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From my new book review in Taki’s Magazine:

Deep State of the Union
by Steve Sailer
January 13, 2016

The 20th-century Turkish concept of a “deep state” first spread to other Mediterranean countries such as Italy, and is now slowly being picked up by American pundits. Ex–Republican congressional staffer Mike Lofgren’s 2016 book The Deep State: The Fall of the Constitution and the Rise of the Shadow Government offers a snarky and intelligent tour d’horizon of some of America’s more or less perpetual ruling organs. …

Despite the origin of the phrase among conspiracy-loving Byzantines, Lofgren warns enthusiasts that the American deep state is more mundane. …

The American deep state is less Oliver Stone’s JFK than The Office. Lofgren remarks upon “the sheer weight of its boring ordinariness once you have planted yourself in your office chair for the ten thousandth time.” It’s an emergent phenomenon of a quasi-empire run out of a wealthy and not exceptionally at-risk republic.

… America is rich enough that it can more or less afford to waste vast amounts of money on F-35s and the like.

So it does.

Read the whole thing there.

 
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  1. Bill B. says:

    OT

    I would like to thank Steve’s commentators who drew attention to Florence King who also died last week.

    She was indeed an astonishingly good writer I discover. I can’t imagine prose written for her purposes being better.

    This essay on Lizzie Borden I find strangely comforting in these trying times not just because sheer quality is itself a comfort but because it hints at subterranean strengths in the west.

    http://www.nationalreview.com/article/211803/lizzie-border-wasp-florence-king?target=author&tid=901405

    Read More
    • Agree: snorlax, Kylie
    • Replies: @donut
    I enjoyed her book "With Charity Toward None "You might also enjoy "Against Love" by Laura Kipnis .
    , @Reg Cæsar
    The NYT published a respectful obituary, listing many of her books. Somehow, they left out Wasp, Where Is Thy Sting? I wonder why.
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  2. Chiron says:

    How about the US State Department? Its really is the Khaganate of Nuland?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Lunatic Jeb Boosh once again called for the removal of Assad.

    Here is the deep state toggle for this potus campaign (whichever candidate):

    A. ASSAD MUST GO. We need 50,000 troops on the ground.

    B. UKRAINE. Because, because, because, because.

    There are no other issues in the campaign.
    , @Lugash
    Pretty much. Search Google News on a regular basis and her name pops up all the time in the foreign press and little, out of the way American papers. When she first popped up during the Ukraine Provocation she seemed to be assigned to eastern Europe, but now she's involved with Syria and the European immigration fiasco.

    As DCThrowback notes, the CIA and State Department are in an alliance with each other. The Iraq war, Benghazi, Operation Fast and Furious all seem to ties these two entities together. A lot of the State Department officials involved like Nuland, Stevens and Sean Smith all have murky pasts that scream CIA.

    If Trump gets the nomination it will be interesting to see how the Deep State reacts. He's the first president since Nixon who has the potential desire, strength and intelligence to challenge them. The MSM doesn't take him seriously, even though he's the front runner. It almost seems like they think someone will 'take care of him'.
  3. BB753 says:

    So basically the Deep State is just the State, without the show called democracy. Voting does not change policies, it only changes some people in charge.
    Democracy is just good for the “churn”.

    Read More
  4. Hilarious video clip of the Deep State at work:

    Read More
    • Replies: @donut
    Some Cohen Bros. fans didn't like that movie but I thought it was quite good .
    , @Boomstick
    JK Simmons is a great character actor in these roles. He completely nailed JJ Jameson in the Spiderman movies as well.
  5. DPG says:

    A family member works for the DoD. We were commiserating about dealing with mediocrity at work. I mentioned how much dead weight we have in our operations group (financial company), people making 60 grand a year.

    He replied, “we’ve got the same problem, except the people I’m talking about make over a hundred.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Exactly right. The average grade in the US Civil Service is GS-13 which pays around $100k -before- you add in "locality adjustments" for expensive areas like N Virginia. The latest budget bill raised to $300 a month the allowance federal employees can get for riding public transit. The country would be up in arms if they saw all the BMWs, Mercedes, Porsches, Range Rovers, etc. being driven around DC. It's disgusting.
  6. Pat Casey says:

    I’ll say this for DC, far fewer rich resident aliens than London, and I suspect that’s the one upshot to the Israel Lobby. Keep up the good work fellas.

    Which makes me wonder about the nexus between me and Steve, I mean between DC and LA. Who remembers that movie SwordFish with Travolta. The concept very conveniently made no sense, if you recall, such that it was the perfect reply to the Truthers, yeah you saw that in a stupid movie idiot.

    What dude would think to brag about suburbs, but I must say ours are rather luscious. I mean before I was too unemployed to live in them. I should’ve let the CIA recruit me when they tried.

    Read More
  7. NOTA says:

    Does he talk about the role of think tanks in the deep state. Those both provide intellectual hired guns for various establishment causes, and are also a way to give various important players in the deep state jobs when their party is out of power and thus they’re between appointed or elected positions.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "Does he talk about the role of think tanks in the deep state. Those both provide intellectual hired guns for various establishment causes, and are also a way to give various important players in the deep state jobs when their party is out of power and thus they’re between appointed or elected positions."

    Yes, those must be considered important elements in the modern deep-state. They also serve as a vehicle for propaganda. The "donors" (i.e. oligarchs) who buy candidates are the same ones who fund think-tanks. The think-tank flaks appear on cable news shows, dressed in the guise of "experts", to promote policies that are beneficial to their patrons. Same for the pollsters and political operatives who appear as pundits on the talking-head shows.
    , @Brutusale
    Speaking of the Deep State and DC suburbs, The Jasons immediately spring to mind.
  8. “The American deep state is less Oliver Stone’s JFK than The Office.”

    The two are far from mutually exclusive:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cover-Up_%28The_Office%29

    Idle hands…

    Read More
  9. JackOH says:

    Steve, thanks. I’m glad to see important people articulating the phenomenon I first noticed as a young political operative for both major parties back in the 1980s. Since then I’ve used phrases such as “Council of 25,000″ (the Washington lobbies) and “Fascism Lite”, and variants thereof, to describe our actual government workings.

    FWIW-it’s almost painful to watch impassioned younger people being played by local political hustlers who won’t tell them that much of our national political agenda, the boundaries of debate, the array of possible solutions to problems, etc. is driven from the top down by America’s own “deep state”.

    Read More
  10. “The champions of socialism call themselves progressives, but they recommend a system which is characterized by rigid observance of routine and by a resistance to every kind of improvement. They call themselves liberals, but they are intent upon abolishing liberty. They call themselves democrats, but they yearn for dictatorship. They call themselves revolutionaries, but they want to make the government omnipotent. They promise the blessings of the Garden of Eden, but they plan to transform the world into a gigantic post office. Every man but one a subordinate clerk in a bureau.” — Ludwig von Mises

    Read More
  11. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    the deep state are largely shielded from the economic consequences of mass immigration by their jobs’ requirements of citizenship and security clearances.

    This is not true. My job involves security clearance background investigations for the USG. I’ve had a lot of clearances involving non-U.S. citizens. Heck, I’ve had top secret clearances (SSBI) investigations where the foreign national Subject’s prior address was a village in West Africa that didn’t have street names. I’ve had a lot of H1-B contractors doing USG IT work getting public trust or secret-level clearances. They and their spouse will be foreign nationals but all of their children (born in U.S.) are citizens.

    According to DOHA, in 2015 exactly zero security clearances were denied based on allegiance to the U.S., For foreign preference it was 41. While for finances it was 499. (NB: more than 99% who apply for a security clearance get it). Who can apply for a security clearance? A USG agency or a company that contracts with USG for work classified or confidential (almost all contracting work) information.

    http://clearancejobsblog.com/top-issues-2015-security-clearance-denials/

    Read More
    • Replies: @ua2
    I have to disagree with you. CIA/NSA/FBI and virtually all State (FSOs or INR for example) jobs require US Citizenship. DOHA does not include CIA or NSA (not sure about FBI or State) clearance decisions for blue badges.

    I know for a fact that the CIA rate for obtaining clearance is much less than the 99% you tout (which is a number includes public trust or secret that's given out like candy).

    I'm a citizen born in the US and my parents are not citizens - before 2008, it was extremely difficult for you to get cleared at CIA with that combo (all employees there are TS/SCI). There is high scrutiny still with that combo.

    I can't speak to what DOD and other Agencies that run their clearances through OPM do.

    But steve is bang on with the labor market protection TS/SCI (w FSP) - CIA's standard clearance level - provides.
  12. I also think a parallel read of Peter Dale Scott’s book on the Deep State would make a good companion piece. His view is less trusting than Lofgren’s, and focuses on Continuity of Government (COG) plans, which, while a low probability of occurring, represent the hard steel behind the expensive velvet glove that Lofgren describes.

    I find the Old Right Libertarians (think Lew Rockwell and Murray Rothbard) the best on Deep State studies. Their examinations of the power elite make for excellent reading. A recent book on John Foster Dulles by David Talbot had that community a-twitter; as the head of the CIA (and de facto head after he was canned by JFK) Dulles had his hands in many pies, many of them downright nasty. These examinations deserve study by curious folks like us.

    Your review to Lofgren’s books sounds like it makes for an excellent intro book for those not already curious of the Deep State’s presence, but it may a bit benign by a half. The US gov’t deep state’s foray into Iran-Contra, torture, the Bay of Pigs, JFK’s murder, etc. show it’s not all just a bunch of people w/ clearances living high off the hog; there are consequences in the form of blowback to these actions. Ask Gary Webb, for example, how things can get downright deadly when one discovers the plans of our nation’s intel/deep state services.

    Finally, the idea (espoused by Mencius Moldbug) that their are factions of the Deep State that don’t always agree is a fine one, too. The red side (DoD, NSA) holds the bases and the information, the blue side (State, CIA) the diplomatic reins. One just needs to read Sy Hersh’s latest on DoD having enough of the CIA’s BS w/ ISIS and giving away their positions to “Friendly foreign militaries” to pass to Syria to see that divisions can and do occur in our apparatus.

    The solution to this insanity is to defund as much of it as possible. But as Steve said, a country as rich as America w/ people as smart as we possess…well, that seems neigh impossible. I’d say congressional oversight, but LOL, come on, who the hell are we kidding. In the meantime, I’d say sunlight is the best disinfectant along with a healthy skepticism of the words that come from our media who often serve as their mouthpieces.

    Read More
    • Replies: @tbraton
    " A recent book on John Foster Dulles by David Talbot had that community a-twitter; as the head of the CIA (and de facto head after he was canned by JFK) Dulles had his hands in many pies, many of them downright nasty."

    It's hard to tell from the language, but I believe you are confusing John Foster Dulles, Eisenhower's SOS, with his brother, Allen Dulles, who served as head of the CIA under Eisenhower and JFK (until he was fired).
  13. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    America is rich Steve? Have you seen our national debt and deficits?

    Read More
  14. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    OT: Trump recited snake poem at campaign rally. Interesting. Could refer to Merkel. To the West.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Qu6_2hFTw74

    Read More
    • Replies: @TangoMan
    Modern liberal society has as a ground rule the requirement that human nature be denied. That poem and the fable about the scorpion and the turtle rely on accepting that human nature does exist. This even extends to the war against stereotypes, liberals have been leading an agenda to discredit stereotypes while some brave truth-tellers have produced work which shows that stereotype accuracy is very high and that the critics of stereotyping have done shoddy work.

    The more I see of Trump the more little pieces of evidence accumulate which show how his mind works and this increases my level of comfort with him. I'm voting to elect a President based on how he will act in the future so I'm voting on his outlook, personality, beliefs etc not on his mastery of policies and institutions for these can be learned in short order.
  15. Is Mike Lofgren related to Nils, the rock guitarist?

    DC and suburbs haven’t produced many stars in the rock era– Mama Cass, Jorma Kaukonen (Jorma Sr was a bureaucrat), and Nils are all that come to mind. Oh, and Root Boy Slim, of the Sex Change Band, who never broke out.

    Are they any better at rap?

    Read More
    • Replies: @DCThrowback
    Wale, Fugazi, Dave Grohl & O.A.R. come to mind immediately for DC music veterans.

    Dave McMahon (I am wrong on this last name, but it's close) over at the Center for A Concerned America wrote a book on the ties between the Deep State and the 60s rock community titled "Echoes from Laurel Canyon" that I have been dying to read, too. His website is below. I think he has cancer now, so I am sure a book purchase will be greatly appreciated.

    www.davesweb.cnchost.com
    , @Brutusale
    And Bad Brains, the black hardcore outfit with serious musical chops for the punk era.
    , @Anonymous
    DC is mostly irrelevant in hip-hop history.


    The closest area I can think of with people who really hit nationally are from Virginia Beach.


    Maybe DC is too accessible to NYC to have its own scenes without its most ambitious people being absorbed by the goliath to its north?

    DC: hollywood for ugly people/ivy league graduates who can't hack it on wall street/southern weather and northern charm

    , @anonguy

    Are they any better at rap?
     
    It may be thin gruel, but DC does have Go Go.
    , @gruff
    Minor Threat.
    , @william munney
    When hip hop broke out, DC was in the middle of a unique musical trend called go-go. I served with a DC black guy while in the military in the early 90s, and remember him saying that they didn't listen to rap music as much. It was limited to DC. I listened to it but did not like it. Very musical. It seems like you had to be involved with it as it evolved, or it would just sound too exotic, like listening to music from a foreign country. I had completely forgotten about it until I read this.

    From wikipedia's entry on music of washington, DC:

    Go-go
    Main article: Go-go

    The go-go sound developed during the mid-1970s and began to take its current shape by the late '70s, and has become known as D.C.'s answer to hip-hop. Its characteristic formula combined simple funk grooves with instrumental percussion and often rapping. It is a blend of funk, R&B, and early hip-hop, with a focus on lo-fi percussion instruments and melodic jamming in place of dance tracks, although some sampling is used. As such, it is primarily a dance music with an emphasis on live audience call and response. Go-go rhythms are also incorporated into street percussion. Many Washington, D.C. soul & funk artists contributed to the characteristic go-go sound, but the main pioneers were The Young Senators, also known as "The Emperors of Go-go", known for their hit tune "Jungle", and Chuck Brown & the Soul Searchers, known for "Bustin' Loose", which became a surprise national hit. Later go-go bands include Rare Essence, Trouble Funk, Experience Unlimited, and the Southeast go-go band Aggressive Funk. Bands such as Backyard, TCB, and UCB have gained recognition by being featured in music by rapper, Wale.
  16. tbraton says:
    @DCThrowback
    I also think a parallel read of Peter Dale Scott's book on the Deep State would make a good companion piece. His view is less trusting than Lofgren's, and focuses on Continuity of Government (COG) plans, which, while a low probability of occurring, represent the hard steel behind the expensive velvet glove that Lofgren describes.

    I find the Old Right Libertarians (think Lew Rockwell and Murray Rothbard) the best on Deep State studies. Their examinations of the power elite make for excellent reading. A recent book on John Foster Dulles by David Talbot had that community a-twitter; as the head of the CIA (and de facto head after he was canned by JFK) Dulles had his hands in many pies, many of them downright nasty. These examinations deserve study by curious folks like us.

    Your review to Lofgren's books sounds like it makes for an excellent intro book for those not already curious of the Deep State's presence, but it may a bit benign by a half. The US gov't deep state's foray into Iran-Contra, torture, the Bay of Pigs, JFK's murder, etc. show it's not all just a bunch of people w/ clearances living high off the hog; there are consequences in the form of blowback to these actions. Ask Gary Webb, for example, how things can get downright deadly when one discovers the plans of our nation's intel/deep state services.

    Finally, the idea (espoused by Mencius Moldbug) that their are factions of the Deep State that don't always agree is a fine one, too. The red side (DoD, NSA) holds the bases and the information, the blue side (State, CIA) the diplomatic reins. One just needs to read Sy Hersh's latest on DoD having enough of the CIA's BS w/ ISIS and giving away their positions to "Friendly foreign militaries" to pass to Syria to see that divisions can and do occur in our apparatus.

    The solution to this insanity is to defund as much of it as possible. But as Steve said, a country as rich as America w/ people as smart as we possess...well, that seems neigh impossible. I'd say congressional oversight, but LOL, come on, who the hell are we kidding. In the meantime, I'd say sunlight is the best disinfectant along with a healthy skepticism of the words that come from our media who often serve as their mouthpieces.

    ” A recent book on John Foster Dulles by David Talbot had that community a-twitter; as the head of the CIA (and de facto head after he was canned by JFK) Dulles had his hands in many pies, many of them downright nasty.”

    It’s hard to tell from the language, but I believe you are confusing John Foster Dulles, Eisenhower’s SOS, with his brother, Allen Dulles, who served as head of the CIA under Eisenhower and JFK (until he was fired).

    Read More
  17. @Reg Cæsar
    Is Mike Lofgren related to Nils, the rock guitarist?

    DC and suburbs haven't produced many stars in the rock era-- Mama Cass, Jorma Kaukonen (Jorma Sr was a bureaucrat), and Nils are all that come to mind. Oh, and Root Boy Slim, of the Sex Change Band, who never broke out.

    Are they any better at rap?

    Wale, Fugazi, Dave Grohl & O.A.R. come to mind immediately for DC music veterans.

    Dave McMahon (I am wrong on this last name, but it’s close) over at the Center for A Concerned America wrote a book on the ties between the Deep State and the 60s rock community titled “Echoes from Laurel Canyon” that I have been dying to read, too. His website is below. I think he has cancer now, so I am sure a book purchase will be greatly appreciated.

    http://www.davesweb.cnchost.com

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    The Nighthawks were a crack blues outfit in the '70s that impressed critics more than record buyers.

    And Bill Nye was the Weird Al of pop science ed, with his parodies.
  18. Brutusale says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    Is Mike Lofgren related to Nils, the rock guitarist?

    DC and suburbs haven't produced many stars in the rock era-- Mama Cass, Jorma Kaukonen (Jorma Sr was a bureaucrat), and Nils are all that come to mind. Oh, and Root Boy Slim, of the Sex Change Band, who never broke out.

    Are they any better at rap?

    And Bad Brains, the black hardcore outfit with serious musical chops for the punk era.

    Read More
  19. Mr. Anon says:
    @NOTA
    Does he talk about the role of think tanks in the deep state. Those both provide intellectual hired guns for various establishment causes, and are also a way to give various important players in the deep state jobs when their party is out of power and thus they're between appointed or elected positions.

    “Does he talk about the role of think tanks in the deep state. Those both provide intellectual hired guns for various establishment causes, and are also a way to give various important players in the deep state jobs when their party is out of power and thus they’re between appointed or elected positions.”

    Yes, those must be considered important elements in the modern deep-state. They also serve as a vehicle for propaganda. The “donors” (i.e. oligarchs) who buy candidates are the same ones who fund think-tanks. The think-tank flaks appear on cable news shows, dressed in the guise of “experts”, to promote policies that are beneficial to their patrons. Same for the pollsters and political operatives who appear as pundits on the talking-head shows.

    Read More
  20. @DCThrowback
    Wale, Fugazi, Dave Grohl & O.A.R. come to mind immediately for DC music veterans.

    Dave McMahon (I am wrong on this last name, but it's close) over at the Center for A Concerned America wrote a book on the ties between the Deep State and the 60s rock community titled "Echoes from Laurel Canyon" that I have been dying to read, too. His website is below. I think he has cancer now, so I am sure a book purchase will be greatly appreciated.

    www.davesweb.cnchost.com

    The Nighthawks were a crack blues outfit in the ’70s that impressed critics more than record buyers.

    And Bill Nye was the Weird Al of pop science ed, with his parodies.

    Read More
  21. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Chiron
    How about the US State Department? Its really is the Khaganate of Nuland?

    Lunatic Jeb Boosh once again called for the removal of Assad.

    Here is the deep state toggle for this potus campaign (whichever candidate):

    A. ASSAD MUST GO. We need 50,000 troops on the ground.

    B. UKRAINE. Because, because, because, because.

    There are no other issues in the campaign.

    Read More
  22. fish says:

    OT: Steve…..any comment on the recently announced change to the apparently vasectomy resistant Cromartie Index?

    http://www.fox5ny.com/news/73987882-story

    Read More
  23. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    The Clintons really turned supposed ‘government service’ into a cash cow with their phony foundation and scandalously high speaking fees, being paid hundreds of thousands of dollars for speeches nobody really cared about. It’s all bribery, pay to play. This is how payoffs are done amongst high class people, they keep their word and follow through with payment later on to show the next crop that they’re reliable. No matter who one votes for they always seem to get something else. I wonder what a McCain presidency would have looked like. Would he have gone on to start wars all over the globe or would the system have reined him in?

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    I'd be very interested to read a knowledgeable analysis of how much power the US president truly has. Anyone with more than a child's understanding of politics realizes that his power is limited by many forces (the constitution being only a minor force). But it's clear that Presidents are given a significant amount of leeway to push their pet agendas. Obama's has been the fundamental ethnic and cultural transformation of the US, and he's been very successful in that regard (although it's obviously true that this transformation in no way goes against the interests of our elites).

    Basically, I'd like to see a detailed list of all the foiled ambitions of all US presidents but especially the ones since approximately FDR.

    To address your question specifically, I think McCain would have certainly been allowed to instigate conflict with Iran since that is what Israel wants. Pretty much the only good thing that Obama has done as president is to improve relations with Iran and stand up to Israel.

  24. Leftist conservative [AKA "radical_rebel"] says: • Website

    jackie of the UVA rape hoax being forced to turn over some personal communications in court case:

    http://www.thecollegefix.com/post/25843/

    The wheels of justice move slowly, but they DO grind fine.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    But see this:

    http://www.roanoke.com/news/virginia/now-letter-calls-on-sullivan-to-put-a-stop-to/article_082e5f35-2ed0-5167-8a96-344df51092dc.html


    "Terry O’Neill, president of the National Organization for Women, disagreed with the notion that Jackie had fabricated her story, saying that “I have always believed Jackie” and that Jackie’s trauma could have affected her memory of the alleged assault. She further censured the university and Sullivan for condoning Jackie’s “re-victimization” through Eramo’s court filings."

    Un -effing-believable.

    Either (1) no one has taught President O'Neill the first rule of holes, (2) she is an ideologue whose ideology blinds her to the facts or (3) she is willing to play poker with U Va and she feels that she has enough support that she is can double down and try to not only bluff her way out of a losing hand but get the other side to fold without having to show her cards (she wants Eramo fired for having dragged the "victim" Jackie into the law suit). Regarding #3, I think she is dreaming (see #1 and 2) - even milquetoast leftist PC college administrators are not going to fall for Jackie's shtick and throw Eramo to the wolves now that the mainstream press (the Washington Post) has thoroughly discredited her.

    The other possibility is that she know that U Va is just going to throw her letter in the trash and she is just grandstanding for her supporters who want to know that NOW has their back no matter how outrageously they behave. Also maybe she feels that even if she can't win, she can at least blow some heat in Eramo's direction as a warning to others.

  25. Boomstick says:

    The apologetics for Russia on the paleo-right puzzle me. Putin’s a tool who wants to get the Soviet band back together, though ditching the overt Communism. That he’s also anti-gay doesn’t make him a friend of the US or of the paleo-right.

    Read More
    • Agree: Romanian
    • Replies: @snorlax
    Quite a few of the Putin-apologist commenters are actually paid Russians. The Putinbots are especially endemic amongst blogs and commenters on the political fringe - the alt-right, far-left, libertarians and conspiracy theorists. And then a larger portion of the Putin-apologists are useful idiots who go along with the appearance of consensus created by the Putinbots.

    It's easy to spot Putinbots if you know what to look for - they insist Russia Today is an objective and independent source, or, despite supposedly being American and European, they feel the need to post in-depth "rebuttals" to every single negative statement about Russia or Putin, no matter how arcane (e.g. the weakness of the ruble or the recent doping scandal), or they frequently launch into non-sequitur diatribes about the eeeevil Ukrainians, with the temerity to oppose their country being invaded and laid waste to. And so on. They tend to be very big fans of whataboutism.

    Prediction: Your comment and mine will soon have a half-dozen indignant replies each. ;)

    , @inertial
    No, Putin doesn't want to restore the Soviet Union (unless you believe that a series of trade agreements about lower tariffs and such is the same as the new USSR.) But that's a separate topic. Here, I just want to help you solve your puzzle.

    Putin gave an interview to a German newspaper a few days ago, and in this interview he defined democracy as follows: "Democracy is the rule of the people and the influence of the people over the authorities." Now think about this for a second. That's not how they define democracy in the West, not quite. Instead, that's how they define populism (or rather populist demands.) Is it any wonder that a leader who thinks like that would be attractive to populists all over? Oh, and right before the phrase above Putin said this, "As far as democracy is concerned, the ruling classes usually talk about freedom to pull the wool over the eyes of those whom they govern. "

    You see now?
    , @anon

    The apologetics for Russia on the paleo-right puzzle me.
     
    Really, how strange.

    The neocon offer is invade the world, invite the world which boils down to:

    "hey guys kill Arabs in the middle east for us while we import them into the West to kill you, thanks bunches, mwah."

    In that context only an idiot would dislike someone who annoys neocons.

  26. Lugash says:
    @Chiron
    How about the US State Department? Its really is the Khaganate of Nuland?

    Pretty much. Search Google News on a regular basis and her name pops up all the time in the foreign press and little, out of the way American papers. When she first popped up during the Ukraine Provocation she seemed to be assigned to eastern Europe, but now she’s involved with Syria and the European immigration fiasco.

    As DCThrowback notes, the CIA and State Department are in an alliance with each other. The Iraq war, Benghazi, Operation Fast and Furious all seem to ties these two entities together. A lot of the State Department officials involved like Nuland, Stevens and Sean Smith all have murky pasts that scream CIA.

    If Trump gets the nomination it will be interesting to see how the Deep State reacts. He’s the first president since Nixon who has the potential desire, strength and intelligence to challenge them. The MSM doesn’t take him seriously, even though he’s the front runner. It almost seems like they think someone will ‘take care of him’.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bill
    I was listening to a news story on Bloomberg Radio, I think, maybe yesterday, and the two political analysts were talking about the various differences in policy which would occur were either Hillary or Cruz to be elected. One of them even mentioned how the conversation would be different if Rubio had not faded and how that fade was due to Cruz's hard line on immigration. It was surreal.
    , @gruff

    If Trump gets the nomination it will be interesting to see how the Deep State reacts. He’s the first president since Nixon who has the potential desire, strength and intelligence to challenge them
     
    Does he really have the strength? I mean connections, pull where it counts. He knows a lot of entertainers but does he have what it takes to tangle with Langley?
  27. marwan says:

    OT
    But I like to think of stevie as ” the thinking man’s racist ” .

    Read More
  28. Whiskey says: • Website

    Steve, I think Charles Murray more accurately described the “deep state” which is an intermarried, interconnected, nepotistic group of people entrenched in the government, related industries, and reflects the interests of the new gentry class, to borrow Kotkin’s phrase.

    Consider Michael Lewis of Liars Poker and Moneyball and the Big Short and the Blind Side. He was hired at Saloman on the sole basis of having gone to Dartmouth and being friends with the son of someone at Saloman. He knew nothing of bonds or equities. His major was History.

    Hollywood is the same way, with say Conan O’Brien’s show and the Simpsons being notorious for hiring only Harvard cronies and cronies of cronies. You have people like Nuland who are there at the State Dept. for reasons of relatives (she’s related to someone) and the emergence of a defacto aristocracy.

    Rather than landed estates, the new aristocracy depends on control of institutions through crony, nepotistic networks that are deeply centralized. I’d say the US resembles socially more China and Russia than say, Turkey. Its always the same few princelings jockeying for power which is why Trump, a rich and powerful man but one OUTSIDE THE ARISTOCRACY is so threatening. If say, Kathleen Brown had emerged as a Republican and said the same things, the reaction would have been far less — personnel IS the policy, and while there is churn the SAME FAMILY/CRONY NETWORKS always have a hold on important positions.

    This is not going to end well.

    And, being aristocratic, explains the massive sex / gender differential in support for the status quo aristocracy or revolt and overthrow. Women love love love aristocrats, why what better to marry into?

    Read More
    • Replies: @EriK
    Michael Lewis went to Princeton, not Dartmouth, and the London School of Economics. He was then hired by Salomon Brothers. I do agree he didn't describe himself as being ready for Wall Street when hired.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Women love love love aristocrats, why what better to marry into?
     
    Wait a minute… I thought they loved loved loved Mandingo.

    Did their tastes suddenly change? Or, as successful social climbers, do they eat their beefcake and have it, too?
  29. Hepp says:

    What’s interesting is that the elites would pretty much be left alone to be as corrupt and rich as they’d like they just stopped mass immigration and threw a few cultural bones to the masse like leaving abortion and gay marriage to the states. But they can’t help it, because of the nature of the regime and how they see themselves.

    Read More
  30. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    We don’t have a Deep State. We have a Balls Deep State – a state that endlessly screws its citizens balls deep.

    Read More
  31. Jack D says:

    [America] can more or less afford to waste vast amounts of money on F-35s and the like

    First of all, we can’t REALLY afford this – we are like someone who sits down and has a big meal with expensive wines at a super luxurious restaurant knowing that they don’t have a penny in their pocket. Only if you are an oblivious idiot or mentally ill can you put it out of your head that the overpriced food and wine isn’t going to be worth all the hassle that is going to come down on your head later on. (Incidentally, there used to be a well dressed black woman in Philadelphia who used to do exactly that on a regular basis. Even after she became known to the restaurant community, she got away with it for a while because who would dare say anything to a black customer before a meal (“Can I see your credit card?”). After about the 10th time it stopped working but it lasted surprisingly long.)

    2nd, last night Obama BRAGGED that we spend as much money on the military as the next six countries combined (or ten – forget which), as if this is something to be proud of. Not that our military is six times more effective (you would think that if were true, no one would dare to take us on and we wouldn’t keep getting into so many wars), just that we spend X times more money. He also bragged that we had bombed ISIS 10,000 times (or something like that). If our super expensive military is so effective, why hasn’t ISIS surrendered (it appears to have barely been dented) after so many thousands of air strikes?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rob McX
    America is still dining out on its equivalent of Untouchable Black Customer status.
  32. Old fogey says:

    “The MSM doesn’t take [Trump] seriously, even though he’s the front runner. It almost seems like they think someone will ‘take care of him’.”

    That is what I find most frightening these days.

    Read More
  33. snorlax says:
    @Boomstick
    The apologetics for Russia on the paleo-right puzzle me. Putin's a tool who wants to get the Soviet band back together, though ditching the overt Communism. That he's also anti-gay doesn't make him a friend of the US or of the paleo-right.

    Quite a few of the Putin-apologist commenters are actually paid Russians. The Putinbots are especially endemic amongst blogs and commenters on the political fringe – the alt-right, far-left, libertarians and conspiracy theorists. And then a larger portion of the Putin-apologists are useful idiots who go along with the appearance of consensus created by the Putinbots.

    It’s easy to spot Putinbots if you know what to look for – they insist Russia Today is an objective and independent source, or, despite supposedly being American and European, they feel the need to post in-depth “rebuttals” to every single negative statement about Russia or Putin, no matter how arcane (e.g. the weakness of the ruble or the recent doping scandal), or they frequently launch into non-sequitur diatribes about the eeeevil Ukrainians, with the temerity to oppose their country being invaded and laid waste to. And so on. They tend to be very big fans of whataboutism.

    Prediction: Your comment and mine will soon have a half-dozen indignant replies each. ;)

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    As an unpaid Putin fan and defender, do you know where I can get my checks?
    , @Mr. Anon
    "It’s easy to spot Putinbots if you know what to look for......"

    They sound like Hasbara. But perhaps you think that they are just myth.

    What you describe as "Putinbots" doesn't describe anybody I've seen at this website. Some people like him, others hate him. Others are just neutral. But I haven't seen any posts that seem like they are due to paid russian trolls.

    "Prediction: Your comment and mine will soon have a half-dozen indignant replies each."

    Imagine! Getting indignant at being called a paid stooge. The nerve of some people.
  34. Bill says:
    @Lugash
    Pretty much. Search Google News on a regular basis and her name pops up all the time in the foreign press and little, out of the way American papers. When she first popped up during the Ukraine Provocation she seemed to be assigned to eastern Europe, but now she's involved with Syria and the European immigration fiasco.

    As DCThrowback notes, the CIA and State Department are in an alliance with each other. The Iraq war, Benghazi, Operation Fast and Furious all seem to ties these two entities together. A lot of the State Department officials involved like Nuland, Stevens and Sean Smith all have murky pasts that scream CIA.

    If Trump gets the nomination it will be interesting to see how the Deep State reacts. He's the first president since Nixon who has the potential desire, strength and intelligence to challenge them. The MSM doesn't take him seriously, even though he's the front runner. It almost seems like they think someone will 'take care of him'.

    I was listening to a news story on Bloomberg Radio, I think, maybe yesterday, and the two political analysts were talking about the various differences in policy which would occur were either Hillary or Cruz to be elected. One of them even mentioned how the conversation would be different if Rubio had not faded and how that fade was due to Cruz’s hard line on immigration. It was surreal.

    Read More
  35. L7's says:

    DC throwback meant dave McGowan. He is a very funny writer but less smooth in person. If you look at his stuff with an open mind if nothing else good questions are raised. He’s another so Cal guy of steve s Era probably crossed paths over the years and not even knew it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @DCThrowback
    Exactly correct, thanks sir. Now I am going to buy his book.
    , @Mr. Anon
    "DC throwback meant dave McGowan. He is a very funny writer but less smooth in person."

    The author of the "Wag the Moondoggie" site? He was an idiot - and an especially stupid one. And he's not funny either. He clearly thought that he was - but he wasn't.
  36. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Reg Cæsar
    Is Mike Lofgren related to Nils, the rock guitarist?

    DC and suburbs haven't produced many stars in the rock era-- Mama Cass, Jorma Kaukonen (Jorma Sr was a bureaucrat), and Nils are all that come to mind. Oh, and Root Boy Slim, of the Sex Change Band, who never broke out.

    Are they any better at rap?

    DC is mostly irrelevant in hip-hop history.

    The closest area I can think of with people who really hit nationally are from Virginia Beach.

    Maybe DC is too accessible to NYC to have its own scenes without its most ambitious people being absorbed by the goliath to its north?

    DC: hollywood for ugly people/ivy league graduates who can’t hack it on wall street/southern weather and northern charm

    Read More
    • Replies: @ua2
    Philly is closer to NYC yet has a rich history of local rap historically. DC's weak showing in rap has to do with the type of black-community that populated DC. Lot of 'international' blacks, gay blacks, weird blacks, bougie blacks, and military blacks.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    DC is mostly irrelevant in hip-hop history.

    The closest area I can think of with people who really hit nationally are from Virginia Beach.
     
    Has anybody else from Tidewater made it big since Gary U.S. Bonds?
  37. Svigor says:

    Here we have a review of a book about the American “Deep State,” yet a CTRL-F for “Zion” yields no results for the Taki article, and no results on this page.

    Pass.

    Read More
  38. EriK says:

    OT
    Can’t wait to see Steve’s post on his doppelganger’s Spanish version of the response to the SOTU.
    Mario Diaz Balart Spanish Language GOP Respose to 2016 State of the Union Address

    Read More
  39. Maybe it’s because I’m a minor Deep State functionary (in its boring domestic policy incarnation), but I think there’s kind of no there there. Yes, understanding how academia, the media, formal government policy, large corporations, and the Deep State function in a continuum of coordination and control would be interesting, but it is deliberately impossible. Our system doesn’t have any man behind the curtain, just people who can pass the buck effectively, and so it is extremely difficult to understand where decisions and priorities come from. The guys who look like they’re calling the shots- the Goldmans and Soroses and Slims- are just skimming off the top of the great flows of capital and resources that are kept in endless motion by forces that are almost entirely opaque. Well, I guess that’s why we’re reading ISteve.

    Of course, if sociology knew what it was doing, this is the kind of thing it would seriously investigate, instead of interviewing lesbian Latinx ceramic artists in Dumbo about how they feel about making Zuni-style pottery or regressing mortgage default rates on race and calling racial discrimination. Not holding my breath.

    Read More
  40. anonguy says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    Is Mike Lofgren related to Nils, the rock guitarist?

    DC and suburbs haven't produced many stars in the rock era-- Mama Cass, Jorma Kaukonen (Jorma Sr was a bureaucrat), and Nils are all that come to mind. Oh, and Root Boy Slim, of the Sex Change Band, who never broke out.

    Are they any better at rap?

    Are they any better at rap?

    It may be thin gruel, but DC does have Go Go.

    Read More
  41. Jack D says:
    @Leftist conservative
    jackie of the UVA rape hoax being forced to turn over some personal communications in court case:
    http://www.thecollegefix.com/post/25843/


    The wheels of justice move slowly, but they DO grind fine.

    But see this:

    http://www.roanoke.com/news/virginia/now-letter-calls-on-sullivan-to-put-a-stop-to/article_082e5f35-2ed0-5167-8a96-344df51092dc.html

    “Terry O’Neill, president of the National Organization for Women, disagreed with the notion that Jackie had fabricated her story, saying that “I have always believed Jackie” and that Jackie’s trauma could have affected her memory of the alleged assault. She further censured the university and Sullivan for condoning Jackie’s “re-victimization” through Eramo’s court filings.”

    Un -effing-believable.

    Either (1) no one has taught President O’Neill the first rule of holes, (2) she is an ideologue whose ideology blinds her to the facts or (3) she is willing to play poker with U Va and she feels that she has enough support that she is can double down and try to not only bluff her way out of a losing hand but get the other side to fold without having to show her cards (she wants Eramo fired for having dragged the “victim” Jackie into the law suit). Regarding #3, I think she is dreaming (see #1 and 2) – even milquetoast leftist PC college administrators are not going to fall for Jackie’s shtick and throw Eramo to the wolves now that the mainstream press (the Washington Post) has thoroughly discredited her.

    The other possibility is that she know that U Va is just going to throw her letter in the trash and she is just grandstanding for her supporters who want to know that NOW has their back no matter how outrageously they behave. Also maybe she feels that even if she can’t win, she can at least blow some heat in Eramo’s direction as a warning to others.

    Read More
  42. donut says:
    @Bill B.
    OT

    I would like to thank Steve's commentators who drew attention to Florence King who also died last week.

    She was indeed an astonishingly good writer I discover. I can't imagine prose written for her purposes being better.

    This essay on Lizzie Borden I find strangely comforting in these trying times not just because sheer quality is itself a comfort but because it hints at subterranean strengths in the west.

    http://www.nationalreview.com/article/211803/lizzie-border-wasp-florence-king?target=author&tid=901405

    I enjoyed her book “With Charity Toward None “You might also enjoy “Against Love” by Laura Kipnis .

    Read More
  43. donut says:
    @27 year old
    Hilarious video clip of the Deep State at work:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlA9hmrC8DU

    Some Cohen Bros. fans didn’t like that movie but I thought it was quite good .

    Read More
  44. BB753 says:
    @snorlax
    Quite a few of the Putin-apologist commenters are actually paid Russians. The Putinbots are especially endemic amongst blogs and commenters on the political fringe - the alt-right, far-left, libertarians and conspiracy theorists. And then a larger portion of the Putin-apologists are useful idiots who go along with the appearance of consensus created by the Putinbots.

    It's easy to spot Putinbots if you know what to look for - they insist Russia Today is an objective and independent source, or, despite supposedly being American and European, they feel the need to post in-depth "rebuttals" to every single negative statement about Russia or Putin, no matter how arcane (e.g. the weakness of the ruble or the recent doping scandal), or they frequently launch into non-sequitur diatribes about the eeeevil Ukrainians, with the temerity to oppose their country being invaded and laid waste to. And so on. They tend to be very big fans of whataboutism.

    Prediction: Your comment and mine will soon have a half-dozen indignant replies each. ;)

    As an unpaid Putin fan and defender, do you know where I can get my checks?

    Read More
    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @anonymous
    Comrade, your Putin rubles are on their way. But don't breathe a word because some of the shrewd observers that monitor this blog are onto us.

    Yours in struggle,
    VP
  45. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Anyone read this? Any good?

    http://www.amazon.com/The-American-Deep-State-Democracy/dp/1442214244

    If the ‘plumbers’ fixed the leaks in the state, what are people who try to probe its depths?

    Plungers?

    Read More
  46. Hepp says:

    OT, but look at what clever liars they are:

    Headline

    Research Doesn’t Back a Link Between Migrants and Crime in U.S.

    Now the text

    Mr. Ewing and Rubén G. Rumbaut, a sociology professor at University of California in Irvine, collaborated on a 2007 study, based on official crime and census data, that methodically refuted what they described as the “myth of immigrant criminality” in the United States.

    It found that for “every ethnic group without exception, incarceration rates among young men are lowest among immigrants, even those who are the least educated.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/14/world/europe/research-doesnt-back-a-link-between-migrants-and-crime-in-us.html?emc=edit_tnt_20160113&nlid=62382746&tntemail0=y

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon

    It found that for “every ethnic group without exception, incarceration rates among young men are lowest among immigrants, even those who are the least educated.”
     
    And if they hadn't been allowed to immigrate their incarceration rate in the US would be zero.

    The NYT - never knowingly honest.
    , @Anonymous

    Research Doesn’t Back a Link Between Migrants and Crime in U.S.
     
    It had better not, if it wants to get funded.
  47. EriK says:
    @Whiskey
    Steve, I think Charles Murray more accurately described the "deep state" which is an intermarried, interconnected, nepotistic group of people entrenched in the government, related industries, and reflects the interests of the new gentry class, to borrow Kotkin's phrase.

    Consider Michael Lewis of Liars Poker and Moneyball and the Big Short and the Blind Side. He was hired at Saloman on the sole basis of having gone to Dartmouth and being friends with the son of someone at Saloman. He knew nothing of bonds or equities. His major was History.

    Hollywood is the same way, with say Conan O'Brien's show and the Simpsons being notorious for hiring only Harvard cronies and cronies of cronies. You have people like Nuland who are there at the State Dept. for reasons of relatives (she's related to someone) and the emergence of a defacto aristocracy.

    Rather than landed estates, the new aristocracy depends on control of institutions through crony, nepotistic networks that are deeply centralized. I'd say the US resembles socially more China and Russia than say, Turkey. Its always the same few princelings jockeying for power which is why Trump, a rich and powerful man but one OUTSIDE THE ARISTOCRACY is so threatening. If say, Kathleen Brown had emerged as a Republican and said the same things, the reaction would have been far less -- personnel IS the policy, and while there is churn the SAME FAMILY/CRONY NETWORKS always have a hold on important positions.

    This is not going to end well.

    And, being aristocratic, explains the massive sex / gender differential in support for the status quo aristocracy or revolt and overthrow. Women love love love aristocrats, why what better to marry into?

    Michael Lewis went to Princeton, not Dartmouth, and the London School of Economics. He was then hired by Salomon Brothers. I do agree he didn’t describe himself as being ready for Wall Street when hired.

    Read More
    • Replies: @DCThrowback
    Wall Street mines for high IQ, they figure (correctly) they'll train you in what you need to know. I had plenty of friends from my (USNWR top 20) alma mater who got gigs at goldman and the morgue not only as finance majors, but english majors as well.
  48. Clyde says:

    OT:

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/general-electric-plans-to-move-headquarters-to-boston-1452703676

    General Electric to Move Headquarters to Boston

    For GE, the move to uproot its executive offices comes amid a broader effort to cut corporate costs and streamline its operations for what it portrays as a new industrial era that will revolve around software innovation as much as bended metal—one that will make it a priority to attract the talented workers who prefer to live and work in cities.

    GE Moved in 1974 to the Fairfield campus, which covers more than 68 acres. The Fairfield site includes two three-story office buildings, a helipad, television-production facilities and hotel rooms for corporate guests.

    The attraction of such suburban office settings has faded, said John Boyd, a corporate-relocation consultant. Improvements in public safety in New York City and a preference among younger workers for urban lifestyles have lured major companies back toward or into cities, he said, and lowered the value of suburban office campuses such as GE’s.

    “That’s one of the issues of our time: the decline of the suburban office complex,” Mr. Boyd said. “States like Connecticut and New Jersey lead the nation in vacant suburban office campuses.”

    Read More
  49. Read More
  50. donut says:

    What “Deep State” ? They seem to be right out in the open . Even our new great white hope Trump isn’t really promising fuckall . He still want’s to continue our foreign involvements and maintain our subservience to the Jew . Trump is just a blowhard and will leave you pregnant and then dump you . I’ll bet he won’t even pay any child support . Keep your panties on and wait for true love . The Donut loves you , now let’s get those panties off .

    Read More
    • Replies: @andy178
    why do you punctuate so weird?
    , @JohnnyWalker123
    I'll give you this. You're one of the most entertaining posters here.
  51. Read More
    • Replies: @Leftist conservative
    speaking of nikki haley and the obvious push to get her into higher office, check out this excellent new vdare post:
    http://www.vdare.com/posts/tough-luck-gop-establishment-nikki-haley-a-not-natural-born-citizen-either-is-george-p-bush


    I find the arguments above persuasive, and not only are cruz and haley ineligible under those arguments, so was obama illegible for the white house...of course mccain never gave his permission to pursue the birther argument in 2008...obama should never have been allowed to run!
  52. @Whiskey
    Steve, I think Charles Murray more accurately described the "deep state" which is an intermarried, interconnected, nepotistic group of people entrenched in the government, related industries, and reflects the interests of the new gentry class, to borrow Kotkin's phrase.

    Consider Michael Lewis of Liars Poker and Moneyball and the Big Short and the Blind Side. He was hired at Saloman on the sole basis of having gone to Dartmouth and being friends with the son of someone at Saloman. He knew nothing of bonds or equities. His major was History.

    Hollywood is the same way, with say Conan O'Brien's show and the Simpsons being notorious for hiring only Harvard cronies and cronies of cronies. You have people like Nuland who are there at the State Dept. for reasons of relatives (she's related to someone) and the emergence of a defacto aristocracy.

    Rather than landed estates, the new aristocracy depends on control of institutions through crony, nepotistic networks that are deeply centralized. I'd say the US resembles socially more China and Russia than say, Turkey. Its always the same few princelings jockeying for power which is why Trump, a rich and powerful man but one OUTSIDE THE ARISTOCRACY is so threatening. If say, Kathleen Brown had emerged as a Republican and said the same things, the reaction would have been far less -- personnel IS the policy, and while there is churn the SAME FAMILY/CRONY NETWORKS always have a hold on important positions.

    This is not going to end well.

    And, being aristocratic, explains the massive sex / gender differential in support for the status quo aristocracy or revolt and overthrow. Women love love love aristocrats, why what better to marry into?

    Women love love love aristocrats, why what better to marry into?

    Wait a minute… I thought they loved loved loved Mandingo.

    Did their tastes suddenly change? Or, as successful social climbers, do they eat their beefcake and have it, too?

    Read More
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    They like good-looking men with lots of money, skills in bed, invites to parties, and entertaining lives.

    Aristocrats have all of that.
    , @5371
    Whiskey suspects they love love love everyone but him.
  53. @Bill B.
    OT

    I would like to thank Steve's commentators who drew attention to Florence King who also died last week.

    She was indeed an astonishingly good writer I discover. I can't imagine prose written for her purposes being better.

    This essay on Lizzie Borden I find strangely comforting in these trying times not just because sheer quality is itself a comfort but because it hints at subterranean strengths in the west.

    http://www.nationalreview.com/article/211803/lizzie-border-wasp-florence-king?target=author&tid=901405

    The NYT published a respectful obituary, listing many of her books. Somehow, they left out Wasp, Where Is Thy Sting? I wonder why.

    Read More
  54. @L7's
    DC throwback meant dave McGowan. He is a very funny writer but less smooth in person. If you look at his stuff with an open mind if nothing else good questions are raised. He's another so Cal guy of steve s Era probably crossed paths over the years and not even knew it.

    Exactly correct, thanks sir. Now I am going to buy his book.

    Read More
  55. @EriK
    Michael Lewis went to Princeton, not Dartmouth, and the London School of Economics. He was then hired by Salomon Brothers. I do agree he didn't describe himself as being ready for Wall Street when hired.

    Wall Street mines for high IQ, they figure (correctly) they’ll train you in what you need to know. I had plenty of friends from my (USNWR top 20) alma mater who got gigs at goldman and the morgue not only as finance majors, but english majors as well.

    Read More
    • Replies: @EriK
    I understand that. Lewis said as much. He didn't seem convinced it was a good idea IIRC. Not that he offered a clear alternative.
    , @NOTA
    How much of the point of that is getting high IQ people, and how much is getting the connections made at top schools?
  56. AndrewR says:
    @anonymous
    The Clintons really turned supposed 'government service' into a cash cow with their phony foundation and scandalously high speaking fees, being paid hundreds of thousands of dollars for speeches nobody really cared about. It's all bribery, pay to play. This is how payoffs are done amongst high class people, they keep their word and follow through with payment later on to show the next crop that they're reliable. No matter who one votes for they always seem to get something else. I wonder what a McCain presidency would have looked like. Would he have gone on to start wars all over the globe or would the system have reined him in?

    I’d be very interested to read a knowledgeable analysis of how much power the US president truly has. Anyone with more than a child’s understanding of politics realizes that his power is limited by many forces (the constitution being only a minor force). But it’s clear that Presidents are given a significant amount of leeway to push their pet agendas. Obama’s has been the fundamental ethnic and cultural transformation of the US, and he’s been very successful in that regard (although it’s obviously true that this transformation in no way goes against the interests of our elites).

    Basically, I’d like to see a detailed list of all the foiled ambitions of all US presidents but especially the ones since approximately FDR.

    To address your question specifically, I think McCain would have certainly been allowed to instigate conflict with Iran since that is what Israel wants. Pretty much the only good thing that Obama has done as president is to improve relations with Iran and stand up to Israel.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The president has a lot of power to betray his own side.
    , @PiltdownMan
    Being ill-educated on matters regarding constitutional democracy, I'm beginning to understand only late in life that the President of the United States of America is akin to the building supervisor in a co-op apartment building.

    His power comes from his vast number of underlings and flunkies, and from the huge budget he has, but the owners can stop him in his tracks anytime they choose.

    The constitutional controls on him–via the legislature's iron grip on the budget and it's ability to legislate into reality any constraint on him it chooses–means that his leadership ability to take charge, be creative and fix national problems is severely crippled.

  57. Boomstick says:
    @27 year old
    Hilarious video clip of the Deep State at work:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlA9hmrC8DU

    JK Simmons is a great character actor in these roles. He completely nailed JJ Jameson in the Spiderman movies as well.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Romanian
    I still can’t look at him and not think about his role as an Aryan Brotherhood head in Oz, when he made the new guy accountant (standing in for the audience) his bitch by tattooing a swastika on his ass in bed. Affably evil indeed. I was 11 or so, I think, when I went into the living room after bedtime to see that show they were advertising on TV. Though Adebisi was scarier.
  58. EriK says:
    @DCThrowback
    Wall Street mines for high IQ, they figure (correctly) they'll train you in what you need to know. I had plenty of friends from my (USNWR top 20) alma mater who got gigs at goldman and the morgue not only as finance majors, but english majors as well.

    I understand that. Lewis said as much. He didn’t seem convinced it was a good idea IIRC. Not that he offered a clear alternative.

    Read More
  59. @DPG
    A family member works for the DoD. We were commiserating about dealing with mediocrity at work. I mentioned how much dead weight we have in our operations group (financial company), people making 60 grand a year.

    He replied, "we've got the same problem, except the people I'm talking about make over a hundred."

    Exactly right. The average grade in the US Civil Service is GS-13 which pays around $100k -before- you add in “locality adjustments” for expensive areas like N Virginia. The latest budget bill raised to $300 a month the allowance federal employees can get for riding public transit. The country would be up in arms if they saw all the BMWs, Mercedes, Porsches, Range Rovers, etc. being driven around DC. It’s disgusting.

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  60. inertial says:
    @Boomstick
    The apologetics for Russia on the paleo-right puzzle me. Putin's a tool who wants to get the Soviet band back together, though ditching the overt Communism. That he's also anti-gay doesn't make him a friend of the US or of the paleo-right.

    No, Putin doesn’t want to restore the Soviet Union (unless you believe that a series of trade agreements about lower tariffs and such is the same as the new USSR.) But that’s a separate topic. Here, I just want to help you solve your puzzle.

    Putin gave an interview to a German newspaper a few days ago, and in this interview he defined democracy as follows: “Democracy is the rule of the people and the influence of the people over the authorities.” Now think about this for a second. That’s not how they define democracy in the West, not quite. Instead, that’s how they define populism (or rather populist demands.) Is it any wonder that a leader who thinks like that would be attractive to populists all over? Oh, and right before the phrase above Putin said this, “As far as democracy is concerned, the ruling classes usually talk about freedom to pull the wool over the eyes of those whom they govern. ”

    You see now?

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    Putin's right of course; any system that doesn't have a feedback loop will crash and sooner rather than later.

    Democracy is one way to provide that feedback loop but if it becomes rigged by big donors, party collusion and media manipulation then it stops working.

    A medieval king with a court jester has more of a feedback loop than the current US - which is why the US heading toward a cliff.
  61. @AndrewR
    I'd be very interested to read a knowledgeable analysis of how much power the US president truly has. Anyone with more than a child's understanding of politics realizes that his power is limited by many forces (the constitution being only a minor force). But it's clear that Presidents are given a significant amount of leeway to push their pet agendas. Obama's has been the fundamental ethnic and cultural transformation of the US, and he's been very successful in that regard (although it's obviously true that this transformation in no way goes against the interests of our elites).

    Basically, I'd like to see a detailed list of all the foiled ambitions of all US presidents but especially the ones since approximately FDR.

    To address your question specifically, I think McCain would have certainly been allowed to instigate conflict with Iran since that is what Israel wants. Pretty much the only good thing that Obama has done as president is to improve relations with Iran and stand up to Israel.

    The president has a lot of power to betray his own side.

    Read More
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    Perhaps the CIA has some blackmail power over Obama.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6m1XbWOfVk

    CIA Analyst Russ Tice claimed the NSA spied on Obama before he became president. I wouldn't be surprised if the NSA picked up on some controversial statements from Obama. Perhaps these statements were about topics like Tony Rezko and Reverend Wright. Given that Bush administration officials were running the NSA at the time, maybe that can explain why Obama has continued Bush's policies on foreign policy and domestic spying.

    Maybe Obama isn't really president at all. Maybe he's just being blackmailed. It wouldn't surprise me if he's just a puppet being manipulated from behind the scenes.
  62. Rob McX says:
    @Jack D

    [America] can more or less afford to waste vast amounts of money on F-35s and the like
     
    First of all, we can't REALLY afford this - we are like someone who sits down and has a big meal with expensive wines at a super luxurious restaurant knowing that they don't have a penny in their pocket. Only if you are an oblivious idiot or mentally ill can you put it out of your head that the overpriced food and wine isn't going to be worth all the hassle that is going to come down on your head later on. (Incidentally, there used to be a well dressed black woman in Philadelphia who used to do exactly that on a regular basis. Even after she became known to the restaurant community, she got away with it for a while because who would dare say anything to a black customer before a meal ("Can I see your credit card?"). After about the 10th time it stopped working but it lasted surprisingly long.)

    2nd, last night Obama BRAGGED that we spend as much money on the military as the next six countries combined (or ten - forget which), as if this is something to be proud of. Not that our military is six times more effective (you would think that if were true, no one would dare to take us on and we wouldn't keep getting into so many wars), just that we spend X times more money. He also bragged that we had bombed ISIS 10,000 times (or something like that). If our super expensive military is so effective, why hasn't ISIS surrendered (it appears to have barely been dented) after so many thousands of air strikes?

    America is still dining out on its equivalent of Untouchable Black Customer status.

    Read More
  63. gruff says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    Is Mike Lofgren related to Nils, the rock guitarist?

    DC and suburbs haven't produced many stars in the rock era-- Mama Cass, Jorma Kaukonen (Jorma Sr was a bureaucrat), and Nils are all that come to mind. Oh, and Root Boy Slim, of the Sex Change Band, who never broke out.

    Are they any better at rap?

    Minor Threat.

    Read More
  64. gruff says:
    @anonguy

    Are they any better at rap?
     
    It may be thin gruel, but DC does have Go Go.

    Trouble Funk!

    Read More
  65. gruff says:
    @Lugash
    Pretty much. Search Google News on a regular basis and her name pops up all the time in the foreign press and little, out of the way American papers. When she first popped up during the Ukraine Provocation she seemed to be assigned to eastern Europe, but now she's involved with Syria and the European immigration fiasco.

    As DCThrowback notes, the CIA and State Department are in an alliance with each other. The Iraq war, Benghazi, Operation Fast and Furious all seem to ties these two entities together. A lot of the State Department officials involved like Nuland, Stevens and Sean Smith all have murky pasts that scream CIA.

    If Trump gets the nomination it will be interesting to see how the Deep State reacts. He's the first president since Nixon who has the potential desire, strength and intelligence to challenge them. The MSM doesn't take him seriously, even though he's the front runner. It almost seems like they think someone will 'take care of him'.

    If Trump gets the nomination it will be interesting to see how the Deep State reacts. He’s the first president since Nixon who has the potential desire, strength and intelligence to challenge them

    Does he really have the strength? I mean connections, pull where it counts. He knows a lot of entertainers but does he have what it takes to tangle with Langley?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Maybe Trump would appoint Derek Jeter Director of the CIA?
    , @Anonym
    Trump is a negotiator. I think it's likely he will do his best to learn what it is the Deep State want, he knows what he wants (for the USA), and he will work out a compromise deal that suits both.
  66. @gruff

    If Trump gets the nomination it will be interesting to see how the Deep State reacts. He’s the first president since Nixon who has the potential desire, strength and intelligence to challenge them
     
    Does he really have the strength? I mean connections, pull where it counts. He knows a lot of entertainers but does he have what it takes to tangle with Langley?

    Maybe Trump would appoint Derek Jeter Director of the CIA?

    Read More
  67. ua2 says:
    @Anonymous
    DC is mostly irrelevant in hip-hop history.


    The closest area I can think of with people who really hit nationally are from Virginia Beach.


    Maybe DC is too accessible to NYC to have its own scenes without its most ambitious people being absorbed by the goliath to its north?

    DC: hollywood for ugly people/ivy league graduates who can't hack it on wall street/southern weather and northern charm

    Philly is closer to NYC yet has a rich history of local rap historically. DC’s weak showing in rap has to do with the type of black-community that populated DC. Lot of ‘international’ blacks, gay blacks, weird blacks, bougie blacks, and military blacks.

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  68. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @BB753
    As an unpaid Putin fan and defender, do you know where I can get my checks?

    Comrade, your Putin rubles are on their way. But don’t breathe a word because some of the shrewd observers that monitor this blog are onto us.

    Yours in struggle,
    VP

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  69. ua2 says:
    @Anonymous

    the deep state are largely shielded from the economic consequences of mass immigration by their jobs’ requirements of citizenship and security clearances.

     

    This is not true. My job involves security clearance background investigations for the USG. I've had a lot of clearances involving non-U.S. citizens. Heck, I've had top secret clearances (SSBI) investigations where the foreign national Subject's prior address was a village in West Africa that didn't have street names. I've had a lot of H1-B contractors doing USG IT work getting public trust or secret-level clearances. They and their spouse will be foreign nationals but all of their children (born in U.S.) are citizens.

    According to DOHA, in 2015 exactly zero security clearances were denied based on allegiance to the U.S., For foreign preference it was 41. While for finances it was 499. (NB: more than 99% who apply for a security clearance get it). Who can apply for a security clearance? A USG agency or a company that contracts with USG for work classified or confidential (almost all contracting work) information.

    http://clearancejobsblog.com/top-issues-2015-security-clearance-denials/

    I have to disagree with you. CIA/NSA/FBI and virtually all State (FSOs or INR for example) jobs require US Citizenship. DOHA does not include CIA or NSA (not sure about FBI or State) clearance decisions for blue badges.

    I know for a fact that the CIA rate for obtaining clearance is much less than the 99% you tout (which is a number includes public trust or secret that’s given out like candy).

    I’m a citizen born in the US and my parents are not citizens – before 2008, it was extremely difficult for you to get cleared at CIA with that combo (all employees there are TS/SCI). There is high scrutiny still with that combo.

    I can’t speak to what DOD and other Agencies that run their clearances through OPM do.

    But steve is bang on with the labor market protection TS/SCI (w FSP) – CIA’s standard clearance level – provides.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    If Huma Abedin can get a clearance, how difficult can it be?
  70. @Reg Cæsar

    Women love love love aristocrats, why what better to marry into?
     
    Wait a minute… I thought they loved loved loved Mandingo.

    Did their tastes suddenly change? Or, as successful social climbers, do they eat their beefcake and have it, too?

    They like good-looking men with lots of money, skills in bed, invites to parties, and entertaining lives.

    Aristocrats have all of that.

    Read More
  71. @Steve Sailer
    The president has a lot of power to betray his own side.

    Perhaps the CIA has some blackmail power over Obama.

    CIA Analyst Russ Tice claimed the NSA spied on Obama before he became president. I wouldn’t be surprised if the NSA picked up on some controversial statements from Obama. Perhaps these statements were about topics like Tony Rezko and Reverend Wright. Given that Bush administration officials were running the NSA at the time, maybe that can explain why Obama has continued Bush’s policies on foreign policy and domestic spying.

    Maybe Obama isn’t really president at all. Maybe he’s just being blackmailed. It wouldn’t surprise me if he’s just a puppet being manipulated from behind the scenes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Leftist conservative
    nice youtube link there. ...Sailer has brought up this possibility--that many politicians got elected because they are blackmailable. And listening to that video brings up the point that Obama was being set up to be president before he was even elected senator. ...he had not even be elected US Senator, yet he gave the keynote speech at the 2004 Dem convention...same thing with Romney--they were running mormon-friendly ads on TV a few years before he ran for president.

    Now they are pushing Nikki Halley on us. Expect the establishment to put her in the white house soon.
  72. @AndrewR
    I'd be very interested to read a knowledgeable analysis of how much power the US president truly has. Anyone with more than a child's understanding of politics realizes that his power is limited by many forces (the constitution being only a minor force). But it's clear that Presidents are given a significant amount of leeway to push their pet agendas. Obama's has been the fundamental ethnic and cultural transformation of the US, and he's been very successful in that regard (although it's obviously true that this transformation in no way goes against the interests of our elites).

    Basically, I'd like to see a detailed list of all the foiled ambitions of all US presidents but especially the ones since approximately FDR.

    To address your question specifically, I think McCain would have certainly been allowed to instigate conflict with Iran since that is what Israel wants. Pretty much the only good thing that Obama has done as president is to improve relations with Iran and stand up to Israel.

    Being ill-educated on matters regarding constitutional democracy, I’m beginning to understand only late in life that the President of the United States of America is akin to the building supervisor in a co-op apartment building.

    His power comes from his vast number of underlings and flunkies, and from the huge budget he has, but the owners can stop him in his tracks anytime they choose.

    The constitutional controls on him–via the legislature’s iron grip on the budget and it’s ability to legislate into reality any constraint on him it chooses–means that his leadership ability to take charge, be creative and fix national problems is severely crippled.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
    A feature, not a bug of the system. The Founders gave the people the power of the purse, because they knew that it was too tempting to put it into the hands of an executive, even one democratically elected. KGIII raised taxes on a whim (from their perspective; it was actually to help pay expenses incurred for the French and Indian War fought on our behalf, among other things) and without any say so on their part as English citizens. Even Parliament had some say so for folks back in the home country. Ye olde "taxation without representation!" battle cry. Do they even teach that in schools anymore?
  73. Mr. Anon says:
    @snorlax
    Quite a few of the Putin-apologist commenters are actually paid Russians. The Putinbots are especially endemic amongst blogs and commenters on the political fringe - the alt-right, far-left, libertarians and conspiracy theorists. And then a larger portion of the Putin-apologists are useful idiots who go along with the appearance of consensus created by the Putinbots.

    It's easy to spot Putinbots if you know what to look for - they insist Russia Today is an objective and independent source, or, despite supposedly being American and European, they feel the need to post in-depth "rebuttals" to every single negative statement about Russia or Putin, no matter how arcane (e.g. the weakness of the ruble or the recent doping scandal), or they frequently launch into non-sequitur diatribes about the eeeevil Ukrainians, with the temerity to oppose their country being invaded and laid waste to. And so on. They tend to be very big fans of whataboutism.

    Prediction: Your comment and mine will soon have a half-dozen indignant replies each. ;)

    “It’s easy to spot Putinbots if you know what to look for……”

    They sound like Hasbara. But perhaps you think that they are just myth.

    What you describe as “Putinbots” doesn’t describe anybody I’ve seen at this website. Some people like him, others hate him. Others are just neutral. But I haven’t seen any posts that seem like they are due to paid russian trolls.

    “Prediction: Your comment and mine will soon have a half-dozen indignant replies each.”

    Imagine! Getting indignant at being called a paid stooge. The nerve of some people.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    There are many with positive thoughts about Vladdie simply because he likes being a Russian and is all for maintaining and improving Russia's place in the world. Some of us are nostalgic for an American leader with the same outlook.
  74. Mr. Anon says:
    @L7's
    DC throwback meant dave McGowan. He is a very funny writer but less smooth in person. If you look at his stuff with an open mind if nothing else good questions are raised. He's another so Cal guy of steve s Era probably crossed paths over the years and not even knew it.

    “DC throwback meant dave McGowan. He is a very funny writer but less smooth in person.”

    The author of the “Wag the Moondoggie” site? He was an idiot – and an especially stupid one. And he’s not funny either. He clearly thought that he was – but he wasn’t.

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  75. Leftist conservative [AKA "radical rebel"] says: • Website
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Perhaps the CIA has some blackmail power over Obama.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6m1XbWOfVk

    CIA Analyst Russ Tice claimed the NSA spied on Obama before he became president. I wouldn't be surprised if the NSA picked up on some controversial statements from Obama. Perhaps these statements were about topics like Tony Rezko and Reverend Wright. Given that Bush administration officials were running the NSA at the time, maybe that can explain why Obama has continued Bush's policies on foreign policy and domestic spying.

    Maybe Obama isn't really president at all. Maybe he's just being blackmailed. It wouldn't surprise me if he's just a puppet being manipulated from behind the scenes.

    nice youtube link there. …Sailer has brought up this possibility–that many politicians got elected because they are blackmailable. And listening to that video brings up the point that Obama was being set up to be president before he was even elected senator. …he had not even be elected US Senator, yet he gave the keynote speech at the 2004 Dem convention…same thing with Romney–they were running mormon-friendly ads on TV a few years before he ran for president.

    Now they are pushing Nikki Halley on us. Expect the establishment to put her in the white house soon.

    Read More
    • Replies: @JackOH
    Yep, it's possible. Among the search committees where I work, a state university, there's been an informal unarticulated guideline that the more desirable candidate may be one who can be blackmailed into submissiveness should he demonstrate unwanted scholarly or administrative energy.

    Bad credit, unpaid student loans, a known messy domestic situation, misdemeanors or low-end felonies, an affair with a student, failure to control university property or moneys (sometimes a euphemism for allegations of theft), conflicts of interest (such as uncompensated use of university facilities and staff to conduct proprietary research), the advancement of cronies or relatives, alcoholism or drug abuse, and more. Hard to imagine, but these drawbacks can make you more promotable than Mr. Clean. The rule isn't ironclad, but everyone knows it exists.

    The game is up if the scholar or administrator gets wind that he's expected to be a tool and declines to be advanced, or if he takes a publish-and-be-damned attitude to threats made after his hire.

    J. Edgar Hoover, of course, was reportedly a practitioner of the bureaucracy blackmailing elected officials with the effect of undermining the electorate's expectations. It's hard for me to imagine that Hoover's practice is not at work today.
    , @anon

    Now they are pushing Nikki Halley on us. Expect the establishment to put her in the white house soon.
     
    Yes, Rubio was the chosen one for a long time but it seems they may have now decided he sucks.
  76. Anonym says:
    @gruff

    If Trump gets the nomination it will be interesting to see how the Deep State reacts. He’s the first president since Nixon who has the potential desire, strength and intelligence to challenge them
     
    Does he really have the strength? I mean connections, pull where it counts. He knows a lot of entertainers but does he have what it takes to tangle with Langley?

    Trump is a negotiator. I think it’s likely he will do his best to learn what it is the Deep State want, he knows what he wants (for the USA), and he will work out a compromise deal that suits both.

    Read More
  77. 5371 says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Women love love love aristocrats, why what better to marry into?
     
    Wait a minute… I thought they loved loved loved Mandingo.

    Did their tastes suddenly change? Or, as successful social climbers, do they eat their beefcake and have it, too?

    Whiskey suspects they love love love everyone but him.

    Read More
  78. JackOH says:
    @Leftist conservative
    nice youtube link there. ...Sailer has brought up this possibility--that many politicians got elected because they are blackmailable. And listening to that video brings up the point that Obama was being set up to be president before he was even elected senator. ...he had not even be elected US Senator, yet he gave the keynote speech at the 2004 Dem convention...same thing with Romney--they were running mormon-friendly ads on TV a few years before he ran for president.

    Now they are pushing Nikki Halley on us. Expect the establishment to put her in the white house soon.

    Yep, it’s possible. Among the search committees where I work, a state university, there’s been an informal unarticulated guideline that the more desirable candidate may be one who can be blackmailed into submissiveness should he demonstrate unwanted scholarly or administrative energy.

    Bad credit, unpaid student loans, a known messy domestic situation, misdemeanors or low-end felonies, an affair with a student, failure to control university property or moneys (sometimes a euphemism for allegations of theft), conflicts of interest (such as uncompensated use of university facilities and staff to conduct proprietary research), the advancement of cronies or relatives, alcoholism or drug abuse, and more. Hard to imagine, but these drawbacks can make you more promotable than Mr. Clean. The rule isn’t ironclad, but everyone knows it exists.

    The game is up if the scholar or administrator gets wind that he’s expected to be a tool and declines to be advanced, or if he takes a publish-and-be-damned attitude to threats made after his hire.

    J. Edgar Hoover, of course, was reportedly a practitioner of the bureaucracy blackmailing elected officials with the effect of undermining the electorate’s expectations. It’s hard for me to imagine that Hoover’s practice is not at work today.

    Read More
    • Replies: @NOTA
    It seems like scale overt blackmail should be leaving some tracks in terms of people going public with being blackmailed after their secret leaks out. But we don't see this. Why not?
    , @JackOH
    I ought to add that our campus is jammed with video cameras, ostensibly for "security", according to the crony hire who's our campus police chief. Well, sure, okay. But there are numerous stories of ill-motivated video surveillance directed at innocent people for "managerial" or "control" purposes, and some of those stories have reached, in my thinking, a reasonable threshold of plausibility.

    E. g., a newspaper account of a physical confrontation between a junior researcher and a senior lab tech had it that the tech was monitoring the researcher's use of lab equipment by video cam. Lab techs aren't policemen. The newspaper account was lengthy, and concluded with a prosecutor dropping criminal charges against the researcher.

    But the gist was that the department chair didn't want the junior guy to use a specific piece of equipment to which the latter had access and expertise to operate. He assigned the lab tech to do surveillance, although it's not clear whether the campus police were involved, whether there are departmental video monitoring stations, or whether the camera was installed on the department chair's nickel. The lab tech, apparently acting on the department chair's instructions, confronted the researcher. A shoving match followed, and the university attempted to press charges against the researcher. In other words, message to the researcher sent and delivered.

    Again, the notion that our political leaders are gelded by the bureaucracy and other elites using surveillance and blackmail---not at all implausible.
  79. NOTA says:
    @DCThrowback
    Wall Street mines for high IQ, they figure (correctly) they'll train you in what you need to know. I had plenty of friends from my (USNWR top 20) alma mater who got gigs at goldman and the morgue not only as finance majors, but english majors as well.

    How much of the point of that is getting high IQ people, and how much is getting the connections made at top schools?

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  80. NOTA says:
    @JackOH
    Yep, it's possible. Among the search committees where I work, a state university, there's been an informal unarticulated guideline that the more desirable candidate may be one who can be blackmailed into submissiveness should he demonstrate unwanted scholarly or administrative energy.

    Bad credit, unpaid student loans, a known messy domestic situation, misdemeanors or low-end felonies, an affair with a student, failure to control university property or moneys (sometimes a euphemism for allegations of theft), conflicts of interest (such as uncompensated use of university facilities and staff to conduct proprietary research), the advancement of cronies or relatives, alcoholism or drug abuse, and more. Hard to imagine, but these drawbacks can make you more promotable than Mr. Clean. The rule isn't ironclad, but everyone knows it exists.

    The game is up if the scholar or administrator gets wind that he's expected to be a tool and declines to be advanced, or if he takes a publish-and-be-damned attitude to threats made after his hire.

    J. Edgar Hoover, of course, was reportedly a practitioner of the bureaucracy blackmailing elected officials with the effect of undermining the electorate's expectations. It's hard for me to imagine that Hoover's practice is not at work today.

    It seems like scale overt blackmail should be leaving some tracks in terms of people going public with being blackmailed after their secret leaks out. But we don’t see this. Why not?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "It seems like scale overt blackmail should be leaving some tracks in terms of people going public with being blackmailed after their secret leaks out. But we don’t see this. Why not?"

    James Trafficant did just that. Of course he was a buffoon and a crook, so nobody paid much attention to him.

    Or consider the case of Denny Hastert: The Feds indicted, tried, and convicted him for crimes (or rather, I should say "crimes") pertaining to how he paid a blackmailer. That he was being blackmailed is now a matter of public record. Most people who know about it will assume that he was guilty of something creepy (and he probably is). And now, in addition to any shame he might feel, he may go to prison, and he will be subject to years of federal prosecutorial jurisdiction, probably right up until he dies. He is not free to say anything, as it could lead to change in parole status, etc. In effect, the DoJ now owns him. I imagine there are a lot of things an old man would not say, in exchage for the privilege of staying out of jail.

    And this all happened after he left office. I'm sure a lot of other politicians have taken note of what ultimately happened to this very blackmail-able public official. And perhaps that was the purpose of the exercise in the first place.
    , @JackOH
    NOTA, thanks. Charlie Sheen's situation may be instructive. He's admitted to paying blackmail. J. Edgar Hoover's surveillance of Congressmen and Senators is the stuff of cable TV. The lengthy memo by White House staffer and former FBI agent G. Gordon Liddy recommending the removal of Hoover from office mentioned cryptically, if my memory's okay, secret files and the hint of undue influence on Congress.

    Successful blackmail is unlikely to result in admissions from the perps or victims. President John F. Kennedy never admitted he and his lovers were under surveillance by Hoover's boys. Why? Because people who are shaken down want to keep their position and their civic esteem.
  81. JackOH says:
    @JackOH
    Yep, it's possible. Among the search committees where I work, a state university, there's been an informal unarticulated guideline that the more desirable candidate may be one who can be blackmailed into submissiveness should he demonstrate unwanted scholarly or administrative energy.

    Bad credit, unpaid student loans, a known messy domestic situation, misdemeanors or low-end felonies, an affair with a student, failure to control university property or moneys (sometimes a euphemism for allegations of theft), conflicts of interest (such as uncompensated use of university facilities and staff to conduct proprietary research), the advancement of cronies or relatives, alcoholism or drug abuse, and more. Hard to imagine, but these drawbacks can make you more promotable than Mr. Clean. The rule isn't ironclad, but everyone knows it exists.

    The game is up if the scholar or administrator gets wind that he's expected to be a tool and declines to be advanced, or if he takes a publish-and-be-damned attitude to threats made after his hire.

    J. Edgar Hoover, of course, was reportedly a practitioner of the bureaucracy blackmailing elected officials with the effect of undermining the electorate's expectations. It's hard for me to imagine that Hoover's practice is not at work today.

    I ought to add that our campus is jammed with video cameras, ostensibly for “security”, according to the crony hire who’s our campus police chief. Well, sure, okay. But there are numerous stories of ill-motivated video surveillance directed at innocent people for “managerial” or “control” purposes, and some of those stories have reached, in my thinking, a reasonable threshold of plausibility.

    E. g., a newspaper account of a physical confrontation between a junior researcher and a senior lab tech had it that the tech was monitoring the researcher’s use of lab equipment by video cam. Lab techs aren’t policemen. The newspaper account was lengthy, and concluded with a prosecutor dropping criminal charges against the researcher.

    But the gist was that the department chair didn’t want the junior guy to use a specific piece of equipment to which the latter had access and expertise to operate. He assigned the lab tech to do surveillance, although it’s not clear whether the campus police were involved, whether there are departmental video monitoring stations, or whether the camera was installed on the department chair’s nickel. The lab tech, apparently acting on the department chair’s instructions, confronted the researcher. A shoving match followed, and the university attempted to press charges against the researcher. In other words, message to the researcher sent and delivered.

    Again, the notion that our political leaders are gelded by the bureaucracy and other elites using surveillance and blackmail—not at all implausible.

    Read More
  82. Brutusale says:
    @NOTA
    Does he talk about the role of think tanks in the deep state. Those both provide intellectual hired guns for various establishment causes, and are also a way to give various important players in the deep state jobs when their party is out of power and thus they're between appointed or elected positions.

    Speaking of the Deep State and DC suburbs, The Jasons immediately spring to mind.

    Read More
  83. Romanian says:
    @Boomstick
    JK Simmons is a great character actor in these roles. He completely nailed JJ Jameson in the Spiderman movies as well.

    I still can’t look at him and not think about his role as an Aryan Brotherhood head in Oz, when he made the new guy accountant (standing in for the audience) his bitch by tattooing a swastika on his ass in bed. Affably evil indeed. I was 11 or so, I think, when I went into the living room after bedtime to see that show they were advertising on TV. Though Adebisi was scarier.

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  84. Brutusale says:
    @Mr. Anon
    "It’s easy to spot Putinbots if you know what to look for......"

    They sound like Hasbara. But perhaps you think that they are just myth.

    What you describe as "Putinbots" doesn't describe anybody I've seen at this website. Some people like him, others hate him. Others are just neutral. But I haven't seen any posts that seem like they are due to paid russian trolls.

    "Prediction: Your comment and mine will soon have a half-dozen indignant replies each."

    Imagine! Getting indignant at being called a paid stooge. The nerve of some people.

    There are many with positive thoughts about Vladdie simply because he likes being a Russian and is all for maintaining and improving Russia’s place in the world. Some of us are nostalgic for an American leader with the same outlook.

    Read More
    • Agree: dfordoom
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "There are many with positive thoughts about Vladdie simply because he likes being a Russian and is all for maintaining and improving Russia’s place in the world."

    Ah, but is he really "maintaining and improving" Russia's place in the world, or his own? Putin may not be as bad for his own country as our governing elites are for ours. But that is a long ways from being an actual upright, wise, and well-meaning statesman. He certainly seems to have become fantastically wealthy from public office, so he is obviously just as corrupt, if not more so, than any of our politicians. And, for a lot of his life, Putin was a spy and a secret policeman. That tells me most of what I need to know about him. I would never trust him.
  85. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    On the subject of blackmail look at how Gen Petraeus was quickly ousted from his position because of having some fling with a woman that wasn’t his wife. That was some power play against him for reasons unknown to us. The affair was just leverage.

    Read More
  86. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Hepp
    OT, but look at what clever liars they are:

    Headline

    Research Doesn’t Back a Link Between Migrants and Crime in U.S.

    Now the text

    Mr. Ewing and Rubén G. Rumbaut, a sociology professor at University of California in Irvine, collaborated on a 2007 study, based on official crime and census data, that methodically refuted what they described as the “myth of immigrant criminality” in the United States.

    It found that for “every ethnic group without exception, incarceration rates among young men are lowest among immigrants, even those who are the least educated.”


    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/14/world/europe/research-doesnt-back-a-link-between-migrants-and-crime-in-us.html?emc=edit_tnt_20160113&nlid=62382746&tntemail0=y

    It found that for “every ethnic group without exception, incarceration rates among young men are lowest among immigrants, even those who are the least educated.”

    And if they hadn’t been allowed to immigrate their incarceration rate in the US would be zero.

    The NYT – never knowingly honest.

    Read More
  87. Mr. Anon says:
    @NOTA
    It seems like scale overt blackmail should be leaving some tracks in terms of people going public with being blackmailed after their secret leaks out. But we don't see this. Why not?

    “It seems like scale overt blackmail should be leaving some tracks in terms of people going public with being blackmailed after their secret leaks out. But we don’t see this. Why not?”

    James Trafficant did just that. Of course he was a buffoon and a crook, so nobody paid much attention to him.

    Or consider the case of Denny Hastert: The Feds indicted, tried, and convicted him for crimes (or rather, I should say “crimes”) pertaining to how he paid a blackmailer. That he was being blackmailed is now a matter of public record. Most people who know about it will assume that he was guilty of something creepy (and he probably is). And now, in addition to any shame he might feel, he may go to prison, and he will be subject to years of federal prosecutorial jurisdiction, probably right up until he dies. He is not free to say anything, as it could lead to change in parole status, etc. In effect, the DoJ now owns him. I imagine there are a lot of things an old man would not say, in exchage for the privilege of staying out of jail.

    And this all happened after he left office. I’m sure a lot of other politicians have taken note of what ultimately happened to this very blackmail-able public official. And perhaps that was the purpose of the exercise in the first place.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rob McX
    I've noticed that about many people convicted in the US - one condition imposed on them is that they make no public comment on the case against them. Blackmail does work.
  88. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Boomstick
    The apologetics for Russia on the paleo-right puzzle me. Putin's a tool who wants to get the Soviet band back together, though ditching the overt Communism. That he's also anti-gay doesn't make him a friend of the US or of the paleo-right.

    The apologetics for Russia on the paleo-right puzzle me.

    Really, how strange.

    The neocon offer is invade the world, invite the world which boils down to:

    “hey guys kill Arabs in the middle east for us while we import them into the West to kill you, thanks bunches, mwah.”

    In that context only an idiot would dislike someone who annoys neocons.

    Read More
  89. Mr. Anon says:
    @Brutusale
    There are many with positive thoughts about Vladdie simply because he likes being a Russian and is all for maintaining and improving Russia's place in the world. Some of us are nostalgic for an American leader with the same outlook.

    “There are many with positive thoughts about Vladdie simply because he likes being a Russian and is all for maintaining and improving Russia’s place in the world.”

    Ah, but is he really “maintaining and improving” Russia’s place in the world, or his own? Putin may not be as bad for his own country as our governing elites are for ours. But that is a long ways from being an actual upright, wise, and well-meaning statesman. He certainly seems to have become fantastically wealthy from public office, so he is obviously just as corrupt, if not more so, than any of our politicians. And, for a lot of his life, Putin was a spy and a secret policeman. That tells me most of what I need to know about him. I would never trust him.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    You make it sound like the klept in Russia is so much different than that of the West. How many magnitudes did Putin improve his financial lot versus how much the Bonnie & Clyde of American politics, Bubba BJ and his sidekick Pants Suit, have improved theirs?

    I don't need a saint to lead the country; I need a leader to lead the country. I certainly don't need a political class at war with the majority of the people it purports to lead. When our leaders unilaterally decide that the country needs millions of 85 IQ retched refuse when the clear majority of citizens is dead-set against it, you've a long row to hoe in trying make me believe foreign oligarchs are somehow more reprehensible than our own.

  90. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @inertial
    No, Putin doesn't want to restore the Soviet Union (unless you believe that a series of trade agreements about lower tariffs and such is the same as the new USSR.) But that's a separate topic. Here, I just want to help you solve your puzzle.

    Putin gave an interview to a German newspaper a few days ago, and in this interview he defined democracy as follows: "Democracy is the rule of the people and the influence of the people over the authorities." Now think about this for a second. That's not how they define democracy in the West, not quite. Instead, that's how they define populism (or rather populist demands.) Is it any wonder that a leader who thinks like that would be attractive to populists all over? Oh, and right before the phrase above Putin said this, "As far as democracy is concerned, the ruling classes usually talk about freedom to pull the wool over the eyes of those whom they govern. "

    You see now?

    Putin’s right of course; any system that doesn’t have a feedback loop will crash and sooner rather than later.

    Democracy is one way to provide that feedback loop but if it becomes rigged by big donors, party collusion and media manipulation then it stops working.

    A medieval king with a court jester has more of a feedback loop than the current US – which is why the US heading toward a cliff.

    Read More
  91. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Leftist conservative
    nice youtube link there. ...Sailer has brought up this possibility--that many politicians got elected because they are blackmailable. And listening to that video brings up the point that Obama was being set up to be president before he was even elected senator. ...he had not even be elected US Senator, yet he gave the keynote speech at the 2004 Dem convention...same thing with Romney--they were running mormon-friendly ads on TV a few years before he ran for president.

    Now they are pushing Nikki Halley on us. Expect the establishment to put her in the white house soon.

    Now they are pushing Nikki Halley on us. Expect the establishment to put her in the white house soon.

    Yes, Rubio was the chosen one for a long time but it seems they may have now decided he sucks.

    Read More
  92. andy178 says:
    @donut
    What "Deep State" ? They seem to be right out in the open . Even our new great white hope Trump isn't really promising fuckall . He still want's to continue our foreign involvements and maintain our subservience to the Jew . Trump is just a blowhard and will leave you pregnant and then dump you . I'll bet he won't even pay any child support . Keep your panties on and wait for true love . The Donut loves you , now let's get those panties off .

    why do you punctuate so weird?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    @donut

    why do you punctuate so weird?
     
    He can't spell doughnut, either.
    , @donut
    Because I am weird .
  93. @ua2
    I have to disagree with you. CIA/NSA/FBI and virtually all State (FSOs or INR for example) jobs require US Citizenship. DOHA does not include CIA or NSA (not sure about FBI or State) clearance decisions for blue badges.

    I know for a fact that the CIA rate for obtaining clearance is much less than the 99% you tout (which is a number includes public trust or secret that's given out like candy).

    I'm a citizen born in the US and my parents are not citizens - before 2008, it was extremely difficult for you to get cleared at CIA with that combo (all employees there are TS/SCI). There is high scrutiny still with that combo.

    I can't speak to what DOD and other Agencies that run their clearances through OPM do.

    But steve is bang on with the labor market protection TS/SCI (w FSP) - CIA's standard clearance level - provides.

    If Huma Abedin can get a clearance, how difficult can it be?

    Read More
  94. Leftist conservative [AKA "radical rebel"] says: • Website
    @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/AnnCoulter/status/687114640782921728

    speaking of nikki haley and the obvious push to get her into higher office, check out this excellent new vdare post:

    http://www.vdare.com/posts/tough-luck-gop-establishment-nikki-haley-a-not-natural-born-citizen-either-is-george-p-bush

    I find the arguments above persuasive, and not only are cruz and haley ineligible under those arguments, so was obama illegible for the white house…of course mccain never gave his permission to pursue the birther argument in 2008…obama should never have been allowed to run!

    Read More
  95. JackOH says:
    @NOTA
    It seems like scale overt blackmail should be leaving some tracks in terms of people going public with being blackmailed after their secret leaks out. But we don't see this. Why not?

    NOTA, thanks. Charlie Sheen’s situation may be instructive. He’s admitted to paying blackmail. J. Edgar Hoover’s surveillance of Congressmen and Senators is the stuff of cable TV. The lengthy memo by White House staffer and former FBI agent G. Gordon Liddy recommending the removal of Hoover from office mentioned cryptically, if my memory’s okay, secret files and the hint of undue influence on Congress.

    Successful blackmail is unlikely to result in admissions from the perps or victims. President John F. Kennedy never admitted he and his lovers were under surveillance by Hoover’s boys. Why? Because people who are shaken down want to keep their position and their civic esteem.

    Read More
  96. TangoMan says:
    @Anonymous
    OT: Trump recited snake poem at campaign rally. Interesting. Could refer to Merkel. To the West.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Qu6_2hFTw74

    Modern liberal society has as a ground rule the requirement that human nature be denied. That poem and the fable about the scorpion and the turtle rely on accepting that human nature does exist. This even extends to the war against stereotypes, liberals have been leading an agenda to discredit stereotypes while some brave truth-tellers have produced work which shows that stereotype accuracy is very high and that the critics of stereotyping have done shoddy work.

    The more I see of Trump the more little pieces of evidence accumulate which show how his mind works and this increases my level of comfort with him. I’m voting to elect a President based on how he will act in the future so I’m voting on his outlook, personality, beliefs etc not on his mastery of policies and institutions for these can be learned in short order.

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  97. Sean says:

    I disagree with this post. Those in authority in states largely serve the state by articulating a consensus among the people that are most concerned with international trade. But, no one little sector of the economy like the military industrial complex, is allowed to guide overall policy, because important sectors counterbalance eath other. Some make more money from stability. Oil companies do not want war in the Middle East.

    States are survival machines and they lead with their strength. America chooses military force because no country can match it in military force. Germany wants to dominate Europe industrially and financially and it needs a lot of political credit . Germany needs to be seen as the opposite of nationalist. That is what Merkel and the migrant influx are, a soft power blitzkrieg.

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  98. @andy178
    why do you punctuate so weird?

    why do you punctuate so weird?

    He can’t spell doughnut, either.

    Read More
  99. @donut
    What "Deep State" ? They seem to be right out in the open . Even our new great white hope Trump isn't really promising fuckall . He still want's to continue our foreign involvements and maintain our subservience to the Jew . Trump is just a blowhard and will leave you pregnant and then dump you . I'll bet he won't even pay any child support . Keep your panties on and wait for true love . The Donut loves you , now let's get those panties off .

    I’ll give you this. You’re one of the most entertaining posters here.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    @donut
    I’ll give you this. You’re one of the most entertaining posters here.
     
    I believe the word is spelled p-o-s-e-u-r.
  100. @Anonymous
    DC is mostly irrelevant in hip-hop history.


    The closest area I can think of with people who really hit nationally are from Virginia Beach.


    Maybe DC is too accessible to NYC to have its own scenes without its most ambitious people being absorbed by the goliath to its north?

    DC: hollywood for ugly people/ivy league graduates who can't hack it on wall street/southern weather and northern charm

    DC is mostly irrelevant in hip-hop history.

    The closest area I can think of with people who really hit nationally are from Virginia Beach.

    Has anybody else from Tidewater made it big since Gary U.S. Bonds?

    Read More
  101. @JohnnyWalker123
    I'll give you this. You're one of the most entertaining posters here.


    I’ll give you this. You’re one of the most entertaining posters here.

    I believe the word is spelled p-o-s-e-u-r.

    Read More
    • Replies: @donut
    "a person who pretends to be what he or she is not : an affected or insincere person"

    Me , a "poseur" ? Oh God , that's rich .
  102. Rob McX says:
    @Mr. Anon
    "It seems like scale overt blackmail should be leaving some tracks in terms of people going public with being blackmailed after their secret leaks out. But we don’t see this. Why not?"

    James Trafficant did just that. Of course he was a buffoon and a crook, so nobody paid much attention to him.

    Or consider the case of Denny Hastert: The Feds indicted, tried, and convicted him for crimes (or rather, I should say "crimes") pertaining to how he paid a blackmailer. That he was being blackmailed is now a matter of public record. Most people who know about it will assume that he was guilty of something creepy (and he probably is). And now, in addition to any shame he might feel, he may go to prison, and he will be subject to years of federal prosecutorial jurisdiction, probably right up until he dies. He is not free to say anything, as it could lead to change in parole status, etc. In effect, the DoJ now owns him. I imagine there are a lot of things an old man would not say, in exchage for the privilege of staying out of jail.

    And this all happened after he left office. I'm sure a lot of other politicians have taken note of what ultimately happened to this very blackmail-able public official. And perhaps that was the purpose of the exercise in the first place.

    I’ve noticed that about many people convicted in the US – one condition imposed on them is that they make no public comment on the case against them. Blackmail does work.

    Read More
  103. Rob McX says:

    Lofgren points to the Clintons as epitomizing the current system of post hoc bribery in which government officials who play ball get taken care of by the system after they’re out of office.

    Imagine if a police officer on $70 000 per annum retired after 20 years and then started buying up million-dollar properties, sending his children to expensive private schools, etc. He’d soon have law enforcement knocking on his door investigating possible corruption, money laundering, etc. Fortunately, these rules don’t apply to politicians. Everybody agrees to accept the fiction that a retired politician actually earns the money he’s paid for directorships, speaking engagements and consultancy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @NOTA
    I suspect this is less of a problem with presidents (who really are famous people that might command big speaking fees even without a bribery motive) than with journalists and the next couple tiers down of politicians--congressmen, assistant undersecretaries of X, etc. The phenomenon of working journalists getting a year's salary for a single speech to someone about whom they sometimes report is obviously and obnoxiously corrupt.
    , @Steve Sailer
    It's an interesting policy design problem for my idea of a single 18-year term for Supreme Court justices instead of today's lifetime term. I'd favor a ban on other income after the term was up combined with a $1 million per year lifetime pension. But what do you do about spouses and children?
  104. NOTA says:
    @Rob McX

    Lofgren points to the Clintons as epitomizing the current system of post hoc bribery in which government officials who play ball get taken care of by the system after they’re out of office.
     
    Imagine if a police officer on $70 000 per annum retired after 20 years and then started buying up million-dollar properties, sending his children to expensive private schools, etc. He'd soon have law enforcement knocking on his door investigating possible corruption, money laundering, etc. Fortunately, these rules don't apply to politicians. Everybody agrees to accept the fiction that a retired politician actually earns the money he's paid for directorships, speaking engagements and consultancy.

    I suspect this is less of a problem with presidents (who really are famous people that might command big speaking fees even without a bribery motive) than with journalists and the next couple tiers down of politicians–congressmen, assistant undersecretaries of X, etc. The phenomenon of working journalists getting a year’s salary for a single speech to someone about whom they sometimes report is obviously and obnoxiously corrupt.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "I suspect this is less of a problem with presidents (who really are famous people that might command big speaking fees even without a bribery motive) than with journalists and the next couple tiers down of politicians."

    Goldman-Sachs once gave Bill Clinton a half-million dollars for a single speech. Do you think they really wanted to listen to that bloviating swine that much. Do you think an ex-President has anything to say that is worth that much? Do you think they could not have engaged him to speak for a lot less?

    That, and the other money they sent his way was pretty clearly a bribe for services rendered (Hey, thanks for dismantling Glass-Steagal!) And that was not an isolated event. Clinton has received lots of fat speaking fees over the last 15 years. He is as corrupt as hell.

  105. Brutusale says:
    @Mr. Anon
    "There are many with positive thoughts about Vladdie simply because he likes being a Russian and is all for maintaining and improving Russia’s place in the world."

    Ah, but is he really "maintaining and improving" Russia's place in the world, or his own? Putin may not be as bad for his own country as our governing elites are for ours. But that is a long ways from being an actual upright, wise, and well-meaning statesman. He certainly seems to have become fantastically wealthy from public office, so he is obviously just as corrupt, if not more so, than any of our politicians. And, for a lot of his life, Putin was a spy and a secret policeman. That tells me most of what I need to know about him. I would never trust him.

    You make it sound like the klept in Russia is so much different than that of the West. How many magnitudes did Putin improve his financial lot versus how much the Bonnie & Clyde of American politics, Bubba BJ and his sidekick Pants Suit, have improved theirs?

    I don’t need a saint to lead the country; I need a leader to lead the country. I certainly don’t need a political class at war with the majority of the people it purports to lead. When our leaders unilaterally decide that the country needs millions of 85 IQ retched refuse when the clear majority of citizens is dead-set against it, you’ve a long row to hoe in trying make me believe foreign oligarchs are somehow more reprehensible than our own.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    If you really want a honest answer, it appears that Putin stole orders of magnitude more. Putin's wealth is estimated at $200 billion or more

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2015/02/20/is-vladimir-putin-hiding-a-200-billion-fortune-and-if-so-does-it-matter/

    As a practical matter, it is unlimited - he is the Czar of all the Russias, an absolute ruler unconstrained by any checks on his power so he can have whatever he wants - in effect he "owns" it all. If he say to you ," may I have that ring" http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/eye-on-football/22429359/patriots-owner-robert-kraft-vladimir-putin-stole-my-super-bowl-ring
    or that oil company, or whatever, who in Russia is in a position to say no and live to tell about it?

    In contrast to that, the few piddling millions that the Clintons stole is pocket change.
  106. NOTA says:

    It’s an imprecise term, but I often think in terms of the ruling class (aka the set of people who tend to end up in top positions in government, media, academia, and industry), and the related notion of the big ruling class favor bank, where powerful people owe one another favors and pay them back in ways that bind different parts of the class together.

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  107. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Hepp
    OT, but look at what clever liars they are:

    Headline

    Research Doesn’t Back a Link Between Migrants and Crime in U.S.

    Now the text

    Mr. Ewing and Rubén G. Rumbaut, a sociology professor at University of California in Irvine, collaborated on a 2007 study, based on official crime and census data, that methodically refuted what they described as the “myth of immigrant criminality” in the United States.

    It found that for “every ethnic group without exception, incarceration rates among young men are lowest among immigrants, even those who are the least educated.”


    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/14/world/europe/research-doesnt-back-a-link-between-migrants-and-crime-in-us.html?emc=edit_tnt_20160113&nlid=62382746&tntemail0=y

    Research Doesn’t Back a Link Between Migrants and Crime in U.S.

    It had better not, if it wants to get funded.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Leftist conservative

    Research Doesn’t Back a Link Between Migrants and Crime in U.S.

    It had better not, if it wants to get funded.
     
    and that is exactly how it works---money makes the world go round...
  108. Mr. Anon says:

    “I don’t need a saint to lead the country; I need a leader to lead the country.”

    I’m an American. I don’t need a leader, and I don’t want the country to be “lead”. I merely need elected officials who understand their job – they are employees, hired by us, to faithfully and honestly execute the law, and nothing more. I don’t want them to have a “vision”, I don’t want them to “build a bridge to the 21st century”, I don’t want them “usher in a new era”, or any of that other meglomaniacal bullshit that Presidential candidates traffic in.

    “……………you’ve a long row to hoe in trying make me believe foreign oligarchs are somehow more reprehensible than our own.”

    I’m not trying to make you believe that. Indeed, I do not believe that. However, I also don’t think it’s my job to stick up for Russia’s strong-man / quasi-dictator, Putin, anymore than I think it should be the business of the american government to stick its finger in his eye (as they did in Ukraine). I don’t dislike Putin or Russia or consider them to be an enemy. That doesn’t mean I should necessarily like and/or trust them either.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It's an interesting policy design problem for my idea of a single 18-year term for Supreme Court justices instead of today's lifetime term. I'd favor a ban on other income after the term was up combined with a $1 million per year lifetime pension. But what do you do about spouses and children?
    , @Brutusale
    Like/trust, no. Respect that he's proudly Russian, yes. As opposed to our elite, many of whom seem to want to be citizens of somewhere else.

    And about those piddling millions:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/clintons-raised-nearly-2-billion-for-foundation-since-2001/2015/02/18/b8425d88-a7cd-11e4-a7c2-03d37af98440_story.html
  109. Mr. Anon says:
    @NOTA
    I suspect this is less of a problem with presidents (who really are famous people that might command big speaking fees even without a bribery motive) than with journalists and the next couple tiers down of politicians--congressmen, assistant undersecretaries of X, etc. The phenomenon of working journalists getting a year's salary for a single speech to someone about whom they sometimes report is obviously and obnoxiously corrupt.

    “I suspect this is less of a problem with presidents (who really are famous people that might command big speaking fees even without a bribery motive) than with journalists and the next couple tiers down of politicians.”

    Goldman-Sachs once gave Bill Clinton a half-million dollars for a single speech. Do you think they really wanted to listen to that bloviating swine that much. Do you think an ex-President has anything to say that is worth that much? Do you think they could not have engaged him to speak for a lot less?

    That, and the other money they sent his way was pretty clearly a bribe for services rendered (Hey, thanks for dismantling Glass-Steagal!) And that was not an isolated event. Clinton has received lots of fat speaking fees over the last 15 years. He is as corrupt as hell.

    Read More
  110. @PiltdownMan
    Being ill-educated on matters regarding constitutional democracy, I'm beginning to understand only late in life that the President of the United States of America is akin to the building supervisor in a co-op apartment building.

    His power comes from his vast number of underlings and flunkies, and from the huge budget he has, but the owners can stop him in his tracks anytime they choose.

    The constitutional controls on him–via the legislature's iron grip on the budget and it's ability to legislate into reality any constraint on him it chooses–means that his leadership ability to take charge, be creative and fix national problems is severely crippled.

    A feature, not a bug of the system. The Founders gave the people the power of the purse, because they knew that it was too tempting to put it into the hands of an executive, even one democratically elected. KGIII raised taxes on a whim (from their perspective; it was actually to help pay expenses incurred for the French and Indian War fought on our behalf, among other things) and without any say so on their part as English citizens. Even Parliament had some say so for folks back in the home country. Ye olde “taxation without representation!” battle cry. Do they even teach that in schools anymore?

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  111. AndrewR says:
    @anon

    Now they are pushing Nikki Halley on us. Expect the establishment to put her in the white house soon.
     
    Yes, Rubio was the chosen one for a long time but it seems they may have now decided he sucks.

    Haley is browner and womanlier

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    True, although I'd quibble a bit on the womanlier. That's one the weird things watching all these politicians - so many of the men look a lot like women. I wonder if this is a function of political corruption somehow?
  112. Leftist conservative [AKA "radical_centrist"] says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    Research Doesn’t Back a Link Between Migrants and Crime in U.S.
     
    It had better not, if it wants to get funded.

    Research Doesn’t Back a Link Between Migrants and Crime in U.S.

    It had better not, if it wants to get funded.

    and that is exactly how it works—money makes the world go round…

    Read More
  113. Jack D says:
    @Brutusale
    You make it sound like the klept in Russia is so much different than that of the West. How many magnitudes did Putin improve his financial lot versus how much the Bonnie & Clyde of American politics, Bubba BJ and his sidekick Pants Suit, have improved theirs?

    I don't need a saint to lead the country; I need a leader to lead the country. I certainly don't need a political class at war with the majority of the people it purports to lead. When our leaders unilaterally decide that the country needs millions of 85 IQ retched refuse when the clear majority of citizens is dead-set against it, you've a long row to hoe in trying make me believe foreign oligarchs are somehow more reprehensible than our own.

    If you really want a honest answer, it appears that Putin stole orders of magnitude more. Putin’s wealth is estimated at $200 billion or more

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2015/02/20/is-vladimir-putin-hiding-a-200-billion-fortune-and-if-so-does-it-matter/

    As a practical matter, it is unlimited – he is the Czar of all the Russias, an absolute ruler unconstrained by any checks on his power so he can have whatever he wants – in effect he “owns” it all. If he say to you ,” may I have that ring” http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/eye-on-football/22429359/patriots-owner-robert-kraft-vladimir-putin-stole-my-super-bowl-ring
    or that oil company, or whatever, who in Russia is in a position to say no and live to tell about it?

    In contrast to that, the few piddling millions that the Clintons stole is pocket change.

    Read More
    • Replies: @vinteuil
    I carry no brief for Vladimir Putin, and I'm perfectly prepared to believe that he's a nasty piece of work. But the links you provide are deeply unimpressive.

    The important point is that Russia under Putin poses no danger whatsoever to the USA or to Western Europe.

    I mean, seriously: do you think he has plans to nuke us? or to invade Germany?

    Not to mention that he probably enjoys more popular support than any Western leader, with the possible exception of Viktor Orban...

    Agreed that, compared to him, the Clintons are...piddling.
  114. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @AndrewR
    Haley is browner and womanlier

    True, although I’d quibble a bit on the womanlier. That’s one the weird things watching all these politicians – so many of the men look a lot like women. I wonder if this is a function of political corruption somehow?

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Well I'm not claiming Rube-io is the epitome of masculinity but Haley isn't exactly butch.
  115. vinteuil says:
    @Jack D
    If you really want a honest answer, it appears that Putin stole orders of magnitude more. Putin's wealth is estimated at $200 billion or more

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2015/02/20/is-vladimir-putin-hiding-a-200-billion-fortune-and-if-so-does-it-matter/

    As a practical matter, it is unlimited - he is the Czar of all the Russias, an absolute ruler unconstrained by any checks on his power so he can have whatever he wants - in effect he "owns" it all. If he say to you ," may I have that ring" http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/eye-on-football/22429359/patriots-owner-robert-kraft-vladimir-putin-stole-my-super-bowl-ring
    or that oil company, or whatever, who in Russia is in a position to say no and live to tell about it?

    In contrast to that, the few piddling millions that the Clintons stole is pocket change.

    I carry no brief for Vladimir Putin, and I’m perfectly prepared to believe that he’s a nasty piece of work. But the links you provide are deeply unimpressive.

    The important point is that Russia under Putin poses no danger whatsoever to the USA or to Western Europe.

    I mean, seriously: do you think he has plans to nuke us? or to invade Germany?

    Not to mention that he probably enjoys more popular support than any Western leader, with the possible exception of Viktor Orban…

    Agreed that, compared to him, the Clintons are…piddling.

    Read More
  116. @Rob McX

    Lofgren points to the Clintons as epitomizing the current system of post hoc bribery in which government officials who play ball get taken care of by the system after they’re out of office.
     
    Imagine if a police officer on $70 000 per annum retired after 20 years and then started buying up million-dollar properties, sending his children to expensive private schools, etc. He'd soon have law enforcement knocking on his door investigating possible corruption, money laundering, etc. Fortunately, these rules don't apply to politicians. Everybody agrees to accept the fiction that a retired politician actually earns the money he's paid for directorships, speaking engagements and consultancy.

    It’s an interesting policy design problem for my idea of a single 18-year term for Supreme Court justices instead of today’s lifetime term. I’d favor a ban on other income after the term was up combined with a $1 million per year lifetime pension. But what do you do about spouses and children?

    Read More
  117. @Mr. Anon
    "I don’t need a saint to lead the country; I need a leader to lead the country."

    I'm an American. I don't need a leader, and I don't want the country to be "lead". I merely need elected officials who understand their job - they are employees, hired by us, to faithfully and honestly execute the law, and nothing more. I don't want them to have a "vision", I don't want them to "build a bridge to the 21st century", I don't want them "usher in a new era", or any of that other meglomaniacal bullshit that Presidential candidates traffic in.

    "...............you’ve a long row to hoe in trying make me believe foreign oligarchs are somehow more reprehensible than our own."

    I'm not trying to make you believe that. Indeed, I do not believe that. However, I also don't think it's my job to stick up for Russia's strong-man / quasi-dictator, Putin, anymore than I think it should be the business of the american government to stick its finger in his eye (as they did in Ukraine). I don't dislike Putin or Russia or consider them to be an enemy. That doesn't mean I should necessarily like and/or trust them either.

    It’s an interesting policy design problem for my idea of a single 18-year term for Supreme Court justices instead of today’s lifetime term. I’d favor a ban on other income after the term was up combined with a $1 million per year lifetime pension. But what do you do about spouses and children?

    Read More
  118. donut says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    @donut
    I’ll give you this. You’re one of the most entertaining posters here.
     
    I believe the word is spelled p-o-s-e-u-r.

    “a person who pretends to be what he or she is not : an affected or insincere person”

    Me , a “poseur” ? Oh God , that’s rich .

    Read More
  119. @Reg Cæsar
    Is Mike Lofgren related to Nils, the rock guitarist?

    DC and suburbs haven't produced many stars in the rock era-- Mama Cass, Jorma Kaukonen (Jorma Sr was a bureaucrat), and Nils are all that come to mind. Oh, and Root Boy Slim, of the Sex Change Band, who never broke out.

    Are they any better at rap?

    When hip hop broke out, DC was in the middle of a unique musical trend called go-go. I served with a DC black guy while in the military in the early 90s, and remember him saying that they didn’t listen to rap music as much. It was limited to DC. I listened to it but did not like it. Very musical. It seems like you had to be involved with it as it evolved, or it would just sound too exotic, like listening to music from a foreign country. I had completely forgotten about it until I read this.

    From wikipedia’s entry on music of washington, DC:

    Go-go
    Main article: Go-go

    The go-go sound developed during the mid-1970s and began to take its current shape by the late ’70s, and has become known as D.C.’s answer to hip-hop. Its characteristic formula combined simple funk grooves with instrumental percussion and often rapping. It is a blend of funk, R&B, and early hip-hop, with a focus on lo-fi percussion instruments and melodic jamming in place of dance tracks, although some sampling is used. As such, it is primarily a dance music with an emphasis on live audience call and response. Go-go rhythms are also incorporated into street percussion. Many Washington, D.C. soul & funk artists contributed to the characteristic go-go sound, but the main pioneers were The Young Senators, also known as “The Emperors of Go-go”, known for their hit tune “Jungle”, and Chuck Brown & the Soul Searchers, known for “Bustin’ Loose”, which became a surprise national hit. Later go-go bands include Rare Essence, Trouble Funk, Experience Unlimited, and the Southeast go-go band Aggressive Funk. Bands such as Backyard, TCB, and UCB have gained recognition by being featured in music by rapper, Wale.

    Read More
  120. AndrewR says:
    @anon
    True, although I'd quibble a bit on the womanlier. That's one the weird things watching all these politicians - so many of the men look a lot like women. I wonder if this is a function of political corruption somehow?

    Well I’m not claiming Rube-io is the epitome of masculinity but Haley isn’t exactly butch.

    Read More
  121. Brutusale says:
    @Mr. Anon
    "I don’t need a saint to lead the country; I need a leader to lead the country."

    I'm an American. I don't need a leader, and I don't want the country to be "lead". I merely need elected officials who understand their job - they are employees, hired by us, to faithfully and honestly execute the law, and nothing more. I don't want them to have a "vision", I don't want them to "build a bridge to the 21st century", I don't want them "usher in a new era", or any of that other meglomaniacal bullshit that Presidential candidates traffic in.

    "...............you’ve a long row to hoe in trying make me believe foreign oligarchs are somehow more reprehensible than our own."

    I'm not trying to make you believe that. Indeed, I do not believe that. However, I also don't think it's my job to stick up for Russia's strong-man / quasi-dictator, Putin, anymore than I think it should be the business of the american government to stick its finger in his eye (as they did in Ukraine). I don't dislike Putin or Russia or consider them to be an enemy. That doesn't mean I should necessarily like and/or trust them either.

    Like/trust, no. Respect that he’s proudly Russian, yes. As opposed to our elite, many of whom seem to want to be citizens of somewhere else.

    And about those piddling millions:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/clintons-raised-nearly-2-billion-for-foundation-since-2001/2015/02/18/b8425d88-a7cd-11e4-a7c2-03d37af98440_story.html

    Read More

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