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From my book review in Taki’s Magazine:

Tucker’s Treatise
by Steve Sailer, November 28, 2018

Shortly after this month’s election, an Antifa mob descended upon the Washington, D.C., home of Fox News personality Tucker Carlson, his wife, and their four children, chanting, “Tucker Carlson, we will fight. We know where you sleep at night.”

Why all the hate for Carlson? …

The funny thing is that Carlson, a lifelong Republican, has drifted leftward on economics and foreign policy in recent years, as seen in his new best-seller, Ship of Fools: How a Selfish Ruling Class Is Bringing America to the Brink of Revolution.

Carlson, who voted for Ron Paul in 1988, has largely left behind his youthful economic libertarianism. For example, he now asks:

Why do we tax capital at half the rate of labor?

The central theme of Ship of Fools is that the convergence toward the reigning elite consensus of economic conservatism and social progressivism is better for the people at the top of society than for maintaining a stable middle-class democracy:

The marriage of market capitalism to progressive social values may be the most destructive combination in American economic history. Someone needs to protect workers from the terrifying power of market forces, which tend to accelerate change to intolerable levels and crush the weak.

Read the whole thing there.

 
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  1. The review is excellent. Tucker Carlson is the best person now on mainstream TV news broadcasting.

  2. @exiled off mainstreet

    Tucker Carlson is the best person now on mainstream TV news broadcasting.

    While we’re setting low bars, may I also observe that he’d quickly rise above the common run of politician on the national stage, should he desire to make his way there.

    And as an aside, imagine for a moment the cataclysm which would await anyone who laid siege to the residence of Ta-Nehisi, or Rachel Maddow, or Peter Beinhart, or Jonathan Chait, or well, you get the idea. Unimaginable that it would even happen, much less go completely unpunished.

    • Agree: densa
    • Replies: @Tiny Duck
    , @Tiny Duck
    , @IHTG
  3. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Digital Samizdat

    That sounds exciting. What did they “attack” him with? Nukes? Cyber-warfare? Kabbalistic magic?

    Oh…they posted a few ineffectual facebook ads and sent him an email over a legitimate political disagreement. An epic Manichean struggle this is not. People like you might be more effective if you didn’t act like such a loopy old maid.

  4. Tyrion 2 says:
    @exiled off mainstreet

    I can’t believe that someone as talented and interesting as Tucker Carlson has his own mainstream TV show. It is testament to his talents, intelligence and those of the persons (who (genuinely) must not be named) in the lineage of the ideas he expresses.

    …having to write like the above is quite annoying…

    • Replies: @lavoisier
    , @L Woods
  5. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @Digital Samizdat

    Already drawing flies…

    Please whim these people. They are rude.

  6. Bill P says:

    Carlson is a “class traitor,” which is a great thing and a necessity for a nation of any worth. It’s also extremely rare in my experience. Over the last few decades, the American upper class has developed into an extraordinarily cohesive society. I’m not sure why, because you’d think people at the top would be competitive by nature, but maybe the benefits are sufficient to override their bloodier impulses.

    On the other hand, maybe they are scared by what they’ve gotten away with. Nick Hanauer, an early Amazon investor and prolific funder of liberal causes, has suggested so on occasion, saying that the American people must be disarmed before they seek revenge.

  7. @Tyrion 2

    Loopy old maids need something to do. I wish it wouldn’t take up space at iSteve, though.

  8. Meh, Carlson sounds better in print that he actually is. No one had an excuse for going after his family though.

    My overall conclusion: Let the oceans boil, baby, let ‘em boil!

  9. At the moment, the coalition of identity groups has held together because it is united in a single purpose against white male power.

    But rapid demographic change makes this unsustainable. When the traditional scapegoat becomes insufficient, various factions will turn on one another.

    Chaos will ensue.

    Whites are a minority in Texas, California, and Hawaii. Have Whites been persecuted in any of these states? Have non-whites turned on each other?

    When California turned majority Democrat and majority Nonwhite, did Steve leave the state to avoid racial persecution and a coming racial conflagration?

    I’m not necessarily dismissing this point, but I think we have to a reality check. Multi-racial societies have lots of problems, but things aren’t so bad in areas in which Whites are a minority. Of course, the situation could change in the future.

  10. Tyrion 2 says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    My worry is that in a political party based democracy local conflicts are tempered by national debates. Once the national debate lacks an implicit ethnic majority then the conversation of ideas will break down and there’ll be a cascade of ethnic conflict out to the local level.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational, Liza
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @anonymous
  11. @JohnnyWalker123

    You assert “facts” about the circumstances of whites who have become the minority as if you’d actually researched the issue. Yet a persecuted non-Jewish white is as likely to be taken seriously as a man reporting that he’s been raped by a woman. The whites who get victimized will often be people who will endure it thinking (rightly) that they have no recourse. There are lots of people like yourself who find it completely acceptable for whites to be persecuted.

  12. Dan Hayes says:

    Sooner or later it’s axiomatic that Tucker will be brought down for emitting some PC thought crime. In the interim let’s enjoy him while we can. It’s amazing that he’s lasted this long in his present political incarnation.

    Although he initially supported Gulf War II, later he was quite honest in stating that this support was based on listening to the advice (which he later rued) of a supposedly smarter colleague. For a major TV pundit this showed remarkable humility.

    His thoughts on the shallowness of the present day Episcopal Church are quite interesting. Evidently he only remains a member due to its remaining liturgical remnants.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
  13. Anonym says:

    This takimag piece was enjoyable; I was sad when it ended.

  14. Pericles says:
    @Tyrion 2

    That sounds exciting. What did they “attack” him with? Nukes? Cyber-warfare? Kabbalistic magic?

    Oh…they posted a few ineffectual facebook ads (needle scratch)

    Call in the FBI, NSA and CIA. We got us some foreign political interference to root out. Get me the NYT and WaPo on line one, pronto.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  15. anon[161] • Disclaimer says:

    “Whites are a minority in Texas, California, and Hawaii. Have Whites been persecuted in any of these states?

    Affirmative action, “white privilege”, section 8 housing, corporate diversity quotas, endless negative media coverage of republicans and whites, social media witch hunts, government contract set asides for non-whites, that whole BLM thing back in 2016, Oscars So White, misgendering laws, that Colorado baker case ……

    “Have non-whites turned on each other?”

    Well, feminists and cross-dressers have certainly turned on each other, so there is the trend. Also, Blacks and Hispanics famously don’t get along in California (and elsewhere). Hispanics drove out Maxine Waters’s original constituents; her eventual replacement will not be black. Solidarity may come to an end once the republican party is no longer nationally competitive. You saw a bit of this with all those white guy insiders being purged from the democrat party in minority districts this year. Plus, these new constituents tried overthrowing Pelosi just recently while announcing plans to recruit more non-whites; democratic party leadership is nearing their 80s and is coming to resemble the Soviet Union’s aging leadership circa 1979. Change is in the air.

    I think the explicitly race-based appeals being made by democrats are bound to turn inward at some point. Fires rarely stop where you intend them to.

    “When California turned majority Democrat and majority Nonwhite, did Steve leave the state to avoid racial persecution and a coming racial conflagration?”

    A huge number of whites have already fled California. The state experienced a net outflow of well over 100,000 just last year. Everyone I know wants out, especially what’s left of the middle class. As recently as a few years ago, California, a huge state, had about the same net immigration rate as the state of Michigan. So, the writing has been on the wall for a while now.

    There was a time in the 1990s when Venezuela was quite nice if you knew the right places. Now, not so much. The proper way to assess these things is to look at underlying dynamics – ethnic, fiscal, and class among many – and assess the possibility they could boil to the surface, causing a change in the current order. Both the US and Venezuela, unlike China, are democracies where the stupid masses could theoretically destroy everything in just a few elections. So, the possibility is higher here, all things considered.

    In a society that is getting ever more polarized (where noble white guys who maintain law and order at the FBI and Inspector General’s Office are subject to getting purged like Obama purged that white Librarian of Congress in favor of his fellow co-ethnic), I assess the possibility of a sudden reversal of fortune for the US to be higher than you might think, and it is growing. Both Russia and China think so as well and are preparing to exploit. I’d only take Chavez – er, uh – Cortez to get the nomination in 2020 and win the White House to possibly send the whole thing downward. Certainly not a Mad Max collapse or anything, but possibly a fall from grace overall.

    Ask yourself this. What happens when Cortez or Kamala Harris takes power and rams through diversity quotas for Silicon Valley (or Space X) in the face of Chinese competition? Or economy killing fossil fuel restrictions? Or defense department cuts? If any of that is a possibility at all (and it definitely is), then how stable do you think this current system/era is? I would guess it is merely metastable and subject to a sudden vacuum decay into a lower state. Happens on the global stage all the time. I don’t see why the US should be immune.

    “but things aren’t so bad in areas in which Whites are a minority.”

    Depends on where you live and what your profession is. Try being a white cop in a majority non-white New Orleans ten years ago. The racist government there contributed to the city’s police-force dysfunction by instituting residency requirements to exclude whites. Given the numerous examples already available, I’d rather not base my people’s future on the generosity of peoples with deeply held racist beliefs and the tendency to seek payback. Ask Zimbabwean whites how that worked out for them. And just look at what Obama turned his Justice Department into under Holder.

    “Of course, the situation could change in the future.”

    Isn’t it prudent to plan for the future instead of hoping for the present?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @ThreeCranes
  16. Why all the hate for Carlson? For example, Matthew Yglesias of Vox endorsed the intentions of the leftist goon squad who terrorized Mrs. Carlson into locking herself in the pantry.

    Probably because Tucker Carlson is witty and intellectually agile. So lots of powerful people fear his ability to deconstruct the ruling class.. Especially since Tucker Carlson occasionally flirts with white racialism, I think a certain tribe (which Yglesias belongs to) finds him particularly threatening.

    AntiFa is being funded by George Soros and lots of other Democrat-leaning political donors. So it’s not an autonomous group. There are handlers whose strings are being pulled from behind the scenes. Don’t think anything is just spontaneously happening.

    The attack on Tucker Carlson’s house was a message to shut up and move on to safer topics (like tax, deregulation, and rap music).

    Carlson, a rich kid from La Jolla, isn’t a populist outsider by upbringing or personality.

    For whatever reason, the coastal areas of Southern California seem to a produce a notably high proportion of good looking people.

    Carlson is certainly telegenic, youthful looking, and handsome. He doesn’t seem to have aged much since he started on tv. He really seems to bring a fresh face to the conservative, while having the intellect of a more seasoned veteran. That’s a good combination.

    Based on what I’ve seen, he’s intellectually matured a lot since his days on Cross Fire.

    The funny thing is that Carlson, a lifelong Republican, has drifted leftward on economics and foreign policy in recent years, as seen in his new best-seller, Ship of Fools: How a Selfish Ruling Class Is Bringing America to the Brink of Revolution.

    I think there’s a general sense that America’s rulers have totally mismanaged this country, especially from the early 2000s onward, due to incompetence and parasitic corruption. There’s a lot of critique of the ruling class from both the left and right. Interestingly enough, while there are differences in leftist and rightist critiques, there seems to be somewhat of a consensus on some issues.

    Back in the late 90s/early 2000s, I was struck by how similar Pat Buchanan and Ralph Nader often sounded. It seems like others (Tucker Carlson, Bernie Sanders, occasionally even Donald Trump) are converging on that left-right consensus.

    The central theme of Ship of Fools is that the convergence toward the reigning elite consensus of economic conservatism and social progressivism is better for the people at the top of society than for maintaining a stable middle-class democracy:

    The transition to economic conservatism happened back in the 80s, during the Reagan-Bush era. There were plenty of leftists and unions who fought back, but they got curb stomped into the ground. The victory of economic conservatives was so complete (especially after the collapse of the Soviet Union) that the Democrat party “triangulated” right in the 90s, under Clinton-Gore (who were very supportive of NAFTA, trade with China, financial deregulation, cutting capital gains, catering to Silicon Valley).

    Similar trends occurred in other first-world nations (like the UK under Thatcher and Major).

    In his book “Death of the West,” Pat Buchanan admits the positive social value of a high minimum wage, protections for workers, regulation of executive pay, and support for unions.

    People often say that the problem with conservatives is that they’ve become “RINOs” (Republican-in-name-only) who adopt liberal positions. Maybe, the problem is just the opposite. Maybe the problem is that the left has given up its traditional defense of the working-class and tacked too far to right on issues like taxes, trade, and deregulation.

    Companies can openly mistreat their employees (or “contractors”), but for the price of installing transgender bathrooms they buy a pass. Shareholders win, workers lose. Bowing to the diversity agenda is a lot cheaper than raising wages.

    It’d be nice if we had labor unions, but those were broken back a few decades ago. Especially after Reagan fired the air traffic controllers, all hell broke loose. It was really then that workers became seen as a commodity who could be bought, sold, or discarded.

    Ship of Fools is full of appreciations of liberal heroes of the 20th century, such as Ralph Nader, Frank Church (the Democratic senator who helped bring the American deep state under some degree of legislative control in 1975), and farm labor leader Cesar Chavez (a fervent opponent of illegal immigration).

    At some point, he should also give a shout out to Jimmy Carter, who tried his best to reign in CIA excesses as president. Unfortunately, after the CIA and Reagan-Bush stole the 1980 election by manipulating the release of the Iranian hostages, politicians got the message that you shouldn’t screw with the intelligence agencies. Either they ruin you or they kill you (which JFK and RFK found out the hard way).

    At least Tucker Carlson is intellectually honest enough to admit the role that various types of leftists (environmentalists, consumer safety advocates, union organizers, anti-corruption activists) played in making America a better place to live. They weren’t perfect, but they were never as evil as Reagan, Bush, and Gingrich portrayed them. At this point, we sort of wish those people had more power in this country.

    FDR receives a tribute for his Civilian Conservation Corps, which provided healthy, prideful hard work to many unmarried young men. Carlson then acidly observes: “It would be denounced as irredeemably sexist today.”

    There actually was a female version of the CCC, organized by Eleanor Roosevelt.

    He’s likewise old enough to notice how humiliating it ought to be to contemporary intellectuals that they feel obligated to praise the intelligence of Ta-Nehisi Coates:

    It can’t be any more humiliating than all the praise that conservative intellectuals gave to President Bush (and later Sarah Palin). Neither of whom are, in any way, more intellectually sophisticated than Coates. The pro-Bush sycophancy of the 2004 Republican National Convention (when speakers portrayed a dimwitted man as the next Winston Churchill) was particularly depressing.

    Actually, it’s even worse, as Coates is merely a journalist. Bush and Palin were seen as Presidential/VP timber. Which reflects pretty badly on the Republican electorate.

    Sure it’s ridiculous for Coates to go from journalist to comic book writer, but it’s even more ridiculous that Governor Palin quit her governorship to do reality tv.

  17. anon[129] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: the War on the War on Christmas gets an early start this year.

    The BBC’s SJW diversity focused Dr. Who replaces traditional Christmas special with secular New Years Eve special. Unconvincingly claims they couldn’t think of any good Christmas stories. Sure.

    • Replies: @c matt
    , @Anon
  18. TTSSYF says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Just look at the antics of the Democrats at the Kavanaugh hearings for an example of the coming chaos in the general population.

  19. clyde says:

    I often see Tucker on YouTube the next day or download into mp3 format and listen while exercising or driving. Tuck is very quick witted and knows how to catch lefties in contradictions.

  20. TTSSYF says:
    @Dan Hayes

    I don’t think it’s amazing that he’s lasted this long. His cable show was designed from day one for him to debate far-lefties and create outrage in those of us on the political Right. I find it irritating that a show purposely was created to grant Leftist kooks the honor of debate, even if Carlson runs logical rings around them. I’d prefer that he debate the finer points with those on the political Right or slightly left of center.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
  21. Trevor H. says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Multi-racial societies have lots of problems, but things aren’t so bad in areas in which Whites are a minority. Of course, the situation could change in the future.

    Agreed. For example, it’s quite possible that a nation like the USA could end up like South Africa. But you are surely right that we shouldn’t concern ourselves with such a possibility until it’s already happened.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  22. njguy73 says:

    I wonder how much of Carlson’s leftward drift came from the defining moment of his career: the day Jon Stewart went on Crossfire. The show had been on CNN since 1982 and after this, was cancelled three months later.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  23. Anon[334] • Disclaimer says:

    I was listening to the Rubin Report interview/bookselling stop with Carlson, and he mentioned that all his kids were “gone.” I’ve seen the family portrait and they seemed still young. But his youngest in a 2013 interview was 10, 5 and a half years ago, so she’s as old as 16-1/2 now. Maybe she’s in college already, although it seems a year too early.

    • Replies: @Marquandian Hero
  24. I have no idea how Carlson creates five hours of television per week and writes a book at the same time, but Ship of Fools is quite good. It’s currently No. 3 on the nonfiction best-seller list, behind Michelle Obama and Bill O’Reilly.

    Both of whom are hucksters. It should be noted that Tucker Carlson came in after Bill O’Reilly (a loudmouth right-wing conman who spent decades talking about how he was a “culture warrior”) got fired by FOX for trying to coerce sex out of his female subordinates.

    Back in the early 2000s, O’Reilly started a boycott to get Pepsi to stop sponsoring rapper “Ludacris,” saying that he “degraded women.” His boycott was successful and got “Ludacris” dropped. A few years later, O’Reilly ran into a workplace sexual harassment scandal. Then more recently, O’Reill ran into another harassment scandal, which resulted in him getting fired.

    Here’s what “Ludacris” had to say about O’Reilly.

    “It’s not my place to judge Bill O’Reilly the same way he judged me,” he said during an appearance on radio show “The Breakfast Club.” “I’m thriving in life right now. All I can do is hope that Bill O’Reilly settles these issues and learns from whatever mistakes he may have made ― and also thrives.”

    “But,” he added, “it is definitely ironic that Pepsi and Bill O’Reilly are under fire right now.”

    Here’s a good clip that demonstrates the “intellect” of Bill O’Reilly (it gets interesting at 3:05). The man is a complete charlatan and an entertainer who knows his audience. He’s a more coherent version of Glenn Beck.

    It’s remarkable that O’Reilly is an intellectual leader in the conservative movement.

    There exists this view that somehow White media/govt figures (especially White conservative men) are held to a high standard, while dumb Blacks get a pass. In reality, dumb people (regardless of race or politics) often do make it to the top, but the left has no monopoly on idiocy.

    Bill Maher had some good critique (watch from 1:30 onward).

    The left has its flaws too, but let’s not act like the right is somehow the adult in the room.

  25. David says:
    @Tyrion 2

    I can’t see what provoked you to play the role of hallway monitor here. Sometimes attack just means verbally. I bet it’s used more often in that way than any other.

    And a lot of people, like me, feel that taking money from the US citizens and lavishing it on Israel is not a legitimate policy, even if arrived at after years of systematic national gas-lighting.

    You and I know that Rand Paul is exposing himself to the collective fury of our largely Jewish press. Let’s just watch together and see if his political opponents talk about his position as “legitimate political disagreement” or if the opposition plays up his latent antisemitism instead.

    • Agree: European-American
    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    , @David
  26. Tucker, a while back on his show, completely demolished Max Boot, one of his finest performances. After a couple of minutes into the mugging, poor Max looked like a guy whose wife had just kicked him out, locked up his checking account, and charged him with domestic assault and battery.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • LOL: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @Ian M.
  27. I’ve been looking forward to reading Ship of Fools for a while, and coincidentally just put in on hold from the libary a week ago (they’ve got dozens of copies, but they’re all being read right now!) Your review, Steve, has got me looking forward to it even more …

    Yeah, now about that review: It sounds like Tucker Carlson, seen by you as a “centrist”, is just a guy who seeks truth in all things. That’s a rarity, most especially in his current occupation. Is it because, as you say, he is of the upper class to begin with? If he’s not been struggling too hard to make it in life, and is a righteous dude in general, then perhaps he realizes that in his current high position, he can really do the right thing for the viewers and readers. Again that is a rarity in the “journalism” “profession”.

    I don’t particularly agree (surprise, surprise) with your view of who Libertarians are, Steve. You, and most commenter on here, associate them all with pro-Big-Biz types. That’s not particulary true. I wonder what Ron Paul, in fact, would say about taxes on capital gains vs. income, and I reckon Mr. Carlson would have a damn good opinion of a libertarian like John Stossel, another TV guy. That’s speculation, but it leads to thoughts of what exactly is libertarianism.

    I enjoyed your column though (and now realize I could have read it while unz was down yesterday, if I’d thought about it. Taki really needs to quit with the retroactive pop-up bullshit though. How bad does he need the ad money?!)

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  28. @miss marple

    What do you mean “than he actually is”, MIss Marple? Do you mean compared to on TV? I’ve seen him only on youtube, except for one time with his regular show at a friends house. I’ve like every clip I’ve seen of him. I’ve not read anything by him, yet (waiting for the book).

  29. LondonBob says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Not every Israeli critic gets the JFK critic. I remember watching a clip of Tucker biting his tongue when a Republican Congressman came on to defend attacking Syria because Israel.

    Carlson is a much welcome relic of the old Protestant establishment, a true blue.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  30. @JohnnyWalker123

    That’s nonsense comparing Sarah Palin to TC Coates. What has Mr. Coates done constructive in his whole affirmative-action-based life, Johnny? Sarah Palin worked her way up to Governer of the great State of Alaska the old fashioned way – being white, hence earning it. She may sound ditzy, but that’s the problem with getting lots of your news off the TV – they can pick and choose the bad parts.

    The only reason I even THOUGHT ABOUT voting for (but didn’t) John McCain in 08 is that he may have croaked within the first coupla years and Mrs. Palin could take over. No, she is no Ronald Reagan, but has more decorum than 10 Donald Trumps (not that that is everything by any means). Don’t get all your opinions off of TV – they can make things look a whole lot different than reality.

    Speaking of reality – no, I haven’t watched Mrs. Palin on reality-TV. When they film you for hours a day, and pick out 5 minutes of it, then it’s pretty easy to make you look stupid, yes, even you, Johnny Walker, will look stupid on reality-TV. I had watched those Bering Straits fishing shows way back. Do you think those tough guys are really drama queens, as they seem on. the show? They may get filmed for days and days, getting along fine with the crew, cooperating with their buddies on other boats, etc. Then, the Captain gets a little annoyed for 2 minutes and then … yes, THERE’S YOUR SHOW!

    .
    .

    Oh, BTW, I made a good bet. I voted L in ’08. I sure didn’t want the Øb☭ma, but McCain didn’t win either, and he died only a few months back.

    • Agree: Tyrion 2
  31. clyde says:

    Both of whom are hucksters. It should be noted that Tucker Carlson came in after Bill O’Reilly (a loudmouth right-wing conman who spent decades talking about how he was a “culture warrior”)

    You are agitatedly wrong! You can call O’Reilly a huckster but not Tucker Carlson.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  32. @JohnnyWalker123

    Whites are a minority in Texas, California, and Hawaii. Have Whites been persecuted in any of these states? Have non-whites turned on each other?

    If limiting the number of Jews who can be employed is persecution, whites have been persecuted in those states. If having people kill Jews and get away with it is an anti-Jewish pogrom, whites are being pogromed. If taking measures that lead to the steady decline and extinction of whites is genocide, whites are being genocided. If people fleeing for other areas is evidence of suffering, whites are suffering.

  33. Arclight says:

    It seems to me that a shift from the nominally libertarian/free market politics that dominate in the GOP on immigration and the workforce to something more like the what the labor Dems of old held would solidify the white working class vote for the party and probably scoop up more blacks and latinos as well. The GOP doesn’t have to win anything approaching a majority of black or latino voters to be competitive, they just need to pick up another 5% of each than their current voter share and the Democrats would lose every national election by the same margin as Hilary in the electoral college and the GOP would scoop up another half dozen Senate seats.

    Yes, the free market line of thinking on mass immigration, trade, etc. would grow the economy faster than a more populist economic model, but the benefits of it overwhelmingly accrue to people already at the top. I’d trade a bit of growth in favor of a middle and lower class that have better economic prospects rather than letting the already well off get richer. That’s supposedly what the Democrats are about but their positions on immigration and coziness with Wall Street and Silicon Valley work against most of the people they claim to care the most about.

  34. @JohnnyWalker123

    Perhaps you should lay off the caffeine for a few days (or go back to the JW). Good grief you’re a hick. You plant some controversial theories every other sentence but pretend they are commonly held views that don’t need backing up with some sort of evidence. One thing that can be said of O’Reilly is that he’d never spew out anything controversial without some research and/or references to reputable sources.

  35. Ed says:
    @exiled off mainstreet

    Which is why the forces that be want him removed.

  36. @JohnnyWalker123

    Whites are a minority in Texas, California, and Hawaii. Have Whites been persecuted in any of these states? Have non-whites turned on each other?

    Yes and yes. Hawaiian abuse of “Haoles” is well-known. There have been legislative attempts, supported by leading Hawaiian politicians to legally preference native Hawaiians over Whites. Mexicans have violently driven Blacks out of many previously Black California neighborhoods. Black-on-White and Hispanic-on-White crime is rampant in those states. Victor Davis Hanson details the abuse and vandalism and differential police treatment (Browns are given a pass. Whites are held to a strict standard) he suffers at the hands of non-Whites around his home in California.

  37. @miss marple

    Meh, Carlson sounds better in print that he actually is.

    Try hosting an hour-long television show five nights a week.

    TV is a mass medium, not a scholarly publication. Carlson is a brave talent at this.

    His program is just about the only thing on TV that I will watch or record anymore. It reaches millions of Americans. How many people does anyone better than him on the subjects that concern us communicate with?

  38. Regarding ratings, the numbers for all of them are pretty pathetic. There are teenagers on YouTube who average 3 million viewers using their phone cams. The mainstream media is dying.

  39. lavoisier says: • Website
    @Tyrion 2

    having to write like the above is quite annoying…

    But still true.

  40. @JohnnyWalker123

    Thanks for one helluva a comment. Now I don’t have to labor to put one together myself. I don’t think all or many here on Unz will agree with your assessment of Reagan and Clinton but you are, neverthelessless, spot on.

    Both betrayed the American working class. The Clintons are simply hillbilly Arkansas grifters who saw which way would lead them to the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. Bill, as much as Reagan, permitted policies which enabled the bankers and investors to break the back of American labor.

    This is anecdotal, but straight from the trenches. An uncle of mine was a highly placed executive of a large international corporation through the 60′s and 70′s. and into the 80′s. He was a board member during the midst of the war on American corporations that was waged by raiders and takeover artists.

    Remember the credo “the board must act so as to maximize shareholder value”? Once that took hold, all the old-fashioned executives who felt that the corporation actually had an obligation to give back to the community and support civil society by paying decent wages to its employees were marginalized in the board rooms. A new crew of cold-blooded pirates, with freshly minted MBAs from Harvard and the like, took over. They had no such sentimental sympathies with the American worker and saw him instead as a clod and a stubborn dolt who stood in the way of their financial schemes to get rich quick.

    When I asked my uncle about executive compensation in 2003, he said that then-current levels were “obscene”. His generation earned a good living but weren’t rich.

    The financiers have taken over. The makers and doers are in retreat. Trade and Federal deficits have soared. The fanning apologist Krugman’s of the world see no problem in America issuing bonds and printing money indefinitely–just as long as we have the military might to impose the dollar standard on Saudi oil–which serves Israel’s purposes as well. What a coincidence.

    Bogus dollars, oil and military might, the American triumvirate.

    • Agree: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @Lagertha
  41. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Oh…they posted a few ineffectual facebook ads and sent him an email over a legitimate political disagreement.

    Pro-Israel groups are mobilizing against Sen. Rand Paul for his block on legislation to give Israel $38 billion over the next 10 years. AIPAC is placing Facebook ads & CUFI is sending emails to pressure Paul, “the last obstacle” to Israel obtaining the largest military aid package in US history…”

    Sure, because after all, AIPAC is such a marginal, ineffectual organization.

    What it likely means is that money will pour into his next election opponent. Maybe even into the coffers of a primary challenger.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  42. @JohnnyWalker123

    Although I don’t agree with you on your last part, Johnny, that’s a very interesting comment though, and it goes along with the thoughts in Mr. Sailer’s review. I don’t agree with it all, but the old left did care about the lives of ordinary Americans. I can’t argue with that.

    The reason the new left, the ctrl-left, as it were, doesn’t care about unions and the environment anymore is that they simply want to destroy the country. If destroying the American people causes collateral damage to “the planet”, then it’s just that whole egg/omelet thing for them. They are indeed the Neo-Bolsheviks, coming back to make history rhyme.

    I don’t think Reagan was down with the Deep State, though, until, (let’s not forget) he was almost JFK’d too, only a couple of months into his presidency. That was probably a warning, and though it was a .22 shot, it was not the normal 22 LR, but explosive “Devastator” rounds. By the time Reagan was done with surgery, he’d lost 1/2 of his blood volume, and though it went well, he had a fever that kept him in the hospital for 2 weeks. I still have lots of respect for Ronald Reagan, the man and the President, but those shots in 1981 may have been a warning that he heeded.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  43. lavoisier says: • Website
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The left has its flaws too, but let’s not act like the right is somehow the adult in the room.

    I would agree with this statement. But I despise Bill Maher and his simplistic and vulgar attacks on anyone who challenges the virtue of the left and their dystopian fantasies.

    His show is a hate fest against the goyim and their civilization.

    I cannot stand the arrogant creep.

  44. @JohnnyWalker123

    A lot of fair points. Yet I’d take Sarah Palin as governor in place of Jerry Brown or most other current governors. Rather have her family as our neighbors than the people we actually have here, too.

    But yes, she wasn’t ready for the White House and the republicans should have picked someone else. On the other hand, we will hear all about how the next unqualified white-hating open-borders woman on the democrat ticket, Kamala Harris or Pocahontas Warren or Michelle Obama etc., is well prepared for the presidency.

  45. @JohnnyWalker123

    Yeah, every time I think that we’re on our way to the Balkans, I look at California, Texas, New Mexico and Florida say, “Well, maybe not.”

    Granted, those states are likely far, far less appealing due to their diversity than they would have been without it, but they are not cauldrons of racial hatred and violence. Whites are not being persecuted nor are White identity groups being created to fight back. It’s just a slow slide toward some Latin American-style society.

    But then every time I think that these states represent our future (crappy but not the Balkans), I see some Obama type talking about how we need to get blacks down the street from Whites through housing policy, or the need for more “opportunity” for NAMs, i.e. money from Whites, or I hear about some new program to put NAMs into executive positions or some diversity program where Whites have to sit and be scolded by blacks about how evil they are. I see this and think that maybe we’re heading toward something far worse than Latin America.

    I can’t quite figure which direction where heading. But what I do know is that Door 2 which really could lead to the Balkans is no longer some crazy fantasy. Even if the odds are against it, it’s a possibility. Certainly, it’s enough of a possibility to think about contingency plans. (The odds of me dying in the next year are extremely low but because of the consequences, I have life insurance. The same holds true here. Low odds (but growing odds) but huge negative consequences.)

    • Replies: @Flip
  46. Mr. Anon says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Whites are a minority in Texas, California, and Hawaii. Have Whites been persecuted in any of these states? Have non-whites turned on each other?

    A lot of whites have found California to have become inhospitable and have therefore left. Mostly for economic reasons, I gather, but a lot of those are the direct result of the foreign influx.

    And non-whites have turned on each other at the street level, but they still hold their mutual animosities in check in order to stick it to whites.

    Moreover, there have been numerous cases recently of whites who have lost their jobs or been subjected to public ridicule for comments they have made, often simply truthful, about minority behavior, or actions they have taken based on experience. And then there is the newly minted crime of “calling 911 while white”. Those are forms of persecution

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  47. @JohnnyWalker123

    Bill Mayer.

    Straw man argumentation from an intellectual weakling who panders to a base every bit as ignorant and prejudiced as those he skewers, doesn’t make for good humor. Bill O’Reilly for NPR listeners.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  48. utu says:
    @Arclight

    Yes, the free market line of thinking on mass immigration, trade, etc. would grow the economy faster than a more populist economic model

    Large part of this growth is due to population growth. It does not make people better off.

  49. The left is extremely agitated by the man, as seen by the property damage and threats to Mr. Carlson’s life by these Commies (face it, that’s who they are, N. Lenin could have really used a few guys like them.)

    What’s getting them into an uproar is that it’s OK to have some truth-telling real conservatives around, but, for the love of God, NOT ON TV! People like Mr. Carlson should be relegated to the dark side of the internet (even this side just went down for a day – hope it was just Mr. Unz’s own screw-up), maybe let to twit for awhile before banning them, and well “let them have Facebook”. Even that’s not OK forever, as some of them will start making their own TV channels on the internet. Look at Alex Jones – they had to cut all the links, as it was getting to be too much*.

    I was surprised that Lou Dobbs was allowed to speak about the immigration invasion nightly for a few years back in the day. That didn’t last – something happened.

    I figure there’ve got to be lots of people trying to dig up dirt about Tucker anywhere they can. He must be a pretty decent guy to not already have something out there on him. There are probably a number of hotties being set up to try to #him, I mean, #MeToo him. That’s a tough situation to be in, and I mean that seriously.

    .
    .

    * and don’t you commenters chime in with “well, he was a kook” and that, OK? Your VS-bucks are no good here – only cold hard cash or facts.

  50. Mr. Anon says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    What I found really remarkable was the way that FOX casually unpersoned O’Reilly. His show was the biggest ratings garner on FOX; it was their weeknight lineup anchor. That creepy, weasely little prick, Greg Gutfeld, hosted the last episode of “The Factor”, and signed O’Reilly’s show off the air without even once mentioning his name. Mind you, I despise O’Reilly and always have; he is a smug, self-righteous, loud-mouthed jerk. But he was their jerk and they could have admitted it.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  51. Mr. Anon says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Bill Maher had some good critique (watch from 1:30 onward).

    I would no more voluntarily subject myself to listening to Bill Maher than I would to Bill O’Reilly.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  52. countenance says: • Website

    If I didn’t know any better, I think Steve just admitted to having ghostwritten the book.

    • Replies: @Jason Roberts
  53. @Buzz Mohawk

    Tucker states it as plainly as is allowed on public airwaves. Nevertheless, he is still commonly referred to on the left (and by odious neocons like Max Boot) as a “white nationalist”. They’re on to him!

  54. songbird says:

    I’m surprised so many people watch Maddow. I hadn’t known she was competitive to Tucker in ratings.

    • Replies: @donut
  55. Anonymous[234] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill P

    Nick Hanauer, an early Amazon investor and prolific funder of liberal causes, has suggested so on occasion, saying that the American people must be disarmed before they seek revenge.

    Citation?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    , @Herald
  56. Anonymous[234] • Disclaimer says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Also, there’s little reason to think that Whites will soon become so insignificant that they cannot be scapegoated. Even assuming they are scapegoated now.

    But rapid demographic change makes this unsustainable. When the traditional scapegoat becomes insufficient, various factions will turn on one another.

  57. Tiny Duck says:
    @Mr McKenna

    This is facile.

    Coates Maddow and the like are not promoting bigotry and hatred,

    Carlson is an evil man and deserves everything he gets or he is stupid and doesn’t understand his privilege.

    Here is some truthful educational materials that are amusing at the same time

    • Replies: @Pat Boyle
  58. Anonymous[234] • Disclaimer says:
    @Tyrion 2

    My worry is that in a political party based democracy local conflicts are tempered by national debates.

    Example please?

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  59. L Woods says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Admirable as his showing is, no amount of talent or intelligence gives one a national television platform or a pass for crimethink. He manages (so far) to get away with what he does for the same reason Pat Buchanan did: elite status.

  60. I have no idea how Carlson creates five hours of television per week and writes a book at the same time

    By getting other people to write for him.

    Watch him when he doesn’t have a script to read, which is every time he “interviews” a Democrat. In these tedious and predictable sessions the pattern is: Tucker interrupts with “Let me ask you a question…”, letting the guy get out just enough words for Tucker to see his brilliant trap hasn’t worked, then interrupting with another rhetorical question. After a while, Tucker’s been beaten up enough, and he goes to laughing at his guest as he ends the interview.

    Tucker solo — reading the news (as he tosses in sharp asides), opinionating outright or (I’ll take Steve’s word for it) in this book — is way smarter than Tucker the interviewer. Which can mean only one thing: he relies on others to write for him.

    Not that there’s anything wrong with that. Dan Rather didn’t (and couldn’t) write his own material either. But let’s call a spade a spade, ok?

    Ann Coulter is an example of someone who really is smart enough to have written her books. Or Douglas Murray for another. Just watch them.

  61. @Bill P

    Over the last few decades, the American upper class has developed into an extraordinarily cohesive society. I’m not sure why, because you’d think people at the top would be competitive by nature, but maybe the benefits are sufficient to override their bloodier impulses.

    The phenomenon seems to be that there is an actual ruling class, and then there is a much larger subordinate level of status conscious whites who aspire to admission in the actual ruling class and ape its fashions and manners.

    The subordinate caste does a lot of the dirty work of striking at the white working class in every day society, thereby announcing their fitness for inclusion in the true ruling class and pretensions to belonging to it.

    We really are saddled with a large caste of officious Hyacinth Buckets – mediocrities with college degrees who work as the enforcement arm of the ruling caste.

    • Agree: L Woods, densa
    • Replies: @Anon
    , @densa
  62. @countenance

    Absolutely. I’m calling on Tucker to make a substantial donation to Steve’s upcoming panhandling drive as a “thank you” for ghostwriting.

  63. Jack D says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Especially after Reagan fired the air traffic controllers, all hell broke loose. It was really then that workers became seen as a commodity who could be bought, sold, or discarded.

    Firing the traffic controllers is seen as a turning point but nothing really changed in the law. What happened was that unions (rightly) lost the sympathy of the public by their excesses. FDR opposed public employees unions because of their ability to hold vital public services hostage. If unions go on strike against GM you can still buy a Ford but if they shut down the air transport system there is no alternative. Likewise, private sector unions lost popular support because they were seen as havens of corruption and featherbedding rather than legitimate protectors of workers’ rights.

    Also the recovery of the other advanced industrial economies meant that American industry now had competition. Back in the day, GM, Ford and Chrysler all competed on a level playing field – they all had to pay their workers the same union wages and put out the same product that was indifferently assembled by workers who didn’t give a damn about quality because their jobs were protected by the union. The auto makers and the unions had a cozy arrangement – the unions would raise their wages and the car makers would pass this thru to their customers (and reduce the quality of the product to make up for increased labor costs) and everyone was happy (except for the customers who had no choice). Then the imports came (first VW and then the Japanese) and this threw a monkey wrench into the cozy arrangement.

    Of course immigration did not help – one of the things that gave employees power was a tight labor market. Marx predicted that the workers would be “immiserated’ because there would always be a “reserve army of the unemployed” waiting at the factory gates and driving down wage levels. But in fact, after WWII, workers were in short supply before the era of widespread illegal immigration – you couldn’t find enough people to operate your meat processing plant or do other dirty jobs unless you paid them really well. But for Mexican illegal aliens, minimum wage was good enough. Then the Chinese came and took away millions of factory jobs and “outsourcing” took away even more jobs (you call customer support and they answer in India or the Philippines) leaving a permanent slack labor market – even now with “full employment” a lot of people are underemployed or out of the workforce .

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Marty
  64. anonymous[191] • Disclaimer says:
    @Tyrion 2

    At the same time with a large number of native born Latinos marrying Anglos, so there will be a whitish majority race 50 years into the future.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  65. @International Jew

    I have witnessed Carlson freely admitting what you claim. It is no secret that to produce a whole hour (minus commercial time) of television, you need a small army of writers and producers. There is no shame in that.

    Remember, he has authority on what gets on the air. It’s like when you hire somebody to remodel your house. He does the job, but you tell him what you want. It is your house.

    If you haven’t ever hosted a TV show, (something I did many years ago on a laughably local level) you might not realize how hard it is not to have slow, dead air and bore people to death. It is incredibly difficult to hold an audience and to keep them from changing the channel for an entire hour. Tucker Carlson deserves all the credit he gets, and he does, at lease occasionally, credit his team as well.

    • Agree: Trevor H.
    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @International Jew
  66. Jack D says:
    @Arclight

    This is wishful thinking. Blacks are wedded to whichever party offers more gibmedats. Unless the GOP wants to compete in giving out more free stuff it will never be able to peel blacks away from the Dems. Blacks understand that they cannot compete in a free market environment and need the Democrat version of government to give them endless benefits and privileges or else they would still be living in shotgun shacks and eating cornmeal except for a few rich entertainers. Even what appears to be a black middle class exists only because they have mostly government jobs or are AA hires.

  67. Stick says:

    Socialism is Serfdom. Pretty simple. The greatest achievement of Western Civilization was that it was the only civilization known to history to overcome both slavery and serfdom as an economic – governing model. By doing so Western Civilization created modernity. The US is the epitome of this achievement. Regression to the serfdom mean is going to be nasty and bloody. Hopefully all those Globalists with two or more passports have a secure bug out site to hunker down in. The egalitarian Europeans can get quite vengeful.

  68. @Bill P

    “Nick Hanauer … has suggested so on occasion, saying that the American people must be disarmed before they seek revenge.”

    I’ve read where he says they’ll seek revenge, but where has he said they must be disarmed?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Bill P
  69. “The majority of journalists and intellectuals in 1975 would never have accepted the lame excuse that silencing, firing, and ruining people for holding an opinion was fine, as long as it wasn’t specifically the government doing it. They would have declared that a free society depends above all on free minds.”

    This is a good point that doesn’t get stated often enough.

    In the 1970s and 1980s,”freedom of speech” was colloquially a blanket defense for, well, speaking freely. As I recall, it was only in the early 1990s that people began noticing that the First Amendment applied specifically to Congress rather than to everyone. At the time, I had a naive libertarian’s sense of relief that a law only applying to government was naturally a good thing. In retrospect I can see that my incipient tyrant colleagues drew a different conclusion: the law is no barrier to our Plan!

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @dwb
  70. “At the moment, the coalition of identity groups has held together because it is united in a single purpose against white male power. But rapid demographic change makes this unsustainable. When the traditional scapegoat becomes insufficient, various factions will turn on one another.

    Chaos will ensue.”

    I have to differ with Tucker about this. So long as one white(ish) Emmanuel Goldstein lives, that will be sufficient for the Coalition of the Fringes’ purpose. Indeed, that will be preferable, as fewer, more beleaguered straight white men can’t fight back.

    And chaos is already here, in the parasitical, destructive economy, the unequal administration of the laws, the debauched culture, the intellectually bankrupt academy, and much else.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  71. Ursala says:

    I wish I was born into a rich and privileged family so I had the resources to write books.

    When it comes to writing, it pays to be rich:

    https://www.salon.com/2015/01/25/sponsored_by_my_husband_why_its_a_problem_that_writers_never_talk_about_where_their_money_comes_from/

  72. AndrewR says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    “Non-Hispanic whites are a plurality”

    FTFY

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  73. Carlson, who voted for Ron Paul in 1988, has largely left behind his youthful economic libertarianism.

    I’m about a year older than Carlson. I might have voted for Bill Clinton in 1992; I won’t directly admit it. It might have stemmed from my hatred of the Bush Organized Crime Syndicate.

    I voted for Perot in 1996 and Pat Buchanan in 2000.

    I made a tar paper and masking tape road sign for Buchanan. It held up pretty good in all kinds of weather. I can’t recall where I procured the metal frame that held the sign upright and planted in the ground. If Mueller or the FBI asks me where I got the metal frame that might have held up another candidates sign before I re-purposed it, I will plead memory loss and the 5th Amendment. I don’t remember, I can’t recall, I got no memories of the alleged incident at all.

    2004? Who knows!

    2008? Hazy!

    2012? I voted for Virgil Goode and in 2016 I voted for Trump.

  74. Nathan says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    People are pretty ignorant about Hawaii. It’s not a place you want to live. Neither is California.

  75. Tucker Carlson:

    At the moment, the coalition of identity groups has held together because it is united in a single purpose against white male power. But rapid demographic change makes this unsustainable. When the traditional scapegoat becomes insufficient, various factions will turn on one another.

    White Core American Patriots must do some fracturing of our own by attacking the treasonous rats in the GOP ruling class and the GOP Cheap Labor Faction and the various chambers of commerce that push horrible policies and the Neo-Conservative boobs who control GOP foreign policy.

    Gingerly describing the troubling relationship between Shelly Adelson and President Trump must be done too. It will take someone with my level of subtlety and sophisticated language skills to do it. No hotheads!

    The Alt-Right must smash the living shit out of the GOP so as to be able to put it back together as a political force that explicitly protects and advances the interests of the European Christian ancestral core of the USA.

    Tweet from 2014:

  76. Anon[277] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alec Leamas

    Remember, that’s pronounced “boo-kay.”

  77. BB753 says:

    “The central theme of Ship of Fools is that the convergence toward the reigning elite consensus of economic conservatism and social progressivism is better for the people at the top of society than for maintaining a stable middle-class democracy (…)”

    Now we know the real reason why he’s being harassed and threatened.

  78. @JohnnyWalker123

    The left has its flaws too, but let’s not act like the right is somehow the adult in the room.

    The right isn’t even in the room. O’Reilly never represented the right. Neither did Reagan. What did any of these men ever conserve? When did they even try? Even Trump hasn’t done any of the “right” agenda, such limiting immigration.

    Being for lower taxes and regulations doesn’t make you the “right.” Preserving your people and culture makes you of the right. Pushing back intellectually and openly against those who want to change your people and culture make you of the right.

    Since I’m been born – and really much longer than that – this country’s politicians have been fast-pace progressives and slower-pace progressives. It’s why the left is so angry about Trump – a politician who only hints at being right wing; they haven’t been challenged in their entire lives.

    The left reminds of a wife who’s pushed around her husband for decades when she comes across a man who won’t take her shit. Those types of women absolutely lose it when someone pushes back.

  79. ronhan says:

    “When the traditional scapegoat becomes insufficient, various factions will turn on one another.”

    I would like to know what Tucker means by insufficient. If he means out of power, that is bad but livable. But if he means something closer to eradicated, isn’t that simply unacceptable?Doesn’t that need to be fought against with more than a quizzical look?

  80. I disliked Tucker back when he was on Crossfire. I like the Tucker 4.0 we have today.

    Like Tucker, I voted for Paul in 88 as well, but soon became a Buchananite. Tucker just took a bit longer to get there.

    I was already thinking to go buy the book today before reading this. This review seems to reinforce the idea.

  81. @Jack D

    I live in the Washington, D.C. area, home to a very large black middle-class due to the federal government’s massive AA. These people are stunningly incompetent. Even the military blacks who are the most disciplined and generally give effort are relatively pointless. And these are the “talented tenth.”

    Without AA, the black middle and upper-middle class would collapse overnight. Best guess is that maybe one out of ten – one out five at the high end – would remain at their current level.

    As it is, there’s not too much continuity to the black middle class anyway since so many of their kids falls right back into the abyss.

    Expecting Africans to achieve and act like Europeans is the folly of our time, something that even iSteve commentators are often guilty of doing.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  82. @JohnnyWalker123

    I am certain that Steve is very circumspect (by rational necessity) about where he goes in California and that there are far fewer options (not attributible to gross growth in population/development per se) for strolling about there than there were 40 or 50 years ago.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  83. Jack D says:
    @Almost Missouri

    The trend in 20th century jurisprudence (when it was the “good guys” who were being protected) was to call almost everything “government action” on the theory that you had to use the court system to enforce your “private actions”. So, racial covenants in deeds were out, even though they were private agreements between landowners, because the court had to enforce the covenants. Libel actions against public figures (NY Times v. Sullivan) were out even though they were civil suits by individuals against the newspaper, again because it involved the court system and thus implicated government and the 1st Amendment.

    Let’s say that the Current Year trend involved black female Google programmers losing their jobs for hatefully proclaiming that black women were superior programmers, thus denigrating other races and genders (Damore in reverse). Would the Left be proclaiming that while Latisha had a 1st Amendment right to her opinions, it would be perfectly OK for Google to fire her for having those opinions? Or would they be looking for a way to somehow bind Google too to the 1st Amendment? Some kind of novel legal theory that as a beneficiary of government largess, a corporation that exists with limited liability under a state charter, Google too is bound? Universities are “private” but Title IX etc. gets enforced against them as a condition of receiving government funding. It’s kind of ridiculous to say that you have 1st Amendment rights but only as long as you don’t use them.

    But, as we know, the Left is all about who/whom. It turns out that they didn’t really object to McCarthyism in principle – they just didn’t like being on the receiving end of it. “Free speech” was great when Leftists were giving the speeches denouncing the conservative white men who were running the show, but now that they are running the show, free speech (against them) doesn’t seem like such a good idea.

    • Replies: @dwb
    , @Almost Missouri
  84. JLK says:
    @International Jew

    Ann Coulter is an example of someone who really is smart enough to have written her books.

    While some of Carlson’s comments may be helpful in moving the envelope of permissible discussion in a more moderate direction, there’s nothing in his academic background or Coulter’s for that matter that suggests an intellect capable of seeing the whole picture.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    , @anon
  85. carol says:

    Tucker used to wear a bow tie at where, CNN? Years ago. That kind of put him in George Will territory.

    Glad he got rid of it.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  86. Anonymous[234] • Disclaimer says:
    @International Jew

    Which can mean only one thing: he relies on others to write for him.

    Who could he possibly be relying upon? How many people?

  87. Anonymous[234] • Disclaimer says:
    @International Jew

    Or Douglas Murray for another.

    Who is Douglas Murray?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  88. The funny thing is that Carlson, a lifelong Republican, has drifted leftward on economics and foreign policy in recent years

    As many have pointed out around here, the old definitions of Left and Right are growing increasingly irrelevant by the day and almost by the hour. The meaningful political distinctions for today and tomorrow are between the growing nationalist, pro-family, pro-worker traditionalists and the cosmopolitan, oligo-capitalist progressives. The former involves a great deal of what used to be called the “Labor” branch of economic liberalism (something closely akin to Catholic distributism à la Rerum Novarum) while the latter is the pure distillation of a Lincolnian Republicanism that has shed the hypocrisy of popular concern. All the bewildering political developments of the last two decades can be explained by the fact that not only are these two camps fighting with each other, they’re also each fighting a war of succession within their own respective parties. The New Right is still struggling for position, gearing up for its true purpose of defending that which is best and essential in the human condition, while the New Left is pursuing the urbane “freedom” to engage in unrestrained acquisition and self-seeking beyond all responsibility and law. Once both sides have found their footing, they will clash in a decisive cataclysm in which the history of the 21st century will be settled.

    I’ve been saying that I’m “socially conservative and fiscally liberal” ever since I was back in high school, using a deliberate inversion of the phrase favored by the cucks and thots of the GOPe. This is a pithy saying that captures much of what motivates the New Right and it was these hitherto unrepresented people who formed the basis of Trump’s electoral victory, notwithstanding the fact that the Donald hasn’t exactly delivered much for his base to be happy about. Tucker Carlson is their new mouthpiece, and I think he’s doing the job reasonably well given that most people are too unintellectual to grapple with the ideas at a high philosophical level, yet they still feel them to be true. I don’t mind Tucker stealing my thunder, I’m just glad that the ideas are gaining a wider audience. Twenty years ago you had to be quite the esotericist or the rare private intellectual to have any grasp of New Right concepts. Now Tucker is making some of those concepts mainstream, and that is a good thing.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @IHTG
  89. Anonymous[234] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Then the imports came (first VW and then the Japanese) and this threw a monkey wrench into the cozy arrangement.

    Was auto worker labor in Germany and Japan not unionized? Was there a labor oversupply in those countries? If those countries had unions or a tight labor supply, how do you explain the competitive sales prices and the (presumably) better quality?

  90. Jack D says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Of course scapegoats can continue to exist even after the goats are (largely) extinct. In post-1967 Communist Poland they had an anti-Semitic purge even though 99% of the Jewish population was already dead or out of the country. Even after the remaining 1% was gone, it was STILL possible to blame invisible “Jewish influence” for anything bad.

    So, “hate on white men” is always going to be the unifying principle of the Coalition of the Fringes, at least as a public stance. However, this is not sufficient. Once you have wrested the levers of power away from whitey, who is going to command the helm of the ship of state? Do blacks get the leading role? Women (white women can’t be trusted, the others will say – they are sleeping with the enemy)? Latinos? Of course they are going to fight amongst themselves over how to divide the spoils.

    And there are further complications – you need the competence of white men to actually make things work. If you are too successful in purging whites, everything goes to hell – see Zimbabwe.

    • Replies: @DFH
    , @Jonathan Mason
  91. Jack D says:
    @Almost Missouri

    This sounds like “they want to take our guns away” paranoia. America is so knee deep in guns that “they” will never be able to take them away even if “they” want to. “They” can’t even take our fentanyl away, let alone our guns.

    “They” don’t even need to take your guns away. China’s new social credit program points the way. You can keep your guns, you just won’t have a job or the ability to buy a plane ticket or to get internet service, a cell phone, a driver’s license, etc. And of course if you ever try to use your gun, the SWAT team will pump you full of lead from their APCs.

  92. @JohnnyWalker123

    Back in the late 90s/early 2000s, I was struck by how similar Pat Buchanan and Ralph Nader often sounded. It seems like others (Tucker Carlson, Bernie Sanders, occasionally even Donald Trump) are converging on that left-right consensus.

    In short order, before the 2000 election, the New York Times attacked Ralph Nader and the Wall Street Journal attacked Pat Buchanan.

    Both the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal push globalization, mass immigration and sovereignty-sapping trade deal scams.

    Both the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal support the use of the US military as muscle to fight wars on behalf of Israel in the Middle East and West Asia.

    The American Empire is starting wars in the Middle East(Iraq) and West Asia(Afghanistan) to create turmoil and chaos to further the foreign policy goals of the client state of Israel.

    The PEWITT campaign for president has not paid for this message.

    We love Trump, but Trump has made himself unlovable with his weakness and lack of action on immigration. The Pewitt campaign will challenge Trump for the 2020 GOP presidential nomination.

    Immigration Moratorium Now!

    Deport All Illegal Alien Invaders Now!

  93. L Woods says:
    @Jack D

    Guns are a ridiculous red herring born of empty bluster and machismo. For all their precious guns, conservatives have done nothing but bend over and say “yes sir, may I have another” for 60+ years.

  94. JLK says:

    In post-1967 Communist Poland they had an anti-Semitic purge even though 99% of the Jewish population was already dead or out of the country. Even after the remaining 1% was gone, it was STILL possible to blame invisible “Jewish influence” for anything bad.

    According to some Polish accounts available on the Internet (not easy to find), many of those purged were in the Polish secret police (the SB) or other government ministries, and left the country to avoid criminal prosecution for torture and other excesses of political repression. Very similar to Hungary and the 1956 uprising in that regard.

  95. Steve, O/T but apropos of your recent tweeting (I’m in eternal twitter Purgatory), our favorite blog’s recently departed neighbor Mr. Khan did analyses of intelligence and verbal/mathematical acuity by field of study in a 2012 Discover blog entitled “Classicists are Smart!:”

    http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/gnxp/2012/01/classicists-are-smart/#.XAAoWOJRdhG

    From experience I can say that studying Attic Greek is not the usual soft study where one can hide in the University’s school of Liberal Arts. In my day many of my classes had a total of two or three students for the semester.

  96. Jack D says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Just watch the endless credits at the end of any movie – even the most modest drama seemingly lacking in stunts and special effects. It may look to you like just a couple of actors on the screen, a cameraman and a director would do it, but in fact you need a whole army of people, 99% of whom you will never see. What you seen on the screen is just the tip of the iceberg. A talk show takes fewer but still it is not just a guy and a cameraman by a long shot.

    Television is a relentless consumer of material – it burns thru material like a bonfire. Back in the days of vaudeville, an entertainer could have one act and take that act on the road and do the same routine over and over in every city for their entire career. You could get really good at doing your act because you were polishing the same material night after night. If you were the guy who spun plates on a stick , you could spin them like crazy and they would never fall. Even if you came back to the same city the following year, the 1,000 people who bought tickets for your repeat performance were mostly not the same people who saw your act las year. Then came TV and they would go on Ed Sullivan once and do their act, which was pretty good, but what would they do the NEXT time? You couldn’t go on Ed Sullivan again and do the same act, but a lot of these guys didn’t have anything else.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
  97. @exiled off mainstreet

    Tucker is a Nazi.
    Imran Khan had no quarrel with the Indians and no plans or ambitions outside Pakistan. But the Modi Administration violated international law by giving illegal military aid to belligerents, and drew India into a foreign war that was not our affair and none of our business. Four hundred thousand young working-class males, almost all of them Hindus and Sikhs, died to prop up Trump and install Salvini, Putin, and Leo Varadkar in power–less than five years after Modi’s henchmen, almost all of them members of the White Christian Tribe that shall Not be Named, murdered thirty million Black Christian Nigerians. And we put his face on the coinage and name government buildings after him.

  98. Sean says:

    The central theme of Ship of Fools is that the convergence toward the reigning elite consensus of economic conservatism and social progressivism is better for the people at the top of society than for maintaining a stable middle-class democracy:

    Pleasing a particular domestic power base is all very well, but the test of a nation state’s policy is whether its power in increasing relative to foreign countries. To make America great might not be compatible with economic conservatism, social progressivism (and the rich getting richer), but neither is it fully compatible with a stable middle-class democracy without wars.

    China overtaking America was something the people at the top of American society failed to notice because they were doing too well out of it. There are things the middle class fail to see the necessity for, like a major war against a country that is not a military threat.

    Convergence on common sense is not to be expected. What happens is blundering from one extreme to the other domestically, and constancy in foreign policy.

  99. dwb says:
    @Jack D

    Exactly, Jack. Very well put.

  100. istevefan says:
    @Jack D

    “They” don’t even need to take your guns away. China’s new social credit program points the way. You can keep your guns, you just won’t have a job or the ability to buy a plane ticket or to get internet service, a cell phone, a driver’s license, etc. And of course if you ever try to use your gun, the SWAT team will pump you full of lead from their APCs.

    The problem for them is that if you take away too many people’s ability to have a job, good life etc., you will create a a large population of too many people with nothing to lose. And when you have a large population of armed people with nothing to lose, the potential for bad things to happen to those in charge increases immensely. And there won’t be enough SWAT teams or military personnel to contain it.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  101. dwb says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Small point, but I don’t entirely agree that the problem is the transmogrification of free speech from, well, public speech free of private consequences.

    Yes – the defenders of the mob who come after anyone who dares gore the ox of some liberal faction will inevitably point to the fact that the First Amendment protects one from government coercion, and that Google, for example, have a right to can James Damore for daring to veer too far of script.

    But I think that even in 1975, there were certain common standards that one dared not cross lest he risk being defenestrated. Witness the end of Anita Bryant’s career, for example.

    In my opinion, what has changed is not so much the relative tolerance for heterodox ideas, or even what defines heterodox ideas. What has happened is that various tools have been developed that make it far, far easier to gin up a storm of “outrage,” focus it on someone, and destroy them.

    I am reminded of the infamous case where a pretty much obscure woman with a modestly successful career in marketing made the mistake of tweeting about a trip to South Africa and laughing (virtually) about her freedom of fear from contracting HIV because she was white.

    Her career was over before her plane landed in Cape Town.

    The mob now can take one comment, supply its own context, broadcast it in seconds to millions of like-minded fools, and organize a mob in minutes. That did not exist in 1975.

    The effect is a bit like what would happen in a baseball game if baserunners were allowed bicycles on the basepaths.

    • Agree: Sean
  102. DFH says:
    @Jack D

    In post-1967 Communist Poland they had an anti-Semitic purge even though 99% of the Jewish population was already dead or out of the country. Even after the remaining 1% was gone, it was STILL possible to blame invisible “Jewish influence” for anything bad.

    The eternal boomer strikes again

    The leaders of Stalinist Poland (Jakub Berman and Hilary Minc) were Jews.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jakub_Berman

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hilary_Minc

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatol_Fejgin

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julia_Brystiger

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C3%B3zef_R%C3%B3%C5%BCa%C5%84ski

    The head of the secret police (Roman Romkowski) and 37% of secret police directors in Stalinist Poland were Jewish.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Romkowski

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ministry_of_Public_Security_(Poland)#Organization

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    , @Jack D
  103. @International Jew

    I agree about Ann Coulter. She’s a smart talker who inserts asides and clauses as she goes along. Her speech is closer to the written word. Her wit also is a sign of her intelligence. She sticks that in there too, often in the same manner. This refreshing complexity in her speech probably leaves behind many of the liberals who might be listening.

    BTW, why isn’t Steve Sailer all over TV? Well, I guess we know why. He must have written too many taboo opinions. Still, it would be great if he could do some interviews. Can’t he at least get on Tucker Carlson’s show? Nah, probably not. Even that program avoids third rails — very skillfully.

  104. @Jack D

    Back in the days of vaudeville, an entertainer could have one act and take that act on the road and do the same routine over and over in every city for their entire career.

    Many years ago Elton John was asked what he thought he would be doing when he was 40. I don’t know, he said, but I sure as hell ain’t going to be traveling the world playing Crocodile Rock every night. Now he is 70 and still touring the world playing the same old shit.

    I like Tucker Carlson, or I would if I ever watched TV. He used to be a posh young man with a bow tie abnd a good head of hair. Now he is all grown up and the bow tie is gone, but the hair is still there. No doubt he has grown immensely rich, but appears not to have entirely sold his soul to the Devil.

    He should run for President since he already has the name recognition necessary for success in politics these days, speaks well on TV, and I can think of plenty of slogans that would rhyme with Tucker, that would evoke motherhood, apple pie, and family values.

    He has four children, so has proved his fertility, and is Episcopalian like Judge Gorsuch, so he should have a friend on the Supreme Court to help advance an agenda such as declaring Easter to be a National Holiday instead of Spring Break.

    His father was once the director of Voice of America, which would not be a bad campaign slogan.

    Vote for Tucker, The Voice of America, and make America respectable and less of an international pariah again! (Possibly some focus group testing required here.)

    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
  105. @JohnnyWalker123

    Well, I tend to take all sexual harassment accusations with a grain of salt; have done since Clarence Thomas and the recent nonsense with respect to the newest addition to the Supreme Court tends to confirm my long-held suspicions.

    As for what any “rapper” has to say, who gives a damn?

    Who ever regarded Bill O’Reilly as an intellectual, conservative or otherwise? People who quote rap artists, I suppose. O’Reilly was essentially a shock jock on TV whose act undeniably had a degree of novelty value at the start, but which eventually wore thin.

    Bill Maher is even more of a mediocre con artist than O’Reilly. At least as a pugnacious Irishman, O’Reilly occasionally took shots at the Globohomo establishment — Maher actively shills for it.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  106. densa says:
    @Alec Leamas

    Oregon has its very own Gov. Hyacinth Bucket who just released her budget proposal. Naturally it calls for much more funding for and greater numbers of the subordinate class. This endless do-gooderism spans the budget, but Gov. HB specifically calls out for state paid healthcare for all children of border crossers. She also wants a new legal defense fund to protect illegal border crossers from being prosecuted by the feds. So the feds will try to enforce the law and Gov. HB will tax us to provide legal defense.

    Always lost to the parasitical class is the sight of the taxpayers who support them, unwillingly I might add. That is bad enough, to be invisible when “all” the interests have a seat at the table, but to have your money actually deployed to help illegal invaders seems, well, unConstitutional.

    Meanwhile, in their generosity the Hyacinth Buckets expand by 4% the program that allows exhausted tax donkeys, aka senior citizens, to defer their property tax by having the state pay the county the money. Last I saw they were getting 12% on that money, although I don’t know what they get now. The point is, they will tax you beyond your last earnings and breath to pay to invite 7 billion to replace you. And they’re happy with that as long as they continue to get paid.

  107. Tiny Duck says:
    @Mr McKenna

    Except Coates and the rest of them are not apologizing for literal Nazis

  108. @Tyrion 2

    I absolutely agree with you: A five-year moratorium on all U.S. tax-payer aid to Israel, followed by a ten-year probationary period.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  109. I’m the star of my own movie — David Byrne

    istevefan and Jack D start the out-of-the-box thinking

    Everyone in the future will have command of a SWAT team and be a member of one.

    Everyone in the future will command a fleet of drones and fly in one.

    Everyone will be employed by an intelligence agency or be politically represented by one.

    Everyone in the future will have their own central bank and be the beneficiary of the electronically conjured up cash.

    Remember, there are only two things that matter:

    Monetary Policy and Mass Immigration

    in other words,

    Debt and Demography

  110. IHTG says:
    @Mr McKenna

    Not true for Jonathan Chait. The hard left has a hate-boner for him.

    • Replies: @snorlax
  111. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Anonymous

    Any time the opposing side tries to hang a local “radical” politician around the neck of the other national party for general electoral gain.

    Basically any non-leading Democrat you hear about from the Republicans and vice versa.

    The same is true in the UK.

    Look at how calls to “abolish ICE” were tempered by national political considerations and were replaced with messages about health care, a sensible point.

  112. @Jack D

    And there are further complications – you need the competence of white men to actually make things work. If you are too successful in purging whites, everything goes to hell – see Zimbabwe.

    The key is to use faceless corporations to make things work, or at least corporations run by white people, but fronted by lovable family men like Bill Cosby, Tiger Woods, and Michael Jackson.

  113. Pat Boyle says:

    One of the most clever features of Carlson’s show is that he packages it into portions that fit well into YouTube videos. O’Reilly had longer segments. But Tucker has a lot of short seven to ten minute interviews and those are stored and viewed the next day on YouTube.

    O’Reilly may have gotten higher ratings but half of Tucker’s viewership is later in the week on YouTube. Carlson has a bigger impact than his Nielsen ratings. He’s seeding social media with short pithy discussions of popular topics. He’s the King of the New Media.

  114. Anonymous[234] • Disclaimer says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    I live in the Washington, D.C. area, home to a very large black middle-class due to the federal government’s massive AA.

    How does the federal government implement AA? Aren’t racial preferences illegal?

  115. @JLK

    You wrote,

    While some of Carlson’s comments may be helpful in moving the envelope of permissible discussion in a more moderate direction, there’s nothing in his academic background or Coulter’s for that matter that suggests an intellect capable of seeing the whole picture.

    Regarding Ann Coulter, a brain from New Caanan, Connecticut, you are wrong. From Wikipedia, the font of all truth:

    While attending Cornell University, Coulter helped found The Cornell Review,[9] and was a member of the Delta Gamma national sorority.[10] She graduated cum laude from Cornell in 1984 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in history and received her Juris Doctor from the University of Michigan Law School in 1988, where she was an editor of the Michigan Law Review.[11] At Michigan, Coulter was president of the local chapter of the Federalist Society and was trained at the National Journalism Center.[12]

    Furthermore, regarding Carlson also, or anybody else, the simplistic judgement contained in your comment indicates a true inability to see the whole picture, almost by definition.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  116. Marty says:
    @Jack D

    Jack, good post, but perhaps the cited nexus between the air-traffic controllers and “all hell broke loose” should be further discounted by considering the antics of Mike Milken? Would be interested to hear your thoughts on that.

  117. @Jonathan Mason

    He should run for President since he already has the name recognition necessary for success in politics these days, speaks well on TV, and I can think of plenty of slogans that would rhyme with Tucker, that would evoke motherhood, apple pie, and family values.

    There once was a Carlson named Tucker

    Who came damn close to calling Max Boot a motherhphucka

    It only works if you come from an accent region that replaces the R sound at the end of words with an AH sound.

  118. IHTG says:
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Twenty years ago you had to be quite the esotericist or the rare private intellectual to have any grasp of New Right concepts.

    Well, or you could be an oldschool Joe Manchin-style Democrat, but that’s been flushed down the memory hole.

  119. Tyrion 2 says:
    @anonymous

    It depends very much on if borders can be brought under control, multiculturalism can be discredited and a reasonable educated birth rate be reached.

    The lack of these three things is pulling our societies apart even as their inherent strengths, culture, a productive population, civility, work to keep them somewhat together.

    I’d rather err strongly on the side of not throwing everything away because accepting people from all around the world sounds nice.

    If the American people needing to turn to a reality TV star isn’t warning enough, then I have no idea what would be.

  120. @JohnnyWalker123

    It’d be nice if we had labor unions, but those were broken back a few decades ago. Especially after Reagan fired the air traffic controllers, all hell broke loose.

    I generally agree about labor unions, but not for government workers. That should never have been permitted. As Derbyshire notes, they’re essentially lobbies, not unions. There’s no opposition from management to their demands and they’ve become the foot soldiers of the Democratic Party.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
  121. The whole libertarian project was a smokescreen. Some of us wasted 30 years on it, chasing our tails as intended. Look at the founders and major promoters of libertarianism, specifically the post-WW2 movement. Every single time.

  122. @JohnnyWalker123

    It’s remarkable that O’Reilly is an intellectual leader in the conservative movement.

    The only people I know who liked O’Reilly are political morons. He’s a blowhard with nothing worthwhile to offer.

  123. @Buzz Mohawk

    BTW, yes, I know I misspelled New Canaan. That’s funny, because it’s right down the road and, um, I know people there. I make spelling errors and typos; I must not have “an intellect capable of seeing the whole picture.”

  124. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    What odds will you offer that Rand Paul is re-elected?

    Since you give me the impression that you think AIPAC and assorted organisations afs all powerful, I think it’d be fair if you gave me 100 to 1 against.

    Still, I’m a sporting man so I’ll happily take evens as a bet between equals. Sound fair?

    • Replies: @ATBOTL
    , @Mr. Anon
  125. @Anonymous

    Googling Nick Hanauer, I see that he has spoken and written about how the American people are on the verge of coming after billionaires like himself with “pitchforks” due to income inequality. But I think he fears AR-15s more than pitchforks, as he’s a huge supporter of gun control.

    My inference: Hanauer feels that if we can’t achieve income equality, at least disarm the damned rabble.

  126. Flip says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Yeah, Latin America seems to be the future. Mixed race population with a white (and Asian) elite. Weak currencies and low rule of law.

    Mexicans and Asians don’t seem to be nearly as hostile to American whites as blacks do.

  127. OT, but iSteve material:

    Holocaust scholar at Teachers College, Columbia University finds swastikas spray-painted on her office wall

    https://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/nyc-crime/ny-metro-teacher-college-professor-office-wall-defaced-swastikas-20181128-story.html

    QUOTES:

    Elizabeth Midlarsky said she first saw the hate symbols, which included the word “YID” scrawled on a wall outside her office, when she arrived at work at the Ivy League campus at about 1 p.m.

    Midlarsky’s been targeted by anti-Jewish hate crime before. In October 2007, a vandal spray-painted a swastika on her office door, and wrote her name and crossed it out — a crime she said made her blood boil.

    END QUOTES

    There’s also an article at WaPo, with lots of commenters saying Trump is to blame somehow.

    So who might have done this? The word “YID” seems like a good clue. What sort of person in New York City would even think of using that word ?

    And something very similar happened to Elizabeth Midlarsky 11 years ago. Hmmm.

  128. Pat Boyle says:
    @Tiny Duck

    Is that Tiny Duck? The guy with the glasses and the pointy hair?

    If so he’s a piece of work. “In the California in the sixties the Black Panthers resisted police violence in Oakland”. You might rephrase that as – in the nineteen sixties in the Bay Area the Black Panther engaged in mass murder of white people. These were called the Zebra Murders.

    Denying guns to black people is a fine idea. It would save a lot of black lives.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  129. @L Woods

    The Federal government backed off when confronted by Civilian Militia at the 2014 Bundy ranch standoff.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/08/us/bundy-ranch-standoff-case-charges-dismissed.html

  130. @carol

    The bow tie was definitely holding him back. It used to be a thing among conservative doofuses.

  131. @Anonymous

    Doesn’t your computer have Google? Why does your every comment involve asking someone to explain something to you?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  132. AndrewR says:
    @istevefan

    The state can always revise the criteria and change scores at will in order to keep too many people from having nothing to lose.

  133. Why do we tax capital at half the rate of labor?

    Corporate and capital gains taxes here are not that much different from Europe and the rest of the Anglosphere, and sometimes higher.

    Someone needs to protect workers from the terrifying power of market forces, which tend to accelerate change to intolerable levels and crush the weak.

    I’d rather have the Church do this than the state. You say, the Church doesn’t have the guns. I’d say that’s a feature, not a bug. They can’t be turned on us, either.

    …the famous 1971 “crying Indian” TV commercial persuaded Americans to be ashamed of littering.

    The “Dont Mess With Texas” campaign did the same with more honesty, no condescension, and better and quicker results.

    Carlson is struck by how many 20th-century progressive shibboleths have been forgotten as the long march through the institutions has triumphed:

    Forgotten, or never really believed in the first place? The one progressive constant is lust for power. Only the means change. And the ends justify them.

    When the traditional scapegoat becomes insufficient, various factions will turn on one another.

    Chaos will ensue.

    Time to start hoarding popcorn.

  134. snorlax says:
    @International Jew

    Even from the host’s substantial bully pulpit, debating people on TV is much harder than it looks. Tucker acquits himself very well compared to just about anyone else with a talk show, who tend to debate people much less often than he does, and then to rely on methods like putting them in a “panel” of 3 conservatives and 1 liberal or vice-versa, and/or yelling over them then cutting to commercial. Tucker does those things too, but much less often.

    And yes, obviously he (like every talk show host) has writers and this isn’t a secret.

    Ann Coulter is an example of someone who really is smart enough to have written her books. … Just watch them.

    Have you seen Ann Coulter on TV? It’s cringe-inducing. She makes Bill O’Reilly look like Disraeli. Watch her strike out on Lou Dobbs’ t-balls:

    Compare to Tucker laying the smackdown on Michael Avenatti, who, for whatever else you can say about him, is an extremely quick-witted and verbally facile adversary:

  135. Herald says:
    @Anonymous

    The reply of “citation” is irritating and a sign of laziness. Perhaps worse it often denotes a troll at work.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  136. @Pat Boyle

    Ann Coulter would disagree with you on the Panthers:

    Despite modern perceptions that blend all the black activists of the ’60s, the Black Panthers did not hate whites. Although some of their most high-profile leaders were drug dealers and murderers, they did not seek armed revolution.

    Those were the precepts of Karenga’s United Slaves.

    http://www.anncoulter.com/columns/2017-12-27.html

    The Panthers’ march through the Capitol in Sacramento was wholly within the limits of the law at the time. We need someone as crafty as Huey on our side. James O’Keefe is good, but hardly enough.

  137. anonymous[443] • Disclaimer says:

    Texas and California are current examples of white minority societies in the process of the next generation becoming whitish majority societies without the 3 things you cite and yet holding together before the return to majority hegemony.

  138. donut says:
    @songbird

    Maybe it’s for laughs . I sometimes watch a few minutes of TYTs for that reason .

    • Replies: @songbird
  139. J.Ross says: • Website

    With all the lying press blaring about Russian hackers and every Trump tweet there’s an enormous amount of legitimate news that is not being discussed. Chief among these themes and items, and causative for the Trumpening, is what I have been calling the Crisis of Authority.
    To be careful, this is not griping about inevitable processes. Everybody who burdens himself with some degree of expertise finds himself in the position of Richard Dreyfuss’s character in Jaws when he tries to warn fishermen about boat capacity. Hooper is vindicated if they sink or lose a mate — the film doesn’t follow them, but the issue doesn’t appear to be terribly controversial, and the audience laughs because really Hooper is already obviously right. A rocket exploding on its launchpad doesn’t invalidate physics. However, as more people get sick and today die as a result of medically unjustifiable flu vaccines from a totally out of control pharmaceutical industry, as judges rewrite their own powers and dismiss criticism with incoherent nonsense about ideals, we are very far from a credulity legitimated by uneven knowledge.
    There are no sinking boats vindicating our current crop of experts. They are not only wrong, they are not only consistently wrong, they are not only obviously wrong, but they are guaranteed to stay wrong. People aren’t corrected by intellect. They’re corrected by injury. We are the beautiful ones dancing at the end of time and there are no injuries. The people who warned us that Saddam Hussein would nuke us think that they were right and there exists nothing but impotent rage to suggest otherwise. The people who devoted their lives to studying US politics and still concluded that Hillary Clinton was an intelligent choice for a national candidate think that they were right, blame their failure on an incoherent story that isn’t even a conspiracy theory, and talk about rerunning Hillary.
    Authors like Tucker Carlson and Nassim Taleb who recognize what time we are living in are guaranteed the moral pleasure of selling books that deserve to have been published and read.

  140. Why do we tax capital at half the rate of labor?

    If he’s asking why the corporate tax rate is lower than the top personal rate, that’s because corporate profits are already taxed once — as the personal income of the shareholders who receive those profits as dividends.

    If he’s asking why long-term capital gains are taxed more lightly than short-term capital gains, that reflects the politically popular (if economically ignorant) opinion that investing is good but “speculation” is bad.

  141. @JohnnyWalker123

    You’re describing the New Jerseyfication of the land. New Jersey has always been diverse, and it shows as a checkerboard of white paradise pockets, white ethnic pockets, minority pockets, oil refineries, and pine barrens. With little coherence.

    Gerry Goffin nailed the middle class Jersey life, and here’s his composer/bride ‘splainin’ it for ya:

    • Replies: @Buck
  142. @anonymous

    Texas and California are current examples of white minority societies in the process of the next generation becoming whitish majority societies without the 3 things you cite and yet holding together before the return to majority hegemony.

    In the meantime, who fills the School Book Depository?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @kaganovitch
  143. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Harry Baldwin

    Since 234 is defying board culture and has no comment archive, I cannot prove or disprove this, but I’m pretty sure this one is an established troll. Demanding proof that the sun exists (to which you can alway reply with further proof demands) is a CTR bird-dogging meant to frustrate your opponent while making yourself look principled. Think twice before replying to an Anonymous commenter on a board that asks commenters to set a name.

    • Agree: William Badwhite
  144. @L Woods

    Guns are a ridiculous red herring born of empty bluster and machismo.

    They let you know who really trusts you.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  145. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Reg Cæsar

    Who associates Texas or California with “holding together”?

  146. OT – It’s reported that one Samuel Little, currently inside for 3 murders of women, is confessing to 90 killings. As is well known, all serial killers are white.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-46384197

  147. J.Ross says: • Website

    Thank you Muslims for making us a violent tribalist society like the ones you people come from!

    A Syrian invader in the UK was involved with a violent gang attack against a young girl, who had her face smashed with a hockey stick (as well as being bitten by the “bully victim refugee”) and now has to be homeschooled due to her fear.

    Naturally, the fake news media is framing this as a racist attack by the young white hero who was standing up for an attacked white woman.

    The young man has received thousands of death threads from [Muslims] on his faceberg page and has been forced to write a letter of apology to the “victim” (aggressor) he bullied.

    How did he bully the child? He pushed him over and poured water on his head.

    http://archive.is/kD9Rn

    https://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/news/3556346/bob-malcolm-rangers-syrian-schoolboy-refugee-bullied-deserved/

    http://archive.is/KIG8I

    https://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/news/3556626/tommy-robinson-defends-bully-who-waterboarded-syrian-refugee-and-blames-the-victim/

    A lot of this stuff could be handled, without any identity stuff, if we could get the mass newsmedia to comprehend that sometimes people lie, especially to get out of trouble.

  148. snorlax says:
    @IHTG

    You’re (like I did for several years) confusing him with Jonathan Haidt.

    Haidt is the Heterodox Academy guy, Chait is a weasel who spins preposterous conspiracy theories in various rags about how The Donald became a deep-cover KGB asset in 1987.

    • Agree: Tyrion 2
    • Replies: @Henry's Cat
    , @IHTG
  149. Tyrion 2 says:
    @SunBakedSuburb

    I wouldn’t give US aid to any country. Least of all the hundreds of billions to Iraq and Afghanistan. Or the billions to other countries where Americans aren’t even safe on the streets…

    Anyway, I wonder what the US is buying from Israel for that military money? Whatever it is, I highly doubt it is worth it and would obviously stop it.

  150. Tucker Carlson’s show is literally only half as good as it could be. Even though he is able to ask good questions, he can really only ask people who are either in the center or left of the political spectrum and there are bright red areas he cannot go.

    In a non PC world he could just tap people on the alt-right to come on his show and talk openly with them about whatever the topics of the day are rather then hinting around them like now. What he has to do is invite someone from the left and then try and cross examine them in the hopes that they will accidentally blurt out the truth. This means there are a large number of guests that will either filibuster or simply stick to talking points leading to some pretty funny but non-enlightening exchanges.

  151. Buck says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Was Carol Klein’s dad not able to join a New Jersey golf club or something? That’s quite a grudge she holds against upper-middle-class huwytes.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  152. Also OT – did Steve see this from 2017? Dalton Conley again. Heresy, in Scientific American!

    I guess years of reading New Scientist has made me surprised to see science in a science journal.

    https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/whats-your-polygenic-score/

    “Back in the 1970s, nurture ruled the intellectual world and sex, not just gender, was thought to be entirely socially constructed. Oh, to be back in an era when everything was so malleable. Just imagine the possibilities of how we could mold our children (and society). As recently as 2000, the year the Human Genome Project draft sequence was completed, the late Harvard biologist Stephen J. Gould wrote, “There’s been no biological change in humans in 40,000 or 50,000 years. Everything we call culture and civilization we’ve built with the same body and brain

    Today, however, we now know that much of human behavior and social life is genetically influenced and not entirely programmable by social inputs. Further, we now know that natural selection has continued apace and perhaps even sped up over the last 10,000 years since we settled down as farmers. Counterintuitively, this does not mean we have no influence on the future of the human race. Rather, now that we have mapped the genetic architecture behind a wide range of outcomes—from height to cognitive ability—a brave new world has opened up whereby we can select our mates, and, yes, even our children, by and for their genotypes.

    Heritability—the proportion of variation in a trait within a population that is explained by genetic differences—ranges from about one-third for religiousness to about three-quarters for IQ, with personality, education level and even income falling somewhere in the middle. Genetic influence on human behavior is so pervasive that it has led the psychologist Eric Turkheimer to coin the “first law of behavior genetics”: All human behavioral traits are heritable. (His second law goes further in arguing that: The effect of being raised in the same family is smaller than the effect of genes.)”

  153. Bill P says:
    @Almost Missouri

    The Pitchforks Are Coming

    The most ironic thing about rising inequality is how completely unnecessary and self-defeating it is. If we do something about it, if we adjust our policies in the way that, say, Franklin D. Roosevelt did during the Great Depression—so that we help the 99 percent and preempt the revolutionaries and crazies, the ones with the pitchforks—that will be the best thing possible for us rich folks, too. It’s not just that we’ll escape with our lives; it’s that we’ll most certainly get even richer.

    By “pitchforks” he means more modern weapons, of course, and he just helped pass the most stringent law against semi-automatic rifles in the United States. Now if I want to buy my kid a Ruger 10/22 I’ve got to jump through European-style hoops because elites like Hanauer are scared people might come after them for what they’ve done.

  154. @Herald

    The reply of “citation” is irritating and a sign of laziness. Perhaps worse it often denotes a troll at work.

    Who can only afford to drive a 40-year-old Chevy.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GANcs2sxcH8&feature=youtu.be

    • Replies: @snorlax
  155. @snorlax

    I think we can forgive Tucker his youthful libertarianism. It’s not a crazy position for someone of his rarefied cultural milieu.

  156. Vendetta says:
    @exiled off mainstreet

    #MeToo allowing Tucker to take over the prime spot at Fox News by clearing out O’Reilly is the biggest win the Right has had since Trump we elected.

  157. Northeast says:

    Tucker is alt-right with the rare skill & ability to distance himself with a tincure of plausible deniability. That’s why the political left despises him. They sense he’s getting away with this on a legit platform like Fox News.

  158. @ThreeCranes

    Bill Maher is more of a snarky polemicist than a deep thinker, but he often offers good insight into different issues.

    Here’s Bill Maher criticizing the PC police.

    Even as a conservative, you can’t tell me that Maher is all bad.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  159. @Anonymous

    Walk into a federal building and a huge percentage of the low level workers will be black, and they earn a decent amount. Regarding higher level positions, you’ll see an inordinate number of blacks, though not as high as the lower levels. Don’t know if there’s an official AA program, but on the ground, there’s just a lot of blacks at the various agencies.

    You know something’s off when you go to any private company office in the area, where blacks are few and far between.

    The military impact is pretty high too. There are a lot of blacks who go in the military and, of course, rise very quickly.

  160. @Nathan

    can you elaborate on the problems with Hawaii?

    • Replies: @Nathan
  161. @celt darnell

    Bill O’Reilly paid out $32 million to 5 different women. A lot to pay out for an innocent man.

    Nobody normally cares what the rapper has to say, but in this case the rapper comes out looking like the better man. Which is not a good look for a “culture warrior” like O’Reilly.

  162. @Arclight

    I can remember ages ago hearing old liberal Mark Shields say “The Republicans don’t care how you live, and the Democrats don’t care how you think.” His point was that Republicans cater to the rich over the working class, and the Democrats disdain the moral values of the people they supposedly champion. I think at the time he also said if the Democrats dropped gun control they’d be the majority party forever.

    Trump blasted a hole the Republicans could drive the proverbial truck through. It’s too bad the Republicans are mostly stupid cowards.

  163. dr kill says:

    I would only add that it might be better to look out the window instead of watching the telly or reading Tucker Carlson. I cannot understand the fascination with political non-fiction.

  164. @JohnnyWalker123

    Seriously, stop projecting your fantasies onto JFK and RFK…They we’re INVADE THE WORD…INVITE THE WORLD TYPES…..And they both hated the Working Class Native Born White American Historic Majority…..

  165. In another life, with a lither build and shorter frame, Tucker would’ve starred in John Cusack-type movies. He really shows off his acting chops on the show. Most of the draw for me is Tucker’s emoting and expressions, not the content.

    O/T Life Expectancy Decline Worst in US since Great War https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/us-life-expectancy-declines-again-a-dismal-trend-not-seen-since-world-war-i/2018/11/28/ae58bc8c-f28c-11e8-bc79-68604ed88993_story.html?utm_term=.6bfec308b755

    “After three years of stagnation and decline, what do we do now?” asked S.V. Subramanian, a professor of population health and geography at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health. “Do we say this is the new normal? Or can we say this is a tractable problem?”

    Maybe US life expectancy is converging with the life expectancy in places where Subramanians and Chans are from. Maybe the white death, attributed to overdoses and suicides, is in part occuring because more and more Subramanians are providing care for older Americans, and they don’t much care if Meemaw makes it to 80.

  166. @Mr. Anon

    I think the basic problem was that after Roger Ailes was kicked out of the network, there was no one left to protect O’Reilly. Murdoch’s sons (the family are a clan of power-hungry wheeler-dealers) never particularly liked him, so they pushed him out when they got the chance.

  167. @Mr. Anon

    A lot of whites have found California to have become inhospitable and have therefore left. Mostly for economic reasons, I gather, but a lot of those are the direct result of the foreign influx.

    It’s true to say that immigrants (mostly due to driving overpopulation) are ruining the high standard of living in some parts of the country, but that’s not quite the same thing as saying they’re persecuting Whites.

    There’s a huge difference between turning into Singapore and turning into Detroit.

    Not that I’d want to live in Singapore, but at least it’s a functional country in which affluent people have a good standard of living.

    Moreover, there have been numerous cases recently of whites who have lost their jobs or been subjected to public ridicule for comments they have made, often simply truthful, about minority behavior, or actions they have taken based on experience. And then there is the newly minted crime of “calling 911 while white”. Those are forms of persecution

    Yes, but this is happening throughout the country. Even in overwhelmingly White places. Would you say that being a White in California, Hawaii, or Texas is a much worse deal than being a White in West Virginia, Kentucky, or Maine?

    • Replies: @3g4me
  168. @clyde

    I meant Michelle Obama and Bill O’Reilly.

    Not Tucker.

    • Replies: @Clyde
  169. @Trevor H.

    Well there is an important ethnic difference between South Africa and California.

  170. @JohnnyWalker123

    Especially after Reagan fired the air traffic controllers, all hell broke loose.

    Reagan did not fire the air-traffic controllers. They fired themselves, per the laws on the books when he took office. You’re complaining because he didn’t use his discretion to break the laws Congress gave him.

    I’m guessing that of every aspect of government, Reagan was most familiar with labor law, have been the longest-serving president of the Screen Actors Guild to this day.

    What other union allows employers to force their members to work naked? That sure wasn’t the case back in Ronnie’s day!

    • Replies: @snorlax
  171. @Buck

    That’s quite a grudge she holds against upper-middle-class huwytes.

    She was one of them.

  172. Tyrion 2 says:
    @David

    It isn’t largely Jewish and questioning military aid to Israel doesn’t make all of the Jews in it furious though.

    Stop fantasising.

    • Replies: @David
  173. ATBOTL says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Great post. O’Reilly encapsulates everything wrong with the boomer style of conservatism. Let’s remember that Bill was a cuck on immigration too.

  174. Tyrion 2 says:
    @LondonBob

    Twice you’ve fantasised. That the Republican defended attacking Syria “because Israel”, and that JFK was assassinated for criticising Israel – a theory born out of the fevered wishes of a bunch of loons.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @ATBOTL
    , @Mr. Anon
  175. @JohnnyWalker123

    It’s remarkable that O’Reilly is an intellectual leader in the conservative movement.

    He is? That’s news to us.

    All his books are co-written, taking after James Patterson’s 21st-century œuvre. It’s no surprise that he finally wrote one with Patterson.

    I wonder what they discussed about Patterson’s other co-author, Bill Clinton. Who could have taken their advice on certain occasions:

  176. ATBOTL says:
    @Tyrion 2

    That’s a pathetic straw man argument you set up there.

    How powerful do you think AIPAC is?

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  177. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Pericles

    Yes, you are as dumb as the “muh Russia” lot. Except you’re actually worse as you are as dumb as them but about a country America has long-standing good relations with and is not a competitor.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  178. @Tyrion 2

    Twice you’ve fantasised. That the Republican defended attacking Syria “because Israel”, and that JFK was assassinated for criticising Israel – a theory born out of the fevered wishes of a bunch of loons.

    RFK was assassinated for supporting Israel.

    He was thanked with the name of a cheesy cookie-cutter stadium that hosted a racially insensitive professional sports organization, and is so bad that even MLS has abandoned it.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  179. @Achmed E. Newman

    I don’t think Reagan was down with the Deep State, though, until, (let’s not forget) he was almost JFK’d too, only a couple of months into his presidency. That was probably a warning, and though it was a .22 shot, it was not the normal 22 LR, but explosive “Devastator” rounds. By the time Reagan was done with surgery, he’d lost 1/2 of his blood volume, and though it went well, he had a fever that kept him in the hospital for 2 weeks. I still have lots of respect for Ronald Reagan, the man and the President, but those shots in 1981 may have been a warning that he heeded.

    That’s a good point.

    Here’s an interesting piece of information.

    John Hinckley’s father was a close friend of HW Bush and a major donor. Hinckley’s brother had dinner scheduled with Neil Bush (son of HW Bush) on the day after the assassination.

    Imagine I’m your VP (and next in line to take your job). You end up shot by the son of my friend. On the next day, my son has plans to meet with the brother of the assassin.

    Wouldn’t you be a little suspicious?

    My guess is that HW Bush (who was the former CIA director) took care of all the details behind when the Iranian-held hostages would be released. He figured after Carter was out of the way, he needed to somehow oust Reagan.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  180. Re: Tucker’s former libertarianism
    The problem isn’t that Ron Paul’s libertarianism won. It didn’t. The Koch Brothers’ mercantilist scam, promoted as a pro-freedom philosophy, was the one that won the day. Notice how the gains in freedom, like the gains in income, went only to the upper classes.

  181. Tyrion 2 says:
    @ATBOTL

    Just about powerful enough to get the US President to move the US embassy to Israel’s de facto capital, as it is in every single other country, but after waiting 38 years…

    And even then it wasn’t really to do with AIPAC but a mixture between Trump’s common sense approach and his mutual sympathy with Netanyahu.

    • Replies: @ATBOTL
  182. Anon[285] • Disclaimer says:

    Although the book has nearly 1,000 reviews on Amazon it has obtained the elusive 5-star rating. Almost any book with that many reviews maxes out at 4-1/2 stars, especially a political book. How is this possible? You don’t have to read or buy the book to log in and dump on it in a 1-star review. Maybe the left doesn’t know it exists because the media is boycotting any mention of Merion Kampf-skye hate books?

  183. c matt says:
    @anon

    At least she is relatively attractive.

  184. jb says:

    Just FYI, in case you missed it, the Times has done it again: How Twitter’s Ban on ‘Deadnaming’ Promotes Free Speech.

  185. Andrew says:

    Have you done any book reviews of Reihan Salaam’s immigration book or Jonah Goldberg’s latest, with the stolen James Burnham title? Just always appreciate the real right doing reviews of the phony right’s books, since they always love responding to all the critical reviews…to their left. And then ignore reviews by people like you and Paul Gottfried who they always childishly pretend don’t exist.

    Do plan to crack Tucker’s book.

  186. The central theme of Ship of Fools is that the convergence toward the reigning elite consensus of economic conservatism and social progressivism is better for the people at the top of society than for maintaining a stable middle-class democracy:

    @SteveSailer The part of the left that still cares about workers calls these folks Neo-Liberals with all the negative connotations that “neo” implies. I prefer to call them smoke screen liberals, they are true grifters, fool the masses by walking in a MLK parade, be seen glad handing the voters when a sidewalk crosswalk gets painted in rainbow colors in the LGBT section of the city. In the mean time, displace workers, the poor for new development opportunities and sell their souls to the Amazon’s of the world as rapidly as they can. Anyway “Ship of Fools” reminded me of this little ditty from the group World Party.

    Avarice and greed are gonna drive you over the endless sea
    They will leave you drifting in the shallows
    or drowning in the oceans of history
    Traveling the world, you’re in search of no good
    but I’m sure you’ll build your Sodom like you knew you would
    Using all the good people for your galley slaves
    as you’re little boat struggles through the warning waves, but you don’t pay
    You will pay tomorrow
    You’re gonna pay tomorrow
    You’re gonna pay tomorrow
    Save me. Save me from tomorrow
    I don’t want to sail with this ship of fools
    Save me. Save me from tomorrow
    I don’t want to sail with this ship of fools
    Where’s it comin’ from?
    Where’s it goin’ to now?
    It’s just a It’s just a ship of fools

  187. ATBOTL says:
    @Tyrion 2

    According to President Trump, we are in Syria because of Israel.

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/trump-says-us-troops-will-remain-in-middle-east-for-israels-sake/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

    “US President Donald Trump indicated in an interview published Wednesday that, although he could remove troops from the Middle East, citing cheaper oil as an explanation, one reason not to do so is concern for Israel’s security.

    “Now, are we going to stay in that part of the world? One reason to is Israel,” Trump told the Washington Post.

    “Oil is becoming less and less of a reason because we’re producing more oil now than we’ve ever produced,” he added, appearing to envision a world where the US would be less beholden to Saudi Arabia. “So, you know, all of a sudden it gets to a point where you don’t have to stay there.”

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    , @Charles Pewitt
  188. @Achmed E. Newman

    She may sound ditzy, but that’s the problem with getting lots of your news off the TV – they can pick and choose the bad parts.

    Here’s the thing.

    Governor Sarah Palin resigned her job. After resigning her job, she starred on this reality TV show.

    What type of person resigns a governorship to do reality tv?

    When she was criticized for this, she noted that Reagan was an actor who starred in “Bedtime for Bonzo.” Except what she didn’t note is that Reagan didn’t resign his California governorship to go act.

    If Sarah Palin had stayed Governor, she could’ve refined her knowledge and speaking abilities. Given her popularity with the base, she could’ve run as a reform-minded “adult” conservative in 2012. She could’ve used Alaska as an example of what she would do for America.

    Her quitting sort of confirmed everything everyone thought about her.

    Don’t get all your opinions off of TV – they can make things look a whole lot different than reality.

    Katie Couric asked what newspapers and magazines that Palin read in order to stay informed. She couldn’t name a single publication.

    How is one supposed to know anything if one doesn’t read? Intellectual osmosis?

    Can you think of any examples of Sarah Palin coherently issuing an interesting critique of social, economic, or foreign policy?

    After getting out of politics, has Palin even tried to get back in? She seems mostly interested in doing tv shows and being a political commentator. I’d guess it’s because she finds the world of politics to be boring and lots of dreary, hard work.

  189. @anon

    What happens when Cortez or Kamala Harris takes power and rams through diversity quotas for Silicon Valley…?

    They’ll deserve it good and goddam hard.

    Really, California should do that. It’ll send the tech industry to friendlier states like Utah, Idaho, Texas, etc. We need a second Silicon Valley a lot more than a second Hollywood, which a number of states are trying to build.

  190. ATBOTL says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Is there anything different about Israel’s capital that might explain the discrepancy?

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  191. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @njguy73

    It probably had an impact on Tucker, not in terms of politics per se but in prompting him to try to rise above his genre, as Stewart did, in a different way. I think Stewart came to realize that the genre he’d created was bad, too, and his response to it was to quit (that may have been motivated partly by the ascendance of the populist left, as Steve notes).

    In Tucker’s case, he transcended it by no longer being a WASP proto-Ben Shapiro, and, instead, thinking critically and letting his views flow from that.

  192. Nathan says:
    @Houston 1992

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kill_Haole_Day

    I trust your Wikipedia goggles work and that you can read past the spin. Hawaii is full of this sort of thing.

  193. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I don’t particularly agree (surprise, surprise) with your view of who Libertarians are, Steve. You, and most commenter on here, associate them all with pro-Big-Biz types.

    They may not be explicitly pro-Big Business, but the results of laissez faire over the last 20 years or so have been a huge consolidation of American industries into oligopolies. Steve was early in writing about how antitrust has basically been in abeyance but now Matt Stoller and even David Leondhardt at the NYT are taking it up:

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  194. anon[166] • Disclaimer says:
    @JLK

    > there’s nothing in his academic background or Coulter’s for that matter that suggests an intellect capable of seeing the whole picture.

    What parts of the picture are they missing?

    • Replies: @JLK
  195. @JohnnyWalker123

    Shortly after 9/11, he said on his late-night ABC show that America was “cowardly” because it merely lobbed cruise missiles at its enemies, while the terrorists at least had the balls to die for their cause:

    (Within months, American soldiers were dying for the neocon cause in Iraq and Afghanistan.)

    Unlike Roseanne, he wasn’t immediately fired and publicly crucified. But advertisers started boycotting his show and ABC pulled the plug a few months later.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  196. @Achmed E. Newman

    I did vote for McCain/Palin in 2008, and only because she was on the ticket. I saw her as an Idaho/Alaska native with western values. And nicer to look at than any other contestant.

  197. Tyrion 2 says:
    @ATBOTL

    Not when compared to many of the coubtries in the world. Nevermind that half of Jerusalem is built on UN mandated to Israel land.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    , @Colin Wright
  198. Tyrion 2 says:
    @ATBOTL

    When a politician says “one reason” they usually mean not the reason and certainly mean “one among many”. Thanks for reinforcing my point.

    “One reason” we can’t stop illegal immigration is because the crops will rot in the fields.

  199. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    x-mas or no x-mas, anyone who watches Dr. Goo needs to have his head examined.

  200. “But rapid demographic change makes this unsustainable. When the traditional scapegoat becomes insufficient, various factions will turn on one another.” (https://takimag.com/article/tuckers-treatise/print#ixzz5YIOtB6sg)

    Tucker’s being his overly-optimistic self here. He’s got it backwards.

    White Americans have it easy with minorities now. When whites are reduced to a mere plurality in America, that’s when the minority-majority will start squeezing the white turnips bigly.

  201. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    No, everyone knows that his support for Israel was really just a ploy while he secretly hunted down his brother’s killers – Israel.

    The actual assassin was a Jewish Hollywood actor who first starred as an extra in a couple of 70s Blaxploitation flicks in minstrel face, before taking on his introductory international spy role as Ayatollah Khomeini.

    Later, he was a one time stand-in for Baghdadi and occasionally appeared as “fat” Bin Laden.

    Also, the RFK stadium was not the only venue named after Bobby, but so too was the mediocre London-based chain of Fish and Chip shops called “Kennedys”.

    The point being to associate RFK’s and JFK’s surname with a potentially Jewish-created dish that fits into Britain’s cultural heritage so as to distract attention from all of the above.

    Fortunately, I, an internet sleuth know this. It must be true because I am really smart and special and all the people who laugh at me are actually Hasbara and therefore wrong…or…actually Hasbara are all the people who laugh at me so Hasbara or wrong. This makes me right. It is a nice logical circle…see?

  202. Tyrion 2 says:
    @DFH

    I stopped reading after you got the leader of Stalinist Poland wrong.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bolesław_Bierut

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    , @DFH
  203. @Nathan

    I believe there is some tension between “natives” of Hawaii and haoles.

    “In Hawaii’s “Rainbow” ethnic melange of peoples, “Haole” is the slang word used to describe Caucasians, and by itself is not a racial slur and has no pejorative connotations. Many visitors are haole, and may be targeted by criminals, but this is because they are vulnerable tourists, not because they are haole. Rumors that in Hawaii the last day of school is called “Kill Haole Day” is nothing but a rumor. According to this rumor, on this day, “local” (nonwhite) children beat up, bully, and harass the “haole” or “white” children in their school. Some residents say there is little to no evidence or documentation of incidents involving “Kill Haole Day” or of Caucasian students being assaulted on specific days. Other residents dispute this. Hawaii schools have responded by saying that they take the initiative to achieve tolerance, safety, compassion, and acceptance for all students.[10]

    The word “Haole” is used as a racial slur or insult in incidents of harassment and physical assaults by Native Hawaiians and members of other “minority” (nonwhite) groups on white people in Hawaii—tourists as well as residents and military personnel.”

    Wiki

    • Replies: @Nathan
  204. @anon

    Everyone should spend some time in the Big Easy, if only to experience what armed robbery feels like. The joy of living in a predominately black metropolis.

  205. ATBOTL says:

    What are the other countries whose “capitals” are on legally disputed land?

    You false implied that the lack of embassies in Jerusalem was due to some kind of double standard against Israel.

  206. @Reg Cæsar

    In the meantime, who fills the School Book Depository?

    How long have you been on unz? The Mossad of course.

  207. Anonymous[287] • Disclaimer says:
    @AndrewR

    You’re wrong, Non-Hispanic Whites are not a plurality in California and are not even close to a plurality in Hawaii, and are just barely a plurality in Texas.

  208. J.Ross says: • Website
    @JohnnyWalker123

    It’s remarkable that O’Reilly is an intellectual leader in the conservative movement.

    Well, you know what intellectual leaders say. Tide goes in, tide goes out. You can’t explain that.

  209. Lagertha says:
    @ThreeCranes

    Exactly, and so depressing. When I finally realized this, I could never listen, politely, to people who declare themselves Progressive…or Republican ( I have lost a lot of friends). All of these people do not want to listen to other people’s ideas…they simply don’t.

    It is truly hard to open the eyes of the Millennials, but I take every chance I am given. Teaching them that the Central Banks, actually, lord over the world…except Russia and China, is hard because these young people have been so indoctrinated with Cultural Marxism ideas in public school (now, boarding school, , btw; Soros (Alumnus) gave millions to a prestigious private school in my region).

    Ergo, the media are sent in as the first agitators to bring regime change and probably, war. I hope Trump does not fall for the phony Ukrainian Nazis wanting to take back Dumbass…I mean, Donbass :) by coercing the USA to intervene: Stay out of it. Russians and Ukrainians have been fighting for centuries – do not get involved for God’s sake! Take it from a Finn: stay away from Russia and its Eastern neighbors.

  210. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    What odds will you offer that Rand Paul is re-elected?

    I have no idea what the possibility of his reelection is. What I am saying is that the probability of funding by AIPAC or any allied group or person directed to someone challenging him is pretty high.

    Since you give me the impression that you think AIPAC and assorted organisations afs all powerful, I think it’d be fair if you gave me 100 to 1 against.

    I’m not responsible for your impressions. You are, and I really don’t care how you arrive at them. I never said AIPAC is all powerful. I never implied it. They are however quite powerful. Do you deny that they are powerful at all? Does virtually every “serious” candidate for President (and quite a few for Senate) address their conventions because they lack power?

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  211. @Reg Cæsar

    My sister prevented her own rape and perhaps even worse, by brandishing a handgun. Must be more of that macho bluster you’re talking about. Those gun nuts.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  212. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    I stopped reading after you got the leader of Stalinist Poland wrong.

    That’s funny; I typically stop reading your posts after “Tyrion 2 says:”.

  213. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Twice you’ve fantasised. That the Republican defended attacking Syria “because Israel”, and that JFK was assassinated for criticising Israel – a theory born out of the fevered wishes of a bunch of loons.

    What makes you an authority on American politics? You are, ostensibly, a citizen of the UK. We live here, nitwit. We have eyes and can see. Seeing a Republican Congressman slavering over our bestest little buddy of a country is a not uncommon sight. Sometimes it is painfully, embarrassingly obvious. There is no compelling reason for us to give a damn about who governs Syria one way or the other, so – yes – what a great deal of our involvement there is driven by what is in Israel’s interest.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  214. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Not when compared to many of the coubtries in the world.

    Which ones? How many?

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  215. @RadicalCenter

    Should be directed not at you but the person to whom you were responding. Thanks.

  216. Jack D says:
    @DFH

    Most of the Jews were purged around the time of the Secret Speech in 1956, so by the time of the 1967 pogrom they were long gone from the levers of power. Communism was supposed to be free from race and religious prejudice, so why shouldn’t Poles of Jewish descent have been involved in it along with Poles of Christian descent? Weren’t such distinctions supposed to disappear and become irrelevant under Communism? If 37% of secret police directors were Jewish (not that you are counting – oh wait, you are) then 63% weren’t.

    In pre-war Poland, Jews (who were not religious and who were interested in politics) were disproportionately drawn to leftist causes because all of the right wing parties were explicitly anti-Semitic.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  217. @JohnnyWalker123

    I will admit, Johnny, that I didn’t know about this move that she made from Governor to Reality show star…. women …?

    Can you think of any examples of Sarah Palin coherently issuing an interesting critique of social, economic, or foreign policy?

    I was already pretty much off TV by that 2008 election or before. I just read what she stood for, and was pretty pleased with it. An executive, even of a small-pop state like Alaska is still going to have the ability to delegate the work based on his principles (OK “her”, in this case).

    I’d guess it’s because she finds the world of politics to be boring and lots of dreary, hard work.

    Maybe she doesn’t quite have the thick enough skin to be treated as a (purported or real) conservative is nowadays. The press was all over her. Trump’s got his way with them, but for someone, let’s say, just a bit more sensitive, it probably just got to be too much. Then she had Juan McAmnesty disparage her too, when, as I said, she was the only reason I’d even though of voting for that “maverick” piece of neocon crap!

  218. Dan Hayes says:
    @TTSSYF

    TTSSYF:

    Good point. But these gladiatorial events ensure much higher ratings than cerebral discussions about some political science finer points.

  219. @L Woods

    I’ve thought that occasionally, Mr. Woods, but you’ve gotta to realize that most conservatives don’t want a war, if they can at all help it. They have lots more to lose than the ctrl-left does. It seems its always been this way. However, they’ve been doing a pretty good job defending this right, for when the time comes.

    The low in gun control mania was from 1968, after those political assassinations, through probably the late 1980′s when CC started spreading (from almost forbidden unless you know someone, to “shall issue” all the way to Constitutional Carry – no permit required) from state to state, and the public had turned away from the gun controller in fear. On this, I’m gonna put in an animated .gif under here. If it doesn’t work (very possible) go HERE.

  220. Nathan says:
    @ThreeCranes

    It’s caucasians, and pretty much anybody not sufficiently ethnically Hawaiian. As you might expect from a Wikipedia article that spends the majority of its length arguing that the subject of the wiki isn’t much of a problem, the problem is severe and prevalent.

  221. snorlax says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    allows employers to force their members to work naked?

    Harvey Weinstein and Louis C.K. should’ve used that as their defense.

  222. JLK says:
    @anon

    What parts of the picture are they missing?

    Probably most of the more salient topics brought up on this site, plus a few others. Of course it is hard to tell the totality of their thoughts because they are very limited in what they can say on the air or write in a book without being sidelined.

    The bottom line is that they are media personalities, not original thinkers like a Charles Murray. If they say something new and interesting, it has probably been vetted ahead of time.

  223. @Jack D

    Jack, you are so good on so many topics, but here you do not seem to realize that you contradict yourself – and all in one post.

    You must think we are stupid. If someone says “you can keep your guns, but ammunition is forbidden” it is no different than saying “you can exercise your freedom of speech, as long as you speak where no one hears you.” The same dishonesty is in evidence when the Leftist try their other dishonest assertions. (Hillary got more votes than Trump) and so on.

    If someone says, “You can keep your guns, but the U.S. Gubbmint will murder your family your family if you do”, you will not conclude that your 2nd Amendment Rights have been preserved.

    If they ever try such a tactic there won’t be enough SWAT teams to prevent the collective raising of the Black Flag. And 1861-1865 will look positively irenic compared to the results of that boulder breaking free and rolling down the mountain.

    Leave Philly and visit us in flyover country. You can practice at the gun range. You can hunt with the salt of the earth. We will disabuse you of your mistaken notions.

  224. Ian M. says:
    @Stephen Paul Foster

    Yeah, Boot comes off as ridiculous with his overweening earnestness, but I don’t see how Carlson comes off much better: he’s just making snarky comments and laughing the whole time.

    I don’t really understand why people are so bully on Carlson’s ‘interviews’: the few clips I’ve seen (all courtesy of Sailer’s site, I think), are just Carlson constantly interrupting his guests, shouting over them, and making sarcastic comments. I find it remarkable that any lefty would ever agree to be on his show. Do they get money for it?

    I did see part of a speech Carlson gave once: that was much better.

  225. @anonymous

    Texas and California are current examples of white minority societies in the process of the next generation becoming whitish majority societies without the 3 things you cite and yet holding together before the return to majority hegemony.

    Let us see if this has a track record:

    Germany 1933-1941 is an example of a Germanic-majority society in the process of the next generation becoming a Judeophilic majority societiy without the 3 things you cite and yet holding together before the return to majority hegemony.

    After all, the holocaust didn’t begin until 1942. It can’t happen until it happens, right? And when it happens, you will say what? You didn’t want it to happen?

    Recall that everyone knows about the Algerian model Spanky. And your name is at the top of the list.

  226. 3g4me says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    @173 JohnnyWalker123: “Not that I’d want to live in Singapore, but at least it’s a functional country in which affluent people have a good standard of living.”

    You wouldn’t want to live in Singapore because the Han run Singapore and all the Indians there know their place – and know how they have to behave and vote to keep that second spot. Meanwhile, in Weimerica, you can pretend to be a heritage American and refer to “we” and “us” while your pajeet cultural prejudices shine through your comments for those with eyes to see.

    You are an opportunistic social and cultural parasite. Go home.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  227. @Buzz Mohawk

    I’m not suggesting even for a moment that producing a TV show is easy.

    I just wish Tucker would be more polite when he interviews people. Let them talk (for at least thirty seconds at a time) so we can learn something from them. Stop arguing with them.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  228. Interestingly, the BBC had a fit of integrity or something and gave this film only two stars.

    http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20181121-film-review-two-stars-for-green-book

  229. @Nathan

    ‘People are pretty ignorant about Hawaii. It’s not a place you want to live. Neither is California.’

    My wife and I lived on Hawaii for about a year and a half. It can get strange, but it’s got its points. In the end, we decided to move back to the mainland, but if somebody had ordered me to stay, I wouldn’t have minded much.

    • Replies: @Corn
  230. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Here you’re reasonable. Later you’ll be pretending that Israel killed JFK and managed to successfully cover it up because they controlled almost everything that mattered. Then, you’ll retreat again to a reasonable and innocuous point

    Motte to Bailey, Bailey to Motte, Motte to Bailey, Bailey to Motte…ad nauseam…it’s the K-Mac cult Calypso.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  231. @Tyrion 2

    ‘Yes, you are as dumb as the “muh Russia” lot. Except you’re actually worse as you are as dumb as them but about a country America has long-standing good relations with and is not a competitor.’

    This is a bit like claiming a human has good relations with his puppet master.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  232. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    The United States put an embassy in North Vietnam conquered “Ho Ch Minh” in 1995. They even had one in occupied East Berlin during the Cold War. Meanwhile, the one in Assad governed Damascus was eventually closed but only after a year of the Syrian civil war.

    Israel must run Washington to not quite reach the big leagues of those three.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  233. @Tyrion 2

    ‘Not when compared to many of the coubtries in the world. Nevermind that half of Jerusalem is built on UN mandated to Israel land.’

    ? The UN mandated that Jerusalem was to be a ‘free city’ on the lines of Tangiers or Danzig between the wars. Then, in ten years, the inhabitants would vote on whether to join the Jewish state or the Palestinian state. Israel pretended to accept this arrangement.

    Then she simply took half of the city in 1948 and the rest in 1967. The UN never mandated any of it to Israel. Your statement is false.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  234. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    There’s no compelling reason for Israel to want Assad overthrown either. It was a quiet border and whatever followed Assad would be worse.

    You can never bring yourself to have one standard for truth…

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  235. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Colin Wright

    If you were more knowledgeable or more thoughtful you’d have reckoned that perhaps Jerusalem has grown somewhat in the last 70 years…

    The municipal boundary now extends far, far West than did the municipal boundary under the British in 1947.

  236. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Colin Wright

    “A bit like” as in both claims have subjects, objects and verbs?

  237. DFH says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Berman was the one in fact closest to Stalin and with the most power in Poland. But don’t lie, you stopped reading because you’re a Jew.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  238. Tyrion 2 says:
    @DFH

    He wasn’t the leader as alleged. Now you’re saying “he was closest to Stalin”. You are astounding! Are you Stalin to vouch for such a thing?

    I guess facts don’t matter when DFH feels the Jew must be responsible.

    • Replies: @DFH
  239. David says:
    @David

    You’ve disagreed with two people here. One you’ve called a loopy old maid and another you’ve called a fantasist. Neither comment is at all connected to the comments you are answering. You are a frail mind that tries to rough-up anyone that puts forth an idea you don’t like. You bring noting to the table that anyone else could learn from.

  240. @ATBOTL

    The American Empire keeps troops in West Asia — Afghanistan — to advance the foreign policy interests of Israel by putting the squeeze on Iran.

    The American Empire’s ruling class is using the US military as muscle to advance the foreign policy interests of Israel.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  241. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Here you’re reasonable. Later you’ll be pretending that Israel killed JFK and managed to successfully cover it up because they controlled almost everything that mattered. Then, you’ll retreat again to a reasonable and innocuous point

    Here you’re deflecting things I actually said, and responding to things I never said.

    Motte to Bailey, Bailey to Motte, Motte to Bailey, Bailey to Motte…ad nauseam…it’s the K-Mac cult Calypso.

    Nobody knows what the Hell you’re always on about with Motte and Bailey. I fail to see what medieval castle architecture has to do with anything. And don’t bother explaining. I don’t care what you think it has to do with anything.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  242. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    The United States put an embassy in North Vietnam conquered “Ho Ch Minh” in 1995. They even had one in occupied East Berlin during the Cold War.

    North Vietnam won the war. We recognized the fact, as we certainly weren’t going to go back to war with them. In any event, moving the embassy there wasn’t one of Bill Clinton’s campaign promises, nor was it one of his first official actions as President, nor did he list it as one of the great accomplishments of his administration. And East Berlin was occupied by, you know, East Germans.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  243. Corn says:
    @Colin Wright

    My neighbors once vacationed in Hawaii. The wife liked it, the husband didn’t.

    He didn’t complain about anti-white racism, he complained about boredom. He said you need a boat or plane to visit the other islands in the state. You’re a 4 or 5 hour or more plane ride from home. He said after you’ve laid on the beach a couple days and drank a few drinks with umbrellas in them you just get bored in his opinion.

    An island version of cabin fever.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  244. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    There’s no compelling reason for Israel to want Assad overthrown either. It was a quiet border and whatever followed Assad would be worse.

    Really? You should tell the Israeli ambassador to the U.S. He didn’t get the memo.

    https://www.haaretz.com/ambassador-oren-israel-has-wanted-assad-ousted-since-syria-war-began-1.5336075

    I wouldn’t be surprised if there are any number of reasons why Israel would want the Assad regime gone, even if (or perhaps especially if) he is replaced by political vacuum and/or chaos.

    What was it a man once said? You can never bring yourself to have one standard for truth…

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  245. Mr. Anon says:

    He wasn’t the leader as alleged. Now you’re saying “he was closest to Stalin”.

    Being closest to Stalin is essentially “being the leader”. Who were the leaders in medieval Japan? The emperors or the shoguns?

    Your argumentation is all very hair-splitting in a rather deceitful way. I think there’s even a word for that.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  246. DFH says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Actually the New York Times says that he was, as well as wikipedia which calls him Stalin’s right hand man in Poland. The triumvirate of leaders were Bierut, Minc and Berman. So 2/3 were Jewish and, as I have already showed, more than a third of secret police directors (more at even higher levels) were Jewish, in a country where they made up less than 2% of the population.

    https://www.nytimes.com/1984/04/16/obituaries/jakub-berman-a-polish-ex-aide.html

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  247. Tyrion 2 says:
    @DFH

    Fair enough, though I note you were happy to go with them on that point and him reporting to Beria and Stalin but not their addition that he was “one of the few Jews in the Polish leadership”…

    …which directly contradicts your actual argument that the Polish Communist leadership was Jewish.

    • Replies: @DFH
  248. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    And East Berlin was occupied by, you know, East Germans.

    Other than Jerusalem being occupied by Jews, I’m suprised that you think the GDPR was a free German nation.

    North Vietnam won the war. We recognized the fact, as we certainly weren’t going to go back to war with them

    I’m pretty sure Israel won the Six Day war.

    In any event, moving the embassy there wasn’t one of Bill Clinton’s campaign promises, nor was it one of his first official actions as President, nor did he list it as one of the great accomplishments of his administration.

    Clinton did it as soon as diplomatic relations were reestablished. The American Presidents took decades in the case of Israel. No wonder Trump boasted of doing what his predecessors were too scared to do. And it wasn’t the Israeli lobby they were scared of…

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  249. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    By your standard of proof America had tons of reasons for intervening in Syria other than Israeli interests. American politicians were constantly listing them.

    Thanks for completing my argument for me.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  250. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Nice example, but it isn’t hair-splitting to query when someone says an individual is the leader but they were not. Even if they were akin to shogun and emperor, it’d hardly be bad faith to be wrong on the relationship.

    Nonetheless, after the formal leader died, Berman immediately “resigned” in disgrace. That’s not what a puppet master does. That’s what a lackey does.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  251. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    You initiated this thread with me while I was responding to someone else. Their link was mad nonsense. You disagreed, I believe, with my disagreement with them. I took this to imply that you support their original link.

    I guess not. Sorry, I misunderstood you, but please don’t message me and then wonder why I respond to you!

  252. @Jack D

    Thanks for the very good legal precis.

    One thought: since somewhere or other Google is no doubt receiving Federal money and such contracts usually stipulate compliance to Federal legal norms, might this be a peg for a Damore-type plaintiff to hang his hat on?

  253. @Jack D

    “They” can’t even take our fentanyl away, let alone our guns.

    They don’t want to take our fentanyl away.

  254. Art Deco says:
    @Corn

    The outer islands are entirely small town and rural; there is no commuting to and from peri-urban zones outside Oahu. Honolulu’s real estate is expensive and stylistically ticky-tacky. It’s a second-tier city whose major industry is the hotel and restaurant business. It has two unremarkable private colleges, a third private college notable mainly for being a subsidiary of the Mormon Church, and a state university locals will commonly disparage.

    Hawaii’s asset is it’s climate, which includes both the temperature and the trade winds. Forty years ago, it also had a relentlessly informal business culture quite distinct from that of the mainland, which was appealing to a certain constituency. The courthouse was I’d wager about the only venue a coat and time was the mode.

    If that’s where you grew up or a certain climate is what you’re seeking, the place is fine. It’s not hard to see why people don’t stay.

  255. @Dave Pinsen

    They may not be explicitly pro-Big Business, but the results of laissez faire over the last 20 years or so have been a huge consolidation of American industries into oligopolies.

    Laissez faire for whom, though, Mr. Pinson? I’ve seen this same bad trend over more like 3 decades with bigger is better and consolidation. However, part of the reason for this is that small business is kept on a tight leash or even run into the ground, in America nowadays. Who does that? I’ll tell ya’:

    1) The American Feral and state governments lay down regulations that may make a formerly-good business model into a bad idea overnight. Guess who supports these kinds of regulations? I’ll tell ya’:

    2) Big Business, in crony-capitalistic cooperation (there’s a good alliteration for ya’) with government on all levels, works to crush any competition from the small guy. That wouldn’t work in a free market without the tremendous regulation that has accumulated.

    Sorry for the late reply, Mr. Pinson.

  256. David says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Here’s a fresh example of how Rand Paul’s position is depicted as “legitimate political disagreement”:

    “Rand Paul is against sanctions on Iran and Russia, but he wants to block assistance to Israel and Saudi Arabia,” said one senior GOP congressional official who spoke to the Free Beacon. “When Republicans hear that, they don’t hear the sound of a principled conservative who avoids foreign affairs. That just sounds like a guy who’s on the wrong side.”

    See, Paul is hardly even an American, he’s so wrongly not on the side of Israel in every conceivable respect. And he wants to make love to Putin in Iran. Not only that, but we wouldn’t even know how evil he is without the beneficent and heroic efforts of “AIPAC, the nation’s foremost pro-Israel lobby group, …purchasing advertisements on Facebook outing Paul…”

    This is the second article that came up when I searched “Rand Paul Israel,” and was the source of the first. And it was written by a Jew.

    https://freebeacon.com/national-security/pro-israel-groups-expose-rand-paul-blocking-u-s-aid-israel/

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  257. @International Jew

    Lots of the people that Tucker interviews, though he may pick them for that, just spout out their complete stupidity for the world to see, and we all like to see that. However, he is right to cut them off when they never answer the freakin’ questions. I’m not saying he doesn’t encourage this sort of thing, as again, who picks these nutcases? Still, they come on to spout their BS, not be interviewed, and will never talk logically. Mr. Carlson then says “I! GET! THAT! Can you just answer the question? This is the 3rd/4th/etc. time …” Yeah, that’s entertainment.

    I do think the more these ctrl-left nutcases are put on display for the world to see, the higher Carlson’s ratings will go, but more importantly, the more Americans will see who they are up against.

  258. @JohnnyWalker123

    Yeah, I’d read about this long ago. I had a female relative, Johnny, that long ago told me she liked old Ronnie (even though she was pretty hard-core left), but “I don’t trust that man” in reference to President H.W. Bush, and this was way back. I had no idea about his CIA connections, as I was too young to pay close attention back then. I rail against the woman’s vote quite often, and, though I’m not changing my tune, I think my relative had some female intuition about this, more than anything.

    Yes, I know a lot about Mr. Reagan from reading his radio addresses and a few books about him, plust seeing him as President. I think that he was Deep-Stated is probably the best explanation for some of what went on later with the GOP foreign policy especially. Look at what’s going on with Donald Trump – all it would take is a threat to one of his family members.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  259. @3g4me

    You wouldn’t want to live in Singapore because the Han run Singapore and all the Indians there know their place – and know how they have to behave and vote to keep that second spot.

    You’re wrong about that.

    Singapore’s Han Chinese actually treat the ethnic minorities quite well and promote state-enforced multiculturalism. The Indians and Malays not only enjoy a very good standard of living, but the state punishes Han Chinese for any type of ethnic chauvinism. In particular, Indians are very well-represented in politics, media, and high-paying occupations. Many Indians and Southeast Asians are clamoring to migrate to Singapore. A lot of the Chinese aren’t enamored of the behavior of foreigners or the resulting overpopulation crisis, but it’s hard to criticize state policy.

    You seem to know as much about Singapore as every topic you run your mouth about.

    There’s an old saying you might want to heed.

    “It’s better to keep your mouth shut and appear stupid than open it and remove all doubt.”

    You probably miss Bill O’Reilly because you don’t get to hear those big, fancy-sounding words on tv anymore.

  260. 3g4me says:

    @268 JohnnyWalker123: “You seem to know as much about Singapore as every topic you run your mouth about.”

    Boilerplate ad hominem, while carefully avoiding acknowledging that you are a magic dirt/magic paper fake American. You larp at Sailer, and all the boomercons and conservatards earnestly debate politics with you as if you had genuine skin in the game. Just as with Twinkie’s purported refutation of my comments re Singapore (studies show!! and online searches reveal!!), have you lived there, pajeet, or are you merely claiming knowledge and erudition you do not possess? Typical of your people, who love preaching to any White man of his sins while proclaiming his squalid, street-shitting homeland is the world’s “largest democracy.”

    Newsflash: Try shaming someone who actually gives a flying f&**k about your opinion. And muh democracy matters to me about as much as muh multiculturalism. It all needs to burn.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  261. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Stan Adams

    Maher was reacting to the transparently false comment repeated by W. and others that the 9/11 terrorists were cowards. Remember, too, that Maher’s ABC show was called “Politically Incorrect with Bill Maher”, and that Maher has frequently had Ann Coulter on as a guest.

    Maher’s gaffe was similar to Trump calling out Jeb in 2015 when he said his brother “kept us safe”. “W. kept us safe” was a lie commonly stated by GOP pols from 2004 on, and Trump was, AFAIK, the first high-profile GOP candidate to point out the obvious refutation, that 9/11 happened on W.’s watch.

  262. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Charles Pewitt

    Afghanistan isn’t in West Asia – it’s in Central Asia, bordering China. Keeping American troops in Afghanistan doesn’t seem to be putting the squeeze on anyone but America.

  263. DFH says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Well of course the NYT would tell a lie about that. But it is obviously incorrect, as the fact that of the triumvirate of Polish leadership, 2/3 were Jewish shows, and over a third of the directors of secret police in a country where Jews were probably at most 1% of the post-war population

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  264. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    There is a difference between an actual leader and a figurehead.

    At least for anyone who isn’t just being disingenuous.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  265. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    By your standard of proof America had tons of reasons for intervening in Syria other than Israeli interests. American politicians were constantly listing them.

    No, I haven’t seen any American politician give a cogent reason for intervening in Syria. I have seen a few give cogent reasons why we shouldn’t. Our involvement there makes no sense for us. And by us, I mean actual American citizens, not the government.

    But we do have a concrete example of Donald Trump – who happens to be the actual President of the United States – saying that it is done, at least in part, for the benefit of Israel.

    I also note that you – very dishonestly – completely elided over the fact that the Israeli government did indeed call for the ouster of Assad, counter to what you claimed.

    But dishonestly is what I have come to expect from you.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  266. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Other than Jerusalem being occupied by Jews, I’m suprised that you think the GDPR was a free German nation.

    Free, no. German, yes. Whereas Jerusalem is only about half jewish. I honestly don’t care where Israel establishes its capital. I do object to my government acting like a lapdog for foreign interests.

    I’m pretty sure Israel won the Six Day war.

    Then they don’t need us to validate their victory.

    Oh – and by the way – they can damned well apologize for deliberately attacking one of our ships, trying to murder one of our ambassadors, mailing letter bombs to a sitting US President, and trading our naval secrets (aquired by one of their spies, Jonathan Pollard) to the Soviet Union.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  267. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    You need a “cogent” reason from an American but any reason from an Israeli…

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  268. Tyrion 2 says:
    @David

    “On the wrong side” just means the designator disagrees with the designee. By the standard of contemporary political hyperbole, that barely counts as criticism. Untwist your knickers.

  269. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Yeah, ‘cos leaders always have to resign in disgrace when their powerless figurehead leaves power…

    Why do I have to repeat this point?

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  270. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    We were discussing how the US not opening an embassy in Israel’s de facto capital for decades is hardly a sign of Israel lobby power. You’ve gone off rambling into the weeds of your pathological obsessions again…

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    , @Mr. Anon
  271. Tyrion 2 says:
    @DFH

    When the NYT agrees with you, it is proof. When they don’t, they’re lying. Even in the same article?

    You say triumvirate…where’s that come from?

    As for Jews doing well in the good jobs…shocking. Also, shocking that an empire would exploit ethnic divisions to divide and rule…whatever could have made Jews quite grateful to the Soviet Union that kicked the Nazis out of Poland in 1945 anyway?

    • Replies: @DFH
  272. DFH says:
    @Tyrion 2

    When the NYT agrees with you, it is proof. When they don’t, they’re lying. Even in the same article?

    When someone who has a very strong reason to deny something (e.g. that the Soviet leadership was Jewish) then that means it’s worth less as evidence. For instance when (ceteris paribus) someone accused of a crime denies something, we give that much less weight than when they confess.

    You say triumvirate…where’s that come from?

    https://www.thenation.com/article/apparatchiks/

    last but not least, with Jakub Berman, who, as the man in charge of ideology and security, was one of the ruling Troika (together with Boleslaw Bierut, the party chief, and Hilary Minc, the economist) in the worst years of the Moscow-sponsored dictatorship.

    As for Jews doing well in the good jobs…shocking.

    This is like a parody of Jewish apologism. You think that it’s because of merit that 1% of the population get 40% of secret police jobs?

    whatever could have made Jews quite grateful to the Soviet Union that kicked the Nazis out of Poland in 1945 anyway?

    And whatever could have made the Poles resent Jews who made up 40% of the secret police directors and 2/3 of the puppet government?

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  273. @Dave Pinsen

    Afghanistan isn’t in West Asia – it’s in Central Asia, bordering China. Keeping American troops in Afghanistan doesn’t seem to be putting the squeeze on anyone but America.

    The region called West Asia is like horseshoes, close enough counts.

    What are the countries of West Asia?

    The following countries and areas comprise the West Asia subregion: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Cyprus, Gaza Strip, Georgia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, West Bank and Yemen[36] (Figure 21 …

  274. songbird says:
    @donut

    It sure isn’t for her looks.

  275. @JohnnyWalker123

    Sarah Palin faced mounting legal bills from the lawfare attacks of the Left because the Left feared her. In the same way Trump has pointed out the Left has no clothes, so did Palin. She could not pay her legal bills on the Governor’s salary, and was not willing to prostrate herself before a Big-Money Sugar Daddy. Just as she had the courage to stand up to the corrupt Republicans in Alaska, she relied on herself to beat back the rabid Left. Your criticism relies on a supposed deficiency of not reading magazines (because Time, Newsweek, The Economist, National Review, The Nation, etc. help you ‘know something’). But the opposite is true. Your data sources are propaganda. Since when did propaganda help you know anything useful?

    Can you think of any examples of Sarah Palin coherently issuing an interesting critique of social, economic, or foreign policy?

    Palin would not fight stupid wars, not allow unrestricted immigration, nor support the globalists hollowing out middle America. Take any position of the Left, and Palin takes the opposite position.

    I suspect that is your real objection to Palin. She isn’t a Leftist like you.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  276. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    You need a “cogent” reason from an American but any reason from an Israeli…

    More dishonest dissembling from you. Unsurprising.

    Do you imagine you are swaying anybody’s opinion? Actually, I think you are, but not in the way you think.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  277. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Your obsessions are quite obvious – flacking for your ethnic group while pretending to be neutral.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  278. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    We were discussing how the US not opening an embassy in Israel’s de facto capital for decades is hardly a sign of Israel lobby power.

    That one little thing isn’t a sign of their lobbying power. Their enormously outsized influence in the US government – even to the extent of getting away with deliberately attcking a US naval vessel – is.

    You just ignore the obvious things that belie your contention while focussing on minutiae. I expect nothing less from a propagandist.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  279. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Anybody with a brain can follow the line of logic to see how you’re embarrassingly wrong, time and time again. Yet you can never admit it. Stop making your personal problems everyone else’s issue.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  280. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    I present cogent, logical points. You fantasise to make yourself feel better. Cool.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  281. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Yeah, ‘cos leaders always have to resign in disgrace when their powerless figurehead leaves power…

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jakub_Berman

    After the death of Bolesław Bierut – the first secretary of the PUWP – Berman resigned from the PUWP Politbiuro in June 1956, incriminated by Dir. Józef Światło who defected to the West. He was relieved from Central Committee of PUWP in the fall of 1956, and in 1957 dismissed from PUWP altogether, as responsible for the “Stalinist-era errors and distortions” (abuse of power and gross human rights law violations).

    Gosh, he resigned in June of 1956. Something else happened in 1956, didn’t it? Oh yeah, that’s right – Kruschev’s denunciation of Stalin:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_the_Cult_of_Personality_and_Its_Consequences

    And by the way, three months is not “immediately”.

    Any more lies you care to tell?

    Why do I have to repeat this point?

    Because lying benefits by repetition?

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  282. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    On the contrary, you are simply lying, and it is probably obvious to everyone. And we know why you are doing it.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  283. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    You shift and dissemble as an exercise in propaganda. It isn’t fooling anyone.

    • Troll: Tyrion 2
  284. ATBOTL says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    So it’s just a coincidence that Iran shares a border with Afghanistan?

    I notice there is a contingent of commenters here whose main goal is to try to get others to un-notice things. They like to explain how apparently connected events are just random, unrelated and unimportant and that we are being bad by noticing and discussing them.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  285. @3g4me

    I don’t like to quote Wikipedia, but here’s a long entry on Singapore-Indians. Indians are apparently over represented in politics, law, education, and the civil service of that country. Hardly a minority who “know their place.” Their numbers have actually increased dramatically in recent decades because of liberal skilled migration policies, which has angered the Singaporean majority (whose housing costs have been raised and wages have been suppressed). Singapore is basically Silicon Valley and the Indians there are like the local H1Bs. There appears to be some sort of mild affirmative action for minorities there too.

    Admittedly, Chinese-Singaporeans are much nicer than Chinese elsewhere, so this might be an isolated case. The point is that the country’s Chinese rulers aren’t hostile to Indians. Rather they’re amenable to migrants, often at the expense of the natives who actually live there. It’s oligarchy+multiculturalism.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Singaporeans

    Politics – Indians have been well represented in national politics, including the ruling People’s Action Party (PAP) as well as opposition parties. Indians have served as two out of eight Presidents of Singapore, two out of four Senior Ministers and three out of eleven Deputy Prime Ministers. At some point, Indians have been Ministers of almost all ministries, including Foreign Affairs and Finance. The only key posts Indians have not held are Prime Minister and Defence Minister. As of June 2018, Indians were over-represented in the Cabinet (5 out of 19 cabinet ministers, or 26% of the total). They also comprise 10 out of 89 MPs in the 13th Parliament of Singapore, and one of three of its Non-constituency MPs.

    The law – Historically, Indians have been prominent in the legal profession, including the judiciary. In 2007, 21 out of 81 persons listed in the Singapore Academy of Law’s senior counsel directory in June 2018, or 26%, were Indian. In the Subordinate Courts of Singapore, 9.8% of all District Judges was ethnic Indian. Meanwhile, in the Supreme Court of Singapore, 14%, or two of the 14 Supreme Court Judges and Judicial Commissioners, are Indian.[45]
    Diplomacy – Indians have traditionally served in the Singapore Diplomatic Service in disproportionate numbers. The Second Permanent Secretary to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Mr Bilahari Kausikan, is Indian, as have been three of its five Ministers to date. As of March 2007, a survey of the Singapore Government Directory Interactive website showed about 27% of the heads of Singaporean diplomatic missions abroad were Indian, including heads of missions to the UN in New York and Geneva, High Commissioners to Malaysia and South Africa and Ambassadors to Belgium (de facto representative to the European Union) Germany, Indonesia and Saudi Arabia.[45]

    Education – Since colonial times, teaching was a job Indians were traditionally involved in. In 2006, Indians remained well represented in the teaching service. In March 2007, the Singapore Government Directory Interactive website showed that 13.3% of primary school principals were Indian, as were 10.3% of secondary school principals.[45] Indians also head prominent higher education schools and think tanks, including the NUS Faculty of Engineering, Institute of Policy Studies, Institute of South Asian Studies, Institute of Southeast Asian Studies and Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy.

    The arts – Indian Singaporeans have distinguished themselves in a number of cultural fields, including contemporary forms of art targeted at a broad national and international audience, as well as more traditional Indian art forms. From 1979 to 2006, Indian Singaporeans have won 10, or 11.4%, of the 88 Cultural Medallions conferred, the highest honour to artists given by the Singapore government.

    Civil Service – In addition to the foreign, legal and education services, Indians have also traditionally entered the Singapore Civil Service. Several individuals have risen to prominence in various government ministries and statutory boards. 9.4% of the heads of Singapore’s 64 statutory boards are Indian – these are the National Library Board, Accounting and Corporate Regulatory Authority, Hindu Endowments Board, Hindu Advisory Board and Sikh Advisory Board.[45]
    Business – In 2006, Forbes listed four ethnic Indians among the 40 largest private individual and family fortunes in Singapore, which is 10% of the list. These four individuals each represent large and diversified business empires in their own right, ranging from commodities to retail to electronics, amongst others.[46]

    The rest of your post is, as you might say, “boilerplate ad hominem.”

    I’ll leave you with one closing thought. If you (and hundreds of millions of other “conservatards”) hadn’t supported the Iraq War, America would be $5 trillion richer. If not for all these other unnecessary wars overseas (Yemen, Libya, Afghanistan) and the post-911 “homeland security” spending at home, America would have saved trillions in ADDITIONAL spending.

    America has dug its grave financially due all these wars. One day, this country is going to experience a major-scale debt default that’ll make what happened in PIIGS (Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Greece, Spain) look trivial in comparison. However, unlike in their case, there’ll be no one who can (or will) step in to bail out this country. The consequent tax hikes, spending cuts, and devaluation-driven hyperinflation will bring this country to its knees and economically devastate the masses of the country (including you).

    That social security check you were going to get? Gone.
    That hip replacement that Medicare would’ve paid for? Gone.

    You can rant and rave all you want against liberals and immigrants, but they weren’t the ones that cheered on Uncle Sam as he jumped off the financial cliff in the post-911 era. Sooner or later, you will realize how screwed you are.

    • Replies: @TRASH(NOT)
  286. @Dave Pinsen

    Why exactly are we in Afghanistan all these years later?

  287. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @ATBOTL

    How does NATO’s presence in Afghanistan hurt Iran?

  288. @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    Sarah Palin faced mounting legal bills

    Palin claims that she had half a million in legal bills. Most of her legal expenses were covered by the Alaska state govt, but she claims that she had additional uncovered fees.

    Assuming that’s even true (which may or may not be the case), she only had 2 years before her governorship ended and she had a very lucrative book deal awaiting her. If she wanted to stay on a couple more years (with perhaps the offer of a slight contingency fee), her lawyers would’ve played ball. Especially given her power as a national politician. Lawyers negotiate that type of thing all the time.

    Even if she wanted to make some money and get back in politics, she could’ve easily done that. She’s made tens of millions of dollars. She made $12 million in her first year out of office and much more since then (enough to live on comfortable for a lifetime, perhaps several lifetimes). Why doesn’t she get back in? Become a Senator or Congressional representative?

    She quit because she got bored with the job, the hard work, and the state. She (and her family) wanted to be apart of the jet set. Being exposed to that lifestyle by McCain whet her appetite for the fine life, which rural and cold Alaska couldn’t provide. More fun to be a FOX News commentator and do Reality TV.

    She could’ve been a Tea Party organizer during the whole 2009-2012 era. She could’ve done for the Republicans what Nixon in the mid 60s did after his loss of the 1960 election. Then at least she would’ve been credible for 2012, a campaign she didn’t run in.

    The funny thing is that Hillary Clinton claimed that legal expenses decimated her family during the 90s. She offered that as an excuse for why she and Bill needed to make lots of money later on. For some reason, I doubt you buy that excuse.

    prostrate herself before a Big-Money Sugar Daddy.

    Which she never would’ve had to do, given her ability to do a lucrative book deal.

    Your criticism relies on a supposed deficiency of not reading magazines

    Or papers.

    (because Time, Newsweek, The Economist, National Review, The Nation, etc. help you ‘know something’).

    Your data sources are propaganda. Since when did propaganda help you know anything useful?

    You do realize there are numerous conservative publications (National Review, Weekly Standard, Wall Street Journal, New York Post, World Net Daily, Washington Times, Pat Buchanan’s American Conservative). Any of which she could’ve read if she had felt the need to do so. These publications range from Neocon to Conservative Inc to Paleo, so she could easily find whatever it is she desired.

    The mainstream sources do plenty of straight news. Which is one reason why Steve Sailer always quotes mainstream news sites. However, if you believe the MSM is so irredeemably tainted to the extent that it’s utterly worthless, there are plenty of alternatives. Very easy to find alternatives.

    Anyway, when Palin was asked the question, her answer was that she read “all of them” Not that she read conservative publications or that she distrusted media bias. It’s obvious Palin reads nothing and relies on her political consultants to tell her what to think. To the extent that she knows anything outside of that, she likely gets her information from watching TV broadcasts (which are even more biased than newspapers and magazines, not to mention having less factual detail).

    By the way, when asked to provide critique of mainstream media, her main criticism is that our major outlets are “Lame Stream Media.”

    Sarah Palin talks like the characters out of Idiocracy.

    Palin would not fight stupid wars

    Her son went to Iraq.

    Here were her thoughts on the Iraq War.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/09/11/AR2008091103789.html

    FORT WAINWRIGHT, Alaska, Sept. 11 — Gov. Sarah Palin linked the war in Iraq with the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, telling an Iraq-bound brigade of soldiers that included her son that they would “defend the innocent from the enemies who planned and carried out and rejoiced in the death of thousands of Americans.”

    “America can never go back to that false sense of security that came before September 11, 2001,” she said at the deployment ceremony, which drew hundreds of military families who walked from their homes on the sprawling post to the airstrip where the service was held.

  289. @Achmed E. Newman

    Yes, I know a lot about Mr. Reagan from reading his radio addresses and a few books about him, plust seeing him as President. I think that he was Deep-Stated is probably the best explanation for some of what went on later with the GOP foreign policy especially. Look at what’s going on with Donald Trump – all it would take is a threat to one of his family members.

    I think the Deep State works in all sorts of ways, including violence and blackmail. They have the tools, expertise, and personnel to make short work of their enemies.

    The Kennedy brothers tried to reign in the military-industrial-intelligence complex and ended up dying in very suspicious assassinations. One brother was killed by Oswald (was quickly killed by Ruby) and the other brother was killed by the enigmatic Sirhan Sirhan.

    Jimmy Carter fired 25% of the CIA and tried to reign in our national security establishment. He failed to rescue the hostages who were taken in Iran, which killed his chances for reelection. Right after Reagan was inaugurated (with former CIA director HW Bush as his VP), the Iranian-held hostages were released. The Reagan administration then proceeded to secretly have arms sold to Iran (“Iran-Contra”).

    Trump hangs out a lot with Roger Stone, who knows quite a lot about these issues. Hopefully, Stone talks to him about all these matters.

  290. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Yes, the resignation/death order went Stalin (supreme leader), Bierut (local leader), (((Berman))) (local minister).

    It cascaded down the chain of command.

  291. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    What’s your explanation for how they could not get that one simple thing done despite their supposedly awesome power?

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  292. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Your attempt at negging and social proof is ham-handed. It seems that not only can you not do logical discussion properly but you can’t even get basic flirting correct. Know that I feel sorry for you.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  293. Tyrion 2 says:
    @DFH

    When someone who has a very strong reason to deny something (e.g. that the Soviet leadership was Jewish) then that means it’s worth less as evidence. For instance when (ceteris paribus) someone accused of a crime denies something, we give that much less weight than when they confess.

    You inpute that “strong reason” from your bias, use it to put your thumb on the scale for evaluating reality which then in turn, unsurprisingly, confirms your bias, and so you go back around again and again and again.

    This is like a parody of Jewish apologism. You think that it’s because of merit that 1% of the population get 40% of secret police jobs?

    Didn’t you say 30% before? Regardless, Jews are 0.2% of the world’s population and 30% of Nobel prize winning Economists and there are probably even more remarkable ratios based on factors we’ve never thought of if we had the data to drill down into the details.

    I also added, and you chose to ignore, that naturally Jews would have felt especially loyal in 1945 to the Soviet Union that rescued them and would have made excellent enforcers of the party line.

    It is a pattern as old as history itself for empires to use groups in this way. The Gurkhas were key in putting down the Indian mutiny.

    I have no issues with recognising that Jews can, in the wrong circumstances, be a strongly subversive element. And immediately post-Holocaust is very clearly the wrong circumstances. I just recognise that there is an endless expanse between that and the retarded cr*p peddled by some of the commenters here.

    And whatever could have made the Poles resent Jews who made up 40% of the secret police directors and 2/3 of the puppet government?

    Stop making up stats to suit your argument. There is an important point in here but it is obscured by your absurd hyperbole.

  294. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    What’s your explanation for how they could not get that one simple thing done despite their supposedly awesome power?

    They get lots of other things done. The embassy is symbolic. The billions in aid every year is much more substantial. As is the effective burying of the Liberty incident, Pollard, and any number of other provocations.

    Are you actually denying that AIPAC has much power? Are they no more influential than, say, the Sons of Norway?

    Being a UK resident, you are just talking out of your ass anyway. You don’t know America. You’re just squirting squid-ink in favor of your own group.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  295. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyrion 2

    You can stop the false pity. I don’t need pity, and certainly not from you. You’re a rather pathetic, lying clown.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    , @Tyrion 2
  296. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    But I can’t help but pity you! You’re pitiful.

  297. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    So you have no explanation. Just the same old tired talking points.

    I’m not saying AIPAC has no influence. It does. Trump did recognise Israel’s capital after decades of US Presidents refusing to do so. That means they certainly have some influence. They don’t get to be viciously autocratic and kill hundreds of thousands like the Saudis. Nor take all producer good manufacturing like the Japanese. Nor be defended at huge expense despite being vociferously anti-American like the EU. Nor transform the South West like Mexico. But they did (eventually) get their capital recognised!

  298. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Here’s a harsh truth for you:

    The reason why Western populations have so heartily embraced diversity and the multicult is because most people struggle to think outside of binary choices and, given a choice between the poz and people as obviously unpleasant as you, they always choose the poz.

    Naturally there are those who can see outside of the extremes and they know you’re irrelevant, but it is clear as day that normal people reject you guys so hard that they’ll follow anybody who says they’re your opposite.

    They’ll crawl up a barbed wire fence to escape a resevoir of sewage. (And you wonder how the barbed wire fence always beats you!!!)

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  299. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Oh, and a harsh truth for me is that most of the time I say anything sensible to English people I meet, they react like I’m you. Your stench is so overpowering that it takes me ages to patiently explain the difference.

    You should be happy you cause me so much strife!

    Or, to mix metaphors, you and your ilk are an albatross around the necks of everybody who tries to correct the course of Western societies away from catastrophe.

    It’s like Charybdis was so ugly that everyone set sail directly for Scylla!

  300. @JohnnyWalker123

    So can we assume that your stand is, as long as the incoming “immivaders” are not of the outwardly violent kind, we must keep importing them and turn the whole thing on its head?

    Nevermind how (((that))) turned out for us in the last 150 years, we must go down that road again, because you know “skillz” and muh “IQ”. Race is for )))losers((( right?? Talking about IQ, the dot heads clock in at a “tremendous” 82 but that’s OK. They make up for it with their verbal loquaciousness and their “networking”.

    What a guy! Please talk to someone in tech [non Indian, non Chinese] or read my commenting history to know what a white guy in tech sees everyday at work. These people wouldn’t mind taking over the reins of power from the chosenites, as (((they))) trickle away, fleeing from an ever increasing brown horde [mostly of their own making of course]. In fact they look forward to it. And they’ll ask us to be thankful for it. You know, muh “skillz” and all that

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  301. @TRASH(NOT)

    I actually agree with most of what you’re saying.

    However, my point is this. Immigrants don’t actually run America.

    White conservatives, on the other hand, have pretty much run America for the last few decades. Unfortunately, White conservative politicians have advanced policies (such as wildly expensive “War on Terror”) that have brought this country to the brink of financial insolvency.

    Immigrants may be ruining America in a variety of ways (as you mentioned), but ultimately they don’t bear responsibility for the coming national bankruptcy.

    I’m not saying you should like immigrants. I am, however, saying that White conservatives need to be more introspective about all the wrong-headed policies they’ve advocated for over the years, such as the disastrous and unnecessary $5 trillion Iraq War. Massive tax cuts for the wealthy. Deregulation for business and financial interests. Unconstrained “free trade.” An insultingly low minimum wage. Blatant anti-Unionism.

    It’s easy to hate immigrants, but it’s harder for people to take responsibility for decades of poor management of their own country.

    Immigrants may be the deck louts of the Titanic, but they weren’t the ones who steered the boat into a huge iceberg.

    • Replies: @TRASH(NOT)
  302. @JohnnyWalker123

    White conservatives, on the other hand, have pretty much run America for the last few decades. Unfortunately, White conservative politicians have advanced policies (such as wildly expensive “War on Terror”) that have brought this country to the brink of financial insolvency.

    Which “conservatives” are we referring to here? Establishment planks like Bill O reilly? Or phonies like W with his cultivated texas swagger, ranch and all? Ron Paul was the last true conservative to have graced us, but alas he didn’t manage to (or perhaps was not allowed to) reach critical support

    I’m not saying you should like immigrants. I am, however, saying that White conservatives need to be more introspective about all the wrong-headed policies they’ve advocated for over the years, such as the disastrous and unnecessary $5 trillion Iraq War. Massive tax cuts for the wealthy. Deregulation for business and financial interests. Unconstrained “free trade.” An insultingly low minimum wage. Blatant anti-Unionism.

    Of course “free market” capitalism was shoved down our throats. It was only when it started to hurt middle class americans that the point struck home that as long as making money remains the sole motive of the ruling and the corporate class in the country (with NO motivation to do well by doing good), it will always be a race to the bottom for most americans. Add to that the kind of legal and illegal immigrants they are bringing here have the worst aspects of western and eastern market capitalism combined into a toxic brew. I’m not advocating a burmese junta style governance model here but there has to be limits to everything. We are practically an oligarchy now

    I do not think it will bode well for anyone in the long run. The soon this charade of a country collapses, the better it’ll be for us and the rest of the world. We’d have a fighting chance of taking the country back with minimal bloodshed. The more this charade continues, the more severe the “disruption” would get

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