Yinon Plan and PNAC) required the destruction of functioning nation states like Iraq, Syria and Libya and replacing them with a reign of easily controlled and manipulated chaos. No body is more responsible for the muslim radicalization than CIA and Mossad. Hamas was born with a great help of the latter in order to undermine PLO of Arafat that was much more constructive and had significant international support and recognition. Who is supporting Uyghur radicals in China?

    • Agree: Cagey Beast
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Puh-lease. The Yinon Plan was not a "plan" - it was just an obscure article in an obscure journal (that happened to foresee the future fragmentation of the Arab world). Here's a pro-tip: Mentioning the "Yinon Plan" makes whatever you write self-refuting. Mentioning the CIA and Mossad in one sentence gets you bonus points for same.
  48. Leftist conservative [AKA "Make Unz.com Great Again"] says: • Website

    such reasonable triangulation….surely you will be inducted into the hall of secrets in due time…

  49. @Luke Lea
    One angle I've not heard much about is how little experience Germany has had with successful democratic self-government. After the Kaiser came Weimar, then Hitler, followed by allied occupation in the West and Soviet rule in the east. Merkel's democratic experience only began after she was a fully mature adult, which may help explain her naivete (if naivete it is) in the Syrian migrant crisis.

    The notion that Germany should be the dominant power in a "democratic" EU when she has had so little experience of democracy at home seems like an idea worth discussing.

    Well, Britain is still a monarchy today. And the Kaiser’s Germany wasn’t less democratic than early twentieth century Britain.
    And being an “experienced democracy” didn’t help when London was literally taken over by Muslims.

    • Replies: @anon
    German workers in 1914 were well fed and well housed. They had access to first rate health care. In contrast the British people were largely crammed into the worst slums in Europe. Any casual observer strolling about cities in Germany and Britain prior to WW1 would certainly have concluded the average German worker and his family were much better off then their British counterparts.
    , @Expletive Deleted

    Britain is still a monarchy today
     
    as are Belgium, The Netherlands, Denmark, Norway and Sweden, technically.
    All awash in illiterate, unskilled, resentful foreigners, up to their liberal welfarist armpits. Is it in fact a "constitutional monarchy" problem?
    Hmmm. Maybe only the French and the Americans know how to deal with these sceptred pests?
  50. Marty [AKA "Near Vicksburg"] says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Interesting column. Here's a complication to consider for a future one.

    Stephen F. Cohen said on John Batchelor's radio show a few hours ago that the Obama administration is essentially risking a repeat of the Cuban Missile Crisis in Europe. He said they were demanding Germany supply troops to station on Russia's border near some new missile installation, and Germany is objecting because they think having German troops on Russia's border might raise unpleasant memories.

    He also said that the Obama administration was planning a joint exercise in Georgia, and to treat Georgia and Ukraine as de facto NATO members, over the objections of Germany and other NATO members.

    When asked about whether Trump was backtracking on his previous comments about getting along with Russia due to a quote of Trump saying none of Putin's compliments about him would make him go easy on Trump in negotiations, Cohen said, first, that Putin really wasn't that complimentary about Trump, but, second, that he was encouraged by Trump's use of the "negotiations", because there are no such negotiations being conducted now.

    Related, the FT over the weekend quoted Turkey's president warning his NATO allies that the Black Sea was becoming "a Russian lake", and of the need to confront Russia.

    So, to recap:

    - Germany has welcomed millions of Muslims into Europe.

    - London just elected a Muslim mayor.

    - We have a new Cold War with Russia -- and are, apparently, risking a hot war in Ukraine -- in part to bolster Turkey, which is also being bribed by Germany over migration.

    Maybe the real power in Europe isn't Germany but Turkey?

    But since this was the Batchelor show, what’s the Israel angle?

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Israel didn't come up during the part of the segment I listened to.
  51. @Jack D
    In the 19th century in the US there was a religious group called the Shakers, who were advanced in many ways - they developed many clever inventions and the furniture that they made had clean simple lines. Their society was egalitarian and women had leading roles. Economically they were quite successful because the quality products that they invented and designed were well liked by the public.

    There was just one little flaw to their religion - one of its tenets was abstinence from sex, so there were never any little Shakers. This makes sense for an organization founded by women. If you are spending your time giving birth and raising children, then there is no way that you can also participate fully in other matters such as running an economically self-supporting religious cult. For a while, they got by with converts and by taking in orphans, but eventually their membership dwindled to next to nothing and their villages were abandoned or turned into museums operated by non-Shakers.

    Modern liberalism is a slightly modified version of the Shaker religion and the outcome will be the same. Hillary Clinton, who barely managed to squeeze out one child, is the perfect flag bearer for this dead end cult.

    Modern liberalism is a slightly modified version of the Shaker religion and the outcome will be the same.

    That’s a pretty good analogy.

  52. @helena
    Europe has got itself in a mess over Turkey. Turkey has been waiting for Accession for decades and economically inferior countries have been admitted in the meantime. And also in the meantime, Turkey has Islamised. So it would have been better to have admitted Turkey when it was still secular. But now the EU is backed into a corner, especially having just invited the rest of the world.

    My impression of the no. 1 reason for popular support for Brexit is 'sovereignty'. Secondly, immigration and Turkey membership. But the campaign has become a means for deciding Conservative leadership. If Boris won the leadership on the back of a Brexit vote there's a good chance he would simply turn round and make a deal with EU and dress it up as sufficient concession to quell any dissent. The Irish voted against the Treaty of Somewhere (Lisbon?) and so the name was changed, but little else, and the Irish accepted it. There's really not that much gusto for revolution in W Europe.

    The no. 1 economic reason for Bexit is, as someone recently said, 'the lower down the business scale one goes, from big business to small business, the more the business owners favour Brexit'.

    Boris Johnson has always been pro-EU. Putting him in charge of the leave campaign is blatant manipulation of the situation.

  53. @Dave Pinsen
    Interesting column. Here's a complication to consider for a future one.

    Stephen F. Cohen said on John Batchelor's radio show a few hours ago that the Obama administration is essentially risking a repeat of the Cuban Missile Crisis in Europe. He said they were demanding Germany supply troops to station on Russia's border near some new missile installation, and Germany is objecting because they think having German troops on Russia's border might raise unpleasant memories.

    He also said that the Obama administration was planning a joint exercise in Georgia, and to treat Georgia and Ukraine as de facto NATO members, over the objections of Germany and other NATO members.

    When asked about whether Trump was backtracking on his previous comments about getting along with Russia due to a quote of Trump saying none of Putin's compliments about him would make him go easy on Trump in negotiations, Cohen said, first, that Putin really wasn't that complimentary about Trump, but, second, that he was encouraged by Trump's use of the "negotiations", because there are no such negotiations being conducted now.

    Related, the FT over the weekend quoted Turkey's president warning his NATO allies that the Black Sea was becoming "a Russian lake", and of the need to confront Russia.

    So, to recap:

    - Germany has welcomed millions of Muslims into Europe.

    - London just elected a Muslim mayor.

    - We have a new Cold War with Russia -- and are, apparently, risking a hot war in Ukraine -- in part to bolster Turkey, which is also being bribed by Germany over migration.

    Maybe the real power in Europe isn't Germany but Turkey?

    Boris Johnson is supposedly in charge of the ‘leave’ campaign in Britain. He’s always favoured the EU – until now.

    And he is of Turkish origin. And not just any old Turk, his background is Donmeh (see many previous iSteve articles).

    • Replies: @helena
    His TV genealogy said he's the greatgrandson of the man who was hung drawn and quartered for opposing Ataturk. Also that he is related to every royal house of europe.
    , @okie
    i looked it up, one Turkish great-grandparent who died before his grandfather was born, , shortly followed by the great grandmother , who was English Swiss, and said grand father was subsequently raised by the his wholly English grandmother as completely English. In Slavery terms that makes him Octaroon -Turk and in cultural terms 0% due to the death of both great grandparents
    , @5371
    Actually, he has one Turkish great-grandparent. That was a Young Turk, but I await evidence of his Donmeh origins.
  54. @unpc downunder
    Don't worry, Philippe Legrain assures us that the refugees will double Europe's investment in them within 5 years:

    https://www.rt.com/news/343394-eu-refugees-economy-report/

    I like the single, one-word comment in response to this article - "Nonsense."

    Legrain is an odious little shill for the elites.

  55. @Charlie_U
    Great article, Steve.

    I don't know anyone who is planning to vote to stay in, but a headline in today's Times informs me that women and white-collar workers will swing the vote enough to ensure that Britain remains part of the EU.

    We'll see.

    THEY ALLOW WOMEN TO VOTE????!!

  56. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    ” The European Union always was a CIA project, as Brexiteers discover ”

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2016/04/27/the-european-union-always-was-a-cia-project-as-brexiteers-discov/

    Brexiteers should have been prepared for the shattering intervention of the US. The European Union always was an American project.

    It was Washington that drove European integration in the late 1940s, and funded it covertly under the Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations.

    While irritated at times, the US has relied on the EU ever since as the anchor to American regional interests alongside NATO.

    There has never been a divide-and-rule strategy.

    The eurosceptic camp has been strangely blind to this, somehow supposing that powerful forces across the Atlantic are egging on British secession, and will hail them as liberators.

    The anti-Brussels movement in France – and to a lesser extent in Italy and Germany, and among the Nordic Left – works from the opposite premise, that the EU is essentially an instrument of Anglo-Saxon power and ‘capitalisme sauvage’.

    France’s Marine Le Pen is trenchantly anti-American. She rails against dollar supremacy. Her Front National relies on funding from Russian banks linked to Vladimir Putin.

    Like it or not, this is at least is strategically coherent.

    The Schuman Declaration that set the tone of Franco-German reconciliation – and would lead by stages to the European Community – was cooked up by the US Secretary of State Dean Acheson at a meeting in Foggy Bottom. “It all began in Washington,” said Robert Schuman’s chief of staff.

    It was the Truman administration that browbeat the French to reach a modus vivendi with Germany in the early post-War years, even threatening to cut off US Marshall aid at a furious meeting with recalcitrant French leaders they resisted in September 1950.

    Nor are many aware of declassified documents from the State Department archives showing that US intelligence funded the European movement secretly for decades, and worked aggressively behind the scenes to push Britain into the project.

    As this newspaper first reported when the treasure became available, one memorandum dated July 26, 1950, reveals a campaign to promote a full-fledged European parliament. It is signed by Gen William J Donovan, head of the American wartime Office of Strategic Services, precursor of the Central Inteligence Agency.

    The key CIA front was the American Committee for a United Europe (ACUE), chaired by Donovan. Another document shows that it provided 53.5 per cent of the European movement’s funds in 1958. The board included Walter Bedell Smith and Allen Dulles, CIA directors in the Fifties, and a caste of ex-OSS officials who moved in and out of the CIA.

    Papers show that it treated some of the EU’s ‘founding fathers’ as hired hands, and actively prevented them finding alternative funding that would have broken reliance on Washington.

    There were horrible misjudgments along the way, of course. A memo dated June 11, 1965, instructs the vice-president of the European Community to pursue monetary union by stealth, suppressing debate until the “adoption of such proposals would become virtually inescapable”. This was too clever by half, as we can see today from debt-deflation traps and mass unemployment across southern Europe.

    In a sense these papers are ancient history. What they show is that the American ‘deep state’ was in up to its neck. We can argue over whether Boris Johnson crossed a line last week by dredging up President Barack Obama’s “part-Kenyan ancestry”, but the cardinal error was to suppose that Mr Obama’s trade threat had anything to do with the ordeals of his grandfather in a Mau Mau prison camp. It was American foreign policy boilerplate.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    This makes it all sound far more sinister than it really was. Washington realized that its fundamental mistake after WWI was allowing the French, who were eager for revenge, to rig the post war economic game in such a way that the Germans had no hope of recovery. This time they did not want to set the stage for more American boys to have to die in WWIII and preferred a united and prosperous Europe instead, especially since the Soviet Union had emerged as an even greater threat. And this time, they had the leverage, economic (Marshall Plan) and military (NATO) to get what they wanted. If that was a crime, then America is guilty, guilty, guilty.
  57. @Randal

    Philippe Legrain assures us that the refugees will double Europe’s investment in them within 5 years:
     
    I see the Guardian has put the same report prominently on its website, unsurprisingly:

    Refugees will repay EU spending almost twice over in five years - report

    "Most significantly, Legrain calculates that while the absorption of so many refugees will increase public debt by almost €69bn (£54bn) between 2015 and 2020, during the same period refugees will help GDP grow by €126.6bn – a ratio of almost two to one."

    Looks to me like the usual disingenuous confusion of gdp with something actually important to real people like gdp per capita.

    Of course the overwhelmingly important question never dealt with when the establishment's media organs talk about the benefits of mass immigration is "who, whom?", as in: "who gets the benefits and who bears the costs?"

    And for me it looks like something that talking heads in TV babble happily about while aborigines are buying new, reinforced doors, alarms and join Shooting Club in order to expedite getting gun permit.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    And for me it looks like something that talking heads in TV babble happily about while aborigines are buying new, reinforced doors, alarms and join Shooting Club in order to expedite getting gun permit.
     
    That's good to know--not the sleazy bought-and-paid-for academic liars--but the aborigines working to get themselves armed.

    A terrible weakness in Europe is the lack of a 2nd amendment. WTSHTF native Europeans--except the Swiss--seem like they are going to be unarmed and will be steam rolled by their hostile states.
  58. @Lurker
    Boris Johnson is supposedly in charge of the 'leave' campaign in Britain. He's always favoured the EU - until now.

    And he is of Turkish origin. And not just any old Turk, his background is Donmeh (see many previous iSteve articles).

    His TV genealogy said he’s the greatgrandson of the man who was hung drawn and quartered for opposing Ataturk. Also that he is related to every royal house of europe.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    One of Boris Johnson's ancestors, Karolina von Rothenburg, was an illegitimate daughter of Prince Paul of Wurttemberg. Through Prince Paul, Boris is a direct descendant of George II of Great Britain.
  59. @Dave Pinsen
    Interesting column. Here's a complication to consider for a future one.

    Stephen F. Cohen said on John Batchelor's radio show a few hours ago that the Obama administration is essentially risking a repeat of the Cuban Missile Crisis in Europe. He said they were demanding Germany supply troops to station on Russia's border near some new missile installation, and Germany is objecting because they think having German troops on Russia's border might raise unpleasant memories.

    He also said that the Obama administration was planning a joint exercise in Georgia, and to treat Georgia and Ukraine as de facto NATO members, over the objections of Germany and other NATO members.

    When asked about whether Trump was backtracking on his previous comments about getting along with Russia due to a quote of Trump saying none of Putin's compliments about him would make him go easy on Trump in negotiations, Cohen said, first, that Putin really wasn't that complimentary about Trump, but, second, that he was encouraged by Trump's use of the "negotiations", because there are no such negotiations being conducted now.

    Related, the FT over the weekend quoted Turkey's president warning his NATO allies that the Black Sea was becoming "a Russian lake", and of the need to confront Russia.

    So, to recap:

    - Germany has welcomed millions of Muslims into Europe.

    - London just elected a Muslim mayor.

    - We have a new Cold War with Russia -- and are, apparently, risking a hot war in Ukraine -- in part to bolster Turkey, which is also being bribed by Germany over migration.

    Maybe the real power in Europe isn't Germany but Turkey?

    News of Obama’s adventures in Europe, and specifically his tweaking the nose of Russia, are chilling.

    I think it’s pretty well established by now that Obama in no way has the best interests of the US at heart…or in mind. So, the question is, what’s to be gained by provoking Russia in an area very vital to Russia’s security, but marginal to non-existent with regards to US security?

    I can’t help thinking back to the origins of Islam, where the Byzantine and the Persian empire wore themselves out fighting each other, leaving the military preeminence to the emerging Arab armies of the desert, who may or may not have been following Islam at the time. The needless and destructive wars between Persia and the West, both bastions of civilization and even of human rights, opened the entire Middle East, Western Asia, and Eastern Europe, to Muslim conquest.

    Obama’s actions are perfectly consistent with the concept of weakening the US and Europe through a war with Russia, combined with Muslim penetration of the US through unrestricted Muslim immigration.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    The FT article was written in part by a reporter on a Canadian warship in the Black Sea. NATO patrolling the Black Sea seems like Russia patrolling the Caribbean or the Gulf of Mexico.
  60. @jimmyriddle
    There are a few pertinent facts you might not be aware of:

    1. Large numbers of the poor and criminal class of East Europe are coming over. 200,000 Roma, for example. Most of the Somalis given asylum in Holland now live in England.

    2. The British welfare state model is mostly communitarian rather than contributory. Access to the NHS, Child Benefit and social housing etc is based on need. EU rules mean EU citizens must be treated identically to the British.

    3. Low paid work is subsidised via the tax credit system.

    4. Membership of the EU puts us under the jurisdiction of an EU court that, for example, makes it impossible to deport suspected terrorists, or seriously tackle non-EU chain migration. It also makes it impossible for the UK to derogate from any article of the European Convention on Human Rights - which is enforced by a non-EU, and activist liberal, court.

    In other words, our system worked when unrestricted migration was restricted to a few equally wealthy north west European countries. Now we need to leave the EU or completely reform our welfare model.

    2. The British welfare state model is mostly communitarian rather than contributory. Access to the NHS, Child Benefit and social housing etc is based on need. EU rules mean EU citizens must be treated identically to the British.

    3. Low paid work is subsidised via the tax credit system.

    Due to its low birth rate, Singapore’s population is now 30 percent foreigners. Many are low wage workers from India, China, and the Philippines. Needless to say, foreigners don’t get any government assistance.

    Singapore has about four million citizens and permanent residents. Only 3000 households receive government cash assistance. Families members are expected to help first, only when it is documented that no family member can assist will the government step in with aid.

    About 45,000 households (a third are ethnic Malay) live in low-income subsidized rental housing. It comes in two sizes: 1-room or 2-room. The 2-room (1 bedroom) flat is for households with three or more occupants.

    This woman lives in a 2-room flat with six children:

    • Replies: @jimmyriddle
    "foreigners don’t get any government assistance"

    And they don't get citizenship. This is the Gulf Arab model and I'm dead against it. I want to live in country where the population is enfranchised.

    We just don't need mass immigration.

    As to social housing - there is decent social housing in Hong Kong and there used to be decent social housing in England. It had advantages like aiding labour mobility and keeping cities affordable.

    Thatcher sold it off with massive discounts to tennants. Now a lot of it is owned by investors - the rentier economy has replaced industry. But you can't have decent social housing and mass immigration. Not in a country with 55 million people in 50,000 square miles where most immigration is to the south east corner.
    , @AnotherDad

    Due to its low birth rate, Singapore’s population is now 30 percent foreigners. Many are low wage workers from India, China, and the Philippines. Needless to say, foreigners don’t get any government assistance.
     
    While way, way better than the Western welfare state model, where the looting starts immediately upon entry, this is still a *terrible* idea.

    There's only one number that is correct for low-skill immigration--zero. (You can maybe tolerate a small trickle of high-skill immigrants with the background that they will quickly assimilate into your national race. But even that must be limited to avoid any development of a hostile elite caste.) The problem is in the next generation ... these new folks will be "Singaporeans". They aren't going back. So Singapore is just making itself dumber.

    Singapore needs to kick the immigration habit. Ramp up its fertility promoting measures in ways that incentivize eugenic fertility and just deal with its situation.

    Their isn't actually any virus out there that's killing babies--other than the mind virus of modernity. But guys are still guys and gals are still gals. Get the incentives right and as wage rates rise and housing prices fall ... nature will take it's course.

    Same goes of course--even more so--for the West.
    , @donut
    Gee what a tragedy !! here's a solution:

    http://dogtime.com/dog-health/general/42-spaying-your-female
  61. @fox
    trump is already trying to backtrack on banning Muslims.

    Well, if it’s not a concrete campaign promise, like building a wall, then he won’t do it (try to put a total ban on Muslims entering the country).

    I actually think that Trump’s backtracking on a total Muslim ban on immigration is a good idea. The difference between rigorous enforcement of our present laws, and a total Muslim ban, is not that great. But, if he tries to push a ban, the Democrats will dig out a bunch of doe-eyed, dark-skinned children and cry about how these innocent children are being consigned to starvation and death just because they’re Muslim.

    This will draw the women’s vote, which is the area in which Trump is the weakest. Women as a group tend to vote emotionally and a total ban will elicit an emotional reaction that simply wanting to enforce the law won’t.

    In other words, backtracking on the total ban on Muslim immigration will not lose you that much, but sticking with a ban could well lose Trump the Presidency.

  62. @Dave Pinsen
    Interesting column. Here's a complication to consider for a future one.

    Stephen F. Cohen said on John Batchelor's radio show a few hours ago that the Obama administration is essentially risking a repeat of the Cuban Missile Crisis in Europe. He said they were demanding Germany supply troops to station on Russia's border near some new missile installation, and Germany is objecting because they think having German troops on Russia's border might raise unpleasant memories.

    He also said that the Obama administration was planning a joint exercise in Georgia, and to treat Georgia and Ukraine as de facto NATO members, over the objections of Germany and other NATO members.

    When asked about whether Trump was backtracking on his previous comments about getting along with Russia due to a quote of Trump saying none of Putin's compliments about him would make him go easy on Trump in negotiations, Cohen said, first, that Putin really wasn't that complimentary about Trump, but, second, that he was encouraged by Trump's use of the "negotiations", because there are no such negotiations being conducted now.

    Related, the FT over the weekend quoted Turkey's president warning his NATO allies that the Black Sea was becoming "a Russian lake", and of the need to confront Russia.

    So, to recap:

    - Germany has welcomed millions of Muslims into Europe.

    - London just elected a Muslim mayor.

    - We have a new Cold War with Russia -- and are, apparently, risking a hot war in Ukraine -- in part to bolster Turkey, which is also being bribed by Germany over migration.

    Maybe the real power in Europe isn't Germany but Turkey?

    On the one hand, you say that Germany doesn’t want to get into a confrontation with Russia.

    Then you say that Turkey DOES want more confrontation with Russia.

    Then you say that Germany does whatever Turkey tells it to do.

    So at least one of these statements is not true.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    "Germany does whatever Turkey tells it to do" overstates the case a bit, but...
    https://twitter.com/MarksLarks/status/733052453260800000
  63. @5371
    Britons worried about the EU have historically been far more worried about the things France does in it than the things Germany does. Just as from 1919-33 (at least) they were much more hostile to France than to Germany.
    As for the outlandish nonsense of "Sean", Germany's "traditional desire to dominate Europe" was a misinterpretation of her attempts to cope with her unfavourable strategic position, whereas the only threat to Germany's security now is from the migrants themselves.

    Britain has been more or less continuously allied with France since at least 1933 (and I’m not sure it’s accurate to say that they were really more hostile to Germany during the period ’19 to ’33) and before that during WWI, starting with the Triple Entente of 1907. Britain was “historically” opposed to American interests as well. But that was 70+ years ago so I’m not sure what relevance it has any more, any more than the 1920s KKK has much to do with the America of 2016.

    The British were really not that wild about the Soviets leaving Germany at the end of the Cold War – a divided Germany was one less threat they had to worry about.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    No wonder Britain was so successful controlling other countries... they had so much experience at applying divide and rule in Europe.
    , @The Alarmist

    "The British were really not that wild about the Soviets leaving Germany at the end of the Cold War – a divided Germany was one less threat they had to worry about."
     
    And yet they signed up to that Lisbon Treaty thingy ... I guess so they could keep an eye on their Continental adversaries. Problem is that those bloody Continentals keep voting down all the crap the UK wants in the EC. Don't they know who is supposed to be running the show?
  64. @helena
    Europe has got itself in a mess over Turkey. Turkey has been waiting for Accession for decades and economically inferior countries have been admitted in the meantime. And also in the meantime, Turkey has Islamised. So it would have been better to have admitted Turkey when it was still secular. But now the EU is backed into a corner, especially having just invited the rest of the world.

    My impression of the no. 1 reason for popular support for Brexit is 'sovereignty'. Secondly, immigration and Turkey membership. But the campaign has become a means for deciding Conservative leadership. If Boris won the leadership on the back of a Brexit vote there's a good chance he would simply turn round and make a deal with EU and dress it up as sufficient concession to quell any dissent. The Irish voted against the Treaty of Somewhere (Lisbon?) and so the name was changed, but little else, and the Irish accepted it. There's really not that much gusto for revolution in W Europe.

    The no. 1 economic reason for Bexit is, as someone recently said, 'the lower down the business scale one goes, from big business to small business, the more the business owners favour Brexit'.

    So it would have been better to have admitted Turkey when it was still secular.

    Maybe you could get a job as the foreign policy advisor to the rulers of Troy. For sure open the gates and let that beautiful secular Turkish horse in. What could go wrong?

  65. @Jack D
    Britain has been more or less continuously allied with France since at least 1933 (and I'm not sure it's accurate to say that they were really more hostile to Germany during the period '19 to '33) and before that during WWI, starting with the Triple Entente of 1907. Britain was "historically" opposed to American interests as well. But that was 70+ years ago so I'm not sure what relevance it has any more, any more than the 1920s KKK has much to do with the America of 2016.

    The British were really not that wild about the Soviets leaving Germany at the end of the Cold War - a divided Germany was one less threat they had to worry about.

    No wonder Britain was so successful controlling other countries… they had so much experience at applying divide and rule in Europe.

    • Replies: @Matra
    Otherwise known as resisting domination by one country, something that was usually good for the nations of the continent that had no hope of being great powers but always vulnerable to their stronger neighbours. If you think Britain's balance of power policy was so awful then perhaps you could tell us which dominant power you think the small continental nations should've been grovelling to.
  66. @Randal
    The historical policy of preventing any one power from dominating Europe is out of date now, since we are already anyway subordinate to a united continental power (the US), which technology has rendered adjacent to us in all the ways that matter. Another, much weaker, continental power on the other side is as likely to be a benefit (a balancing opportunity) as the existential threat it could have been until a century ago.

    And although there are always concerns about German dominance in Europe, I don't see these as really driving anything here. In most issues German predominance is seen as a useful counterweight to other forces in Europe, such as the transnational bureaucracy, or the southern/French bloc (admittedly going through a weak spell at the moment, but nevertheless always a potentially malign and powerful grouping as far as the UK is concerned, and far less likely to align with British interests on most important issues).

    Immigration is indeed the key, but it is also to some extent emblematic of the wider loss of control at the national level that is inherent in the creation of any supranational authority, and particularly one as intrusive as the EU.

    The best way to view Brexit, imo, is as the main currently active European front in the same titanic nationalism versus globalism struggle that animates the Trump/establishment fight in the US. Choose your sides appropriately.

    In fact, on its best (worst?) days, it was the dream of the EUers that a united Europe could form a political/economic/military counterweight to the US – in effect replace the role of the Soviet Union. That dream lies in tatters now. The EU never had any potential as a military organization. Mao said that power comes from the barrel of a gun. The only power that the EU had was over naming rights for cheese and other such weighty matters.

  67. okie says:
    @Lurker
    Boris Johnson is supposedly in charge of the 'leave' campaign in Britain. He's always favoured the EU - until now.

    And he is of Turkish origin. And not just any old Turk, his background is Donmeh (see many previous iSteve articles).

    i looked it up, one Turkish great-grandparent who died before his grandfather was born, , shortly followed by the great grandmother , who was English Swiss, and said grand father was subsequently raised by the his wholly English grandmother as completely English. In Slavery terms that makes him Octaroon -Turk and in cultural terms 0% due to the death of both great grandparents

  68. The eurozone experiment terminates in a ruin of ashes if Greek (and other sovereign) default sinks the German financial institutions.

    Deutschbank looked like it was teetering at this possibility earlier in the spring.

    I am a watcher of the economies right now.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    Spain is not growing at all, nor is France or Italy. And the migrant mess continues.
  69. @Jack D
    In the 19th century in the US there was a religious group called the Shakers, who were advanced in many ways - they developed many clever inventions and the furniture that they made had clean simple lines. Their society was egalitarian and women had leading roles. Economically they were quite successful because the quality products that they invented and designed were well liked by the public.

    There was just one little flaw to their religion - one of its tenets was abstinence from sex, so there were never any little Shakers. This makes sense for an organization founded by women. If you are spending your time giving birth and raising children, then there is no way that you can also participate fully in other matters such as running an economically self-supporting religious cult. For a while, they got by with converts and by taking in orphans, but eventually their membership dwindled to next to nothing and their villages were abandoned or turned into museums operated by non-Shakers.

    Modern liberalism is a slightly modified version of the Shaker religion and the outcome will be the same. Hillary Clinton, who barely managed to squeeze out one child, is the perfect flag bearer for this dead end cult.

    You’re pretty much wrong on all counts here.

    “Mother” Ann Lee’s goal was to create a utopian community where members would strive for perfection through a learned, aspirational, structured set of disciplined and innovative behaviors, skills, and interactions. Not one that sought to perpetuate itself genetically. Unlike, say, Jews or Muslims or Catholics.

    She actually foresaw that the original living community numbers would drop off over time, then prophesied that when their membership dropped to 5, the sect would renew (through, as usual, outside members coming in). We shall see about that. From what I’ve heard, however, the Sabbath Day Shaker community in Maine (e.g.) has no trouble populating its busy schedule of seasonal events with visiting families.

    The sect’s intent was educational and spiritual, not genetic. Many people joined Shaker communities for a time and left them to breed. I don’t know of any study of that.

    Judging from the number of people who commission Shaker style crafts or seek to learn them themselves, her “community” may have morphed into something different than she and her followers created. Most of the clients I’ve had for Shaker furniture and wooden artifacts were people deeply interested in this strain of Americanism (along with the Oneida, New Harmony, and other communities), and most have children.

    This all will be difficult to understand for people whose notion of America was fed to them in the 1950s and after by the (((entertainment industry))). But not all life strategies seek to recapitulate evolution and genetically isolate and advance tribal interets. Some life strategies seek to extend extend evolution’s potential by creating communities where the evolved can interact apart from and free of outside influences.

    This and their members’ genomes no doubt accounts for why the original Shaker communities were so richly innovative technically.

    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Some life strategies seek to extend extend evolution’s potential by creating communities where the evolved can interact apart from and free of outside influences.
     
    I don't think past tense is the look you're going for here.
    , @Jack D
    I frankly have no idea what you are talking about. Putting aside all the mystical new agey mumbo jumbo and prophesies, blah, blah, blah, the Shakers are down to 3 members. Not 3 billion or 3 million. Just 3. If you have inhaled so much new agey incense that you can't understand why that is not a good thing for the future of Shaker culture, I can't explain it to you. Some ideas are so stupid that only an intellectual could believe them. And if you apply the lessons of the Shakers to our society not as a warning but as a roadmap to extend evolution’s potential (whatever the hell that means), then we are bound for the same extinction too.
  70. @Romanian
    I'd say the Euros dodged a bullet for the time being. Turkey's slow conversion away from secularism was almost inevitable from a demographic standpoint. Did the European dithering sting the Kemalist sophisticates in the East of the country? Sure. It might even have hurt them politically. But, so long as the religious people in the Center and the East, including the Kurds, kept having more children, sponsored by the state in many cases, the outcome was not in question. The Western liberals have gotten used to the idea that they can piggyback onto other people's fertility by converting their children, and it worked for people from other classes, but of the same general culture and ethnicity. They've met their match in the new arrivals to Europe, though they are expending superhuman effort into not understanding this. The modernists of Turkey are failing in the same manner. Maybe it's just Islam that is less conducive to this sort of subversion. Or maybe our subversion worked (Enlightenment and all that) for better or worse because it came about in our midst and was tailored for our characteristics. Something like that was happening in the Middle East-North Africa region, too, tentatively, before Western intervention was added to back-to-rootsism among the Islamists to kill the new models - Arab socialism and nationalism, the Al-Nahda movement in late XIXth century and so on. I do not know where they would have led, but one can imagine.

    Gamal Abdel Nasser on the Muslim Brotherhood in the 1950s
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TX4RK8bj2W0

    That short video really is extraordinary in a hundred different ways.

    BTW, Nasser, for all his failings (and there were many) was a great politician. Compare him to Hillary – it’s like day and night. You see him up on the stage relaxed and confident and comfortable and joking and in command of his audience, convinced that history is on HIS side and that his opposition is just a bunch of hypocrites who do not practice what they preach. He’s not shrilly haranguing his audience in dictator style. Trump (and I mean this as a compliment) is more like Nasser than Hillary but Nasser was much better. Despite hating 99% of Nasser’s beliefs (his opposition to radical Islam was good) you just have to like the guy and his style.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    Nasser was also,in all likelihood, the least corrupt Arab ruler in modern times.
  71. @Jack D
    In the 19th century in the US there was a religious group called the Shakers, who were advanced in many ways - they developed many clever inventions and the furniture that they made had clean simple lines. Their society was egalitarian and women had leading roles. Economically they were quite successful because the quality products that they invented and designed were well liked by the public.

    There was just one little flaw to their religion - one of its tenets was abstinence from sex, so there were never any little Shakers. This makes sense for an organization founded by women. If you are spending your time giving birth and raising children, then there is no way that you can also participate fully in other matters such as running an economically self-supporting religious cult. For a while, they got by with converts and by taking in orphans, but eventually their membership dwindled to next to nothing and their villages were abandoned or turned into museums operated by non-Shakers.

    Modern liberalism is a slightly modified version of the Shaker religion and the outcome will be the same. Hillary Clinton, who barely managed to squeeze out one child, is the perfect flag bearer for this dead end cult.

    Excuse me, I meant to say “most of the clients I’ve had for Shaker STYLE furniture.” Which is to say, requesting features within that design, technical, materials, or craft idiom. Which is remarkably popular along with “Scandinavian” and “Asian/Japanese” among people who like refined simple form in their interior environments.

  72. @fox
    trump is already trying to backtrack on banning Muslims.

    He will just change it to banning all middle eastern/African people.

  73. @Anonymous
    " The European Union always was a CIA project, as Brexiteers discover "

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2016/04/27/the-european-union-always-was-a-cia-project-as-brexiteers-discov/

    Brexiteers should have been prepared for the shattering intervention of the US. The European Union always was an American project.

    It was Washington that drove European integration in the late 1940s, and funded it covertly under the Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations.

    While irritated at times, the US has relied on the EU ever since as the anchor to American regional interests alongside NATO.

    There has never been a divide-and-rule strategy.

    The eurosceptic camp has been strangely blind to this, somehow supposing that powerful forces across the Atlantic are egging on British secession, and will hail them as liberators.

    The anti-Brussels movement in France - and to a lesser extent in Italy and Germany, and among the Nordic Left - works from the opposite premise, that the EU is essentially an instrument of Anglo-Saxon power and 'capitalisme sauvage'.

    France's Marine Le Pen is trenchantly anti-American. She rails against dollar supremacy. Her Front National relies on funding from Russian banks linked to Vladimir Putin.

    Like it or not, this is at least is strategically coherent.

    The Schuman Declaration that set the tone of Franco-German reconciliation - and would lead by stages to the European Community - was cooked up by the US Secretary of State Dean Acheson at a meeting in Foggy Bottom. "It all began in Washington," said Robert Schuman's chief of staff.

    It was the Truman administration that browbeat the French to reach a modus vivendi with Germany in the early post-War years, even threatening to cut off US Marshall aid at a furious meeting with recalcitrant French leaders they resisted in September 1950.

    ...

    Nor are many aware of declassified documents from the State Department archives showing that US intelligence funded the European movement secretly for decades, and worked aggressively behind the scenes to push Britain into the project.

    As this newspaper first reported when the treasure became available, one memorandum dated July 26, 1950, reveals a campaign to promote a full-fledged European parliament. It is signed by Gen William J Donovan, head of the American wartime Office of Strategic Services, precursor of the Central Inteligence Agency.

    The key CIA front was the American Committee for a United Europe (ACUE), chaired by Donovan. Another document shows that it provided 53.5 per cent of the European movement's funds in 1958. The board included Walter Bedell Smith and Allen Dulles, CIA directors in the Fifties, and a caste of ex-OSS officials who moved in and out of the CIA.

    Papers show that it treated some of the EU's 'founding fathers' as hired hands, and actively prevented them finding alternative funding that would have broken reliance on Washington.

    ...

    There were horrible misjudgments along the way, of course. A memo dated June 11, 1965, instructs the vice-president of the European Community to pursue monetary union by stealth, suppressing debate until the "adoption of such proposals would become virtually inescapable". This was too clever by half, as we can see today from debt-deflation traps and mass unemployment across southern Europe.

    In a sense these papers are ancient history. What they show is that the American 'deep state' was in up to its neck. We can argue over whether Boris Johnson crossed a line last week by dredging up President Barack Obama's "part-Kenyan ancestry", but the cardinal error was to suppose that Mr Obama's trade threat had anything to do with the ordeals of his grandfather in a Mau Mau prison camp. It was American foreign policy boilerplate.
     

    This makes it all sound far more sinister than it really was. Washington realized that its fundamental mistake after WWI was allowing the French, who were eager for revenge, to rig the post war economic game in such a way that the Germans had no hope of recovery. This time they did not want to set the stage for more American boys to have to die in WWIII and preferred a united and prosperous Europe instead, especially since the Soviet Union had emerged as an even greater threat. And this time, they had the leverage, economic (Marshall Plan) and military (NATO) to get what they wanted. If that was a crime, then America is guilty, guilty, guilty.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Triumph104

    Washington realized that its fundamental mistake after WWI was allowing the French, who were eager for revenge, to rig the post war economic game in such a way that the Germans had no hope of recovery.
     
    That's what the French did to Haiti. Haiti won its independence from France in 1804. In 1825 France threatens to attack unless Haiti pays reparations for the French plantations and slaves lost in the Haitian Revolution. France also offers to recognize Haiti as a republic. After agreeing, it took several decades, but Haiti made its final payment in 1893.
    , @anon
    America's fundamental mistake was ENTERING WW1. That led to Lenin, Stalin, Versailles, Hitler, Holodomor, Holocaust and WW2.

    So yes, America is indeed truly guilty, guilty, guilty.
  74. AmericanaCON [AKA "Billy Mo"] says:

    Very interesting…

    What you are basically saying is that the Shakers put their own success before their own community. Their community couldn’t live on as they replaced their dying members with orphans and converts who didn’t have same strong belief. Naturally, you cannot replace the bloodline. This is why all societies have encouraged their people to have babies. I don’t think post-liberalism stem from the Shakers although there are similarities. The Shakers peaked in 1840. Modern liberalism is a product of different events occurring in the 20st century.

    The technological and economic advancements ought to be attributed The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (the title of Max Weber’s book) and the Northern European bourgeoisie-protestant culture. They were much more successful than the Shakers, an English charismatic sect. Most people (both men and women) want to have children. The current liberal regime had made it impossible for millions of men and women having them as they cannot afford them. It doesn’t matter if it’s Denmark or Japan. This is the very consequence of the dismantlement of a prosperous cohesive-society were children are highly valued and seen as the continuation of the people they belong to.

    We used to value child birth and we should do it again.

    • Replies: @Desiderius

    We used to value child birth and we should do it again.
     
    You'll need to figure out who we is first.
    , @Jack D

    I don’t think post-liberalism stem from the Shakers although there are similarities. The Shakers peaked in 1840. Modern liberalism is a product of different events occurring in the 20st century.
     
    I totally agree - modern post liberal society is not directly descended from the Shakers because they have no descendants. Rather the Shakers provide an object lesson in what happens to your society if you "forget" to have children.
    , @Anonymous
    The future will bring automation that displaces human workers and renders larger and larger numbers of us economically useless. What are all of those children in a rejuvenated society going to do when they grow up?
  75. Sean says:
    @5371
    Britons worried about the EU have historically been far more worried about the things France does in it than the things Germany does. Just as from 1919-33 (at least) they were much more hostile to France than to Germany.
    As for the outlandish nonsense of "Sean", Germany's "traditional desire to dominate Europe" was a misinterpretation of her attempts to cope with her unfavourable strategic position, whereas the only threat to Germany's security now is from the migrants themselves.

    A German economist recently provoked uproar by claiming that the poorest 40% in Germany have less wealth than their European equivalents. By some measures Germans are not rich even compared to the Irish
    http://www.irishtimes.com/business/personal-finance/how-rich-are-the-irish-1.2649475

    http://www.dw.com/en/ifo-economist-warns-of-conflict-between-refugees-and-poorer-germans/a-18956411

    Why is the German establishment backing Merkel ? Given the risks of creating a mass organised opposition and destroying all the post war political consensus, the German elite surely think her actions are going to bring them closer to some desirable objective.

    http://archive.spectator.co.uk/article/3rd-july-1971/31/enoch-powell-on-the-balance-of-power
    A logical contradiction can be lived with, long and sometimes happily, in real life, and that is what Germany is doing with the objectives of a political integration of Western Europe and a reunification of Germany; but it cannot be rationalised, and that is what Helmut Schmidt, as a working politician writing a book, attempted to do and failed. In the end, however, the contradiction has to get itself resolved in real life: one imperative drives out the other. My bet is that German reunification will drive out Western Political unification and the EEC: some day, I don’t know how, or when, I think we are going to get pattern no. 3.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    "A German economist recently provoked uproar by claiming that the poorest 40% in Germany have less wealth than their European equivalents."

    Germans tend to rent rather than buy houses. Strong rent controls and tenancy laws.

    Much European 'wealth' consists of overpriced property.

    After Tony Blair opened the borders to Eastern Europe, house prices (and private landlord numbers) increased massively in the UK, while house prices fell in Poland and Romania.


    (That said, Germans are poorer relatively than they were. Used to see a lot more German tourists in the UK.)

  76. Thank you for noticing the referendum, but I think your historical analysis misses a huge factor. Immigration weighs heavily with the voters, but the leaders of the two campaigns are not personally concerned about it – who could be so snobbish as to care what the servants look like? What divides them is the Industrial Revolution and therefore, indirectly, Germany.

    The Leavers regard the Industrial Revolution as one long unqualified triumph, the very wellspring of Britain’s greatness. They loathe Europe for stifling the spirit of Watt, Brunel and Rhodes. And Whittle. And Barnes Wallis. Let the beautiful beast of capitalism run free!

    The Remainers regard it as, at best, a necessary evil. Their sort positively admire modern Germany, its neutered capitalism, its bland political menu, its superficial classlessness, its constipated constitution (which, in a previous generation, they helped write). If Europe is a greater Germany, they want to be part of it.

    In this, though they would not care to be told so, they resemble the Germanophiles of Milner’s day, who also looked down on the provincial manufacturers in the ugly northern cities and saw nineteenth-century Germany as an attractive alternative.

    • Replies: @neon2
    Given that nineteenth-century Germany was both economically and culturally the most successful and attractive place on earth, I would say that the Milnerites were definitely on to something.
    What a tragedy that the Leavers of the day won out and started the Great War.
  77. @Olorin
    You're pretty much wrong on all counts here.

    "Mother" Ann Lee's goal was to create a utopian community where members would strive for perfection through a learned, aspirational, structured set of disciplined and innovative behaviors, skills, and interactions. Not one that sought to perpetuate itself genetically. Unlike, say, Jews or Muslims or Catholics.

    She actually foresaw that the original living community numbers would drop off over time, then prophesied that when their membership dropped to 5, the sect would renew (through, as usual, outside members coming in). We shall see about that. From what I've heard, however, the Sabbath Day Shaker community in Maine (e.g.) has no trouble populating its busy schedule of seasonal events with visiting families.

    The sect's intent was educational and spiritual, not genetic. Many people joined Shaker communities for a time and left them to breed. I don't know of any study of that.

    Judging from the number of people who commission Shaker style crafts or seek to learn them themselves, her "community" may have morphed into something different than she and her followers created. Most of the clients I've had for Shaker furniture and wooden artifacts were people deeply interested in this strain of Americanism (along with the Oneida, New Harmony, and other communities), and most have children.

    This all will be difficult to understand for people whose notion of America was fed to them in the 1950s and after by the (((entertainment industry))). But not all life strategies seek to recapitulate evolution and genetically isolate and advance tribal interets. Some life strategies seek to extend extend evolution's potential by creating communities where the evolved can interact apart from and free of outside influences.

    This and their members' genomes no doubt accounts for why the original Shaker communities were so richly innovative technically.

    Some life strategies seek to extend extend evolution’s potential by creating communities where the evolved can interact apart from and free of outside influences.

    I don’t think past tense is the look you’re going for here.

  78. @AmericanaCON
    Very interesting…

    What you are basically saying is that the Shakers put their own success before their own community. Their community couldn’t live on as they replaced their dying members with orphans and converts who didn’t have same strong belief. Naturally, you cannot replace the bloodline. This is why all societies have encouraged their people to have babies. I don’t think post-liberalism stem from the Shakers although there are similarities. The Shakers peaked in 1840. Modern liberalism is a product of different events occurring in the 20st century.

    The technological and economic advancements ought to be attributed The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (the title of Max Weber’s book) and the Northern European bourgeoisie-protestant culture. They were much more successful than the Shakers, an English charismatic sect. Most people (both men and women) want to have children. The current liberal regime had made it impossible for millions of men and women having them as they cannot afford them. It doesn’t matter if it’s Denmark or Japan. This is the very consequence of the dismantlement of a prosperous cohesive-society were children are highly valued and seen as the continuation of the people they belong to.

    We used to value child birth and we should do it again.

    We used to value child birth and we should do it again.

    You’ll need to figure out who we is first.

  79. @Romanian
    I'd say the Euros dodged a bullet for the time being. Turkey's slow conversion away from secularism was almost inevitable from a demographic standpoint. Did the European dithering sting the Kemalist sophisticates in the East of the country? Sure. It might even have hurt them politically. But, so long as the religious people in the Center and the East, including the Kurds, kept having more children, sponsored by the state in many cases, the outcome was not in question. The Western liberals have gotten used to the idea that they can piggyback onto other people's fertility by converting their children, and it worked for people from other classes, but of the same general culture and ethnicity. They've met their match in the new arrivals to Europe, though they are expending superhuman effort into not understanding this. The modernists of Turkey are failing in the same manner. Maybe it's just Islam that is less conducive to this sort of subversion. Or maybe our subversion worked (Enlightenment and all that) for better or worse because it came about in our midst and was tailored for our characteristics. Something like that was happening in the Middle East-North Africa region, too, tentatively, before Western intervention was added to back-to-rootsism among the Islamists to kill the new models - Arab socialism and nationalism, the Al-Nahda movement in late XIXth century and so on. I do not know where they would have led, but one can imagine.

    Gamal Abdel Nasser on the Muslim Brotherhood in the 1950s
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TX4RK8bj2W0

    That short video really is extraordinary in a hundred different ways.

    Or it could be that secularism is a stage in a generational cycle that comes back to the spiritual (to eventually generate a new secularism) rather than an end stage.

    The secular being the fruit of the sacred, the sacred the soil in which the secular grows anew.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    You forgot to add "all things being the same".

    But I hesitate to view this cycle as being benign when it takes place concurrently with technological, political, economic upheaval, as well as base treachery. It's an effect, not a cause, but I can't feel too passive about it when it means that peoples, cultures and states will have to shuffle off the stage of history to make way for others, without any indication that this will lead to improvement or something that I would term greater.

    Also, leaving aside the religious aspect of the cycle, I think the main thrust of current political culture is that the incumbents are doing their damnedest not to have to pass the reins. Leaving aside religion, every one of liberalism's successes was gained at the sufferance and later tolerance and acceptance of the dreaded and stifling Patriarchy - I do not know of any suffragist terrorism campaign, or of a successful rebellion that throws off the yoke of colonialism by defeating the metropolis (aside from Haiti, and we know how that turned out). It was the same with gay rights, the welfare state, universal voting, immigration and so on. Yet now that the Liberals are in power, they are not about to award the same consideration and freedom to resurgent rightists, nationalists and traditionalists. Frank Herbert had a line in Dune: "When I am Weaker Than You, I ask you for Freedom because that is according to your principles; when I am Stronger than you, I take away your Freedom Because that is according to my principles". So, in essence, somebody (not as a conspiracy, but rather a self-coordinating sub-culture working independently towards similar goals) is trying to throw off the cycle of prudence vs recklessness, conservatism vs progressivism, nativism vs alienism (what Sobran said) and, therefore, trying to prevent the remediation of the current regime's excesses.
  80. Black male is told an AirBNB unit is not available, makes a fake white profile, is told it is available, and sues.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-05-18/airbnb-sued-over-host-s-alleged-discrimination-against-black-man

    Seems like a good test of Steve’s observation that anti-discrimination laws don’t apply to cool young start-up companies run by goodwhites.

  81. @Randal

    Ideally there would be some people offering an alt-rightish analysis of European affairs (and whilst I’m at it, Israeli affairs) who were more knowledgeable on the subject.
     
    Realistically that would need British equivalents of sites like Unz and Vdare. Are there such, of any substance? Alternatively, US sites like the aforementioned would have to take the decision to host British-based writers on a regular basis.

    The problem with any British based site offering the kind of discussions you find on Unz and Vdare is that there would be a very real likelihood that the writers and owners would find themselves in prison (and I speak with some experience on this, as someone whose mere below the line political comments have resulted in my case being raised by specially connected minority lobby activists at Assistant Chief Constable level, in an attempt to get me harassed by the police and, ideally from their point of view, prosecuted - only time will tell whether they will succeed or not).

    “Realistically that would need British equivalents of sites like Unz and Vdare. Are there such, of any substance? Alternatively, US sites like the aforementioned would have to take the decision to host British-based writers on a regular basis.”

    May I suggest you look at Gates of Vienna?
    http://gatesofvienna.net/

    This is a US-based blog of high quality with a heavy focus on European (and English/British) affairs. They have several European correspondents already, but you could certainly try your luck with them. I’m absolutely certain they would keep your identity secret, were you to become a contributor.

    • Replies: @Randal

    May I suggest you look at Gates of Vienna?
     
    Like Breitbart they produce a lot of excellent stuff, especially on immigration, but they are a little too obsessed with the muslim issue for my taste, and (probably as a result) far too pro-Israeli.

    Really, though, we need to solve our problems with freedom of speech in this country rather than relying forever on the US's First Amendment protections (which anyway are likely to be abrogated within a few years).
  82. One of my commenters, Sean, offered the Machiavellian hypothesis that Ms. Merkel’s surprise 2015 decision to invite in a Million Muslim Mob was in reality a brilliant improvisation to disarm traditional British and French hostility toward German supremacy by recasting the mighty Reich as masochistically anti-ethnocentric, the Sweden of the south…

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    Seems a bit too clever ... how do they ever get the genie back in the bottle?
  83. The chances of England leaving the EU are the same as the chances of Texas leaving the Union . While it might be to the benefit of both to shed the domination of their enemies , they will never grow the balls to do so and even with a 90 % vote in favor of throwing off their parasitical masters the centralized state will never allow it . You will find Texans in the “volunteer” army slaughtering their own for a car payment and the bright hope of a pension . I wonder , does the white man deserve the freedoms bequeathed to him by those who came before ? I think not .

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    You have mistaken Texans for people living in Texas. And your underestimation of Texans can only be explained by ignorance.
  84. @Jack D
    In the 19th century in the US there was a religious group called the Shakers, who were advanced in many ways - they developed many clever inventions and the furniture that they made had clean simple lines. Their society was egalitarian and women had leading roles. Economically they were quite successful because the quality products that they invented and designed were well liked by the public.

    There was just one little flaw to their religion - one of its tenets was abstinence from sex, so there were never any little Shakers. This makes sense for an organization founded by women. If you are spending your time giving birth and raising children, then there is no way that you can also participate fully in other matters such as running an economically self-supporting religious cult. For a while, they got by with converts and by taking in orphans, but eventually their membership dwindled to next to nothing and their villages were abandoned or turned into museums operated by non-Shakers.

    Modern liberalism is a slightly modified version of the Shaker religion and the outcome will be the same. Hillary Clinton, who barely managed to squeeze out one child, is the perfect flag bearer for this dead end cult.

    Fun analogy Jack. I’m going to steal it.

    It’s the–now old–quip: “the future belongs to those who show up for it”.

    Female “empowerment” (which actually entails stripping them of their natural power) and female careerism are a death cult. And Hillary is like it’s goddess.

    It will be folks like the Mormons, the Muslims and the Orthodox Jews who people the next generation. Can’t say i’m fond of any of them. But, I’ve met several quality Mormon men (a few on the job and more in Scouting) and they are good folks. Too bad there isn’t some movement of just sane Western men and women to preserve our race and culture. But I guess human psychology is such that these things take–or at least work best–with some us-against-them religious element to promote group cohesion.

    Too bad, cause the highly fertile Cincinnati suburb I grew up in the 60s of 99% generic (though majority Germanic) white gentiles was a *really* nice place. Lack of diversity with the right sort of people is … awesome!

    • Replies: @neon2
    Quite right.
    The USA of anytime up to around 1968 was a wonderful place. It has been replaced by a dysfunctional hell, and the only consolation is that it will not last long.
  85. @Marty
    But since this was the Batchelor show, what's the Israel angle?

    Israel didn’t come up during the part of the segment I listened to.

  86. @RonaldB
    News of Obama's adventures in Europe, and specifically his tweaking the nose of Russia, are chilling.

    I think it's pretty well established by now that Obama in no way has the best interests of the US at heart...or in mind. So, the question is, what's to be gained by provoking Russia in an area very vital to Russia's security, but marginal to non-existent with regards to US security?

    I can't help thinking back to the origins of Islam, where the Byzantine and the Persian empire wore themselves out fighting each other, leaving the military preeminence to the emerging Arab armies of the desert, who may or may not have been following Islam at the time. The needless and destructive wars between Persia and the West, both bastions of civilization and even of human rights, opened the entire Middle East, Western Asia, and Eastern Europe, to Muslim conquest.

    Obama's actions are perfectly consistent with the concept of weakening the US and Europe through a war with Russia, combined with Muslim penetration of the US through unrestricted Muslim immigration.

    The FT article was written in part by a reporter on a Canadian warship in the Black Sea. NATO patrolling the Black Sea seems like Russia patrolling the Caribbean or the Gulf of Mexico.

  87. @Jack D
    On the one hand, you say that Germany doesn't want to get into a confrontation with Russia.

    Then you say that Turkey DOES want more confrontation with Russia.

    Then you say that Germany does whatever Turkey tells it to do.

    So at least one of these statements is not true.

    “Germany does whatever Turkey tells it to do” overstates the case a bit, but…

  88. @Bies Podkrakowski
    And for me it looks like something that talking heads in TV babble happily about while aborigines are buying new, reinforced doors, alarms and join Shooting Club in order to expedite getting gun permit.

    And for me it looks like something that talking heads in TV babble happily about while aborigines are buying new, reinforced doors, alarms and join Shooting Club in order to expedite getting gun permit.

    That’s good to know–not the sleazy bought-and-paid-for academic liars–but the aborigines working to get themselves armed.

    A terrible weakness in Europe is the lack of a 2nd amendment. WTSHTF native Europeans–except the Swiss–seem like they are going to be unarmed and will be steam rolled by their hostile states.

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    Americans really overrate the value of the 2nd amendment. In my case I know that any upstanding native Austrian citizen who really wants a gun can get one. Pretty much any aristocratic family has plenty of hunting weapons at their country houses. And because Austria has no 2nd amendment, they do a much better job of keeping guns out of the hands of the people who you don't want to have weapons - petty criminals, immigrants, mentally deficients, etc.

    In any case guns will not help you fight back against a government that is undermining you through long term demographic replacement.
    , @Lurker

    A terrible weakness in Europe is the lack of a 2nd amendment. WTSHTF native Europeans–except the Swiss–seem like they are going to be unarmed and will be steam rolled by their hostile states.
     
    True but we're already being steam rolled by our elites without shots fired by them. And in what way are gun owners stemming the immigrant tide in the US?
  89. @Triumph104

    2. The British welfare state model is mostly communitarian rather than contributory. Access to the NHS, Child Benefit and social housing etc is based on need. EU rules mean EU citizens must be treated identically to the British.

    3. Low paid work is subsidised via the tax credit system.

     

    Due to its low birth rate, Singapore's population is now 30 percent foreigners. Many are low wage workers from India, China, and the Philippines. Needless to say, foreigners don't get any government assistance.

    Singapore has about four million citizens and permanent residents. Only 3000 households receive government cash assistance. Families members are expected to help first, only when it is documented that no family member can assist will the government step in with aid.

    About 45,000 households (a third are ethnic Malay) live in low-income subsidized rental housing. It comes in two sizes: 1-room or 2-room. The 2-room (1 bedroom) flat is for households with three or more occupants.

    This woman lives in a 2-room flat with six children:

    https://youtu.be/EQGTNyw9Rmk?t=41

    “foreigners don’t get any government assistance”

    And they don’t get citizenship. This is the Gulf Arab model and I’m dead against it. I want to live in country where the population is enfranchised.

    We just don’t need mass immigration.

    As to social housing – there is decent social housing in Hong Kong and there used to be decent social housing in England. It had advantages like aiding labour mobility and keeping cities affordable.

    Thatcher sold it off with massive discounts to tennants. Now a lot of it is owned by investors – the rentier economy has replaced industry. But you can’t have decent social housing and mass immigration. Not in a country with 55 million people in 50,000 square miles where most immigration is to the south east corner.

  90. @Clyde
    Easy decision for Brexit! UK and Germany are the two poles of the EU.
    Brexit is a gamble to destroy or severely weaken the pro-migrant cabals located in the EU government and bureaucracy in Brussels. Weaken the pro-migrant cabals running Germany and the UK. UK Brexit nationalism can defeat them. The refugee pushers/profiteers will not stand when disunited. Get rid of them all!

    Maybe the Brexit will prompt the EU to do an about face on immigration. If there is one thing bureaucrats and politicians like, it is retaining their jobs.

  91. @Triumph104

    2. The British welfare state model is mostly communitarian rather than contributory. Access to the NHS, Child Benefit and social housing etc is based on need. EU rules mean EU citizens must be treated identically to the British.

    3. Low paid work is subsidised via the tax credit system.

     

    Due to its low birth rate, Singapore's population is now 30 percent foreigners. Many are low wage workers from India, China, and the Philippines. Needless to say, foreigners don't get any government assistance.

    Singapore has about four million citizens and permanent residents. Only 3000 households receive government cash assistance. Families members are expected to help first, only when it is documented that no family member can assist will the government step in with aid.

    About 45,000 households (a third are ethnic Malay) live in low-income subsidized rental housing. It comes in two sizes: 1-room or 2-room. The 2-room (1 bedroom) flat is for households with three or more occupants.

    This woman lives in a 2-room flat with six children:

    https://youtu.be/EQGTNyw9Rmk?t=41

    Due to its low birth rate, Singapore’s population is now 30 percent foreigners. Many are low wage workers from India, China, and the Philippines. Needless to say, foreigners don’t get any government assistance.

    While way, way better than the Western welfare state model, where the looting starts immediately upon entry, this is still a *terrible* idea.

    There’s only one number that is correct for low-skill immigration–zero. (You can maybe tolerate a small trickle of high-skill immigrants with the background that they will quickly assimilate into your national race. But even that must be limited to avoid any development of a hostile elite caste.) The problem is in the next generation … these new folks will be “Singaporeans”. They aren’t going back. So Singapore is just making itself dumber.

    Singapore needs to kick the immigration habit. Ramp up its fertility promoting measures in ways that incentivize eugenic fertility and just deal with its situation.

    Their isn’t actually any virus out there that’s killing babies–other than the mind virus of modernity. But guys are still guys and gals are still gals. Get the incentives right and as wage rates rise and housing prices fall … nature will take it’s course.

    Same goes of course–even more so–for the West.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Not even the Japanese have been able to reduce immigration down to zero. The only place that have zero immigration are hellholes like Ukraine where no one in their right mind would want to move. Even if you could get the birthrate up to replacement level (or close to it - most places in the world were nicer when they had fewer people than they have today) you have the too many chiefs and not enough Indians problems. Even with all the robots in the world, there are still crappy jobs that natives of high income countries (even high income countries with replacement level birth rates) don't want their kids to do. And it's not just purely a matter of employers not wanting to pay enough. There are crappy jobs that modern Westerners just don't want to do period - they are terrible jobs (cleaning toilets, etc.) and they are overqualified for them and they don't want them.
    , @Triumph104
    Former prime minister and senior minister Goh Chok Tong said that when times get bad the foreigners can go back home and they won't be Singapore's problem. He only foresees perhaps 10 percent of the permanent residents becoming full citizens.

    I plan on visiting the country in a year or two and have been watching a lot of videos. The Singapore of 1993 is gone. They now have gambling and legalized prostitution (foreigners, of course). Half the citizens would leave if they could. The men are angry that they have to do mandatory military service but foreigners and first-generation permanent residents don't.

    I believe the majority of Singapore's foreigners are low-income, brought in to keep wages down. That may be the new model for the developed world: make housing and education so expensive for citizens that the stop having children and replenish the workforce with low-wage temporary (H1B) foreigners.

    https://youtu.be/RZcw6Ldbbvc?t=199
  92. @Dave Pinsen
    Interesting column. Here's a complication to consider for a future one.

    Stephen F. Cohen said on John Batchelor's radio show a few hours ago that the Obama administration is essentially risking a repeat of the Cuban Missile Crisis in Europe. He said they were demanding Germany supply troops to station on Russia's border near some new missile installation, and Germany is objecting because they think having German troops on Russia's border might raise unpleasant memories.

    He also said that the Obama administration was planning a joint exercise in Georgia, and to treat Georgia and Ukraine as de facto NATO members, over the objections of Germany and other NATO members.

    When asked about whether Trump was backtracking on his previous comments about getting along with Russia due to a quote of Trump saying none of Putin's compliments about him would make him go easy on Trump in negotiations, Cohen said, first, that Putin really wasn't that complimentary about Trump, but, second, that he was encouraged by Trump's use of the "negotiations", because there are no such negotiations being conducted now.

    Related, the FT over the weekend quoted Turkey's president warning his NATO allies that the Black Sea was becoming "a Russian lake", and of the need to confront Russia.

    So, to recap:

    - Germany has welcomed millions of Muslims into Europe.

    - London just elected a Muslim mayor.

    - We have a new Cold War with Russia -- and are, apparently, risking a hot war in Ukraine -- in part to bolster Turkey, which is also being bribed by Germany over migration.

    Maybe the real power in Europe isn't Germany but Turkey?

    Obama’s passive-aggressive pajama boys have been trying to get one over on Bad Vlad ever since Vlad showed them how its done in Syria to obliterate ISIS. Ever notice all the wacky lefty females working at State? They are always trying to even up the score with Vlad who knows and shows what a joke Obama is. What a sick joke his State Department is, thrusting their gay ambassadors (Dem party donors) onto various third world nations. Plus promoting the gay agenda in many foreign lands that want nothing to do with it.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Plus promoting the gay agenda in many foreign lands that want nothing to do with it.
     
    Too true. But if they would wholeheartedly embrace it, the results (theoretically) would reduce their population burden. Why don't they enthusiastically sign up? Maybe they are eligible for U.N. subsidies for the same?
  93. @Jack D
    Britain has been more or less continuously allied with France since at least 1933 (and I'm not sure it's accurate to say that they were really more hostile to Germany during the period '19 to '33) and before that during WWI, starting with the Triple Entente of 1907. Britain was "historically" opposed to American interests as well. But that was 70+ years ago so I'm not sure what relevance it has any more, any more than the 1920s KKK has much to do with the America of 2016.

    The British were really not that wild about the Soviets leaving Germany at the end of the Cold War - a divided Germany was one less threat they had to worry about.

    “The British were really not that wild about the Soviets leaving Germany at the end of the Cold War – a divided Germany was one less threat they had to worry about.”

    And yet they signed up to that Lisbon Treaty thingy … I guess so they could keep an eye on their Continental adversaries. Problem is that those bloody Continentals keep voting down all the crap the UK wants in the EC. Don’t they know who is supposed to be running the show?

  94. @Anatoly Karlin

    One of my commenters, Sean, offered the Machiavellian hypothesis that Ms. Merkel’s surprise 2015 decision to invite in a Million Muslim Mob was in reality a brilliant improvisation to disarm traditional British and French hostility toward German supremacy by recasting the mighty Reich as masochistically anti-ethnocentric, the Sweden of the south...
     
    https://twitter.com/akarlin88/status/728175438409797636

    Seems a bit too clever … how do they ever get the genie back in the bottle?

  95. @Anonym
    No wonder Britain was so successful controlling other countries... they had so much experience at applying divide and rule in Europe.

    Otherwise known as resisting domination by one country, something that was usually good for the nations of the continent that had no hope of being great powers but always vulnerable to their stronger neighbours. If you think Britain’s balance of power policy was so awful then perhaps you could tell us which dominant power you think the small continental nations should’ve been grovelling to.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    Otherwise known as resisting domination by one country, something that was usually good for the nations of the continent that had no hope of being great powers but always vulnerable to their stronger neighbours. If you think Britain’s balance of power policy was so awful then perhaps you could tell us which dominant power you think the small continental nations should’ve been grovelling to.

    Please tell me where in my comment I said that I thought Britain's "balance of power" policy was "so awful". All I said was that they had plenty of practice, and the implication was that when it came to navigating their way in the world, with other great powers and their colonies, it was second nature for them to play this game.

    Divide and rule is kind of hard to grok, or at least was for me it was. I've played plenty of RTS games over the years, pitting your own strategy against an opponent, or as a team against an opposing team. However, the real world experience of making your way among multiple powers is something not really seen in any game I was playing. And I guess you can see it with every ism faultline that has been (((promoted))) over the years, such as sexism, classism, racism, you name it. But you have to actually be noticing to see the latter.
  96. @Matra
    Otherwise known as resisting domination by one country, something that was usually good for the nations of the continent that had no hope of being great powers but always vulnerable to their stronger neighbours. If you think Britain's balance of power policy was so awful then perhaps you could tell us which dominant power you think the small continental nations should've been grovelling to.

    Otherwise known as resisting domination by one country, something that was usually good for the nations of the continent that had no hope of being great powers but always vulnerable to their stronger neighbours. If you think Britain’s balance of power policy was so awful then perhaps you could tell us which dominant power you think the small continental nations should’ve been grovelling to.

    Please tell me where in my comment I said that I thought Britain’s “balance of power” policy was “so awful”. All I said was that they had plenty of practice, and the implication was that when it came to navigating their way in the world, with other great powers and their colonies, it was second nature for them to play this game.

    Divide and rule is kind of hard to grok, or at least was for me it was. I’ve played plenty of RTS games over the years, pitting your own strategy against an opponent, or as a team against an opposing team. However, the real world experience of making your way among multiple powers is something not really seen in any game I was playing. And I guess you can see it with every ism faultline that has been (((promoted))) over the years, such as sexism, classism, racism, you name it. But you have to actually be noticing to see the latter.

  97. @Olorin
    You're pretty much wrong on all counts here.

    "Mother" Ann Lee's goal was to create a utopian community where members would strive for perfection through a learned, aspirational, structured set of disciplined and innovative behaviors, skills, and interactions. Not one that sought to perpetuate itself genetically. Unlike, say, Jews or Muslims or Catholics.

    She actually foresaw that the original living community numbers would drop off over time, then prophesied that when their membership dropped to 5, the sect would renew (through, as usual, outside members coming in). We shall see about that. From what I've heard, however, the Sabbath Day Shaker community in Maine (e.g.) has no trouble populating its busy schedule of seasonal events with visiting families.

    The sect's intent was educational and spiritual, not genetic. Many people joined Shaker communities for a time and left them to breed. I don't know of any study of that.

    Judging from the number of people who commission Shaker style crafts or seek to learn them themselves, her "community" may have morphed into something different than she and her followers created. Most of the clients I've had for Shaker furniture and wooden artifacts were people deeply interested in this strain of Americanism (along with the Oneida, New Harmony, and other communities), and most have children.

    This all will be difficult to understand for people whose notion of America was fed to them in the 1950s and after by the (((entertainment industry))). But not all life strategies seek to recapitulate evolution and genetically isolate and advance tribal interets. Some life strategies seek to extend extend evolution's potential by creating communities where the evolved can interact apart from and free of outside influences.

    This and their members' genomes no doubt accounts for why the original Shaker communities were so richly innovative technically.

    I frankly have no idea what you are talking about. Putting aside all the mystical new agey mumbo jumbo and prophesies, blah, blah, blah, the Shakers are down to 3 members. Not 3 billion or 3 million. Just 3. If you have inhaled so much new agey incense that you can’t understand why that is not a good thing for the future of Shaker culture, I can’t explain it to you. Some ideas are so stupid that only an intellectual could believe them. And if you apply the lessons of the Shakers to our society not as a warning but as a roadmap to extend evolution’s potential (whatever the hell that means), then we are bound for the same extinction too.

  98. According to the Wikipedia article, Foreign-born
    population in the UK (as of 2012), the largest groups
    (apart from the Irish) in 1000’s came from India
    (729), Poland (646), Pakistan (461), Germany (304),
    Bangladesh (234), U.S. (217), France (136), Italy (133),
    Sri Lanka (131), Lithuania (130), Romania (101). However,
    these figures are dwarfed by the total immigration from
    Africa (1.2 million).

    I was surprised by the large number of German immigrants.
    As to Poland, it must be kept in mind that until recently,
    with minor exceptions such as Joseph Conrad (Korzeniowski)
    who settled in England in the 1890s after 20 years of seafaring,
    and the Polish airmen who flew for RAF in the Battle of Britain,
    and their descendants, there had been virtually no Polish
    immigration to Britain. The Polish population in Britain in
    2001 was only 60,000.

    The standard joke in the Polish community in the UK is that
    the Polish come to England as part of the “Beautify Britain”
    program, and they should be paid just for being there. Adding
    hundreds of thousand of blue and green eyes to the color
    palette of England should be worth something!

    But seriously, spending a few years in Britain is an excellent
    deal for the Polish – they pick up the language, save money
    to buy a condo in Poland, and send millions to their relatives
    back home. Thousands, of course, get university degrees in
    England, including Oxford and Cambridge, and go into
    management.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    Post-WW2 nearly 250,000 Poles remained/settled in the UK - mostly soldiers, sailors, airmen and their families.

    We hear constantly about the non-white arrivals from the 1940s onward (The greatest thing that ever happened to us!™) but for a a long time the Poles would have been the largest single immigrant group in Britain. Yet that has largely gone down the memory hole, unlike more vibrant, highly problematic incomers.
  99. @AnotherDad

    Due to its low birth rate, Singapore’s population is now 30 percent foreigners. Many are low wage workers from India, China, and the Philippines. Needless to say, foreigners don’t get any government assistance.
     
    While way, way better than the Western welfare state model, where the looting starts immediately upon entry, this is still a *terrible* idea.

    There's only one number that is correct for low-skill immigration--zero. (You can maybe tolerate a small trickle of high-skill immigrants with the background that they will quickly assimilate into your national race. But even that must be limited to avoid any development of a hostile elite caste.) The problem is in the next generation ... these new folks will be "Singaporeans". They aren't going back. So Singapore is just making itself dumber.

    Singapore needs to kick the immigration habit. Ramp up its fertility promoting measures in ways that incentivize eugenic fertility and just deal with its situation.

    Their isn't actually any virus out there that's killing babies--other than the mind virus of modernity. But guys are still guys and gals are still gals. Get the incentives right and as wage rates rise and housing prices fall ... nature will take it's course.

    Same goes of course--even more so--for the West.

    Not even the Japanese have been able to reduce immigration down to zero. The only place that have zero immigration are hellholes like Ukraine where no one in their right mind would want to move. Even if you could get the birthrate up to replacement level (or close to it – most places in the world were nicer when they had fewer people than they have today) you have the too many chiefs and not enough Indians problems. Even with all the robots in the world, there are still crappy jobs that natives of high income countries (even high income countries with replacement level birth rates) don’t want their kids to do. And it’s not just purely a matter of employers not wanting to pay enough. There are crappy jobs that modern Westerners just don’t want to do period – they are terrible jobs (cleaning toilets, etc.) and they are overqualified for them and they don’t want them.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    And it’s not just purely a matter of employers not wanting to pay enough. There are crappy jobs that modern Westerners just don’t want to do period – they are terrible jobs (cleaning toilets, etc.) and they are overqualified for them and they don’t want them.
     
    Seriously Jack?

    You don't have to lick the toilets clean.

    I failed to line up an internship one summer and did temp labor. One job was at P+Gs general headquarters building. I cleaned toilets, mopped the johns, buffed the floors, wiped down desks, emptied trash, vacuumed ... did it for barely more than minimum wage, didn't die of shame and went back to school in the fall.

    Cleaning toilets and other janitorial stuff is not even difficult work. Who the heck do you think is cleaning most of the toilets, public, office, hotel, restaurants in Japan or even Germany--two of the most advanced nations on earth? Japanese and Germans. And it used to be that way in America. Seriously, restrooms were cleaned in America before the Mexican invasion.

    This is *entirely* a question of employers paying enough. And when you have to raise the pay rate too high for something, folks change procedures, develop work arounds, automate it away, substitute, etc. etc.

    This idea that you need immigration for *anything* is nonsense. Most societies down through the ages have *not* had immigration to any significant extent at all. Immigration is invasion and is resisted while a society, people, nation can resist it. And yet these societies were able to do all the work they needed to do.
    , @Clifford Brown
    There is a mythical place called America prior to 1985. You should look it up some time. You will be amazed what you will find. It is kind of like Narnia, but with more Trans Ams.

    If you reduce welfare and disability benefits, there will suddenly be "modern Westerners" who can clean toilets.
    , @Big Bill

    There are crappy jobs that modern Westerners just don’t want to do period – they are terrible jobs (cleaning toilets, etc.) and they are overqualified for them and they don’t want them.
     
    Jack, how old are you? Where are you from? Who are your people? No offense, but you really don't sound like you come from around here.

    Do you have servants to make your bed, clean your room, cook your food, wash your clothes, and change Jack Junior's nappies? A wife/homemaker? Is that work too terrible?
  100. @Anonym
    Alternatively, US sites like the aforementioned would have to take the decision to host British-based writers on a regular basis.

    Milo Yiannopoulos?

    Yeah, how does he get away with it, now that you mention it? I hope he has a US passport somehow.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    Milo has a Greek father and a Jewish mother. I think he gets away with it because he can pull both the Jew card and the homo card. Maybe he has US residency or citizenship. Plus he is eloquent and amazingly quick on his feet, as you'd kind of expect from an upper echelon Jew/Greek. Zuckerberg would be a fool to be interviewed by him, though I'd love to see it.
  101. OT – I don’t know if anyone has been watching the “Power Players” version of Jeopardy! which is hosted in Washington D.C. They had former RNC chairman Michael Steele on. It did not go well. I guess I shouldn’t be surprised that politicians and journalists aren’t really as smart as they’d like to think they are, but how was he so clueless on Final Jeopardy? He tries to make up for his ignorance with a feeble joke. He later on Twitter tried to blame his poor performance on the clicker, but he stood there blankly most of the time well out of his depth. He was once one of the leaders of the party??

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    My clicker was broken when I was on Jeopardy in 1994.
    , @Jack D
    Look up Wolf Blitzer on Jeopardy on youtube - you'll be shocked at what an idiot he is (or maybe you won't). OTOH, Andy Richter (Conan O'Brien's sidekick) did great on the same show - go figure.
  102. @Jack D
    This makes it all sound far more sinister than it really was. Washington realized that its fundamental mistake after WWI was allowing the French, who were eager for revenge, to rig the post war economic game in such a way that the Germans had no hope of recovery. This time they did not want to set the stage for more American boys to have to die in WWIII and preferred a united and prosperous Europe instead, especially since the Soviet Union had emerged as an even greater threat. And this time, they had the leverage, economic (Marshall Plan) and military (NATO) to get what they wanted. If that was a crime, then America is guilty, guilty, guilty.

    Washington realized that its fundamental mistake after WWI was allowing the French, who were eager for revenge, to rig the post war economic game in such a way that the Germans had no hope of recovery.

    That’s what the French did to Haiti. Haiti won its independence from France in 1804. In 1825 France threatens to attack unless Haiti pays reparations for the French plantations and slaves lost in the Haitian Revolution. France also offers to recognize Haiti as a republic. After agreeing, it took several decades, but Haiti made its final payment in 1893.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    IIRC, Haiti once produced something like a third of the GDP of the French Empire. 1893 was a long time ago. Haiti's problem is too many Haitians.
  103. Stop boasting about predicting the obvious and get off your ass you wind bag and pass my comments .

  104. @Anon87
    OT - I don't know if anyone has been watching the "Power Players" version of Jeopardy! which is hosted in Washington D.C. They had former RNC chairman Michael Steele on. It did not go well. I guess I shouldn't be surprised that politicians and journalists aren't really as smart as they'd like to think they are, but how was he so clueless on Final Jeopardy? He tries to make up for his ignorance with a feeble joke. He later on Twitter tried to blame his poor performance on the clicker, but he stood there blankly most of the time well out of his depth. He was once one of the leaders of the party??

    My clicker was broken when I was on Jeopardy in 1994.

    • Replies: @donut
    Think about how much humiliation that broken clicker spared you .
    , @Anonym
    My clicker was broken when I was on Jeopardy in 1994.

    Yeah, that's what they all say.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efHzGxEzDQA

    , @Anon87
    Did you at least do the obligatory button mashing "see, I'm trying to buzz in!!" move? Or stare slack jawed, mouthing sounds to look like the answer is on the tip of your tounge like Steele?
  105. @AmericanaCON
    Very interesting…

    What you are basically saying is that the Shakers put their own success before their own community. Their community couldn’t live on as they replaced their dying members with orphans and converts who didn’t have same strong belief. Naturally, you cannot replace the bloodline. This is why all societies have encouraged their people to have babies. I don’t think post-liberalism stem from the Shakers although there are similarities. The Shakers peaked in 1840. Modern liberalism is a product of different events occurring in the 20st century.

    The technological and economic advancements ought to be attributed The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (the title of Max Weber’s book) and the Northern European bourgeoisie-protestant culture. They were much more successful than the Shakers, an English charismatic sect. Most people (both men and women) want to have children. The current liberal regime had made it impossible for millions of men and women having them as they cannot afford them. It doesn’t matter if it’s Denmark or Japan. This is the very consequence of the dismantlement of a prosperous cohesive-society were children are highly valued and seen as the continuation of the people they belong to.

    We used to value child birth and we should do it again.

    I don’t think post-liberalism stem from the Shakers although there are similarities. The Shakers peaked in 1840. Modern liberalism is a product of different events occurring in the 20st century.

    I totally agree – modern post liberal society is not directly descended from the Shakers because they have no descendants. Rather the Shakers provide an object lesson in what happens to your society if you “forget” to have children.

  106. SFG says:
    @AndrewR
    Not sure what her lack of youthful experience with democrazy has to do with anything. Britain and Sweden have had democrazy since well before their leaders were born and they're really no better than Germany in terms of suicidal policies.

    All y’all eager for a king always seem to think he’s going to do what you want, ignoring that the people who would most likely become king–i.e., rich people–are pretty much the ones who are responsible for the mess we’re in now. Just imagine King Obama or Queen Hillary. Even King W would probably get us into more wars. How on earth would you get a King Pat Buchanan?

    Democracy is the only thing that keeps the global elite from doing even *more* damage.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    To the contrary, I say confiscate the elite's wealth, or tell them they have to run the country themselves. Democratic government removes ownership incentives.
  107. @Anon87
    OT - I don't know if anyone has been watching the "Power Players" version of Jeopardy! which is hosted in Washington D.C. They had former RNC chairman Michael Steele on. It did not go well. I guess I shouldn't be surprised that politicians and journalists aren't really as smart as they'd like to think they are, but how was he so clueless on Final Jeopardy? He tries to make up for his ignorance with a feeble joke. He later on Twitter tried to blame his poor performance on the clicker, but he stood there blankly most of the time well out of his depth. He was once one of the leaders of the party??

    Look up Wolf Blitzer on Jeopardy on youtube – you’ll be shocked at what an idiot he is (or maybe you won’t). OTOH, Andy Richter (Conan O’Brien’s sidekick) did great on the same show – go figure.

    • Replies: @JsP
    "You can pretend to be serious but you can't pretend to be witty."

    Not at all hard to figure. Comedy is a brutally competitive field where only the strong survive (on their wits).

    Sucking at the corporate teat of CNN requires a different skill set--like connections and a willingness to suckle eagerly (see eg Anderson Cooper, another moron exposed on jeopardy).


    Norm Macdonald is another brilliant comedian who dominated a TV quiz show.

    Heck, even Cheech Marin crushed those CNN anchors and affirmative action baby political hacks (some Hispanic woman with a lot of clout in the GOP was particularly dumb)

    , @Anon87
    Wolf was easily the worst. He even bombed the practice game! Fully exposed as a dolt but still collecting checks without shame.
  108. @Steve Sailer
    My clicker was broken when I was on Jeopardy in 1994.

    Think about how much humiliation that broken clicker spared you .

  109. @utu
    We should not forger that Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and elsewhere was supported by CIA in 1950s. Religious fanatics were an American weapon of choice used to fight the Soviet influence. Then it was done in Afghanistan in 1970s and then more recently in Libya and Syria when Soviet Union was no more. The plan to refurbish Middle East (Yinon Plan and PNAC) required the destruction of functioning nation states like Iraq, Syria and Libya and replacing them with a reign of easily controlled and manipulated chaos. No body is more responsible for the muslim radicalization than CIA and Mossad. Hamas was born with a great help of the latter in order to undermine PLO of Arafat that was much more constructive and had significant international support and recognition. Who is supporting Uyghur radicals in China?

    Puh-lease. The Yinon Plan was not a “plan” – it was just an obscure article in an obscure journal (that happened to foresee the future fragmentation of the Arab world). Here’s a pro-tip: Mentioning the “Yinon Plan” makes whatever you write self-refuting. Mentioning the CIA and Mossad in one sentence gets you bonus points for same.

    • Replies: @Clyde

    Here’s a pro-tip: Mentioning the “Yinon Plan” makes whatever you write self-refuting. Mentioning the CIA and Mossad in one sentence gets you bonus points for same.
     
    What does saying "false flag operation" get you?
  110. Another hate hoax exposed.
    http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_573ca944e4b0aee7b8e8aa8e?ir=Black+Voices

    And yes the liar is Black as usual. Blacks in 2016 have jumped the shark. These hate hoaxes are getting out of control.

  111. @SFG
    Yeah, how does he get away with it, now that you mention it? I hope he has a US passport somehow.

    Milo has a Greek father and a Jewish mother. I think he gets away with it because he can pull both the Jew card and the homo card. Maybe he has US residency or citizenship. Plus he is eloquent and amazingly quick on his feet, as you’d kind of expect from an upper echelon Jew/Greek. Zuckerberg would be a fool to be interviewed by him, though I’d love to see it.

  112. @Steve Sailer
    My clicker was broken when I was on Jeopardy in 1994.

    My clicker was broken when I was on Jeopardy in 1994.

    Yeah, that’s what they all say.

  113. @Jack D
    Not even the Japanese have been able to reduce immigration down to zero. The only place that have zero immigration are hellholes like Ukraine where no one in their right mind would want to move. Even if you could get the birthrate up to replacement level (or close to it - most places in the world were nicer when they had fewer people than they have today) you have the too many chiefs and not enough Indians problems. Even with all the robots in the world, there are still crappy jobs that natives of high income countries (even high income countries with replacement level birth rates) don't want their kids to do. And it's not just purely a matter of employers not wanting to pay enough. There are crappy jobs that modern Westerners just don't want to do period - they are terrible jobs (cleaning toilets, etc.) and they are overqualified for them and they don't want them.

    And it’s not just purely a matter of employers not wanting to pay enough. There are crappy jobs that modern Westerners just don’t want to do period – they are terrible jobs (cleaning toilets, etc.) and they are overqualified for them and they don’t want them.

    Seriously Jack?

    You don’t have to lick the toilets clean.

    I failed to line up an internship one summer and did temp labor. One job was at P+Gs general headquarters building. I cleaned toilets, mopped the johns, buffed the floors, wiped down desks, emptied trash, vacuumed … did it for barely more than minimum wage, didn’t die of shame and went back to school in the fall.

    Cleaning toilets and other janitorial stuff is not even difficult work. Who the heck do you think is cleaning most of the toilets, public, office, hotel, restaurants in Japan or even Germany–two of the most advanced nations on earth? Japanese and Germans. And it used to be that way in America. Seriously, restrooms were cleaned in America before the Mexican invasion.

    This is *entirely* a question of employers paying enough. And when you have to raise the pay rate too high for something, folks change procedures, develop work arounds, automate it away, substitute, etc. etc.

    This idea that you need immigration for *anything* is nonsense. Most societies down through the ages have *not* had immigration to any significant extent at all. Immigration is invasion and is resisted while a society, people, nation can resist it. And yet these societies were able to do all the work they needed to do.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    You're right.

    Every allegedly crappy job done by immigrants either is being done or was done by Americans as well. Tom Arnold worked in a meatpacking plant, and judging from his descriptions of it, didn't seem to hate it.

    Twenty years ago, I had a blonde American maid cleaning my hotel room in Michigan, and had white American men as cab drivers in Spokane and Scottsdale. Haven't been to any of those places recently, so I don't know what's going on there now.
    , @helena
    Agreed. A society 'should' be able to monitor, regulate and reproduce itself. Western policies in 1970s promoted 'save the planet' instead of promoting 'save the family'.
    , @Randal

    This is *entirely* a question of employers paying enough. And when you have to raise the pay rate too high for something, folks change procedures, develop work arounds, automate it away, substitute, etc. etc.

    This idea that you need immigration for *anything* is nonsense. Most societies down through the ages have *not* had immigration to any significant extent at all. Immigration is invasion and is resisted while a society, people, nation can resist it. And yet these societies were able to do all the work they needed to do.
     
    Exactly right, and the point that somehow needs to be rammed home in the propaganda contest that is currently dominated by the globalist media giants. The incorrect assertion made by Jack D is the "received opinion" in the wider US sphere population precisely because the propaganda war has been won so comprehensively by the globalists over the past few decades.
    , @JsP
    Greeks and Romans developed civilization because their elites had slaves.

    The English class system had servants.


    No, it's not at all obvious that societies can do the work themselves.
  114. @AnotherDad

    Due to its low birth rate, Singapore’s population is now 30 percent foreigners. Many are low wage workers from India, China, and the Philippines. Needless to say, foreigners don’t get any government assistance.
     
    While way, way better than the Western welfare state model, where the looting starts immediately upon entry, this is still a *terrible* idea.

    There's only one number that is correct for low-skill immigration--zero. (You can maybe tolerate a small trickle of high-skill immigrants with the background that they will quickly assimilate into your national race. But even that must be limited to avoid any development of a hostile elite caste.) The problem is in the next generation ... these new folks will be "Singaporeans". They aren't going back. So Singapore is just making itself dumber.

    Singapore needs to kick the immigration habit. Ramp up its fertility promoting measures in ways that incentivize eugenic fertility and just deal with its situation.

    Their isn't actually any virus out there that's killing babies--other than the mind virus of modernity. But guys are still guys and gals are still gals. Get the incentives right and as wage rates rise and housing prices fall ... nature will take it's course.

    Same goes of course--even more so--for the West.

    Former prime minister and senior minister Goh Chok Tong said that when times get bad the foreigners can go back home and they won’t be Singapore’s problem. He only foresees perhaps 10 percent of the permanent residents becoming full citizens.

    I plan on visiting the country in a year or two and have been watching a lot of videos. The Singapore of 1993 is gone. They now have gambling and legalized prostitution (foreigners, of course). Half the citizens would leave if they could. The men are angry that they have to do mandatory military service but foreigners and first-generation permanent residents don’t.

    I believe the majority of Singapore’s foreigners are low-income, brought in to keep wages down. That may be the new model for the developed world: make housing and education so expensive for citizens that the stop having children and replenish the workforce with low-wage temporary (H1B) foreigners.

  115. How deranged do you have to be to not have an absolute undeniable opinion that the removal of an unnecessary, unelected, unaccountable layer of political filth is a good?

  116. @Triumph104

    2. The British welfare state model is mostly communitarian rather than contributory. Access to the NHS, Child Benefit and social housing etc is based on need. EU rules mean EU citizens must be treated identically to the British.

    3. Low paid work is subsidised via the tax credit system.

     

    Due to its low birth rate, Singapore's population is now 30 percent foreigners. Many are low wage workers from India, China, and the Philippines. Needless to say, foreigners don't get any government assistance.

    Singapore has about four million citizens and permanent residents. Only 3000 households receive government cash assistance. Families members are expected to help first, only when it is documented that no family member can assist will the government step in with aid.

    About 45,000 households (a third are ethnic Malay) live in low-income subsidized rental housing. It comes in two sizes: 1-room or 2-room. The 2-room (1 bedroom) flat is for households with three or more occupants.

    This woman lives in a 2-room flat with six children:

    https://youtu.be/EQGTNyw9Rmk?t=41

    Gee what a tragedy !! here’s a solution:

    http://dogtime.com/dog-health/general/42-spaying-your-female

  117. @Jack D
    Puh-lease. The Yinon Plan was not a "plan" - it was just an obscure article in an obscure journal (that happened to foresee the future fragmentation of the Arab world). Here's a pro-tip: Mentioning the "Yinon Plan" makes whatever you write self-refuting. Mentioning the CIA and Mossad in one sentence gets you bonus points for same.

    Here’s a pro-tip: Mentioning the “Yinon Plan” makes whatever you write self-refuting. Mentioning the CIA and Mossad in one sentence gets you bonus points for same.

    What does saying “false flag operation” get you?

  118. @Jack D
    BTW, Nasser, for all his failings (and there were many) was a great politician. Compare him to Hillary - it's like day and night. You see him up on the stage relaxed and confident and comfortable and joking and in command of his audience, convinced that history is on HIS side and that his opposition is just a bunch of hypocrites who do not practice what they preach. He's not shrilly haranguing his audience in dictator style. Trump (and I mean this as a compliment) is more like Nasser than Hillary but Nasser was much better. Despite hating 99% of Nasser's beliefs (his opposition to radical Islam was good) you just have to like the guy and his style.

    Nasser was also,in all likelihood, the least corrupt Arab ruler in modern times.

  119. Europeans favoring each other over outsiders is unthinkably racist.

    Preference is not prejudice.

  120. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous
    In or out, the British have shown the capability to wreck their own country all by themselves. They've willingly saddled themselves with blacks, Pakistanis and other third worlders going back to the days of Enoch Powell. Brexit might help as a first step if they're willing to keep going but it's probable they won't seeing as how they've elected a Muslim for mayor of London. They have no will to do anything to reverse what's already taken place.

    Sadly I have to agree with you. Here in Canada we are just as bad. Our Liberal government just apologized today for sending back a boatload of Sikh illegal aliens 102 YEARS AGO! Of course Trudeau jr. just wants the Sikh vote, but it is still unbelievable how demented western countries have now become about non-whites.

  121. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @anon
    Well, Britain is still a monarchy today. And the Kaiser's Germany wasn't less democratic than early twentieth century Britain.
    And being an "experienced democracy" didn't help when London was literally taken over by Muslims.

    German workers in 1914 were well fed and well housed. They had access to first rate health care. In contrast the British people were largely crammed into the worst slums in Europe. Any casual observer strolling about cities in Germany and Britain prior to WW1 would certainly have concluded the average German worker and his family were much better off then their British counterparts.

  122. @Jack D
    This makes it all sound far more sinister than it really was. Washington realized that its fundamental mistake after WWI was allowing the French, who were eager for revenge, to rig the post war economic game in such a way that the Germans had no hope of recovery. This time they did not want to set the stage for more American boys to have to die in WWIII and preferred a united and prosperous Europe instead, especially since the Soviet Union had emerged as an even greater threat. And this time, they had the leverage, economic (Marshall Plan) and military (NATO) to get what they wanted. If that was a crime, then America is guilty, guilty, guilty.

    America’s fundamental mistake was ENTERING WW1. That led to Lenin, Stalin, Versailles, Hitler, Holodomor, Holocaust and WW2.

    So yes, America is indeed truly guilty, guilty, guilty.

    • Agree: Thea
  123. It’s late, and I have medicine head (though no cancer cells in my lymph node closest… to excisions! – yey!) because my leg hurts like crazy. The tingling sensation of tissue loss is an experience I hope, y’all never have to experience. But, scheisse, no cancer cells taking over my system…yet… so, can’t complain about the pain – I’m good. I’m eyeing a bottle of Tequila in the liquor cabinet right now.

    The sun is damaging. I spent copious amounts of time on the water from 1960’s-1980’s; before that Australian study on skin cancer in 1973 ( doomed, but “not dead yet!) And, please, for God’s sake, don’t let your children or grands, get tattoos…it ups their chances of melanoma, btw. I don’t have tattoos, and neither do my sons, but injecting metals (dyes) underneath your skin is an invitation for melanoma/carcinoma. OK, done with my public health message. Onto important stuff, however; OT big time.

    OT: http://www.courant.com/politics/capitol…/hc-chris-murphy-vp-story;html.

    I have been thinking a lot about the election these last several weeks. I think Hillary may pick Chris Murphy ( a perfectly nice guy) to be her VP. Why? I think her team was appalled by New England going so overwhelmingly for Trump. I think the taking on of the TX Castro bros may be a mistake: Because: white guys. She may need a young white guy to take down Trump’s ascendancy.

    If Chris Murphy gains traction, I believe it may be an effort on Clinton’s part to align herself with a young, white guy who is very articulate, intelligent, experienced, non-controversial, likable…all those things. He has been very good for the state of Connecticut – everybody likes him – just speculating. And, more importantly: if Trump picks a shallow candidate (Palin) well, it’s all over – finito.

    New England is gonna rule this time around; Tom has been pilloried; our Patriots have been maligned. Our real estate has not recovered; we have massive hardship (esp CT) in our cities; severe outsourcing and H1B invasion; and, scheisse, New Englanders are reveling in being a hot-head area that may once again matter, just like it did in 1770’s. All of you guys know I loathe Palin…many Repubs of the past; and, if stupid decisions are made, then stupid decisions are made, and it all sucks.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Newt's leading the VP predictions right now: https://www.predictit.org/Market/1529/Who-will-win-the-2016-Republican-vice-presidential-nomination
    , @SFG
    Sorry about your melanoma. That sucks.

    FWIW, now they're finding that vitamin D deficiency due to *lack* of sun exposure can raise your risk of cancer too.

    Tattoos-I always figured it was a mistake you couldn't undo, and never got any, but if you tell the kids not to, won't they just do it to rebel when they get old enough?

    I can't see Trump picking another northeasterner (yes, I know New England is culturally distinct from and hates NYC but the rest of the country forgets the difference--at least when it comes to Boston you have two arrogant, rich, old, walkable cities with a wealth of cultural institutions that seem to think of each other as antitheses for some reason). Hillary, well, I'd think she'd go for a southerner or midwesterner to extend the party's reach. You add a New Englander if you think you're weak in the Northeast; Trump needs to win the Rust Belt.
    , @Clyde
    http://drsircus.com/medicine/sodium-bicarbonate-baking-soda/sodium-bicarbonate-effective-cancer-medicine Potassium bicarbonate too. It is a common item for home wine makers.
  124. OT: Trump above Hillary in the polls.

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/05/18/trump-edges-clinton-new-fox-poll/

    I see a landslide in November for Trump. Americans love a winner.

  125. @RamonaQ
    Peter Hitchens seems to be in favor of Brexit but of the view that a win for remain will legitimize the pro-EU argument for decades.

    Since you seem knowledgeable, maybe you can explain why UKIP never took off like Trump did? Farage has really impressed me throughout this whole Brexit campaign as one of the only UK politicians capable of talking sense. Also, why is the loony left so much in favor of Brexit? It's all very confusing

    why UKIP never took off like Trump did?

    There was actually something of a UKIP boomlet in 2014 (they reached 25% in one poll). The reason they didn’t do better is because David Cameron has more political talent in his little finger than every Republican politician combined. Seriously, watch Prime Minister’s Questions on YouTube; it’s astonishing how much better British politicians are at debating than American politicians are.

    Also, why is the loony left so much in favor of Brexit?

    The EU started off as a right-wing initiative — a free trade area (the “Common Market”). In the first referendum in 1975, Thatcher and the Tories campaigned for it while Labour was officially neutral but with the majority of the membership, led by ur-loony-leftist Tony Benn, against.

    The subsequent expansions of EU power were also right-wing; harmonization and liberalization of regulations, and the Euro, joining which was supposed to require balancing the budget and keeping inflation minimal on an indefinite basis.

    Then they added the removal of border controls and free movement, still not particularly leftist since it was still confined to Western Europe.

    And then, in the mid-90’s/early 00’s, Conquest’s Second Law (“any organization not explicitly right-wing sooner or later becomes left-wing”) came true, with the creation of the European Court of Human Rights and the expansion agenda.

    Since then, the sides have switched, with EU supporters mainly being on the left and opponents on the right. Most of the old loony leftists (such as Corbyn) are now firmly in the Remain camp, and it’s just a few especially crazy types like George Galloway who still support Out. (Presumably, they’re still awaiting word from Moscow that the party line has changed).

  126. @jim jones
    Everyone I know is intending to vote "Leave", it is seen as a rejection of the bureaucratic class.

    Paging Pauline Kael…

  127. @Lurker
    Boris Johnson is supposedly in charge of the 'leave' campaign in Britain. He's always favoured the EU - until now.

    And he is of Turkish origin. And not just any old Turk, his background is Donmeh (see many previous iSteve articles).

    Actually, he has one Turkish great-grandparent. That was a Young Turk, but I await evidence of his Donmeh origins.

  128. @Triumph104

    Washington realized that its fundamental mistake after WWI was allowing the French, who were eager for revenge, to rig the post war economic game in such a way that the Germans had no hope of recovery.
     
    That's what the French did to Haiti. Haiti won its independence from France in 1804. In 1825 France threatens to attack unless Haiti pays reparations for the French plantations and slaves lost in the Haitian Revolution. France also offers to recognize Haiti as a republic. After agreeing, it took several decades, but Haiti made its final payment in 1893.

    IIRC, Haiti once produced something like a third of the GDP of the French Empire. 1893 was a long time ago. Haiti’s problem is too many Haitians.

    • Replies: @iffen
    Haiti once produced something like a third of the GDP of the French Empire.

    Only because slaves were ground up to produce sugar.

    After the revolution, not too many workers could be enticed to work themselves to death on sugar plantations (who would have guessed) in 5-6 years as was necessary to produce the "GNP."

    Adoption of the civilized plan of grinding yourself down in 50-60 years like we do now requires a lot of infrastructure, human capital, capital and real economic structure.
  129. @Romanian
    I'd say the Euros dodged a bullet for the time being. Turkey's slow conversion away from secularism was almost inevitable from a demographic standpoint. Did the European dithering sting the Kemalist sophisticates in the East of the country? Sure. It might even have hurt them politically. But, so long as the religious people in the Center and the East, including the Kurds, kept having more children, sponsored by the state in many cases, the outcome was not in question. The Western liberals have gotten used to the idea that they can piggyback onto other people's fertility by converting their children, and it worked for people from other classes, but of the same general culture and ethnicity. They've met their match in the new arrivals to Europe, though they are expending superhuman effort into not understanding this. The modernists of Turkey are failing in the same manner. Maybe it's just Islam that is less conducive to this sort of subversion. Or maybe our subversion worked (Enlightenment and all that) for better or worse because it came about in our midst and was tailored for our characteristics. Something like that was happening in the Middle East-North Africa region, too, tentatively, before Western intervention was added to back-to-rootsism among the Islamists to kill the new models - Arab socialism and nationalism, the Al-Nahda movement in late XIXth century and so on. I do not know where they would have led, but one can imagine.

    Gamal Abdel Nasser on the Muslim Brotherhood in the 1950s
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TX4RK8bj2W0

    That short video really is extraordinary in a hundred different ways.

    I have always had admiration for Nasser and his vision for the Arab world.

    Still one has to wonder how representative this video is of Egyptian society at the time. Nasser was part of the Cairo elite who came of age when Egypt was still a British protectorate. His values were likely very different from those of the village peasants who made up a majority of the population. Perhaps Arab secularism was merely a holdover from the age of European colonization and that a return to Islamic conservatism was inevitable once Europeans and European influenced Arab elites no longer had undue influence over Muslim societies.

    With Socialism no longer a global restraint and alternative in the Arab world, Islam has more free reign.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    What you say is true, but the character, culture, inclinations, aspirations, sympathies of elites are very important for the ultimate character of their society. Remember what John Addams said about elites being people who can count on another person's vote aside from their own. This means influence. While I've argued that the demographic strength of the religious masses was a factor in the decline of secularism in Turkey and elsewhere (and it probably was), what also contributed to prior elites losing power is their loss in status relative to emerging religious and jihadi elites (teleological groups, which have a stated goal to which they can rally society, like the spread of Islam). Politics being, at its basest, a mechanism for establishing the relative status of different groups, we can consider that whether Nasser and the guys in the hall were representative of Egyptian society is not that relevant for an age of reform and advancement, but rather whether they could make their society conform to their expectations. Even European Enlightenment, for good or ill, was driven by various elites (noblemen and noblewomen and their salons, philosophers, the aristocracy given to impecunious scientific and philosophical explorations, the newly made men of the ambitious classes) . And the Nasserites and their successors did for a while, and they could have done so permanently... maybe. The Kemalists had a good run in Turkey. They managed to extinguish my people's age old enmity towards them, by making us see them as charming and pushy Turks rather than the hated Ottomans.
  130. @AnotherDad

    And it’s not just purely a matter of employers not wanting to pay enough. There are crappy jobs that modern Westerners just don’t want to do period – they are terrible jobs (cleaning toilets, etc.) and they are overqualified for them and they don’t want them.
     
    Seriously Jack?

    You don't have to lick the toilets clean.

    I failed to line up an internship one summer and did temp labor. One job was at P+Gs general headquarters building. I cleaned toilets, mopped the johns, buffed the floors, wiped down desks, emptied trash, vacuumed ... did it for barely more than minimum wage, didn't die of shame and went back to school in the fall.

    Cleaning toilets and other janitorial stuff is not even difficult work. Who the heck do you think is cleaning most of the toilets, public, office, hotel, restaurants in Japan or even Germany--two of the most advanced nations on earth? Japanese and Germans. And it used to be that way in America. Seriously, restrooms were cleaned in America before the Mexican invasion.

    This is *entirely* a question of employers paying enough. And when you have to raise the pay rate too high for something, folks change procedures, develop work arounds, automate it away, substitute, etc. etc.

    This idea that you need immigration for *anything* is nonsense. Most societies down through the ages have *not* had immigration to any significant extent at all. Immigration is invasion and is resisted while a society, people, nation can resist it. And yet these societies were able to do all the work they needed to do.

    You’re right.

    Every allegedly crappy job done by immigrants either is being done or was done by Americans as well. Tom Arnold worked in a meatpacking plant, and judging from his descriptions of it, didn’t seem to hate it.

    Twenty years ago, I had a blonde American maid cleaning my hotel room in Michigan, and had white American men as cab drivers in Spokane and Scottsdale. Haven’t been to any of those places recently, so I don’t know what’s going on there now.

    • Replies: @415 reasons
    In Japan they have Japanese -- Japanese! -- ticket takers and maids and cashiers and cab drivers and fast food cooks
    , @Triumph104
    I lived in Salt Lake City five years ago. The landscaping crew at my small apartment complex was all white.

    The "need" for immigration is the desire to suppress wages. Elon Musk paying foreign construction workers $5/hour is the latest example.

    In the book Freakonomics, drug dealers were interested in being janitors. Janitors earned more and weren't at daily risk of violence or arrest.
  131. @Lagertha
    It's late, and I have medicine head (though no cancer cells in my lymph node closest... to excisions! - yey!) because my leg hurts like crazy. The tingling sensation of tissue loss is an experience I hope, y'all never have to experience. But, scheisse, no cancer cells taking over my system...yet... so, can't complain about the pain - I'm good. I'm eyeing a bottle of Tequila in the liquor cabinet right now.

    The sun is damaging. I spent copious amounts of time on the water from 1960's-1980's; before that Australian study on skin cancer in 1973 ( doomed, but "not dead yet!) And, please, for God's sake, don't let your children or grands, get tattoos...it ups their chances of melanoma, btw. I don't have tattoos, and neither do my sons, but injecting metals (dyes) underneath your skin is an invitation for melanoma/carcinoma. OK, done with my public health message. Onto important stuff, however; OT big time.

    OT: www.courant.com/politics/capitol.../hc-chris-murphy-vp-story;html.

    I have been thinking a lot about the election these last several weeks. I think Hillary may pick Chris Murphy ( a perfectly nice guy) to be her VP. Why? I think her team was appalled by New England going so overwhelmingly for Trump. I think the taking on of the TX Castro bros may be a mistake: Because: white guys. She may need a young white guy to take down Trump's ascendancy.

    If Chris Murphy gains traction, I believe it may be an effort on Clinton's part to align herself with a young, white guy who is very articulate, intelligent, experienced, non-controversial, likable...all those things. He has been very good for the state of Connecticut - everybody likes him - just speculating. And, more importantly: if Trump picks a shallow candidate (Palin) well, it's all over - finito.

    New England is gonna rule this time around; Tom has been pilloried; our Patriots have been maligned. Our real estate has not recovered; we have massive hardship (esp CT) in our cities; severe outsourcing and H1B invasion; and, scheisse, New Englanders are reveling in being a hot-head area that may once again matter, just like it did in 1770's. All of you guys know I loathe Palin...many Repubs of the past; and, if stupid decisions are made, then stupid decisions are made, and it all sucks.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    Jesus. Newt manages to make Trump and Cruz look popular (Obama was leading him like 59-36 in the 2012 polls). If Trump actually picks him then I'll have to start believing my neocon friend who claims Trump is a Clinton plant.
    , @RadicalCenter
    Would be a surefire way for Trump to lose. What a stupid idea.
  132. Steve I think you are overthinking things. Erdogan got on fine with Putin, and Assad, and Iraq, and Iran. He had a “no problems with neighbors” policy that allowed (connected) Turkish merchants to make a fortune in Syria, Iraq, and trading with Iran and Russia. Then he got greedy and ambitious, saw that Obama was weak and not committed to maintain America’s sway in the ME, and figured Assad was a goner. So he went all in on ISIS figuring that he’d bite off a big chunk of Syria, Iraq, and Lebanon (hence the hostility to traditional partner Israel). Erdogan gradually saw himself as the anti-Ataturk, able to roll everything back and become a Suleiman the Magnificent.

    Just human nature, a thug getting greedy when the former big man left.

    Merkel, same thing. She criticized multiculturalism but saw votes and elite applause by letting in half the ME and Third World. Now the FT reports that subrosa the Germans are trying to deport refugees there and not let any in, but not admit a change in policy because that would be disastrous politics. The only reason the Christian Democrats have not bounced Merkel is because she pre-emptively over the last decade removed all possible challengers.

    Merkel is a typical post-menopausal professional women with contempt for her own people’s men and idiot delusions about the Third World and particularly its men. Nothing more than her feelz, tingles, and short term politics are at stake.

    Brexit is the only option for Britain to maintain its welfare state and cohesion. Merkel has made it clear that EU states will all equally share in the massive Camp of the Saints coming to Western Europe from Africa and the ME and Pakistan/Afghanistan/Iran. Germany will attempt not to take any more but Britain will be stuffed with them. Draining rapidly any hope of social welfare for natives as “migrants” (youfs and the diverse) take up all the resources. With the social order of the refugee camps in Calais as daily life. To avoid that, only Brexit is necessary, but not sufficient in and of itself, to stop that from happening.

    In the end, Europe will be over-run, in varying degrees, from country to country, by the Third World. Some places will revolt quickly to maintain not only social/ethnic/racial cohesion but social welfare spending. Switzerland, Poland, Czech Republic, and Hungary are good bets. Possibly the Netherlands, likely Ireland, and Austria. Others will face civil war, and sooner rather than later over what else, race and money? Entirely avoidable but Merkel wanted to feed her feelz, tingles, and two week press cycle.

    Erdogan probably eyes Greece, Bulgaria, Macedonia, and other former parts of the Ottoman Empire as easy targets while Putin probably still dreams of restoring Constantinople. None of that will end well. Disaster strikes when leaders don’t have a sense of the possible. The Kaiser failed to see the Schlieman Plan was a fantasy where everything went right and there were no delays. Napoleon wished away the Russian winter, as did Hitler.

    But then, America leaving the ME has a cost. Erdogan’s ambition colliding with Putin’s is one of them.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted

    Brexit is the only option for Britain to maintain its welfare state and cohesion.
     
    As far as working guys are concerned, the welfare state might as well not exist, even down to the NHS (an internationalist global charity outfit, like MSF). I doubt we'd notice it imploding, apart from the wailing and gnashing from the Special Ones.
    As for cohesion .. there's a tricky calculus involved. Brexit might trigger a 2nd secessionist vote from Wee Fat Nikla, dictator of the porridgewogs. Which means the Taffs would kick off too. And could embolden the Shinners et al. on the Left Island to force a Unification at last ("take those troublesome unemployable indigents off yer hands, yer'onner??") ... etc. etc.
    So England sensu stricto would be oot, and all the interminably pauper bits of FKOGBANI clamouring to be renegotiated in, for handouts carrying on as usual (no more Barnett formula). For which a stiff (resources&autonomy) price would doubtless be exacted by the Bundeskanzlerin and her minions in Rome and Paris.
    Omnishambles. But hilarious, like most history.
    FTR, I'm for oot.
    , @Lagertha
    I totally agree with Whiskey. I want all EU countries (EU has absolutely sucked for some of them) to drop out of the EU. It was stupid and idealistic and worthless in the first place to establish something as dumb (low-energy) as the EU: just a con-job by the global elite...because: people are still so effing tribal, corrupt, stupid and different. There is too much hate...and it will never end. Hate is such a tough part of the human mind. Hate is there and it is reflected (Egyptair downing) everyday. Hate rules right now.
    , @Diversity Heretic
    Small correction: The German World War I plan was known as the Schlieffen Plan, named after the Chief of the German General Staff who devised it. The Kaiser turned out to be no great fan of the Schlieffen Plan--he wanted to mobilize German forces only against Russia in support of Austria-Hungary, but was told by the then Chief of the German General Staff Helmuth von Moltke the Younger that such a modification of the Plan was not possible. The Kaiser reportedly said "Your uncle [Helmuth von Moltke the Elder] would have given me a different answer." It played to all of the younger von Moltke's insecurities, and he had a nervous breakdown during the First Battle of the Marne.
    , @RadicalCenter
    Superb. One correction: Merkel is a typical CHILD-LESS postmenopausal "woman" who hates and resents her own people and has bizarre expectations and fantasies regarding "strong men" from hostile, backwards cultures and races.

    Merkel and every German official who doesn't loudly oppose this invasion, needs to be voted out, or impeached, whatever the fastest means is that's allowed by German law. Then they should be prosecuted and imprisoned for the rest of their lives.
  133. @The Alarmist
    I just got an ear-full from my colleagues in The City to the effect that Brexit will fail (probably true, since the govt holds critical levers that drive the discussion) and why that is a good thing. I could easily rebut every point of the Remain advocates, but it all boils down to this: The Remain argument is premised on the EU continuing as a viable, relatively harmonious going concern, and that is a really bold assumption. One or two more summers like last and there will be no EU to speak of, other than a shell police state that is focused on dealing with spiraling "internal problems."

    The UK has probably shackled itself to the Titanic.

    One or two more summers like last and there will be no EU to speak of, other than a shell police state that is focused on dealing with spiraling “internal problems.”

    Feature or a Bug?

    Alternatively, destroying social cohesion and the long term viability of social democracy may just be why the EU was set up in the first place.

  134. @Jack D
    Not even the Japanese have been able to reduce immigration down to zero. The only place that have zero immigration are hellholes like Ukraine where no one in their right mind would want to move. Even if you could get the birthrate up to replacement level (or close to it - most places in the world were nicer when they had fewer people than they have today) you have the too many chiefs and not enough Indians problems. Even with all the robots in the world, there are still crappy jobs that natives of high income countries (even high income countries with replacement level birth rates) don't want their kids to do. And it's not just purely a matter of employers not wanting to pay enough. There are crappy jobs that modern Westerners just don't want to do period - they are terrible jobs (cleaning toilets, etc.) and they are overqualified for them and they don't want them.

    There is a mythical place called America prior to 1985. You should look it up some time. You will be amazed what you will find. It is kind of like Narnia, but with more Trans Ams.

    If you reduce welfare and disability benefits, there will suddenly be “modern Westerners” who can clean toilets.

    • Agree: Anonym
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    A magical place indeed, where Anglo-Europeans were near 90% of the population and "immigrants" were seasonal migrants in peach orchards or British and French engineers fleeing socialist schemes back home.

    In case anybody missed it, this reduction to 60% of the population happened in one lifetime. One more lifetime, and your Anglo-European children will be an ethnic minority.
    , @Jack D
    1. I'm old enough to remember pre-1985 America, though for the decade before that I lived in NY and Phila, where most people who did menial type jobs were either black or Puerto Rican or immigrant (the proverbial Polish cleaning lady). I do remember visiting Seattle and being shocked to see American white people doing those kind of jobs.

    2. Historically the US had a lot of foreign born but the % tapered off between the Immigration Acts of '24 and '65 and then started going up again, so if you pick the right date you can pick the high water mark, which does not represent the "typical " American situation at all but just one particular moment in time.
  135. Looked for your review of “The lives of others” and got the following (have only got it looking for your stuff):

    NOTICE OF HACKING
    The link which forwarded your browser to this webpage may have come from a website which has was hacked for the purpose of redirecting consumers to websites selling counterfeit products. Accordingly, the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida has ordered that the intermediary domain names which control traffic from potentially hacked websites be taken into the custody of the court and redirected to this webpage. Unfortunately, taking control of these domains does not undo the hacking of the original legitimate website, so the website may still be at risk.

    If you believe your website may have been compromised, please contact your host or webmaster for information on how to fix the problem and secure your website. Online resources such as StopBadware.org can provide you with more information.

    More information about the Federal Lawsuit which resulted in the creation of this webpage can be found at: http://servingnotice.com/Kxd6us/index.html

    • Replies: @anon
    People have made this very post numerous times over the years-- seems Steve either no longer owns the domain or must remain mum due to ongoing litigation.
  136. @RamonaQ
    Peter Hitchens seems to be in favor of Brexit but of the view that a win for remain will legitimize the pro-EU argument for decades.

    Since you seem knowledgeable, maybe you can explain why UKIP never took off like Trump did? Farage has really impressed me throughout this whole Brexit campaign as one of the only UK politicians capable of talking sense. Also, why is the loony left so much in favor of Brexit? It's all very confusing

    Britain’s parlimentry seats are elected by first-past-the-post, so the candidate who wins the most votes gets the seat. In the 2015 election UKIP came 3rd in terms of votes but because they were spread throughout the UK they only ended up with one seat. Compare the SNP who got 47 seats with 1,400,000 votes with UKIPs 1 seat with 3,800,000 votes.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom_general_election,_2015

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    UK and USA need proportional representation in Congress / Parliament.
  137. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @unpc downunder
    Don't worry, Philippe Legrain assures us that the refugees will double Europe's investment in them within 5 years:

    https://www.rt.com/news/343394-eu-refugees-economy-report/

    I like the single, one-word comment in response to this article - "Nonsense."

    It’s economic illiteracy of the 5 year old ‘Cinderella’ ,’ Snow White’, ‘Big Rock Candy Mountain’ type of the highest order that should disgrace anyone with more than a room temperature IQ for giving it more than one milliseond’s credence.

    So, ‘refugees’ sprinkle ‘magic economic fairy dust’ on their target nation merely by settling there and attracting ‘the blessing of the gods’, why, the even defecate gold coins, according to Legrain.

    Strange, therefore, that Bangladesh, a place which desperately needs this fairy dust and – the torrent of gold excrement – isn’t doing its damndest to invite the gold-shitters in.

  138. @AnotherDad

    And it’s not just purely a matter of employers not wanting to pay enough. There are crappy jobs that modern Westerners just don’t want to do period – they are terrible jobs (cleaning toilets, etc.) and they are overqualified for them and they don’t want them.
     
    Seriously Jack?

    You don't have to lick the toilets clean.

    I failed to line up an internship one summer and did temp labor. One job was at P+Gs general headquarters building. I cleaned toilets, mopped the johns, buffed the floors, wiped down desks, emptied trash, vacuumed ... did it for barely more than minimum wage, didn't die of shame and went back to school in the fall.

    Cleaning toilets and other janitorial stuff is not even difficult work. Who the heck do you think is cleaning most of the toilets, public, office, hotel, restaurants in Japan or even Germany--two of the most advanced nations on earth? Japanese and Germans. And it used to be that way in America. Seriously, restrooms were cleaned in America before the Mexican invasion.

    This is *entirely* a question of employers paying enough. And when you have to raise the pay rate too high for something, folks change procedures, develop work arounds, automate it away, substitute, etc. etc.

    This idea that you need immigration for *anything* is nonsense. Most societies down through the ages have *not* had immigration to any significant extent at all. Immigration is invasion and is resisted while a society, people, nation can resist it. And yet these societies were able to do all the work they needed to do.

    Agreed. A society ‘should’ be able to monitor, regulate and reproduce itself. Western policies in 1970s promoted ‘save the planet’ instead of promoting ‘save the family’.

  139. @Dave Pinsen
    Newt's leading the VP predictions right now: https://www.predictit.org/Market/1529/Who-will-win-the-2016-Republican-vice-presidential-nomination

    Jesus. Newt manages to make Trump and Cruz look popular (Obama was leading him like 59-36 in the 2012 polls). If Trump actually picks him then I’ll have to start believing my neocon friend who claims Trump is a Clinton plant.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    I think Newt would be a good pick:

    - He's a policy wonk, which balances out Trump not being one.

    - He has the government / legislative experience Trump wants.

    - He's a great debater, and will expose any token VP pick.

    - He counters Hillary's attempt at late '90s economic nostalgia.

    - Impeachment insurance.
  140. @Dave Pinsen
    You're right.

    Every allegedly crappy job done by immigrants either is being done or was done by Americans as well. Tom Arnold worked in a meatpacking plant, and judging from his descriptions of it, didn't seem to hate it.

    Twenty years ago, I had a blonde American maid cleaning my hotel room in Michigan, and had white American men as cab drivers in Spokane and Scottsdale. Haven't been to any of those places recently, so I don't know what's going on there now.

    In Japan they have Japanese — Japanese! — ticket takers and maids and cashiers and cab drivers and fast food cooks

  141. @snorlax
    Jesus. Newt manages to make Trump and Cruz look popular (Obama was leading him like 59-36 in the 2012 polls). If Trump actually picks him then I'll have to start believing my neocon friend who claims Trump is a Clinton plant.

    I think Newt would be a good pick:

    – He’s a policy wonk, which balances out Trump not being one.

    – He has the government / legislative experience Trump wants.

    – He’s a great debater, and will expose any token VP pick.

    – He counters Hillary’s attempt at late ’90s economic nostalgia.

    – Impeachment insurance.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    Gingrich is an old man with multiple wives, soft on immigration too. If the apples are rotten then go to the tree. Kris Kobach all the way.
    , @iffen
    Absolutely not.

    He needs a woman that has congressional/ gubernatorial experience.
    , @Matra
    What about Newt as White House Chief of Staff?
    , @AnotherDad
    Newt? Seriously? The three wives men ticket?
    , @Chrisnonymous
    With the "contract with America" Newt set himself up for the "Contract ON America" phrase, which, along with "i did not have sex with that woman" and "it's the economy, stupid" is one of the memorable phrases of 90s politics.

    That kind of back-firing phraseology is the opposite of what Trump's about. Trump might pick a wonk, but he'll pick a winner for sure, not Newt.
  142. But is it good for the Irish?

  143. @Anonym
    Alternatively, US sites like the aforementioned would have to take the decision to host British-based writers on a regular basis.

    Milo Yiannopoulos?

    Yiannopoulos does some good stuff, for sure, though he’s a little excitable for my taste. I prefer things a little more old school.

  144. @AnotherDad

    And it’s not just purely a matter of employers not wanting to pay enough. There are crappy jobs that modern Westerners just don’t want to do period – they are terrible jobs (cleaning toilets, etc.) and they are overqualified for them and they don’t want them.
     
    Seriously Jack?

    You don't have to lick the toilets clean.

    I failed to line up an internship one summer and did temp labor. One job was at P+Gs general headquarters building. I cleaned toilets, mopped the johns, buffed the floors, wiped down desks, emptied trash, vacuumed ... did it for barely more than minimum wage, didn't die of shame and went back to school in the fall.

    Cleaning toilets and other janitorial stuff is not even difficult work. Who the heck do you think is cleaning most of the toilets, public, office, hotel, restaurants in Japan or even Germany--two of the most advanced nations on earth? Japanese and Germans. And it used to be that way in America. Seriously, restrooms were cleaned in America before the Mexican invasion.

    This is *entirely* a question of employers paying enough. And when you have to raise the pay rate too high for something, folks change procedures, develop work arounds, automate it away, substitute, etc. etc.

    This idea that you need immigration for *anything* is nonsense. Most societies down through the ages have *not* had immigration to any significant extent at all. Immigration is invasion and is resisted while a society, people, nation can resist it. And yet these societies were able to do all the work they needed to do.

    This is *entirely* a question of employers paying enough. And when you have to raise the pay rate too high for something, folks change procedures, develop work arounds, automate it away, substitute, etc. etc.

    This idea that you need immigration for *anything* is nonsense. Most societies down through the ages have *not* had immigration to any significant extent at all. Immigration is invasion and is resisted while a society, people, nation can resist it. And yet these societies were able to do all the work they needed to do.

    Exactly right, and the point that somehow needs to be rammed home in the propaganda contest that is currently dominated by the globalist media giants. The incorrect assertion made by Jack D is the “received opinion” in the wider US sphere population precisely because the propaganda war has been won so comprehensively by the globalists over the past few decades.

  145. @NickG

    Realistically that would need British equivalents of sites like Unz and Vdare. Are there such, of any substance?
     
    Breitbart London would be the closest candidate, and that's a section of a US site.

    Any UK dissident / Alt Right/ iSteveish/non-PeeCee site needs to be US based anyway, as there is no first amendment in the UK and it would likely elicit a visit from the Peelers - it happens to Twitter users in Blighty - as well asmuch wailing and gnashing of teeth, so would probably be shut-down. Even the British 'decent leftist' site Harry's Place* is US hosted.

    The best option for the UK is the Breitbart model, that US sites become somewhat trans-Atlanticist.

    * Harry's Place is 'decent left' because it was founded by a lefty, mugged by reality on 9/11, who managed to notice the red-green alliance in the post atrocity apologetics on the left - and the general lefty love-in for Islmofascism (a tautological term if ever there was). HP has strong Jewish ethno-nationalist sympathies.

    Breitbart is a little too obsessed with the islam question and too pro-Israel for my liking. I don’t want muslims in my country, but I don’t have any great problem with them in their own countries.

    It’s also as extremely intolerant of dissent in the comment section as the Guardian, in my experience (having been banned early on at both places).

    Any UK dissident / Alt Right/ iSteveish/non-PeeCee site needs to be US based anyway, as there is no first amendment in the UK and it would likely elicit a visit from the Peelers – it happens to Twitter users in Blighty

    Yes, exactly (see my last paragraph for my own experience of this).

    In truth, rather than relying on the US First Amendment protections (which I suspect will be abrogated by a “hate speech exception” quite soon anyway), we need to be campaigning for our own absolutist protections for freedom of political speech. Unfortunately one preliminary step required is departure from the European “rights” structure, as that enshrines the pernicious idea that freedom of speech should be “balanced” against other supposed rights.

  146. @Dave Pinsen
    I think Newt would be a good pick:

    - He's a policy wonk, which balances out Trump not being one.

    - He has the government / legislative experience Trump wants.

    - He's a great debater, and will expose any token VP pick.

    - He counters Hillary's attempt at late '90s economic nostalgia.

    - Impeachment insurance.

    Gingrich is an old man with multiple wives, soft on immigration too. If the apples are rotten then go to the tree. Kris Kobach all the way.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Yes, we need someone who is tough on "legal" and illegal immigration -- preferably someone much younger than Trump, and ideally someone who can tip a swing state our way.

    Newt is definitely NOT the guy for VP on any front.

    Someone who is currently married to his one and only wife, has children, has experience in Congress or a legislature, and has never been booted from office, sounds about right.
  147. @RamonaQ
    Peter Hitchens seems to be in favor of Brexit but of the view that a win for remain will legitimize the pro-EU argument for decades.

    Since you seem knowledgeable, maybe you can explain why UKIP never took off like Trump did? Farage has really impressed me throughout this whole Brexit campaign as one of the only UK politicians capable of talking sense. Also, why is the loony left so much in favor of Brexit? It's all very confusing

    maybe you can explain why UKIP never took off like Trump did? Farage has really impressed me throughout this whole Brexit campaign as one of the only UK politicians capable of talking sense.

    Well it’s a matter of degree, to some extent, since our first past the post electoral system makes it extremely hard for third parties to break past the established parties, who can often continue to win seats with only 30-40% of the vote against divided opposition. If you are in third place in a seat, your vote gets “squeezed” by the top parties, each saying to hesitant voters that if they vote for the third place party they will be letting the other in.

    In fact, UKIP’s achievement of getting nearly 4 million votes from such a low base was remarkably good, but since it won them only one seat it can also be painted by its enemies as utter failure. In just the same way, the Cameron “Conservative” Party is declared by its supporters to have been a great success because they are in government, but they won a lower level of support than any other government in our recent history except Blair’s 2005 win – and he was out of office within a couple of years. Less than a quarter of the electorate (as opposed to the vote) actually voted for the ruling “Conservative” Party

    If UKIP can regain some momentum in the runup to the next election, they stand to make a lot of gains in actual seats, since they are now starting in second place in so many seats, where they can start to use the aforementioned “squeeze” technique against whichever party is in third place. Of course, it’ anybody’s guess how the EU referendum result will affect things, whichever way it goes. Probably depends on how close it is (I have always assume the vote will go against leaving – I’m a pessimist in such things).

    On the other hand, Farage clearly took a strategic decision to respond submissively to political correctness and to kowtow to it by dismissing any candidates who breached its requirements and apologising for most offending statements, whereas Trump went the other way, sticking two fingers up at it. That gave his campaign more outsider energy, but maybe Farage was correct that such an approach would not have worked in the UK, where the media establishment is more stifling than in the US.

    Also, why is the loony left so much in favor of Brexit? It’s all very confusing

    The old left was always mostly against the European project, which was seen (probably correctly) as a conspiracy of bosses and ruling elites aimed at bypassing the powers of the trade unions. Some of the left are still not entirely happy with the globalist alliance with big business that powers the promotion of mass immigration and other anti-national projects such as the EU. These two groups are among the reasons why UKIP has done as well in many old Labour areas as in old conservative areas.

  148. @RonaldB
    "Realistically that would need British equivalents of sites like Unz and Vdare. Are there such, of any substance? Alternatively, US sites like the aforementioned would have to take the decision to host British-based writers on a regular basis."

    May I suggest you look at Gates of Vienna?
    http://gatesofvienna.net/

    This is a US-based blog of high quality with a heavy focus on European (and English/British) affairs. They have several European correspondents already, but you could certainly try your luck with them. I'm absolutely certain they would keep your identity secret, were you to become a contributor.

    May I suggest you look at Gates of Vienna?

    Like Breitbart they produce a lot of excellent stuff, especially on immigration, but they are a little too obsessed with the muslim issue for my taste, and (probably as a result) far too pro-Israeli.

    Really, though, we need to solve our problems with freedom of speech in this country rather than relying forever on the US’s First Amendment protections (which anyway are likely to be abrogated within a few years).

  149. @Anon 2
    According to the Wikipedia article, Foreign-born
    population in the UK (as of 2012), the largest groups
    (apart from the Irish) in 1000's came from India
    (729), Poland (646), Pakistan (461), Germany (304),
    Bangladesh (234), U.S. (217), France (136), Italy (133),
    Sri Lanka (131), Lithuania (130), Romania (101). However,
    these figures are dwarfed by the total immigration from
    Africa (1.2 million).

    I was surprised by the large number of German immigrants.
    As to Poland, it must be kept in mind that until recently,
    with minor exceptions such as Joseph Conrad (Korzeniowski)
    who settled in England in the 1890s after 20 years of seafaring,
    and the Polish airmen who flew for RAF in the Battle of Britain,
    and their descendants, there had been virtually no Polish
    immigration to Britain. The Polish population in Britain in
    2001 was only 60,000.

    The standard joke in the Polish community in the UK is that
    the Polish come to England as part of the "Beautify Britain"
    program, and they should be paid just for being there. Adding
    hundreds of thousand of blue and green eyes to the color
    palette of England should be worth something!

    But seriously, spending a few years in Britain is an excellent
    deal for the Polish - they pick up the language, save money
    to buy a condo in Poland, and send millions to their relatives
    back home. Thousands, of course, get university degrees in
    England, including Oxford and Cambridge, and go into
    management.

    Post-WW2 nearly 250,000 Poles remained/settled in the UK – mostly soldiers, sailors, airmen and their families.

    We hear constantly about the non-white arrivals from the 1940s onward (The greatest thing that ever happened to us!™) but for a a long time the Poles would have been the largest single immigrant group in Britain. Yet that has largely gone down the memory hole, unlike more vibrant, highly problematic incomers.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    Shedloads of "Lithuanians" arrived in Edwardian times (i.e. ca. 100+ years back, not in Longshanks's baggage train) to dig coal in Central Scotland. Ou sont les nieges etc.
    The woods round here are haunted by the brick fireplaces and utility huts of vast vanished WWII camps. Ask the locals and it's inevitably "oh, that was the Polish boys/commandos/pilots etc." and loads managed to hang on somehow after, mainly as tradesmen, and marry locally. Then there was a heap of Hungarians after '56 ...
    .. for balance, my mate's dad was hauled out of a U-boot after the reich fell, a 15-year-old Hitlerjugend, bound ostensibly for South America. Spent a long, profitable and entirely blameless life as an industrious market gardener in Lincs. Which just proves that sprouts really are of-the-devil.
    , @anon
    "....the Poles would have been the largest single immigrant group in Britain. Yet that has largely gone down the memory hole..."

    Probably because unlike the third world colored immigrants the Poles simply assimilated, and made no trouble. Just nine years after their arrival, Jamaicans had a race riot in Britain. I doubt the Poles ever rioted about anything and I am pretty sure Britain never had any Polish suicide bombers like the Muslims in London in 2005.
  150. @AnotherDad

    And for me it looks like something that talking heads in TV babble happily about while aborigines are buying new, reinforced doors, alarms and join Shooting Club in order to expedite getting gun permit.
     
    That's good to know--not the sleazy bought-and-paid-for academic liars--but the aborigines working to get themselves armed.

    A terrible weakness in Europe is the lack of a 2nd amendment. WTSHTF native Europeans--except the Swiss--seem like they are going to be unarmed and will be steam rolled by their hostile states.

    Americans really overrate the value of the 2nd amendment. In my case I know that any upstanding native Austrian citizen who really wants a gun can get one. Pretty much any aristocratic family has plenty of hunting weapons at their country houses. And because Austria has no 2nd amendment, they do a much better job of keeping guns out of the hands of the people who you don’t want to have weapons – petty criminals, immigrants, mentally deficients, etc.

    In any case guns will not help you fight back against a government that is undermining you through long term demographic replacement.

  151. OT

    BBC on Sykes-Picot – once again diversity is a strength for European countries, but a weakness everywhere else.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-36300224

    “The resulting order inherited by the Middle East of the day sees a variety of states whose borders were generally drawn with little regard for ethnic, tribal, religious or linguistic considerations.

    Often a patchwork of minorities, there is a natural tendency for such countries to fall apart unless held together by the iron grip of a strongman or a powerful central government. ”

    • Replies: @anonymous

    Often a patchwork of minorities, there is a natural tendency for such countries to fall apart unless held together by the iron grip of a strongman or a powerful central government. ”
     
    Hence the increasing of the American security state.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    Another take:
    https://twitter.com/lionelbarber/status/733191776647950336
  152. Jumping in to the sub-thread about jobs Westerners won’t do: it occurs to me that…

    What pro-immigration people want is not diversity, per se. What they really want is the inequality, and the stratified society, that goes with it. That is what we call vibrancy.
    The last thing a Swedish SJW (nice lady, doctor’s wife, call her what you will) is a middle-class Faisal next door who is exactly like boring Olaf, but browner and spicier at dinner time. People seem to need the frisson of inequality, the chaos, the crime, the degradation, the guilt, the sense of perpetual menace. It makes them feel alive.

    Do not underestimate the extent of perfectly lovely nihilism.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    What pro-immigration people want is not diversity, per se. What they really want is the inequality, and the stratified society, that goes with it. That is what we call vibrancy.

     

    Yes. They prefer to import a lower class, finding the possibility that they and their progeny might fall into their own society's lower class too terrifying to contemplate.

    This is the Achilles' heel of prosperous, 'meritocratic', market economies. When you define the 'good life' as being a college-educated, white-collar, 'career' person, then having a son who's a plumber or a daughter who's a dental hygienist is de facto failure. You can try desperately to distinguish yourself from people who look like you who do engage in blue-collar work (and Lord knows we see enough of this), but the lack of a long-term, stable intra-ethnic hierarchy renders this approach precarious and exhausting.

    A profound yearning for social stability is one of the reasons a show such as Downton Abbey has been so incredibly successful, and why battalions of otherwise-SJW-oriented females remain obsessed with the Regency England of Jane Austen.
  153. @AnotherDad

    And for me it looks like something that talking heads in TV babble happily about while aborigines are buying new, reinforced doors, alarms and join Shooting Club in order to expedite getting gun permit.
     
    That's good to know--not the sleazy bought-and-paid-for academic liars--but the aborigines working to get themselves armed.

    A terrible weakness in Europe is the lack of a 2nd amendment. WTSHTF native Europeans--except the Swiss--seem like they are going to be unarmed and will be steam rolled by their hostile states.

    A terrible weakness in Europe is the lack of a 2nd amendment. WTSHTF native Europeans–except the Swiss–seem like they are going to be unarmed and will be steam rolled by their hostile states.

    True but we’re already being steam rolled by our elites without shots fired by them. And in what way are gun owners stemming the immigrant tide in the US?

  154. Slightly off topic. Merkel has no children, a lot of German women of that generation had no children. I suspect psychologically having no children makes you far more likely to welcome immigrants, especially if you are a middle-aged woman.

    • Replies: @Clyde

    Slightly off topic. Merkel has no children, a lot of German women of that generation had no children. I suspect psychologically having no children makes you far more likely to welcome immigrants, especially if you are a middle-aged woman.
     
    This has been talked about before and others agree with you.
    #2 Some of these older women are jealous of the bodacious German babes and get a kick out of seeing them subject to the depredations (rape, theft, groping etc) of Muslim and African yoofs-immigrants. Misery loves company.
    #3 You have the old cat lady factor. Instead of feeding and collecting stray cats they are doing the same for stray male migrant yoofs. Both involve the mothering instinct.
    , @RadicalCenter
    Yes, and sorry to be so "judgmental" and "harsh", but deliberately choosing not to have children bespeaks emotional and psychological problems, especially for a woman.

    Women who chose not to have children -- or not to make it any kind of priority when compared to "hooking up" or career advancement or travel or partying or political activism -- and then pass their childbearing years, are on balance some of the most unhappy, bitter, strange, nasty, and untrustworthy people around. My own sister is one, as was one of the worst, angriest, most obnoxious bosses I've ever had.
  155. @AKAHorace
    Looked for your review of "The lives of others" and got the following (have only got it looking for your stuff):

    NOTICE OF HACKING
    The link which forwarded your browser to this webpage may have come from a website which has was hacked for the purpose of redirecting consumers to websites selling counterfeit products. Accordingly, the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida has ordered that the intermediary domain names which control traffic from potentially hacked websites be taken into the custody of the court and redirected to this webpage. Unfortunately, taking control of these domains does not undo the hacking of the original legitimate website, so the website may still be at risk.

    If you believe your website may have been compromised, please contact your host or webmaster for information on how to fix the problem and secure your website. Online resources such as StopBadware.org can provide you with more information.

    More information about the Federal Lawsuit which resulted in the creation of this webpage can be found at: http://servingnotice.com/Kxd6us/index.html

    People have made this very post numerous times over the years– seems Steve either no longer owns the domain or must remain mum due to ongoing litigation.

  156. @Sean
    A German economist recently provoked uproar by claiming that the poorest 40% in Germany have less wealth than their European equivalents. By some measures Germans are not rich even compared to the Irish
    http://www.irishtimes.com/business/personal-finance/how-rich-are-the-irish-1.2649475

    http://www.dw.com/en/ifo-economist-warns-of-conflict-between-refugees-and-poorer-germans/a-18956411

    Why is the German establishment backing Merkel ? Given the risks of creating a mass organised opposition and destroying all the post war political consensus, the German elite surely think her actions are going to bring them closer to some desirable objective.

    http://archive.spectator.co.uk/article/3rd-july-1971/31/enoch-powell-on-the-balance-of-power
    A logical contradiction can be lived with, long and sometimes happily, in real life, and that is what Germany is doing with the objectives of a political integration of Western Europe and a reunification of Germany; but it cannot be rationalised, and that is what Helmut Schmidt, as a working politician writing a book, attempted to do and failed. In the end, however, the contradiction has to get itself resolved in real life: one imperative drives out the other. My bet is that German reunification will drive out Western Political unification and the EEC: some day, I don't know how, or when, I think we are going to get pattern no. 3.
     

    “A German economist recently provoked uproar by claiming that the poorest 40% in Germany have less wealth than their European equivalents.”

    Germans tend to rent rather than buy houses. Strong rent controls and tenancy laws.

    Much European ‘wealth’ consists of overpriced property.

    After Tony Blair opened the borders to Eastern Europe, house prices (and private landlord numbers) increased massively in the UK, while house prices fell in Poland and Romania.

    (That said, Germans are poorer relatively than they were. Used to see a lot more German tourists in the UK.)

    • Replies: @Sean

    http://www.dw.com/en/ifo-economist-warns-of-conflict-between-refugees-and-poorer-germans/a-18956411
    In the “Tagesspiegel” interview, Hans-Werner Sinn rejected proposals to forgo the minimum wage in order to make it easier for refugees to find a job. It would have a negative impact on the local workforce if refugees accepted salaries that undercut the minimum wage, he stressed.
     
    German manufacturing is good but they cannot wipe out competitor countries outside a shared single currency, because the way exchange rates works means German exports are made too expensive. Germany needs the single currency to blitz their competition and deindustrialise Europe. The single currency lets them slowly strangle other countries like Greece within it.

    Exports surge drives German trade surplus to record high in MarchThe United States has for years called for Germany and other countries with current account surpluses to do more to boost lackluster domestic demand. The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) have also urged Germany to step up public and private investment in infrastructure to reduce its current account surplus.
     
    The German taxpayers might get sick of bailing out Greece in paying for what what Thilo Sarrazin'called an export subsidy program for German business, especially when it is combined with mass migration which as Siins points out will erode the welfare and pay of German workers. Such popular disaffection could bring about Gexit (Germany leaving the EU). Enoch Powell suggested that, one way or another, a united Germany would cease to be a friend of Britain.
  157. @Desiderius
    Or it could be that secularism is a stage in a generational cycle that comes back to the spiritual (to eventually generate a new secularism) rather than an end stage.

    The secular being the fruit of the sacred, the sacred the soil in which the secular grows anew.

    You forgot to add “all things being the same”.

    But I hesitate to view this cycle as being benign when it takes place concurrently with technological, political, economic upheaval, as well as base treachery. It’s an effect, not a cause, but I can’t feel too passive about it when it means that peoples, cultures and states will have to shuffle off the stage of history to make way for others, without any indication that this will lead to improvement or something that I would term greater.

    Also, leaving aside the religious aspect of the cycle, I think the main thrust of current political culture is that the incumbents are doing their damnedest not to have to pass the reins. Leaving aside religion, every one of liberalism’s successes was gained at the sufferance and later tolerance and acceptance of the dreaded and stifling Patriarchy – I do not know of any suffragist terrorism campaign, or of a successful rebellion that throws off the yoke of colonialism by defeating the metropolis (aside from Haiti, and we know how that turned out). It was the same with gay rights, the welfare state, universal voting, immigration and so on. Yet now that the Liberals are in power, they are not about to award the same consideration and freedom to resurgent rightists, nationalists and traditionalists. Frank Herbert had a line in Dune: “When I am Weaker Than You, I ask you for Freedom because that is according to your principles; when I am Stronger than you, I take away your Freedom Because that is according to my principles”. So, in essence, somebody (not as a conspiracy, but rather a self-coordinating sub-culture working independently towards similar goals) is trying to throw off the cycle of prudence vs recklessness, conservatism vs progressivism, nativism vs alienism (what Sobran said) and, therefore, trying to prevent the remediation of the current regime’s excesses.

    • Replies: @SFG
    The cycles of history are never benign to those on the losing end. The Chinese described a dynastic cycle centuries ago.

    America is big enough there are still places to flee to, but for a European I have no suggestions. :(
    , @Desiderius

    But I hesitate to view this cycle as being benign
     
    It is neither benign nor malign, it merely is.

    the incumbents are doing their damnedest not to have to pass the reins
     
    Hasn't that always been the case, just as fruit eventually sours (or worse)? The secular have never gone quietly, yet they've always gone.

    EACH life converges to some centre
    Expressed or still;
    Exists in every human nature
    A goal,

    Admitted scarcely to itself, it may be,
    Too fair
    For credibility’s temerity
    To dare.

    Adored with caution, as a brittle heaven,
    To reach
    Were hopeless as the rainbow’s raiment
    To touch,

    Yet persevered toward, surer for the distance;
    How high
    Unto the saints’ slow diligence
    The sky!

    Ungained, it may be, by a life’s low venture,
    But then,
    Eternity enables the endeavoring
    Again.

    - Dickinson

    , @Expletive Deleted

    I do not know of any suffragist terrorism campaign
     
    Pankhurst's mob used to chuck bombs at the Lower Orders without compunction if they got in the way e.g. as nightwatchmen, coppers. Men who, unlike her and her jolly D chums who may have made the Property/Income Qualifications, probably did not have a vote, and were very soon to be enlisted and permanently disposed of, abroad.
    They stopped the terror campaign when WWI was declared, and became amazingly pacifist, as they would have been shot/hanged (with any luck) like Fenians and spies. She and her kin subsequently agitated for universal male conscription, and dished out White Feathers.
  158. @Peter Akuleyev
    Slightly off topic. Merkel has no children, a lot of German women of that generation had no children. I suspect psychologically having no children makes you far more likely to welcome immigrants, especially if you are a middle-aged woman.

    Slightly off topic. Merkel has no children, a lot of German women of that generation had no children. I suspect psychologically having no children makes you far more likely to welcome immigrants, especially if you are a middle-aged woman.

    This has been talked about before and others agree with you.
    #2 Some of these older women are jealous of the bodacious German babes and get a kick out of seeing them subject to the depredations (rape, theft, groping etc) of Muslim and African yoofs-immigrants. Misery loves company.
    #3 You have the old cat lady factor. Instead of feeding and collecting stray cats they are doing the same for stray male migrant yoofs. Both involve the mothering instinct.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Right on the money. And there's probably something worse than a misguided mothering instinct; some of these intentionally barren "professional" "women" are so deeply unhappy as well as sexually frustrated that they have fantasies, consciously or not, about the savage men they are importing.

    Come to think of it, that may partly explain Jorge Bergoglio's enthusiasm for the heavily-male Third World invasion of Europe, as well.
  159. JsP says:
    @Jack D
    Look up Wolf Blitzer on Jeopardy on youtube - you'll be shocked at what an idiot he is (or maybe you won't). OTOH, Andy Richter (Conan O'Brien's sidekick) did great on the same show - go figure.

    “You can pretend to be serious but you can’t pretend to be witty.”

    Not at all hard to figure. Comedy is a brutally competitive field where only the strong survive (on their wits).

    Sucking at the corporate teat of CNN requires a different skill set–like connections and a willingness to suckle eagerly (see eg Anderson Cooper, another moron exposed on jeopardy).

    Norm Macdonald is another brilliant comedian who dominated a TV quiz show.

    Heck, even Cheech Marin crushed those CNN anchors and affirmative action baby political hacks (some Hispanic woman with a lot of clout in the GOP was particularly dumb)

  160. SFG says:
    @Lagertha
    It's late, and I have medicine head (though no cancer cells in my lymph node closest... to excisions! - yey!) because my leg hurts like crazy. The tingling sensation of tissue loss is an experience I hope, y'all never have to experience. But, scheisse, no cancer cells taking over my system...yet... so, can't complain about the pain - I'm good. I'm eyeing a bottle of Tequila in the liquor cabinet right now.

    The sun is damaging. I spent copious amounts of time on the water from 1960's-1980's; before that Australian study on skin cancer in 1973 ( doomed, but "not dead yet!) And, please, for God's sake, don't let your children or grands, get tattoos...it ups their chances of melanoma, btw. I don't have tattoos, and neither do my sons, but injecting metals (dyes) underneath your skin is an invitation for melanoma/carcinoma. OK, done with my public health message. Onto important stuff, however; OT big time.

    OT: www.courant.com/politics/capitol.../hc-chris-murphy-vp-story;html.

    I have been thinking a lot about the election these last several weeks. I think Hillary may pick Chris Murphy ( a perfectly nice guy) to be her VP. Why? I think her team was appalled by New England going so overwhelmingly for Trump. I think the taking on of the TX Castro bros may be a mistake: Because: white guys. She may need a young white guy to take down Trump's ascendancy.

    If Chris Murphy gains traction, I believe it may be an effort on Clinton's part to align herself with a young, white guy who is very articulate, intelligent, experienced, non-controversial, likable...all those things. He has been very good for the state of Connecticut - everybody likes him - just speculating. And, more importantly: if Trump picks a shallow candidate (Palin) well, it's all over - finito.

    New England is gonna rule this time around; Tom has been pilloried; our Patriots have been maligned. Our real estate has not recovered; we have massive hardship (esp CT) in our cities; severe outsourcing and H1B invasion; and, scheisse, New Englanders are reveling in being a hot-head area that may once again matter, just like it did in 1770's. All of you guys know I loathe Palin...many Repubs of the past; and, if stupid decisions are made, then stupid decisions are made, and it all sucks.

    Sorry about your melanoma. That sucks.

    FWIW, now they’re finding that vitamin D deficiency due to *lack* of sun exposure can raise your risk of cancer too.

    Tattoos-I always figured it was a mistake you couldn’t undo, and never got any, but if you tell the kids not to, won’t they just do it to rebel when they get old enough?

    I can’t see Trump picking another northeasterner (yes, I know New England is culturally distinct from and hates NYC but the rest of the country forgets the difference–at least when it comes to Boston you have two arrogant, rich, old, walkable cities with a wealth of cultural institutions that seem to think of each other as antitheses for some reason). Hillary, well, I’d think she’d go for a southerner or midwesterner to extend the party’s reach. You add a New Englander if you think you’re weak in the Northeast; Trump needs to win the Rust Belt.

    • Replies: @Desiderius

    some reason
     
    Baseball.

    Trump needs to win the Rust Belt.

     

    Trump needs to shore up support in the Competence Belt.

    Portman might be a wise choice.
    , @Brutusale
    New Yorkers come to Boston for an education. Bostonians go to New York to work on Wall Street.

    Trump would be an idiot to pick a New Englander, with the possible exception of the entertaining nut Paul LePage, governor of Maine.
    , @Sean

    https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2015/08/17/something-else/ If you’re close enough to the equator, you need dark skin, and the genes in these pathways are constrained – not free to change. But if they are free to change, then a change that improves fitness through a pleiotropic effect is now free to spread, since the resulting paleness is bearable.
     
    The above quote is talking nonsense, because East Asians have the same risk of getting skin cancer as black Africans.

    http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2014/01/07/comment-east-asian-genes-may-solve-skin-cancer-puzzle The data indicated that people with European ancestry are approximately 20 times more susceptible to melanoma than those of African or East Asian descent.
     
    European skin is the anomaly, because it has been selected for a pressure which is totally unrelated to UV or vitamin d. In a world wide range of traditional societies (in which chastity was considered the supreme virtue for a marriageable girl) maidens kept their skin a light as possible and took care to avoid the sun. European women working outside covered up. But there was always another aspect

    "But What About Suntanning?" by Peter Frost.


    If lighter skin has been favored in the human female ..in her male partner, could it also be inhibiting certain impulsive components of sexual desire? And wouldn't tanning release this inhibition? [...]
    Such "hyperarousal" may also explain why the tanned look has remained so popular among modern European and North American women since the 1920s. But why was this look so marginal previously? And why has it not caught on elsewhere in the world? [...]

    With the 20th century, there developed in Europe and North America a new sexual environment that presents marriage and family formation as one of many possible life choices, thereby allowing alternate eroticisms to compete with the mainstream ideal on more equal terms, particularly among young single adults who tend to set fashion trends. For many people today, the aim is no longer to maximize reproductive potential. Rather, it is to maximize erotic stimulation. It is this new sexual environment that may have allowed the tanned look to make its breakthrough into the mainstream of women's fashion.
     
    , @RadicalCenter
    Boston and NYC -- you can keep both of them. The people in those cities are NOT, in fact, rich or even reasonably well off in the face of the ridiculous housing costs and taxes there. Each one has a highly visible and publicized rich elite, but the population as a whole is not much better off than in less "impressive" and supposedly "rich" places. This is true of L.A., too.

    But you are, of course, right that Trump should not pick a Veep from Mid-Atlantic or New England. Someone from a larger Midwestern / Upper Midwestern State, perhaps -- but please, NOT John Kasich!
  161. @Romanian
    You forgot to add "all things being the same".

    But I hesitate to view this cycle as being benign when it takes place concurrently with technological, political, economic upheaval, as well as base treachery. It's an effect, not a cause, but I can't feel too passive about it when it means that peoples, cultures and states will have to shuffle off the stage of history to make way for others, without any indication that this will lead to improvement or something that I would term greater.

    Also, leaving aside the religious aspect of the cycle, I think the main thrust of current political culture is that the incumbents are doing their damnedest not to have to pass the reins. Leaving aside religion, every one of liberalism's successes was gained at the sufferance and later tolerance and acceptance of the dreaded and stifling Patriarchy - I do not know of any suffragist terrorism campaign, or of a successful rebellion that throws off the yoke of colonialism by defeating the metropolis (aside from Haiti, and we know how that turned out). It was the same with gay rights, the welfare state, universal voting, immigration and so on. Yet now that the Liberals are in power, they are not about to award the same consideration and freedom to resurgent rightists, nationalists and traditionalists. Frank Herbert had a line in Dune: "When I am Weaker Than You, I ask you for Freedom because that is according to your principles; when I am Stronger than you, I take away your Freedom Because that is according to my principles". So, in essence, somebody (not as a conspiracy, but rather a self-coordinating sub-culture working independently towards similar goals) is trying to throw off the cycle of prudence vs recklessness, conservatism vs progressivism, nativism vs alienism (what Sobran said) and, therefore, trying to prevent the remediation of the current regime's excesses.

    The cycles of history are never benign to those on the losing end. The Chinese described a dynastic cycle centuries ago.

    America is big enough there are still places to flee to, but for a European I have no suggestions. 🙁

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted

    for a European I have no suggestions
     
    I wonder what an Ireland deprived of the police, and ultimately the British Army's solicitations might contain, to attract visibly foreign settlers and conquerors? Or numerous islands and provinces currently belonging to the decaying ancient hulks known as "UK", "Spain" and "Italy". Anybody fancy their chances kicking the Flems or the Frisians around? Bueller? Anyone?
    It's the giant, sclerotic, overweening nation-states and mini-empires that need to go. Turn Europe back into the horrendous wasps'-nest it always was.
  162. @AnotherDad

    And it’s not just purely a matter of employers not wanting to pay enough. There are crappy jobs that modern Westerners just don’t want to do period – they are terrible jobs (cleaning toilets, etc.) and they are overqualified for them and they don’t want them.
     
    Seriously Jack?

    You don't have to lick the toilets clean.

    I failed to line up an internship one summer and did temp labor. One job was at P+Gs general headquarters building. I cleaned toilets, mopped the johns, buffed the floors, wiped down desks, emptied trash, vacuumed ... did it for barely more than minimum wage, didn't die of shame and went back to school in the fall.

    Cleaning toilets and other janitorial stuff is not even difficult work. Who the heck do you think is cleaning most of the toilets, public, office, hotel, restaurants in Japan or even Germany--two of the most advanced nations on earth? Japanese and Germans. And it used to be that way in America. Seriously, restrooms were cleaned in America before the Mexican invasion.

    This is *entirely* a question of employers paying enough. And when you have to raise the pay rate too high for something, folks change procedures, develop work arounds, automate it away, substitute, etc. etc.

    This idea that you need immigration for *anything* is nonsense. Most societies down through the ages have *not* had immigration to any significant extent at all. Immigration is invasion and is resisted while a society, people, nation can resist it. And yet these societies were able to do all the work they needed to do.

    Greeks and Romans developed civilization because their elites had slaves.

    The English class system had servants.

    No, it’s not at all obvious that societies can do the work themselves.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    The English class system had servants?
    My boy, every civilised nation before World War I had servants, and lots of them. The USA probably had more per capita than the English, because it was by around 1900 a richer society.
    Servants were cheap, and everybody who had any pretensions to gentility had at least one. But they were not "slaves" and were indeed often much loved members of the household who continued in service with the same family all their working lives.

    Your point seems to be that servants were somehow not part of the society which they served. Of course they were: they were more often that not young women (and "service" was overwhelmingly a female affair) from the countryside whose fathers and brothers were farmers and tradesmen. They themselves would marry and have children who would then themselves make their way in the world as integral members of the society around them.
    Society, in other words, is not confined to "Society".

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    Ignorant statement. It's an economic calculation: do it yourself or pay someone from the proceeds of your more lucrative activities to avoid opportunity costs.

    Employees are the economic equivalent of slaves and servants; we just pay them their room and board instead of providing it to them. Employees per se are not the ones "building" the civilization, but the owners of capital.
  163. @SFG
    Sorry about your melanoma. That sucks.

    FWIW, now they're finding that vitamin D deficiency due to *lack* of sun exposure can raise your risk of cancer too.

    Tattoos-I always figured it was a mistake you couldn't undo, and never got any, but if you tell the kids not to, won't they just do it to rebel when they get old enough?

    I can't see Trump picking another northeasterner (yes, I know New England is culturally distinct from and hates NYC but the rest of the country forgets the difference--at least when it comes to Boston you have two arrogant, rich, old, walkable cities with a wealth of cultural institutions that seem to think of each other as antitheses for some reason). Hillary, well, I'd think she'd go for a southerner or midwesterner to extend the party's reach. You add a New Englander if you think you're weak in the Northeast; Trump needs to win the Rust Belt.

    some reason

    Baseball.

    Trump needs to win the Rust Belt.

    Trump needs to shore up support in the Competence Belt.

    Portman might be a wise choice.

  164. OT

    Dying former Republican senator wants to tell Muslims how much they improve America, implying they are better than existing Americans. We’re not told what the recipients of his grovelling thought.

    http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/2016-election/gop-senator-bob-bennett-apologized-muslims-trump-while-deathbed-n576566

    “Jim Bennett said that when he later spoke to his mother, Joyce Bennett, about the conversation, she told him that expressing a sense of inclusion for ostracized populations, especially Muslims, had become “something that he was doing quite a lot of in the last months of his life.”

    Joyce told her son that his father had approached people wearing hijabs in an airport to “let them know that he was grateful they were in the country and the country was better for them being here.” “

  165. @Romanian
    You forgot to add "all things being the same".

    But I hesitate to view this cycle as being benign when it takes place concurrently with technological, political, economic upheaval, as well as base treachery. It's an effect, not a cause, but I can't feel too passive about it when it means that peoples, cultures and states will have to shuffle off the stage of history to make way for others, without any indication that this will lead to improvement or something that I would term greater.

    Also, leaving aside the religious aspect of the cycle, I think the main thrust of current political culture is that the incumbents are doing their damnedest not to have to pass the reins. Leaving aside religion, every one of liberalism's successes was gained at the sufferance and later tolerance and acceptance of the dreaded and stifling Patriarchy - I do not know of any suffragist terrorism campaign, or of a successful rebellion that throws off the yoke of colonialism by defeating the metropolis (aside from Haiti, and we know how that turned out). It was the same with gay rights, the welfare state, universal voting, immigration and so on. Yet now that the Liberals are in power, they are not about to award the same consideration and freedom to resurgent rightists, nationalists and traditionalists. Frank Herbert had a line in Dune: "When I am Weaker Than You, I ask you for Freedom because that is according to your principles; when I am Stronger than you, I take away your Freedom Because that is according to my principles". So, in essence, somebody (not as a conspiracy, but rather a self-coordinating sub-culture working independently towards similar goals) is trying to throw off the cycle of prudence vs recklessness, conservatism vs progressivism, nativism vs alienism (what Sobran said) and, therefore, trying to prevent the remediation of the current regime's excesses.

    But I hesitate to view this cycle as being benign

    It is neither benign nor malign, it merely is.

    the incumbents are doing their damnedest not to have to pass the reins

    Hasn’t that always been the case, just as fruit eventually sours (or worse)? The secular have never gone quietly, yet they’ve always gone.

    EACH life converges to some centre
    Expressed or still;
    Exists in every human nature
    A goal,

    Admitted scarcely to itself, it may be,
    Too fair
    For credibility’s temerity
    To dare.

    Adored with caution, as a brittle heaven,
    To reach
    Were hopeless as the rainbow’s raiment
    To touch,

    Yet persevered toward, surer for the distance;
    How high
    Unto the saints’ slow diligence
    The sky!

    Ungained, it may be, by a life’s low venture,
    But then,
    Eternity enables the endeavoring
    Again.

    – Dickinson

  166. @Anonymous Nephew
    OT

    BBC on Sykes-Picot - once again diversity is a strength for European countries, but a weakness everywhere else.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-36300224

    "The resulting order inherited by the Middle East of the day sees a variety of states whose borders were generally drawn with little regard for ethnic, tribal, religious or linguistic considerations.

    Often a patchwork of minorities, there is a natural tendency for such countries to fall apart unless held together by the iron grip of a strongman or a powerful central government. "

    Often a patchwork of minorities, there is a natural tendency for such countries to fall apart unless held together by the iron grip of a strongman or a powerful central government. ”

    Hence the increasing of the American security state.

  167. If you want to know Merkel’s motivation for the immigration disaster.

    https://mishtalk.com/2016/05/18/new-nothingness-central-banks-are-powerless-they-should-go-away-steen-jakobsen/

    It made me think of this year’s Davos meeting, which showed a leadership class terrified of slowing jobs growth and enamoured with the idea that population movements might be used to address this.

    You mentioned supply and demand and demographic changes. Before German chancellor Angela Merkel launched the refugee programme that has seen over a million people arrive in Germany, there were several reports from EU banks and think tanks calling for an injection of new working-aged people into Europe. Why were they calling for that if growth and the jobs market are stuck at zero?

    Looking at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s report on immigration and migration, for example, it shows that in the history of European immigration, 75% of all immigrants have been put into some kind of work and become productive taxpayers within one year of their arrival.
    If you can retain that 75% inclusion rate, immigration will provide a huge boost in terms of injecting workers into a faltering demographic context. These are young, aggressive, multicultural people who are going to add colour and flavour to a continent that has been too homogenous for too long.
    On the other hand, people thrive when they are challenged. While the political narrative on refugees might follow the script you just laid out, for an economist like me it’s very clear: immigration is positive.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted

    These are young, aggressive, multicultural people
     
    .. till they get old. Or sick. Or pregnant. But don't worry, be happy, that never happens. And the basic problem is their vehement anti-multiculturalism, and predilection for sectarian ghetto-forming. We must assimilate to them, apparently, or else ...
    About the only constant is the "aggressive" factor. You got that right. About time the favour was returned.

    .. add colour and flavour to a continent that has been too homogenous for too long.
     
    Now I know your trollin'. Ho ho. Go and tell the Chinese and the Desis that.
    , @Yak-15
    That is specious reasoning at best. Immigrants are not created equal. The places they come from matter. As does their IQ and their cultural proclivities. It's illogical to believe low-IQ people with few skills can add much to an economy. This is especially true because most low-skill labor jobs are being replaced by automation. All you are doing in adding these low-end immigrants is creating more drain on social resources.

    Good luck!
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    So 1 in 4 are unemployable? Are the others even net tax producers? Is having your daughter groped at festivals part of the calculation?
  168. @Randal

    Ideally there would be some people offering an alt-rightish analysis of European affairs (and whilst I’m at it, Israeli affairs) who were more knowledgeable on the subject.
     
    Realistically that would need British equivalents of sites like Unz and Vdare. Are there such, of any substance? Alternatively, US sites like the aforementioned would have to take the decision to host British-based writers on a regular basis.

    The problem with any British based site offering the kind of discussions you find on Unz and Vdare is that there would be a very real likelihood that the writers and owners would find themselves in prison (and I speak with some experience on this, as someone whose mere below the line political comments have resulted in my case being raised by specially connected minority lobby activists at Assistant Chief Constable level, in an attempt to get me harassed by the police and, ideally from their point of view, prosecuted - only time will tell whether they will succeed or not).

    I’d do it but only anonymously. I don’t want to be jailed.

  169. @Lagertha
    It's late, and I have medicine head (though no cancer cells in my lymph node closest... to excisions! - yey!) because my leg hurts like crazy. The tingling sensation of tissue loss is an experience I hope, y'all never have to experience. But, scheisse, no cancer cells taking over my system...yet... so, can't complain about the pain - I'm good. I'm eyeing a bottle of Tequila in the liquor cabinet right now.

    The sun is damaging. I spent copious amounts of time on the water from 1960's-1980's; before that Australian study on skin cancer in 1973 ( doomed, but "not dead yet!) And, please, for God's sake, don't let your children or grands, get tattoos...it ups their chances of melanoma, btw. I don't have tattoos, and neither do my sons, but injecting metals (dyes) underneath your skin is an invitation for melanoma/carcinoma. OK, done with my public health message. Onto important stuff, however; OT big time.

    OT: www.courant.com/politics/capitol.../hc-chris-murphy-vp-story;html.

    I have been thinking a lot about the election these last several weeks. I think Hillary may pick Chris Murphy ( a perfectly nice guy) to be her VP. Why? I think her team was appalled by New England going so overwhelmingly for Trump. I think the taking on of the TX Castro bros may be a mistake: Because: white guys. She may need a young white guy to take down Trump's ascendancy.

    If Chris Murphy gains traction, I believe it may be an effort on Clinton's part to align herself with a young, white guy who is very articulate, intelligent, experienced, non-controversial, likable...all those things. He has been very good for the state of Connecticut - everybody likes him - just speculating. And, more importantly: if Trump picks a shallow candidate (Palin) well, it's all over - finito.

    New England is gonna rule this time around; Tom has been pilloried; our Patriots have been maligned. Our real estate has not recovered; we have massive hardship (esp CT) in our cities; severe outsourcing and H1B invasion; and, scheisse, New Englanders are reveling in being a hot-head area that may once again matter, just like it did in 1770's. All of you guys know I loathe Palin...many Repubs of the past; and, if stupid decisions are made, then stupid decisions are made, and it all sucks.

    http://drsircus.com/medicine/sodium-bicarbonate-baking-soda/sodium-bicarbonate-effective-cancer-medicine Potassium bicarbonate too. It is a common item for home wine makers.

  170. @Karl
    The eurozone experiment terminates in a ruin of ashes if Greek (and other sovereign) default sinks the German financial institutions.

    Deutschbank looked like it was teetering at this possibility earlier in the spring.

    I am a watcher of the economies right now.

    Spain is not growing at all, nor is France or Italy. And the migrant mess continues.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    You're right. Sadly, the native white populations of Germany, France, Spain, and Italy are all declining in number because the freaks have no pride, no self-respect, no sense of loyalty to their ancestors or their country's future generations, and no longer want the hard work of raising one's own children.

    Nothing else matters -- not any policy or legal change, deportation, etc -- if white people in those countries and elsewhere do not start having more children again. At least three per healthy, sane, adult married couple.

  171. @SFG
    All y'all eager for a king always seem to think he's going to do what you want, ignoring that the people who would most likely become king--i.e., rich people--are pretty much the ones who are responsible for the mess we're in now. Just imagine King Obama or Queen Hillary. Even King W would probably get us into more wars. How on earth would you get a King Pat Buchanan?

    Democracy is the only thing that keeps the global elite from doing even *more* damage.

    To the contrary, I say confiscate the elite’s wealth, or tell them they have to run the country themselves. Democratic government removes ownership incentives.

  172. @Clifford Brown
    There is a mythical place called America prior to 1985. You should look it up some time. You will be amazed what you will find. It is kind of like Narnia, but with more Trans Ams.

    If you reduce welfare and disability benefits, there will suddenly be "modern Westerners" who can clean toilets.

    A magical place indeed, where Anglo-Europeans were near 90% of the population and “immigrants” were seasonal migrants in peach orchards or British and French engineers fleeing socialist schemes back home.

    In case anybody missed it, this reduction to 60% of the population happened in one lifetime. One more lifetime, and your Anglo-European children will be an ethnic minority.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    I visited Germany in 1987, as a teenager, and loved the experience. Bracing myself for how it is when we visit next, in a few years.

    (Our young children are learning German, and we had hopes that at least one of them would go obtain a university education there (almost for free). But will we really send them to study or work in the increasingly Islamicized, African/Arab-infected Germany or Austria or Switzerland that will exist 15-20 years from now?)

  173. Speak of the devil:

    http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/may/19/boris-johnson-wins-most-offensive-erdogan-poem-competition

    It’s not a good limerick, or even one that observes the rules of the genre, but I suppose deserved a prize for effort.

  174. Thea says:

    OT but this Egyptair crash makes me so sad. Sad for the families of those on board and for ordinary Egyptians.

    Tourism to Egypt stretches back to the ancients.

    One overlooked aspect of travel there is the warmth of the Egyption people towards tourists. Growing up in Florida, where tourists are treated with contempt by those not getting paid, Egyptian freindliness is such a contrast.

    I worked in a travel agency and people always had stories of poor Egyptians treating the rich Americans with kindness and generosity.

    An American couple sat in a matinee movie in Cairo. Now movie watching in Egypt is a loud social event where vendors walk the aisles selling snacks. Noticing that the couple had no snacks, a teenage boy bought two ice creams and handed it to them.

    • Replies: @Yak-15
    They can be kind and friendly. But they can also be pushy louts who try to rip you off at every chance they get.
    , @Marcus
    Except when they harass, molest, rape foreign women.
    , @Marty
    There was an Egyptian family that ran a magazine/smoke shop in Berkeley in the late '90s. After I'd come around a few times, the owner blurted out at me, "what religion are you!"
  175. Check out Google’s banner today.

    • Replies: @IBC
    Wow, bold move by Google. This woman actually thanked Osama bin Laden for sticking it to the United States. On the plus side (for iSteve readers), she was also a vocal advocate for Puerto Rican independence. Honoring one (deceased) Asian-American will excuse Google from hiring how many African-Americans? Malcolm X would have been proud!
    , @Malcolm X-Lax
    I was just about to comment on that. Were it not so utterly believable, I'd call it uneffing believable. This is what happens when billionaire leftists have nothing but contempt for the country.
  176. @The Alarmist
    I just got an ear-full from my colleagues in The City to the effect that Brexit will fail (probably true, since the govt holds critical levers that drive the discussion) and why that is a good thing. I could easily rebut every point of the Remain advocates, but it all boils down to this: The Remain argument is premised on the EU continuing as a viable, relatively harmonious going concern, and that is a really bold assumption. One or two more summers like last and there will be no EU to speak of, other than a shell police state that is focused on dealing with spiraling "internal problems."

    The UK has probably shackled itself to the Titanic.

    I see the Rt Hon “Shadow Europe Minister”, Ms. Fat Lass MP, has got the tenor of the debate pitch-perfect.

    She can be heard telling the reporter: “The very first person I come to is a horrible racist. I’m never coming back to wherever this is.”

    The geezer had been bellyaching about a Polish family of (suspected) “spongers” who were allegedly getting more free stuff for nowt than him and his were.
    Classic. Remember “Just some .. bigoted woman”.

  177. @LondonBob
    Being overrun by Spaniards, huge numbers have appeared in London in the past two years, might be less objectionable than being overrun by Pakistanis, but it is still preferable not to be overrun. Americans often forget Europe is peopled by a number of distinct ethnic groups and we remain German, Dutch, Italian, Welsh etc. despite EU attempts to create the new European man.

    Of course a recent phenomenon is ethnic minorities arriving in another European country then gaining citizenship, which then gives them the freedom to settle here, as has happened with Somalians from the Netherlands. Brexit is the necessary first step to getting back control of our country.

    Spaniards have no love lost for the Brits, both tourists and expats, in their country either (they’ll accept their money though).

  178. [Brits] are allowed to express their opinions of Poles, while speaking freely about Pakistanis can bring a visit from the police.

    Odd that Steve clearly sees this inconsistency over there but doesn’t see or care that the same standard applies to ethnic epithets at his comment section. (Substituting Jews and Blacks for Pakistanis, I made this exact point earlier this month.)

  179. @Anonymous
    Apropos of the idea of the British not wanting more Pakistani inbred immigrants, a new paper is out in science detailing exactly how dysgenic the Pakistani inbreeding actually is.

    http://science.sciencemag.org/content/352/6284/474

    If you read the paper and look at Figure 1a you can see that Pakistanis in England don't even seem to fall within the range of variation amongst Europeans on how outbred they are. I.e. the least inbred Pakistani in England is more inbred than the typical European.

    And yet to suggest that people should not purposefully turn themselves into a library of knockout mice, with homozygous deletions of every known gene that isn't embryonic lethal, is to be Islamophobic and a bigot not capable of accepting other cultures.

    Yeah, just look at our friend Rehmat

  180. @anon
    Well, Britain is still a monarchy today. And the Kaiser's Germany wasn't less democratic than early twentieth century Britain.
    And being an "experienced democracy" didn't help when London was literally taken over by Muslims.

    Britain is still a monarchy today

    as are Belgium, The Netherlands, Denmark, Norway and Sweden, technically.
    All awash in illiterate, unskilled, resentful foreigners, up to their liberal welfarist armpits. Is it in fact a “constitutional monarchy” problem?
    Hmmm. Maybe only the French and the Americans know how to deal with these sceptred pests?

  181. @Whiskey
    Steve I think you are overthinking things. Erdogan got on fine with Putin, and Assad, and Iraq, and Iran. He had a "no problems with neighbors" policy that allowed (connected) Turkish merchants to make a fortune in Syria, Iraq, and trading with Iran and Russia. Then he got greedy and ambitious, saw that Obama was weak and not committed to maintain America's sway in the ME, and figured Assad was a goner. So he went all in on ISIS figuring that he'd bite off a big chunk of Syria, Iraq, and Lebanon (hence the hostility to traditional partner Israel). Erdogan gradually saw himself as the anti-Ataturk, able to roll everything back and become a Suleiman the Magnificent.

    Just human nature, a thug getting greedy when the former big man left.

    Merkel, same thing. She criticized multiculturalism but saw votes and elite applause by letting in half the ME and Third World. Now the FT reports that subrosa the Germans are trying to deport refugees there and not let any in, but not admit a change in policy because that would be disastrous politics. The only reason the Christian Democrats have not bounced Merkel is because she pre-emptively over the last decade removed all possible challengers.

    Merkel is a typical post-menopausal professional women with contempt for her own people's men and idiot delusions about the Third World and particularly its men. Nothing more than her feelz, tingles, and short term politics are at stake.

    Brexit is the only option for Britain to maintain its welfare state and cohesion. Merkel has made it clear that EU states will all equally share in the massive Camp of the Saints coming to Western Europe from Africa and the ME and Pakistan/Afghanistan/Iran. Germany will attempt not to take any more but Britain will be stuffed with them. Draining rapidly any hope of social welfare for natives as "migrants" (youfs and the diverse) take up all the resources. With the social order of the refugee camps in Calais as daily life. To avoid that, only Brexit is necessary, but not sufficient in and of itself, to stop that from happening.

    In the end, Europe will be over-run, in varying degrees, from country to country, by the Third World. Some places will revolt quickly to maintain not only social/ethnic/racial cohesion but social welfare spending. Switzerland, Poland, Czech Republic, and Hungary are good bets. Possibly the Netherlands, likely Ireland, and Austria. Others will face civil war, and sooner rather than later over what else, race and money? Entirely avoidable but Merkel wanted to feed her feelz, tingles, and two week press cycle.

    Erdogan probably eyes Greece, Bulgaria, Macedonia, and other former parts of the Ottoman Empire as easy targets while Putin probably still dreams of restoring Constantinople. None of that will end well. Disaster strikes when leaders don't have a sense of the possible. The Kaiser failed to see the Schlieman Plan was a fantasy where everything went right and there were no delays. Napoleon wished away the Russian winter, as did Hitler.

    But then, America leaving the ME has a cost. Erdogan's ambition colliding with Putin's is one of them.

    Brexit is the only option for Britain to maintain its welfare state and cohesion.

    As far as working guys are concerned, the welfare state might as well not exist, even down to the NHS (an internationalist global charity outfit, like MSF). I doubt we’d notice it imploding, apart from the wailing and gnashing from the Special Ones.
    As for cohesion .. there’s a tricky calculus involved. Brexit might trigger a 2nd secessionist vote from Wee Fat Nikla, dictator of the porridgewogs. Which means the Taffs would kick off too. And could embolden the Shinners et al. on the Left Island to force a Unification at last (“take those troublesome unemployable indigents off yer hands, yer’onner??”) … etc. etc.
    So England sensu stricto would be oot, and all the interminably pauper bits of FKOGBANI clamouring to be renegotiated in, for handouts carrying on as usual (no more Barnett formula). For which a stiff (resources&autonomy) price would doubtless be exacted by the Bundeskanzlerin and her minions in Rome and Paris.
    Omnishambles. But hilarious, like most history.
    FTR, I’m for oot.

  182. @SFG
    Sorry about your melanoma. That sucks.

    FWIW, now they're finding that vitamin D deficiency due to *lack* of sun exposure can raise your risk of cancer too.

    Tattoos-I always figured it was a mistake you couldn't undo, and never got any, but if you tell the kids not to, won't they just do it to rebel when they get old enough?

    I can't see Trump picking another northeasterner (yes, I know New England is culturally distinct from and hates NYC but the rest of the country forgets the difference--at least when it comes to Boston you have two arrogant, rich, old, walkable cities with a wealth of cultural institutions that seem to think of each other as antitheses for some reason). Hillary, well, I'd think she'd go for a southerner or midwesterner to extend the party's reach. You add a New Englander if you think you're weak in the Northeast; Trump needs to win the Rust Belt.

    New Yorkers come to Boston for an education. Bostonians go to New York to work on Wall Street.

    Trump would be an idiot to pick a New Englander, with the possible exception of the entertaining nut Paul LePage, governor of Maine.

  183. @Dave Pinsen
    I think Newt would be a good pick:

    - He's a policy wonk, which balances out Trump not being one.

    - He has the government / legislative experience Trump wants.

    - He's a great debater, and will expose any token VP pick.

    - He counters Hillary's attempt at late '90s economic nostalgia.

    - Impeachment insurance.

    Absolutely not.

    He needs a woman that has congressional/ gubernatorial experience.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    IIRC, the last two tickets with women as running mates lost. But Ernst is in the betting too.
    , @Thea
    Can the effective the vp pick be quantified?

    Unless Trump picks someone out of left field I don't think it will matter.

    Isnt it just to shore up political alliances. except John McCain who thought Palin would deliver conservative votes.
  184. @Lurker
    Post-WW2 nearly 250,000 Poles remained/settled in the UK - mostly soldiers, sailors, airmen and their families.

    We hear constantly about the non-white arrivals from the 1940s onward (The greatest thing that ever happened to us!™) but for a a long time the Poles would have been the largest single immigrant group in Britain. Yet that has largely gone down the memory hole, unlike more vibrant, highly problematic incomers.

    Shedloads of “Lithuanians” arrived in Edwardian times (i.e. ca. 100+ years back, not in Longshanks’s baggage train) to dig coal in Central Scotland. Ou sont les nieges etc.
    The woods round here are haunted by the brick fireplaces and utility huts of vast vanished WWII camps. Ask the locals and it’s inevitably “oh, that was the Polish boys/commandos/pilots etc.” and loads managed to hang on somehow after, mainly as tradesmen, and marry locally. Then there was a heap of Hungarians after ’56 …
    .. for balance, my mate’s dad was hauled out of a U-boot after the reich fell, a 15-year-old Hitlerjugend, bound ostensibly for South America. Spent a long, profitable and entirely blameless life as an industrious market gardener in Lincs. Which just proves that sprouts really are of-the-devil.

  185. sixty six souls deep sixed. lest anyone still thinks this stuff is about race.

  186. @Randal

    Ideally there would be some people offering an alt-rightish analysis of European affairs (and whilst I’m at it, Israeli affairs) who were more knowledgeable on the subject.
     
    Realistically that would need British equivalents of sites like Unz and Vdare. Are there such, of any substance? Alternatively, US sites like the aforementioned would have to take the decision to host British-based writers on a regular basis.

    The problem with any British based site offering the kind of discussions you find on Unz and Vdare is that there would be a very real likelihood that the writers and owners would find themselves in prison (and I speak with some experience on this, as someone whose mere below the line political comments have resulted in my case being raised by specially connected minority lobby activists at Assistant Chief Constable level, in an attempt to get me harassed by the police and, ideally from their point of view, prosecuted - only time will tell whether they will succeed or not).

    I recommend The New Observer. It has wonderful English translations of largely European sources:

    http://newobserveronline.com

    Excellent source of news on the Invasion of Europe.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Wow! I gave it a look and the headline "Low IQ Nonwhites Crash US Academics" immediately jumped out at me.
  187. @Romanian
    You forgot to add "all things being the same".

    But I hesitate to view this cycle as being benign when it takes place concurrently with technological, political, economic upheaval, as well as base treachery. It's an effect, not a cause, but I can't feel too passive about it when it means that peoples, cultures and states will have to shuffle off the stage of history to make way for others, without any indication that this will lead to improvement or something that I would term greater.

    Also, leaving aside the religious aspect of the cycle, I think the main thrust of current political culture is that the incumbents are doing their damnedest not to have to pass the reins. Leaving aside religion, every one of liberalism's successes was gained at the sufferance and later tolerance and acceptance of the dreaded and stifling Patriarchy - I do not know of any suffragist terrorism campaign, or of a successful rebellion that throws off the yoke of colonialism by defeating the metropolis (aside from Haiti, and we know how that turned out). It was the same with gay rights, the welfare state, universal voting, immigration and so on. Yet now that the Liberals are in power, they are not about to award the same consideration and freedom to resurgent rightists, nationalists and traditionalists. Frank Herbert had a line in Dune: "When I am Weaker Than You, I ask you for Freedom because that is according to your principles; when I am Stronger than you, I take away your Freedom Because that is according to my principles". So, in essence, somebody (not as a conspiracy, but rather a self-coordinating sub-culture working independently towards similar goals) is trying to throw off the cycle of prudence vs recklessness, conservatism vs progressivism, nativism vs alienism (what Sobran said) and, therefore, trying to prevent the remediation of the current regime's excesses.

    I do not know of any suffragist terrorism campaign

    Pankhurst’s mob used to chuck bombs at the Lower Orders without compunction if they got in the way e.g. as nightwatchmen, coppers. Men who, unlike her and her jolly D chums who may have made the Property/Income Qualifications, probably did not have a vote, and were very soon to be enlisted and permanently disposed of, abroad.
    They stopped the terror campaign when WWI was declared, and became amazingly pacifist, as they would have been shot/hanged (with any luck) like Fenians and spies. She and her kin subsequently agitated for universal male conscription, and dished out White Feathers.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    Interesting. I did not know that. But it seems from your tale that they did not gain victory for their cause through terrorism, which was the main gist of my point.
  188. OT: wasn’t this the point Steve made?

    http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/what-can-europes-far-right-tell-us-about-trumps-rise/

    Also another explanation by Maxi-Nate.

    http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/how-i-acted-like-a-pundit-and-screwed-up-on-donald-trump/

    Maxi-Nate, or possibly Maxi-Pad-Nate manages to put McGovern and Goldwater in the same sentence as Trump. He has learned nothing it seems.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/when-did-trump-become-unstoppable/

    And this is interesting, even if in hindsight they managed to learn something.

    And now that Trump and Hillary are neck and neck, we should discount the polls.

    http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/dont-worry-about-the-electoral-college-math/

  189. @Anonym
    OT: wasn't this the point Steve made?

    http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/what-can-europes-far-right-tell-us-about-trumps-rise/

    Also another explanation by Maxi-Nate.

    http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/how-i-acted-like-a-pundit-and-screwed-up-on-donald-trump/

    Maxi-Nate, or possibly Maxi-Pad-Nate manages to put McGovern and Goldwater in the same sentence as Trump. He has learned nothing it seems.

    http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/when-did-trump-become-unstoppable/

    And this is interesting, even if in hindsight they managed to learn something.

    And now that Trump and Hillary are neck and neck, we should discount the polls.

    http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/dont-worry-about-the-electoral-college-math/

  190. @SFG
    The cycles of history are never benign to those on the losing end. The Chinese described a dynastic cycle centuries ago.

    America is big enough there are still places to flee to, but for a European I have no suggestions. :(

    for a European I have no suggestions

    I wonder what an Ireland deprived of the police, and ultimately the British Army’s solicitations might contain, to attract visibly foreign settlers and conquerors? Or numerous islands and provinces currently belonging to the decaying ancient hulks known as “UK”, “Spain” and “Italy”. Anybody fancy their chances kicking the Flems or the Frisians around? Bueller? Anyone?
    It’s the giant, sclerotic, overweening nation-states and mini-empires that need to go. Turn Europe back into the horrendous wasps’-nest it always was.

  191. Sean says:
    @Anonymous Nephew
    "A German economist recently provoked uproar by claiming that the poorest 40% in Germany have less wealth than their European equivalents."

    Germans tend to rent rather than buy houses. Strong rent controls and tenancy laws.

    Much European 'wealth' consists of overpriced property.

    After Tony Blair opened the borders to Eastern Europe, house prices (and private landlord numbers) increased massively in the UK, while house prices fell in Poland and Romania.


    (That said, Germans are poorer relatively than they were. Used to see a lot more German tourists in the UK.)

    http://www.dw.com/en/ifo-economist-warns-of-conflict-between-refugees-and-poorer-germans/a-18956411
    In the “Tagesspiegel” interview, Hans-Werner Sinn rejected proposals to forgo the minimum wage in order to make it easier for refugees to find a job. It would have a negative impact on the local workforce if refugees accepted salaries that undercut the minimum wage, he stressed.

    German manufacturing is good but they cannot wipe out competitor countries outside a shared single currency, because the way exchange rates works means German exports are made too expensive. Germany needs the single currency to blitz their competition and deindustrialise Europe. The single currency lets them slowly strangle other countries like Greece within it.

    Exports surge drives German trade surplus to record high in MarchThe United States has for years called for Germany and other countries with current account surpluses to do more to boost lackluster domestic demand. The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) have also urged Germany to step up public and private investment in infrastructure to reduce its current account surplus.

    The German taxpayers might get sick of bailing out Greece in paying for what what Thilo Sarrazin’called an export subsidy program for German business, especially when it is combined with mass migration which as Siins points out will erode the welfare and pay of German workers. Such popular disaffection could bring about Gexit (Germany leaving the EU). Enoch Powell suggested that, one way or another, a united Germany would cease to be a friend of Britain.

  192. @Dave Pinsen
    You're right.

    Every allegedly crappy job done by immigrants either is being done or was done by Americans as well. Tom Arnold worked in a meatpacking plant, and judging from his descriptions of it, didn't seem to hate it.

    Twenty years ago, I had a blonde American maid cleaning my hotel room in Michigan, and had white American men as cab drivers in Spokane and Scottsdale. Haven't been to any of those places recently, so I don't know what's going on there now.

    I lived in Salt Lake City five years ago. The landscaping crew at my small apartment complex was all white.

    The “need” for immigration is the desire to suppress wages. Elon Musk paying foreign construction workers $5/hour is the latest example.

    In the book Freakonomics, drug dealers were interested in being janitors. Janitors earned more and weren’t at daily risk of violence or arrest.

  193. @LondonBob
    If you want to know Merkel's motivation for the immigration disaster.

    https://mishtalk.com/2016/05/18/new-nothingness-central-banks-are-powerless-they-should-go-away-steen-jakobsen/

    It made me think of this year’s Davos meeting, which showed a leadership class terrified of slowing jobs growth and enamoured with the idea that population movements might be used to address this.

    You mentioned supply and demand and demographic changes. Before German chancellor Angela Merkel launched the refugee programme that has seen over a million people arrive in Germany, there were several reports from EU banks and think tanks calling for an injection of new working-aged people into Europe. Why were they calling for that if growth and the jobs market are stuck at zero?

    Looking at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s report on immigration and migration, for example, it shows that in the history of European immigration, 75% of all immigrants have been put into some kind of work and become productive taxpayers within one year of their arrival.
    If you can retain that 75% inclusion rate, immigration will provide a huge boost in terms of injecting workers into a faltering demographic context. These are young, aggressive, multicultural people who are going to add colour and flavour to a continent that has been too homogenous for too long.
    On the other hand, people thrive when they are challenged. While the political narrative on refugees might follow the script you just laid out, for an economist like me it’s very clear: immigration is positive.

    These are young, aggressive, multicultural people

    .. till they get old. Or sick. Or pregnant. But don’t worry, be happy, that never happens. And the basic problem is their vehement anti-multiculturalism, and predilection for sectarian ghetto-forming. We must assimilate to them, apparently, or else …
    About the only constant is the “aggressive” factor. You got that right. About time the favour was returned.

    .. add colour and flavour to a continent that has been too homogenous for too long.

    Now I know your trollin’. Ho ho. Go and tell the Chinese and the Desis that.

  194. IBC says:
    @Anonymous
    Check out Google's banner today.

    Wow, bold move by Google. This woman actually thanked Osama bin Laden for sticking it to the United States. On the plus side (for iSteve readers), she was also a vocal advocate for Puerto Rican independence. Honoring one (deceased) Asian-American will excuse Google from hiring how many African-Americans? Malcolm X would have been proud!

  195. @Philip Neal
    Thank you for noticing the referendum, but I think your historical analysis misses a huge factor. Immigration weighs heavily with the voters, but the leaders of the two campaigns are not personally concerned about it - who could be so snobbish as to care what the servants look like? What divides them is the Industrial Revolution and therefore, indirectly, Germany.

    The Leavers regard the Industrial Revolution as one long unqualified triumph, the very wellspring of Britain's greatness. They loathe Europe for stifling the spirit of Watt, Brunel and Rhodes. And Whittle. And Barnes Wallis. Let the beautiful beast of capitalism run free!

    The Remainers regard it as, at best, a necessary evil. Their sort positively admire modern Germany, its neutered capitalism, its bland political menu, its superficial classlessness, its constipated constitution (which, in a previous generation, they helped write). If Europe is a greater Germany, they want to be part of it.

    In this, though they would not care to be told so, they resemble the Germanophiles of Milner's day, who also looked down on the provincial manufacturers in the ugly northern cities and saw nineteenth-century Germany as an attractive alternative.

    Given that nineteenth-century Germany was both economically and culturally the most successful and attractive place on earth, I would say that the Milnerites were definitely on to something.
    What a tragedy that the Leavers of the day won out and started the Great War.

  196. @AnotherDad
    Fun analogy Jack. I'm going to steal it.

    It's the--now old--quip: "the future belongs to those who show up for it".

    Female "empowerment" (which actually entails stripping them of their natural power) and female careerism are a death cult. And Hillary is like it's goddess.

    It will be folks like the Mormons, the Muslims and the Orthodox Jews who people the next generation. Can't say i'm fond of any of them. But, I've met several quality Mormon men (a few on the job and more in Scouting) and they are good folks. Too bad there isn't some movement of just sane Western men and women to preserve our race and culture. But I guess human psychology is such that these things take--or at least work best--with some us-against-them religious element to promote group cohesion.

    Too bad, cause the highly fertile Cincinnati suburb I grew up in the 60s of 99% generic (though majority Germanic) white gentiles was a *really* nice place. Lack of diversity with the right sort of people is ... awesome!

    Quite right.
    The USA of anytime up to around 1968 was a wonderful place. It has been replaced by a dysfunctional hell, and the only consolation is that it will not last long.

  197. @Jack D
    Not even the Japanese have been able to reduce immigration down to zero. The only place that have zero immigration are hellholes like Ukraine where no one in their right mind would want to move. Even if you could get the birthrate up to replacement level (or close to it - most places in the world were nicer when they had fewer people than they have today) you have the too many chiefs and not enough Indians problems. Even with all the robots in the world, there are still crappy jobs that natives of high income countries (even high income countries with replacement level birth rates) don't want their kids to do. And it's not just purely a matter of employers not wanting to pay enough. There are crappy jobs that modern Westerners just don't want to do period - they are terrible jobs (cleaning toilets, etc.) and they are overqualified for them and they don't want them.

    There are crappy jobs that modern Westerners just don’t want to do period – they are terrible jobs (cleaning toilets, etc.) and they are overqualified for them and they don’t want them.

    Jack, how old are you? Where are you from? Who are your people? No offense, but you really don’t sound like you come from around here.

    Do you have servants to make your bed, clean your room, cook your food, wash your clothes, and change Jack Junior’s nappies? A wife/homemaker? Is that work too terrible?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    We have someone who comes in part time to do cleaning and ironing. When Jack Jr. was in nappies we had a part time nanny. I do the cooking - it's my hobby.

    My original comment was aimed at Singapore, where most of the citizens are highly educated (Chinese) - they want their kids to be programmers, not toilet cleaners.

    I have nothing against honest work, I'm just trying to be realistic. 40% of the population of Singapore is now foreign workers. You can't replace 1.4 million people overnight. I'm still not sure you can replace them all with natives at all. Singapore is Chinese - I don't think it would hurt them to let in a few Chinese guest workers to clean their toilets. Is there a "law" that every nation has to be self sufficient in toilet cleaners?

    At any point in the last 120 years, there were people who wanted to slam the doors shut on immigration in the US. In 1896 Walker wrote in the Atlantic about how horrible the new group of E. European (Jewish) and Italian immigrants coming in were and how unsuited to democracy they were. In retrospect I think it would have been a mistake for the US to cut off immigration in 1896 - we would have missed out on a lot of talented people, but YMMV.

    To me, the key (aside from questions of overcrowding) is whether immigrants will assimilate or not. Every immigrant group has some short term adjustment problems but the question is whether their kids are going to be contributing to the society or a long term burden, crime problem, source of terrorists, etc. in the long run. If the answer is yes, then who the hell needs that?

  198. @Anonymous
    Check out Google's banner today.

    I was just about to comment on that. Were it not so utterly believable, I’d call it uneffing believable. This is what happens when billionaire leftists have nothing but contempt for the country.

  199. @LondonBob
    If you want to know Merkel's motivation for the immigration disaster.

    https://mishtalk.com/2016/05/18/new-nothingness-central-banks-are-powerless-they-should-go-away-steen-jakobsen/

    It made me think of this year’s Davos meeting, which showed a leadership class terrified of slowing jobs growth and enamoured with the idea that population movements might be used to address this.

    You mentioned supply and demand and demographic changes. Before German chancellor Angela Merkel launched the refugee programme that has seen over a million people arrive in Germany, there were several reports from EU banks and think tanks calling for an injection of new working-aged people into Europe. Why were they calling for that if growth and the jobs market are stuck at zero?

    Looking at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s report on immigration and migration, for example, it shows that in the history of European immigration, 75% of all immigrants have been put into some kind of work and become productive taxpayers within one year of their arrival.
    If you can retain that 75% inclusion rate, immigration will provide a huge boost in terms of injecting workers into a faltering demographic context. These are young, aggressive, multicultural people who are going to add colour and flavour to a continent that has been too homogenous for too long.
    On the other hand, people thrive when they are challenged. While the political narrative on refugees might follow the script you just laid out, for an economist like me it’s very clear: immigration is positive.

    That is specious reasoning at best. Immigrants are not created equal. The places they come from matter. As does their IQ and their cultural proclivities. It’s illogical to believe low-IQ people with few skills can add much to an economy. This is especially true because most low-skill labor jobs are being replaced by automation. All you are doing in adding these low-end immigrants is creating more drain on social resources.

    Good luck!

  200. @Thea
    OT but this Egyptair crash makes me so sad. Sad for the families of those on board and for ordinary Egyptians.

    Tourism to Egypt stretches back to the ancients.

    One overlooked aspect of travel there is the warmth of the Egyption people towards tourists. Growing up in Florida, where tourists are treated with contempt by those not getting paid, Egyptian freindliness is such a contrast.

    I worked in a travel agency and people always had stories of poor Egyptians treating the rich Americans with kindness and generosity.

    An American couple sat in a matinee movie in Cairo. Now movie watching in Egypt is a loud social event where vendors walk the aisles selling snacks. Noticing that the couple had no snacks, a teenage boy bought two ice creams and handed it to them.

    They can be kind and friendly. But they can also be pushy louts who try to rip you off at every chance they get.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    What you say is true, but you also have to understand the desperation of someone whose kids may literally be hungry. The guys who hung around the tourist sites giving camel rides, etc. used to do OK but now when the rare tourist shows up, 10 guys will mob him because they are all desperate.

    It's all very sad because (and you have to go back a long way now, to pre-Nasser times) Egypt used to be a pretty cosmopolitan place, with British and Greeks and Jews, etc. and clubs and cultural events, etc. and now it's just a big hot mess. And they have no one to blame but themselves.
  201. O/T: Steve, did you notice the Google doodle for today? It’s some Marxist agitator named Yuri Kochiyama, and Wikipedia describes her as — get this — a “non-black black separatist.”

    Isn’t a “non-black black separatist” technically a segregationist? Or am I missing something here?

    I’m getting really tired of these explicitly political Google doodles…

  202. @Dave Pinsen
    I think Newt would be a good pick:

    - He's a policy wonk, which balances out Trump not being one.

    - He has the government / legislative experience Trump wants.

    - He's a great debater, and will expose any token VP pick.

    - He counters Hillary's attempt at late '90s economic nostalgia.

    - Impeachment insurance.

    What about Newt as White House Chief of Staff?

  203. @JsP
    Greeks and Romans developed civilization because their elites had slaves.

    The English class system had servants.


    No, it's not at all obvious that societies can do the work themselves.

    The English class system had servants?
    My boy, every civilised nation before World War I had servants, and lots of them. The USA probably had more per capita than the English, because it was by around 1900 a richer society.
    Servants were cheap, and everybody who had any pretensions to gentility had at least one. But they were not “slaves” and were indeed often much loved members of the household who continued in service with the same family all their working lives.

    Your point seems to be that servants were somehow not part of the society which they served. Of course they were: they were more often that not young women (and “service” was overwhelmingly a female affair) from the countryside whose fathers and brothers were farmers and tradesmen. They themselves would marry and have children who would then themselves make their way in the world as integral members of the society around them.
    Society, in other words, is not confined to “Society”.

  204. I still think I’m right.

    We Are The World (WATW) was the theme of the last decade of the last century.

    Sentiment has already turned to, if I don’t know you I don’t like you. It’s just that the politicians, their handlers and their MSM megaphones haven’t caught on.

    By the time this new trend is complete, I’m not sure any large political systems will still be intact. There will be far too much conflict over who gets to decide which group pays the taxes and which group consumes them, a conflict made more difficult when EVERYONE is getting some benefits. What is the Military Industrial Complex and the Medical Industrial Complex but tax-paid welfare for middle-class and upper-middle-class people?

  205. @iffen
    Absolutely not.

    He needs a woman that has congressional/ gubernatorial experience.

    IIRC, the last two tickets with women as running mates lost. But Ernst is in the betting too.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    IIRC, the last two tickets with women as running mates lost.
     
    All three, in fact:

    http://www.cato.org/blog/rip-tonie-nathan-first-woman-receive-electoral-vote

    And those are just the ones chosen by Electors.

    Female presidential nominees

    Female vice-presidential nominees

    And, yes, I realize that "female nominee" is redundant.

  206. @JsP
    Greeks and Romans developed civilization because their elites had slaves.

    The English class system had servants.


    No, it's not at all obvious that societies can do the work themselves.

    Ignorant statement. It’s an economic calculation: do it yourself or pay someone from the proceeds of your more lucrative activities to avoid opportunity costs.

    Employees are the economic equivalent of slaves and servants; we just pay them their room and board instead of providing it to them. Employees per se are not the ones “building” the civilization, but the owners of capital.

  207. @LondonBob
    If you want to know Merkel's motivation for the immigration disaster.

    https://mishtalk.com/2016/05/18/new-nothingness-central-banks-are-powerless-they-should-go-away-steen-jakobsen/

    It made me think of this year’s Davos meeting, which showed a leadership class terrified of slowing jobs growth and enamoured with the idea that population movements might be used to address this.

    You mentioned supply and demand and demographic changes. Before German chancellor Angela Merkel launched the refugee programme that has seen over a million people arrive in Germany, there were several reports from EU banks and think tanks calling for an injection of new working-aged people into Europe. Why were they calling for that if growth and the jobs market are stuck at zero?

    Looking at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s report on immigration and migration, for example, it shows that in the history of European immigration, 75% of all immigrants have been put into some kind of work and become productive taxpayers within one year of their arrival.
    If you can retain that 75% inclusion rate, immigration will provide a huge boost in terms of injecting workers into a faltering demographic context. These are young, aggressive, multicultural people who are going to add colour and flavour to a continent that has been too homogenous for too long.
    On the other hand, people thrive when they are challenged. While the political narrative on refugees might follow the script you just laid out, for an economist like me it’s very clear: immigration is positive.

    So 1 in 4 are unemployable? Are the others even net tax producers? Is having your daughter groped at festivals part of the calculation?

  208. @Expletive Deleted

    I do not know of any suffragist terrorism campaign
     
    Pankhurst's mob used to chuck bombs at the Lower Orders without compunction if they got in the way e.g. as nightwatchmen, coppers. Men who, unlike her and her jolly D chums who may have made the Property/Income Qualifications, probably did not have a vote, and were very soon to be enlisted and permanently disposed of, abroad.
    They stopped the terror campaign when WWI was declared, and became amazingly pacifist, as they would have been shot/hanged (with any luck) like Fenians and spies. She and her kin subsequently agitated for universal male conscription, and dished out White Feathers.

    Interesting. I did not know that. But it seems from your tale that they did not gain victory for their cause through terrorism, which was the main gist of my point.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    Post-Wall women only at first. I don't think it was the merits and justice of their case they cared about, pacifist or not. Did. Not. Care.
    They sort of rolled it in with giving all those recently unemployed "Mad Minute" specialists the vote, as the Top People were still freaking out about what happened to Cousin Nicky, and the poor poor wittle tsarina and all, and there were about a half million of these malcontents lurching about.
    The ones who'd come back to find their families in the street because the landlords had raised the rents were particularly irritable.
    Then there were the Irish. My grandad and loads of others were kept on for a year or more, making themselves thoroughly obnoxious to the Paddies. But they were under Military Regs., so couldn't cause any ructions anywhere near Westminster or Whitehall, or it was Shot at Dawn.
    Perhaps they thought giving older women whose first thought was food and safety the vote would counterbalance the new, embittered, war-hardened prole voting bloc, whose demands they refused at their mortal peril, as well they knew.

    Don't let all that ludicrous made-up 'Downton Abbey' horlicks fool you. The mood was very, very ugly and chaotic. Churchill sent tanks and 10,000 troops including heavy machine-gunners to the middle of Glasgow, just like he'd sent troops against the Welsh miners before the War, and against the Fenians in Dublin in the middle of it. People were as hungry as f***, broke (Army pay is buttons, compared to a pitman or a riveter), exhausted, and being ripped off by war profiteers on all sides, with government connivance, even after it had "finished".

    I can't recall a single woman in my family of grandma's generation who didn't hate, hate, hate Winston, for that, or the Dardanelles both, till the day they died (in their 90s lol, the men all died young, so I was only a kid or not born yet, and only had their opinions 2nd hand). All that voting malarkey was for the posh ladies and gents who could afford to cause trouble, and get away with it. More interested in two ounces of lard for the kids' breakfast and borrowing a cup of sugar. Maybe five Woodbines, for Saturday.

  209. @Thea
    OT but this Egyptair crash makes me so sad. Sad for the families of those on board and for ordinary Egyptians.

    Tourism to Egypt stretches back to the ancients.

    One overlooked aspect of travel there is the warmth of the Egyption people towards tourists. Growing up in Florida, where tourists are treated with contempt by those not getting paid, Egyptian freindliness is such a contrast.

    I worked in a travel agency and people always had stories of poor Egyptians treating the rich Americans with kindness and generosity.

    An American couple sat in a matinee movie in Cairo. Now movie watching in Egypt is a loud social event where vendors walk the aisles selling snacks. Noticing that the couple had no snacks, a teenage boy bought two ice creams and handed it to them.

    Except when they harass, molest, rape foreign women.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Yeah, Thea may want to talk to Lara Logan about oh-so-friendly Egyptians.
  210. @jimmyriddle
    There are a few pertinent facts you might not be aware of:

    1. Large numbers of the poor and criminal class of East Europe are coming over. 200,000 Roma, for example. Most of the Somalis given asylum in Holland now live in England.

    2. The British welfare state model is mostly communitarian rather than contributory. Access to the NHS, Child Benefit and social housing etc is based on need. EU rules mean EU citizens must be treated identically to the British.

    3. Low paid work is subsidised via the tax credit system.

    4. Membership of the EU puts us under the jurisdiction of an EU court that, for example, makes it impossible to deport suspected terrorists, or seriously tackle non-EU chain migration. It also makes it impossible for the UK to derogate from any article of the European Convention on Human Rights - which is enforced by a non-EU, and activist liberal, court.

    In other words, our system worked when unrestricted migration was restricted to a few equally wealthy north west European countries. Now we need to leave the EU or completely reform our welfare model.

    How does EU membership preclude the UK leaving the ECHR which as you noted is under a different organization, the Council of Europe?

    • Replies: @jimmyriddle
    This issue is discussed here:

    http://researchbriefings.parliament.uk/ResearchBriefing/Summary/SN06577

    I'd say the legal consensus is that adherence to the ECHR is a requirement of EU membership.
    It would certainly be easier to derogate once we are outside the jurisdiction of the ECJ.
  211. Sort of On Topic: Mickey Kaus says that Hillary is getting way out on the “open borders” limb: http://www.kausfiles.com/2016/05/18/out-on-a-limb-with-hillary/

  212. @Big Bill

    There are crappy jobs that modern Westerners just don’t want to do period – they are terrible jobs (cleaning toilets, etc.) and they are overqualified for them and they don’t want them.
     
    Jack, how old are you? Where are you from? Who are your people? No offense, but you really don't sound like you come from around here.

    Do you have servants to make your bed, clean your room, cook your food, wash your clothes, and change Jack Junior's nappies? A wife/homemaker? Is that work too terrible?

    We have someone who comes in part time to do cleaning and ironing. When Jack Jr. was in nappies we had a part time nanny. I do the cooking – it’s my hobby.

    My original comment was aimed at Singapore, where most of the citizens are highly educated (Chinese) – they want their kids to be programmers, not toilet cleaners.

    I have nothing against honest work, I’m just trying to be realistic. 40% of the population of Singapore is now foreign workers. You can’t replace 1.4 million people overnight. I’m still not sure you can replace them all with natives at all. Singapore is Chinese – I don’t think it would hurt them to let in a few Chinese guest workers to clean their toilets. Is there a “law” that every nation has to be self sufficient in toilet cleaners?

    At any point in the last 120 years, there were people who wanted to slam the doors shut on immigration in the US. In 1896 Walker wrote in the Atlantic about how horrible the new group of E. European (Jewish) and Italian immigrants coming in were and how unsuited to democracy they were. In retrospect I think it would have been a mistake for the US to cut off immigration in 1896 – we would have missed out on a lot of talented people, but YMMV.

    To me, the key (aside from questions of overcrowding) is whether immigrants will assimilate or not. Every immigrant group has some short term adjustment problems but the question is whether their kids are going to be contributing to the society or a long term burden, crime problem, source of terrorists, etc. in the long run. If the answer is yes, then who the hell needs that?

  213. @Yak-15
    They can be kind and friendly. But they can also be pushy louts who try to rip you off at every chance they get.

    What you say is true, but you also have to understand the desperation of someone whose kids may literally be hungry. The guys who hung around the tourist sites giving camel rides, etc. used to do OK but now when the rare tourist shows up, 10 guys will mob him because they are all desperate.

    It’s all very sad because (and you have to go back a long way now, to pre-Nasser times) Egypt used to be a pretty cosmopolitan place, with British and Greeks and Jews, etc. and clubs and cultural events, etc. and now it’s just a big hot mess. And they have no one to blame but themselves.

  214. @Clifford Brown
    There is a mythical place called America prior to 1985. You should look it up some time. You will be amazed what you will find. It is kind of like Narnia, but with more Trans Ams.

    If you reduce welfare and disability benefits, there will suddenly be "modern Westerners" who can clean toilets.

    1. I’m old enough to remember pre-1985 America, though for the decade before that I lived in NY and Phila, where most people who did menial type jobs were either black or Puerto Rican or immigrant (the proverbial Polish cleaning lady). I do remember visiting Seattle and being shocked to see American white people doing those kind of jobs.

    2. Historically the US had a lot of foreign born but the % tapered off between the Immigration Acts of ’24 and ’65 and then started going up again, so if you pick the right date you can pick the high water mark, which does not represent the “typical ” American situation at all but just one particular moment in time.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Ten years ago, my girlfriend was surprised to see a white bus driver in Seattle.
    , @Brutusale
    Visit Pasco or Hernando counties in Florida. White people are still doing those jobs.
  215. @RamonaQ
    Peter Hitchens seems to be in favor of Brexit but of the view that a win for remain will legitimize the pro-EU argument for decades.

    Since you seem knowledgeable, maybe you can explain why UKIP never took off like Trump did? Farage has really impressed me throughout this whole Brexit campaign as one of the only UK politicians capable of talking sense. Also, why is the loony left so much in favor of Brexit? It's all very confusing

    The problem with UKIP is that it has very little appeal to the white working class. It’s a low tax, free trade, pro-City party. It only opposes the EU because it thinks the EU is too economically left-wing. It gets votes for it’s anti-EU policies, but struggles to attract any support in general elections.

    The majority of people who oppose open borders are working class. Hence, a immigration restrictionist party has to appeal to the working class. Britian needs to start from scratch with a populist party that isn’t connected to UKIP or the BNP. The new leadership of the BNP has the right idea – focus on local elections and forget national politics for the time being. However, the BNP has too much negative baggage associated with it, and its name sounds too fascist for English tastes (it needs to have the word democracy in there somewhere).

    • Replies: @Seneca
    Thank you for your post.

    As an American I hope I now finally understand a little better why UKIP has been unable to gain much traction. It always seemed a puzzle to me before. Strange that it would be for free trade but against open borders. Here in the USA the GLOB is for open borders and free trade (well crony capitalism Wall Street friendly managed free trade).

    From what you say UKIP appears to be economic conservatives or libertarians who are against against immigration because they don't like the EU and what comes with membership to the EU, and not because they have anything against immigration per se, right? So limiting immigration is not really a central feature of UKIP's policy. Is that correct?
    , @helena
    One way to go would be to have an English Democratic Alliance - a fully multi-racial English-cultural organisation - not a full party but a body prepared to promote issues and variously support mainstream policies across Parties. If it focused solely on English issues it would avoid sensitive topics relating to other countries. Being English would bring it in line with SNP and PC since it would not be based on ethnicity rather on 'regional' community and economy and development. Something like that is the best one could hope for at this juncture; there are plenty of people in England who would be attracted by something like that, if it was thoroughly non-ethnicity focused - health, housing, labour rights, education, policing, and immigration but going forward only, so to speak.
  216. @Anonymous Nephew
    OT

    BBC on Sykes-Picot - once again diversity is a strength for European countries, but a weakness everywhere else.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-36300224

    "The resulting order inherited by the Middle East of the day sees a variety of states whose borders were generally drawn with little regard for ethnic, tribal, religious or linguistic considerations.

    Often a patchwork of minorities, there is a natural tendency for such countries to fall apart unless held together by the iron grip of a strongman or a powerful central government. "
  217. @Jack D
    1. I'm old enough to remember pre-1985 America, though for the decade before that I lived in NY and Phila, where most people who did menial type jobs were either black or Puerto Rican or immigrant (the proverbial Polish cleaning lady). I do remember visiting Seattle and being shocked to see American white people doing those kind of jobs.

    2. Historically the US had a lot of foreign born but the % tapered off between the Immigration Acts of '24 and '65 and then started going up again, so if you pick the right date you can pick the high water mark, which does not represent the "typical " American situation at all but just one particular moment in time.

    Ten years ago, my girlfriend was surprised to see a white bus driver in Seattle.

    • Replies: @Marty
    In San Francisco there are plenty of white bus drivers, but they work for Golden Gate Transit, which runs up to Marin and Sonoma counties. Their drivers often work 13- hour shifts. You don't see any whites in the SF Muni system. I assume this reflects the differences in extent of government connection. GGT may be privately run with only some government subsidy. But they let blacks ride free by flashing a "mentally disabled" card.
  218. Ed says:

    This is in response to several (off topic) comments on Newt Gingrich as Trump’s VP.

    Trump would be better off picking the other non-child molesting former Republican House Speaker, John Boehner. There is actually a chance that Boehner is anti-immigration, due to his work on impeding the pushes for amnesty that happened when he was Speaker. And his personality will go down alot better with the American public.

    Newt was a globalization enthusiast in the 1990s. Trump is an anti-globalization candidate, on trade as well as immigration.

  219. @Jack D
    Look up Wolf Blitzer on Jeopardy on youtube - you'll be shocked at what an idiot he is (or maybe you won't). OTOH, Andy Richter (Conan O'Brien's sidekick) did great on the same show - go figure.

    Wolf was easily the worst. He even bombed the practice game! Fully exposed as a dolt but still collecting checks without shame.

  220. @Steve Sailer
    My clicker was broken when I was on Jeopardy in 1994.

    Did you at least do the obligatory button mashing “see, I’m trying to buzz in!!” move? Or stare slack jawed, mouthing sounds to look like the answer is on the tip of your tounge like Steele?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I was constantly holding up my buzzer pushing it over and over with it only going off about 10% or 20% of the time. During both commercial breaks, the Jeopardy technical crew besieged me, asking what I was doing wrong to keep my buzzer from going off.

    A few years later, a friend whom I hadn't seen in a decade dropped by. The first thing he said was, "I saw you on Jeopardy. What the hell was wrong with your buzzer?"

    A few weeks after me, General Schwarzkopf appeared on Celebrity Jeopardy and his buzzer was unreliable. He made them stop taping until they fixed his buzzer.

    It probably cost me around $25,000.

  221. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Lurker
    Post-WW2 nearly 250,000 Poles remained/settled in the UK - mostly soldiers, sailors, airmen and their families.

    We hear constantly about the non-white arrivals from the 1940s onward (The greatest thing that ever happened to us!™) but for a a long time the Poles would have been the largest single immigrant group in Britain. Yet that has largely gone down the memory hole, unlike more vibrant, highly problematic incomers.

    “….the Poles would have been the largest single immigrant group in Britain. Yet that has largely gone down the memory hole…”

    Probably because unlike the third world colored immigrants the Poles simply assimilated, and made no trouble. Just nine years after their arrival, Jamaicans had a race riot in Britain. I doubt the Poles ever rioted about anything and I am pretty sure Britain never had any Polish suicide bombers like the Muslims in London in 2005.

  222. @Anon87
    Did you at least do the obligatory button mashing "see, I'm trying to buzz in!!" move? Or stare slack jawed, mouthing sounds to look like the answer is on the tip of your tounge like Steele?

    I was constantly holding up my buzzer pushing it over and over with it only going off about 10% or 20% of the time. During both commercial breaks, the Jeopardy technical crew besieged me, asking what I was doing wrong to keep my buzzer from going off.

    A few years later, a friend whom I hadn’t seen in a decade dropped by. The first thing he said was, “I saw you on Jeopardy. What the hell was wrong with your buzzer?”

    A few weeks after me, General Schwarzkopf appeared on Celebrity Jeopardy and his buzzer was unreliable. He made them stop taping until they fixed his buzzer.

    It probably cost me around $25,000.

    • Replies: @Anon87
    So I take it they didn't change anything and left you to deal with a wonky signaling device? Did they claim you were buzzing in before Alex finished reading, which I've heard locks you out for a second or two?

    I hereby pledge double my usual donation to your next fund drive if you have a recording of your Jeopardy! appearance to post to YouTube.

    I wouldn't have wanted to be part of the technical crew when Schwarzkopf stopped the show. I almost want to know if he forcefully but calmly put a stop to it, or just barked out orders like Patton? Searching, this site came up with the date of his appearance. Alas, "Steve Sailer" returns no results. "J! Archive" reeks of something white males would spend their time cataloging. If the majority of people who run the site aren't, I will triple my usual donation.
    , @Desiderius
    There's a metaphor for your career in a nutshell.
  223. Marty [AKA "Harvard Hates America"] says:
    @Thea
    OT but this Egyptair crash makes me so sad. Sad for the families of those on board and for ordinary Egyptians.

    Tourism to Egypt stretches back to the ancients.

    One overlooked aspect of travel there is the warmth of the Egyption people towards tourists. Growing up in Florida, where tourists are treated with contempt by those not getting paid, Egyptian freindliness is such a contrast.

    I worked in a travel agency and people always had stories of poor Egyptians treating the rich Americans with kindness and generosity.

    An American couple sat in a matinee movie in Cairo. Now movie watching in Egypt is a loud social event where vendors walk the aisles selling snacks. Noticing that the couple had no snacks, a teenage boy bought two ice creams and handed it to them.

    There was an Egyptian family that ran a magazine/smoke shop in Berkeley in the late ’90s. After I’d come around a few times, the owner blurted out at me, “what religion are you!”

  224. Ivy says:
    @Anonymous
    Steve, there's a lot more to it than that.

    Firstly, the British - Conservative - government of Harold MacMillan's desire to enter the fledgling 'Common Market' way back in 1960 - which was rebuffed by De Gaulle -, must be seen in the context of loss of empire, a traumatic experience, and the rank refusal of the Eisenhower administration to support the Anglo French action in Suez in 1956. the British government, quite rightly, saw the American action as a deliberate attempt to relegate Britain as a global power in order for America to 'fill its shoes' and take its place. Also, back in the day the world was seen firmly as being divided between the two rival cold war power blocs, the USA and the former USSR, and the prevailing opinion was that only be unifying could the western European nations stamp their ground on the world.

    Also, during that immediate post war period, Britain was plagued by notions of slow economic growth vis a vis the continental nations, and it was thought that by joining the common market, Britain would be 'infected' with economic growth.


    The main objection to the EU in Britain hinges on the notion of 'parliamentary sovereignty', as described in the works of Dicey, the closest that Britain has got to a written constitution. In essence, the Powellite objection, the sensible objection, is that the will of the British people as expressed as their democratically elected parliamentary representatives is sovereign, in that 'there is no higher power' exercising control over Britain. The EU mandates that, effectively, parliament is subordinated to EU institutions, institutions that are outside of the control of the British electorate -'and which very well might act contra to the wishes and interests of the British people. Powell had an almost religious reverence for Westminster and its ancient hard fought history.


    At bottom, it's all about democracy - that's why such strong passions are being aroused.

    French antipathy to Americans, and by proxy, British, stems in part from the exclusion of De Gaulle from the Big Three discussions during WWII. Monsieur thought that he was of equal stature to Winnie, Frank and Joe, and never got over the slight.

    One consequence of that, compounded by the Suez kerfuffle, was the French ejection of NATO.

    iSteve side note: There are numerous golf courses in France that were once associated with US-led bases.

    Back to Brexit. I support it. Powell was right and will be found right. There is going to be a reshuffling of the European order and the British may as well initiate a position. The eventual structure will likely take years, be sub-optimal, and result in payoffs to many, so business as usual.

  225. Marty [AKA "coot veal or cot deal"] says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Ten years ago, my girlfriend was surprised to see a white bus driver in Seattle.

    In San Francisco there are plenty of white bus drivers, but they work for Golden Gate Transit, which runs up to Marin and Sonoma counties. Their drivers often work 13- hour shifts. You don’t see any whites in the SF Muni system. I assume this reflects the differences in extent of government connection. GGT may be privately run with only some government subsidy. But they let blacks ride free by flashing a “mentally disabled” card.

  226. @Steve Sailer
    I was constantly holding up my buzzer pushing it over and over with it only going off about 10% or 20% of the time. During both commercial breaks, the Jeopardy technical crew besieged me, asking what I was doing wrong to keep my buzzer from going off.

    A few years later, a friend whom I hadn't seen in a decade dropped by. The first thing he said was, "I saw you on Jeopardy. What the hell was wrong with your buzzer?"

    A few weeks after me, General Schwarzkopf appeared on Celebrity Jeopardy and his buzzer was unreliable. He made them stop taping until they fixed his buzzer.

    It probably cost me around $25,000.

    So I take it they didn’t change anything and left you to deal with a wonky signaling device? Did they claim you were buzzing in before Alex finished reading, which I’ve heard locks you out for a second or two?

    I hereby pledge double my usual donation to your next fund drive if you have a recording of your Jeopardy! appearance to post to YouTube.

    I wouldn’t have wanted to be part of the technical crew when Schwarzkopf stopped the show. I almost want to know if he forcefully but calmly put a stop to it, or just barked out orders like Patton? Searching, this site came up with the date of his appearance. Alas, “Steve Sailer” returns no results. “J! Archive” reeks of something white males would spend their time cataloging. If the majority of people who run the site aren’t, I will triple my usual donation.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I believe the Jeopardy episode I was on aired February 27, 1994. It was filmed about a month earlier, not long after the Northridge Earthquake.
  227. @Anon87
    So I take it they didn't change anything and left you to deal with a wonky signaling device? Did they claim you were buzzing in before Alex finished reading, which I've heard locks you out for a second or two?

    I hereby pledge double my usual donation to your next fund drive if you have a recording of your Jeopardy! appearance to post to YouTube.

    I wouldn't have wanted to be part of the technical crew when Schwarzkopf stopped the show. I almost want to know if he forcefully but calmly put a stop to it, or just barked out orders like Patton? Searching, this site came up with the date of his appearance. Alas, "Steve Sailer" returns no results. "J! Archive" reeks of something white males would spend their time cataloging. If the majority of people who run the site aren't, I will triple my usual donation.

    I believe the Jeopardy episode I was on aired February 27, 1994. It was filmed about a month earlier, not long after the Northridge Earthquake.

  228. @Dave Pinsen
    I think Newt would be a good pick:

    - He's a policy wonk, which balances out Trump not being one.

    - He has the government / legislative experience Trump wants.

    - He's a great debater, and will expose any token VP pick.

    - He counters Hillary's attempt at late '90s economic nostalgia.

    - Impeachment insurance.

    Newt? Seriously? The three wives men ticket?

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    According to Islam four is the threshold. Newt for VP!
    , @Dave Pinsen
    Hillary is too compromised on that score to make an issue of it.
    , @Lagertha
    plus, Donald is also on to his 3rd wife. I think Newt would not be the best VP CHOICE at this time (how 'bout never?) and, the VP must represent a "new under-represented category." This is why, I think, pick a guy or girl who is somewhat youngish, but palatable to the baby boomers who are losing their scheisse over this election - whose retirement funds are constantly streaming across their conscious.
  229. @G Pinfold
    Jumping in to the sub-thread about jobs Westerners won't do: it occurs to me that...

    What pro-immigration people want is not diversity, per se. What they really want is the inequality, and the stratified society, that goes with it. That is what we call vibrancy.
    The last thing a Swedish SJW (nice lady, doctor's wife, call her what you will) is a middle-class Faisal next door who is exactly like boring Olaf, but browner and spicier at dinner time. People seem to need the frisson of inequality, the chaos, the crime, the degradation, the guilt, the sense of perpetual menace. It makes them feel alive.

    Do not underestimate the extent of perfectly lovely nihilism.

    What pro-immigration people want is not diversity, per se. What they really want is the inequality, and the stratified society, that goes with it. That is what we call vibrancy.

    Yes. They prefer to import a lower class, finding the possibility that they and their progeny might fall into their own society’s lower class too terrifying to contemplate.

    This is the Achilles’ heel of prosperous, ‘meritocratic’, market economies. When you define the ‘good life’ as being a college-educated, white-collar, ‘career’ person, then having a son who’s a plumber or a daughter who’s a dental hygienist is de facto failure. You can try desperately to distinguish yourself from people who look like you who do engage in blue-collar work (and Lord knows we see enough of this), but the lack of a long-term, stable intra-ethnic hierarchy renders this approach precarious and exhausting.

    A profound yearning for social stability is one of the reasons a show such as Downton Abbey has been so incredibly successful, and why battalions of otherwise-SJW-oriented females remain obsessed with the Regency England of Jane Austen.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Damn you Last Real Calvinist! Odi et amo, meum amicum. Your soundness is exemplary.
    , @Jack D
    We see this in places like Ivy League admissions. People who got in thru "meritocracy" want their kids to get in as "legacies". These people are also much more adept in gaming the system - they know that you are supposed to get Junior classified as "learning disabled" (and are able to pay for expensive private testing that shows this) so that he can take the SAT on an untimed basis (but the College Board is not permitted to note this on Junior's scores). They send Junior on a trip to Costa Rica to volunteer in rain forest restoration, which becomes the subject of Junior's admission essay, while Joe Podunk writes about his 4H project breeding a calf. Now Junior, who is a little regressed toward the mean compared to his parents, has gotten into Ivy U. (Joe Podunk, despite being smarter than Junior, is now at State U) and he has to compete on the curve in classes. Isn't he better off if almost everyone else in his class is also some sort of special (relaxed standard) admit - AA or legacy or sports or an Asian who writes in terrible Engrish, vs. having to sit in a class that consists mostly of people like his parents - meritocratic sons of white people from the sticks (and Asian-Americans)?
  230. @iffen
    Absolutely not.

    He needs a woman that has congressional/ gubernatorial experience.

    Can the effective the vp pick be quantified?

    Unless Trump picks someone out of left field I don’t think it will matter.

    Isnt it just to shore up political alliances. except John McCain who thought Palin would deliver conservative votes.

    • Replies: @iffen
    Not sure what you mean by quantified.

    McCain most likely picked Palin because of a little tingle in his dick.

    The VP never matters. It might make a difference this time. It could be close.

    He needs someone that appeals to the base.
  231. @Kat Grey
    I fully support Brexit however even if the UK does secure a majority leave vote it us too late to undo the damage caused by massive non-white Third World immigrstion since the late 1940s. Mixed race is the fastest growing ethnic group and Islam the fastest growing religion. Even Northern Ireland has an increasing number of ethnic minorities; Northern Irish children are in fact the minority in one school in South Belfast! The British people should have sovereignty over their own nation without having to take orders from some bespectacled platter-face in Brussels However it will not, sadly, put brakes on the eventual and disastrous demographic demise of the white British.

    too late to undo the damage caused by massive non-white Third World immigrstion since the late 1940s

    No it isn’t, unless you succumb to despair. Grab your bootstraps and pull yourself up.

  232. @donut
    The chances of England leaving the EU are the same as the chances of Texas leaving the Union . While it might be to the benefit of both to shed the domination of their enemies , they will never grow the balls to do so and even with a 90 % vote in favor of throwing off their parasitical masters the centralized state will never allow it . You will find Texans in the "volunteer" army slaughtering their own for a car payment and the bright hope of a pension . I wonder , does the white man deserve the freedoms bequeathed to him by those who came before ? I think not .

    You have mistaken Texans for people living in Texas. And your underestimation of Texans can only be explained by ignorance.

  233. @Clyde
    Obama's passive-aggressive pajama boys have been trying to get one over on Bad Vlad ever since Vlad showed them how its done in Syria to obliterate ISIS. Ever notice all the wacky lefty females working at State? They are always trying to even up the score with Vlad who knows and shows what a joke Obama is. What a sick joke his State Department is, thrusting their gay ambassadors (Dem party donors) onto various third world nations. Plus promoting the gay agenda in many foreign lands that want nothing to do with it.

    Plus promoting the gay agenda in many foreign lands that want nothing to do with it.

    Too true. But if they would wholeheartedly embrace it, the results (theoretically) would reduce their population burden. Why don’t they enthusiastically sign up? Maybe they are eligible for U.N. subsidies for the same?

  234. @AnotherDad
    Newt? Seriously? The three wives men ticket?

    According to Islam four is the threshold. Newt for VP!

  235. @The Last Real Calvinist

    What pro-immigration people want is not diversity, per se. What they really want is the inequality, and the stratified society, that goes with it. That is what we call vibrancy.

     

    Yes. They prefer to import a lower class, finding the possibility that they and their progeny might fall into their own society's lower class too terrifying to contemplate.

    This is the Achilles' heel of prosperous, 'meritocratic', market economies. When you define the 'good life' as being a college-educated, white-collar, 'career' person, then having a son who's a plumber or a daughter who's a dental hygienist is de facto failure. You can try desperately to distinguish yourself from people who look like you who do engage in blue-collar work (and Lord knows we see enough of this), but the lack of a long-term, stable intra-ethnic hierarchy renders this approach precarious and exhausting.

    A profound yearning for social stability is one of the reasons a show such as Downton Abbey has been so incredibly successful, and why battalions of otherwise-SJW-oriented females remain obsessed with the Regency England of Jane Austen.

    Damn you Last Real Calvinist! Odi et amo, meum amicum. Your soundness is exemplary.

  236. @AnotherDad
    Newt? Seriously? The three wives men ticket?

    Hillary is too compromised on that score to make an issue of it.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of small minds. The great minds who sway our elections can't be bothered with such trifles.
  237. @Steve Sailer
    I was constantly holding up my buzzer pushing it over and over with it only going off about 10% or 20% of the time. During both commercial breaks, the Jeopardy technical crew besieged me, asking what I was doing wrong to keep my buzzer from going off.

    A few years later, a friend whom I hadn't seen in a decade dropped by. The first thing he said was, "I saw you on Jeopardy. What the hell was wrong with your buzzer?"

    A few weeks after me, General Schwarzkopf appeared on Celebrity Jeopardy and his buzzer was unreliable. He made them stop taping until they fixed his buzzer.

    It probably cost me around $25,000.

    There’s a metaphor for your career in a nutshell.

  238. @Dave Pinsen
    Hillary is too compromised on that score to make an issue of it.

    A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of small minds. The great minds who sway our elections can’t be bothered with such trifles.

  239. @LondonBob
    Being overrun by Spaniards, huge numbers have appeared in London in the past two years, might be less objectionable than being overrun by Pakistanis, but it is still preferable not to be overrun. Americans often forget Europe is peopled by a number of distinct ethnic groups and we remain German, Dutch, Italian, Welsh etc. despite EU attempts to create the new European man.

    Of course a recent phenomenon is ethnic minorities arriving in another European country then gaining citizenship, which then gives them the freedom to settle here, as has happened with Somalians from the Netherlands. Brexit is the necessary first step to getting back control of our country.

    The demise of England via Islamic invasion started with the Pakistanis piggybacking onto Indian Hindus immigrating to the UK. The Hindus came first because they culturally got along better with the English. Following the Hindus came the Muslims from India and Pakistan.
    The main Anglo-Pakistani scam today is importing marriage partners for profit. Not marrying within the existing Anglo-Pakistani community but bringing in partners (and eventually their family) from Pakistan and getting compensated for this. Making for more effective demographic warfare against the native British. Enoch Powell predicted this 40 years ago.

  240. @Dave Pinsen
    IIRC, the last two tickets with women as running mates lost. But Ernst is in the betting too.

    IIRC, the last two tickets with women as running mates lost.

    All three, in fact:

    http://www.cato.org/blog/rip-tonie-nathan-first-woman-receive-electoral-vote

    And those are just the ones chosen by Electors.

    Female presidential nominees

    Female vice-presidential nominees

    And, yes, I realize that “female nominee” is redundant.

    • Replies: @iffen
    If he selects a woman for vp then one ticket with a female will win. I would like for it to not be the one headed by Clinton. The vp needs to be one that has been elected on her own merits. Then when the female cards are played Trump can ask, "How many votes would Hillary Rodham get"?
  241. @Whiskey
    Steve I think you are overthinking things. Erdogan got on fine with Putin, and Assad, and Iraq, and Iran. He had a "no problems with neighbors" policy that allowed (connected) Turkish merchants to make a fortune in Syria, Iraq, and trading with Iran and Russia. Then he got greedy and ambitious, saw that Obama was weak and not committed to maintain America's sway in the ME, and figured Assad was a goner. So he went all in on ISIS figuring that he'd bite off a big chunk of Syria, Iraq, and Lebanon (hence the hostility to traditional partner Israel). Erdogan gradually saw himself as the anti-Ataturk, able to roll everything back and become a Suleiman the Magnificent.

    Just human nature, a thug getting greedy when the former big man left.

    Merkel, same thing. She criticized multiculturalism but saw votes and elite applause by letting in half the ME and Third World. Now the FT reports that subrosa the Germans are trying to deport refugees there and not let any in, but not admit a change in policy because that would be disastrous politics. The only reason the Christian Democrats have not bounced Merkel is because she pre-emptively over the last decade removed all possible challengers.

    Merkel is a typical post-menopausal professional women with contempt for her own people's men and idiot delusions about the Third World and particularly its men. Nothing more than her feelz, tingles, and short term politics are at stake.

    Brexit is the only option for Britain to maintain its welfare state and cohesion. Merkel has made it clear that EU states will all equally share in the massive Camp of the Saints coming to Western Europe from Africa and the ME and Pakistan/Afghanistan/Iran. Germany will attempt not to take any more but Britain will be stuffed with them. Draining rapidly any hope of social welfare for natives as "migrants" (youfs and the diverse) take up all the resources. With the social order of the refugee camps in Calais as daily life. To avoid that, only Brexit is necessary, but not sufficient in and of itself, to stop that from happening.

    In the end, Europe will be over-run, in varying degrees, from country to country, by the Third World. Some places will revolt quickly to maintain not only social/ethnic/racial cohesion but social welfare spending. Switzerland, Poland, Czech Republic, and Hungary are good bets. Possibly the Netherlands, likely Ireland, and Austria. Others will face civil war, and sooner rather than later over what else, race and money? Entirely avoidable but Merkel wanted to feed her feelz, tingles, and two week press cycle.

    Erdogan probably eyes Greece, Bulgaria, Macedonia, and other former parts of the Ottoman Empire as easy targets while Putin probably still dreams of restoring Constantinople. None of that will end well. Disaster strikes when leaders don't have a sense of the possible. The Kaiser failed to see the Schlieman Plan was a fantasy where everything went right and there were no delays. Napoleon wished away the Russian winter, as did Hitler.

    But then, America leaving the ME has a cost. Erdogan's ambition colliding with Putin's is one of them.

    I totally agree with Whiskey. I want all EU countries (EU has absolutely sucked for some of them) to drop out of the EU. It was stupid and idealistic and worthless in the first place to establish something as dumb (low-energy) as the EU: just a con-job by the global elite…because: people are still so effing tribal, corrupt, stupid and different. There is too much hate…and it will never end. Hate is such a tough part of the human mind. Hate is there and it is reflected (Egyptair downing) everyday. Hate rules right now.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    What does "low energy" really mean, other than it is an all-purpose negative epithet of the moment?
  242. @AnotherDad
    Newt? Seriously? The three wives men ticket?

    plus, Donald is also on to his 3rd wife. I think Newt would not be the best VP CHOICE at this time (how ’bout never?) and, the VP must represent a “new under-represented category.” This is why, I think, pick a guy or girl who is somewhat youngish, but palatable to the baby boomers who are losing their scheisse over this election – whose retirement funds are constantly streaming across their conscious.

  243. @unpc downunder
    The problem with UKIP is that it has very little appeal to the white working class. It's a low tax, free trade, pro-City party. It only opposes the EU because it thinks the EU is too economically left-wing. It gets votes for it's anti-EU policies, but struggles to attract any support in general elections.

    The majority of people who oppose open borders are working class. Hence, a immigration restrictionist party has to appeal to the working class. Britian needs to start from scratch with a populist party that isn't connected to UKIP or the BNP. The new leadership of the BNP has the right idea - focus on local elections and forget national politics for the time being. However, the BNP has too much negative baggage associated with it, and its name sounds too fascist for English tastes (it needs to have the word democracy in there somewhere).

    Thank you for your post.

    As an American I hope I now finally understand a little better why UKIP has been unable to gain much traction. It always seemed a puzzle to me before. Strange that it would be for free trade but against open borders. Here in the USA the GLOB is for open borders and free trade (well crony capitalism Wall Street friendly managed free trade).

    From what you say UKIP appears to be economic conservatives or libertarians who are against against immigration because they don’t like the EU and what comes with membership to the EU, and not because they have anything against immigration per se, right? So limiting immigration is not really a central feature of UKIP’s policy. Is that correct?

  244. @Clifford Brown
    I have always had admiration for Nasser and his vision for the Arab world.

    Still one has to wonder how representative this video is of Egyptian society at the time. Nasser was part of the Cairo elite who came of age when Egypt was still a British protectorate. His values were likely very different from those of the village peasants who made up a majority of the population. Perhaps Arab secularism was merely a holdover from the age of European colonization and that a return to Islamic conservatism was inevitable once Europeans and European influenced Arab elites no longer had undue influence over Muslim societies.

    With Socialism no longer a global restraint and alternative in the Arab world, Islam has more free reign.

    What you say is true, but the character, culture, inclinations, aspirations, sympathies of elites are very important for the ultimate character of their society. Remember what John Addams said about elites being people who can count on another person’s vote aside from their own. This means influence. While I’ve argued that the demographic strength of the religious masses was a factor in the decline of secularism in Turkey and elsewhere (and it probably was), what also contributed to prior elites losing power is their loss in status relative to emerging religious and jihadi elites (teleological groups, which have a stated goal to which they can rally society, like the spread of Islam). Politics being, at its basest, a mechanism for establishing the relative status of different groups, we can consider that whether Nasser and the guys in the hall were representative of Egyptian society is not that relevant for an age of reform and advancement, but rather whether they could make their society conform to their expectations. Even European Enlightenment, for good or ill, was driven by various elites (noblemen and noblewomen and their salons, philosophers, the aristocracy given to impecunious scientific and philosophical explorations, the newly made men of the ambitious classes) . And the Nasserites and their successors did for a while, and they could have done so permanently… maybe. The Kemalists had a good run in Turkey. They managed to extinguish my people’s age old enmity towards them, by making us see them as charming and pushy Turks rather than the hated Ottomans.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    As you say, modernity or enlightenment (with all the good AND bad that implies) is a top down phenomenon which also contains the seeds of its own destruction because one of the things that it implies is the universal franchise (as well as universal education). So once you light the fuse on it, you are in a demographic race - if you can educate and modernize the majority of the population before they are in a position to exercise popular sovereignty (and this is a pretty rare event, found mostly in Europe and the Anglophone nations) then you will end up with a self sustaining Western democracy. But if you can't (because the peasants keep spitting out kids faster than you can Westernize them) then you will regress back to some sort of theocracy or dictatorship. For decades in Turkey it looked like the modernizers were winning the race but the reactionary forces eventually won the war of the cradle. The game is hard to win because modernization also implies a lower birth rate for your side.
  245. @Pseudonymic Handle
    How does EU membership preclude the UK leaving the ECHR which as you noted is under a different organization, the Council of Europe?

    This issue is discussed here:

    http://researchbriefings.parliament.uk/ResearchBriefing/Summary/SN06577

    I’d say the legal consensus is that adherence to the ECHR is a requirement of EU membership.
    It would certainly be easier to derogate once we are outside the jurisdiction of the ECJ.

    • Replies: @Pseudonymic Handle
    Thanks.
  246. @Whiskey
    Steve I think you are overthinking things. Erdogan got on fine with Putin, and Assad, and Iraq, and Iran. He had a "no problems with neighbors" policy that allowed (connected) Turkish merchants to make a fortune in Syria, Iraq, and trading with Iran and Russia. Then he got greedy and ambitious, saw that Obama was weak and not committed to maintain America's sway in the ME, and figured Assad was a goner. So he went all in on ISIS figuring that he'd bite off a big chunk of Syria, Iraq, and Lebanon (hence the hostility to traditional partner Israel). Erdogan gradually saw himself as the anti-Ataturk, able to roll everything back and become a Suleiman the Magnificent.

    Just human nature, a thug getting greedy when the former big man left.

    Merkel, same thing. She criticized multiculturalism but saw votes and elite applause by letting in half the ME and Third World. Now the FT reports that subrosa the Germans are trying to deport refugees there and not let any in, but not admit a change in policy because that would be disastrous politics. The only reason the Christian Democrats have not bounced Merkel is because she pre-emptively over the last decade removed all possible challengers.

    Merkel is a typical post-menopausal professional women with contempt for her own people's men and idiot delusions about the Third World and particularly its men. Nothing more than her feelz, tingles, and short term politics are at stake.

    Brexit is the only option for Britain to maintain its welfare state and cohesion. Merkel has made it clear that EU states will all equally share in the massive Camp of the Saints coming to Western Europe from Africa and the ME and Pakistan/Afghanistan/Iran. Germany will attempt not to take any more but Britain will be stuffed with them. Draining rapidly any hope of social welfare for natives as "migrants" (youfs and the diverse) take up all the resources. With the social order of the refugee camps in Calais as daily life. To avoid that, only Brexit is necessary, but not sufficient in and of itself, to stop that from happening.

    In the end, Europe will be over-run, in varying degrees, from country to country, by the Third World. Some places will revolt quickly to maintain not only social/ethnic/racial cohesion but social welfare spending. Switzerland, Poland, Czech Republic, and Hungary are good bets. Possibly the Netherlands, likely Ireland, and Austria. Others will face civil war, and sooner rather than later over what else, race and money? Entirely avoidable but Merkel wanted to feed her feelz, tingles, and two week press cycle.

    Erdogan probably eyes Greece, Bulgaria, Macedonia, and other former parts of the Ottoman Empire as easy targets while Putin probably still dreams of restoring Constantinople. None of that will end well. Disaster strikes when leaders don't have a sense of the possible. The Kaiser failed to see the Schlieman Plan was a fantasy where everything went right and there were no delays. Napoleon wished away the Russian winter, as did Hitler.

    But then, America leaving the ME has a cost. Erdogan's ambition colliding with Putin's is one of them.

    Small correction: The German World War I plan was known as the Schlieffen Plan, named after the Chief of the German General Staff who devised it. The Kaiser turned out to be no great fan of the Schlieffen Plan–he wanted to mobilize German forces only against Russia in support of Austria-Hungary, but was told by the then Chief of the German General Staff Helmuth von Moltke the Younger that such a modification of the Plan was not possible. The Kaiser reportedly said “Your uncle [Helmuth von Moltke the Elder] would have given me a different answer.” It played to all of the younger von Moltke’s insecurities, and he had a nervous breakdown during the First Battle of the Marne.

  247. @SFG
    Sorry about your melanoma. That sucks.

    FWIW, now they're finding that vitamin D deficiency due to *lack* of sun exposure can raise your risk of cancer too.

    Tattoos-I always figured it was a mistake you couldn't undo, and never got any, but if you tell the kids not to, won't they just do it to rebel when they get old enough?

    I can't see Trump picking another northeasterner (yes, I know New England is culturally distinct from and hates NYC but the rest of the country forgets the difference--at least when it comes to Boston you have two arrogant, rich, old, walkable cities with a wealth of cultural institutions that seem to think of each other as antitheses for some reason). Hillary, well, I'd think she'd go for a southerner or midwesterner to extend the party's reach. You add a New Englander if you think you're weak in the Northeast; Trump needs to win the Rust Belt.

    https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2015/08/17/something-else/ If you’re close enough to the equator, you need dark skin, and the genes in these pathways are constrained – not free to change. But if they are free to change, then a change that improves fitness through a pleiotropic effect is now free to spread, since the resulting paleness is bearable.

    The above quote is talking nonsense, because East Asians have the same risk of getting skin cancer as black Africans.

    http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2014/01/07/comment-east-asian-genes-may-solve-skin-cancer-puzzle The data indicated that people with European ancestry are approximately 20 times more susceptible to melanoma than those of African or East Asian descent.

    European skin is the anomaly, because it has been selected for a pressure which is totally unrelated to UV or vitamin d. In a world wide range of traditional societies (in which chastity was considered the supreme virtue for a marriageable girl) maidens kept their skin a light as possible and took care to avoid the sun. European women working outside covered up. But there was always another aspect

    “But What About Suntanning?” by Peter Frost.

    If lighter skin has been favored in the human female ..in her male partner, could it also be inhibiting certain impulsive components of sexual desire? And wouldn’t tanning release this inhibition? […]
    Such “hyperarousal” may also explain why the tanned look has remained so popular among modern European and North American women since the 1920s. But why was this look so marginal previously? And why has it not caught on elsewhere in the world? […]

    With the 20th century, there developed in Europe and North America a new sexual environment that presents marriage and family formation as one of many possible life choices, thereby allowing alternate eroticisms to compete with the mainstream ideal on more equal terms, particularly among young single adults who tend to set fashion trends. For many people today, the aim is no longer to maximize reproductive potential. Rather, it is to maximize erotic stimulation. It is this new sexual environment that may have allowed the tanned look to make its breakthrough into the mainstream of women’s fashion.

  248. @Big Bill
    I recommend The New Observer. It has wonderful English translations of largely European sources:

    Http://newobserveronline.com

    Excellent source of news on the Invasion of Europe.

    Wow! I gave it a look and the headline “Low IQ Nonwhites Crash US Academics” immediately jumped out at me.

  249. @Marcus
    Except when they harass, molest, rape foreign women.

    Yeah, Thea may want to talk to Lara Logan about oh-so-friendly Egyptians.

    • Replies: @Marcus
    I would not want any woman I care about between the age of 6 and 70 anywhere near that hellhole. Maybe a resort town would be ok, but that's about it.
  250. @Dave Pinsen
    I think Newt would be a good pick:

    - He's a policy wonk, which balances out Trump not being one.

    - He has the government / legislative experience Trump wants.

    - He's a great debater, and will expose any token VP pick.

    - He counters Hillary's attempt at late '90s economic nostalgia.

    - Impeachment insurance.

    With the “contract with America” Newt set himself up for the “Contract ON America” phrase, which, along with “i did not have sex with that woman” and “it’s the economy, stupid” is one of the memorable phrases of 90s politics.

    That kind of back-firing phraseology is the opposite of what Trump’s about. Trump might pick a wonk, but he’ll pick a winner for sure, not Newt.

  251. @Jack D
    1. I'm old enough to remember pre-1985 America, though for the decade before that I lived in NY and Phila, where most people who did menial type jobs were either black or Puerto Rican or immigrant (the proverbial Polish cleaning lady). I do remember visiting Seattle and being shocked to see American white people doing those kind of jobs.

    2. Historically the US had a lot of foreign born but the % tapered off between the Immigration Acts of '24 and '65 and then started going up again, so if you pick the right date you can pick the high water mark, which does not represent the "typical " American situation at all but just one particular moment in time.

    Visit Pasco or Hernando counties in Florida. White people are still doing those jobs.

  252. @Dave Pinsen
    IIRC, Haiti once produced something like a third of the GDP of the French Empire. 1893 was a long time ago. Haiti's problem is too many Haitians.

    Haiti once produced something like a third of the GDP of the French Empire.

    Only because slaves were ground up to produce sugar.

    After the revolution, not too many workers could be enticed to work themselves to death on sugar plantations (who would have guessed) in 5-6 years as was necessary to produce the “GNP.”

    Adoption of the civilized plan of grinding yourself down in 50-60 years like we do now requires a lot of infrastructure, human capital, capital and real economic structure.

  253. @Lagertha
    I totally agree with Whiskey. I want all EU countries (EU has absolutely sucked for some of them) to drop out of the EU. It was stupid and idealistic and worthless in the first place to establish something as dumb (low-energy) as the EU: just a con-job by the global elite...because: people are still so effing tribal, corrupt, stupid and different. There is too much hate...and it will never end. Hate is such a tough part of the human mind. Hate is there and it is reflected (Egyptair downing) everyday. Hate rules right now.

    What does “low energy” really mean, other than it is an all-purpose negative epithet of the moment?

  254. @Romanian
    What you say is true, but the character, culture, inclinations, aspirations, sympathies of elites are very important for the ultimate character of their society. Remember what John Addams said about elites being people who can count on another person's vote aside from their own. This means influence. While I've argued that the demographic strength of the religious masses was a factor in the decline of secularism in Turkey and elsewhere (and it probably was), what also contributed to prior elites losing power is their loss in status relative to emerging religious and jihadi elites (teleological groups, which have a stated goal to which they can rally society, like the spread of Islam). Politics being, at its basest, a mechanism for establishing the relative status of different groups, we can consider that whether Nasser and the guys in the hall were representative of Egyptian society is not that relevant for an age of reform and advancement, but rather whether they could make their society conform to their expectations. Even European Enlightenment, for good or ill, was driven by various elites (noblemen and noblewomen and their salons, philosophers, the aristocracy given to impecunious scientific and philosophical explorations, the newly made men of the ambitious classes) . And the Nasserites and their successors did for a while, and they could have done so permanently... maybe. The Kemalists had a good run in Turkey. They managed to extinguish my people's age old enmity towards them, by making us see them as charming and pushy Turks rather than the hated Ottomans.

    As you say, modernity or enlightenment (with all the good AND bad that implies) is a top down phenomenon which also contains the seeds of its own destruction because one of the things that it implies is the universal franchise (as well as universal education). So once you light the fuse on it, you are in a demographic race – if you can educate and modernize the majority of the population before they are in a position to exercise popular sovereignty (and this is a pretty rare event, found mostly in Europe and the Anglophone nations) then you will end up with a self sustaining Western democracy. But if you can’t (because the peasants keep spitting out kids faster than you can Westernize them) then you will regress back to some sort of theocracy or dictatorship. For decades in Turkey it looked like the modernizers were winning the race but the reactionary forces eventually won the war of the cradle. The game is hard to win because modernization also implies a lower birth rate for your side.

  255. @The Last Real Calvinist

    What pro-immigration people want is not diversity, per se. What they really want is the inequality, and the stratified society, that goes with it. That is what we call vibrancy.

     

    Yes. They prefer to import a lower class, finding the possibility that they and their progeny might fall into their own society's lower class too terrifying to contemplate.

    This is the Achilles' heel of prosperous, 'meritocratic', market economies. When you define the 'good life' as being a college-educated, white-collar, 'career' person, then having a son who's a plumber or a daughter who's a dental hygienist is de facto failure. You can try desperately to distinguish yourself from people who look like you who do engage in blue-collar work (and Lord knows we see enough of this), but the lack of a long-term, stable intra-ethnic hierarchy renders this approach precarious and exhausting.

    A profound yearning for social stability is one of the reasons a show such as Downton Abbey has been so incredibly successful, and why battalions of otherwise-SJW-oriented females remain obsessed with the Regency England of Jane Austen.

    We see this in places like Ivy League admissions. People who got in thru “meritocracy” want their kids to get in as “legacies”. These people are also much more adept in gaming the system – they know that you are supposed to get Junior classified as “learning disabled” (and are able to pay for expensive private testing that shows this) so that he can take the SAT on an untimed basis (but the College Board is not permitted to note this on Junior’s scores). They send Junior on a trip to Costa Rica to volunteer in rain forest restoration, which becomes the subject of Junior’s admission essay, while Joe Podunk writes about his 4H project breeding a calf. Now Junior, who is a little regressed toward the mean compared to his parents, has gotten into Ivy U. (Joe Podunk, despite being smarter than Junior, is now at State U) and he has to compete on the curve in classes. Isn’t he better off if almost everyone else in his class is also some sort of special (relaxed standard) admit – AA or legacy or sports or an Asian who writes in terrible Engrish, vs. having to sit in a class that consists mostly of people like his parents – meritocratic sons of white people from the sticks (and Asian-Americans)?

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    This is exactly what has happened.

    Watch this movie to see the sort of men who've lost out:

    http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/harvard_beats_yale_29_29/

    The working class ethnics on that Harvard team (the film consists of interviews where you get a sense of what kind of men they were/are) would no longer be there. Buscaren (the heel of the movie) and friends got the last laugh.
  256. @Brutusale
    Yeah, Thea may want to talk to Lara Logan about oh-so-friendly Egyptians.

    I would not want any woman I care about between the age of 6 and 70 anywhere near that hellhole. Maybe a resort town would be ok, but that’s about it.

  257. @unpc downunder
    The problem with UKIP is that it has very little appeal to the white working class. It's a low tax, free trade, pro-City party. It only opposes the EU because it thinks the EU is too economically left-wing. It gets votes for it's anti-EU policies, but struggles to attract any support in general elections.

    The majority of people who oppose open borders are working class. Hence, a immigration restrictionist party has to appeal to the working class. Britian needs to start from scratch with a populist party that isn't connected to UKIP or the BNP. The new leadership of the BNP has the right idea - focus on local elections and forget national politics for the time being. However, the BNP has too much negative baggage associated with it, and its name sounds too fascist for English tastes (it needs to have the word democracy in there somewhere).

    One way to go would be to have an English Democratic Alliance – a fully multi-racial English-cultural organisation – not a full party but a body prepared to promote issues and variously support mainstream policies across Parties. If it focused solely on English issues it would avoid sensitive topics relating to other countries. Being English would bring it in line with SNP and PC since it would not be based on ethnicity rather on ‘regional’ community and economy and development. Something like that is the best one could hope for at this juncture; there are plenty of people in England who would be attracted by something like that, if it was thoroughly non-ethnicity focused – health, housing, labour rights, education, policing, and immigration but going forward only, so to speak.

  258. @Jack D
    We see this in places like Ivy League admissions. People who got in thru "meritocracy" want their kids to get in as "legacies". These people are also much more adept in gaming the system - they know that you are supposed to get Junior classified as "learning disabled" (and are able to pay for expensive private testing that shows this) so that he can take the SAT on an untimed basis (but the College Board is not permitted to note this on Junior's scores). They send Junior on a trip to Costa Rica to volunteer in rain forest restoration, which becomes the subject of Junior's admission essay, while Joe Podunk writes about his 4H project breeding a calf. Now Junior, who is a little regressed toward the mean compared to his parents, has gotten into Ivy U. (Joe Podunk, despite being smarter than Junior, is now at State U) and he has to compete on the curve in classes. Isn't he better off if almost everyone else in his class is also some sort of special (relaxed standard) admit - AA or legacy or sports or an Asian who writes in terrible Engrish, vs. having to sit in a class that consists mostly of people like his parents - meritocratic sons of white people from the sticks (and Asian-Americans)?

    This is exactly what has happened.

    Watch this movie to see the sort of men who’ve lost out:

    http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/harvard_beats_yale_29_29/

    The working class ethnics on that Harvard team (the film consists of interviews where you get a sense of what kind of men they were/are) would no longer be there. Buscaren (the heel of the movie) and friends got the last laugh.

    • Replies: @Golan Globus
    The EU and Euro are too useful to their leading members to fail. Both are here to stay. The question is how big they should be.
  259. @Romanian
    Interesting. I did not know that. But it seems from your tale that they did not gain victory for their cause through terrorism, which was the main gist of my point.

    Post-Wall women only at first. I don’t think it was the merits and justice of their case they cared about, pacifist or not. Did. Not. Care.
    They sort of rolled it in with giving all those recently unemployed “Mad Minute” specialists the vote, as the Top People were still freaking out about what happened to Cousin Nicky, and the poor poor wittle tsarina and all, and there were about a half million of these malcontents lurching about.
    The ones who’d come back to find their families in the street because the landlords had raised the rents were particularly irritable.
    Then there were the Irish. My grandad and loads of others were kept on for a year or more, making themselves thoroughly obnoxious to the Paddies. But they were under Military Regs., so couldn’t cause any ructions anywhere near Westminster or Whitehall, or it was Shot at Dawn.
    Perhaps they thought giving older women whose first thought was food and safety the vote would counterbalance the new, embittered, war-hardened prole voting bloc, whose demands they refused at their mortal peril, as well they knew.

    Don’t let all that ludicrous made-up ‘Downton Abbey’ horlicks fool you. The mood was very, very ugly and chaotic. Churchill sent tanks and 10,000 troops including heavy machine-gunners to the middle of Glasgow, just like he’d sent troops against the Welsh miners before the War, and against the Fenians in Dublin in the middle of it. People were as hungry as f***, broke (Army pay is buttons, compared to a pitman or a riveter), exhausted, and being ripped off by war profiteers on all sides, with government connivance, even after it had “finished”.

    I can’t recall a single woman in my family of grandma’s generation who didn’t hate, hate, hate Winston, for that, or the Dardanelles both, till the day they died (in their 90s lol, the men all died young, so I was only a kid or not born yet, and only had their opinions 2nd hand). All that voting malarkey was for the posh ladies and gents who could afford to cause trouble, and get away with it. More interested in two ounces of lard for the kids’ breakfast and borrowing a cup of sugar. Maybe five Woodbines, for Saturday.

  260. @Desiderius
    This is exactly what has happened.

    Watch this movie to see the sort of men who've lost out:

    http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/harvard_beats_yale_29_29/

    The working class ethnics on that Harvard team (the film consists of interviews where you get a sense of what kind of men they were/are) would no longer be there. Buscaren (the heel of the movie) and friends got the last laugh.

    The EU and Euro are too useful to their leading members to fail. Both are here to stay. The question is how big they should be.

  261. @Dave Pinsen
    Newt's leading the VP predictions right now: https://www.predictit.org/Market/1529/Who-will-win-the-2016-Republican-vice-presidential-nomination

    Would be a surefire way for Trump to lose. What a stupid idea.

  262. @Whiskey
    Steve I think you are overthinking things. Erdogan got on fine with Putin, and Assad, and Iraq, and Iran. He had a "no problems with neighbors" policy that allowed (connected) Turkish merchants to make a fortune in Syria, Iraq, and trading with Iran and Russia. Then he got greedy and ambitious, saw that Obama was weak and not committed to maintain America's sway in the ME, and figured Assad was a goner. So he went all in on ISIS figuring that he'd bite off a big chunk of Syria, Iraq, and Lebanon (hence the hostility to traditional partner Israel). Erdogan gradually saw himself as the anti-Ataturk, able to roll everything back and become a Suleiman the Magnificent.

    Just human nature, a thug getting greedy when the former big man left.

    Merkel, same thing. She criticized multiculturalism but saw votes and elite applause by letting in half the ME and Third World. Now the FT reports that subrosa the Germans are trying to deport refugees there and not let any in, but not admit a change in policy because that would be disastrous politics. The only reason the Christian Democrats have not bounced Merkel is because she pre-emptively over the last decade removed all possible challengers.

    Merkel is a typical post-menopausal professional women with contempt for her own people's men and idiot delusions about the Third World and particularly its men. Nothing more than her feelz, tingles, and short term politics are at stake.

    Brexit is the only option for Britain to maintain its welfare state and cohesion. Merkel has made it clear that EU states will all equally share in the massive Camp of the Saints coming to Western Europe from Africa and the ME and Pakistan/Afghanistan/Iran. Germany will attempt not to take any more but Britain will be stuffed with them. Draining rapidly any hope of social welfare for natives as "migrants" (youfs and the diverse) take up all the resources. With the social order of the refugee camps in Calais as daily life. To avoid that, only Brexit is necessary, but not sufficient in and of itself, to stop that from happening.

    In the end, Europe will be over-run, in varying degrees, from country to country, by the Third World. Some places will revolt quickly to maintain not only social/ethnic/racial cohesion but social welfare spending. Switzerland, Poland, Czech Republic, and Hungary are good bets. Possibly the Netherlands, likely Ireland, and Austria. Others will face civil war, and sooner rather than later over what else, race and money? Entirely avoidable but Merkel wanted to feed her feelz, tingles, and two week press cycle.

    Erdogan probably eyes Greece, Bulgaria, Macedonia, and other former parts of the Ottoman Empire as easy targets while Putin probably still dreams of restoring Constantinople. None of that will end well. Disaster strikes when leaders don't have a sense of the possible. The Kaiser failed to see the Schlieman Plan was a fantasy where everything went right and there were no delays. Napoleon wished away the Russian winter, as did Hitler.

    But then, America leaving the ME has a cost. Erdogan's ambition colliding with Putin's is one of them.

    Superb. One correction: Merkel is a typical CHILD-LESS postmenopausal “woman” who hates and resents her own people and has bizarre expectations and fantasies regarding “strong men” from hostile, backwards cultures and races.

    Merkel and every German official who doesn’t loudly oppose this invasion, needs to be voted out, or impeached, whatever the fastest means is that’s allowed by German law. Then they should be prosecuted and imprisoned for the rest of their lives.

  263. @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin
    Britain's parlimentry seats are elected by first-past-the-post, so the candidate who wins the most votes gets the seat. In the 2015 election UKIP came 3rd in terms of votes but because they were spread throughout the UK they only ended up with one seat. Compare the SNP who got 47 seats with 1,400,000 votes with UKIPs 1 seat with 3,800,000 votes.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom_general_election,_2015

    UK and USA need proportional representation in Congress / Parliament.

  264. @LondonBob
    Gingrich is an old man with multiple wives, soft on immigration too. If the apples are rotten then go to the tree. Kris Kobach all the way.

    Yes, we need someone who is tough on “legal” and illegal immigration — preferably someone much younger than Trump, and ideally someone who can tip a swing state our way.

    Newt is definitely NOT the guy for VP on any front.

    Someone who is currently married to his one and only wife, has children, has experience in Congress or a legislature, and has never been booted from office, sounds about right.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Though I sympathize with his views and find him a compelling personality, Kobach has never served in either his state legislature or in Congress. He is currently Secretary of State of Kansas and, prior to that, was a city councilman in Overland Park, KS and chairman of the Kansas Republican Party.
  265. @Peter Akuleyev
    Slightly off topic. Merkel has no children, a lot of German women of that generation had no children. I suspect psychologically having no children makes you far more likely to welcome immigrants, especially if you are a middle-aged woman.

    Yes, and sorry to be so “judgmental” and “harsh”, but deliberately choosing not to have children bespeaks emotional and psychological problems, especially for a woman.

    Women who chose not to have children — or not to make it any kind of priority when compared to “hooking up” or career advancement or travel or partying or political activism — and then pass their childbearing years, are on balance some of the most unhappy, bitter, strange, nasty, and untrustworthy people around. My own sister is one, as was one of the worst, angriest, most obnoxious bosses I’ve ever had.

    • Replies: @AP
    I've known a few Russian women who chose not to have children; they were very nice people. When childlessness is more common, those who practice it are less likely to be weirdos (which doesn't make it terribly harmful on a societal level, of course).
  266. @Clyde

    Slightly off topic. Merkel has no children, a lot of German women of that generation had no children. I suspect psychologically having no children makes you far more likely to welcome immigrants, especially if you are a middle-aged woman.
     
    This has been talked about before and others agree with you.
    #2 Some of these older women are jealous of the bodacious German babes and get a kick out of seeing them subject to the depredations (rape, theft, groping etc) of Muslim and African yoofs-immigrants. Misery loves company.
    #3 You have the old cat lady factor. Instead of feeding and collecting stray cats they are doing the same for stray male migrant yoofs. Both involve the mothering instinct.

    Right on the money. And there’s probably something worse than a misguided mothering instinct; some of these intentionally barren “professional” “women” are so deeply unhappy as well as sexually frustrated that they have fantasies, consciously or not, about the savage men they are importing.

    Come to think of it, that may partly explain Jorge Bergoglio’s enthusiasm for the heavily-male Third World invasion of Europe, as well.

    • Replies: @Clyde

    some of these intentionally barren “professional” “women” are so deeply unhappy as well as sexually frustrated that they have fantasies, consciously or not, about the savage men they are importing.
     
    They can go on periodic vacations to the third world to get topped off sexually. There is fiction and movies about unaccompanied first world women vacationing in the third world.
    , @Clyde

    Come to think of it, that may partly explain Jorge Bergoglio’s enthusiasm for the heavily-male Third World invasion of Europe, as well.
     
    I dunno. How do they it behind the Vatican walls? Rough?
  267. @SFG
    Sorry about your melanoma. That sucks.

    FWIW, now they're finding that vitamin D deficiency due to *lack* of sun exposure can raise your risk of cancer too.

    Tattoos-I always figured it was a mistake you couldn't undo, and never got any, but if you tell the kids not to, won't they just do it to rebel when they get old enough?

    I can't see Trump picking another northeasterner (yes, I know New England is culturally distinct from and hates NYC but the rest of the country forgets the difference--at least when it comes to Boston you have two arrogant, rich, old, walkable cities with a wealth of cultural institutions that seem to think of each other as antitheses for some reason). Hillary, well, I'd think she'd go for a southerner or midwesterner to extend the party's reach. You add a New Englander if you think you're weak in the Northeast; Trump needs to win the Rust Belt.

    Boston and NYC — you can keep both of them. The people in those cities are NOT, in fact, rich or even reasonably well off in the face of the ridiculous housing costs and taxes there. Each one has a highly visible and publicized rich elite, but the population as a whole is not much better off than in less “impressive” and supposedly “rich” places. This is true of L.A., too.

    But you are, of course, right that Trump should not pick a Veep from Mid-Atlantic or New England. Someone from a larger Midwestern / Upper Midwestern State, perhaps — but please, NOT John Kasich!

  268. @The Anti-Gnostic
    Spain is not growing at all, nor is France or Italy. And the migrant mess continues.

    You’re right. Sadly, the native white populations of Germany, France, Spain, and Italy are all declining in number because the freaks have no pride, no self-respect, no sense of loyalty to their ancestors or their country’s future generations, and no longer want the hard work of raising one’s own children.

    Nothing else matters — not any policy or legal change, deportation, etc — if white people in those countries and elsewhere do not start having more children again. At least three per healthy, sane, adult married couple.

  269. @The Anti-Gnostic
    A magical place indeed, where Anglo-Europeans were near 90% of the population and "immigrants" were seasonal migrants in peach orchards or British and French engineers fleeing socialist schemes back home.

    In case anybody missed it, this reduction to 60% of the population happened in one lifetime. One more lifetime, and your Anglo-European children will be an ethnic minority.

    I visited Germany in 1987, as a teenager, and loved the experience. Bracing myself for how it is when we visit next, in a few years.

    (Our young children are learning German, and we had hopes that at least one of them would go obtain a university education there (almost for free). But will we really send them to study or work in the increasingly Islamicized, African/Arab-infected Germany or Austria or Switzerland that will exist 15-20 years from now?)

  270. @Thea
    Can the effective the vp pick be quantified?

    Unless Trump picks someone out of left field I don't think it will matter.

    Isnt it just to shore up political alliances. except John McCain who thought Palin would deliver conservative votes.

    Not sure what you mean by quantified.

    McCain most likely picked Palin because of a little tingle in his dick.

    The VP never matters. It might make a difference this time. It could be close.

    He needs someone that appeals to the base.

  271. But who is his base ?

    You can make arguments for Saunders voters if Saunders loses. You could also say that he needs to gain the loyalties of Republicans.

  272. @RadicalCenter
    Right on the money. And there's probably something worse than a misguided mothering instinct; some of these intentionally barren "professional" "women" are so deeply unhappy as well as sexually frustrated that they have fantasies, consciously or not, about the savage men they are importing.

    Come to think of it, that may partly explain Jorge Bergoglio's enthusiasm for the heavily-male Third World invasion of Europe, as well.

    some of these intentionally barren “professional” “women” are so deeply unhappy as well as sexually frustrated that they have fantasies, consciously or not, about the savage men they are importing.

    They can go on periodic vacations to the third world to get topped off sexually. There is fiction and movies about unaccompanied first world women vacationing in the third world.

  273. @Reg Cæsar

    IIRC, the last two tickets with women as running mates lost.
     
    All three, in fact:

    http://www.cato.org/blog/rip-tonie-nathan-first-woman-receive-electoral-vote

    And those are just the ones chosen by Electors.

    Female presidential nominees

    Female vice-presidential nominees

    And, yes, I realize that "female nominee" is redundant.

    If he selects a woman for vp then one ticket with a female will win. I would like for it to not be the one headed by Clinton. The vp needs to be one that has been elected on her own merits. Then when the female cards are played Trump can ask, “How many votes would Hillary Rodham get”?

  274. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “Nice article Steve, I like the Franklin-esque geopolitical analysis. No wonder Holland has been a nation of traders, situated as they are at the mouth of the Rhine.”

    London was famously established as a Roman military camp guarding a river crossing. If London is considered the big city at the northern end of the Rhine, Basel, located at the intersection of France, Germany, and Switzerland, forms the southern end.

    Basel is near Augusta Raurica, “…the site of the oldest known Roman colony on the Rhine.”.

    The next big city north of Basel on the Rhine is Strasbourg. Also founded as a Roman military outpost, Strasbourg became a major wine producer. Places like Augusta Raurica and Strasbourg are where the Romans first introduced Roman wine-making and vineyards north of the Alps.

    Strasbourg had significant water power and was one of Britain’s few rivals in the early days of the industrial revolution (things like textile mills). Earlier, the printing press was invented in Strasbourg. The printing-press evolved from the wine-press, among other technologies:

    “…a number of medieval products and technological processes had reached a level of maturity which allowed their potential use for printing purposes…

    …The screw press which allowed direct pressure to be applied… was already of great antiquity in Gutenberg’s time… Introduced in the 1st century AD by the Romans, it was commonly employed in agricultural production for pressing wine grapes and (olive) oil…

    …Printing, however, put a demand on the machine quite different from pressing.”

    One of the common “pilgrim highways” went down the Rhine, then to the Rhone, then down the Rhone to the Mediterranean or down until northern Italy south of the Alps could be crossed (via Milan) to the Po (and then on to Venice). The Rhine and the Rhone were finally connected by the Rhone-Rhine Canal in 1834:

    “The Rhone–Rhine Canal… connect the Rhine and the Rhone and thereby the North Sea and the Mediterranean…

    …finally opened in 1834, although the River Doubs which it incorporated has been significant since earliest times…”

    Early interstate highway effect. Before there was Route 128, before there was the CalTrain corridor (Silicon Valley)…

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The Rhine shows up in the maps in Charles Murray's Human Accomplishment as the central part of the broad corridor running from Scotland to Naples where a disproportionate number of high achievers worked.
  275. @RadicalCenter
    Right on the money. And there's probably something worse than a misguided mothering instinct; some of these intentionally barren "professional" "women" are so deeply unhappy as well as sexually frustrated that they have fantasies, consciously or not, about the savage men they are importing.

    Come to think of it, that may partly explain Jorge Bergoglio's enthusiasm for the heavily-male Third World invasion of Europe, as well.

    Come to think of it, that may partly explain Jorge Bergoglio’s enthusiasm for the heavily-male Third World invasion of Europe, as well.

    I dunno. How do they it behind the Vatican walls? Rough?

  276. @helena
    His TV genealogy said he's the greatgrandson of the man who was hung drawn and quartered for opposing Ataturk. Also that he is related to every royal house of europe.

    One of Boris Johnson’s ancestors, Karolina von Rothenburg, was an illegitimate daughter of Prince Paul of Wurttemberg. Through Prince Paul, Boris is a direct descendant of George II of Great Britain.

  277. @AmericanaCON
    Very interesting…

    What you are basically saying is that the Shakers put their own success before their own community. Their community couldn’t live on as they replaced their dying members with orphans and converts who didn’t have same strong belief. Naturally, you cannot replace the bloodline. This is why all societies have encouraged their people to have babies. I don’t think post-liberalism stem from the Shakers although there are similarities. The Shakers peaked in 1840. Modern liberalism is a product of different events occurring in the 20st century.

    The technological and economic advancements ought to be attributed The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (the title of Max Weber’s book) and the Northern European bourgeoisie-protestant culture. They were much more successful than the Shakers, an English charismatic sect. Most people (both men and women) want to have children. The current liberal regime had made it impossible for millions of men and women having them as they cannot afford them. It doesn’t matter if it’s Denmark or Japan. This is the very consequence of the dismantlement of a prosperous cohesive-society were children are highly valued and seen as the continuation of the people they belong to.

    We used to value child birth and we should do it again.

    The future will bring automation that displaces human workers and renders larger and larger numbers of us economically useless. What are all of those children in a rejuvenated society going to do when they grow up?

  278. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @RadicalCenter
    Yes, we need someone who is tough on "legal" and illegal immigration -- preferably someone much younger than Trump, and ideally someone who can tip a swing state our way.

    Newt is definitely NOT the guy for VP on any front.

    Someone who is currently married to his one and only wife, has children, has experience in Congress or a legislature, and has never been booted from office, sounds about right.

    Though I sympathize with his views and find him a compelling personality, Kobach has never served in either his state legislature or in Congress. He is currently Secretary of State of Kansas and, prior to that, was a city councilman in Overland Park, KS and chairman of the Kansas Republican Party.

  279. @anonymous
    "Nice article Steve, I like the Franklin-esque geopolitical analysis. No wonder Holland has been a nation of traders, situated as they are at the mouth of the Rhine."


    London was famously established as a Roman military camp guarding a river crossing. If London is considered the big city at the northern end of the Rhine, Basel, located at the intersection of France, Germany, and Switzerland, forms the southern end.

    Basel is near Augusta Raurica, "...the site of the oldest known Roman colony on the Rhine.".

    The next big city north of Basel on the Rhine is Strasbourg. Also founded as a Roman military outpost, Strasbourg became a major wine producer. Places like Augusta Raurica and Strasbourg are where the Romans first introduced Roman wine-making and vineyards north of the Alps.

    Strasbourg had significant water power and was one of Britain's few rivals in the early days of the industrial revolution (things like textile mills). Earlier, the printing press was invented in Strasbourg. The printing-press evolved from the wine-press, among other technologies:


    "...a number of medieval products and technological processes had reached a level of maturity which allowed their potential use for printing purposes...

    ...The screw press which allowed direct pressure to be applied... was already of great antiquity in Gutenberg's time... Introduced in the 1st century AD by the Romans, it was commonly employed in agricultural production for pressing wine grapes and (olive) oil...

    ...Printing, however, put a demand on the machine quite different from pressing."

     

    One of the common "pilgrim highways" went down the Rhine, then to the Rhone, then down the Rhone to the Mediterranean or down until northern Italy south of the Alps could be crossed (via Milan) to the Po (and then on to Venice). The Rhine and the Rhone were finally connected by the Rhone-Rhine Canal in 1834:


    "The Rhone–Rhine Canal... connect the Rhine and the Rhone and thereby the North Sea and the Mediterranean...

    ...finally opened in 1834, although the River Doubs which it incorporated has been significant since earliest times..."

     

    Early interstate highway effect. Before there was Route 128, before there was the CalTrain corridor (Silicon Valley)...

    The Rhine shows up in the maps in Charles Murray’s Human Accomplishment as the central part of the broad corridor running from Scotland to Naples where a disproportionate number of high achievers worked.

  280. @jimmyriddle
    This issue is discussed here:

    http://researchbriefings.parliament.uk/ResearchBriefing/Summary/SN06577

    I'd say the legal consensus is that adherence to the ECHR is a requirement of EU membership.
    It would certainly be easier to derogate once we are outside the jurisdiction of the ECJ.

    Thanks.

  281. @RadicalCenter
    Yes, and sorry to be so "judgmental" and "harsh", but deliberately choosing not to have children bespeaks emotional and psychological problems, especially for a woman.

    Women who chose not to have children -- or not to make it any kind of priority when compared to "hooking up" or career advancement or travel or partying or political activism -- and then pass their childbearing years, are on balance some of the most unhappy, bitter, strange, nasty, and untrustworthy people around. My own sister is one, as was one of the worst, angriest, most obnoxious bosses I've ever had.

    I’ve known a few Russian women who chose not to have children; they were very nice people. When childlessness is more common, those who practice it are less likely to be weirdos (which doesn’t make it terribly harmful on a societal level, of course).