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From the New York Times:

‘The Social Contract Is Broken’: Inequality Becomes Deadly in Mexico
The Interpreter
By MAX FISHER and AMANDA TAUB SEPT. 30, 2017

MONTERREY, Mexico — Viewed from above, greater Monterrey, with its corporate headquarters and golf resorts, appears as one city stretching between the mountains that surround it.

Closer up, though, it becomes clear that invisible walls enclose Monterrey’s wealthy core, creating a dividing line between its four million residents. For the people within those invisible walls, government is responsive and crime low. Those outside face rising murder rates, corruption and, activists say, police brutality. …

As Mexico descends into its most violent year on record and the state proves incapable of responding, those with resources are taking matters into their own hands. Landowners, businesses and the rich are buying security by means legal and not.

Any social compact is built in part on the agreement that security is a public good, shared and maintained by all. As Mexico’s rich effectively withdraw, the implicit arrangements that hold society together are breaking down.

One question I can’t answer is whether anything much is actually changing in Mexico. Newspapers like to phrase everything as a Trend, but often the most valuable articles are about enduring differences.

The Mexico described in this article as coming into being sounds much like the Mexico described in NYT Mexico correspondent Alan Riding’s 1986 book Distant Neighbors.

On the other hand, my impression is that I don’t remember seeing machine guns on trips to Mexico in the 1960s through the 1980s, but when I visited again in 1996, there seemed to be security guards with AK-47s all over the place.

I suspect Mexico got scarier during the Salinas Administration (1988-1994), which did the NAFTA deal with the elder Bush Administration. At some point, Mexico took over from Colombia as the chief shipper of drugs into the United States. The death of Pablo Escobar in Colombia in December 1993 seems like a reasonable milestone in dating when Mexico becoming a narco state.

One interesting question I’ve seldom seen addressed is whether there was any connection between Mexico taking over the cocaine business and the warmer American-Mexico relations between Bush and Salinas. George H.W. Bush had long done oil business in Mexico using a frontman to get around the statutory prohibition on gringos in Mexico’s oil business. My impression is that the main goal of the Bushes, from George H.W. to Jeb, was to cut down the barriers separating business in America and Mexico.

The timeline of events during the Salinas years is lurid but incoherent: e.g., a cardinal is murdered at the airport, the ruling party’s candidate to succeed Salinas is murdered, the chairman of the ruling party, who used to be Salinas’s brother-in-law is murdered.

Though the effects are subtle, they are everywhere. The rise of vigilantism, criminal impunity, police corruption and state weakness can all be traced in part to this growing security inequality.

In Juárez, neighbors would once come together against common challenges like crime or a corrupt police officer, but now, Mr. Salas said, “there is a culture of not participating, of not caring, of silence.”

As the war on drugs fractured large cartels in recent years, smaller and more predatory groups rose in their place. Extortions and kidnappings spiked, targeting not just businesses and the rich but also middle-class workers.

In response, those who could afford it enlisted private security to do what the state could not.

Between 2013 and 2015, the number of private security companies nearly tripled, according to government statistics. Industry analysts believe the real number, including unregistered firms, may be several times higher.

The shift may be worsening Mexico’s notoriously ineffective justice system, which secures convictions for only a tiny fraction of crimes. Armed guards can prevent a murder but they cannot investigate one, much less roll up a local cartel.

Riding’s 1986 book described a chaos of overlapping police agencies, with something like an average of five different police departments theoretically responsible for the typical neighborhood, and sergeants auctioning off the really lucrative corners, where flatfoots were allowed to take down the traffic signs to gin up more business. So 1986 was more nominally statist than 2017: most guys working in security back then were nominally on the public payroll. But the reality was that a policeman’s wages were too low then to support your family unless you undertook to augment them entrepreneurially.

Riding estimated that some ridiculous fraction of working class Mexican men, such as 20%, had been cops at one point or another in their lives. Every cop is a criminal and all the sinners saints. Life in Mexico sounded like the opening of Borges’ “The Lottery in Babylon:”

Like all the men of Babylon, I have been proconsul; like all, I have been a slave. I have known omnipotence, ignominy, imprisonment.

 
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  1. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Hat tip Rolling Stones.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Neoconned
    The phrase i like to use is "53pc of Americans make $30k per yr or less...so half. Roughly a third of Americans make $20k per yr or less. 24pc or a quarter basically make $10k per yr or less. The per capita GDP of Mexico is roughly per CIA factbook about $11k USD a yr.

    So nominally half of Mexicans live as good or better than a quarter of Americans. And given the lower cost of living half of Mexicans probably live about the same as half to a third of Americans."

    Or a more simple way i put it is "Americans aren't as rich as people think they are and Mexicans arent as poor as ppl think they are."

    Mexico is the most obese nation on the planet or was at least a few yrs ago.

    More Mexicans die every yr from diabetes related ailments than from drug violence over five to ten yrs....

    I work 3 restaurant jobs 40-60hrs per week and only cleared $8-9k last.yr if i recall correctly. And when im sweeping the parking lot at the McD's in my town i see Mexicans in newer model pickups while i walk everywhere. Forgive me for not tearing up when i hear their fake sob stories. I got my own, and no fucks are given when I'm sweating my ass off and they're stuffing their fat faces with sausage biscuits or Big Macs....
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  2. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Mexico had ridiculously high population growth around mid 20th century.

    I wonder how much of Mexico’s present dysfunction – and the backwash colonization of much of the USA – is the Malthusian consequence of that growth?

    If so, the implications of current ridiculous African an sub continental population growth is horrendous.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Neoconned
    Hence why the gate must be closed NOW.

    While riding Greyhound last yr or 2015 i met this old Vietnam vet who showed me his federal carry permit and his H & K USP sidearm. He was on his way to Corpus to pick something up from his storage unit and then he was off to Mexico City to work as a bodyguard. Interesting dude, you meet all types on the bus from eccentric toguys like that to crackheads.

    Anyways the situation in Juarez sounds like my hood....once working class white that then went mixed working class and is now a mostly black Section 8 dump.

    We used to call the cops when we heard gunshots. They had a driveby next door about 4 yrs ago. Some petty feud about drugs or something .

    A joint city, county and ATF/DEA swat raid followed the next yr. Preceding that i had a band of US Marshals with bulletproof flackjackets and automatic machine gun AR variants show up in my backyard looking for 1 of the homeboys living next door.

    So now when i hear 1 of those idiots cracking off a shot into the air i dont even call the cops....whays the pt? About a month ago saw a black boy about 18 w his shirt off casing my neighbors backyard. I walked up to him and threatened to shoot him instead of calling the cops.

    I havent seem him since. He had been peaking thru their privacy fence in broad daylight in open view of the street and my neighbors are older white ppl, retirees.

    Im tired of this shit but Juarez sounds kinda like some areas here.

    I was in El Paso in June. Not many know people cross over daily from Juarez daily to shop at the little flea market slash commercial area they have there. Then they cross back at the end of the day. Go to the Greyhound station in El Paso and walk south towards the border. Only a half mile. You can see the Mexicans in the Churchs Chicken or Mcds there. They dont look famished or poor to me
    , @guest
    "the Malthusian consequence of that growth"

    Actually, Malthus' thesis was that population is always pressing on the supply of food necessary to sustain it. Unless war, famine, or "vice" further restricts it. If it's growing, that means either food is more plentiful or restrictive factors have loosened. The idea that Malthusianism says population growth will cause bad things is strange and out of left field.

    Thing is, Malthus was brilliant and massively influential, and I think everyone should read him on the perverse incentives of welfare, but there are various fatal flaws in his reasoning . One is that True Malthusianism has it that humanity is always in crisis. Always, unless we practice conscientious family formation and abstinence. Which we won't. Or, for us moderns, practice "vice," which is unapproved birth control. Like condoms and junk. That's why family planners were all updated Malthusians.

    He's always like, "Better watch out, or things will get worse." But things are already as bad as they can be, not counting famine and pestilence, which we can't control, and war, which is hard to control. And vice, to which he doesn't want us to resort.

    If populations already tend to go past where they can feed themselves, what is he warning against? That they'll...press up against the food supply? They're already doing that! Double-press up against it? Impossible. It doesn't work like that.
    , @Tiny Duck
    Is there anything white men cannot ruin?

    All this dysfunction was caused by white greed and profit seeking

    You white Christians time is coming. The People are going to take back what was stolen

    Racism is wring
    , @TG
    Reply to anonymous: yes Mexico had a ridiculous amount of population growth in the 1960's.

    And it was the deliberate policy of the Mexican government that crafted this population explosion. They propagandized that it was every woman's patriotic duty to have six kids each "to make Mexico bigger and better," they gave medals to women with large families etc. And the result is what always happens in societies without an open frontier: wages for the many were crushed and profits for the few were boosted. Mexico created a record number of billionaires, and also became so poor that it now depends on the safety valve of immigration to the US to avoid collapse.

    It's an old story. Behind every population explosion, if you look hard enough, one can usually find government policies encouraging that. In the US, even though it's being done via immigration instead of inducements to higher native fertility rate, the effect is the same: the rich are forcing population growth upwards, and this is having the predictable effect of lowering wages and increasing profits.

    It is effectively censored in the press, but the problems is Syria can be traced to the government's pro-natalist policies. They even made the sale and possession of any form of contraception a crime!

    http://globuspallidusxi.blogspot.com/2015/04/the-real-story-on-syria-forced.html

    So what happened in Mexico has happened many other times in many other places... and it's starting to happen here.

    , @nebulafox
    No, I don't think so. 50, 60 years ago, South Korean and Brazilian women were having 6 kids a pop, too. Brazil, whatever its problems, isn't a mafia state in the vein of Mexico and has vastly improved over the past decades, and we all know South Korea's story. On the other side of the ledger, you have Russia, where the birth rate was on par with the West by the time the 1950s rolled around (and nearly a whole generation of males was wiped out by WWII), yet the place is also a miserable, corrupt mafia state. China, India, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Iran, and even Saudi Arabia (to an extent) have curbed their birth rates tremendously over the past half-century via different ways and at different times, and they've had subsequently widely variant outcomes.

    Mexico's problems stem from other sources, most of which are pretty deeply entrenched in the basic nature of Mexico and its origins, the American War on Drugs being a major exception. Above all, Mexico's problems can be found with its ruling elite, who feel-and are-truly apart from their the nation they rule. The creoles in Mexico release political and economic pressure by dumping their excess mestizo proletariat off on the United States-and our own increasingly distant bipartisan elites love that. This is far from limited to Democrats, as other commentators have pointed out (Jeb's wet dreams of President George P. Bush), nor have the rulers of Mexico much bothered to hide their efforts to encourage illegal immigration.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/past/docs/issues/97feb/mexico/castaned.htm

    , @anonymous
    Diversity-crazed "Give me your tired and your poor" America is now at 325 million and growing, the population concentrated in relatively few geographical areas. Unless these souls start migrating en mass to Wyoming, Montana and Idaho (which is not likely) these already existing population centers (the Boston-NY-Philly-DC megalopolis, LA, all of Florida) will become even more densely populated with groups who are at loggerheads with each other. A lethal mix if you ask me.
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  3. Romanian says: • Website

    A good posting. Stylistically, one of the top 20%.

    I am amazed at the difference between the Mexico I learn about here (and Vdare) and from the various recommendations I have picked up like the article “Mexico’s undiplomatic diplomats” and the Mexico that people in Europe imagine, where the anti-American narrative is accepted even by the reflexively pro-American.

    The stolen land idiocy and the moral validity of reconquista comes up, though from the same people who shrug at Western European replacement by colonial subjects as being karma.

    PS Damn you, Anonymous, I wanted to be first!

    Read More
    • Replies: @jim jones
    If you live in a different timezone it`s easy to be first.
    , @Neoconned
    I've often heard Somalia called a libertarian paradise because corporations can thrive there but not govts.

    Mexico sounds similar only with richer people, more Christians and hotter women. Most Somalis don't look like Iman
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  4. Maj. Kong says:

    Quite interesting, as usually the leftist media apparatchiks sniff out any mention of “Mexico” and “violent” and condemn it as racist.

    Perhaps The Wall would actually work, perhaps we should ask an AIPAC lobbyist about that…

    Read More
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  5. Neoconned says:
    @Anonymous
    Hat tip Rolling Stones.

    The phrase i like to use is “53pc of Americans make $30k per yr or less…so half. Roughly a third of Americans make $20k per yr or less. 24pc or a quarter basically make $10k per yr or less. The per capita GDP of Mexico is roughly per CIA factbook about $11k USD a yr.

    So nominally half of Mexicans live as good or better than a quarter of Americans. And given the lower cost of living half of Mexicans probably live about the same as half to a third of Americans.”

    Or a more simple way i put it is “Americans aren’t as rich as people think they are and Mexicans arent as poor as ppl think they are.”

    Mexico is the most obese nation on the planet or was at least a few yrs ago.

    More Mexicans die every yr from diabetes related ailments than from drug violence over five to ten yrs….

    I work 3 restaurant jobs 40-60hrs per week and only cleared $8-9k last.yr if i recall correctly. And when im sweeping the parking lot at the McD’s in my town i see Mexicans in newer model pickups while i walk everywhere. Forgive me for not tearing up when i hear their fake sob stories. I got my own, and no fucks are given when I’m sweating my ass off and they’re stuffing their fat faces with sausage biscuits or Big Macs….

    Read More
    • Agree: bomag, BB753
    • Replies: @Tiny Duck
    If you are a white male and cannot do better than raw food then you are a loser

    With all your privilege and unearned advantages you should not complain when you make poor life choices
    , @epebble
    Very good observation. As recently as 2000, Mexico was in top 10 nations economically, even ahead of Brazil. In 2005, however, it was pushed out by Spain and South Korea, which were pushed aside by 2010 by India and Russia. Fortunes of nations is very dynamic! By 2050, it is projected to be 8th.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_largest_historical_GDP#By_average_values_of_GDP_.28nominal.29

    By Purchasing power, it is projected to be 10th by 2030 and 7th by 2050, better than Japan, Germany and U.K. It is amazing what can happen in a generation.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_largest_historical_GDP#By_average_values_of_GDP_.28PPP.29
    , @Seth Largo
    I can't remember if this was coined by Fred Reed or Charles Portis, but, indeed, "there is a lot of non-poverty in Mexico."

    To the point of the post, however, I certainly see the draw of the libertarian way of doing things in Mexico; passing a fifty to a traffic cop is preferable to the court-ordered nonsense you have to deal with al norte. Portis's novel Gringos paints a picture of this political economy, and it's not an unattractive one. However, as Steve points out, the old way of doing things has been blindsided by the movement of cartel violence from Colombia. Libertarian environments don't do so well when inundated with homicidal young men with nothing to lose.
    , @Father O'Hara
    Please try and get a better job,Neo. Your comments are depressing!
    , @The Anti-Gnostic

    So nominally half of Mexicans live as good or better than a quarter of Americans. And given the lower cost of living half of Mexicans probably live about the same as half to a third of Americans.
     
    The Narrative is that Mexico is this giant prison where cruel Americans keep all the vibrancy locked up which could otherwise be here, cooking us delicious meals and paying our pensions.
    , @Henry Bowman
    I work 3 restaurant jobs 40-60hrs per week and only cleared $8-9k last.yr if i recall correctly. And when im sweeping the parking lot at the McD’s in my town i see Mexicans in newer model pickups while i walk everywhere. Forgive me for not tearing up when i hear their fake sob stories. I got my own, and no fucks are given when I’m sweating my ass off and they’re stuffing their fat faces with sausage biscuits or Big Macs….

    Really this, we are done caring about the poor sobbing non whites and their tells of woe, no one cares about our plight, about our lives, about or hopes "dreams", desires, future, etc.

    The era of Altruism is dead, my it burn in hell.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  6. jim jones says:
    @Romanian
    A good posting. Stylistically, one of the top 20%.

    I am amazed at the difference between the Mexico I learn about here (and Vdare) and from the various recommendations I have picked up like the article "Mexico's undiplomatic diplomats" and the Mexico that people in Europe imagine, where the anti-American narrative is accepted even by the reflexively pro-American.

    The stolen land idiocy and the moral validity of reconquista comes up, though from the same people who shrug at Western European replacement by colonial subjects as being karma.

    PS Damn you, Anonymous, I wanted to be first!

    If you live in a different timezone it`s easy to be first.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Romanian
    I expect you'd have to live in the timezone of the content creator, or at least the timezone that fits when he is most active. I am GMT +2, 7 hours away from your Eastern seaboard.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  7. Neoconned says:
    @Anonymous
    Mexico had ridiculously high population growth around mid 20th century.

    I wonder how much of Mexico's present dysfunction - and the backwash colonization of much of the USA - is the Malthusian consequence of that growth?

    If so, the implications of current ridiculous African an sub continental population growth is horrendous.

    Hence why the gate must be closed NOW.

    While riding Greyhound last yr or 2015 i met this old Vietnam vet who showed me his federal carry permit and his H & K USP sidearm. He was on his way to Corpus to pick something up from his storage unit and then he was off to Mexico City to work as a bodyguard. Interesting dude, you meet all types on the bus from eccentric toguys like that to crackheads.

    Anyways the situation in Juarez sounds like my hood….once working class white that then went mixed working class and is now a mostly black Section 8 dump.

    We used to call the cops when we heard gunshots. They had a driveby next door about 4 yrs ago. Some petty feud about drugs or something .

    A joint city, county and ATF/DEA swat raid followed the next yr. Preceding that i had a band of US Marshals with bulletproof flackjackets and automatic machine gun AR variants show up in my backyard looking for 1 of the homeboys living next door.

    So now when i hear 1 of those idiots cracking off a shot into the air i dont even call the cops….whays the pt? About a month ago saw a black boy about 18 w his shirt off casing my neighbors backyard. I walked up to him and threatened to shoot him instead of calling the cops.

    I havent seem him since. He had been peaking thru their privacy fence in broad daylight in open view of the street and my neighbors are older white ppl, retirees.

    Im tired of this shit but Juarez sounds kinda like some areas here.

    I was in El Paso in June. Not many know people cross over daily from Juarez daily to shop at the little flea market slash commercial area they have there. Then they cross back at the end of the day. Go to the Greyhound station in El Paso and walk south towards the border. Only a half mile. You can see the Mexicans in the Churchs Chicken or Mcds there. They dont look famished or poor to me

    Read More
    • Replies: @onetwothree
    Just so you know, there are lots of people, myself included, who do a quick scan of any comment to determine if the commenter is unwilling to spell correctly, punctuate correctly, etc. If so, that comment is skipped.
    , @Thomas
    Respectfully, you sound like you’re slinging some “big fish” stories. For one thing, there’s no such thing as a “federal carry permit” (unless you’re a current or retired cop).
    , @Truth
    Did Mr. Reacher really look like Tom Cruise? I had always heard he was bigger.
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  8. guest says:
    @Anonymous
    Mexico had ridiculously high population growth around mid 20th century.

    I wonder how much of Mexico's present dysfunction - and the backwash colonization of much of the USA - is the Malthusian consequence of that growth?

    If so, the implications of current ridiculous African an sub continental population growth is horrendous.

    “the Malthusian consequence of that growth”

    Actually, Malthus’ thesis was that population is always pressing on the supply of food necessary to sustain it. Unless war, famine, or “vice” further restricts it. If it’s growing, that means either food is more plentiful or restrictive factors have loosened. The idea that Malthusianism says population growth will cause bad things is strange and out of left field.

    Thing is, Malthus was brilliant and massively influential, and I think everyone should read him on the perverse incentives of welfare, but there are various fatal flaws in his reasoning . One is that True Malthusianism has it that humanity is always in crisis. Always, unless we practice conscientious family formation and abstinence. Which we won’t. Or, for us moderns, practice “vice,” which is unapproved birth control. Like condoms and junk. That’s why family planners were all updated Malthusians.

    He’s always like, “Better watch out, or things will get worse.” But things are already as bad as they can be, not counting famine and pestilence, which we can’t control, and war, which is hard to control. And vice, to which he doesn’t want us to resort.

    If populations already tend to go past where they can feed themselves, what is he warning against? That they’ll…press up against the food supply? They’re already doing that! Double-press up against it? Impossible. It doesn’t work like that.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Name Withheld
    A Neo-Malthusian theory might be something like this. Because of the Industrial Revolution, we have temporarily solved the food crisis in most places. That has led to overpopulation that is creating a host of other problems starting with mass immigration, water, politics, over-fishing, pollution, ...
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  9. Neoconned says:
    @Romanian
    A good posting. Stylistically, one of the top 20%.

    I am amazed at the difference between the Mexico I learn about here (and Vdare) and from the various recommendations I have picked up like the article "Mexico's undiplomatic diplomats" and the Mexico that people in Europe imagine, where the anti-American narrative is accepted even by the reflexively pro-American.

    The stolen land idiocy and the moral validity of reconquista comes up, though from the same people who shrug at Western European replacement by colonial subjects as being karma.

    PS Damn you, Anonymous, I wanted to be first!

    I’ve often heard Somalia called a libertarian paradise because corporations can thrive there but not govts.

    Mexico sounds similar only with richer people, more Christians and hotter women. Most Somalis don’t look like Iman

    Read More
    • Replies: @jim jones
    I find there is something repellent about Somali foreheads:

    https://imgur.com/a/w8TqW
    , @Colleen Pater
    You're working three shit jobs in some slum WTF, you sound like an intelligent woke white kid, its bad but not that bad yet.People stay planted and people get myopic about opportunity. Get the fuck out of their even if that makes you homeless a for a while youll figure things out as you already have but you'll do it in an area full of opportunity. I youre that rare thing that has a sense of duty then great a wars coming get ready for it, Either way the pacific northwest is a good place to be white still.
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  10. Achilles says:

    George H.W. Bush had long done oil business in Mexico using a frontman to get around the statutory prohibition on gringos in Mexico’s oil business. My impression is that the main goal of the Bushes, from George H.W. to Jeb, was to cut down the barriers separating business in America and Mexico.

    Another reason, and why the deep state of the time was in favor of NAFTA, was concern over possible major armed communist uprisings and a resulting civil war within Mexico.

    When Ross Perot predicted the result of NAFTA would be a giant sucking sound as American industry relocated south to take advantage of labor and regulatory costs at pennies on the dollar, the establishment publicly mocked him.

    But privately, everyone knew he was right. But the establishment was perfectly willing to sacrifice the heartland industrial jobs of American workers in order to better conditions in Mexico.

    But as we now see, we can bleed the American middle class all we want and yet not solve the cultural, social and political problems of Mexico. Indeed, Mexico is not a poor country in resources. It is a rich country. But the people of Mexico have the government they themselves have created.

    The danger of a widespread collapse in social order in Mexico has certainly not gone away. This is why we need the Wall, as well as a sound visa entry/exit system.

    And this is a big reason why the Jewish/Media Industrial Complex is so insanely adamamtly against the Wall. They would love to see tens of millions of refugees flowing into the US as Mexico collapses into violent anarchy. Just as they are so delighted and thrilled to see millions of Middle Eastern muslims streaming into Germany. Anything to weaken the hated white gentiles of the historic American nation.

    Read More
    • Agree: Charles Pewitt, AndrewR
    • Replies: @LondonBob
    General Kelly is very concerned about Mexico, and supports the wall because of this, perhaps more US attention should be focussed on your neighbour to the south rather than the faraway Middle East.
    , @Rod1963
    NAFTA just smashed the Mexican farmers and was directly responsible for the massive wave of campesinos that swarmed into the U.S.

    NAFTA was never meant to benefit the Mexican workers but the Mexican and American elites. Americans would build their new plants in Mexico, hire Mexicans(at 1/5th to 1/10th of American workers) and not have to worry abotu labor and environmental laws.

    Later a lot of those Mexican workers got fired when those American plants were moved to China for even cheaper labor. Got to meet a lot of Mexican, El Salvadoran workers it happened to here in CA.

    NAFTA also devastated white communities across the heartland as industry moved out of the country and left them economically and socially wrecked. Then came the heroin and Oxycontin plagues like clockwork along with the big box stores to destroy all the mom and pop operations that further hollowed out towns and cities.

    Of course the urban Cosmic whites in their country clubs and gated communities don't care.
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  11. Brabantian says: • Website

    One of Steve Sailer’s colleagues at Taki’s Magazine is Jim Goad, who has just done an hour-long podcast interview with censorship-ground-zero man Andrew Anglin, the 33-year-old Ohio USA proprietor of the multiply-banned Daily Stormer … which just lost its Iceland web address where it had been for a number of days, but quickly re-emerged on a Catalonia url address:

    https://dailystormer.cat/

    Here’s the Anglin interview by iSteve’s Taki Mag fellow scribe:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    Daily Stormer … which just lost its Iceland web address where it had been for a number of days, but quickly re-emerged on a Catalonia url address ..

    Dailystormer lost it's Icelandic domain registration but currently has a Catalan one? Funny. Both Richard Spencer and Julian Assange are going to find that interesting.

    I guess we can expect pro-Catalan death threats and incitements to pro-independence terrorism from Anglin and Weev now. They foul every nest they park their tail feathers in.

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  12. LondonBob says:

    Still not quite the libertarian paradise that is Somalia.

    Read More
    • Replies: @george
    I see the Somali example over and over, usually from progressives who want to know why libertarians don't all move to Somalia. After all, Progressives moved away from the flyover states to the coasts. If I remember the sequence of events the Somalis were 'self-organizing', to use a libertarian phrase, under something called the Islamic Courts Movement. For reasons that are not entirely clear the Bush II administration, decided it was really important to destroy the Islamic courts' movement preemptively and convinced, bribed, or coerced Ethiopia and Uganda to invade. That set off the current chaos.

    search on: somalia islamic courts movement site:antiwar.com for some alternative opinions.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Heh! Was that Timmah at the end there?
    , @CJ
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  13. Romanian says: • Website
    @jim jones
    If you live in a different timezone it`s easy to be first.

    I expect you’d have to live in the timezone of the content creator, or at least the timezone that fits when he is most active. I am GMT +2, 7 hours away from your Eastern seaboard.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I expect you'd have to live in the timezone of the content creator, or at least the timezone that fits when he is most active. I am GMT +2, 7 hours away from your Eastern seaboard.
     
    You are 6 hours later than US Eastern time in the summer (really, mid-March through early November) and 7 hours ahead in winter, Romanian. Steve Sailer lives in the Pacific timezone (that's all I can say without doxing him, haha), and he seems like a late-night guy at that. For all you FIRSTERS, I hope that helps.
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  14. @guest
    "the Malthusian consequence of that growth"

    Actually, Malthus' thesis was that population is always pressing on the supply of food necessary to sustain it. Unless war, famine, or "vice" further restricts it. If it's growing, that means either food is more plentiful or restrictive factors have loosened. The idea that Malthusianism says population growth will cause bad things is strange and out of left field.

    Thing is, Malthus was brilliant and massively influential, and I think everyone should read him on the perverse incentives of welfare, but there are various fatal flaws in his reasoning . One is that True Malthusianism has it that humanity is always in crisis. Always, unless we practice conscientious family formation and abstinence. Which we won't. Or, for us moderns, practice "vice," which is unapproved birth control. Like condoms and junk. That's why family planners were all updated Malthusians.

    He's always like, "Better watch out, or things will get worse." But things are already as bad as they can be, not counting famine and pestilence, which we can't control, and war, which is hard to control. And vice, to which he doesn't want us to resort.

    If populations already tend to go past where they can feed themselves, what is he warning against? That they'll...press up against the food supply? They're already doing that! Double-press up against it? Impossible. It doesn't work like that.

    A Neo-Malthusian theory might be something like this. Because of the Industrial Revolution, we have temporarily solved the food crisis in most places. That has led to overpopulation that is creating a host of other problems starting with mass immigration, water, politics, over-fishing, pollution, …

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  15. unit472 says:

    Wolf Richter/ WolfStreet had an interesting article on Mexico a day or two ago at his website. It seems if the Mexican government can’t much police its borders or control its criminal cartels it can and does control workers wages. This has been the reason Mexico is such a favorite of the auto industry where average wages are kept at $2.25/hour.

    The automakers, both US and European, hammer out these wage agreements before committing to building a plant and Mexican union and government officials honor the terms.

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    • Replies: @StillCARealist
    What I was told by someone looking to do business in Mexico is that they have wage ceilings while we have wage floors.
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  16. LondonBob says:
    @Achilles

    George H.W. Bush had long done oil business in Mexico using a frontman to get around the statutory prohibition on gringos in Mexico’s oil business. My impression is that the main goal of the Bushes, from George H.W. to Jeb, was to cut down the barriers separating business in America and Mexico.

     

    Another reason, and why the deep state of the time was in favor of NAFTA, was concern over possible major armed communist uprisings and a resulting civil war within Mexico.

    When Ross Perot predicted the result of NAFTA would be a giant sucking sound as American industry relocated south to take advantage of labor and regulatory costs at pennies on the dollar, the establishment publicly mocked him.

    But privately, everyone knew he was right. But the establishment was perfectly willing to sacrifice the heartland industrial jobs of American workers in order to better conditions in Mexico.

    But as we now see, we can bleed the American middle class all we want and yet not solve the cultural, social and political problems of Mexico. Indeed, Mexico is not a poor country in resources. It is a rich country. But the people of Mexico have the government they themselves have created.

    The danger of a widespread collapse in social order in Mexico has certainly not gone away. This is why we need the Wall, as well as a sound visa entry/exit system.

    And this is a big reason why the Jewish/Media Industrial Complex is so insanely adamamtly against the Wall. They would love to see tens of millions of refugees flowing into the US as Mexico collapses into violent anarchy. Just as they are so delighted and thrilled to see millions of Middle Eastern muslims streaming into Germany. Anything to weaken the hated white gentiles of the historic American nation.

    General Kelly is very concerned about Mexico, and supports the wall because of this, perhaps more US attention should be focussed on your neighbour to the south rather than the faraway Middle East.

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  17. jim jones says:
    @Neoconned
    I've often heard Somalia called a libertarian paradise because corporations can thrive there but not govts.

    Mexico sounds similar only with richer people, more Christians and hotter women. Most Somalis don't look like Iman

    I find there is something repellent about Somali foreheads:

    https://imgur.com/a/w8TqW

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    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Me too. To wit: They are attached to Somalis. Yech.
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  18. Luke Lea says:

    How many well-governed countries are there are there now, or have there ever been, between the Rio Grand and the tip of Tierra del Fuego? In other words how much is this a Latin American problem and not merely a Mexican one; and what are the commonalities that tie them all together? Supposing there were an actor with God-like powers, what would it take to turn the situation around?

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    How many well-governed countries are there are there now, or have there ever been, between the Rio Grand and the tip of Tierra del Fuego?
     
    "America is ungovernable; those who served the revolution have plowed the sea." - Simon Bolivar

    Intererestingly, he also said this:

    "The United States appears destined by Providence to plague America with miseries in the name of Freedom."

    Smart guy, that Simon Bolivar.
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  19. george says:
    @LondonBob
    Still not quite the libertarian paradise that is Somalia.

    https://youtu.be/b1wXz2Wj-SQ

    I see the Somali example over and over, usually from progressives who want to know why libertarians don’t all move to Somalia. After all, Progressives moved away from the flyover states to the coasts. If I remember the sequence of events the Somalis were ‘self-organizing’, to use a libertarian phrase, under something called the Islamic Courts Movement. For reasons that are not entirely clear the Bush II administration, decided it was really important to destroy the Islamic courts’ movement preemptively and convinced, bribed, or coerced Ethiopia and Uganda to invade. That set off the current chaos.

    search on: somalia islamic courts movement site:antiwar.com for some alternative opinions.

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  20. Interestingly enough the cardinal you refer to being as assassinated was allegedly killed due to crossfire during an attempt to kill el Chapo by the Logan Heights Gang who were from San Diego and at the time were serving as mercenaries by the Tijuana cartel.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logan_Heights_Gang

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assassination_of_Cardinal_Posadas

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  21. Tiny Duck says:
    @Anonymous
    Mexico had ridiculously high population growth around mid 20th century.

    I wonder how much of Mexico's present dysfunction - and the backwash colonization of much of the USA - is the Malthusian consequence of that growth?

    If so, the implications of current ridiculous African an sub continental population growth is horrendous.

    Is there anything white men cannot ruin?

    All this dysfunction was caused by white greed and profit seeking

    You white Christians time is coming. The People are going to take back what was stolen

    Racism is wring

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    • Replies: @Wally
    And in what exclusively white area do you live?

    In 2015, a police officer was 18.5 times more likely to be killed by a black male than an unarmed black male was to be killed by a police officer … That 18.5 ratio undoubtedly worsened in 2016, in light of the 53 percent increase in gun murders of officers—committed vastly and disproportionately by black males.
    All that kneeling ignores the real cause of soaring black homicides, New York Post, September 26, 2017
    http://nypost.com/2017/09/26/all-that-kneeling-ignores-the-real-cause-of-soaring-black-homicides/

    'Analysis of Washington Post police-shootings data reveals surprising result – nearly 2x more whites than blacks shot by police'
    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2016/07/18/analysis-of-washington-post-police-shootings-data-reveals-surprising-result/
    excerpts:
    - For every 10,000 white people arrested for a violent crime, 38 white people were killed by police.
    - For every 10,000 hispanic people arrested for a violent crime, 21 hispanic people were killed by police.
    - For every 10,000 black people arrested for a violent crime, 21 black people were killed by police

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  22. I was reminded of a photo spread at Slate from a few years ago showing the very Trumpy world of Mexicio’s Institutional Revolutionary Party, the PRI:

    The Poor Little Rich Girls of Mexico

    The narrative of Mexico as our impoverished and drug cartel–ridden neighbor dominates most news coverage in America, but that’s only one part of a large and diverse country. Photographer Daniela Rossell brings us tales of the polar opposite segment of Mexican society with her series Ricas y Famosas, which depicts the children of Mexico’s most privileged class of society.

    Rossell knows the world she shoots. She is the daughter of a member of the PRI, Mexico’s long-ruling political party.
    [...]
    Some of the women in the series have been accused of being “poster girls for corruption.” Of the reaction to the series, Rossell said in the video, “There has been a melodramatic pattern of saying these women are evil; they represent corruption; they represent 70 years of PRI rule. …”

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/behold/2012/12/11/daniela_rossell_documenting_the_rich_and_famous_mexican_youth_photos.html

    After seventy years of corruption the PRI went from being the party that hanged priests to the party of Kardashianism. Georges Clemenceau said “America is the only country that went from barbarism to decadence without knowing civilization” but he hadn’t been to Mexico.

    The anti-Trump “#Resistance” is more like the Institutional Revolutionary Party of seventy years ago while Trump is more like the PRI of today. Trumpism is not ideal but it’s miles better than the Antifa, BLM, neocon, Pussy Hat, WW3-curious coalition Hillary is trying to gather around herself.

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  23. Tiny Duck says:
    @Neoconned
    The phrase i like to use is "53pc of Americans make $30k per yr or less...so half. Roughly a third of Americans make $20k per yr or less. 24pc or a quarter basically make $10k per yr or less. The per capita GDP of Mexico is roughly per CIA factbook about $11k USD a yr.

    So nominally half of Mexicans live as good or better than a quarter of Americans. And given the lower cost of living half of Mexicans probably live about the same as half to a third of Americans."

    Or a more simple way i put it is "Americans aren't as rich as people think they are and Mexicans arent as poor as ppl think they are."

    Mexico is the most obese nation on the planet or was at least a few yrs ago.

    More Mexicans die every yr from diabetes related ailments than from drug violence over five to ten yrs....

    I work 3 restaurant jobs 40-60hrs per week and only cleared $8-9k last.yr if i recall correctly. And when im sweeping the parking lot at the McD's in my town i see Mexicans in newer model pickups while i walk everywhere. Forgive me for not tearing up when i hear their fake sob stories. I got my own, and no fucks are given when I'm sweating my ass off and they're stuffing their fat faces with sausage biscuits or Big Macs....

    If you are a white male and cannot do better than raw food then you are a loser

    With all your privilege and unearned advantages you should not complain when you make poor life choices

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    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter
    Tell me where I can get more unearned privilege!

    Should I declare that I am black and Hispanic? Should I declare that I am transgendered?

    What is the right mix. Surely you know!
    , @Henry Bowman
    Yeah, its not like non whites get into college, hired, promoted just because of their skin color right race traitor?

    Enjoy these days, soon people like you will be deported to live among your non white pets..
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  24. george says:

    “Mexico Is a Libertarian Paradise”

    It’s not clear what policy alternative you are suggesting. I guess we are waiting to see if Duterte’s eugenics program in the Philippians works. It is also not clear what direction the US is going. The large-scale immigration from ‘peasant’ South America is vaguely like the large-scale immigration from peasant Italy at the beginning of last century, which lead to the Mafia dominating many communities in the US, usually with the approval of local law enforcement. As long as the Mafia kept Anarchists, Communists, Trade Unionists, Blacks, petty crime ect in line. Eventually, the Mafia petered out after mass immigration from Italy stopped. Mass immigration from somewhere in South America may never stop.

    To some extent, the Mafia and MS-13 are examples of stateless people self-organizing to control the use of force in society. MS-13 is especially interesting as it really does not exist. There are no officers, meetings, or membership roles. My guess is eventually to control it US authorities allow MS-13 enough leeway to form a Mafia-like leadership so that there will be some way to control MS-13.

    The prognosis is not good. In Afghanistan, the US cannot control the situation even with a local government and the ability to assassinate anyone. In Southern Lebanon, the Israelis just made the situation progressively worse until they were forced to withdraw from the first Lebanon intervention and accept a conventional military defeat in the second Lebanon intervention.

    Mexico as Libertarian paradise. The Mexican Peso is doing fine. The Mexican auto industry is doing amazingly well, for example, shock absorber maker Rassini SAB de CV. So the gap between the US and Mexico in terms of economics and order is closing.

    Detroit Three’s to lose dominance of North American auto output in 2017: IHS

    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-autos-production/detroit-threes-to-lose-dominance-of-north-american-auto-output-in-2017-ihs-idUSKCN1C22PD

    Just the term Detroit 3 instead of Big 3 is a shock to me.

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  25. eah says:

    Mexico, Puerto Rico, what’s the difference?

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  26. Life in Mexico sounded like the opening of Borges’ “The Lottery in Babylon” …

    I read that one relatively recently. It’s a great story to think about at this particular moment in the West. Of course, Borges didn’t have the last fifty years in mind when he wrote it back in the ’40s but human social behaviour really hasn’t changed when it comes to this sort of thing.

    Like the lottery in the story, the skinny tie, liberal-progressive managerialism of the mid-1960s has descended into a strange, post-rational system in the last five decades. Bono, Obama and even John McCain are currently a few of the high priests of this low cult.

    Everyone should read (or reread) Borges’ short story with Anglea Merkel, “refugees welcome”, SJWs, cuckservatives, Haven Monaghan and all the rest in mind; just for fun.

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  27. The plan was for me not to write anything tody, but now you’ve gone and done it.

    This post would a decent post if you had substituted the words anarchic or chaotic for libertarian in the title. As it stands, it’s completely wrong. I may not be keeping up, but no where in the ideology of libertarianism does it specify a massivly corrupt government, at all levels.

    I understand your point that “here is the local private police forces that libertarians call for”, (not a quote, but just the point you are trying to make). None of this means anything without rule of law. Local Federales vs. Federal Federales doesn’t change a thing – none of them follow any law besides what they make up on the spot. (yes, I know where the term Federales come from, but it has come to mean completely corrupt cops of any kind – plenty here too).

    It comes down to this, you can’t have anything resembling libertarianism without the right kind of people, and the founders of our country were the closest to these right kind of people. Those libertarians that call for open borders are just too stupid or naive to get this. On the other hand, the conservatives who deride libertarianism’s focus on very small government, God-given rights,and the US Constitution are stupid to not understand that 5 decades of not following these precepts has led to a welfare state in which mostly the stupid and irresponsible thrive. This all means that there will not be anything other than the corruption and 3rd-world situation of Mexico if something is not done about immigration AND our socialist welfare state prontomundo.

    The only decent part of the post was the “Sympathy for the Devil”. I’m surprised none of the music lovers caught that (yet!). Oh, and ragging on the NY times, that’s always cool.

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    • Agree: Travis
    • Replies: @Wulf
    How strong enough borders - to keep out invaders, military and civilian - are to be kept without a strong and centralised government with a centralised chain of command?

    What is going to prevent a neighbouring country with a strong, big and determined government to invade the libertarian paradise with its tiny government, to enslave its citizens and take control over its resources?
    , @utu

    you can’t have anything resembling libertarianism without the right kind of people
     
    That what Stalin and his Politburo used to say about deficiencies of Russian people. And they worked quite hard to trim the population to the right kind of people core.

    The Solution by Bertold Brecht

    After the uprising of the 17th of June
    The Secretary of the Writers' Union
    Had leaflets distributed in the Stalinallee
    Stating that the people
    Had forfeited the confidence of the government
    And could win it back only
    By redoubled efforts. Would it not be easier
    In that case for the government
    To dissolve the people
    And elect another?
     
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  28. ic1000 says:

    Earlier this week, an iSteve commenter linked this Don Winslow piece in Esquire from 2016, “El Chapo and the Secret History of the Heroin Crisis”. It gives a good snapshot of the impact of Narco culture on Mexico.

    If you like your corrosion slower and less violent, Sam Quinones’ investigative reporting book Dreamland is well worth the read. It’s been on iSteve’s radar multiple times.

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    • Replies: @El Dato
    Arguably also

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2666
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  29. @Brabantian
    One of Steve Sailer's colleagues at Taki's Magazine is Jim Goad, who has just done an hour-long podcast interview with censorship-ground-zero man Andrew Anglin, the 33-year-old Ohio USA proprietor of the multiply-banned Daily Stormer ... which just lost its Iceland web address where it had been for a number of days, but quickly re-emerged on a Catalonia url address:
    https://dailystormer.cat/
    Here's the Anglin interview by iSteve's Taki Mag fellow scribe:
    https://soundcloud.com/jim-goad/ep11

    Daily Stormer … which just lost its Iceland web address where it had been for a number of days, but quickly re-emerged on a Catalonia url address ..

    Dailystormer lost it’s Icelandic domain registration but currently has a Catalan one? Funny. Both Richard Spencer and Julian Assange are going to find that interesting.

    I guess we can expect pro-Catalan death threats and incitements to pro-independence terrorism from Anglin and Weev now. They foul every nest they park their tail feathers in.

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  30. And another thing!

    I think there has indeed has been a slow change in Mexico toward more violence at the large scale. I have been there, but not in a while (the guy to really write about this would be your fellow, Steve, at VDare, Mr. Allan Wall. He lived there for a long while till about a decade ago, when his column changed from “Memo from Mexico” to “Memo from Middle America”, and he still goes there on vacations.).

    Here’s my theory, that you would hear from any smart libertarian too. I think it’s pretty plausible that the Drug War has a lot to do with the escalation of violence on a large scale in Mexico. These big cartels grew to consolidate the drug shipping/trading business. Once the US, in the 1980′s started going all out on the DRUG “WAR”*, giving the DEA all kinds of powers (lots of them unconsitutional), it wasn’t so easy anymore for the small guy in a twin Cessna (w/ ferry tanks) to do the job, working with small guys in old Mexico. It became big business as the risks, hence the MONEY, became much bigger.

    It doesn’t take a stretch to compare the situation to that of the US after Amendment XVIII was passed, prohibiting sale of alcohol (NOTE to non-constitutionalists – they had to amend the Constitution! – it actually mattered to people back then). The violence escalated when you had the Al Capone types wanting to consolidate. Once people are already in an illegal business, they will not have many compunctions against carrying out other illegal acts, of course. What difference does it make, at that point, right?

    It doesn’t excuse the violence down there for us to say that its our own fault because the demand is here (that’s what a libertarian would say). It WAS the cause though. However, I think those cartels are so big and violent that I don’t think it will stop even if all the big-selling/smuggling drugs became legal right now, as opposed to here when Amend. XXI, reversing prohibition, was passed. The cartels have turned into armies or nations of their own.
    .

    * a war against substances? I guess. That’s not any worse than a war against tactics (W.O.Terrorism) or maybe it’s a war on “feelings” (W.O. Terror)

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    • Replies: @AM
    ". I think it’s pretty plausible that the Drug War has a lot to do with the escalation of violence on a large scale in Mexico."

    The previous post was pretty good and here it is..the drug thing. Again.

    Alcohol is not modern hard drugs. (You can make a case that Prohibition was in part a reaction to being overrun with hard drinking Catholics.) The industrial revolution has made addictive substances available that would be impossible to create at home. Barriers to getting them are very good things.

    Likewise, I struggle to find any libertarian who will give me, a woman trying to raise a family, unfettered (read cheap) access to antibiotics.

    All of sudden, libertarians remember that my drug use will impact others and maybe it's a good idea to restrict access.

    How is making it easy for my son to gain access to life destroying addictions an advance? It will have just as far reaching impacts, including taxing the welfare system more.

    The existence of the welfare state alone means drug laws must stay in place. If you insist on giving people the "right" to completely trash their lives, then it must be with the full consequences of such. No welfare. Don't think about removing drug laws until the welfare state is rolled back. Otherwise, you're simply pushing for a more libertine society and we've got plenty, thanks.
    , @Yak-15
    Drug laws suck and enforcement can be quite tyrannical but they are important. Recall the fact that widespread opium use in China retarded their progress and impoverished their civilization for 300 or so years.
    , @Thomas

    However, I think those cartels are so big and violent that I don’t think it will stop even if all the big-selling/smuggling drugs became legal right now, as opposed to here when Amend. XXI, reversing prohibition, was passed. The cartels have turned into armies or nations of their own.
     
    The mob didn’t exactly dry up in America either after Prohibition. In fact, you could say that that era was merely when organized crime got its start, with the salad days probably being the 1950s (before Cuba went red) and the decline starting in the 1970s (after J. Edgar Hoover’s death plus the passage of the RICO Act).
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  31. @LondonBob
    Still not quite the libertarian paradise that is Somalia.

    https://youtu.be/b1wXz2Wj-SQ

    Heh! Was that Timmah at the end there?

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  32. Don’t blame it all on the Bush Crime Family. While Bill Clinton was Arkansas Governor, Mena had become a most important final destination for Columbian cocaine. Bill’s state troopers delivered his cut to him in cash-stuffed envelopes – – – and free samples for Bill’s nose.

    If Hillary had won last year, this country would now be suffering an incredible crime wave, the likes of which could not have been imagined, even in one’s wildest nightmares. Hillary’s post-presidential book would have been entitled You’re Fucked, not What Happened.

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    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    While Ronald Reagan was President, Mena had become a most important final destination for Columbian cocaine. Bill’s state troopers delivered his cut to him in cash-stuffed envelopes – – – and free samples for Bill’s nose.

    There fixed it for you.
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  33. MTuggle says: • Website

    Albert Camus: “Absolute freedom is the right of the strongest to dominate.”

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  34. Flemur says:

    invisible walls enclose Monterrey’s wealthy core

    Invisible means “imaginary” ?

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  35. Thank you, Steve, for describing what life will be like in the United States when I retire.

    I will plan accordingly.

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    • Replies: @Flip
    As the US becomes more Brazilified, I think whites will concentrate in certain areas of the country in order to maintain their majority status and local control. South African whites used to be "packing for Perth" and American whites may be packing for Boise.

    I could also see the US becoming more decentralized with whites demanding that the Federal government become less intrusive so they could maintain more local control in their own areas. That won't happen until there is a dollar crisis however, which will come at some point.
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  36. Local TV news right at this very moment is airing a sob story about a 37-year-old Latin American woman here who died — leaving behind 8 children.

    Our Mexican future is fast approaching.

    ¡Adios America!

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  37. As America descends into increasing racial strife driven by politics, the gated community – private security complex will likely take off here.

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  38. libertreee says: • Website

    Why is this supposed to be a libertarian paradise?
    You can’t have a lib paradise when you have a War on Drugs Black market.
    Is it because of the different police agencies claiming jurisdiction? Aren’t these public agencies? Sailer doesn’t say, but I would think they are. This is the same tired trope we see about 19th century duplicative police and fire agencies. Hello, Steve? Those were public agencies, not private agencies working under contract law, but public agencies authorized by different public jurisdictions that resulted in two fire departments refusing to put out a fire because they were arguing over who had jurisdiction.

    I like the alt right to a degree, and iSteve is a learned and articulate fellow, but if you are going to criticize libertarians you should understand the philosophy a bit better than I see alt-right authors do

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I like the alt right to a degree, and iSteve is a learned and articulate fellow, but if you are going to criticize libertarians you should understand the philosophy a bit better than I see alt-right authors do.
     
    Libertree, thank you and welcome! I can't set all these people straight by myself. It's a burden, even though I feel like I'm standing on the shoulders of giants, who are, in turn, standing on the shoulders of other giants. It's giants all the way down.
    , @MarkinLA
    Drugs are practically legal in Mexico. Every DEA/Mexican drug operation down there is for show to the gringos. So it is a libertarian paradise.
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  39. Flip says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    Thank you, Steve, for describing what life will be like in the United States when I retire.

    I will plan accordingly.

    As the US becomes more Brazilified, I think whites will concentrate in certain areas of the country in order to maintain their majority status and local control. South African whites used to be “packing for Perth” and American whites may be packing for Boise.

    I could also see the US becoming more decentralized with whites demanding that the Federal government become less intrusive so they could maintain more local control in their own areas. That won’t happen until there is a dollar crisis however, which will come at some point.

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  40. @Neoconned
    I've often heard Somalia called a libertarian paradise because corporations can thrive there but not govts.

    Mexico sounds similar only with richer people, more Christians and hotter women. Most Somalis don't look like Iman

    You’re working three shit jobs in some slum WTF, you sound like an intelligent woke white kid, its bad but not that bad yet.People stay planted and people get myopic about opportunity. Get the fuck out of their even if that makes you homeless a for a while youll figure things out as you already have but you’ll do it in an area full of opportunity. I youre that rare thing that has a sense of duty then great a wars coming get ready for it, Either way the pacific northwest is a good place to be white still.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Either way the pacific northwest is a good place to be white still.
     
    Yeah, but white and straight?
    , @Anon
    The PNW is full of white people who hate being white. Nothing to brag about. And given the relative dearth of negroes, they won't even learn anytime soon.
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  41. @Neoconned
    Hence why the gate must be closed NOW.

    While riding Greyhound last yr or 2015 i met this old Vietnam vet who showed me his federal carry permit and his H & K USP sidearm. He was on his way to Corpus to pick something up from his storage unit and then he was off to Mexico City to work as a bodyguard. Interesting dude, you meet all types on the bus from eccentric toguys like that to crackheads.

    Anyways the situation in Juarez sounds like my hood....once working class white that then went mixed working class and is now a mostly black Section 8 dump.

    We used to call the cops when we heard gunshots. They had a driveby next door about 4 yrs ago. Some petty feud about drugs or something .

    A joint city, county and ATF/DEA swat raid followed the next yr. Preceding that i had a band of US Marshals with bulletproof flackjackets and automatic machine gun AR variants show up in my backyard looking for 1 of the homeboys living next door.

    So now when i hear 1 of those idiots cracking off a shot into the air i dont even call the cops....whays the pt? About a month ago saw a black boy about 18 w his shirt off casing my neighbors backyard. I walked up to him and threatened to shoot him instead of calling the cops.

    I havent seem him since. He had been peaking thru their privacy fence in broad daylight in open view of the street and my neighbors are older white ppl, retirees.

    Im tired of this shit but Juarez sounds kinda like some areas here.

    I was in El Paso in June. Not many know people cross over daily from Juarez daily to shop at the little flea market slash commercial area they have there. Then they cross back at the end of the day. Go to the Greyhound station in El Paso and walk south towards the border. Only a half mile. You can see the Mexicans in the Churchs Chicken or Mcds there. They dont look famished or poor to me

    Just so you know, there are lots of people, myself included, who do a quick scan of any comment to determine if the commenter is unwilling to spell correctly, punctuate correctly, etc. If so, that comment is skipped.

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    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter
    By the time I have scanned a comment for all those things I have read and understood the damn thing anyway!
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  42. And now for something completely different. Sometimes there is humor in the DoJ’s submission to the courts:

    https://www.lambdalegal.org/sites/default/files/legal-docs/downloads/document1.pdf

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Skydivers, that explains it, P.C. (however, I'm no lawyer, so what page is the humor on? You sent me to a freakin' book.)
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  43. El Dato says:
    @ic1000
    Earlier this week, an iSteve commenter linked this Don Winslow piece in Esquire from 2016, "El Chapo and the Secret History of the Heroin Crisis". It gives a good snapshot of the impact of Narco culture on Mexico.

    If you like your corrosion slower and less violent, Sam Quinones' investigative reporting book Dreamland is well worth the read. It's been on iSteve's radar multiple times.
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  44. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    No one cares about Los Deplorez.

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  45. The last time I was in Mexico City was probably thirty or so years ago. It was a business trip. At the time, I was able to clear the border with just my driver’s license and a copy of my birth certificate. I stayed at a very nice hotel on the Paseo de la Reforma. Each evening I took a leisurely stroll through the surrounding neighborhoods. Maybe because I am dark everywhere I went people tried talking to me in Spanish but not once did I ever feel unsafe even when I ended up in the Zona Rosa one night. Four things about that trip have stuck in my memory:

    1. The Mestizo woman who spread a blanket on the sidewalk in front of the hotel and sold hand-made dolls with her daughter at her side. The little girl was strikingly beautiful. In an interesting synchronicity she looked almost identical to the youngest of the sibling group of four who were living with us as foster children at the time.

    2. Policemen standing on the corners with automatic weapons slung on their shoulders.

    3. The taxicabs were old Volkswagens with the front passenger seat removed.

    4. Credit card charges made on that trip did not appear on my statement for over three months. Apparently businesses waited for the most favorable peso to dollar rates before turning in the charges.

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  46. TG says:
    @Anonymous
    Mexico had ridiculously high population growth around mid 20th century.

    I wonder how much of Mexico's present dysfunction - and the backwash colonization of much of the USA - is the Malthusian consequence of that growth?

    If so, the implications of current ridiculous African an sub continental population growth is horrendous.

    Reply to anonymous: yes Mexico had a ridiculous amount of population growth in the 1960′s.

    And it was the deliberate policy of the Mexican government that crafted this population explosion. They propagandized that it was every woman’s patriotic duty to have six kids each “to make Mexico bigger and better,” they gave medals to women with large families etc. And the result is what always happens in societies without an open frontier: wages for the many were crushed and profits for the few were boosted. Mexico created a record number of billionaires, and also became so poor that it now depends on the safety valve of immigration to the US to avoid collapse.

    It’s an old story. Behind every population explosion, if you look hard enough, one can usually find government policies encouraging that. In the US, even though it’s being done via immigration instead of inducements to higher native fertility rate, the effect is the same: the rich are forcing population growth upwards, and this is having the predictable effect of lowering wages and increasing profits.

    It is effectively censored in the press, but the problems is Syria can be traced to the government’s pro-natalist policies. They even made the sale and possession of any form of contraception a crime!

    http://globuspallidusxi.blogspot.com/2015/04/the-real-story-on-syria-forced.html

    So what happened in Mexico has happened many other times in many other places… and it’s starting to happen here.

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    • Replies: @FKA Max

    It is effectively censored in the press, but the problems is Syria can be traced to the government’s pro-natalist policies. They even made the sale and possession of any form of contraception a crime!
     
    Great comment!


    The food crisis is not the result of over population, it is the result of protracted conflict. [This, of course, is nonsense.]

    – page 6 https://www.plan.org.au/~/media/plan/documents/reports/challenging-negative-attitudes-to-the-east-africa-food-crisis.pdf

    They are the ignorant ones…

    List of countries by median age

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_median_age

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_median_age#/media/File:Median_age_by_country,_2016.svg

    Between 1970 and 1999, 80 percent of civil conflicts occurred in countries where 60 percent of the population or more were under the age of thirty, according to the PAI report. [...] – https://www.cfr.org/backgrounder/effects-youth-bulge-civil-conflicts
     
    - http://www.unz.com/isteve/sydney-morning-herald-commenters-who-notice-african-populati/#comment-1923087

    The “Latino” Oligarchy, as is often the case with Mercantile elites, is short-sighted and profit oriented. Their alliance with the Church has put in place a system that pays no heed to genetic inheritance. When the Catholic Church is in power in Latin America, whether the stronger ecclesiastical current of time is on the Right or Left, the arc of history will always lead to a country (even one as white as Argentina) that looks like Brazil or the Dominican Republic, with all of the politico-economic problems that entails. - http://www.unz.com/jthompson/tomster-on-marriage/#comment-1839275

    No problem at all…
     
    - http://www.unz.com/tsaker/listening-to-the-donald-at-the-un/#comment-2016095

    http://eh.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/page39.png

    Great discussion!
    , @Frau Katze
    Thomas Friedman at NYT had a couple of columns on excess population and how it backfired big time after a couple of dry years. People were encouraged to farm marginal land, if I recall correctly.

    So it's not quite censored.

    He wrote this several years ago (but after the civil war had started).

    New taboos spring up very quickly lately. It's possibly become taboo since.

    I have seen several articles at NYT over the last few years that touched on high birth rates. To judge by the comments, no one sympathized with these people. They were quite open about it.
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  47. epebble says:
    @Neoconned
    The phrase i like to use is "53pc of Americans make $30k per yr or less...so half. Roughly a third of Americans make $20k per yr or less. 24pc or a quarter basically make $10k per yr or less. The per capita GDP of Mexico is roughly per CIA factbook about $11k USD a yr.

    So nominally half of Mexicans live as good or better than a quarter of Americans. And given the lower cost of living half of Mexicans probably live about the same as half to a third of Americans."

    Or a more simple way i put it is "Americans aren't as rich as people think they are and Mexicans arent as poor as ppl think they are."

    Mexico is the most obese nation on the planet or was at least a few yrs ago.

    More Mexicans die every yr from diabetes related ailments than from drug violence over five to ten yrs....

    I work 3 restaurant jobs 40-60hrs per week and only cleared $8-9k last.yr if i recall correctly. And when im sweeping the parking lot at the McD's in my town i see Mexicans in newer model pickups while i walk everywhere. Forgive me for not tearing up when i hear their fake sob stories. I got my own, and no fucks are given when I'm sweating my ass off and they're stuffing their fat faces with sausage biscuits or Big Macs....

    Very good observation. As recently as 2000, Mexico was in top 10 nations economically, even ahead of Brazil. In 2005, however, it was pushed out by Spain and South Korea, which were pushed aside by 2010 by India and Russia. Fortunes of nations is very dynamic! By 2050, it is projected to be 8th.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_largest_historical_GDP#By_average_values_of_GDP_.28nominal.29

    By Purchasing power, it is projected to be 10th by 2030 and 7th by 2050, better than Japan, Germany and U.K. It is amazing what can happen in a generation.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_largest_historical_GDP#By_average_values_of_GDP_.28PPP.29

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  48. In other news, Bisexual teen kills black tormentor in De Blasio’s New York!

    https://nypost.com/2017/09/29/bisexual-teen-charged-with-killing-alleged-bully-i-just-snapped/

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    • Replies: @El Dato
    I guess that might fall under "stand your ground" law. But it's unlikely to be allowed in NY.
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  49. I vacationed in Cancun in 1981. As soon as I ventured out of the tourist area I saw soldiers with assault rifles standing on the street corners. Not on every corner, but enough of them to make an impression.

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    • Replies: @Travis
    In 1995 I witnessed many Mexican Federales with assault weapons when driving from Guadalajara to Mazatlán. My friend was robbed at gunpoint by a Federale in La Paz, Baja Sur.

    When I lived in Mexico for 5 weeks in 1995 I was stopped twice and asked for my proper papers by federales...once on a bus and once while walking the streets of Mazatlán..

    First time I ventured into Mexico was 1994, we walked across the bridge from El Paso to Juarez...we got a cab from a man who spoke English, asked him to take us to a decent restaurant...he took us to a brothel....
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  50. My wife has been a volunteer social worker (she will represent the interest of the child in court when the parent is in legal difficulty and the state is threatening to take the child). The immigration from Latin America (not necessarily Mexico) has an underside which is so much worse than anyone thinks and it is costing a fortune. Drug addicted mothers, prostitutes, teen age mothers, mothers wanting to keep Down syndrome children just for the state aid, 6 children by 6 different fathers, all children failing in school, horrible English skills, massive welfare use, not to mention the court and social welfare system! Paid social workers, psychologists, court officials, mandatory drug testing. We pay for it all. It was so depressing she had to stop.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    But they're sending us their best! Otherwise you must be a Nazi.
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  51. The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate is a dwindling portion of the WASP / Jew ruling class, but it still has some power left. The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate has been heavily involved in the treasonous attempt to erase the border between Mexico and the United States.

    George Bush #1, as vice president to Reagan, was a lead backer of the shady formation of the sovereignty-sapping North American Free Trade Agreement(NAFTA). The goal of NAFTA was to pauperize White Core Americans while flooding the United States with illegal alien invaders and legal immigrants. George Bush #1 is an evil Mammonite who sold out his own country for money. The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate was wounded by President Trump, that makes them dangerous.

    Bill Clinton and Newt Gingrich were able to pass the Reagan/Bush NAFTA bill in 1993 or 1994. Bill Clinton and Newt Gingrich are evil baby boomers who knew that NAFTA would hurt White Core American workers. Clinton and Gingrich knew that NAFTA would flood the United States with illegal alien invaders and other immigrants.

    The WASP / Jew ruling class of the American Empire is evil, immoral and irresponsible. The WASP / Jew ruling class must be defeated to restore honor to the United States.

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    • Replies: @Henry Bowman

    The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate is a dwindling portion of the WASP / Jew ruling class, but it still has some power left. The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate has been heavily involved in the treasonous attempt to erase the border between Mexico and the United States.

     

    Can not wait for the WASP/jew ruling class madness to end.
    , @Hibernian
    Didn't you refer to Irish people in uncomplementary terms? Are you at war with the entire world? Might help to have some allies.
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  52. eric says:

    Don’t confuse anarchism with libertarian. The ‘classical liberalism’ of Locke, von Mises, Hayek, Friedman have a functioning state to enforce contracts, protect private property (including one’s body), and has the monopoly of force in the state. The state and its laws are essential in enforcing a limited set of negative rights, and Mexico is not enforcing these, so it is anarchic, not libertarian.

    Note anarchists reject the concept of ‘private property’ and so love smashing storefront windows of ‘businesses’ which they see as illegitimate. This is a naive ideology because anything that would try and provide bread or banking needs to have the right to not be expropriated, otherwise, there will be no bread or banking, and the world would have to be depopulated by 90+% if we want to go back to living as hunter-gatherers.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Don’t confuse anarchism with libertarian.
     
    And don't confuse libertarianism with a serious political philosophy that truly values liberty. To the degree that most people practice it, is amounts to LARPing. To the degree that rich people practice it, it amounts to feudalism.
    , @eD
    To be fair, the most common anarchist philosophy was anarcho-syndicalism, which did envisage organizations/ hierarchies of humans, just not the established governments. But that still doesn't make much sense. Humans will always organize into hierarchies, humans pretty much evolved as tribal apes. The question is how much do people hold to the rule of law, which really is what protects the genuine individualists.
    , @DaveA
    Libertarianism + a few people not of Northern European descent = anarchy. Small government only works when people have the self-restraint not to settle every dispute with a homicide, and the resourcefulness not to have to mooch off the state.

    Joogle deleted the photo that showed a typical neighborhood anywhere in Latin America (lots of barbed wire and concrete topped with broken glass) with the caption, "In Mexico, people build their own walls to keep Mexicans out."
    , @guest
    There are plenty of libertarian more or less anarchists, or anarchistic optimists you might say. Murray Rothbard and Hans Hermann Hoppe tend that way, and I imagine hordes of juvenile Internet Anarchists do, too.

    They envision a legal system, security forces, and defensive companies in place, though no monopoly of force. (Honestly, there's no legal monopoly of force even in the contemporary U.S. You are allowed to defend yourself and others in peril, and for instance in Charlottesville antifa can go buckwild on political undesirables. Or at least they have a lot more leeway. That may be the authorities breaking their own law, but call it de facto law.) In a lot of ways, they envision a legal system much stricter than we have now.

    But I think most of us know that if we ever tried to implement their suggestions, we'd get the bad sort of anarchy. Somalia in action. Disappearance of civilization in favor of Mad Max. Gang warfare, organized crime and warlords instead of cooperative private judicial systems and security syndicates.

    Libertarian anarchists are a little more realistic than commie anarchists. At least they recognize basic human selfishness. But not realistic enough not to send humanity to hell in a handbasket.

    I read radical libertarian writings like I read sci-fi. Their what-if fantasy lands help me better appreciate the reality we actually live in. I'm not about to imagine time machines are real, however.
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  53. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    My impression is that the main goal of the Bushes, from George H.W. to Jeb, was to cut down the barriers separating business in America and Mexico.

    Bush Economic Policy: Is it good for the Bushes?

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  54. Chiron says:

    In most if not all all Latin-Amercian countries the “social contract” is broken and has been broken for a loooong time.

    Mexico and Brazil have unsolvable high violence problems thanks to the drug trade, and illegal drugs aren’t going anywhere.

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    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    Mexican Lives Matter.
    , @nebulafox
    It's "solvable", in the sense that you can enable people to lead functional middle class lives. But it takes some pretty nasty measures, and even most "winners" in these societies have to live their lives watching their backs.

    If you are middle class in Brazil, you will live in a secure compound, and you will be paying a good amount of your check to do so. In a big city like Sao Paulo, this typically translates into a well-guarded high-rise. If you are living in your own house in a smaller city, barbed wire, high walls, security systems, the works. I lived for a summer in a typical working/lower-middle class Brazilian neighborhood in a middle sized city. Anybody with even modest means lived in secure compounds, including graduate students and postdocs who were renting out apartments.

    I suppose that the big difference is that in Brazil, you can't really avoid seeing the reality of danger and poverty and drugs daily even if you have means, whereas if you live in a, say, Baltimore suburb, you can go your entire life without setting an eye on the inner city. That, and for all the similarities with slavery and mass European emigration, the founding colonial regimes (British vs. Portuguese) in the US and Brazil were very different. Brazil didn't exactly have a social contract like the US did to begin with. Hence, O Jeitinho Brasileiro.

    (I personally find the idea of becoming a Latin American style society with the requisite debt peonage/societal immobility, lack of true yeoman/petty bourgeois independence, governmental corruption, and often racially delineated inequality rather inferior to the vision that the Founding Fathers had in mind, but that's another story. I also think combining this tendency with automation and further exacerbating our problems with mass low-skilled immigration from Central America is rather unwise for basic stability. Though he is right on the money in stating that "Average is Over", Tyler Cowen's subsequent assertions that there won't be mass political violence down the road are unconvincing to me, for a host of reasons. Our plutocratic class and their intellectual/upper-middle class sympathizers, needless to say, disagree.)

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  55. huisache says:

    In 1973 I rode a train second class from Nuevo Laredo to Monterrey and Mexican Army soldiers armed with rifles and Browning Automatic Rifles patrolled the aisles. Dono if they were in first class.

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  56. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    I note the absence of Mexican commenters talking about how bored they are with Mr. Sailer discussing Mexico, and how he should really go talk about something else.

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    • Replies: @AM

    I note the absence of Mexican commenters talking about how bored they are with Mr. Sailer discussing Mexico, and how he should really go talk about something else.
     
    That is strange. You'd think someone would stand against anti-Mexicanism.
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  57. @Neoconned
    The phrase i like to use is "53pc of Americans make $30k per yr or less...so half. Roughly a third of Americans make $20k per yr or less. 24pc or a quarter basically make $10k per yr or less. The per capita GDP of Mexico is roughly per CIA factbook about $11k USD a yr.

    So nominally half of Mexicans live as good or better than a quarter of Americans. And given the lower cost of living half of Mexicans probably live about the same as half to a third of Americans."

    Or a more simple way i put it is "Americans aren't as rich as people think they are and Mexicans arent as poor as ppl think they are."

    Mexico is the most obese nation on the planet or was at least a few yrs ago.

    More Mexicans die every yr from diabetes related ailments than from drug violence over five to ten yrs....

    I work 3 restaurant jobs 40-60hrs per week and only cleared $8-9k last.yr if i recall correctly. And when im sweeping the parking lot at the McD's in my town i see Mexicans in newer model pickups while i walk everywhere. Forgive me for not tearing up when i hear their fake sob stories. I got my own, and no fucks are given when I'm sweating my ass off and they're stuffing their fat faces with sausage biscuits or Big Macs....

    I can’t remember if this was coined by Fred Reed or Charles Portis, but, indeed, “there is a lot of non-poverty in Mexico.”

    To the point of the post, however, I certainly see the draw of the libertarian way of doing things in Mexico; passing a fifty to a traffic cop is preferable to the court-ordered nonsense you have to deal with al norte. Portis’s novel Gringos paints a picture of this political economy, and it’s not an unattractive one. However, as Steve points out, the old way of doing things has been blindsided by the movement of cartel violence from Colombia. Libertarian environments don’t do so well when inundated with homicidal young men with nothing to lose.

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  58. Mr. Anon says:
    @eric
    Don't confuse anarchism with libertarian. The 'classical liberalism' of Locke, von Mises, Hayek, Friedman have a functioning state to enforce contracts, protect private property (including one's body), and has the monopoly of force in the state. The state and its laws are essential in enforcing a limited set of negative rights, and Mexico is not enforcing these, so it is anarchic, not libertarian.

    Note anarchists reject the concept of 'private property' and so love smashing storefront windows of 'businesses' which they see as illegitimate. This is a naive ideology because anything that would try and provide bread or banking needs to have the right to not be expropriated, otherwise, there will be no bread or banking, and the world would have to be depopulated by 90+% if we want to go back to living as hunter-gatherers.

    Don’t confuse anarchism with libertarian.

    And don’t confuse libertarianism with a serious political philosophy that truly values liberty. To the degree that most people practice it, is amounts to LARPing. To the degree that rich people practice it, it amounts to feudalism.

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  59. Mr. Anon says:
    @Luke Lea
    How many well-governed countries are there are there now, or have there ever been, between the Rio Grand and the tip of Tierra del Fuego? In other words how much is this a Latin American problem and not merely a Mexican one; and what are the commonalities that tie them all together? Supposing there were an actor with God-like powers, what would it take to turn the situation around?

    How many well-governed countries are there are there now, or have there ever been, between the Rio Grand and the tip of Tierra del Fuego?

    “America is ungovernable; those who served the revolution have plowed the sea.” – Simon Bolivar

    Intererestingly, he also said this:

    “The United States appears destined by Providence to plague America with miseries in the name of Freedom.”

    Smart guy, that Simon Bolivar.

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  60. @Neoconned
    The phrase i like to use is "53pc of Americans make $30k per yr or less...so half. Roughly a third of Americans make $20k per yr or less. 24pc or a quarter basically make $10k per yr or less. The per capita GDP of Mexico is roughly per CIA factbook about $11k USD a yr.

    So nominally half of Mexicans live as good or better than a quarter of Americans. And given the lower cost of living half of Mexicans probably live about the same as half to a third of Americans."

    Or a more simple way i put it is "Americans aren't as rich as people think they are and Mexicans arent as poor as ppl think they are."

    Mexico is the most obese nation on the planet or was at least a few yrs ago.

    More Mexicans die every yr from diabetes related ailments than from drug violence over five to ten yrs....

    I work 3 restaurant jobs 40-60hrs per week and only cleared $8-9k last.yr if i recall correctly. And when im sweeping the parking lot at the McD's in my town i see Mexicans in newer model pickups while i walk everywhere. Forgive me for not tearing up when i hear their fake sob stories. I got my own, and no fucks are given when I'm sweating my ass off and they're stuffing their fat faces with sausage biscuits or Big Macs....

    Please try and get a better job,Neo. Your comments are depressing!

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  61. @Neoconned
    The phrase i like to use is "53pc of Americans make $30k per yr or less...so half. Roughly a third of Americans make $20k per yr or less. 24pc or a quarter basically make $10k per yr or less. The per capita GDP of Mexico is roughly per CIA factbook about $11k USD a yr.

    So nominally half of Mexicans live as good or better than a quarter of Americans. And given the lower cost of living half of Mexicans probably live about the same as half to a third of Americans."

    Or a more simple way i put it is "Americans aren't as rich as people think they are and Mexicans arent as poor as ppl think they are."

    Mexico is the most obese nation on the planet or was at least a few yrs ago.

    More Mexicans die every yr from diabetes related ailments than from drug violence over five to ten yrs....

    I work 3 restaurant jobs 40-60hrs per week and only cleared $8-9k last.yr if i recall correctly. And when im sweeping the parking lot at the McD's in my town i see Mexicans in newer model pickups while i walk everywhere. Forgive me for not tearing up when i hear their fake sob stories. I got my own, and no fucks are given when I'm sweating my ass off and they're stuffing their fat faces with sausage biscuits or Big Macs....

    So nominally half of Mexicans live as good or better than a quarter of Americans. And given the lower cost of living half of Mexicans probably live about the same as half to a third of Americans.

    The Narrative is that Mexico is this giant prison where cruel Americans keep all the vibrancy locked up which could otherwise be here, cooking us delicious meals and paying our pensions.

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    • Replies: @anonguy

    The Narrative is that Mexico is this giant prison where cruel Americans keep all the vibrancy locked up which could otherwise be here, cooking us delicious meals and paying our pensions.
     
    There are millions of educated Americans who believe there currently are starving people in Mexico.

    Just ask around, you'd be amazed.

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  62. eD says:
    @eric
    Don't confuse anarchism with libertarian. The 'classical liberalism' of Locke, von Mises, Hayek, Friedman have a functioning state to enforce contracts, protect private property (including one's body), and has the monopoly of force in the state. The state and its laws are essential in enforcing a limited set of negative rights, and Mexico is not enforcing these, so it is anarchic, not libertarian.

    Note anarchists reject the concept of 'private property' and so love smashing storefront windows of 'businesses' which they see as illegitimate. This is a naive ideology because anything that would try and provide bread or banking needs to have the right to not be expropriated, otherwise, there will be no bread or banking, and the world would have to be depopulated by 90+% if we want to go back to living as hunter-gatherers.

    To be fair, the most common anarchist philosophy was anarcho-syndicalism, which did envisage organizations/ hierarchies of humans, just not the established governments. But that still doesn’t make much sense. Humans will always organize into hierarchies, humans pretty much evolved as tribal apes. The question is how much do people hold to the rule of law, which really is what protects the genuine individualists.

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    • Replies: @guest
    Commies called themselves "anarchists," I assume because of the miraculous, never-explained "withering away of the state" after the revolution. But that's not what most people think the word "anarchist" means today, unless they happen to be students of leftist history. Or if they pay attention to how commie terrorists like antifa refer to themselves. Sorta like how "liberal" shifted meanings, though it's shifted back a bit. These things change.

    I'm always at pains to explain to people that the stereotypical bomb-chucking "anarchist" of the turn of the century was simply a commie. No one knows anymore. Though admittedly some small portion of the movement was libertarian in a more or less contemporary sense.

    For instance, John Henry Mackay was an individualist of the Lysander Spooner, Benjamin Tucker school. He wrote a novel called The Anarchists, in which the main character was the only what I guess you'd call right-anarchist in a room surrounded by commie anarchists complaining about the Haymarket Square executions.

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  63. DaveA says:
    @eric
    Don't confuse anarchism with libertarian. The 'classical liberalism' of Locke, von Mises, Hayek, Friedman have a functioning state to enforce contracts, protect private property (including one's body), and has the monopoly of force in the state. The state and its laws are essential in enforcing a limited set of negative rights, and Mexico is not enforcing these, so it is anarchic, not libertarian.

    Note anarchists reject the concept of 'private property' and so love smashing storefront windows of 'businesses' which they see as illegitimate. This is a naive ideology because anything that would try and provide bread or banking needs to have the right to not be expropriated, otherwise, there will be no bread or banking, and the world would have to be depopulated by 90+% if we want to go back to living as hunter-gatherers.

    Libertarianism + a few people not of Northern European descent = anarchy. Small government only works when people have the self-restraint not to settle every dispute with a homicide, and the resourcefulness not to have to mooch off the state.

    Joogle deleted the photo that showed a typical neighborhood anywhere in Latin America (lots of barbed wire and concrete topped with broken glass) with the caption, “In Mexico, people build their own walls to keep Mexicans out.”

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  64. guest says:
    @eD
    To be fair, the most common anarchist philosophy was anarcho-syndicalism, which did envisage organizations/ hierarchies of humans, just not the established governments. But that still doesn't make much sense. Humans will always organize into hierarchies, humans pretty much evolved as tribal apes. The question is how much do people hold to the rule of law, which really is what protects the genuine individualists.

    Commies called themselves “anarchists,” I assume because of the miraculous, never-explained “withering away of the state” after the revolution. But that’s not what most people think the word “anarchist” means today, unless they happen to be students of leftist history. Or if they pay attention to how commie terrorists like antifa refer to themselves. Sorta like how “liberal” shifted meanings, though it’s shifted back a bit. These things change.

    I’m always at pains to explain to people that the stereotypical bomb-chucking “anarchist” of the turn of the century was simply a commie. No one knows anymore. Though admittedly some small portion of the movement was libertarian in a more or less contemporary sense.

    For instance, John Henry Mackay was an individualist of the Lysander Spooner, Benjamin Tucker school. He wrote a novel called The Anarchists, in which the main character was the only what I guess you’d call right-anarchist in a room surrounded by commie anarchists complaining about the Haymarket Square executions.

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  65. LKM says:

    OT:

    Politicians and Muslim community leaders are cautioning against potential community backlash after a suspected terrorism attack in Edmonton Saturday night.

    That is the first sentence from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation front-page web article about the (suspected) terrorist attack in Edmonton last night.

    link

    Frontlash indeed.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous

    .@edmontonpolice urge the public not to make broad assumptions in regards to religion, race, or nationality in light of #Edmonton attack.

    — Sarah MacDonald (@CTVSarah) October 1, 2017
     

    Already known at that point it's a Somali refugee known to police for his radical Islamism.

    Also on the front page:


    Photo caption: Amanda Lindhout attends a reception held in her honour by the Alberta Somali-Canadian community...

    More than nine years after journalist Amanda Lindhout was taken hostage in Somalia, a man will face trial Monday in an Ottawa courtroom.

    ... It emerged during pre-trial motions last spring that the Mounties had lured Ader to Canada through an elaborate scheme to sign a purported book-publishing deal.
     

    See, libertarianism only works in Somalia.
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  66. guest says:
    @eric
    Don't confuse anarchism with libertarian. The 'classical liberalism' of Locke, von Mises, Hayek, Friedman have a functioning state to enforce contracts, protect private property (including one's body), and has the monopoly of force in the state. The state and its laws are essential in enforcing a limited set of negative rights, and Mexico is not enforcing these, so it is anarchic, not libertarian.

    Note anarchists reject the concept of 'private property' and so love smashing storefront windows of 'businesses' which they see as illegitimate. This is a naive ideology because anything that would try and provide bread or banking needs to have the right to not be expropriated, otherwise, there will be no bread or banking, and the world would have to be depopulated by 90+% if we want to go back to living as hunter-gatherers.

    There are plenty of libertarian more or less anarchists, or anarchistic optimists you might say. Murray Rothbard and Hans Hermann Hoppe tend that way, and I imagine hordes of juvenile Internet Anarchists do, too.

    They envision a legal system, security forces, and defensive companies in place, though no monopoly of force. (Honestly, there’s no legal monopoly of force even in the contemporary U.S. You are allowed to defend yourself and others in peril, and for instance in Charlottesville antifa can go buckwild on political undesirables. Or at least they have a lot more leeway. That may be the authorities breaking their own law, but call it de facto law.) In a lot of ways, they envision a legal system much stricter than we have now.

    But I think most of us know that if we ever tried to implement their suggestions, we’d get the bad sort of anarchy. Somalia in action. Disappearance of civilization in favor of Mad Max. Gang warfare, organized crime and warlords instead of cooperative private judicial systems and security syndicates.

    Libertarian anarchists are a little more realistic than commie anarchists. At least they recognize basic human selfishness. But not realistic enough not to send humanity to hell in a handbasket.

    I read radical libertarian writings like I read sci-fi. Their what-if fantasy lands help me better appreciate the reality we actually live in. I’m not about to imagine time machines are real, however.

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  67. On the other hand, my impression is that I don’t remember seeing machine guns on trips to Mexico in the 1960s through the 1980s, but when I visited again in 1996, there seemed to be security guards with AK-47s all over the place.

    Mexico now is considerably more dangerous than in the 90s, although this varies by region a lot. (For example, international tourist areas are perfectly safe. When those areas can no longer be protected …) Corruption and ineffectual government have been a Mexican constant since forever, but the drug trade has exacerbated everything, and ruined communities which were previously very peaceful.

    An additional problem has been created by ethnic Mexicans returning to Mexico, by deportation or choice, and bringing with them a very American attitude of entitlement and violence. Kids raised entirely in black/mexican southern California neighborhoods, surviving on crime and welfare, and fully embracing “gangsta” bullshit culture, are returning (maybe for the first time) to places they don’t understand. They don’t fit in, they have no skills except pretending life is a rap video and collecting gibs, and things fall apart.

    They aren’t sending us their best, folks, and we send them back even worse.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    AGREE
    , @(((Owen)))

    They aren’t sending us their best, folks, and we send them back even worse.
     
    This. America trains 2nd generation kids in dysfunction that would have been beaten out of them by hard working fathers and uncles back home in Mexico. And those kids would have been working in real jobs as teenagers, unlike American citizen kids.
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  68. anonguy says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    So nominally half of Mexicans live as good or better than a quarter of Americans. And given the lower cost of living half of Mexicans probably live about the same as half to a third of Americans.
     
    The Narrative is that Mexico is this giant prison where cruel Americans keep all the vibrancy locked up which could otherwise be here, cooking us delicious meals and paying our pensions.

    The Narrative is that Mexico is this giant prison where cruel Americans keep all the vibrancy locked up which could otherwise be here, cooking us delicious meals and paying our pensions.

    There are millions of educated Americans who believe there currently are starving people in Mexico.

    Just ask around, you’d be amazed.

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  69. JohnnyD says:

    One of Trump’s greatest sins was to remind people that Mexico is a narco-state. This is probably why Jorge Ramos and Vincente Fox hate Trump so much.

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  70. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Under globalism, some parts of Mexico become more like Manhattan while other parts become more like Guatemala.

    But then, the curse of Mexico from the beginning was the racial divide between its ruling elites(generally white or mostly white) and the masses(mestizo to meso-indio).

    In contrast, US was essentially white ruled and white-populated. Unity of elites and masses.

    But as US elites are now dominated by Jewish globalists, Anglo-cucks, and Privilege-of-Color(like Zakaria and Fukuyama and that gang), there is no concern for white masses… who are being third-worldized in two ways: replacement by non-white colonizers and economic destitution as globalism only favors the upper crust.

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    • Replies: @(((Owen)))

    But then, the curse of Mexico from the beginning was the racial divide between its ruling elites(generally white or mostly white) and the masses(mestizo to meso-indio).
     
    I hear that from Americans all the time. It's just Anglo-projection. There's no American style racial divide in Mexico. Every level of the class hierarchy is permeable.

    The Mexican elites are abusive and greedy as all elites are. But there's no outright treason and betrayal as in America.

    No, the curse of Mexico has been various things over the years from foreign invaders (France, USA) to bad government to weak dictatorships to poorly organized organized crime to silly high birthrates to commodity bubbles to competition from British steamships. There have been a variety of problems in different eras just as in any ordinary nation.
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  71. Art says:

    Cannot explain it – but there is a darkness in the Mexican makeup – there is a subliminal cruelness and disrespect for life in the male culture. Perhaps it is a genetic carryover from the Maya way of life?

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    • Replies: @LondonBob
    Congrats, people seem to always forget the incredibly violent Mayan, Aztec, Inca etc. inheritance of Latin America. Watched too many episodes of Banged up Abroad to venture there much myself.
    , @Anonymous
    I would think it would be the Aztec, but what do I know?
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  72. As Mexico descends into its most violent year on record…

    Really? I thought the worst of the cartel wars were over. A breakdown of the murder figures with regard to motive would be interesting, and not just for Mexico.

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    • Replies: @Anon

    As Mexico descends into its most violent year on record…
     
    This is why it's so essential that we bring all the Mexicans here to the USA so they won't be around all that violence any more.

    We will.
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  73. anon says: • Disclaimer

    No doubt your observations are true. Spend some time in Guadalajara for example to see normal Mexicans of various classes going about their day.

    You seem too smart as a native born American to be working at McD. I’m skeptical. Why don’t you learn a skilled trade or sell insurance or cars or something?

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  74. KenH says:

    Those outside face rising murder rates, corruption and, activists say, police brutality. …

    And those outside of the walls will just head to America and receive social services courtesy of whitey the taxpayer since that’s easier fixing your own nations. Then after awhile they’ll complain about prejudice towards Latinos amidst getting their butts kissed by politicians and receiving race based set asides.

    The Mexico described in this article is not the Mexico described by Fred Reed. In Reed’s Mexico, the women are all statuesque and beautiful, there’s hardly any crime or drugs, the police are first rate and the trains run on time. Any information to the contrary is ignorant Anglo propaganda.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Fred Reed will have to get real when the dollar goes down the toilet. It's easy to live as an expatriate on your dollar-demoninated SS and pension checks now, but it will be a different story when the SHTF finacially. Hasta la Vista, Fredrico Reedissimo!
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  75. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    I love this short piece:

    The mestizos are, after all, acting rationally. It is we who are not.

    Labor is valueless in Mexico because in Mexico, corruption and the threat of confiscation of capital mean no one will invest there, or if they will they will demand a very high rate of return so as to pay off the investment before it is stolen or confiscated.

    The government of Mexico is corrupt and socialist because that is the government that suits Mexicans. They might grumble a little at these things, but only because they don’t get the spoils, not because they are malum in se. To them they are part of the natural order, like the urges to eat, have sex and make lowriders out of 1964 Chevys.

    Importing Mexicans makes economic sense for businesses that leverage Mexican labor with American management. The Mexicans work cheap and don’t expect medical benefits, won’t sue for frivolous or legitimate reasons, and while they might steal a little lumber or paint or defecate in the customers’ shrubbery, won’t steal their customer lists, won’t break into their computers, won’t learn their business and compete with them in two years. Their sons won’t compete for high school gridiron glory and pom-pom p***y with those of the business owners’, unlike the brighter sons of the white workers they displaced.

    The business owners will pay a little more in taxes because the Mexicans will go to the hospital when they are sick or pregnant, and not pay any bills. So will everyone else’s, but the business owners will pocket all the profits while others pay most all of the costs. They will also pay for the cost of arresting, trying and jailing the Mexicans when they get unruly or decide to ignore gringo law, or when the truly violent and criminal amongst them do their stuff in the United States with its far target-richer environment and cushy jails. But the real catastrophe is that when the illegal Mexicans produce a child, it is instantly an American citizen by law.

    The evidence shows that these American born children will still vote, participate in civic affairs and look at the world in general just like their parents-in other words, like Mexicans. California is living proof of that. They will vote for socialist leaders that promise them short term free stuff and piss off the gringos. If those politicians take bribes and are caught they won’t care. They will go to school for awhile, but the girls will get pregnant and drop out and the boys will get into fights, smoke pot, drink booze, drive and wreck cars, and drop out too. Not all, but the statistics will point that way. They will get entry level jobs and stay there a long time. Over decades, an elite will evolve, but for the masses life will go on like it always has.

    Meanwhile the rest of the country slowly changes, because of the greater political corruption, the disdain for progress, the lack of ambition to do things like go to the moon, build the Panama Canal, or do the other stuff those gringos did for reasons that will no longer make any sense to anyone. Government revenue will slow until the system has to be repudiated, and the currency will implode, but who cares? That happens in Latin America all the time. Our military will become like Mexico’s, or if we are lucky, Argentina’s.

    Lest you think I am just prejudiced against Mexicans, just go back and replace “Mexico” and “Mexicans” with any other non-European nation and its denizens, besides Japan, Taiwan, or maybe South Korea. It all still fits, except for the part about lowriderizing ’64 Chevys of course.

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  76. LondonBob says:
    @Art
    Cannot explain it – but there is a darkness in the Mexican makeup – there is a subliminal cruelness and disrespect for life in the male culture. Perhaps it is a genetic carryover from the Maya way of life?

    Congrats, people seem to always forget the incredibly violent Mayan, Aztec, Inca etc. inheritance of Latin America. Watched too many episodes of Banged up Abroad to venture there much myself.

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  77. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Art
    Cannot explain it – but there is a darkness in the Mexican makeup – there is a subliminal cruelness and disrespect for life in the male culture. Perhaps it is a genetic carryover from the Maya way of life?

    I would think it would be the Aztec, but what do I know?

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  78. OT
    Remember celebrity girl-in-tech Super Awesome Sylvia?
    She’s 16 now and she’s a he, “Zephyrus.”
    And it turns out he’s not that into STEM. He’s more interested in art.

    The truth was, Zeph says, he’s never been a natural at science. He liked the fairs, and he liked messing around with his family on the show, and he knew how to say the right things. “I’ve learned how to seem like I know stuff,” he said. “People ask, ‘Oh — do you know about this electronic thing, blah-dee-blah-dee-blah, and I’m like, ‘I’ve heard of it!’ so it seems like I know about it. But I actually don’t.”

    It’s a Steve, Steve, Steve, Steve World.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    Remember celebrity girl-in-tech Super Awesome Sylvia?
    She’s 16 now and she’s a he, “Zephyrus.”
    And it turns out he’s not that into STEM. He’s more interested in art.

    The truth was, Zeph says, he’s never been a natural at science. He liked the fairs, and he liked messing around with his family on the show, and he knew how to say the right things. “I’ve learned how to seem like I know stuff,” he said. “People ask, ‘Oh — do you know about this electronic thing, blah-dee-blah-dee-blah, and I’m like, ‘I’ve heard of it!’ so it seems like I know about it. But I actually don’t.”

     

    It’s a Steve, Steve, Steve, Steve World.
     
    "Being There" was prophetic, but not quite in the way we expected.

    Sounds like this girl had a psychotic break when she hit algebra and realized she wasn't so STEM-y after all. Tragic.
    , @El Dato

    ‘I’ve heard of it!’ so it seems like I know about it. But I actually don’t.”
     
    Nobody told ve that that's how engineering actually works?
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  79. AM says:
    @Anon
    I note the absence of Mexican commenters talking about how bored they are with Mr. Sailer discussing Mexico, and how he should really go talk about something else.

    I note the absence of Mexican commenters talking about how bored they are with Mr. Sailer discussing Mexico, and how he should really go talk about something else.

    That is strange. You’d think someone would stand against anti-Mexicanism.

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    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    Get me Jack D's non-union, Mexican equivalent!
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  80. @unit472
    Wolf Richter/ WolfStreet had an interesting article on Mexico a day or two ago at his website. It seems if the Mexican government can't much police its borders or control its criminal cartels it can and does control workers wages. This has been the reason Mexico is such a favorite of the auto industry where average wages are kept at $2.25/hour.

    The automakers, both US and European, hammer out these wage agreements before committing to building a plant and Mexican union and government officials honor the terms.

    What I was told by someone looking to do business in Mexico is that they have wage ceilings while we have wage floors.

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  81. @SteveWorld
    OT
    Remember celebrity girl-in-tech Super Awesome Sylvia?
    She's 16 now and she's a he, "Zephyrus."
    And it turns out he's not that into STEM. He's more interested in art.

    The truth was, Zeph says, he's never been a natural at science. He liked the fairs, and he liked messing around with his family on the show, and he knew how to say the right things. “I've learned how to seem like I know stuff,” he said. “People ask, 'Oh — do you know about this electronic thing, blah-dee-blah-dee-blah, and I'm like, 'I've heard of it!' so it seems like I know about it. But I actually don't.”
     
    It's a Steve, Steve, Steve, Steve World.

    Remember celebrity girl-in-tech Super Awesome Sylvia?
    She’s 16 now and she’s a he, “Zephyrus.”
    And it turns out he’s not that into STEM. He’s more interested in art.

    The truth was, Zeph says, he’s never been a natural at science. He liked the fairs, and he liked messing around with his family on the show, and he knew how to say the right things. “I’ve learned how to seem like I know stuff,” he said. “People ask, ‘Oh — do you know about this electronic thing, blah-dee-blah-dee-blah, and I’m like, ‘I’ve heard of it!’ so it seems like I know about it. But I actually don’t.”

    It’s a Steve, Steve, Steve, Steve World.

    “Being There” was prophetic, but not quite in the way we expected.

    Sounds like this girl had a psychotic break when she hit algebra and realized she wasn’t so STEM-y after all. Tragic.

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  82. El Dato says:
    @Peripatetic commenter
    In other news, Bisexual teen kills black tormentor in De Blasio's New York!

    https://nypost.com/2017/09/29/bisexual-teen-charged-with-killing-alleged-bully-i-just-snapped/

    I guess that might fall under “stand your ground” law. But it’s unlikely to be allowed in NY.

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  83. El Dato says:
    @SteveWorld
    OT
    Remember celebrity girl-in-tech Super Awesome Sylvia?
    She's 16 now and she's a he, "Zephyrus."
    And it turns out he's not that into STEM. He's more interested in art.

    The truth was, Zeph says, he's never been a natural at science. He liked the fairs, and he liked messing around with his family on the show, and he knew how to say the right things. “I've learned how to seem like I know stuff,” he said. “People ask, 'Oh — do you know about this electronic thing, blah-dee-blah-dee-blah, and I'm like, 'I've heard of it!' so it seems like I know about it. But I actually don't.”
     
    It's a Steve, Steve, Steve, Steve World.

    ‘I’ve heard of it!’ so it seems like I know about it. But I actually don’t.”

    Nobody told ve that that’s how engineering actually works?

    Read More
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  84. AM says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    And another thing!

    I think there has indeed has been a slow change in Mexico toward more violence at the large scale. I have been there, but not in a while (the guy to really write about this would be your fellow, Steve, at VDare, Mr. Allan Wall. He lived there for a long while till about a decade ago, when his column changed from "Memo from Mexico" to "Memo from Middle America", and he still goes there on vacations.).

    Here's my theory, that you would hear from any smart libertarian too. I think it's pretty plausible that the Drug War has a lot to do with the escalation of violence on a large scale in Mexico. These big cartels grew to consolidate the drug shipping/trading business. Once the US, in the 1980's started going all out on the DRUG "WAR"*, giving the DEA all kinds of powers (lots of them unconsitutional), it wasn't so easy anymore for the small guy in a twin Cessna (w/ ferry tanks) to do the job, working with small guys in old Mexico. It became big business as the risks, hence the MONEY, became much bigger.

    It doesn't take a stretch to compare the situation to that of the US after Amendment XVIII was passed, prohibiting sale of alcohol (NOTE to non-constitutionalists - they had to amend the Constitution! - it actually mattered to people back then). The violence escalated when you had the Al Capone types wanting to consolidate. Once people are already in an illegal business, they will not have many compunctions against carrying out other illegal acts, of course. What difference does it make, at that point, right?

    It doesn't excuse the violence down there for us to say that its our own fault because the demand is here (that's what a libertarian would say). It WAS the cause though. However, I think those cartels are so big and violent that I don't think it will stop even if all the big-selling/smuggling drugs became legal right now, as opposed to here when Amend. XXI, reversing prohibition, was passed. The cartels have turned into armies or nations of their own.
    .

    * a war against substances? I guess. That's not any worse than a war against tactics (W.O.Terrorism) or maybe it's a war on "feelings" (W.O. Terror)

    “. I think it’s pretty plausible that the Drug War has a lot to do with the escalation of violence on a large scale in Mexico.”

    The previous post was pretty good and here it is..the drug thing. Again.

    Alcohol is not modern hard drugs. (You can make a case that Prohibition was in part a reaction to being overrun with hard drinking Catholics.) The industrial revolution has made addictive substances available that would be impossible to create at home. Barriers to getting them are very good things.

    Likewise, I struggle to find any libertarian who will give me, a woman trying to raise a family, unfettered (read cheap) access to antibiotics.

    All of sudden, libertarians remember that my drug use will impact others and maybe it’s a good idea to restrict access.

    How is making it easy for my son to gain access to life destroying addictions an advance? It will have just as far reaching impacts, including taxing the welfare system more.

    The existence of the welfare state alone means drug laws must stay in place. If you insist on giving people the “right” to completely trash their lives, then it must be with the full consequences of such. No welfare. Don’t think about removing drug laws until the welfare state is rolled back. Otherwise, you’re simply pushing for a more libertine society and we’ve got plenty, thanks.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    My experience, AM, is that it's not the legality that usually limits access to drugs, It just raises the prices and increases the violence, as the violence is over money. You don't hear about alcohol pushers outside the schools, right? I'm not trying to be a smart-ass on this, but I think this is the only point we don't agree on, really.

    Likewise, I struggle to find any libertarian who will give me, a woman trying to raise a family, unfettered (read cheap) access to antibiotics.
     
    I would be the last to begrudge you that, but that has everything to do with a screwed-up mostly-government-run health care system. I will write soon about my experiences with the free-market health care system in China. It was a almost completely positive experience, AM.

    As to your last paragraph, I completely agree. The welfare system has to go for America to become a decent country again, along with controls on who lives here. Your last paragraph sounded like it was ghost written by a libertarian, so be careful.... (hell, it's better than transforming into the opposite sex, init, love?)
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  85. @Romanian
    I expect you'd have to live in the timezone of the content creator, or at least the timezone that fits when he is most active. I am GMT +2, 7 hours away from your Eastern seaboard.

    I expect you’d have to live in the timezone of the content creator, or at least the timezone that fits when he is most active. I am GMT +2, 7 hours away from your Eastern seaboard.

    You are 6 hours later than US Eastern time in the summer (really, mid-March through early November) and 7 hours ahead in winter, Romanian. Steve Sailer lives in the Pacific timezone (that’s all I can say without doxing him, haha), and he seems like a late-night guy at that. For all you FIRSTERS, I hope that helps.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    I did the First! thing here a while ago. I regret it, but Steve let it go, and I won't do it again.

    Let's not descend into Taki level comments, which are more personal than informative.
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  86. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Scott made the very great Blade Runner but not very many great movies.

    But this one is hard to shake.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Wrong!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Duellists
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  87. Wulf says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    The plan was for me not to write anything tody, but now you've gone and done it.

    This post would a decent post if you had substituted the words anarchic or chaotic for libertarian in the title. As it stands, it's completely wrong. I may not be keeping up, but no where in the ideology of libertarianism does it specify a massivly corrupt government, at all levels.

    I understand your point that "here is the local private police forces that libertarians call for", (not a quote, but just the point you are trying to make). None of this means anything without rule of law. Local Federales vs. Federal Federales doesn't change a thing - none of them follow any law besides what they make up on the spot. (yes, I know where the term Federales come from, but it has come to mean completely corrupt cops of any kind - plenty here too).

    It comes down to this, you can't have anything resembling libertarianism without the right kind of people, and the founders of our country were the closest to these right kind of people. Those libertarians that call for open borders are just too stupid or naive to get this. On the other hand, the conservatives who deride libertarianism's focus on very small government, God-given rights,and the US Constitution are stupid to not understand that 5 decades of not following these precepts has led to a welfare state in which mostly the stupid and irresponsible thrive. This all means that there will not be anything other than the corruption and 3rd-world situation of Mexico if something is not done about immigration AND our socialist welfare state prontomundo.


    The only decent part of the post was the "Sympathy for the Devil". I'm surprised none of the music lovers caught that (yet!). Oh, and ragging on the NY times, that's always cool.

    How strong enough borders – to keep out invaders, military and civilian – are to be kept without a strong and centralised government with a centralised chain of command?

    What is going to prevent a neighbouring country with a strong, big and determined government to invade the libertarian paradise with its tiny government, to enslave its citizens and take control over its resources?

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    How strong enough borders – to keep out invaders, military and civilian – are to be kept without a strong and centralised government with a centralised chain of command?

    What is going to prevent a neighbouring country with a strong, big and determined government to invade the libertarian paradise with its tiny government, to enslave its citizens and take control over its resources?

     
    Not to be snarky as an insult, Wulf, but I think some guys had this figured out 228 years back - guys like Mr. Madison, Mr. Jefferson and some others. The US Constitution does a pretty good job of limiting the government to a fairly libertarian system when it's followed. It's not.

    We had to break off from you guys to do it, though (yeah, I can tell by your poor spelling. ;-}

    Let me add this, control of the border is one of the areas that everyone except for the Reason Libtards and the cntrl-left useful idiots of the Globalist elite know is one of the jobs the Federal Gov't was made for. (Really some of these people KNOW it too, but that does not serve their purpose.)
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  88. @Tiny Duck
    If you are a white male and cannot do better than raw food then you are a loser

    With all your privilege and unearned advantages you should not complain when you make poor life choices

    Tell me where I can get more unearned privilege!

    Should I declare that I am black and Hispanic? Should I declare that I am transgendered?

    What is the right mix. Surely you know!

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  89. @onetwothree
    Just so you know, there are lots of people, myself included, who do a quick scan of any comment to determine if the commenter is unwilling to spell correctly, punctuate correctly, etc. If so, that comment is skipped.

    By the time I have scanned a comment for all those things I have read and understood the damn thing anyway!

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    • Agree: ATX Hipster
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  90. Travis says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    I vacationed in Cancun in 1981. As soon as I ventured out of the tourist area I saw soldiers with assault rifles standing on the street corners. Not on every corner, but enough of them to make an impression.

    In 1995 I witnessed many Mexican Federales with assault weapons when driving from Guadalajara to Mazatlán. My friend was robbed at gunpoint by a Federale in La Paz, Baja Sur.

    When I lived in Mexico for 5 weeks in 1995 I was stopped twice and asked for my proper papers by federales…once on a bus and once while walking the streets of Mazatlán..

    First time I ventured into Mexico was 1994, we walked across the bridge from El Paso to Juarez…we got a cab from a man who spoke English, asked him to take us to a decent restaurant…he took us to a brothel….

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  91. @libertreee
    Why is this supposed to be a libertarian paradise?
    You can't have a lib paradise when you have a War on Drugs Black market.
    Is it because of the different police agencies claiming jurisdiction? Aren't these public agencies? Sailer doesn't say, but I would think they are. This is the same tired trope we see about 19th century duplicative police and fire agencies. Hello, Steve? Those were public agencies, not private agencies working under contract law, but public agencies authorized by different public jurisdictions that resulted in two fire departments refusing to put out a fire because they were arguing over who had jurisdiction.

    I like the alt right to a degree, and iSteve is a learned and articulate fellow, but if you are going to criticize libertarians you should understand the philosophy a bit better than I see alt-right authors do

    I like the alt right to a degree, and iSteve is a learned and articulate fellow, but if you are going to criticize libertarians you should understand the philosophy a bit better than I see alt-right authors do.

    Libertree, thank you and welcome! I can’t set all these people straight by myself. It’s a burden, even though I feel like I’m standing on the shoulders of giants, who are, in turn, standing on the shoulders of other giants. It’s giants all the way down.

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  92. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @LKM
    OT:

    Politicians and Muslim community leaders are cautioning against potential community backlash after a suspected terrorism attack in Edmonton Saturday night.
     
    That is the first sentence from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation front-page web article about the (suspected) terrorist attack in Edmonton last night.

    link

    Frontlash indeed.

    .@edmontonpolice urge the public not to make broad assumptions in regards to religion, race, or nationality in light of #Edmonton attack.

    — Sarah MacDonald (@CTVSarah) October 1, 2017

    Already known at that point it’s a Somali refugee known to police for his radical Islamism.

    Also on the front page:

    Photo caption: Amanda Lindhout attends a reception held in her honour by the Alberta Somali-Canadian community…

    More than nine years after journalist Amanda Lindhout was taken hostage in Somalia, a man will face trial Monday in an Ottawa courtroom.

    … It emerged during pre-trial motions last spring that the Mounties had lured Ader to Canada through an elaborate scheme to sign a purported book-publishing deal.

    See, libertarianism only works in Somalia.

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  93. @Peripatetic commenter
    And now for something completely different. Sometimes there is humor in the DoJ's submission to the courts:

    https://www.lambdalegal.org/sites/default/files/legal-docs/downloads/document1.pdf

    Skydivers, that explains it, P.C. (however, I’m no lawyer, so what page is the humor on? You sent me to a freakin’ book.)

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    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter

    A.“But For” The Employee’s Sex
    The EEOC and the Seventh Circuit majority contend that sexual orientation discrimination is necessarily sex discrimination because the employer allegedly flunks “‘the simple test of whether the evidence shows treatment of a person in a manner which but for that person’s sex would be different.’”

    EEOC Br. at 6 (quoting City of L.A.Dep’t of Water & Power v. Manhart, 435 U.S. 702, 711 (1978)); see Hively, 853 F.3d at 345-46. For instance, they hypothesize a male employee who is discriminated against because he has a male partner, but who would not have been discriminated against if he were a woman with the same male partner, and they thus conclude that such anemployee would not have been discriminated against “but for” his sex. EEOC Br. at 6; Hively, 853F.3d at 345. This analysis commits two fundamental errors in applying the “but for” test for sex discrimination. First, as the Seventh Circuit dissent correctly observed, the but-for “comparison can’t do its job of ruling in sex discrimination as the actual reason for the employer’s decision * * * if we’re not scrupulous about holding everything constant except the plaintiff’s sex.” Hively, 853 F.3d at 366 (Sykes, J., dissenting). The EEOC and the Seventh Circuit majority fail to hold everything else constant because their hypothetical changes both the employee’s sex (from male to female) and hissexual orientation (from gay to straight). The proper comparison would be to change the employee’s sex (from male to female) but to keep the sexual orientation constant (as gay). In that hypothetical, the employer satisfies Manhart’s “simple test,” because the employee would be adversely affected regardless of sex (whether as a gay man or a gay woman)

     

    See also: http://law.justia.com/cases/federal/appellate-courts/ca2/15-3775/15-3775-2017-04-18.html

    for more info.

    Of course, a gay skydiver is an interesting concept. Not like a gay muff diver, I guess.
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  94. @Don't Drone Me Bro !

    On the other hand, my impression is that I don’t remember seeing machine guns on trips to Mexico in the 1960s through the 1980s, but when I visited again in 1996, there seemed to be security guards with AK-47s all over the place.
     
    Mexico now is considerably more dangerous than in the 90s, although this varies by region a lot. (For example, international tourist areas are perfectly safe. When those areas can no longer be protected ...) Corruption and ineffectual government have been a Mexican constant since forever, but the drug trade has exacerbated everything, and ruined communities which were previously very peaceful.

    An additional problem has been created by ethnic Mexicans returning to Mexico, by deportation or choice, and bringing with them a very American attitude of entitlement and violence. Kids raised entirely in black/mexican southern California neighborhoods, surviving on crime and welfare, and fully embracing "gangsta" bullshit culture, are returning (maybe for the first time) to places they don't understand. They don't fit in, they have no skills except pretending life is a rap video and collecting gibs, and things fall apart.

    They aren't sending us their best, folks, and we send them back even worse.

    AGREE

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  95. anon says: • Disclaimer

    The anthem for the 1 p.m. games was shown by CBS, but not by Fox, which reverted to the usual practice of selling that time to advertisers on the regional broadcasts. The anthem is typically only shown on telecasts on the Thursday night kickoff game and before the Super Bowl.

    I don’t see this as getting much traction. Among other things, fans have never watched the anthem on television other than the Super Bowl. In the stadium? Time for a beer.

    But hell yes. We are now more aware of what we were all aware of. NFL …. very Black.

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  96. @KenH

    Those outside face rising murder rates, corruption and, activists say, police brutality. …
     
    And those outside of the walls will just head to America and receive social services courtesy of whitey the taxpayer since that's easier fixing your own nations. Then after awhile they'll complain about prejudice towards Latinos amidst getting their butts kissed by politicians and receiving race based set asides.

    The Mexico described in this article is not the Mexico described by Fred Reed. In Reed's Mexico, the women are all statuesque and beautiful, there's hardly any crime or drugs, the police are first rate and the trains run on time. Any information to the contrary is ignorant Anglo propaganda.

    Fred Reed will have to get real when the dollar goes down the toilet. It’s easy to live as an expatriate on your dollar-demoninated SS and pension checks now, but it will be a different story when the SHTF finacially. Hasta la Vista, Fredrico Reedissimo!

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  97. @Chiron
    In most if not all all Latin-Amercian countries the “social contract” is broken and has been broken for a loooong time.

    Mexico and Brazil have unsolvable high violence problems thanks to the drug trade, and illegal drugs aren’t going anywhere.

    Mexican Lives Matter.

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  98. mad1 says:

    Mr Sailer,

    I don’t where you were visiting in Mexico in the 1960′s that you missed the machine guns but I remember them vividly.

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  99. The Craw says:

    OT, but apropos of Steve’s observation a week or 10 days ago that the Democrats might use the events in Puerto Rico to relocate Puerto Ricans to Florida and flip the State electorally.

    At only 1:19 mins in linked video, little Luis Gutierrez (D – Illinois) tearfully suggests that Puerto Ricans might need to be evacuated.

    Do you think Luis is an iSteve reader?

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  100. watson79 says:

    How deeply do the rich/middle class look into the security services they’re buying? I could see it working like this: A gang first performs a number of kidnappings, robberies in a nice neighborhood and once the residents are good and terrified, turns around and sells their security services to their former victims. Something similar happened in Afghanistan.

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  101. @Achmed E. Newman

    I expect you'd have to live in the timezone of the content creator, or at least the timezone that fits when he is most active. I am GMT +2, 7 hours away from your Eastern seaboard.
     
    You are 6 hours later than US Eastern time in the summer (really, mid-March through early November) and 7 hours ahead in winter, Romanian. Steve Sailer lives in the Pacific timezone (that's all I can say without doxing him, haha), and he seems like a late-night guy at that. For all you FIRSTERS, I hope that helps.

    I did the First! thing here a while ago. I regret it, but Steve let it go, and I won’t do it again.

    Let’s not descend into Taki level comments, which are more personal than informative.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Takimag has some good people, JDB, but there are too many others, like the JJ Smith guy, that want to argue over details that may be true, but are not important to anyone. It's one thing to set the record straight - I understand that - but they get into it too far to see the big picture anymore.

    It' funny that they are probably very intelligent people and more educated than the Zerohedge commenters, but ZH ones are wordly in their knowledge, write without regard for necessary cusswords, and are funny as all get out. Unz people are somewhere in the middle.
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  102. @Anon
    Scott made the very great Blade Runner but not very many great movies.

    But this one is hard to shake.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iU25WxQksXE
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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    Indeed. The Duellists was a great film.

    Blackhawk Down, also directed by Scott, was also a good movie.
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  103. @Achmed E. Newman
    Skydivers, that explains it, P.C. (however, I'm no lawyer, so what page is the humor on? You sent me to a freakin' book.)

    A.“But For” The Employee’s Sex
    The EEOC and the Seventh Circuit majority contend that sexual orientation discrimination is necessarily sex discrimination because the employer allegedly flunks “‘the simple test of whether the evidence shows treatment of a person in a manner which but for that person’s sex would be different.’”

    EEOC Br. at 6 (quoting City of L.A.Dep’t of Water & Power v. Manhart, 435 U.S. 702, 711 (1978)); see Hively, 853 F.3d at 345-46. For instance, they hypothesize a male employee who is discriminated against because he has a male partner, but who would not have been discriminated against if he were a woman with the same male partner, and they thus conclude that such anemployee would not have been discriminated against “but for” his sex. EEOC Br. at 6; Hively, 853F.3d at 345. This analysis commits two fundamental errors in applying the “but for” test for sex discrimination. First, as the Seventh Circuit dissent correctly observed, the but-for “comparison can’t do its job of ruling in sex discrimination as the actual reason for the employer’s decision * * * if we’re not scrupulous about holding everything constant except the plaintiff’s sex.” Hively, 853 F.3d at 366 (Sykes, J., dissenting). The EEOC and the Seventh Circuit majority fail to hold everything else constant because their hypothetical changes both the employee’s sex (from male to female) and hissexual orientation (from gay to straight). The proper comparison would be to change the employee’s sex (from male to female) but to keep the sexual orientation constant (as gay). In that hypothetical, the employer satisfies Manhart’s “simple test,” because the employee would be adversely affected regardless of sex (whether as a gay man or a gay woman)

    See also: http://law.justia.com/cases/federal/appellate-courts/ca2/15-3775/15-3775-2017-04-18.html

    for more info.

    Of course, a gay skydiver is an interesting concept. Not like a gay muff diver, I guess.

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  104. nebulafox says:
    @Anonymous
    Mexico had ridiculously high population growth around mid 20th century.

    I wonder how much of Mexico's present dysfunction - and the backwash colonization of much of the USA - is the Malthusian consequence of that growth?

    If so, the implications of current ridiculous African an sub continental population growth is horrendous.

    No, I don’t think so. 50, 60 years ago, South Korean and Brazilian women were having 6 kids a pop, too. Brazil, whatever its problems, isn’t a mafia state in the vein of Mexico and has vastly improved over the past decades, and we all know South Korea’s story. On the other side of the ledger, you have Russia, where the birth rate was on par with the West by the time the 1950s rolled around (and nearly a whole generation of males was wiped out by WWII), yet the place is also a miserable, corrupt mafia state. China, India, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Iran, and even Saudi Arabia (to an extent) have curbed their birth rates tremendously over the past half-century via different ways and at different times, and they’ve had subsequently widely variant outcomes.

    Mexico’s problems stem from other sources, most of which are pretty deeply entrenched in the basic nature of Mexico and its origins, the American War on Drugs being a major exception. Above all, Mexico’s problems can be found with its ruling elite, who feel-and are-truly apart from their the nation they rule. The creoles in Mexico release political and economic pressure by dumping their excess mestizo proletariat off on the United States-and our own increasingly distant bipartisan elites love that. This is far from limited to Democrats, as other commentators have pointed out (Jeb’s wet dreams of President George P. Bush), nor have the rulers of Mexico much bothered to hide their efforts to encourage illegal immigration.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/past/docs/issues/97feb/mexico/castaned.htm

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  105. Yak-15 says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    And another thing!

    I think there has indeed has been a slow change in Mexico toward more violence at the large scale. I have been there, but not in a while (the guy to really write about this would be your fellow, Steve, at VDare, Mr. Allan Wall. He lived there for a long while till about a decade ago, when his column changed from "Memo from Mexico" to "Memo from Middle America", and he still goes there on vacations.).

    Here's my theory, that you would hear from any smart libertarian too. I think it's pretty plausible that the Drug War has a lot to do with the escalation of violence on a large scale in Mexico. These big cartels grew to consolidate the drug shipping/trading business. Once the US, in the 1980's started going all out on the DRUG "WAR"*, giving the DEA all kinds of powers (lots of them unconsitutional), it wasn't so easy anymore for the small guy in a twin Cessna (w/ ferry tanks) to do the job, working with small guys in old Mexico. It became big business as the risks, hence the MONEY, became much bigger.

    It doesn't take a stretch to compare the situation to that of the US after Amendment XVIII was passed, prohibiting sale of alcohol (NOTE to non-constitutionalists - they had to amend the Constitution! - it actually mattered to people back then). The violence escalated when you had the Al Capone types wanting to consolidate. Once people are already in an illegal business, they will not have many compunctions against carrying out other illegal acts, of course. What difference does it make, at that point, right?

    It doesn't excuse the violence down there for us to say that its our own fault because the demand is here (that's what a libertarian would say). It WAS the cause though. However, I think those cartels are so big and violent that I don't think it will stop even if all the big-selling/smuggling drugs became legal right now, as opposed to here when Amend. XXI, reversing prohibition, was passed. The cartels have turned into armies or nations of their own.
    .

    * a war against substances? I guess. That's not any worse than a war against tactics (W.O.Terrorism) or maybe it's a war on "feelings" (W.O. Terror)

    Drug laws suck and enforcement can be quite tyrannical but they are important. Recall the fact that widespread opium use in China retarded their progress and impoverished their civilization for 300 or so years.

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    • Replies: @Name Withheld
    There is a theory online that China is doing to us what happened in the Opium Wars. I find this very plausible.
    , @(((Owen)))

    Recall the fact that widespread opium use in China retarded their progress and impoverished their civilization for 300 or so years.
     
    Chinese propaganda backed up by nothing.

    Remember that China chose to impoverish itself with strangling bureaucracy long before opium. And didn't recover at all when the opium came under control.

    China's opium story is just the same as Carrie Nation's story about demon rum. It's idiot moralistic puritanism driving policies that make the country poor and dangerous. As a matter of fact, it's a lot like SJW open borders stupidity.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Recall the fact that widespread opium use in China retarded their progress and impoverished their civilization for 300 or so years.
     
    The Chinese have always had trouble saying no:

    https://mandarinhq.com/2016/04/say-no-in-mandarin-chinese/
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  106. nebulafox says:
    @Chiron
    In most if not all all Latin-Amercian countries the “social contract” is broken and has been broken for a loooong time.

    Mexico and Brazil have unsolvable high violence problems thanks to the drug trade, and illegal drugs aren’t going anywhere.

    It’s “solvable”, in the sense that you can enable people to lead functional middle class lives. But it takes some pretty nasty measures, and even most “winners” in these societies have to live their lives watching their backs.

    If you are middle class in Brazil, you will live in a secure compound, and you will be paying a good amount of your check to do so. In a big city like Sao Paulo, this typically translates into a well-guarded high-rise. If you are living in your own house in a smaller city, barbed wire, high walls, security systems, the works. I lived for a summer in a typical working/lower-middle class Brazilian neighborhood in a middle sized city. Anybody with even modest means lived in secure compounds, including graduate students and postdocs who were renting out apartments.

    I suppose that the big difference is that in Brazil, you can’t really avoid seeing the reality of danger and poverty and drugs daily even if you have means, whereas if you live in a, say, Baltimore suburb, you can go your entire life without setting an eye on the inner city. That, and for all the similarities with slavery and mass European emigration, the founding colonial regimes (British vs. Portuguese) in the US and Brazil were very different. Brazil didn’t exactly have a social contract like the US did to begin with. Hence, O Jeitinho Brasileiro.

    (I personally find the idea of becoming a Latin American style society with the requisite debt peonage/societal immobility, lack of true yeoman/petty bourgeois independence, governmental corruption, and often racially delineated inequality rather inferior to the vision that the Founding Fathers had in mind, but that’s another story. I also think combining this tendency with automation and further exacerbating our problems with mass low-skilled immigration from Central America is rather unwise for basic stability. Though he is right on the money in stating that “Average is Over”, Tyler Cowen’s subsequent assertions that there won’t be mass political violence down the road are unconvincing to me, for a host of reasons. Our plutocratic class and their intellectual/upper-middle class sympathizers, needless to say, disagree.)

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  107. @AM
    ". I think it’s pretty plausible that the Drug War has a lot to do with the escalation of violence on a large scale in Mexico."

    The previous post was pretty good and here it is..the drug thing. Again.

    Alcohol is not modern hard drugs. (You can make a case that Prohibition was in part a reaction to being overrun with hard drinking Catholics.) The industrial revolution has made addictive substances available that would be impossible to create at home. Barriers to getting them are very good things.

    Likewise, I struggle to find any libertarian who will give me, a woman trying to raise a family, unfettered (read cheap) access to antibiotics.

    All of sudden, libertarians remember that my drug use will impact others and maybe it's a good idea to restrict access.

    How is making it easy for my son to gain access to life destroying addictions an advance? It will have just as far reaching impacts, including taxing the welfare system more.

    The existence of the welfare state alone means drug laws must stay in place. If you insist on giving people the "right" to completely trash their lives, then it must be with the full consequences of such. No welfare. Don't think about removing drug laws until the welfare state is rolled back. Otherwise, you're simply pushing for a more libertine society and we've got plenty, thanks.

    My experience, AM, is that it’s not the legality that usually limits access to drugs, It just raises the prices and increases the violence, as the violence is over money. You don’t hear about alcohol pushers outside the schools, right? I’m not trying to be a smart-ass on this, but I think this is the only point we don’t agree on, really.

    Likewise, I struggle to find any libertarian who will give me, a woman trying to raise a family, unfettered (read cheap) access to antibiotics.

    I would be the last to begrudge you that, but that has everything to do with a screwed-up mostly-government-run health care system. I will write soon about my experiences with the free-market health care system in China. It was a almost completely positive experience, AM.

    As to your last paragraph, I completely agree. The welfare system has to go for America to become a decent country again, along with controls on who lives here. Your last paragraph sounded like it was ghost written by a libertarian, so be careful…. (hell, it’s better than transforming into the opposite sex, init, love?)

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    • Replies: @AM

    It just raises the prices and increases the violence, as the violence is over money
     
    Both of these things are barriers to access in hard drug use. That and paying attention to kids. I can't be everyone's parent and I'm not sure how well I'm doing with my own, so I'll take what I can get.

    As to your last paragraph, I completely agree.
     
    Great. Then drop the whining over the drugs. Also, I note you're not really interested in giving me access to antibiotics. No emotion behind it, nor about dropping the welfare state.

    However, there are paragraphs to be had about making society more chaotic because deep thinkers have told me that it's bad to regulate drugs that ruin people's lives.

    .


    I will write soon about my experiences with the free-market health care system in China. It was a almost completely positive experience, AM.
     
    Sure it was. I am sure you'll sprinkle in the reports of where disgruntled patients come back and kill their doctors, because there's no recourse.

    Your last paragraph sounded like it was ghost written by a libertarian, so be careful…. (hell, it’s better than transforming into the opposite sex, init, love?)
     
    I went through a libertarian phase. I've recovered quite nicely, thank you, although it is quite helpful in coming up with arguments against it.
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  108. @Jim Don Bob
    I did the First! thing here a while ago. I regret it, but Steve let it go, and I won't do it again.

    Let's not descend into Taki level comments, which are more personal than informative.

    Takimag has some good people, JDB, but there are too many others, like the JJ Smith guy, that want to argue over details that may be true, but are not important to anyone. It’s one thing to set the record straight – I understand that – but they get into it too far to see the big picture anymore.

    It’ funny that they are probably very intelligent people and more educated than the Zerohedge commenters, but ZH ones are wordly in their knowledge, write without regard for necessary cusswords, and are funny as all get out. Unz people are somewhere in the middle.

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  109. CJ says:
    @LondonBob
    Still not quite the libertarian paradise that is Somalia.

    https://youtu.be/b1wXz2Wj-SQ
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  110. Rod1963 says:
    @Achilles

    George H.W. Bush had long done oil business in Mexico using a frontman to get around the statutory prohibition on gringos in Mexico’s oil business. My impression is that the main goal of the Bushes, from George H.W. to Jeb, was to cut down the barriers separating business in America and Mexico.

     

    Another reason, and why the deep state of the time was in favor of NAFTA, was concern over possible major armed communist uprisings and a resulting civil war within Mexico.

    When Ross Perot predicted the result of NAFTA would be a giant sucking sound as American industry relocated south to take advantage of labor and regulatory costs at pennies on the dollar, the establishment publicly mocked him.

    But privately, everyone knew he was right. But the establishment was perfectly willing to sacrifice the heartland industrial jobs of American workers in order to better conditions in Mexico.

    But as we now see, we can bleed the American middle class all we want and yet not solve the cultural, social and political problems of Mexico. Indeed, Mexico is not a poor country in resources. It is a rich country. But the people of Mexico have the government they themselves have created.

    The danger of a widespread collapse in social order in Mexico has certainly not gone away. This is why we need the Wall, as well as a sound visa entry/exit system.

    And this is a big reason why the Jewish/Media Industrial Complex is so insanely adamamtly against the Wall. They would love to see tens of millions of refugees flowing into the US as Mexico collapses into violent anarchy. Just as they are so delighted and thrilled to see millions of Middle Eastern muslims streaming into Germany. Anything to weaken the hated white gentiles of the historic American nation.

    NAFTA just smashed the Mexican farmers and was directly responsible for the massive wave of campesinos that swarmed into the U.S.

    NAFTA was never meant to benefit the Mexican workers but the Mexican and American elites. Americans would build their new plants in Mexico, hire Mexicans(at 1/5th to 1/10th of American workers) and not have to worry abotu labor and environmental laws.

    Later a lot of those Mexican workers got fired when those American plants were moved to China for even cheaper labor. Got to meet a lot of Mexican, El Salvadoran workers it happened to here in CA.

    NAFTA also devastated white communities across the heartland as industry moved out of the country and left them economically and socially wrecked. Then came the heroin and Oxycontin plagues like clockwork along with the big box stores to destroy all the mom and pop operations that further hollowed out towns and cities.

    Of course the urban Cosmic whites in their country clubs and gated communities don’t care.

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    • Agree: Dan Hayes
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  111. @Wulf
    How strong enough borders - to keep out invaders, military and civilian - are to be kept without a strong and centralised government with a centralised chain of command?

    What is going to prevent a neighbouring country with a strong, big and determined government to invade the libertarian paradise with its tiny government, to enslave its citizens and take control over its resources?

    How strong enough borders – to keep out invaders, military and civilian – are to be kept without a strong and centralised government with a centralised chain of command?

    What is going to prevent a neighbouring country with a strong, big and determined government to invade the libertarian paradise with its tiny government, to enslave its citizens and take control over its resources?

    Not to be snarky as an insult, Wulf, but I think some guys had this figured out 228 years back – guys like Mr. Madison, Mr. Jefferson and some others. The US Constitution does a pretty good job of limiting the government to a fairly libertarian system when it’s followed. It’s not.

    We had to break off from you guys to do it, though (yeah, I can tell by your poor spelling. ;-}

    Let me add this, control of the border is one of the areas that everyone except for the Reason Libtards and the cntrl-left useful idiots of the Globalist elite know is one of the jobs the Federal Gov’t was made for. (Really some of these people KNOW it too, but that does not serve their purpose.)

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    • Replies: @(((Owen)))

    The US Constitution does a pretty good job of limiting the government to a fairly libertarian system when it’s followed. It’s not.
     
    It was 'followed' when America was run by the same Anglo people that wrote it. After the 1880-1920 immigration wave, the Constitution was quickly abandoned in the 1930s and has held no force ever since.

    Muh Constitutionism is the stupidest kind of Darwin denialism.

    A country is governed by its people, not a crusty old piece of paper. When mass immigration replaced enough of the population, constitutional democracy was replaced by unlimited managed mixed democracy. The current wave of mass migration is aimed at ending democracy entirely.

    And there's no going back. A nation not overwhelmingly Anglo cannot maintain a limited constitutional republic. And America hasn't been that for a long time.
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  112. @Neoconned
    The phrase i like to use is "53pc of Americans make $30k per yr or less...so half. Roughly a third of Americans make $20k per yr or less. 24pc or a quarter basically make $10k per yr or less. The per capita GDP of Mexico is roughly per CIA factbook about $11k USD a yr.

    So nominally half of Mexicans live as good or better than a quarter of Americans. And given the lower cost of living half of Mexicans probably live about the same as half to a third of Americans."

    Or a more simple way i put it is "Americans aren't as rich as people think they are and Mexicans arent as poor as ppl think they are."

    Mexico is the most obese nation on the planet or was at least a few yrs ago.

    More Mexicans die every yr from diabetes related ailments than from drug violence over five to ten yrs....

    I work 3 restaurant jobs 40-60hrs per week and only cleared $8-9k last.yr if i recall correctly. And when im sweeping the parking lot at the McD's in my town i see Mexicans in newer model pickups while i walk everywhere. Forgive me for not tearing up when i hear their fake sob stories. I got my own, and no fucks are given when I'm sweating my ass off and they're stuffing their fat faces with sausage biscuits or Big Macs....

    I work 3 restaurant jobs 40-60hrs per week and only cleared $8-9k last.yr if i recall correctly. And when im sweeping the parking lot at the McD’s in my town i see Mexicans in newer model pickups while i walk everywhere. Forgive me for not tearing up when i hear their fake sob stories. I got my own, and no fucks are given when I’m sweating my ass off and they’re stuffing their fat faces with sausage biscuits or Big Macs….

    Really this, we are done caring about the poor sobbing non whites and their tells of woe, no one cares about our plight, about our lives, about or hopes “dreams”, desires, future, etc.

    The era of Altruism is dead, my it burn in hell.

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    • Replies: @Neoconned
    I'm over simplifying the topic & his thesis but a few yrs back Fareed Zakaria did a piece about how its not that we're doing that bad but that much of the rest of the world caught up w us and what we have and are just isnt that unique or exceptional any more.....
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  113. @Tiny Duck
    If you are a white male and cannot do better than raw food then you are a loser

    With all your privilege and unearned advantages you should not complain when you make poor life choices

    Yeah, its not like non whites get into college, hired, promoted just because of their skin color right race traitor?

    Enjoy these days, soon people like you will be deported to live among your non white pets..

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  114. One for Steve!

    FBI data suggests the Ferguson Effect is real:

    http://dailycaller.com/2017/10/01/the-fbis-latest-report-suggests-the-ferguson-effect-is-real/

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  115. FKA Max says: • Website
    @TG
    Reply to anonymous: yes Mexico had a ridiculous amount of population growth in the 1960's.

    And it was the deliberate policy of the Mexican government that crafted this population explosion. They propagandized that it was every woman's patriotic duty to have six kids each "to make Mexico bigger and better," they gave medals to women with large families etc. And the result is what always happens in societies without an open frontier: wages for the many were crushed and profits for the few were boosted. Mexico created a record number of billionaires, and also became so poor that it now depends on the safety valve of immigration to the US to avoid collapse.

    It's an old story. Behind every population explosion, if you look hard enough, one can usually find government policies encouraging that. In the US, even though it's being done via immigration instead of inducements to higher native fertility rate, the effect is the same: the rich are forcing population growth upwards, and this is having the predictable effect of lowering wages and increasing profits.

    It is effectively censored in the press, but the problems is Syria can be traced to the government's pro-natalist policies. They even made the sale and possession of any form of contraception a crime!

    http://globuspallidusxi.blogspot.com/2015/04/the-real-story-on-syria-forced.html

    So what happened in Mexico has happened many other times in many other places... and it's starting to happen here.

    It is effectively censored in the press, but the problems is Syria can be traced to the government’s pro-natalist policies. They even made the sale and possession of any form of contraception a crime!

    Great comment!

    The food crisis is not the result of over population, it is the result of protracted conflict. [This, of course, is nonsense.]

    – page 6 https://www.plan.org.au/~/media/plan/documents/reports/challenging-negative-attitudes-to-the-east-africa-food-crisis.pdf

    They are the ignorant ones…

    List of countries by median age

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_median_age

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_median_age#/media/File:Median_age_by_country,_2016.svg

    Between 1970 and 1999, 80 percent of civil conflicts occurred in countries where 60 percent of the population or more were under the age of thirty, according to the PAI report. [...] – https://www.cfr.org/backgrounder/effects-youth-bulge-civil-conflicts

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/sydney-morning-herald-commenters-who-notice-african-populati/#comment-1923087

    The “Latino” Oligarchy, as is often the case with Mercantile elites, is short-sighted and profit oriented. Their alliance with the Church has put in place a system that pays no heed to genetic inheritance. When the Catholic Church is in power in Latin America, whether the stronger ecclesiastical current of time is on the Right or Left, the arc of history will always lead to a country (even one as white as Argentina) that looks like Brazil or the Dominican Republic, with all of the politico-economic problems that entails.http://www.unz.com/jthompson/tomster-on-marriage/#comment-1839275

    No problem at all…

    http://www.unz.com/tsaker/listening-to-the-donald-at-the-un/#comment-2016095

    Great discussion!

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    • Replies: @FKA Max
    This is an interesting video lecture by Peter Zeihan. He makes an interesting point that the drug war has pushed down labor costs in Mexico and that that is, crazily enough, a good thing from an economic/libertarian/oligarch point of view:

    NAFTA, Mexico and Drug Cartels

    https://youtu.be/zqOpA2_CkLc?t=2m45s

    The Border and the Drug War: Excerpt from 'The Accidental Superpower' by Peter Zeihan

    Mexican failure leads to integration with the United States. Poverty, government corruption, drug‐related violence, environmental catastrophe, and weak infrastructure all increase internal Mexican labor mobility and decrease Mexican labor costs. The bigger the labor cost differential with the United States, the more economic integration between Mexico and the United States.
     
    - http://www.newsmax.com/FastFeatures/mexico-accidental-superpower-peter-zeihan/2014/12/15/id/611108/
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  116. Daniel H says:

    >>Mexico in the 1960s through the 1980s, but when I visited again in 1996, there seemed to be security guards with AK-47s all over the place.

    Yup. Was just down in Nogales last week. Green uniformed soldiers with automatic weapons everywhere. Just a stone’s throw from the US border. Distressing and disturbing.

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  117. But Fred Reed says it’s great down there, and complains that any criticism of Mexican society is just Yanqui racism. Is he telling us porkies?

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  118. BenKenobi says:
    @AM

    I note the absence of Mexican commenters talking about how bored they are with Mr. Sailer discussing Mexico, and how he should really go talk about something else.
     
    That is strange. You'd think someone would stand against anti-Mexicanism.

    Get me Jack D’s non-union, Mexican equivalent!

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  119. @Don't Drone Me Bro !

    On the other hand, my impression is that I don’t remember seeing machine guns on trips to Mexico in the 1960s through the 1980s, but when I visited again in 1996, there seemed to be security guards with AK-47s all over the place.
     
    Mexico now is considerably more dangerous than in the 90s, although this varies by region a lot. (For example, international tourist areas are perfectly safe. When those areas can no longer be protected ...) Corruption and ineffectual government have been a Mexican constant since forever, but the drug trade has exacerbated everything, and ruined communities which were previously very peaceful.

    An additional problem has been created by ethnic Mexicans returning to Mexico, by deportation or choice, and bringing with them a very American attitude of entitlement and violence. Kids raised entirely in black/mexican southern California neighborhoods, surviving on crime and welfare, and fully embracing "gangsta" bullshit culture, are returning (maybe for the first time) to places they don't understand. They don't fit in, they have no skills except pretending life is a rap video and collecting gibs, and things fall apart.

    They aren't sending us their best, folks, and we send them back even worse.

    They aren’t sending us their best, folks, and we send them back even worse.

    This. America trains 2nd generation kids in dysfunction that would have been beaten out of them by hard working fathers and uncles back home in Mexico. And those kids would have been working in real jobs as teenagers, unlike American citizen kids.

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  120. @Anon
    Under globalism, some parts of Mexico become more like Manhattan while other parts become more like Guatemala.

    But then, the curse of Mexico from the beginning was the racial divide between its ruling elites(generally white or mostly white) and the masses(mestizo to meso-indio).

    In contrast, US was essentially white ruled and white-populated. Unity of elites and masses.

    But as US elites are now dominated by Jewish globalists, Anglo-cucks, and Privilege-of-Color(like Zakaria and Fukuyama and that gang), there is no concern for white masses... who are being third-worldized in two ways: replacement by non-white colonizers and economic destitution as globalism only favors the upper crust.

    But then, the curse of Mexico from the beginning was the racial divide between its ruling elites(generally white or mostly white) and the masses(mestizo to meso-indio).

    I hear that from Americans all the time. It’s just Anglo-projection. There’s no American style racial divide in Mexico. Every level of the class hierarchy is permeable.

    The Mexican elites are abusive and greedy as all elites are. But there’s no outright treason and betrayal as in America.

    No, the curse of Mexico has been various things over the years from foreign invaders (France, USA) to bad government to weak dictatorships to poorly organized organized crime to silly high birthrates to commodity bubbles to competition from British steamships. There have been a variety of problems in different eras just as in any ordinary nation.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    I hear that from Americans all the time. It’s just Anglo-projection. There’s no American style racial divide in Mexico. Every level of the class hierarchy is permeable.

    https://youtu.be/CW4q6OFIJOY?t=1m38s

    I've heard that from Mexicans all the time. It's just Conqui denial. The racial divides are fuzzy than stark but it's there. There are gradations from white to mostly white to white-ish to light brown to brown to dark brown and etc. But higher you look, it's lighter, lower you look, it's browner.

    Mexico tries the BS the world that there is no 'racismo' because everything is blended, but there's more cream in the blending at the top and more chili beans in the blending at the bottom.
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  121. Neoconned says:
    @Henry Bowman
    I work 3 restaurant jobs 40-60hrs per week and only cleared $8-9k last.yr if i recall correctly. And when im sweeping the parking lot at the McD’s in my town i see Mexicans in newer model pickups while i walk everywhere. Forgive me for not tearing up when i hear their fake sob stories. I got my own, and no fucks are given when I’m sweating my ass off and they’re stuffing their fat faces with sausage biscuits or Big Macs….

    Really this, we are done caring about the poor sobbing non whites and their tells of woe, no one cares about our plight, about our lives, about or hopes "dreams", desires, future, etc.

    The era of Altruism is dead, my it burn in hell.

    I’m over simplifying the topic & his thesis but a few yrs back Fareed Zakaria did a piece about how its not that we’re doing that bad but that much of the rest of the world caught up w us and what we have and are just isnt that unique or exceptional any more…..

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    • Replies: @Henry Bowman
    Yeah, read that idea, its crap.
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  122. @Yak-15
    Drug laws suck and enforcement can be quite tyrannical but they are important. Recall the fact that widespread opium use in China retarded their progress and impoverished their civilization for 300 or so years.

    There is a theory online that China is doing to us what happened in the Opium Wars. I find this very plausible.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    Me too, especially the part where the USA sent tens of millions of emigrants over to China to help change it into a white, first-world country. Oh wait ..
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  123. I suspect Mexico got scarier during the Salinas Administration (1988-1994), which did the NAFTA deal with the elder Bush Administration. At some point, Mexico took over from Colombia as the chief shipper of drugs into the United States. The death of Pablo Escobar in Colombia in December 1993 seems like a reasonable milestone in dating when Mexico becoming a narco state.

    President Salinas’s brother Raúl made a deal with the cartels. They paid taxes on their profits directly to him. He set out territories for them and kept the peace. Each one had access to US border points and made its own arrangements with Customs and the US banking system to operate freely shipping to the USA. The US banks helped keep the arrangement going on the USA side with the usual bribes to US officials.

    That worked fine until 2006. Then the Mexicans elected an alcoholic President Felipe Calderón. He was an anti-drug true believer that didn’t want his people taking drug money. So the Mexican government went to war with its former cartel partners. And lost.

    The murder rate almost tripled. Whole states became unsafe. Assassinations of politicians and cops became commonplace.

    But the major southern cities and the Bajío and Yucatán stayed safe and prosperous. Eventually cartels came to an understanding with the government and each other but the damage is done. The level of violence is much higher and there is chaos near the border. It will take a generation and a new under the table taxing system to restore order in the countryside.

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    • Replies: @AM

    That worked fine until 2006. Then the Mexicans elected an alcoholic President Felipe Calderón. He was an anti-drug true believer that didn’t want his people taking drug money. So the Mexican government went to war with its former cartel partners. And lost.
     
    In other words, after making the initial deal with the devil, the drug cartels grew so powerful that they were control, not the government and all hell broke loose when the government tried to reassert it's proper place.

    This is like complaining that it's all Trump's fault that rocket man is causing problems. No, someone had to confront the problem.
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  124. @Yak-15
    Drug laws suck and enforcement can be quite tyrannical but they are important. Recall the fact that widespread opium use in China retarded their progress and impoverished their civilization for 300 or so years.

    Recall the fact that widespread opium use in China retarded their progress and impoverished their civilization for 300 or so years.

    Chinese propaganda backed up by nothing.

    Remember that China chose to impoverish itself with strangling bureaucracy long before opium. And didn’t recover at all when the opium came under control.

    China’s opium story is just the same as Carrie Nation’s story about demon rum. It’s idiot moralistic puritanism driving policies that make the country poor and dangerous. As a matter of fact, it’s a lot like SJW open borders stupidity.

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    • Replies: @AM

    China’s opium story is just the same as Carrie Nation’s story about demon rum. It’s idiot moralistic puritanism driving policies that make the country poor and dangerous. As a matter of fact, it’s a lot like SJW open borders stupidity.
     
    In what world does widespread or even moderate drug use improve a society?

    To sling "puritanism" at such concept suggests you've run out of arguments before you've begun. A society at its best has no abusers of drugs.

    Rodrigo Duterte is wildly popular precisely because he's cracking down on drug pushers. From the reports I've read, most Phillino families have "lost" a family member to addiction. Drug addiction is lives wasted and lost, children without parents, and just a generally nightmare that ripples through society.

    What's the point of closing borders if the goal is to lose people to drug addiction?
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  125. @Achmed E. Newman

    How strong enough borders – to keep out invaders, military and civilian – are to be kept without a strong and centralised government with a centralised chain of command?

    What is going to prevent a neighbouring country with a strong, big and determined government to invade the libertarian paradise with its tiny government, to enslave its citizens and take control over its resources?

     
    Not to be snarky as an insult, Wulf, but I think some guys had this figured out 228 years back - guys like Mr. Madison, Mr. Jefferson and some others. The US Constitution does a pretty good job of limiting the government to a fairly libertarian system when it's followed. It's not.

    We had to break off from you guys to do it, though (yeah, I can tell by your poor spelling. ;-}

    Let me add this, control of the border is one of the areas that everyone except for the Reason Libtards and the cntrl-left useful idiots of the Globalist elite know is one of the jobs the Federal Gov't was made for. (Really some of these people KNOW it too, but that does not serve their purpose.)

    The US Constitution does a pretty good job of limiting the government to a fairly libertarian system when it’s followed. It’s not.

    It was ‘followed’ when America was run by the same Anglo people that wrote it. After the 1880-1920 immigration wave, the Constitution was quickly abandoned in the 1930s and has held no force ever since.

    Muh Constitutionism is the stupidest kind of Darwin denialism.

    A country is governed by its people, not a crusty old piece of paper. When mass immigration replaced enough of the population, constitutional democracy was replaced by unlimited managed mixed democracy. The current wave of mass migration is aimed at ending democracy entirely.

    And there’s no going back. A nation not overwhelmingly Anglo cannot maintain a limited constitutional republic. And America hasn’t been that for a long time.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Could you make an effort, Mr. Owen, to read the rest of my comments, UNDER THIS SAME iSTEVE BLOGPOST (#27, paragraph 4) before you write? It's a courtesy thing, and would have saved me and you time here.
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  126. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    “My impression is that the main goal of the Bushes, from George H.W. to Jeb, was to cut down the barriers separating business in America and Mexico.”

    The complete story on the connections between the Bushes and Ancira family of Monterrey, Mexico (I think they own the biggest hotel there?) will no doubt make interesting work for historians.

    The web site of the following story seems to be gone, but it’s still available in the Google cache. Perhaps some would want to archive it before it is gone for good?

    http://www.elandar.com/bush/amigos.html%2Bel+andar+los+amigos+de+bush&hl=en&gbv=1&ct=clnk” href=http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Th5_dq9beuYJ:http://www.elandar.com/bush/amigos.html%2Bel+andar+los+amigos+de+bush&hl=en&gbv=1&ct=clnk rel=”nofollow”>“LOS AMIGOS DE BUSH: The disturbing ties of some of George W. Bush’s Latino advisors”, Julie Reynolds, with research assistance by Victor Almazán and Ana Leonor Rojo, El Andar, 2000.

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  127. @Colleen Pater
    You're working three shit jobs in some slum WTF, you sound like an intelligent woke white kid, its bad but not that bad yet.People stay planted and people get myopic about opportunity. Get the fuck out of their even if that makes you homeless a for a while youll figure things out as you already have but you'll do it in an area full of opportunity. I youre that rare thing that has a sense of duty then great a wars coming get ready for it, Either way the pacific northwest is a good place to be white still.

    Either way the pacific northwest is a good place to be white still.

    Yeah, but white and straight?

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    • Replies: @Colleen Pater
    I suppose you're referring to places like portlandia, what can i say its a city whites flee to other whites its important to balance them so they cant take over most of the PNW is a naturally conservative white place, though liberals have been fleeing to it as well as right wing people if they are not neutralized we will have no place to make a stand. Its also the nicest place on earth to live
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  128. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Hum, let’s try that again:

    http://www.elandar.com/bush/amigos.html%2Bel+andar+los+amigos+de+bush&hl=en&gbv=1&ct=clnk” href=http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Th5_dq9beuYJ:http://www.elandar.com/bush/amigos.html%2Bel+andar+los+amigos+de+bush&hl=en&gbv=1&ct=clnk rel=”nofollow”>“LOS AMIGOS DE BUSH: The disturbing ties of some of George W. Bush’s Latino advisors”.

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    • Replies: @res
    Here it is at the Internet Archive: https://web.archive.org/web/20140210220317/http://www.elandar.com/bush/amigos.html

    When you have a link with special characters it usually helps to put it inside an HTML a tag:
    like this
    Odd, that seems to have failed the first time. And now it works. Very strange.

    This form of bare link seems to work though
    http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Th5_dq9beuYJ:http://www.elandar.com/bush/amigos.html%2Bel+andar+los

    P.S. Also strange is that your link looks OK if you hover over the link to your comment just above.

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  129. FKA Max says: • Website
    @FKA Max

    It is effectively censored in the press, but the problems is Syria can be traced to the government’s pro-natalist policies. They even made the sale and possession of any form of contraception a crime!
     
    Great comment!


    The food crisis is not the result of over population, it is the result of protracted conflict. [This, of course, is nonsense.]

    – page 6 https://www.plan.org.au/~/media/plan/documents/reports/challenging-negative-attitudes-to-the-east-africa-food-crisis.pdf

    They are the ignorant ones…

    List of countries by median age

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_median_age

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_median_age#/media/File:Median_age_by_country,_2016.svg

    Between 1970 and 1999, 80 percent of civil conflicts occurred in countries where 60 percent of the population or more were under the age of thirty, according to the PAI report. [...] – https://www.cfr.org/backgrounder/effects-youth-bulge-civil-conflicts
     
    - http://www.unz.com/isteve/sydney-morning-herald-commenters-who-notice-african-populati/#comment-1923087

    The “Latino” Oligarchy, as is often the case with Mercantile elites, is short-sighted and profit oriented. Their alliance with the Church has put in place a system that pays no heed to genetic inheritance. When the Catholic Church is in power in Latin America, whether the stronger ecclesiastical current of time is on the Right or Left, the arc of history will always lead to a country (even one as white as Argentina) that looks like Brazil or the Dominican Republic, with all of the politico-economic problems that entails. - http://www.unz.com/jthompson/tomster-on-marriage/#comment-1839275

    No problem at all…
     
    - http://www.unz.com/tsaker/listening-to-the-donald-at-the-un/#comment-2016095

    http://eh.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/page39.png

    Great discussion!

    This is an interesting video lecture by Peter Zeihan. He makes an interesting point that the drug war has pushed down labor costs in Mexico and that that is, crazily enough, a good thing from an economic/libertarian/oligarch point of view:

    NAFTA, Mexico and Drug Cartels

    The Border and the Drug War: Excerpt from ‘The Accidental Superpower’ by Peter Zeihan

    Mexican failure leads to integration with the United States. Poverty, government corruption, drug‐related violence, environmental catastrophe, and weak infrastructure all increase internal Mexican labor mobility and decrease Mexican labor costs. The bigger the labor cost differential with the United States, the more economic integration between Mexico and the United States.

    http://www.newsmax.com/FastFeatures/mexico-accidental-superpower-peter-zeihan/2014/12/15/id/611108/

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  130. @Yak-15
    Drug laws suck and enforcement can be quite tyrannical but they are important. Recall the fact that widespread opium use in China retarded their progress and impoverished their civilization for 300 or so years.

    Recall the fact that widespread opium use in China retarded their progress and impoverished their civilization for 300 or so years.

    The Chinese have always had trouble saying no:

    https://mandarinhq.com/2016/04/say-no-in-mandarin-chinese/

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    • Replies: @jim jones
    I have noticed Chinese students starting to say "bye bye" at my university, maybe they will soon start saying "no"
    , @Yak-15
    I wish someone had told me ten years ago that Chinese women could never say no...
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  131. @jim jones
    I find there is something repellent about Somali foreheads:

    https://imgur.com/a/w8TqW

    Me too. To wit: They are attached to Somalis. Yech.

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  132. @Charles Pewitt
    The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate is a dwindling portion of the WASP / Jew ruling class, but it still has some power left. The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate has been heavily involved in the treasonous attempt to erase the border between Mexico and the United States.

    George Bush #1, as vice president to Reagan, was a lead backer of the shady formation of the sovereignty-sapping North American Free Trade Agreement(NAFTA). The goal of NAFTA was to pauperize White Core Americans while flooding the United States with illegal alien invaders and legal immigrants. George Bush #1 is an evil Mammonite who sold out his own country for money. The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate was wounded by President Trump, that makes them dangerous.

    Bill Clinton and Newt Gingrich were able to pass the Reagan/Bush NAFTA bill in 1993 or 1994. Bill Clinton and Newt Gingrich are evil baby boomers who knew that NAFTA would hurt White Core American workers. Clinton and Gingrich knew that NAFTA would flood the United States with illegal alien invaders and other immigrants.

    The WASP / Jew ruling class of the American Empire is evil, immoral and irresponsible. The WASP / Jew ruling class must be defeated to restore honor to the United States.

    The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate is a dwindling portion of the WASP / Jew ruling class, but it still has some power left. The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate has been heavily involved in the treasonous attempt to erase the border between Mexico and the United States.

    Can not wait for the WASP/jew ruling class madness to end.

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  133. Thomas says:
    @Neoconned
    Hence why the gate must be closed NOW.

    While riding Greyhound last yr or 2015 i met this old Vietnam vet who showed me his federal carry permit and his H & K USP sidearm. He was on his way to Corpus to pick something up from his storage unit and then he was off to Mexico City to work as a bodyguard. Interesting dude, you meet all types on the bus from eccentric toguys like that to crackheads.

    Anyways the situation in Juarez sounds like my hood....once working class white that then went mixed working class and is now a mostly black Section 8 dump.

    We used to call the cops when we heard gunshots. They had a driveby next door about 4 yrs ago. Some petty feud about drugs or something .

    A joint city, county and ATF/DEA swat raid followed the next yr. Preceding that i had a band of US Marshals with bulletproof flackjackets and automatic machine gun AR variants show up in my backyard looking for 1 of the homeboys living next door.

    So now when i hear 1 of those idiots cracking off a shot into the air i dont even call the cops....whays the pt? About a month ago saw a black boy about 18 w his shirt off casing my neighbors backyard. I walked up to him and threatened to shoot him instead of calling the cops.

    I havent seem him since. He had been peaking thru their privacy fence in broad daylight in open view of the street and my neighbors are older white ppl, retirees.

    Im tired of this shit but Juarez sounds kinda like some areas here.

    I was in El Paso in June. Not many know people cross over daily from Juarez daily to shop at the little flea market slash commercial area they have there. Then they cross back at the end of the day. Go to the Greyhound station in El Paso and walk south towards the border. Only a half mile. You can see the Mexicans in the Churchs Chicken or Mcds there. They dont look famished or poor to me

    Respectfully, you sound like you’re slinging some “big fish” stories. For one thing, there’s no such thing as a “federal carry permit” (unless you’re a current or retired cop).

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    • Replies: @Neoconned
    It was a story he told me....so if it was a story it was his, not me.

    Anyway, Greyhound requires some kinda federal paperwork or license or something or you can't board their buses with them knowing at least w a firearm....

    I met a mercenary guy once in El Paso in summer 2016 who was carrying his full auto rifle and had some kind of documentation that allowed him to carry it thru Border Patrol checkpoints and across state lines.....
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  134. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @(((Owen)))

    But then, the curse of Mexico from the beginning was the racial divide between its ruling elites(generally white or mostly white) and the masses(mestizo to meso-indio).
     
    I hear that from Americans all the time. It's just Anglo-projection. There's no American style racial divide in Mexico. Every level of the class hierarchy is permeable.

    The Mexican elites are abusive and greedy as all elites are. But there's no outright treason and betrayal as in America.

    No, the curse of Mexico has been various things over the years from foreign invaders (France, USA) to bad government to weak dictatorships to poorly organized organized crime to silly high birthrates to commodity bubbles to competition from British steamships. There have been a variety of problems in different eras just as in any ordinary nation.

    I hear that from Americans all the time. It’s just Anglo-projection. There’s no American style racial divide in Mexico. Every level of the class hierarchy is permeable.

    I’ve heard that from Mexicans all the time. It’s just Conqui denial. The racial divides are fuzzy than stark but it’s there. There are gradations from white to mostly white to white-ish to light brown to brown to dark brown and etc. But higher you look, it’s lighter, lower you look, it’s browner.

    Mexico tries the BS the world that there is no ‘racismo’ because everything is blended, but there’s more cream in the blending at the top and more chili beans in the blending at the bottom.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    Same as virtually every other country on the face of the earth.
    It's almost like there's some sort of natural selection at work.
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  135. Thomas says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    And another thing!

    I think there has indeed has been a slow change in Mexico toward more violence at the large scale. I have been there, but not in a while (the guy to really write about this would be your fellow, Steve, at VDare, Mr. Allan Wall. He lived there for a long while till about a decade ago, when his column changed from "Memo from Mexico" to "Memo from Middle America", and he still goes there on vacations.).

    Here's my theory, that you would hear from any smart libertarian too. I think it's pretty plausible that the Drug War has a lot to do with the escalation of violence on a large scale in Mexico. These big cartels grew to consolidate the drug shipping/trading business. Once the US, in the 1980's started going all out on the DRUG "WAR"*, giving the DEA all kinds of powers (lots of them unconsitutional), it wasn't so easy anymore for the small guy in a twin Cessna (w/ ferry tanks) to do the job, working with small guys in old Mexico. It became big business as the risks, hence the MONEY, became much bigger.

    It doesn't take a stretch to compare the situation to that of the US after Amendment XVIII was passed, prohibiting sale of alcohol (NOTE to non-constitutionalists - they had to amend the Constitution! - it actually mattered to people back then). The violence escalated when you had the Al Capone types wanting to consolidate. Once people are already in an illegal business, they will not have many compunctions against carrying out other illegal acts, of course. What difference does it make, at that point, right?

    It doesn't excuse the violence down there for us to say that its our own fault because the demand is here (that's what a libertarian would say). It WAS the cause though. However, I think those cartels are so big and violent that I don't think it will stop even if all the big-selling/smuggling drugs became legal right now, as opposed to here when Amend. XXI, reversing prohibition, was passed. The cartels have turned into armies or nations of their own.
    .

    * a war against substances? I guess. That's not any worse than a war against tactics (W.O.Terrorism) or maybe it's a war on "feelings" (W.O. Terror)

    However, I think those cartels are so big and violent that I don’t think it will stop even if all the big-selling/smuggling drugs became legal right now, as opposed to here when Amend. XXI, reversing prohibition, was passed. The cartels have turned into armies or nations of their own.

    The mob didn’t exactly dry up in America either after Prohibition. In fact, you could say that that era was merely when organized crime got its start, with the salad days probably being the 1950s (before Cuba went red) and the decline starting in the 1970s (after J. Edgar Hoover’s death plus the passage of the RICO Act).

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  136. Mr. Anon says:
    @Jim Don Bob
    Wrong!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Duellists

    Indeed. The Duellists was a great film.

    Blackhawk Down, also directed by Scott, was also a good movie.

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  137. Wally says:
    @Tiny Duck
    Is there anything white men cannot ruin?

    All this dysfunction was caused by white greed and profit seeking

    You white Christians time is coming. The People are going to take back what was stolen

    Racism is wring

    And in what exclusively white area do you live?

    In 2015, a police officer was 18.5 times more likely to be killed by a black male than an unarmed black male was to be killed by a police officer … That 18.5 ratio undoubtedly worsened in 2016, in light of the 53 percent increase in gun murders of officers—committed vastly and disproportionately by black males.
    All that kneeling ignores the real cause of soaring black homicides, New York Post, September 26, 2017

    http://nypost.com/2017/09/26/all-that-kneeling-ignores-the-real-cause-of-soaring-black-homicides/

    ‘Analysis of Washington Post police-shootings data reveals surprising result – nearly 2x more whites than blacks shot by police’

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2016/07/18/analysis-of-washington-post-police-shootings-data-reveals-surprising-result/

    excerpts:
    - For every 10,000 white people arrested for a violent crime, 38 white people were killed by police.
    - For every 10,000 hispanic people arrested for a violent crime, 21 hispanic people were killed by police.
    - For every 10,000 black people arrested for a violent crime, 21 black people were killed by police

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  138. Truth says:
    @Neoconned
    Hence why the gate must be closed NOW.

    While riding Greyhound last yr or 2015 i met this old Vietnam vet who showed me his federal carry permit and his H & K USP sidearm. He was on his way to Corpus to pick something up from his storage unit and then he was off to Mexico City to work as a bodyguard. Interesting dude, you meet all types on the bus from eccentric toguys like that to crackheads.

    Anyways the situation in Juarez sounds like my hood....once working class white that then went mixed working class and is now a mostly black Section 8 dump.

    We used to call the cops when we heard gunshots. They had a driveby next door about 4 yrs ago. Some petty feud about drugs or something .

    A joint city, county and ATF/DEA swat raid followed the next yr. Preceding that i had a band of US Marshals with bulletproof flackjackets and automatic machine gun AR variants show up in my backyard looking for 1 of the homeboys living next door.

    So now when i hear 1 of those idiots cracking off a shot into the air i dont even call the cops....whays the pt? About a month ago saw a black boy about 18 w his shirt off casing my neighbors backyard. I walked up to him and threatened to shoot him instead of calling the cops.

    I havent seem him since. He had been peaking thru their privacy fence in broad daylight in open view of the street and my neighbors are older white ppl, retirees.

    Im tired of this shit but Juarez sounds kinda like some areas here.

    I was in El Paso in June. Not many know people cross over daily from Juarez daily to shop at the little flea market slash commercial area they have there. Then they cross back at the end of the day. Go to the Greyhound station in El Paso and walk south towards the border. Only a half mile. You can see the Mexicans in the Churchs Chicken or Mcds there. They dont look famished or poor to me

    Did Mr. Reacher really look like Tom Cruise? I had always heard he was bigger.

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    • Replies: @Neoconned
    Dunno, was some old dude in his 50s, said he was a Vietnam vet.
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  139. @(((Owen)))

    The US Constitution does a pretty good job of limiting the government to a fairly libertarian system when it’s followed. It’s not.
     
    It was 'followed' when America was run by the same Anglo people that wrote it. After the 1880-1920 immigration wave, the Constitution was quickly abandoned in the 1930s and has held no force ever since.

    Muh Constitutionism is the stupidest kind of Darwin denialism.

    A country is governed by its people, not a crusty old piece of paper. When mass immigration replaced enough of the population, constitutional democracy was replaced by unlimited managed mixed democracy. The current wave of mass migration is aimed at ending democracy entirely.

    And there's no going back. A nation not overwhelmingly Anglo cannot maintain a limited constitutional republic. And America hasn't been that for a long time.

    Could you make an effort, Mr. Owen, to read the rest of my comments, UNDER THIS SAME iSTEVE BLOGPOST (#27, paragraph 4) before you write? It’s a courtesy thing, and would have saved me and you time here.

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  140. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Colleen Pater
    You're working three shit jobs in some slum WTF, you sound like an intelligent woke white kid, its bad but not that bad yet.People stay planted and people get myopic about opportunity. Get the fuck out of their even if that makes you homeless a for a while youll figure things out as you already have but you'll do it in an area full of opportunity. I youre that rare thing that has a sense of duty then great a wars coming get ready for it, Either way the pacific northwest is a good place to be white still.

    The PNW is full of white people who hate being white. Nothing to brag about. And given the relative dearth of negroes, they won’t even learn anytime soon.

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    • Replies: @Colleen Pater
    portland is hardly the entire pnw, and even the portland type actually love their whiteness they just cant articulate that they moved their for that.all that faux authenticity of white culture of the past is actually real white culture they yearn for and are recreating, sure libtards but who cares just balance them at the voting booth and they will have to content themselves with keeping bees and and farmers markets
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  141. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Cwhatfuture
    My wife has been a volunteer social worker (she will represent the interest of the child in court when the parent is in legal difficulty and the state is threatening to take the child). The immigration from Latin America (not necessarily Mexico) has an underside which is so much worse than anyone thinks and it is costing a fortune. Drug addicted mothers, prostitutes, teen age mothers, mothers wanting to keep Down syndrome children just for the state aid, 6 children by 6 different fathers, all children failing in school, horrible English skills, massive welfare use, not to mention the court and social welfare system! Paid social workers, psychologists, court officials, mandatory drug testing. We pay for it all. It was so depressing she had to stop.

    But they’re sending us their best! Otherwise you must be a Nazi.

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  142. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Henry's Cat

    As Mexico descends into its most violent year on record...
     
    Really? I thought the worst of the cartel wars were over. A breakdown of the murder figures with regard to motive would be interesting, and not just for Mexico.

    As Mexico descends into its most violent year on record…

    This is why it’s so essential that we bring all the Mexicans here to the USA so they won’t be around all that violence any more.

    We will.

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  143. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Name Withheld
    There is a theory online that China is doing to us what happened in the Opium Wars. I find this very plausible.

    Me too, especially the part where the USA sent tens of millions of emigrants over to China to help change it into a white, first-world country. Oh wait ..

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    • Agree: Autochthon
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  144. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Anon
    I hear that from Americans all the time. It’s just Anglo-projection. There’s no American style racial divide in Mexico. Every level of the class hierarchy is permeable.

    https://youtu.be/CW4q6OFIJOY?t=1m38s

    I've heard that from Mexicans all the time. It's just Conqui denial. The racial divides are fuzzy than stark but it's there. There are gradations from white to mostly white to white-ish to light brown to brown to dark brown and etc. But higher you look, it's lighter, lower you look, it's browner.

    Mexico tries the BS the world that there is no 'racismo' because everything is blended, but there's more cream in the blending at the top and more chili beans in the blending at the bottom.

    Same as virtually every other country on the face of the earth.
    It’s almost like there’s some sort of natural selection at work.

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  145. @TG
    Reply to anonymous: yes Mexico had a ridiculous amount of population growth in the 1960's.

    And it was the deliberate policy of the Mexican government that crafted this population explosion. They propagandized that it was every woman's patriotic duty to have six kids each "to make Mexico bigger and better," they gave medals to women with large families etc. And the result is what always happens in societies without an open frontier: wages for the many were crushed and profits for the few were boosted. Mexico created a record number of billionaires, and also became so poor that it now depends on the safety valve of immigration to the US to avoid collapse.

    It's an old story. Behind every population explosion, if you look hard enough, one can usually find government policies encouraging that. In the US, even though it's being done via immigration instead of inducements to higher native fertility rate, the effect is the same: the rich are forcing population growth upwards, and this is having the predictable effect of lowering wages and increasing profits.

    It is effectively censored in the press, but the problems is Syria can be traced to the government's pro-natalist policies. They even made the sale and possession of any form of contraception a crime!

    http://globuspallidusxi.blogspot.com/2015/04/the-real-story-on-syria-forced.html

    So what happened in Mexico has happened many other times in many other places... and it's starting to happen here.

    Thomas Friedman at NYT had a couple of columns on excess population and how it backfired big time after a couple of dry years. People were encouraged to farm marginal land, if I recall correctly.

    So it’s not quite censored.

    He wrote this several years ago (but after the civil war had started).

    New taboos spring up very quickly lately. It’s possibly become taboo since.

    I have seen several articles at NYT over the last few years that touched on high birth rates. To judge by the comments, no one sympathized with these people. They were quite open about it.

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  146. utu says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    The plan was for me not to write anything tody, but now you've gone and done it.

    This post would a decent post if you had substituted the words anarchic or chaotic for libertarian in the title. As it stands, it's completely wrong. I may not be keeping up, but no where in the ideology of libertarianism does it specify a massivly corrupt government, at all levels.

    I understand your point that "here is the local private police forces that libertarians call for", (not a quote, but just the point you are trying to make). None of this means anything without rule of law. Local Federales vs. Federal Federales doesn't change a thing - none of them follow any law besides what they make up on the spot. (yes, I know where the term Federales come from, but it has come to mean completely corrupt cops of any kind - plenty here too).

    It comes down to this, you can't have anything resembling libertarianism without the right kind of people, and the founders of our country were the closest to these right kind of people. Those libertarians that call for open borders are just too stupid or naive to get this. On the other hand, the conservatives who deride libertarianism's focus on very small government, God-given rights,and the US Constitution are stupid to not understand that 5 decades of not following these precepts has led to a welfare state in which mostly the stupid and irresponsible thrive. This all means that there will not be anything other than the corruption and 3rd-world situation of Mexico if something is not done about immigration AND our socialist welfare state prontomundo.


    The only decent part of the post was the "Sympathy for the Devil". I'm surprised none of the music lovers caught that (yet!). Oh, and ragging on the NY times, that's always cool.

    you can’t have anything resembling libertarianism without the right kind of people

    That what Stalin and his Politburo used to say about deficiencies of Russian people. And they worked quite hard to trim the population to the right kind of people core.

    The Solution by Bertold Brecht

    After the uprising of the 17th of June
    The Secretary of the Writers’ Union
    Had leaflets distributed in the Stalinallee
    Stating that the people
    Had forfeited the confidence of the government
    And could win it back only
    By redoubled efforts. Would it not be easier
    In that case for the government
    To dissolve the people
    And elect another?

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    By redoubled efforts.
    Would it not be easier
    In that case for the government
    To dissolve the people
    And elect another?

     
    That's exactly what our elites in both government AND big business have been doing for the last 50 years. They've been working on dissolving the white middle class in order to elect a new people that will be more comfortable with a 3rd-world society.

    The problem for the elites is that any serious widespread middle class, as America had until very recently (even 2,000 AD) is a threat to their dominance. Some of these type of people form associations (see de Tocqueville) and the men especially will have the means and ability to change society and government. The elites don't like that. Liberty and freedom scare the crap out of them. It sounds WAY too much like the kind of stuff the Colonial founders of America used to do.

    You came up with the same quote that Peter Brimelow of VDare uses all the time. Good work.
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  147. jim jones says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Recall the fact that widespread opium use in China retarded their progress and impoverished their civilization for 300 or so years.
     
    The Chinese have always had trouble saying no:

    https://mandarinhq.com/2016/04/say-no-in-mandarin-chinese/

    I have noticed Chinese students starting to say “bye bye” at my university, maybe they will soon start saying “no”

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  148. @utu

    you can’t have anything resembling libertarianism without the right kind of people
     
    That what Stalin and his Politburo used to say about deficiencies of Russian people. And they worked quite hard to trim the population to the right kind of people core.

    The Solution by Bertold Brecht

    After the uprising of the 17th of June
    The Secretary of the Writers' Union
    Had leaflets distributed in the Stalinallee
    Stating that the people
    Had forfeited the confidence of the government
    And could win it back only
    By redoubled efforts. Would it not be easier
    In that case for the government
    To dissolve the people
    And elect another?
     

    By redoubled efforts.
    Would it not be easier
    In that case for the government
    To dissolve the people
    And elect another?

    That’s exactly what our elites in both government AND big business have been doing for the last 50 years. They’ve been working on dissolving the white middle class in order to elect a new people that will be more comfortable with a 3rd-world society.

    The problem for the elites is that any serious widespread middle class, as America had until very recently (even 2,000 AD) is a threat to their dominance. Some of these type of people form associations (see de Tocqueville) and the men especially will have the means and ability to change society and government. The elites don’t like that. Liberty and freedom scare the crap out of them. It sounds WAY too much like the kind of stuff the Colonial founders of America used to do.

    You came up with the same quote that Peter Brimelow of VDare uses all the time. Good work.

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    • Replies: @AM

    They’ve been working on dissolving the white middle class in order to elect a new people that will be more comfortable with a 3rd-world society.
     
    Nobody has been more on this beat than libertarians. Well that and feminists, but I repeat myself.
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  149. AM says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    My experience, AM, is that it's not the legality that usually limits access to drugs, It just raises the prices and increases the violence, as the violence is over money. You don't hear about alcohol pushers outside the schools, right? I'm not trying to be a smart-ass on this, but I think this is the only point we don't agree on, really.

    Likewise, I struggle to find any libertarian who will give me, a woman trying to raise a family, unfettered (read cheap) access to antibiotics.
     
    I would be the last to begrudge you that, but that has everything to do with a screwed-up mostly-government-run health care system. I will write soon about my experiences with the free-market health care system in China. It was a almost completely positive experience, AM.

    As to your last paragraph, I completely agree. The welfare system has to go for America to become a decent country again, along with controls on who lives here. Your last paragraph sounded like it was ghost written by a libertarian, so be careful.... (hell, it's better than transforming into the opposite sex, init, love?)

    It just raises the prices and increases the violence, as the violence is over money

    Both of these things are barriers to access in hard drug use. That and paying attention to kids. I can’t be everyone’s parent and I’m not sure how well I’m doing with my own, so I’ll take what I can get.

    As to your last paragraph, I completely agree.

    Great. Then drop the whining over the drugs. Also, I note you’re not really interested in giving me access to antibiotics. No emotion behind it, nor about dropping the welfare state.

    However, there are paragraphs to be had about making society more chaotic because deep thinkers have told me that it’s bad to regulate drugs that ruin people’s lives.

    .

    I will write soon about my experiences with the free-market health care system in China. It was a almost completely positive experience, AM.

    Sure it was. I am sure you’ll sprinkle in the reports of where disgruntled patients come back and kill their doctors, because there’s no recourse.

    Your last paragraph sounded like it was ghost written by a libertarian, so be careful…. (hell, it’s better than transforming into the opposite sex, init, love?)

    I went through a libertarian phase. I’ve recovered quite nicely, thank you, although it is quite helpful in coming up with arguments against it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I usually like writing to you, and reading your comments, AM (though not always in agreeement ), but you have pretty lame retorts to everything I wrote.

    Serenity now, one at a time:

    Prices and violence are part of the world of the drug sellers, AM. For the buyers, well they get it now, no matter how illegal it is. There is no shortage. Of course you're worried about your 6 kids, but so long as you can steer them to the right peers, to me that is the key. What my point was, is that nobody pushes alcohol on kids. Did you get that point? There's no big money in it, hence no alcohol pushers. You can't say the same for the illegal drugs.

    I just wrote that the State should not be involved in whether you can get antibiotics or not. (Much like it is in China - and you should not write about China if you don't have a clue and haven't been.). So, get your antibiotics whenever you want, as you SHOULD be able to, but that would require the State (meaning every government) staying out of it, which is part of libertarianism. Did you all not look up what the word means before spouting off?

    Yeah, about China, things get done there. They are a can-do natiion and we are a can't-do nation at this point. I have seen the difference here, but cannot say I've seen the changes there - we all know how poor and backwards the place was even 25 years back. Things don't drag on at the hospital, charges are reasonable and enough to pay salaries, and there are not 25% of employees involved in nonproductive billing.

    I'm not whining about the drugs or any of this besides the fact that there is almost no freedom left in America. HAVE YOU NOT NOTICED? How long have you been here? Don't whine to me if your antibiotics are regulated all to hell, your sodas are taxed or any of it. Once you submit to the State having authority of what you can ingest, don't whine whatever it is, because YOU LET THEM!, or more like YOU TOLD THEM TO.

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  150. AM says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    By redoubled efforts.
    Would it not be easier
    In that case for the government
    To dissolve the people
    And elect another?

     
    That's exactly what our elites in both government AND big business have been doing for the last 50 years. They've been working on dissolving the white middle class in order to elect a new people that will be more comfortable with a 3rd-world society.

    The problem for the elites is that any serious widespread middle class, as America had until very recently (even 2,000 AD) is a threat to their dominance. Some of these type of people form associations (see de Tocqueville) and the men especially will have the means and ability to change society and government. The elites don't like that. Liberty and freedom scare the crap out of them. It sounds WAY too much like the kind of stuff the Colonial founders of America used to do.

    You came up with the same quote that Peter Brimelow of VDare uses all the time. Good work.

    They’ve been working on dissolving the white middle class in order to elect a new people that will be more comfortable with a 3rd-world society.

    Nobody has been more on this beat than libertarians. Well that and feminists, but I repeat myself.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Nobody has been more on this beat than libertarians. Well that and feminists, but I repeat myself.
     
    Nah, I think you will find the Reason mag libertards in your list, but libertarians in general are not all for destroying the middle class. I believe you are confusing them with the big business crony-capitalists. Feminist = libertarians? That's complete rubbish. Feminism is enforced on people by governments, PUBLIC schools, and Universities (beholden to the Feral Gov't - ALL of them.). Libertarians do not like much government. Did you miss that part?
    , @utu
    Libertarian phantasy was invented to capture and confuse minds of young people, mostly men, to prepare them for the neoliberal world order. They are perfect useful idiots for TPTB. They never get what role they were cast in and it is them complaining that the libertarian utopia can't be built because people are lacking libertarian qualities. The same crap as in USSR.
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  151. AM says:
    @(((Owen)))

    Recall the fact that widespread opium use in China retarded their progress and impoverished their civilization for 300 or so years.
     
    Chinese propaganda backed up by nothing.

    Remember that China chose to impoverish itself with strangling bureaucracy long before opium. And didn't recover at all when the opium came under control.

    China's opium story is just the same as Carrie Nation's story about demon rum. It's idiot moralistic puritanism driving policies that make the country poor and dangerous. As a matter of fact, it's a lot like SJW open borders stupidity.

    China’s opium story is just the same as Carrie Nation’s story about demon rum. It’s idiot moralistic puritanism driving policies that make the country poor and dangerous. As a matter of fact, it’s a lot like SJW open borders stupidity.

    In what world does widespread or even moderate drug use improve a society?

    To sling “puritanism” at such concept suggests you’ve run out of arguments before you’ve begun. A society at its best has no abusers of drugs.

    Rodrigo Duterte is wildly popular precisely because he’s cracking down on drug pushers. From the reports I’ve read, most Phillino families have “lost” a family member to addiction. Drug addiction is lives wasted and lost, children without parents, and just a generally nightmare that ripples through society.

    What’s the point of closing borders if the goal is to lose people to drug addiction?

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  152. AM says:
    @(((Owen)))

    I suspect Mexico got scarier during the Salinas Administration (1988-1994), which did the NAFTA deal with the elder Bush Administration. At some point, Mexico took over from Colombia as the chief shipper of drugs into the United States. The death of Pablo Escobar in Colombia in December 1993 seems like a reasonable milestone in dating when Mexico becoming a narco state.
     
    President Salinas's brother Raúl made a deal with the cartels. They paid taxes on their profits directly to him. He set out territories for them and kept the peace. Each one had access to US border points and made its own arrangements with Customs and the US banking system to operate freely shipping to the USA. The US banks helped keep the arrangement going on the USA side with the usual bribes to US officials.

    That worked fine until 2006. Then the Mexicans elected an alcoholic President Felipe Calderón. He was an anti-drug true believer that didn't want his people taking drug money. So the Mexican government went to war with its former cartel partners. And lost.

    The murder rate almost tripled. Whole states became unsafe. Assassinations of politicians and cops became commonplace.

    But the major southern cities and the Bajío and Yucatán stayed safe and prosperous. Eventually cartels came to an understanding with the government and each other but the damage is done. The level of violence is much higher and there is chaos near the border. It will take a generation and a new under the table taxing system to restore order in the countryside.

    That worked fine until 2006. Then the Mexicans elected an alcoholic President Felipe Calderón. He was an anti-drug true believer that didn’t want his people taking drug money. So the Mexican government went to war with its former cartel partners. And lost.

    In other words, after making the initial deal with the devil, the drug cartels grew so powerful that they were control, not the government and all hell broke loose when the government tried to reassert it’s proper place.

    This is like complaining that it’s all Trump’s fault that rocket man is causing problems. No, someone had to confront the problem.

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  153. Yak-15 says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Recall the fact that widespread opium use in China retarded their progress and impoverished their civilization for 300 or so years.
     
    The Chinese have always had trouble saying no:

    https://mandarinhq.com/2016/04/say-no-in-mandarin-chinese/

    I wish someone had told me ten years ago that Chinese women could never say no…

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  154. res says:
    @anonymous

    Here it is at the Internet Archive: https://web.archive.org/web/20140210220317/http://www.elandar.com/bush/amigos.html

    When you have a link with special characters it usually helps to put it inside an HTML a tag:
    http://www.elandar.com/bush/amigos.html%2Bel+andar+los” href=http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Th5_dq9beuYJ:http://www.elandar.com/bush/amigos.html%2Bel+andar+los rel=”nofollow”>like this
    Odd, that seems to have failed the first time. And now it works. Very strange.

    This form of bare link seems to work though

    http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Th5_dq9beuYJ:http://www.elandar.com/bush/amigos.html%2Bel+andar+los

    P.S. Also strange is that your link looks OK if you hover over the link to your comment just above.

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  155. dsgntd_plyr says: • Website

    At some point, Mexico took over from Colombia as the chief shipper of drugs into the United States. The death of Pablo Escobar in Colombia in December 1993 seems like a reasonable milestone in dating when Mexico becoming a narco state.

    One interesting question I’ve seldom seen addressed is whether there was any connection between Mexico taking over the cocaine business and the warmer American-Mexico relations between Bush and Salinas.

    this is what season 4 of “narcos,” will be about. they’re moving the entire production from colombia to the us/mexico border. a location scout was murdered a couple weeks ago.

    it’s a really good show that starts off with escobar, then follows the cali cartel. the documentary “cocaine cowboys,” is also good, and available on netfliz.

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  156. @AM

    It just raises the prices and increases the violence, as the violence is over money
     
    Both of these things are barriers to access in hard drug use. That and paying attention to kids. I can't be everyone's parent and I'm not sure how well I'm doing with my own, so I'll take what I can get.

    As to your last paragraph, I completely agree.
     
    Great. Then drop the whining over the drugs. Also, I note you're not really interested in giving me access to antibiotics. No emotion behind it, nor about dropping the welfare state.

    However, there are paragraphs to be had about making society more chaotic because deep thinkers have told me that it's bad to regulate drugs that ruin people's lives.

    .


    I will write soon about my experiences with the free-market health care system in China. It was a almost completely positive experience, AM.
     
    Sure it was. I am sure you'll sprinkle in the reports of where disgruntled patients come back and kill their doctors, because there's no recourse.

    Your last paragraph sounded like it was ghost written by a libertarian, so be careful…. (hell, it’s better than transforming into the opposite sex, init, love?)
     
    I went through a libertarian phase. I've recovered quite nicely, thank you, although it is quite helpful in coming up with arguments against it.

    I usually like writing to you, and reading your comments, AM (though not always in agreeement ), but you have pretty lame retorts to everything I wrote.

    Serenity now, one at a time:

    Prices and violence are part of the world of the drug sellers, AM. For the buyers, well they get it now, no matter how illegal it is. There is no shortage. Of course you’re worried about your 6 kids, but so long as you can steer them to the right peers, to me that is the key. What my point was, is that nobody pushes alcohol on kids. Did you get that point? There’s no big money in it, hence no alcohol pushers. You can’t say the same for the illegal drugs.

    I just wrote that the State should not be involved in whether you can get antibiotics or not. (Much like it is in China – and you should not write about China if you don’t have a clue and haven’t been.). So, get your antibiotics whenever you want, as you SHOULD be able to, but that would require the State (meaning every government) staying out of it, which is part of libertarianism. Did you all not look up what the word means before spouting off?

    Yeah, about China, things get done there. They are a can-do natiion and we are a can’t-do nation at this point. I have seen the difference here, but cannot say I’ve seen the changes there – we all know how poor and backwards the place was even 25 years back. Things don’t drag on at the hospital, charges are reasonable and enough to pay salaries, and there are not 25% of employees involved in nonproductive billing.

    I’m not whining about the drugs or any of this besides the fact that there is almost no freedom left in America. HAVE YOU NOT NOTICED? How long have you been here? Don’t whine to me if your antibiotics are regulated all to hell, your sodas are taxed or any of it. Once you submit to the State having authority of what you can ingest, don’t whine whatever it is, because YOU LET THEM!, or more like YOU TOLD THEM TO.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AM

    I usually like writing to you, and reading your comments, AM (though not always in agreeement ), but you have pretty lame retorts to everything I wrote.
     
    They are not lame retorts. You just don't like what I said.

    Libertarians have some great ideas, when partially implimented maybe the correct course of action.

    But there aren't many libertarians with families and it's easy to see why once you have some children to take care of. Society seems to have been stacked against people trying to do the right with their children and the libertarian battle cry is "Make it more difficult!"


    So, get your antibiotics whenever you want, as you SHOULD be able to, but that would require the State (meaning every government) staying out of it, which is part of libertarianism.
     
    That's not what shows up in Reason. That's not what you care about. You care deeply about getting illegal drugs legalized. My problems raising a family hardly register with any libertarian.

    I’m not whining about the drugs or any of this besides the fact that there is almost no freedom left in America.
     
    There's plenty of freedom in America. You can say what you want on every street corner, wear PJs to Wal-Mart, do anything you want on Sunday. Nobody restricts your access to porn, there's no restrictions on what ends up in movie theater, all manner of birth control and even sex toys are found at Wal-greens.

    The idea of community standards is long dead and buried. That makes my job much harder.

    And gheesh, if you really want drugs, just pester an MD long enough. You can get legal ones. And the cops generally don't arrest people on drugs until they are problems. Everyone in my dorm who wanted one had a pot supply and there were certainly no raids.

    That's the hard part here. Libertarians efforts are not headed towards securing the borders, or removing restrictions, or welfare removal and reform. There's no energy behind making everyone's lives better. Just keep destroying what might be any restriction on libertine behavior until we're at bureaucratic anarchy that has to be documented in triplicate. Health checks for legalized prostitutes would essentially be a libertarian win. I don't call it that.

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  157. @AM

    They’ve been working on dissolving the white middle class in order to elect a new people that will be more comfortable with a 3rd-world society.
     
    Nobody has been more on this beat than libertarians. Well that and feminists, but I repeat myself.

    Nobody has been more on this beat than libertarians. Well that and feminists, but I repeat myself.

    Nah, I think you will find the Reason mag libertards in your list, but libertarians in general are not all for destroying the middle class. I believe you are confusing them with the big business crony-capitalists. Feminist = libertarians? That’s complete rubbish. Feminism is enforced on people by governments, PUBLIC schools, and Universities (beholden to the Feral Gov’t – ALL of them.). Libertarians do not like much government. Did you miss that part?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    This has been about like arguing with a libtard, as you don't even have definitions correct. I can't be explaining defintions first, then correcting the premise of people's arguments, and then setting them straight. [tweet] FRUSTRATING [tweet]
    , @Anon
    Which libertarians are you talking about? I'm only familiar with Rothbard, with whom I sympathize, but who is not a basis for a reasonable anything. Lots of people call themselves libertarians; if you tell us which true libertarians you support, perhaps some progress can be made.

    Personally I incline to the late Dr. Pournelle who saw libertarianism as a vector.
    , @AM

    Feminist = libertarians?
     
    Feminists: The white male patriarchy is telling me what do! Tear it down! (female voice)
    Libertarians: The white male patriarchy is telling me what to do! Tear it down! (male voice)

    Did you ever wonder why the libertarian movement was so easily co-opted and cucked by far leftists? Why, when you got a spot light, you don't get anyone serious, but naked people dancing on stage?

    It's the same hedonism - the same lack of discipline. Thoughtful libertarians have some valid points and things to consider, but the framework is identical to any left leaning movement. It's the side of chaos and self centeredness.
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  158. @Achmed E. Newman

    Nobody has been more on this beat than libertarians. Well that and feminists, but I repeat myself.
     
    Nah, I think you will find the Reason mag libertards in your list, but libertarians in general are not all for destroying the middle class. I believe you are confusing them with the big business crony-capitalists. Feminist = libertarians? That's complete rubbish. Feminism is enforced on people by governments, PUBLIC schools, and Universities (beholden to the Feral Gov't - ALL of them.). Libertarians do not like much government. Did you miss that part?

    This has been about like arguing with a libtard, as you don’t even have definitions correct. I can’t be explaining defintions first, then correcting the premise of people’s arguments, and then setting them straight. [tweet] FRUSTRATING [tweet]

    Read More
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  159. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    Mexico had ridiculously high population growth around mid 20th century.

    I wonder how much of Mexico's present dysfunction - and the backwash colonization of much of the USA - is the Malthusian consequence of that growth?

    If so, the implications of current ridiculous African an sub continental population growth is horrendous.

    Diversity-crazed “Give me your tired and your poor” America is now at 325 million and growing, the population concentrated in relatively few geographical areas. Unless these souls start migrating en mass to Wyoming, Montana and Idaho (which is not likely) these already existing population centers (the Boston-NY-Philly-DC megalopolis, LA, all of Florida) will become even more densely populated with groups who are at loggerheads with each other. A lethal mix if you ask me.

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  160. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Nobody has been more on this beat than libertarians. Well that and feminists, but I repeat myself.
     
    Nah, I think you will find the Reason mag libertards in your list, but libertarians in general are not all for destroying the middle class. I believe you are confusing them with the big business crony-capitalists. Feminist = libertarians? That's complete rubbish. Feminism is enforced on people by governments, PUBLIC schools, and Universities (beholden to the Feral Gov't - ALL of them.). Libertarians do not like much government. Did you miss that part?

    Which libertarians are you talking about? I’m only familiar with Rothbard, with whom I sympathize, but who is not a basis for a reasonable anything. Lots of people call themselves libertarians; if you tell us which true libertarians you support, perhaps some progress can be made.

    Personally I incline to the late Dr. Pournelle who saw libertarianism as a vector.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    At this point, Anon, without having kept up with all the pundits, pols, etc. how about I just give you one Dr. Ron Paul as an example. Never mind the "R" he had next to his name in 2012. He just tried that to get somewhere for a change (the lyin press would have none of it). Ron Paul's weekly columns appear on this very unz site.

    No, I don't agree with the man completely - for instance, re: Charlottesville and anything with a racial angle he simple does not write too much about the real racial truth. He is a smart man, and I bet he figures it would just get him banned from anywhere he would write his ideas about liberty, so why do that? I don't think it's that he values readers/money over honesty by any means, but there'd just be no point in getting called all the usual names and then losing the readers that read him for his foreign policy and economic ideas.

    Now that I think of it, Rothbard and most of the economic-policy libertarians (guys that detest the FED, want sound money and balanced budgets) are usually guys I can get behind - not too many of them are open-borders freaks, really. They know.

    Ha, now I thought of Paul Craig Roberts. I always liked his ideas, though the columns were just the same over and over, but additionally, some months back he got on the Global Climate Disruption(TM) bandwagon with no science/engineering ideas to back it up, and I'd had it. That was just before the time he published his screed against web-site commenters and requested no commenting (you can see that on here (unz)). I hope I was a big part of that, as I tore him a new one on the GCD BS. Felt goooood!!
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  161. AM says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    I usually like writing to you, and reading your comments, AM (though not always in agreeement ), but you have pretty lame retorts to everything I wrote.

    Serenity now, one at a time:

    Prices and violence are part of the world of the drug sellers, AM. For the buyers, well they get it now, no matter how illegal it is. There is no shortage. Of course you're worried about your 6 kids, but so long as you can steer them to the right peers, to me that is the key. What my point was, is that nobody pushes alcohol on kids. Did you get that point? There's no big money in it, hence no alcohol pushers. You can't say the same for the illegal drugs.

    I just wrote that the State should not be involved in whether you can get antibiotics or not. (Much like it is in China - and you should not write about China if you don't have a clue and haven't been.). So, get your antibiotics whenever you want, as you SHOULD be able to, but that would require the State (meaning every government) staying out of it, which is part of libertarianism. Did you all not look up what the word means before spouting off?

    Yeah, about China, things get done there. They are a can-do natiion and we are a can't-do nation at this point. I have seen the difference here, but cannot say I've seen the changes there - we all know how poor and backwards the place was even 25 years back. Things don't drag on at the hospital, charges are reasonable and enough to pay salaries, and there are not 25% of employees involved in nonproductive billing.

    I'm not whining about the drugs or any of this besides the fact that there is almost no freedom left in America. HAVE YOU NOT NOTICED? How long have you been here? Don't whine to me if your antibiotics are regulated all to hell, your sodas are taxed or any of it. Once you submit to the State having authority of what you can ingest, don't whine whatever it is, because YOU LET THEM!, or more like YOU TOLD THEM TO.

    I usually like writing to you, and reading your comments, AM (though not always in agreeement ), but you have pretty lame retorts to everything I wrote.

    They are not lame retorts. You just don’t like what I said.

    Libertarians have some great ideas, when partially implimented maybe the correct course of action.

    But there aren’t many libertarians with families and it’s easy to see why once you have some children to take care of. Society seems to have been stacked against people trying to do the right with their children and the libertarian battle cry is “Make it more difficult!”

    So, get your antibiotics whenever you want, as you SHOULD be able to, but that would require the State (meaning every government) staying out of it, which is part of libertarianism.

    That’s not what shows up in Reason. That’s not what you care about. You care deeply about getting illegal drugs legalized. My problems raising a family hardly register with any libertarian.

    I’m not whining about the drugs or any of this besides the fact that there is almost no freedom left in America.

    There’s plenty of freedom in America. You can say what you want on every street corner, wear PJs to Wal-Mart, do anything you want on Sunday. Nobody restricts your access to porn, there’s no restrictions on what ends up in movie theater, all manner of birth control and even sex toys are found at Wal-greens.

    The idea of community standards is long dead and buried. That makes my job much harder.

    And gheesh, if you really want drugs, just pester an MD long enough. You can get legal ones. And the cops generally don’t arrest people on drugs until they are problems. Everyone in my dorm who wanted one had a pot supply and there were certainly no raids.

    That’s the hard part here. Libertarians efforts are not headed towards securing the borders, or removing restrictions, or welfare removal and reform. There’s no energy behind making everyone’s lives better. Just keep destroying what might be any restriction on libertine behavior until we’re at bureaucratic anarchy that has to be documented in triplicate. Health checks for legalized prostitutes would essentially be a libertarian win. I don’t call it that.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    You care deeply about getting illegal drugs legalized.
     
    Two things on this. I don't take any drugs, because the low-key ones really don't do anything, and I would be scared to even try one of the addictive ones. I don't even use the most common one anymore (yes, the alcohol), but I don't knock people who do. This is not personal. Secondly, if you would remember what I wrote originally I wasn't even writing about legalizing drugs. I wrote my (correct) opinion that the US Drug War was the major reason that violence on a big scale has escalated in Mexico over the last 3 decades.

    You need to argue against what I wrote, not what you remember I wrote, as your memory is not working 100%. For reference, all the posts are on this page, and you can click on a commenter's name and read all the ones Unz has saved.

    I agree that most libertarians turn more conservative than libertine when they have a family. I have one. I don't want my kid around gay pride crap, druggies, and more importantly, all the complete lies that are pushed on him everyday at school.

    Did I mention school? Yes, I believe I did. You think you live in a free country? You must not have ever started a business lately, or more importantly, just wanted to be left THE HELL ALONE. Back to schools: Did it ever occur to you that in a free country, you would not have to put up with all the bullshit being pushed on your kids?

    People with no imagination of freedom cannot even think - "Hey, why can't I and some like-minded parents start our own school. There's a retired engineer down the street who'd love to teach math in a real school without the crap. There's a would-be writer I know who could use some money who could teach English ... We could rent a small part of this 1/2 vacant strip mall. I just worked out the money, and we could do this for $2,000 /kid-year without any frills" Just try this, AM, and see how damn far you get. It is UNTHINKABLE to most people, because any thoughts in that direction immediately trigger the part of the brain that knows "I'll never get anywhere. They'll be 10 state gov't agencies and 20 Feral ones all over me before I can even run the school for 1 day." Those thoughts would be right, and then all similar ideas get buried to where the imagination can't even reach them anymore.

    Can you imagine a time when it was none of any government's business how you taught your kids, who you worked for, how much money you make, and where you live? That was America in the past - pretty damn libertarian if you ask me, and it worked very well until the meddling nannies - I can't say it all started with the women voting, but that sure made it accelerate.

    No, you live in a burgeoning police state, and you'd have to be really young not to have noticed (as in, it's always been this way).
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  162. AM says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Nobody has been more on this beat than libertarians. Well that and feminists, but I repeat myself.
     
    Nah, I think you will find the Reason mag libertards in your list, but libertarians in general are not all for destroying the middle class. I believe you are confusing them with the big business crony-capitalists. Feminist = libertarians? That's complete rubbish. Feminism is enforced on people by governments, PUBLIC schools, and Universities (beholden to the Feral Gov't - ALL of them.). Libertarians do not like much government. Did you miss that part?

    Feminist = libertarians?

    Feminists: The white male patriarchy is telling me what do! Tear it down! (female voice)
    Libertarians: The white male patriarchy is telling me what to do! Tear it down! (male voice)

    Did you ever wonder why the libertarian movement was so easily co-opted and cucked by far leftists? Why, when you got a spot light, you don’t get anyone serious, but naked people dancing on stage?

    It’s the same hedonism – the same lack of discipline. Thoughtful libertarians have some valid points and things to consider, but the framework is identical to any left leaning movement. It’s the side of chaos and self centeredness.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Feminists: The white male patriarchy is telling me what do! Tear it down! (female voice)
    Libertarians: The white male patriarchy is Feral and local governments are telling me what to do! Tear it down! (male voice)

     
    Fixed that one for you, but now your analogy fails miserably. Do you think the US Feral Gov't is mostly white male patriarchs, AM? Have you ever been into one of those Federal buildings - you have to go through a metal detector first, because they are rightfully scared of the population, so maybe you haven't.

    AA hires, glass-ceiling busters, old fogies biding their time till retirement, it's a real riot over at the government offices. There are lots of feminists in government too, as they aren't afraid to hire them, like a smart businessman is.

    OK, I think the problem is you say the libertarians want to tear down everything, like the antifa. I understand what you are worried about. However, most libertarians, and especially the constitutionalists want to tear down everything that has been built in the last 5 decades - ALL THE BAD STUFF. They want the welfare state gone. I'm all for that. If the alt-right is not all for that, then they are just plain morons, because the welfare state is what causes the breeding/raising of stupid and irresponsible people, would you not agree?
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  163. @Anon
    Which libertarians are you talking about? I'm only familiar with Rothbard, with whom I sympathize, but who is not a basis for a reasonable anything. Lots of people call themselves libertarians; if you tell us which true libertarians you support, perhaps some progress can be made.

    Personally I incline to the late Dr. Pournelle who saw libertarianism as a vector.

    At this point, Anon, without having kept up with all the pundits, pols, etc. how about I just give you one Dr. Ron Paul as an example. Never mind the “R” he had next to his name in 2012. He just tried that to get somewhere for a change (the lyin press would have none of it). Ron Paul’s weekly columns appear on this very unz site.

    No, I don’t agree with the man completely – for instance, re: Charlottesville and anything with a racial angle he simple does not write too much about the real racial truth. He is a smart man, and I bet he figures it would just get him banned from anywhere he would write his ideas about liberty, so why do that? I don’t think it’s that he values readers/money over honesty by any means, but there’d just be no point in getting called all the usual names and then losing the readers that read him for his foreign policy and economic ideas.

    Now that I think of it, Rothbard and most of the economic-policy libertarians (guys that detest the FED, want sound money and balanced budgets) are usually guys I can get behind – not too many of them are open-borders freaks, really. They know.

    Ha, now I thought of Paul Craig Roberts. I always liked his ideas, though the columns were just the same over and over, but additionally, some months back he got on the Global Climate Disruption(TM) bandwagon with no science/engineering ideas to back it up, and I’d had it. That was just before the time he published his screed against web-site commenters and requested no commenting (you can see that on here (unz)). I hope I was a big part of that, as I tore him a new one on the GCD BS. Felt goooood!!

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    • Replies: @Anon
    I wouldn't call PCR a libertarian. Also I wouldn't call global warming a policy issue; that's why we're in this mess of bad (no) science about it. I tend to agree with Dr. Paul on most issues.

    My general problem with libertarianism is that I can agree on most policy proposals and on the general idea that government should do as little as possible, but I don't think it's possible to build a coherent philosophy of politics on those ideas alone.
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  164. MarkinLA says:
    @Detective Club
    Don’t blame it all on the Bush Crime Family. While Bill Clinton was Arkansas Governor, Mena had become a most important final destination for Columbian cocaine. Bill’s state troopers delivered his cut to him in cash-stuffed envelopes - - - and free samples for Bill's nose.

    If Hillary had won last year, this country would now be suffering an incredible crime wave, the likes of which could not have been imagined, even in one’s wildest nightmares. Hillary’s post-presidential book would have been entitled You’re Fucked, not What Happened.

    While Ronald Reagan was President, Mena had become a most important final destination for Columbian cocaine. Bill’s state troopers delivered his cut to him in cash-stuffed envelopes – – – and free samples for Bill’s nose.

    There fixed it for you.

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  165. Hibernian says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate is a dwindling portion of the WASP / Jew ruling class, but it still has some power left. The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate has been heavily involved in the treasonous attempt to erase the border between Mexico and the United States.

    George Bush #1, as vice president to Reagan, was a lead backer of the shady formation of the sovereignty-sapping North American Free Trade Agreement(NAFTA). The goal of NAFTA was to pauperize White Core Americans while flooding the United States with illegal alien invaders and legal immigrants. George Bush #1 is an evil Mammonite who sold out his own country for money. The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate was wounded by President Trump, that makes them dangerous.

    Bill Clinton and Newt Gingrich were able to pass the Reagan/Bush NAFTA bill in 1993 or 1994. Bill Clinton and Newt Gingrich are evil baby boomers who knew that NAFTA would hurt White Core American workers. Clinton and Gingrich knew that NAFTA would flood the United States with illegal alien invaders and other immigrants.

    The WASP / Jew ruling class of the American Empire is evil, immoral and irresponsible. The WASP / Jew ruling class must be defeated to restore honor to the United States.

    Didn’t you refer to Irish people in uncomplementary terms? Are you at war with the entire world? Might help to have some allies.

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    • Replies: @FKA Max
    I wrote the following comment yesterday, but then hesitated and decided not to post it, because I didn't want to stir up any unnecessary controversy and ruffle any feathers, but then today I saw this Tweet from Max Fisher, which made me change my mind, because I believe he is correct, and I am afraid that this type of ``stark and dangerous inequality'' is coming to the United States if the responsible culprits and parties are not correctly and properly identified:

    I have never seen a starker or more dangerous form of inequality than what @amandataub and I saw in Mexico

    https://twitter.com/Max_Fisher/status/915204337172967424

    ---------------

    Didn’t you refer to Irish people in uncomplementary terms? Are you at war with the entire world? Might help to have some allies.
     
    Allies are few and far between... I don't know if the Irish are reliable allies if one looks at their track record?

    Still my all-time favorite of Mr. Sailer's blog posts:

    The Curley Effect Versus the Kennedy Effect

    James Michael Curley, a four-time mayor of Boston, used wasteful redistribution to his poor Irish constituents and incendiary rhetoric to encourage richer citizens to emigrate from Boston, thereby shaping the electorate in his favor. As a consequence, Boston stagnated, but Curley kept winning elections.
    [...]
    We call this strategy—increasing the relative size of one’s political base through distortionary, wealth-reducing policies—the Curley effect. But it is hardly unique to Curley. Other American mayors, but also politicians around the world, have pursued policies that encouraged emigration of their political enemies, raising poverty but gaining political advantage.
     
    - http://www.unz.com/isteve/the-curley-effect-versus-the-kennedy-effect/

    Maybe it should really be called the Spellman Effect?
    [...]
    Perhaps he had some Irish immigrant chips on his shoulder about WASPS disrespecting his family. If he disliked the balance of power among the citizens of this country, wildly increasing immigration levels could largely shift the balance of political power and ideology in the country.
    [...] I want you to know, Your Holiness, that in my nearly 50 years of elective office, I have done my best to champion the rights of the poor and open doors of economic opportunity. I’ve worked to welcome the immigrant, fight discrimination and expand access to health care and education. . . – https://www.numbersusa.com/content/nusablog/beckr/september-2-2009/ted-kennedys-immigration-legacy-and-why-did-he-do-it.html
    [...]
    Siskel & Ebert vs. the WASPs

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/siskel-ebert-on-wasps/
     
    - http://www.unz.com/isteve/the-curley-effect-versus-the-kennedy-effect/#comment-1619098

    Another one to add to that list, the Slim Effect:

    Carlos Slim is a Maronite Catholic,[66][67] and he is one of the prominent backers of Legion of Christ, a Roman Catholic religious institute.[68][69]
     
    - http://www.unz.com/article/the-killing-of-history/#comment-2020911


    Billionaire Carlos Slim’s Foundation To Help Mexican Residents Become U.S. Citizens


    [...] There are 2.7 million permanent residents from Mexico eligible for U.S. citizenship who haven’t taken that step yet, according to the Pew Center.

    – https://www.forbes.com/sites/doliaestevez/2017/04/03/billionaire-carlos-slims-foundation-to-help-mexican-residents-become-u-s-citizens/#4ed9d4f72d8f
     
    - http://www.unz.com/article/the-killing-of-history/#comment-2022987

    WHAT IS OUR PREDICAMENT?

    No doubt there is hope that the Papacy can survive a prolonged period of global anarchy. The Church has proved that it can survive anarchic conditions, has a history of promoting anarchy and has on occasion profited from anarchy. There is reason to believe that the Vatican has made its choice between more immediate self-destruction and risking survival over anarchy. It is apparent that the cost in human terms is not a factor in Vatican decision-making. Indeed, from the Vatican's perspective, promotion of worldwide anarchy is a reasonable strategy.
     
    - http://www.population-security.org/25-CH17.html#i1

    IF WE CONTINUE AS WE ARE NOW?

    If we continue as we are now, anarchy will be inevitable, a conclusion reached by the NSSM 200 researchers. Though there is reason to believe the Vatican may be able to survive under the conditions found in anarchy, American democracy will not. In place of anarchy many Americans would be sorely tempted to exchange most of the freedoms they enjoy today -- of mind and movement, speech and vocation -- for the security that an authoritarian government would offer.
     
    - http://www.population-security.org/25-CH17.html#i4

    DISUNITING OF AMERICA


    In his 1993 national bestseller, The Disuniting of America, 306 Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. never mentions the Catholic Church though he does refer to religious groups.
    [...]
    Schlesinger recognizes a serious danger relevant to the death of NSSM 200 which I will discuss further at the end of this chapter: "And when a vocal and visible minority pledges primary allegiance to their groups, whether ethnic, sexual, religious, or...political, it presents a threat to the brittle bonds of national identity that hold this diverse and fractious society together."
    [...]
    Schlesinger identifies an ethnic upsurge today that "threatens to become a counter-revolution against the original theory of America as `one people,' a common culture, a single nation."310 He goes on to say, "The cult of ethnicity exaggerates differences, intensifies resentments and antagonisms, drives ever deeper the awful wedges between races and nationalities. The endgame is self-pity and self-ghettoization."311 And further, "The cult of ethnicity has reversed the movement of American history, producing a nation of minorities -- or at least of minority spokesmen -- less interested in joining with the majority in common endeavor than in declaring their alienation...."312 In the end, the cult of ethnicity defines the republic not as a polity of individuals but as a congeries of distinct and inviolable cultures.313 This set of circumstances has set the stage for the fragmentation and anarchy that we already see in our inner cities today.
     
    - http://www.population-security.org/24-CH16.html#i12
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  166. MarkinLA says:
    @libertreee
    Why is this supposed to be a libertarian paradise?
    You can't have a lib paradise when you have a War on Drugs Black market.
    Is it because of the different police agencies claiming jurisdiction? Aren't these public agencies? Sailer doesn't say, but I would think they are. This is the same tired trope we see about 19th century duplicative police and fire agencies. Hello, Steve? Those were public agencies, not private agencies working under contract law, but public agencies authorized by different public jurisdictions that resulted in two fire departments refusing to put out a fire because they were arguing over who had jurisdiction.

    I like the alt right to a degree, and iSteve is a learned and articulate fellow, but if you are going to criticize libertarians you should understand the philosophy a bit better than I see alt-right authors do

    Drugs are practically legal in Mexico. Every DEA/Mexican drug operation down there is for show to the gringos. So it is a libertarian paradise.

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  167. @AM

    I usually like writing to you, and reading your comments, AM (though not always in agreeement ), but you have pretty lame retorts to everything I wrote.
     
    They are not lame retorts. You just don't like what I said.

    Libertarians have some great ideas, when partially implimented maybe the correct course of action.

    But there aren't many libertarians with families and it's easy to see why once you have some children to take care of. Society seems to have been stacked against people trying to do the right with their children and the libertarian battle cry is "Make it more difficult!"


    So, get your antibiotics whenever you want, as you SHOULD be able to, but that would require the State (meaning every government) staying out of it, which is part of libertarianism.
     
    That's not what shows up in Reason. That's not what you care about. You care deeply about getting illegal drugs legalized. My problems raising a family hardly register with any libertarian.

    I’m not whining about the drugs or any of this besides the fact that there is almost no freedom left in America.
     
    There's plenty of freedom in America. You can say what you want on every street corner, wear PJs to Wal-Mart, do anything you want on Sunday. Nobody restricts your access to porn, there's no restrictions on what ends up in movie theater, all manner of birth control and even sex toys are found at Wal-greens.

    The idea of community standards is long dead and buried. That makes my job much harder.

    And gheesh, if you really want drugs, just pester an MD long enough. You can get legal ones. And the cops generally don't arrest people on drugs until they are problems. Everyone in my dorm who wanted one had a pot supply and there were certainly no raids.

    That's the hard part here. Libertarians efforts are not headed towards securing the borders, or removing restrictions, or welfare removal and reform. There's no energy behind making everyone's lives better. Just keep destroying what might be any restriction on libertine behavior until we're at bureaucratic anarchy that has to be documented in triplicate. Health checks for legalized prostitutes would essentially be a libertarian win. I don't call it that.

    You care deeply about getting illegal drugs legalized.

    Two things on this. I don’t take any drugs, because the low-key ones really don’t do anything, and I would be scared to even try one of the addictive ones. I don’t even use the most common one anymore (yes, the alcohol), but I don’t knock people who do. This is not personal. Secondly, if you would remember what I wrote originally I wasn’t even writing about legalizing drugs. I wrote my (correct) opinion that the US Drug War was the major reason that violence on a big scale has escalated in Mexico over the last 3 decades.

    You need to argue against what I wrote, not what you remember I wrote, as your memory is not working 100%. For reference, all the posts are on this page, and you can click on a commenter’s name and read all the ones Unz has saved.

    I agree that most libertarians turn more conservative than libertine when they have a family. I have one. I don’t want my kid around gay pride crap, druggies, and more importantly, all the complete lies that are pushed on him everyday at school.

    Did I mention school? Yes, I believe I did. You think you live in a free country? You must not have ever started a business lately, or more importantly, just wanted to be left THE HELL ALONE. Back to schools: Did it ever occur to you that in a free country, you would not have to put up with all the bullshit being pushed on your kids?

    People with no imagination of freedom cannot even think – “Hey, why can’t I and some like-minded parents start our own school. There’s a retired engineer down the street who’d love to teach math in a real school without the crap. There’s a would-be writer I know who could use some money who could teach English … We could rent a small part of this 1/2 vacant strip mall. I just worked out the money, and we could do this for $2,000 /kid-year without any frills” Just try this, AM, and see how damn far you get. It is UNTHINKABLE to most people, because any thoughts in that direction immediately trigger the part of the brain that knows “I’ll never get anywhere. They’ll be 10 state gov’t agencies and 20 Feral ones all over me before I can even run the school for 1 day.” Those thoughts would be right, and then all similar ideas get buried to where the imagination can’t even reach them anymore.

    Can you imagine a time when it was none of any government’s business how you taught your kids, who you worked for, how much money you make, and where you live? That was America in the past – pretty damn libertarian if you ask me, and it worked very well until the meddling nannies – I can’t say it all started with the women voting, but that sure made it accelerate.

    No, you live in a burgeoning police state, and you’d have to be really young not to have noticed (as in, it’s always been this way).

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  168. @AM

    Feminist = libertarians?
     
    Feminists: The white male patriarchy is telling me what do! Tear it down! (female voice)
    Libertarians: The white male patriarchy is telling me what to do! Tear it down! (male voice)

    Did you ever wonder why the libertarian movement was so easily co-opted and cucked by far leftists? Why, when you got a spot light, you don't get anyone serious, but naked people dancing on stage?

    It's the same hedonism - the same lack of discipline. Thoughtful libertarians have some valid points and things to consider, but the framework is identical to any left leaning movement. It's the side of chaos and self centeredness.

    Feminists: The white male patriarchy is telling me what do! Tear it down! (female voice)
    Libertarians: The white male patriarchy is Feral and local governments are telling me what to do! Tear it down! (male voice)

    Fixed that one for you, but now your analogy fails miserably. Do you think the US Feral Gov’t is mostly white male patriarchs, AM? Have you ever been into one of those Federal buildings – you have to go through a metal detector first, because they are rightfully scared of the population, so maybe you haven’t.

    AA hires, glass-ceiling busters, old fogies biding their time till retirement, it’s a real riot over at the government offices. There are lots of feminists in government too, as they aren’t afraid to hire them, like a smart businessman is.

    OK, I think the problem is you say the libertarians want to tear down everything, like the antifa. I understand what you are worried about. However, most libertarians, and especially the constitutionalists want to tear down everything that has been built in the last 5 decades – ALL THE BAD STUFF. They want the welfare state gone. I’m all for that. If the alt-right is not all for that, then they are just plain morons, because the welfare state is what causes the breeding/raising of stupid and irresponsible people, would you not agree?

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    • Replies: @AM
    "However, most libertarians, and especially the constitutionalists want to tear down everything that has been built in the last 5 decades – ALL THE BAD STUFF. "

    That's why libertarians dance naked on poltical stages, create volumes in defense of life destroying addictions, and seem to think open borders is a key libertarian principle.

    Meanwhile, Trump, the guy most libertarians voted against, has removed more Federal regulation in 9 months than Reagan did in years.

    Some libertarian theories are sound. But in practice, libertarians put their emotional energy towards either libertine or leftist behavior patterns. What you personally think of it is irrelevant. What it's supposed to be is also irrelevant. I'm talking about what actually shows up in real life, as the product of a group.

    Libertarians give us no practical progress in rolling back the state. If given a choice between working on the welfare state or pointing out that it's difficult and expensive to enforce the law for certain pet issues (duh), the group always chooses the later.

    Libertarians absolutely content themselves with health checks for prostitutes or CO's pot laws, which are an expansion of the state. And with that, there's no much more for me to do but shrug and find a more practical group.

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  169. Neoconned says:
    @Thomas
    Respectfully, you sound like you’re slinging some “big fish” stories. For one thing, there’s no such thing as a “federal carry permit” (unless you’re a current or retired cop).

    It was a story he told me….so if it was a story it was his, not me.

    Anyway, Greyhound requires some kinda federal paperwork or license or something or you can’t board their buses with them knowing at least w a firearm….

    I met a mercenary guy once in El Paso in summer 2016 who was carrying his full auto rifle and had some kind of documentation that allowed him to carry it thru Border Patrol checkpoints and across state lines…..

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  170. Neoconned says:
    @Truth
    Did Mr. Reacher really look like Tom Cruise? I had always heard he was bigger.

    Dunno, was some old dude in his 50s, said he was a Vietnam vet.

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  171. utu says:
    @AM

    They’ve been working on dissolving the white middle class in order to elect a new people that will be more comfortable with a 3rd-world society.
     
    Nobody has been more on this beat than libertarians. Well that and feminists, but I repeat myself.

    Libertarian phantasy was invented to capture and confuse minds of young people, mostly men, to prepare them for the neoliberal world order. They are perfect useful idiots for TPTB. They never get what role they were cast in and it is them complaining that the libertarian utopia can’t be built because people are lacking libertarian qualities. The same crap as in USSR.

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    • Agree: JohnnyWalker123
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  172. anon says: • Disclaimer

    I never really got the whole thing with Bush — both of them — and oil — and Mexico.

    First of all — elites are doing oil via the global integrated oil companies. e.g. Exxon Mobile. They don’t really like the small, independents.

    There was a brief, shining moment for the Bush/Neocon alliance where it looked like the stars were in alignment. Post Cold War? We had the military looking for a mission and got Project for a New Century. Israel and Neocons? Yes … no need to elaborate. Late 90′s — oil prices were in a rut and it wasn’t economical to develop reserves. Unfortunately, it made the US more dependent on foreign oil and it made some sense. As soon as prices started to rise, we had ‘peak oil’ — the climate change of the 00′s. It had plausibility, at the least.

    All of the above includes points that are endlessly debatable, but the big picture is that all the stars were aligned for the GWOT.

    Skip to today.

    1. The US still has an energy imbalance by product, but is roughly energy independent,
    2. The US imports a lot of Saudi Oil.
    3. The US imports most of its oil from Canada (by far) and Mexico.
    4. Saudis own the largest American refinery.
    5. The US gets about 5% of its oil by volume from ‘refinery processing gains’. This is from starting with heavy (high specific gravity) oil and processing/cracking it into lighter products. ‘Heavy/Sour’ oil like Saudi crude is complex and requires more capital intensive processing to refine into the most profitable lighter products.

    As a result, the US imports a lot of oil and exports a lot of refined products. However, in 2016, the US only imported about 1.5 million bpd of OPEC oil and may have imported less if refineries had not been owned by Saudi Arabia.

    If we consider Canada and Mexico — North American oil — as domestic as far as reliability of supply and the absence of any need to provide security of Gulf shipping sea lanes — then we are very secure regarding supply.

    China is the largest importer of oil. We don’t need to guarantee China’s supply. However, our military seems very threatened by China’s legitimate interest in developing supply security.

    We still have the usual suspects making the usual arguments for the necessity of the US guarantying oil security regardless of cost.

    An example is http://secureenergy.org/oil-geopolitics/ Securing America’s Energy Future

    The single biggest distortion is the attempt to conflate Canadian oil with Middle Eastern Oil. The second is ignoring the ease with which we could substitute other oil and energy for the Saudi Heavy Sour Crude refined in the US. If Saudi oil increases our oil insecurity, then the modest economic benefit from Saudi investment in US refineries and the ‘refinery processing gain’ from Saudi crude could be foregone for security. This is ignored.

    Finally, the balance between the risk of supply disruptions for the US and the risk of access to oil markets for the rest of the world is ignored. Beginning in 2014, it has been a buyers market for oil and the US is not a large net buyer of non North American oil.

    In terms of the US economic dependence on stable oil prices, near independence substantially reduces risk. A spike in end user gasoline prices may reduce corporate profits and taxes for consuming industries but will increase profits and taxes on domestic oil production and processing.

    Here is a list of imports by country. https://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcus_a2_nus_epc0_im0_mbblpd_a.htm

    Securing America’s Energy Future is in favor of conservation measures which is fine. But isn’t particularly focused on it.

    It claims to be in favor of diversification. In fact, the reason the US’s energy requirements are so oil heavy is our use of gasoline as a motor vehicle fuel. SAEF is in favor of electric vehicles, but we could be running a decent percent of our national fleet on natural gas, which is so abundant that we are exporting it now.

    They discuss geopolitics. This is handled by the usual suspects. However, they do seem to have an enormous number of people on various ‘boards’ — a few dozen generals and admirals. And CEO’s from major energy using businesses. Too many people to really expect them to even meet once a year.

    Their last analysis of geopolitics was published in 2014 and does not include actual global oil prices but rather scenarios based off of $100/bbl oil.

    The real news was the shocking 2015 oil price of $30/bbl. In fact, the geopolitics of securing America’s oil supply is simply the Monroe Doctrine.

    I suspect that the entire project is going to be slowly wound down. The fact that a North America energy independent USA is going to continue to spend our fortune defending China’s oil supply is a fact that the ‘security’ part of this simply doesn’t want to discuss.

    This is a big deal (in my opinion) and has simply not been processed by the usual interest groups. It needs to become a big thing.

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  173. @Neoconned
    I'm over simplifying the topic & his thesis but a few yrs back Fareed Zakaria did a piece about how its not that we're doing that bad but that much of the rest of the world caught up w us and what we have and are just isnt that unique or exceptional any more.....

    Yeah, read that idea, its crap.

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  174. AM says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Feminists: The white male patriarchy is telling me what do! Tear it down! (female voice)
    Libertarians: The white male patriarchy is Feral and local governments are telling me what to do! Tear it down! (male voice)

     
    Fixed that one for you, but now your analogy fails miserably. Do you think the US Feral Gov't is mostly white male patriarchs, AM? Have you ever been into one of those Federal buildings - you have to go through a metal detector first, because they are rightfully scared of the population, so maybe you haven't.

    AA hires, glass-ceiling busters, old fogies biding their time till retirement, it's a real riot over at the government offices. There are lots of feminists in government too, as they aren't afraid to hire them, like a smart businessman is.

    OK, I think the problem is you say the libertarians want to tear down everything, like the antifa. I understand what you are worried about. However, most libertarians, and especially the constitutionalists want to tear down everything that has been built in the last 5 decades - ALL THE BAD STUFF. They want the welfare state gone. I'm all for that. If the alt-right is not all for that, then they are just plain morons, because the welfare state is what causes the breeding/raising of stupid and irresponsible people, would you not agree?

    “However, most libertarians, and especially the constitutionalists want to tear down everything that has been built in the last 5 decades – ALL THE BAD STUFF. ”

    That’s why libertarians dance naked on poltical stages, create volumes in defense of life destroying addictions, and seem to think open borders is a key libertarian principle.

    Meanwhile, Trump, the guy most libertarians voted against, has removed more Federal regulation in 9 months than Reagan did in years.

    Some libertarian theories are sound. But in practice, libertarians put their emotional energy towards either libertine or leftist behavior patterns. What you personally think of it is irrelevant. What it’s supposed to be is also irrelevant. I’m talking about what actually shows up in real life, as the product of a group.

    Libertarians give us no practical progress in rolling back the state. If given a choice between working on the welfare state or pointing out that it’s difficult and expensive to enforce the law for certain pet issues (duh), the group always chooses the later.

    Libertarians absolutely content themselves with health checks for prostitutes or CO’s pot laws, which are an expansion of the state. And with that, there’s no much more for me to do but shrug and find a more practical group.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    It sounds like you're just hanging out with the wrong libertarians, or people you think are, but are nothing but total flakes. Whatever, I can't point out every libertarian good guy out there, but I do remember I used to like reading Lew Rockwell.

    Meanwhile, Trump, the guy most libertarians voted against, has removed more Federal regulation in 9 months than Reagan did in years.
     
    Not hardly. That's no props to Reagan, but he worked against the Democrats his whole 2 terms (probably too much pressure from the older Deep-State Bush, too). What you need to know is the the President has no power to remove regulations. Laws are passed or repealed by the legislative branch. All these E.O.'s are another thing, but if you take one away, the next guy can just put it back X 2. It's not the way it's supposed to work, and again, part of the problem about the US Constitution being ignored.

    All Federal regulations put together in paper form would barely fit on all the bookshelves on an office wall stacked on 4 shelves. 304 in of double-sided small-type (unfortunately it doesn't give page thickness, but I back-estimated 200 pg/inch per one piece of info. given) is about 25 ft. That link come from some stuff by John Stossel - now there's a great libertarian I've not though of in a while and he was amazingly on TV for a long time.

    Does John Stossel seem like the kind of guy you keep describing as libertarian-like in you comments, American Mom? Have you seen him before on TV? (I have no idea if he's still on.) I think he's a great American.

    Oh yeah, I just noticed something in your quote above - do you think these libertarians voted for the Hildabeast against Donald Trump? They probably voted for Gary Johnson, who is indeed something of a nutcase, but guys like Ron Paul that weren't nutcases used to be on that ticket. What do you think of Judge Napolitano who is published on unz also? He is no relation to the Motherland Security/Univ. of CA Napolitano in any sense at all! I never got it straight whether he is a Judge or it's just his first name, like Judge Rheinhold (of the circuit court of Ridgemont, CA)
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    I apologize for a possible error in my 1st reply to your comment, AM. I read the Washington Examiner article linked on Drudge.

    The Competitive Enterprise Institute said that Trump has issued 58 percent fewer major and costly regulations than former President Obama and slashed the Federal Register, the government's rule book, by 32 percent.
     
    The Federal Register is NOT the government's rule book, that is the CFR, but I can't find much about it besides:

    Federal Register:
    The Federal Register is a legal newspaper published every business day by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). It contains federal agency regulations; proposed rules and notices; and Executive orders, proclamations, and other Presidential documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations:
    The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) is the codification of the general and permanent rules published in the Federal Register by the executive departments and agencies of the federal government. It is divided into 50 titles that represent broad areas subject to federal regulation.

     
    E.O.s are not law, but then unfortunately, lots of regulations are made at agency levels as directed by the admin. branch, and are treated as law. Anyway, I'm no lawyer, and I'd be glad if this, what you pointed me to, is true in SPIRIT, not just on paper somehow.

    Trump's ideas about cutting regs. to let small business (especially) get back to work are from his own experience and are very libertarian, of course. His statist nature has mostly been in his foreign policy, something that is contrary to promises made during the presidential campaign. I never thought of him as a libertarian, but I voted for him on the anti-immigration-invasion promises.
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  175. @AM
    "However, most libertarians, and especially the constitutionalists want to tear down everything that has been built in the last 5 decades – ALL THE BAD STUFF. "

    That's why libertarians dance naked on poltical stages, create volumes in defense of life destroying addictions, and seem to think open borders is a key libertarian principle.

    Meanwhile, Trump, the guy most libertarians voted against, has removed more Federal regulation in 9 months than Reagan did in years.

    Some libertarian theories are sound. But in practice, libertarians put their emotional energy towards either libertine or leftist behavior patterns. What you personally think of it is irrelevant. What it's supposed to be is also irrelevant. I'm talking about what actually shows up in real life, as the product of a group.

    Libertarians give us no practical progress in rolling back the state. If given a choice between working on the welfare state or pointing out that it's difficult and expensive to enforce the law for certain pet issues (duh), the group always chooses the later.

    Libertarians absolutely content themselves with health checks for prostitutes or CO's pot laws, which are an expansion of the state. And with that, there's no much more for me to do but shrug and find a more practical group.

    It sounds like you’re just hanging out with the wrong libertarians, or people you think are, but are nothing but total flakes. Whatever, I can’t point out every libertarian good guy out there, but I do remember I used to like reading Lew Rockwell.

    Meanwhile, Trump, the guy most libertarians voted against, has removed more Federal regulation in 9 months than Reagan did in years.

    Not hardly. That’s no props to Reagan, but he worked against the Democrats his whole 2 terms (probably too much pressure from the older Deep-State Bush, too). What you need to know is the the President has no power to remove regulations. Laws are passed or repealed by the legislative branch. All these E.O.’s are another thing, but if you take one away, the next guy can just put it back X 2. It’s not the way it’s supposed to work, and again, part of the problem about the US Constitution being ignored.

    All Federal regulations put together in paper form would barely fit on all the bookshelves on an office wall stacked on 4 shelves. 304 in of double-sided small-type (unfortunately it doesn’t give page thickness, but I back-estimated 200 pg/inch per one piece of info. given) is about 25 ft. That link come from some stuff by John Stossel – now there’s a great libertarian I’ve not though of in a while and he was amazingly on TV for a long time.

    Does John Stossel seem like the kind of guy you keep describing as libertarian-like in you comments, American Mom? Have you seen him before on TV? (I have no idea if he’s still on.) I think he’s a great American.

    Oh yeah, I just noticed something in your quote above – do you think these libertarians voted for the Hildabeast against Donald Trump? They probably voted for Gary Johnson, who is indeed something of a nutcase, but guys like Ron Paul that weren’t nutcases used to be on that ticket. What do you think of Judge Napolitano who is published on unz also? He is no relation to the Motherland Security/Univ. of CA Napolitano in any sense at all! I never got it straight whether he is a Judge or it’s just his first name, like Judge Rheinhold (of the circuit court of Ridgemont, CA)

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  176. @Reg Cæsar

    Either way the pacific northwest is a good place to be white still.
     
    Yeah, but white and straight?

    I suppose you’re referring to places like portlandia, what can i say its a city whites flee to other whites its important to balance them so they cant take over most of the PNW is a naturally conservative white place, though liberals have been fleeing to it as well as right wing people if they are not neutralized we will have no place to make a stand. Its also the nicest place on earth to live

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  177. @Anon
    The PNW is full of white people who hate being white. Nothing to brag about. And given the relative dearth of negroes, they won't even learn anytime soon.

    portland is hardly the entire pnw, and even the portland type actually love their whiteness they just cant articulate that they moved their for that.all that faux authenticity of white culture of the past is actually real white culture they yearn for and are recreating, sure libtards but who cares just balance them at the voting booth and they will have to content themselves with keeping bees and and farmers markets

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  178. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Achmed E. Newman
    At this point, Anon, without having kept up with all the pundits, pols, etc. how about I just give you one Dr. Ron Paul as an example. Never mind the "R" he had next to his name in 2012. He just tried that to get somewhere for a change (the lyin press would have none of it). Ron Paul's weekly columns appear on this very unz site.

    No, I don't agree with the man completely - for instance, re: Charlottesville and anything with a racial angle he simple does not write too much about the real racial truth. He is a smart man, and I bet he figures it would just get him banned from anywhere he would write his ideas about liberty, so why do that? I don't think it's that he values readers/money over honesty by any means, but there'd just be no point in getting called all the usual names and then losing the readers that read him for his foreign policy and economic ideas.

    Now that I think of it, Rothbard and most of the economic-policy libertarians (guys that detest the FED, want sound money and balanced budgets) are usually guys I can get behind - not too many of them are open-borders freaks, really. They know.

    Ha, now I thought of Paul Craig Roberts. I always liked his ideas, though the columns were just the same over and over, but additionally, some months back he got on the Global Climate Disruption(TM) bandwagon with no science/engineering ideas to back it up, and I'd had it. That was just before the time he published his screed against web-site commenters and requested no commenting (you can see that on here (unz)). I hope I was a big part of that, as I tore him a new one on the GCD BS. Felt goooood!!

    I wouldn’t call PCR a libertarian. Also I wouldn’t call global warming a policy issue; that’s why we’re in this mess of bad (no) science about it. I tend to agree with Dr. Paul on most issues.

    My general problem with libertarianism is that I can agree on most policy proposals and on the general idea that government should do as little as possible, but I don’t think it’s possible to build a coherent philosophy of politics on those ideas alone.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I wouldn’t call PCR a libertarian.
     
    I would based on his writings about huge federal gov't and its overreaching police state along with his criticisms of US foreign policy. What would you call him, Anon? His writings were good, but even though it was often criticism of new stuff, it was just depressing to read the articles after a while - "I know, I know, the Feral Gov't sucks, but tell us what's to be done about it."

    I never called Global Climate Disruption(TM) a policy issue (I used the term "bandwagon"), but I'll call it what it is, a big hoax.

    My general problem with libertarianism is that I can agree on most policy proposals and on the general idea that government should do as little as possible, but I don’t think it’s possible to build a coherent philosophy of politics on those ideas alone.
     
    OK, fine, but one thing about a much smaller STATE as libertarians believe in, is you don't that need much of a coherent philosophy of politics. Just leave everybody the hell alone! (That was not to you, Anon, but that is directed at government.)
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  179. @Anon
    I wouldn't call PCR a libertarian. Also I wouldn't call global warming a policy issue; that's why we're in this mess of bad (no) science about it. I tend to agree with Dr. Paul on most issues.

    My general problem with libertarianism is that I can agree on most policy proposals and on the general idea that government should do as little as possible, but I don't think it's possible to build a coherent philosophy of politics on those ideas alone.

    I wouldn’t call PCR a libertarian.

    I would based on his writings about huge federal gov’t and its overreaching police state along with his criticisms of US foreign policy. What would you call him, Anon? His writings were good, but even though it was often criticism of new stuff, it was just depressing to read the articles after a while – “I know, I know, the Feral Gov’t sucks, but tell us what’s to be done about it.”

    I never called Global Climate Disruption(TM) a policy issue (I used the term “bandwagon”), but I’ll call it what it is, a big hoax.

    My general problem with libertarianism is that I can agree on most policy proposals and on the general idea that government should do as little as possible, but I don’t think it’s possible to build a coherent philosophy of politics on those ideas alone.

    OK, fine, but one thing about a much smaller STATE as libertarians believe in, is you don’t that need much of a coherent philosophy of politics. Just leave everybody the hell alone! (That was not to you, Anon, but that is directed at government.)

    Read More
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  180. @AM
    "However, most libertarians, and especially the constitutionalists want to tear down everything that has been built in the last 5 decades – ALL THE BAD STUFF. "

    That's why libertarians dance naked on poltical stages, create volumes in defense of life destroying addictions, and seem to think open borders is a key libertarian principle.

    Meanwhile, Trump, the guy most libertarians voted against, has removed more Federal regulation in 9 months than Reagan did in years.

    Some libertarian theories are sound. But in practice, libertarians put their emotional energy towards either libertine or leftist behavior patterns. What you personally think of it is irrelevant. What it's supposed to be is also irrelevant. I'm talking about what actually shows up in real life, as the product of a group.

    Libertarians give us no practical progress in rolling back the state. If given a choice between working on the welfare state or pointing out that it's difficult and expensive to enforce the law for certain pet issues (duh), the group always chooses the later.

    Libertarians absolutely content themselves with health checks for prostitutes or CO's pot laws, which are an expansion of the state. And with that, there's no much more for me to do but shrug and find a more practical group.

    I apologize for a possible error in my 1st reply to your comment, AM. I read the Washington Examiner article linked on Drudge.

    The Competitive Enterprise Institute said that Trump has issued 58 percent fewer major and costly regulations than former President Obama and slashed the Federal Register, the government’s rule book, by 32 percent.

    The Federal Register is NOT the government’s rule book, that is the CFR, but I can’t find much about it besides:

    Federal Register:
    The Federal Register is a legal newspaper published every business day by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). It contains federal agency regulations; proposed rules and notices; and Executive orders, proclamations, and other Presidential documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations:
    The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) is the codification of the general and permanent rules published in the Federal Register by the executive departments and agencies of the federal government. It is divided into 50 titles that represent broad areas subject to federal regulation.

    E.O.s are not law, but then unfortunately, lots of regulations are made at agency levels as directed by the admin. branch, and are treated as law. Anyway, I’m no lawyer, and I’d be glad if this, what you pointed me to, is true in SPIRIT, not just on paper somehow.

    Trump’s ideas about cutting regs. to let small business (especially) get back to work are from his own experience and are very libertarian, of course. His statist nature has mostly been in his foreign policy, something that is contrary to promises made during the presidential campaign. I never thought of him as a libertarian, but I voted for him on the anti-immigration-invasion promises.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The Federal Register is NOT the government’s rule book, that is the CFR...
     
    For a second there, I thought the Birchers were back. But, no:

    The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)
     
    , @EdwardM
    The CFR is the steady-state regulatory "rule book" and the Federal Register contains the proceedings related to updating the CFR among other things.

    So Title X, Section A.B.C, paragraph 1 of the CFR might say "Blacks, Mexicans, and Muslims are the exalted noble people of the earth subject to the protections in this section" and an entry yesterday in the Federal Register might have said "'and Muslims' is added to Title X, Section A.B.C, paragraph 1 following 'Mexicans.'"

    So reducing the number of pages in the Federal Register might be an indirect measure of less government, but it doesn't mean much. After all, repeals of regulations are also published in the Federal Register. I'm not sure if presidential appointments are listed there, too, but Trump's inaction on this could also partially account for the shortness of content .

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  181. FKA Max says: • Website
    @Hibernian
    Didn't you refer to Irish people in uncomplementary terms? Are you at war with the entire world? Might help to have some allies.

    I wrote the following comment yesterday, but then hesitated and decided not to post it, because I didn’t want to stir up any unnecessary controversy and ruffle any feathers, but then today I saw this Tweet from Max Fisher, which made me change my mind, because I believe he is correct, and I am afraid that this type of “stark and dangerous inequality” is coming to the United States if the responsible culprits and parties are not correctly and properly identified:

    I have never seen a starker or more dangerous form of inequality than what @amandataub and I saw in Mexico

    —————

    Didn’t you refer to Irish people in uncomplementary terms? Are you at war with the entire world? Might help to have some allies.

    Allies are few and far between… I don’t know if the Irish are reliable allies if one looks at their track record?

    Still my all-time favorite of Mr. Sailer’s blog posts:

    The Curley Effect Versus the Kennedy Effect

    James Michael Curley, a four-time mayor of Boston, used wasteful redistribution to his poor Irish constituents and incendiary rhetoric to encourage richer citizens to emigrate from Boston, thereby shaping the electorate in his favor. As a consequence, Boston stagnated, but Curley kept winning elections.
    [...]
    We call this strategy—increasing the relative size of one’s political base through distortionary, wealth-reducing policies—the Curley effect. But it is hardly unique to Curley. Other American mayors, but also politicians around the world, have pursued policies that encouraged emigration of their political enemies, raising poverty but gaining political advantage.

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/the-curley-effect-versus-the-kennedy-effect/

    Maybe it should really be called the Spellman Effect?
    [...]
    Perhaps he had some Irish immigrant chips on his shoulder about WASPS disrespecting his family. If he disliked the balance of power among the citizens of this country, wildly increasing immigration levels could largely shift the balance of political power and ideology in the country.
    [...] I want you to know, Your Holiness, that in my nearly 50 years of elective office, I have done my best to champion the rights of the poor and open doors of economic opportunity. I’ve worked to welcome the immigrant, fight discrimination and expand access to health care and education. . . – https://www.numbersusa.com/content/nusablog/beckr/september-2-2009/ted-kennedys-immigration-legacy-and-why-did-he-do-it.html
    [...]
    Siskel & Ebert vs. the WASPs

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/siskel-ebert-on-wasps/

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/the-curley-effect-versus-the-kennedy-effect/#comment-1619098

    Another one to add to that list, the Slim Effect:

    Carlos Slim is a Maronite Catholic,[66][67] and he is one of the prominent backers of Legion of Christ, a Roman Catholic religious institute.[68][69]

    http://www.unz.com/article/the-killing-of-history/#comment-2020911


    Billionaire Carlos Slim’s Foundation To Help Mexican Residents Become U.S. Citizens

    [...] There are 2.7 million permanent residents from Mexico eligible for U.S. citizenship who haven’t taken that step yet, according to the Pew Center.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/doliaestevez/2017/04/03/billionaire-carlos-slims-foundation-to-help-mexican-residents-become-u-s-citizens/#4ed9d4f72d8f

    http://www.unz.com/article/the-killing-of-history/#comment-2022987

    WHAT IS OUR PREDICAMENT?

    No doubt there is hope that the Papacy can survive a prolonged period of global anarchy. The Church has proved that it can survive anarchic conditions, has a history of promoting anarchy and has on occasion profited from anarchy. There is reason to believe that the Vatican has made its choice between more immediate self-destruction and risking survival over anarchy. It is apparent that the cost in human terms is not a factor in Vatican decision-making. Indeed, from the Vatican’s perspective, promotion of worldwide anarchy is a reasonable strategy.

    http://www.population-security.org/25-CH17.html#i1

    IF WE CONTINUE AS WE ARE NOW?

    If we continue as we are now, anarchy will be inevitable, a conclusion reached by the NSSM 200 researchers. Though there is reason to believe the Vatican may be able to survive under the conditions found in anarchy, American democracy will not. In place of anarchy many Americans would be sorely tempted to exchange most of the freedoms they enjoy today — of mind and movement, speech and vocation — for the security that an authoritarian government would offer.

    http://www.population-security.org/25-CH17.html#i4

    DISUNITING OF AMERICA

    In his 1993 national bestseller, The Disuniting of America, 306 Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. never mentions the Catholic Church though he does refer to religious groups.
    [...]
    Schlesinger recognizes a serious danger relevant to the death of NSSM 200 which I will discuss further at the end of this chapter: “And when a vocal and visible minority pledges primary allegiance to their groups, whether ethnic, sexual, religious, or…political, it presents a threat to the brittle bonds of national identity that hold this diverse and fractious society together.”
    [...]
    Schlesinger identifies an ethnic upsurge today that “threatens to become a counter-revolution against the original theory of America as `one people,’ a common culture, a single nation.”310 He goes on to say, “The cult of ethnicity exaggerates differences, intensifies resentments and antagonisms, drives ever deeper the awful wedges between races and nationalities. The endgame is self-pity and self-ghettoization.”311 And further, “The cult of ethnicity has reversed the movement of American history, producing a nation of minorities — or at least of minority spokesmen — less interested in joining with the majority in common endeavor than in declaring their alienation….”312 In the end, the cult of ethnicity defines the republic not as a polity of individuals but as a congeries of distinct and inviolable cultures.313 This set of circumstances has set the stage for the fragmentation and anarchy that we already see in our inner cities today.

    http://www.population-security.org/24-CH16.html#i12

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    • Replies: @Hibernian
    This site is full of Jewish conspiracy theories; you seem determined to give us Catholics equal time.
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  182. The NW is basically left-wing atheists on the coasts and right-wing atheists inland. (Or Mormons!)

    I wouldn’t be comfortable there. The constant drizzle is nice, but white folks need a good deep freeze now and then to stay sharp.

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  183. @Achmed E. Newman
    I apologize for a possible error in my 1st reply to your comment, AM. I read the Washington Examiner article linked on Drudge.

    The Competitive Enterprise Institute said that Trump has issued 58 percent fewer major and costly regulations than former President Obama and slashed the Federal Register, the government's rule book, by 32 percent.
     
    The Federal Register is NOT the government's rule book, that is the CFR, but I can't find much about it besides:

    Federal Register:
    The Federal Register is a legal newspaper published every business day by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). It contains federal agency regulations; proposed rules and notices; and Executive orders, proclamations, and other Presidential documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations:
    The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) is the codification of the general and permanent rules published in the Federal Register by the executive departments and agencies of the federal government. It is divided into 50 titles that represent broad areas subject to federal regulation.

     
    E.O.s are not law, but then unfortunately, lots of regulations are made at agency levels as directed by the admin. branch, and are treated as law. Anyway, I'm no lawyer, and I'd be glad if this, what you pointed me to, is true in SPIRIT, not just on paper somehow.

    Trump's ideas about cutting regs. to let small business (especially) get back to work are from his own experience and are very libertarian, of course. His statist nature has mostly been in his foreign policy, something that is contrary to promises made during the presidential campaign. I never thought of him as a libertarian, but I voted for him on the anti-immigration-invasion promises.

    The Federal Register is NOT the government’s rule book, that is the CFR…

    For a second there, I thought the Birchers were back. But, no:

    The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)

    Read More
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  184. EdwardM says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    I apologize for a possible error in my 1st reply to your comment, AM. I read the Washington Examiner article linked on Drudge.

    The Competitive Enterprise Institute said that Trump has issued 58 percent fewer major and costly regulations than former President Obama and slashed the Federal Register, the government's rule book, by 32 percent.
     
    The Federal Register is NOT the government's rule book, that is the CFR, but I can't find much about it besides:

    Federal Register:
    The Federal Register is a legal newspaper published every business day by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). It contains federal agency regulations; proposed rules and notices; and Executive orders, proclamations, and other Presidential documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations:
    The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) is the codification of the general and permanent rules published in the Federal Register by the executive departments and agencies of the federal government. It is divided into 50 titles that represent broad areas subject to federal regulation.

     
    E.O.s are not law, but then unfortunately, lots of regulations are made at agency levels as directed by the admin. branch, and are treated as law. Anyway, I'm no lawyer, and I'd be glad if this, what you pointed me to, is true in SPIRIT, not just on paper somehow.

    Trump's ideas about cutting regs. to let small business (especially) get back to work are from his own experience and are very libertarian, of course. His statist nature has mostly been in his foreign policy, something that is contrary to promises made during the presidential campaign. I never thought of him as a libertarian, but I voted for him on the anti-immigration-invasion promises.

    The CFR is the steady-state regulatory “rule book” and the Federal Register contains the proceedings related to updating the CFR among other things.

    So Title X, Section A.B.C, paragraph 1 of the CFR might say “Blacks, Mexicans, and Muslims are the exalted noble people of the earth subject to the protections in this section” and an entry yesterday in the Federal Register might have said “‘and Muslims’ is added to Title X, Section A.B.C, paragraph 1 following ‘Mexicans.’”

    So reducing the number of pages in the Federal Register might be an indirect measure of less government, but it doesn’t mean much. After all, repeals of regulations are also published in the Federal Register. I’m not sure if presidential appointments are listed there, too, but Trump’s inaction on this could also partially account for the shortness of content .

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Thanks for explaining how this works, Edward. i.e. the Register is thicker each day when there are lots of transactions, some of which add to the CFR, some of which subtract, and some of which don't change it.
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  185. Hibernian says:
    @FKA Max
    I wrote the following comment yesterday, but then hesitated and decided not to post it, because I didn't want to stir up any unnecessary controversy and ruffle any feathers, but then today I saw this Tweet from Max Fisher, which made me change my mind, because I believe he is correct, and I am afraid that this type of ``stark and dangerous inequality'' is coming to the United States if the responsible culprits and parties are not correctly and properly identified:

    I have never seen a starker or more dangerous form of inequality than what @amandataub and I saw in Mexico

    https://twitter.com/Max_Fisher/status/915204337172967424

    ---------------

    Didn’t you refer to Irish people in uncomplementary terms? Are you at war with the entire world? Might help to have some allies.
     
    Allies are few and far between... I don't know if the Irish are reliable allies if one looks at their track record?

    Still my all-time favorite of Mr. Sailer's blog posts:

    The Curley Effect Versus the Kennedy Effect

    James Michael Curley, a four-time mayor of Boston, used wasteful redistribution to his poor Irish constituents and incendiary rhetoric to encourage richer citizens to emigrate from Boston, thereby shaping the electorate in his favor. As a consequence, Boston stagnated, but Curley kept winning elections.
    [...]
    We call this strategy—increasing the relative size of one’s political base through distortionary, wealth-reducing policies—the Curley effect. But it is hardly unique to Curley. Other American mayors, but also politicians around the world, have pursued policies that encouraged emigration of their political enemies, raising poverty but gaining political advantage.
     
    - http://www.unz.com/isteve/the-curley-effect-versus-the-kennedy-effect/

    Maybe it should really be called the Spellman Effect?
    [...]
    Perhaps he had some Irish immigrant chips on his shoulder about WASPS disrespecting his family. If he disliked the balance of power among the citizens of this country, wildly increasing immigration levels could largely shift the balance of political power and ideology in the country.
    [...] I want you to know, Your Holiness, that in my nearly 50 years of elective office, I have done my best to champion the rights of the poor and open doors of economic opportunity. I’ve worked to welcome the immigrant, fight discrimination and expand access to health care and education. . . – https://www.numbersusa.com/content/nusablog/beckr/september-2-2009/ted-kennedys-immigration-legacy-and-why-did-he-do-it.html
    [...]
    Siskel & Ebert vs. the WASPs

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/siskel-ebert-on-wasps/
     
    - http://www.unz.com/isteve/the-curley-effect-versus-the-kennedy-effect/#comment-1619098

    Another one to add to that list, the Slim Effect:

    Carlos Slim is a Maronite Catholic,[66][67] and he is one of the prominent backers of Legion of Christ, a Roman Catholic religious institute.[68][69]
     
    - http://www.unz.com/article/the-killing-of-history/#comment-2020911


    Billionaire Carlos Slim’s Foundation To Help Mexican Residents Become U.S. Citizens


    [...] There are 2.7 million permanent residents from Mexico eligible for U.S. citizenship who haven’t taken that step yet, according to the Pew Center.

    – https://www.forbes.com/sites/doliaestevez/2017/04/03/billionaire-carlos-slims-foundation-to-help-mexican-residents-become-u-s-citizens/#4ed9d4f72d8f
     
    - http://www.unz.com/article/the-killing-of-history/#comment-2022987

    WHAT IS OUR PREDICAMENT?

    No doubt there is hope that the Papacy can survive a prolonged period of global anarchy. The Church has proved that it can survive anarchic conditions, has a history of promoting anarchy and has on occasion profited from anarchy. There is reason to believe that the Vatican has made its choice between more immediate self-destruction and risking survival over anarchy. It is apparent that the cost in human terms is not a factor in Vatican decision-making. Indeed, from the Vatican's perspective, promotion of worldwide anarchy is a reasonable strategy.
     
    - http://www.population-security.org/25-CH17.html#i1

    IF WE CONTINUE AS WE ARE NOW?

    If we continue as we are now, anarchy will be inevitable, a conclusion reached by the NSSM 200 researchers. Though there is reason to believe the Vatican may be able to survive under the conditions found in anarchy, American democracy will not. In place of anarchy many Americans would be sorely tempted to exchange most of the freedoms they enjoy today -- of mind and movement, speech and vocation -- for the security that an authoritarian government would offer.
     
    - http://www.population-security.org/25-CH17.html#i4

    DISUNITING OF AMERICA


    In his 1993 national bestseller, The Disuniting of America, 306 Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. never mentions the Catholic Church though he does refer to religious groups.
    [...]
    Schlesinger recognizes a serious danger relevant to the death of NSSM 200 which I will discuss further at the end of this chapter: "And when a vocal and visible minority pledges primary allegiance to their groups, whether ethnic, sexual, religious, or...political, it presents a threat to the brittle bonds of national identity that hold this diverse and fractious society together."
    [...]
    Schlesinger identifies an ethnic upsurge today that "threatens to become a counter-revolution against the original theory of America as `one people,' a common culture, a single nation."310 He goes on to say, "The cult of ethnicity exaggerates differences, intensifies resentments and antagonisms, drives ever deeper the awful wedges between races and nationalities. The endgame is self-pity and self-ghettoization."311 And further, "The cult of ethnicity has reversed the movement of American history, producing a nation of minorities -- or at least of minority spokesmen -- less interested in joining with the majority in common endeavor than in declaring their alienation...."312 In the end, the cult of ethnicity defines the republic not as a polity of individuals but as a congeries of distinct and inviolable cultures.313 This set of circumstances has set the stage for the fragmentation and anarchy that we already see in our inner cities today.
     
    - http://www.population-security.org/24-CH16.html#i12

    This site is full of Jewish conspiracy theories; you seem determined to give us Catholics equal time.

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  186. @EdwardM
    The CFR is the steady-state regulatory "rule book" and the Federal Register contains the proceedings related to updating the CFR among other things.

    So Title X, Section A.B.C, paragraph 1 of the CFR might say "Blacks, Mexicans, and Muslims are the exalted noble people of the earth subject to the protections in this section" and an entry yesterday in the Federal Register might have said "'and Muslims' is added to Title X, Section A.B.C, paragraph 1 following 'Mexicans.'"

    So reducing the number of pages in the Federal Register might be an indirect measure of less government, but it doesn't mean much. After all, repeals of regulations are also published in the Federal Register. I'm not sure if presidential appointments are listed there, too, but Trump's inaction on this could also partially account for the shortness of content .

    Thanks for explaining how this works, Edward. i.e. the Register is thicker each day when there are lots of transactions, some of which add to the CFR, some of which subtract, and some of which don’t change it.

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