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A commenter replies to my latest Taki’s column proposing that all immigrants be required to have immigration insurance against any harms they may visit up Americans:

This is what I did for a living: design insurance and financial products. “Pittsburgh Thatcherite” has the kernel of brilliance but you have the wrong “bond”.

If you are talking about immigrant mass murders you have a low frequency high severity event.

One of my goals is to get the concept of liability for immigration on the table in the first place. Cigarette companies, for instance, always admitted they would be liable if, say, a cigarette exploded and burned your eyebrows off. But that got the lawyer’s nose in Camel’s tent: after lots and lots of arguing, it turned out the cigarette companies were also liable for increasing customers’ statistical risks of lung cancer. That process wouldn’t have been worth it if somebody with deep pockets wasn’t involved.

This makes an underwriter twitchy to begin with. You will never get meaningful limits in the context of such an event (yes, everyone buys car insurance and Mexicans get $15/30 limits) and insurers will be challenged to screen risks among the riskiest immigrants. The other obvious issue is that in a suretyship transaction there is an oligor (the immigrant) and oblige (his victims?) and a surety. The surety likes it when he is positioned to recover from the obligor after paying the obligee. Won’t happen here. This leaves out the question as to whether the surety/insurer is going to be penalized for underwriting by ethnicity.

This is a capital markets play. Some kind of immigrant CAT bond or quasi-CDS structure. This covers a generational cohort or some such number. The bond pays a premium if immigrants behave; maybe it pays a robust premium if immigrants reach certain socio-economic benchmarks. If Allah Akbar events spike, or socio-economic benchmarks crater, the bond pays no income and certain tranches risk their principal.

The reason this idea might work is that institutions could be shamed or pressured to issue the protection. Soros believes in immigration — hey, back it up. Maybe we could sell some of the bonds to Mexico. But any member of the pro-immigration elite could be made to pony up. Want HB-1 Visas? Buy the … bonds.

So if you want big limits — that are intrinsically diversified or pre-diversified — go to the capital markets not insurers. Another advantage: insurers deny claims. Swap counter-parties can’t. I believe AIG believed, in 2007, that it could weasel out of its CDS protection with Talmudic disputation (much like its D&O policies). AIG’s banks said: f you, we need another 10 billion in collateral for the market moving against you. The capital market clears.

Not immigrant insurance. Immigrant CAT bonds with different triggers and tranches, shoved down the throats of the elites cheerleading for more immigration.

Granted, this technical discussion isn’t typical yuletide subject matter, but Merry Christmas to one and all!

 
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  1. Always wondered why Christians never tried to figure out a more accurate estimate for Jesus’ birth than the beginning of winter.

    Easter’s different.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sparkling Wiggle
    Nobody recorder his birth, so any method of "figuring it out" is little more than a wild guess.

    It was fixed at December 25 because of the Israelite tradition that prophets died on the same day of the year that they had been conceived. Count off 9 months from Passover, and you get December 25.
    , @Cagey Beast
    You people* always have to get the needle in, don't you? That's why we love you so very much. Never change. If you ever stopped the overt and snide hostility you wouldn't be you people anymore, would you? It's what defines you.

    To at least partly answer your question, Wikipedia on birthdays:

    The Romans enthusiastically celebrated birthdays with hedonistic parties and generous presents.
    [....]
    Origen in his commentary "On Levites" writes that Christians should not only refrain from celebrating their birthdays, but should look on them with disgust.

    Orthodox Christianity still prefers the celebration of name days only.
     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birthday#In_cultures_and_religions

    The Church Fathers knew when shepherds were out with their flocks and all the rest and so were not ignorant of the documentary evidence. They likely wanted to separate the celebration of the birth of the Son of God with a pagan, astrological interest in his birth date.

    * Yes, I said "you people". Merry Christmas anyway.

    , @tbraton
    "Always wondered why Christians never tried to figure out a more accurate estimate for Jesus’ birth than the beginning of winter.

    Easter’s different."

    Well, for one thing, the four Gospels say nothing about the time of year he was born. (Easter is different since, according to the Gospels, the crucifixion of Jesus occurred after Passover, which is a "moveable feast," changing from year to year, based on the lunar calendar, which is why the Eastern Orthodox celebrate Easter at a different time most years than the Catholics and Protestants, who long ago moved to the Gregorian calendar.) Long before the Christians came along, the ancient peoples were celebrating the spring equinox (which corresponds to Easter) and the winter equinox (which corresponds to Christmas). Over the 300+ years it took the Christians to become the official religion of the Roman Empire, the pagans were complaining that the Christians were usurping or copying their traditional celebrations to garner more followers. Edward Gibbon has chapters on this in his "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire" and Gore Vidal's "Julian," a historical novel which is largely a reprise of the chapters in Gibbon's great work dealing with the grandson of Constantine the Great who briefly ruled as Emperor in the 4th century A.D., describes in detail how the Christians were aping the rituals and traditions of the pagan religions they were replacing. The problem with determining Jesus' birthday is the same as determining Rhett Butler's birthday. Unlike real persons, fictional characters can have whatever birthday and date of death the author chooses. BTW what year was Jesus born and what year did he die? We know with certainty which year Alexander the Great was born and which year he died, down to the day, and he lived more than 300 years before Jesus. If the calendar was changed to mark the birth of Jesus (A.D. and B.C.), how come later scholars were able to determine that Herod the Great actually died in 4 B.C.? According to the Gospels, Herod was living when Jesus was born. Strange, isn't it? Anyway, a Merry Christmas to you.
    , @Josh
    It's not really a birthday per se, it's a feast day. Merry Christmas, Steve! May the peace of Christ be upon you.
    , @ziel
    I've seen the theory that theologians believed that Jesus must have been conceived on the same day he died - and thus 12/25 represented that date + 9 months. Not sure if there's any validity to that, or if it was just piggybacking on other solstice celebrations.
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  2. Interesting. Another idea, staying with the original insurance scenario, would be to make the immigrant’s home country the obligor (or, in the cases of failed states, the UN). Then the insurer would have someone to recover from, and countries would have an incentive to police their emigrants.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    That's like expecting Mexico to build the wall. Of course, we could always enforce it with an embargo on their exports.
    , @tbraton
    "(or, in the cases of failed states, the UN). "

    Uh, doesn't the U.S. pick up a substantial portion of the U.N.'s bill?
    , @24AheadDotCom
    I'm sure everyone could fantasize all day long about things that are never going to happen.

    Alternatively, everyone can decide to do real work in order to achieve goals. An insurance-related argument I use is to ask the other side what they'll give up if they're wrong. Will they forfeit their money and their freedom? If - like those who polluted current hotspots decades ago - they aren't available anymore, can that be applied to their descendants? Get all Derb on them.

    I just tried that with Yglesias: my tweet.

    I'm sure everyone here can do better, so please choose someone like MattY, tweet them, and post that here.
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  3. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    http://thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box/gop-primaries/264175-george-will-trump-nomination-would-destroy-gop

    As I read that, I have a mental image in my head.

    I see GOP as a big old dying tree. Most branches are barren of leaves. It’s been axed from all sides by Neocons, religious right dummies, globalist free traders, cuckservatives, crunchy cons, libertarian amoralists, and etc. There are huge chunks missing from the side. Few remaining fruits are picked just for the elites. It is about to fall over.

    Then, Trump comes along and picks up an ax…

    and everyone says HE is the one who destroyed the GOP.

    Or imagine a dead man in a coffin nailed shut… but there’s one remaining nail. Trump picks it up and he is blamed for the death of the man.

    Trump is no hero, and he may indeed bring about the implosion of the GOP, but the reason why so many have flocked to him is because GOP elites and politicians have been such wusses who never did anything to stop the globo agenda.

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    • Agree: Hail
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Like I said to Grover Norquist on Twitter today;
    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/680160454212239360
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  4. Merry Christmas, Steve, and God bless. You have done more to shape my mind and see the world through a logical lense, and for that I am grateful. If raising IQ is possible, you did more than any teacher.

    Funds are low now my friend but when times are better, God willing, I will make a handsome and deserved, donation.

    Have a blessed Christmas and New Year, you’ve earned it…

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    • Agree: Kylie
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  5. Like isteve is any sort of a typical forum …

    In the immortal words of Krusty the Klown, “Have a Merry Christmas, A Happy Hannukah, A reverant Ramadan, a kwaaaaaazy Kwanza, and a tip-top Tet. [aside] Oy, that gets longer and longer every year…”

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    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    Unless that's from a DVD extra you got that completely wrong, the real/original version was a subtle dig at how everything BUT Islam is fair game, and many years ahead of schedule.

    "Have a Merry Christmas, a happy Hannukah, a *kwazy* Kwanzaa, a tip-top Tet, and a solemn and dignified Ramadan."
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  6. @Dave Pinsen
    Interesting. Another idea, staying with the original insurance scenario, would be to make the immigrant's home country the obligor (or, in the cases of failed states, the UN). Then the insurer would have someone to recover from, and countries would have an incentive to police their emigrants.

    That’s like expecting Mexico to build the wall. Of course, we could always enforce it with an embargo on their exports.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Or a tax on remittances to Mexico.
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  7. Trump was in Home Alone 2.

    Read More
    • Replies: @tbraton
    Having a movie star as President is unthinkable.
    , @Jefferson
    "Trump was in Home Alone 2."

    Donald J. Trump was also in the The Little Rascals.
    , @reiner Tor
    In Hungary for the last 15 or 20 years at least one major tv channel shows Home Alone at Christmas. Is it similar in other countries?
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  8. @Reg Cæsar
    That's like expecting Mexico to build the wall. Of course, we could always enforce it with an embargo on their exports.

    Or a tax on remittances to Mexico.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    A tax on Taco Bell.
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  9. @Anon
    http://thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box/gop-primaries/264175-george-will-trump-nomination-would-destroy-gop

    As I read that, I have a mental image in my head.

    I see GOP as a big old dying tree. Most branches are barren of leaves. It's been axed from all sides by Neocons, religious right dummies, globalist free traders, cuckservatives, crunchy cons, libertarian amoralists, and etc. There are huge chunks missing from the side. Few remaining fruits are picked just for the elites. It is about to fall over.

    Then, Trump comes along and picks up an ax...

    and everyone says HE is the one who destroyed the GOP.

    Or imagine a dead man in a coffin nailed shut... but there's one remaining nail. Trump picks it up and he is blamed for the death of the man.

    Trump is no hero, and he may indeed bring about the implosion of the GOP, but the reason why so many have flocked to him is because GOP elites and politicians have been such wusses who never did anything to stop the globo agenda.

    Like I said to Grover Norquist on Twitter today;

    Read More
    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    @GroverNorquist The GOP brand is dead already. If Trump declared a new party tomorrow, he'd take half of us with him.

    Mr. Sailer, THAT is the best Christmas present I I have ever received. To the extent that you have helped bring it about-and I believe that it is a definite one- thank you.
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  10. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    One reason there are many Syrian emigrants right now is that they are fleeing massive American bombing. The Washington Post reported that the US has dropped more bombs (22,478) on Syria this year than the past five years in Afghanistan. This is all part of a failed four-year American attempt to overthrow the government of Syria.

    Since the American people refuse to rein in such behavior by its leadership, and many of them condone or support such behavior, then obviously they’re liable for producing these emigrants, millions of whom are fleeing to neighboring countries and Europe.

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    • Replies: @bomag
    Since the American people refuse to rein in such behavior by its leadership, and many of them condone or support such behavior, then obviously they’re liable for producing these emigrants, millions of whom are fleeing to neighboring countries and Europe.

    So... immigration is collective punishment. Good to know. I'll see what I can do to rein in the bad behavior by our leaders.

    We usually bomb at the behest of some group inside Syria. What should be their punishment? Maybe they should suffer some kind of immigrant dispossession.
    , @ben tillman

    One reason there are many Syrian emigrants right now is that they are fleeing massive American bombing. The Washington Post reported that the US has dropped more bombs (22,478) on Syria this year than the past five years in Afghanistan. This is all part of a failed four-year American attempt to overthrow the government of Syria.

    Since the American people refuse to rein in such behavior by its leadership, and many of them condone or support such behavior, then obviously they’re liable for producing these emigrants, millions of whom are fleeing to neighboring countries and Europe.
     
    1. The American people can't rein in its rulers.
    2. Any support for aggression among Americans is due to lies told to them by their rulers.
    3. Your argument that the American people is somehow responsible for the plight of Syrians fails.
    , @Big Bill

    Since the American people refuse to rein in such behavior by its leadership
     
    Dude, show me the reins. I'll be glad to take over.
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  11. One of my goals is to get the concept of liability for immigration on the table in the first place. Cigarette companies, for instance, always admitted they would be liable if, say, a cigarette exploded and burned your eyebrows off.

    That’s a great idea, but we also need to attach liability to judges, politicians and parole boards. These people can make policies or hand down rulings that will result in the deaths of citizens on a routine basis, but never face any consequences, except that politicians may not get elected again.

    Merry Christmas, all.

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  12. I’m afraid that if this idea ever gets off the ground, the gov and the media will work harder than ever to cover up perps’ identities and motivations.

    Case in point, remember that incident at UC Merced a couple months ago? Every time I check back, it gets more interesting:

    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/12/09/with-spotlight-on-san-bernardino-yet-more-questions-about-college-knife-attack.html

    Anyway, you have yourself a merry ניטעל and a happy Rosh Hashanah!

    Read More
    • Replies: @fredyetagain aka superhonky
    Christ our Savior is born! Merry Christmas!
    , @Karl
    >> have yourself a merry ניטעל

    That is not an actual Hebrew word.


    The word used by Hebrew-speaking Israeli Christians (there's plenty) for "Christmas" is :


    חג המולד

    khag ha-moh-lahd

    "holiday of the birth"




    You can write a check to:

    Christian Empowerment Council
    16 Gilboa Street
    17682 Upper Nazareth
    Israel
    , @sabril
    Presumably "terrorism" depends on the motivations of the attacker. But even in the situation of an attack by a known terrorist organization with a clear political agenda, I would guess that a lot of the time, politics are more of an excuse than an actual reason. Is it so strange to think that some people engage in brutal acts against defenseless people because they enjoy getting attention and/or they think it will improve their status in some way?

    Let's call this the "performance art" hypothesis.
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  13. Merry Christmas Steve.

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  14. Every citizen is given an annual immigration allotment, say 1,000th of one immigrant. Citizens can pool their allotments to bring in an immigrant and here’s the important part, they’re jointly and severally responsible for the good conduct and any damages caused by the immigrants and the next generation.

    Having 1,000 people jointly and severally on the hook gives lawyers many targets to pillage.

    And on that note, Merry Christmas.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AnAnon
    that'd also reduce immigration to merely double the replacement rate rather than 10-20x it.
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  15. Best wishes, Steve and family, for Christmas and the New Year. Keep up the quirky (that’s a compliment) and provocative writing. When you go for long yardage and hit–as with the Enrique Marquez photo–you really hit.

    I was a minor political operative for both major parties back in the 1980s. I’ve voted Libertarian since. I’m pretty much convinced only a new constitutional convention that tries to explicitly recognize the influence of the media, economic corporations (including non-profits), the bureaucracies, etc., can give us a chance at dealing with problems that are intractable under the current system. (E. g., entitlements, immigration, executive usurpation (such as war-making), etc.)

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  16. This idea does not sound very palatable to me. Sounds like a lot of rules and financial devices that clever people can spin to profit. Also its very dehumanizing.

    Admitting an immigrant is having someone join the American family. Immigrants should only be admitted in small numbers and after very careful vetting. The criteria should be based on how they benefit US society. That way we don’t have to worry about immigrants’ behavior once they are admitted.

    As Derbyshire says, “maximum security at the borders and maximum liberty within the borders.”

    Read More
    • Agree: Travis
    • Replies: @International Jew

    Also its very dehumanizing.

    Admitting an immigrant is having someone join the American family.
     
    That's my reaction too. Either genuinely welcome someone in, or keep him out altogether. But don't bring him in on a leash.

    Come to think of it, bringing people in as slaves -- someone's property for which he's fully responsible -- is the ultimate way to privatize immigration risk!
    , @Anonym
    The other risk that this would bring is to create another huge corporate sector that gains from the level of immigration. In fact, it would owe its very existence to immigration. That means yet more pressure for the zeroth amendment and the US as "nation of immigrants", world without end, amen.

    Be careful what you wish for.

    You may counter that although the level of immigration would increase or stay similar, at least the immigrants would be safer. My guess is that you'd end up with those most able to afford the premiums and arrange loopholes to suit their own ethnic character. So the USA would become a Chinese colony.
    , @Corvinus
    "Immigrants should only be admitted in small numbers and after very careful vetting. The criteria should be based on how they benefit US society. That way we don’t have to worry about immigrants’ behavior once they are admitted."

    We already have this process in place. Don't you pay attention?
    , @Henry Bowman
    Also its very dehumanizing.

    Life is dehumanizing, and so is mass immigration/replacement/invasions. I give not a damn if some people find self defense very dehumanizing.
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  17. @anony-mouse
    Always wondered why Christians never tried to figure out a more accurate estimate for Jesus' birth than the beginning of winter.

    Easter's different.

    Nobody recorder his birth, so any method of “figuring it out” is little more than a wild guess.

    It was fixed at December 25 because of the Israelite tradition that prophets died on the same day of the year that they had been conceived. Count off 9 months from Passover, and you get December 25.

    Read More
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  18. @anony-mouse
    Always wondered why Christians never tried to figure out a more accurate estimate for Jesus' birth than the beginning of winter.

    Easter's different.

    You people* always have to get the needle in, don’t you? That’s why we love you so very much. Never change. If you ever stopped the overt and snide hostility you wouldn’t be you people anymore, would you? It’s what defines you.

    To at least partly answer your question, Wikipedia on birthdays:

    The Romans enthusiastically celebrated birthdays with hedonistic parties and generous presents.
    [....]
    Origen in his commentary “On Levites” writes that Christians should not only refrain from celebrating their birthdays, but should look on them with disgust.

    Orthodox Christianity still prefers the celebration of name days only.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birthday#In_cultures_and_religions

    The Church Fathers knew when shepherds were out with their flocks and all the rest and so were not ignorant of the documentary evidence. They likely wanted to separate the celebration of the birth of the Son of God with a pagan, astrological interest in his birth date.

    * Yes, I said “you people”. Merry Christmas anyway.

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  19. @anony-mouse
    Always wondered why Christians never tried to figure out a more accurate estimate for Jesus' birth than the beginning of winter.

    Easter's different.

    “Always wondered why Christians never tried to figure out a more accurate estimate for Jesus’ birth than the beginning of winter.

    Easter’s different.”

    Well, for one thing, the four Gospels say nothing about the time of year he was born. (Easter is different since, according to the Gospels, the crucifixion of Jesus occurred after Passover, which is a “moveable feast,” changing from year to year, based on the lunar calendar, which is why the Eastern Orthodox celebrate Easter at a different time most years than the Catholics and Protestants, who long ago moved to the Gregorian calendar.) Long before the Christians came along, the ancient peoples were celebrating the spring equinox (which corresponds to Easter) and the winter equinox (which corresponds to Christmas). Over the 300+ years it took the Christians to become the official religion of the Roman Empire, the pagans were complaining that the Christians were usurping or copying their traditional celebrations to garner more followers. Edward Gibbon has chapters on this in his “Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire” and Gore Vidal’s “Julian,” a historical novel which is largely a reprise of the chapters in Gibbon’s great work dealing with the grandson of Constantine the Great who briefly ruled as Emperor in the 4th century A.D., describes in detail how the Christians were aping the rituals and traditions of the pagan religions they were replacing. The problem with determining Jesus’ birthday is the same as determining Rhett Butler’s birthday. Unlike real persons, fictional characters can have whatever birthday and date of death the author chooses. BTW what year was Jesus born and what year did he die? We know with certainty which year Alexander the Great was born and which year he died, down to the day, and he lived more than 300 years before Jesus. If the calendar was changed to mark the birth of Jesus (A.D. and B.C.), how come later scholars were able to determine that Herod the Great actually died in 4 B.C.? According to the Gospels, Herod was living when Jesus was born. Strange, isn’t it? Anyway, a Merry Christmas to you.

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    • Replies: @Sparkling Wiggle
    What's the name and birthdate of the person who made up Jesus?
    , @Dan Kurt
    Birth Date of Jesus vs. Alexander The Great and only one is known?

    What else is to be expected?

    On one hand is a conqueror, a killer, a temporal destructor of nations and peoples who would make history still felt today. On the other hand is a commoner who was during his life of no import and was executed as a common criminal. Who of the two do you expect to have the records actually recorded?

    Dan Kurt
    , @Eric Rasmusen
    I recall hearing something about December 25 being 9 months after Passover or some other festival. Recall that only a small fraction of Christians lived in Rome, or even in Italy--- they were Eastern Empire based. Was Saturnalia celebrated in Asia Minor?
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  20. @JohnnyWalker123
    Trump was in Home Alone 2.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXE3Ku-mGrk

    Having a movie star as President is unthinkable.

    Read More
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  21. @Dave Pinsen
    Interesting. Another idea, staying with the original insurance scenario, would be to make the immigrant's home country the obligor (or, in the cases of failed states, the UN). Then the insurer would have someone to recover from, and countries would have an incentive to police their emigrants.

    “(or, in the cases of failed states, the UN). ”

    Uh, doesn’t the U.S. pick up a substantial portion of the U.N.’s bill?

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    • Replies: @Peter Lund
    22.000% of the regular budget in 2015. 35.015% for the EU -- more if you add in crypto members (Norway!), protectorates, and enclosed microstates.

    Source:
    http://www.un.org/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=ST/ADM/SER.B/910
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  22. @Dave Pinsen
    Interesting. Another idea, staying with the original insurance scenario, would be to make the immigrant's home country the obligor (or, in the cases of failed states, the UN). Then the insurer would have someone to recover from, and countries would have an incentive to police their emigrants.

    I’m sure everyone could fantasize all day long about things that are never going to happen.

    Alternatively, everyone can decide to do real work in order to achieve goals. An insurance-related argument I use is to ask the other side what they’ll give up if they’re wrong. Will they forfeit their money and their freedom? If – like those who polluted current hotspots decades ago – they aren’t available anymore, can that be applied to their descendants? Get all Derb on them.

    I just tried that with Yglesias: my tweet.

    I’m sure everyone here can do better, so please choose someone like MattY, tweet them, and post that here.

    Read More
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  23. Am a bit loaded right now so glossed over your policy paper, but thank god for your postings, they have opened my eyes to many things. Just left a holiday party, looks like the elders love Trump while the 20 somethings are fearful of being called racist. Merry Christmas Steve, and the same to your erudite commenters.

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  24. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    The original insurance idea remains key for several reasons; this catastrophe (or “cat”) bond idea is really just footnote or ornamentation to it, but one with a certain amount of appeal I’ll grant.

    To begin with, it is usually insurers, faced with risks on a mass of individual policies, who issue cat bonds for the purpose of laying off some of the correlated risks inherent in their portfolio of policies. If there is no insurer, which institution has an interest issuing the cat bonds to investors, and would bear the expense of paying back principal and interest if the immigrants behave, or retaining the principal if they don’t? The government? If there aren’t retail policies earning premiums, how does the bond issuer get income to support investment returns? If there aren’t claims against policies, to what use is the retained principal put if a trigger event occurs? Haven’t we already taken it as a given that the government just isn’t going to do a good job assessing immigration risk, which is why we need to bring in private institutions and litigants? Without underlying insurance policies, cat bonds don’t serve any particular purpose. When an underlying insurance market exists, cat bonds sometimes make sense as a way for an insurer to obtain reinsurance on the capital markets, as opposed to strictly through the institutional reinsurers and retrocessionaires, but cat bonds don’t really make sense in the absence of some kind of underlying exposure.

    I admit, I do like the notion of publicly hoisting people by their own petards — forcing an amnesty advocate to put his money where his mouth is, requiring him invest his life savings in cat bonds issued by an insurer facing risks on a hundred thousand Syrian “refugees” — that would be a vintage Kodak moment.

    The other subtle point is that cat bonds are most suitable for highly correlated, large, but infrequent risks — the kinds of concentrations that keep insurers (and their regulators) up at night. For example, car crashes are relatively small and fairly uncorrelated — plenty happen in a big city over the course of a year, but they all tend to happen in their own time for their own reasons. No one event brings about a devastating wave of car wrecks and losses (a good winter storm can bring about a brief spike, but relative to the number of wrecks in a year it won’t be significant), and year-to-year the numbers don’t change much. You don’t see cat bonds for car insurance risks. But windstorm losses can be very concentrated and correlated. Years can go by with few claims out of the East and Gulf Coasts. Then one day Hurricane Andrew or Katrina or Sandy rolls ashore and the industry is faced with tens of billions worth of insured losses in a day. Or years go by without major earthquake claims in California, but then one day Northridge happens. So you see cat bonds for earthquakes and windstorms.

    All that being said, it would be interesting to see what types of cat bonds would or would not get issued in immigration insurance, and how they were priced on the capital markets. An insurer covering a large cohort of Syrian “refugees” — maybe that company issues a cat bond against terrorism risk and the next 9/11. Another carrier covering mainly Latin American agricultural workers — they don’t bother, because they’re mainly faced with small, uncorrelated traffic and petty-crime risks. Pricing information on individual policies is not always very transparent, but a cat bond quoted over the Bloomberg terminal would say a lot about human nature.

    Finally, the tort litigation angle is brilliant and should not be underrated. Abstruse triggers on abstract financial instruments don’t make headlines. But had there been a million dollar liability policy on Francisco Sanchez, the illegal Mexican immigrant who shot Kathryn Steinle on a tourist pier in San Francisco, you’d get a whole extra layer of drama and headlines and attention. And I see your additional point — Steinle already made the papers. Having million dollar policies all over the place would encourage tort lawyers to dig up cases we’d never otherwise hear of, which has a huge value of its own.

    I’m all for this insurance idea.

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  25. I think the focus should be on cutting off immigration completely or dramatically cutting back on the numbers we admit each year. The problem I have with the insurance proposal or any similar proposal is the propensity of the Democrats in Congress to seize on good sound Republican ideas and turn them into gold plated entitlements. That’s what happened to the sound, modest Republican plan back in the late 80′s to provide “catastrophic coverage” to Medicare recipients. By the time the Democrats finished adding their extensive little options, the plan’s cost had been dramatically increased, and the old folks rebelled. The chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, Dan Rostenkowski of Chicago, was trapped in his limo by a mob of enraged octogenarians protesting the outrage. The old folks didn’t mind the added coverage. They just didn’t like the idea they were going to pay for it. Somebody else should pay for it. Obamacare was based on an idea originated by Republicans, and look what it turned into. What I fear happening is that the Democrats in Congress (they are eventually going to come back) will seize on the insurance proposal and twist it into an entitlement that gives each immigrant an extra thousand dollars a year to ease their transition into American life. So that, instead of saving American taxpayers money, the plan will cost them more and do noting to stem the flood of immigrants.

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  26. Merry Christmas.

    I like the insurance idea better. As you explained very well, the whole litigation-to-get-your-settlement is a feature of the insurance plan. I can easily imagine fancy lawyers spoon feeding the heart-wrenching human interest stories of nice white people getting fucked over by ungrateful mestizos to slack-jawed J-school graduates.

    Besides, the bond idea doesn’t make sense. The underlying of such a derivative is “immigrant behavior” or “immigrant success”. Such a notion doesn’t have a quantifiable yield.

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  27. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!!

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  28. @International Jew
    I'm afraid that if this idea ever gets off the ground, the gov and the media will work harder than ever to cover up perps' identities and motivations.

    Case in point, remember that incident at UC Merced a couple months ago? Every time I check back, it gets more interesting:
    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/12/09/with-spotlight-on-san-bernardino-yet-more-questions-about-college-knife-attack.html

    Anyway, you have yourself a merry ניטעל and a happy Rosh Hashanah!

    Christ our Savior is born! Merry Christmas!

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  29. @anony-mouse
    Always wondered why Christians never tried to figure out a more accurate estimate for Jesus' birth than the beginning of winter.

    Easter's different.

    It’s not really a birthday per se, it’s a feast day. Merry Christmas, Steve! May the peace of Christ be upon you.

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  30. Merry Christmas Steve. I like the way that guy thinks but again the problem is not that we can’t invent a solution, it’s that nobody who matters thinks there is a problem

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  31. MERRY CHRISTMAS!

    May the grace and peace of the Christ Child be yours now, and…

    …ever.

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  32. As long as you are being technical: I think the cig cos always won on assumption of the risk. Smokers knew it was harmful and they freely used the product. Particularly after the boxed health warnings, there was no chance of winning. I think a few plaintiff victories were argued: plaintiff started before the dangers were known and then because it was addictive he could not stop after he knew the dangers. But of course the risk of that was vanishing as all smokers could see the warnings when they started smoking other than the oldest few.

    Cigarette cos really were close to printing money. Look at a 20 year chart of Phillip Morris (MO) it went from 44 cents a share in 1982 to $88.42 in 2007 while paying a hefty yield in dividends. About as good as Apple.

    From the Wikipedia article quoting a critic:

    For 40 years, tobacco companies had not been held liable for cigarette-related illnesses. Then, beginning in 1994, led by Florida, states across the country sued big tobacco to recover public outlays for medical expenses due to smoking. By changing the law to guarantee they would win in court, the states extorted a quarter-trillion-dollar settlement, which was passed along in higher cigarette prices. Basically, the tobacco companies had money; the states and their hired-gun attorneys wanted money; so the companies paid and the states collected. Then sick smokers got stuck with the bill

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    • Replies: @ben tillman

    For 40 years, tobacco companies had not been held liable for cigarette-related illnesses. Then, beginning in 1994, led by Florida, states across the country sued big tobacco to recover public outlays for medical expenses due to smoking. By changing the law to guarantee they would win in court, the states extorted a quarter-trillion-dollar settlement, which was passed along in higher cigarette prices. Basically, the tobacco companies had money; the states and their hired-gun attorneys wanted money; so the companies paid and the states collected. Then sick smokers got stuck with the bill.
     
    And then the states and big tobacco colluded to exclude new (non-settling) low-cost manufacturers from the marketplace.

    And the settlement was, as you suggest, a complete scam. It's blackletter law that a "volunteer" has no right of subrogation, and the states were volunteers since they had no duty to pay anyone's medical expenses. The settlements were in the nature of treaties negotiated between the states and the tobacco companies, and the job should have been done by secretaries of state or attorneys general. It's obscene that a bunch of lawyers received billions of dollars simply for being well-connected.

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  33. Read More
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  34. This seems too elaborate and centralized.

    How about the Swiss system: leave naturalization up to the municipal parliament, or in some cases, a local popular vote. Devolve decision making over immigration, as much as possible, to the local citizens affected by it.

    Much of the extraordinary political friction over immigration comes from stakeholder disenfranchisement – the inability of citizens to influence decision making that directly impacts their neighborhoods. Immigration outcomes are felt, correctly, to reflect a democratic deficit. The effects of immigration take place in neighborhoods and municipalities, but the Feds/central government gets to regulate it. Maybe they shouldn’t.

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    • Replies: @Thea
    There are a lot of things the federal government should not regulate yet they do.

    When the voters detected Ron Paul they showed themselves to be OK with it.
    , @reiner Tor
    There are cheating communities that grant citizenship to all applicants for a hefty fee. Because once citizenship is granted, there's nothing to prevent naturalized citizens from moving elsewhere, this slowly eroded the whole process. Or maybe it's just the general liberal zeitgeist, I don't know. Anyway, since the 1990s the number naturalizations has exploded in Switzerland.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    This suffers from a similar problem as those proposals to import Syrians or whomever to revitalize Detroit: how do you keep them in Detroit?
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  35. @Dave Pinsen
    Or a tax on remittances to Mexico.

    A tax on Taco Bell.

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  36. “Always wondered why Christians never tried to figure out a more accurate estimate for Jesus’ birth than the beginning of winter.”

    I’ve been thinking about that.

    Jesus was probably not born on December 25th or anywhere near that. It happened to be the birthday of the Roman Emperor when the fixed the date, and it also was an attempt, as the Church liked to do, a pagan celebration around that time.

    Easter quite clearly took place during Passover. Easter is a movable feast, but in theory you could fix the date by determining the year Jesus was crucified, then looking up when Passover was that year. Its interesting that no one tried to do that, though apparently there has been a tradition of March 25th being the day. But with the Feast of the Nativity there are not clues at all as to the exact date.

    Scholars now think that the original Dark Ages scholars fixed the year that Jesus was born too late, and that he was actually born sometime around 6 BC, and crucified sometime around 30 BC. Everyone seems to agree that they killed him within three years after he started preaching, so that puts his ministry when he was in his 30s. But who knows? Maybe he was a brash young adult in his late teens or early twenties, or was an old man (for the time) and started preaching and pissing off the authorities because he figured he didn’t have much to lose at that point, which had been the case with Socrates. Mohammed did not start revealing his visions until he was past 40, and Siddhartha and Kung-fu were at least middle aged when they did most of their work.

    We do have a window of a century for when Jesus could have lived. The Gospels are clear that his birth coincided with a tax assessment covered under Octavian, who took control of the Mediterranean in 30 BC. And the second Temple, which plays a prominent part in the story, was destroyed in 70 AD (I might be a couple of years off). But if Christians were active enough in Rome under Nero for him to start persecuting them, Jesus probably lived towards the earlier half of this period. Tiberius ran a proto-Stalinist style government, especially during his later years, so dating the crucifixion as allowed by an insecure procurator to that time is reasonable.

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    • Replies: @tbraton
    "Scholars now think that the original Dark Ages scholars fixed the year that Jesus was born too late, and that he was actually born sometime around 6 BC, and crucified sometime around 30 BC. "

    And that inspired the plot of the movie "Back to the Future."
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  37. The insurance proposal will never work, as it could only function with inherent discrimination partially based on ethnicity. All courts would strike it down.
    What would work is a refundable bond for guest workers, including HB1. The money is held in escrow until such time that the worker departs the country -within the allotted time of his temporary visa – and it is then refunded to the employer that paid it. Make it a meaningful, say, five-figure sum per employee, and watch the agriculture sector and Silicon Valley magically discover the virtue of American workers.

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  38. @anony-mouse
    Always wondered why Christians never tried to figure out a more accurate estimate for Jesus' birth than the beginning of winter.

    Easter's different.

    I’ve seen the theory that theologians believed that Jesus must have been conceived on the same day he died – and thus 12/25 represented that date + 9 months. Not sure if there’s any validity to that, or if it was just piggybacking on other solstice celebrations.

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    • Replies: @Eric Rasmusen
    Here's an excellent article on the dating of Christmas. It's by a professor at Yale, but is written so we all can read it easily. He seems to favor the Passover-connection theory. He lays out all the data--- the ancient scholars who said what when. See http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org/daily/biblical-topics/new-testament/how-december-25-became-christmas/
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  39. @Dave Pinsen
    Like I said to Grover Norquist on Twitter today;
    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/680160454212239360

    @GroverNorquist The GOP brand is dead already. If Trump declared a new party tomorrow, he’d take half of us with him.

    Mr. Sailer, THAT is the best Christmas present I I have ever received. To the extent that you have helped bring it about-and I believe that it is a definite one- thank you.

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  40. From vaguely in my youth, I remember reading that the birth of Christ is the birth of light and right around the 21st,22nd,23rd is the solstice, the shortest day of the year. St. Paul wrote to use the pagan’s symbols against them, make their holy days your holy days, twist the pagan ideas to your cause (proto Alinsky? Democrat?). When I read this a long time ago, I suspected that Marx got his ideas to instill communism from St. Paul. Paulie seemed to know how to make his ideas stick.

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    • Replies: @young_american
    Saul of Tarsus was a clever fellow. His descendants who control your culture today share that quality.
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  41. Watch the Christmas film Krumpus. It is the rare time you hear German being spoken in a Hollywood film that has nothing to do with the Holocaust/World War 2.

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  42. In that Grinchly spirit, same to you.

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  43. I like “the lawyer’s nose in the Camel’s tent”.

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  44. “A Republican elected official who votes for a tax hike is like a rat head in a Coke bottle. He damages GOP brand for all other Republicans.”

    Most middle class Republican voters in flyover country do not give a damn about a tax hike on billionaires. They do not lose sleep at night over it. Grover Norquist is extremely out of touch with Republican voters. Most Republican voters pledge no loyalty to Wall Street. What has Wall Street done for them lately?

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    This is another example of Beltway Republicans pushing policy ideas that made sense in 1980 but don't today. In 1980, federal income taxes were high enough on the middle class that tax cutting was broadly popular. Now (thanks in large part to W.), the federal income tax is so progressive that it's not an issue for most voters. So there's no constituency for tax cuts now. Income taxes will have to go up on the left half of the income distribution before the GOP can run with this issue again.
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  45. Merry Christmas Steve, God bless you and your family. Thank you for your great blog, and all your hard work.

    God bless all your great commentators too. The diverse viewpoints reflected by their comments and posted on your blog are a pleasure to read.

    God bless Mr. Unz too for hosting you and other controversial writers.

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  46. Gavin McInnes busts out his Canadian accent when talking about celebrating Christmas in Canada. He says “Surry”, “Aboot, and “Eh”.

    http://www.therebel.media/hoser_s_guide_to_surviving_christmas_with_your_family

    I hope an African American never tries to imitate how White Canadians speak, because that would be considered racist cultural appropriation/racist microaggression.

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  47. @TangoMan
    Every citizen is given an annual immigration allotment, say 1,000th of one immigrant. Citizens can pool their allotments to bring in an immigrant and here's the important part, they're jointly and severally responsible for the good conduct and any damages caused by the immigrants and the next generation.

    Having 1,000 people jointly and severally on the hook gives lawyers many targets to pillage.

    And on that note, Merry Christmas.

    that’d also reduce immigration to merely double the replacement rate rather than 10-20x it.

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  48. @The Only Catholic Unionist
    Like isteve is any sort of a typical forum ...

    In the immortal words of Krusty the Klown, "Have a Merry Christmas, A Happy Hannukah, A reverant Ramadan, a kwaaaaaazy Kwanza, and a tip-top Tet. [aside] Oy, that gets longer and longer every year..."

    Unless that’s from a DVD extra you got that completely wrong, the real/original version was a subtle dig at how everything BUT Islam is fair game, and many years ahead of schedule.

    “Have a Merry Christmas, a happy Hannukah, a *kwazy* Kwanzaa, a tip-top Tet, and a solemn and dignified Ramadan.”

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    • Replies: @The Only Catholic Unionist
    Like I said, atypical forum ... Great, I've been misquoting it all these years, app.

    All I know is, when Maggie gets scanned at the grocery store, the display says "NRA4EVER"
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  49. @JohnnyWalker123
    Trump was in Home Alone 2.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXE3Ku-mGrk

    “Trump was in Home Alone 2.”

    Donald J. Trump was also in the The Little Rascals.

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  50. @tbraton
    "Always wondered why Christians never tried to figure out a more accurate estimate for Jesus’ birth than the beginning of winter.

    Easter’s different."

    Well, for one thing, the four Gospels say nothing about the time of year he was born. (Easter is different since, according to the Gospels, the crucifixion of Jesus occurred after Passover, which is a "moveable feast," changing from year to year, based on the lunar calendar, which is why the Eastern Orthodox celebrate Easter at a different time most years than the Catholics and Protestants, who long ago moved to the Gregorian calendar.) Long before the Christians came along, the ancient peoples were celebrating the spring equinox (which corresponds to Easter) and the winter equinox (which corresponds to Christmas). Over the 300+ years it took the Christians to become the official religion of the Roman Empire, the pagans were complaining that the Christians were usurping or copying their traditional celebrations to garner more followers. Edward Gibbon has chapters on this in his "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire" and Gore Vidal's "Julian," a historical novel which is largely a reprise of the chapters in Gibbon's great work dealing with the grandson of Constantine the Great who briefly ruled as Emperor in the 4th century A.D., describes in detail how the Christians were aping the rituals and traditions of the pagan religions they were replacing. The problem with determining Jesus' birthday is the same as determining Rhett Butler's birthday. Unlike real persons, fictional characters can have whatever birthday and date of death the author chooses. BTW what year was Jesus born and what year did he die? We know with certainty which year Alexander the Great was born and which year he died, down to the day, and he lived more than 300 years before Jesus. If the calendar was changed to mark the birth of Jesus (A.D. and B.C.), how come later scholars were able to determine that Herod the Great actually died in 4 B.C.? According to the Gospels, Herod was living when Jesus was born. Strange, isn't it? Anyway, a Merry Christmas to you.

    What’s the name and birthdate of the person who made up Jesus?

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  51. @Jefferson
    "A Republican elected official who votes for a tax hike is like a rat head in a Coke bottle. He damages GOP brand for all other Republicans."

    Most middle class Republican voters in flyover country do not give a damn about a tax hike on billionaires. They do not lose sleep at night over it. Grover Norquist is extremely out of touch with Republican voters. Most Republican voters pledge no loyalty to Wall Street. What has Wall Street done for them lately?

    This is another example of Beltway Republicans pushing policy ideas that made sense in 1980 but don’t today. In 1980, federal income taxes were high enough on the middle class that tax cutting was broadly popular. Now (thanks in large part to W.), the federal income tax is so progressive that it’s not an issue for most voters. So there’s no constituency for tax cuts now. Income taxes will have to go up on the left half of the income distribution before the GOP can run with this issue again.

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    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "This is another example of Beltway Republicans pushing policy ideas that made sense in 1980 but don’t today. In 1980, federal income taxes were high enough on the middle class that tax cutting was broadly popular."

    For Beltway Republicans it's always 1980 and Laverne & Shirley and Happy Days are still airing on ABC, while the rubik's cube is the hottest new toy on the block. They are stuck in a time capsule.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Now (thanks in large part to W.), the federal income tax is so progressive that it’s not an issue for most voters.
     
    The big, unspoken issue with the income tax is that immigrants-- legal ones-- almost never pay any. Most probably profit from EITC, an unjustified subsidy.

    Requiring prospective immigrants to reach the tax threshold on day one here would be an effective back-door method to reduce immigration levels.

    Well, Merry Christmas, everybody. Yuul! Ciid wanaagsan iyo sanad cusub oo fiican and nyob zoo xyoo tshiab. I have to go to work now… with underpaid immigrants!
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  52. Merry Christmas Steve. Best wishes for 2016.

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  53. @International Jew
    I'm afraid that if this idea ever gets off the ground, the gov and the media will work harder than ever to cover up perps' identities and motivations.

    Case in point, remember that incident at UC Merced a couple months ago? Every time I check back, it gets more interesting:
    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/12/09/with-spotlight-on-san-bernardino-yet-more-questions-about-college-knife-attack.html

    Anyway, you have yourself a merry ניטעל and a happy Rosh Hashanah!

    >> have yourself a merry ניטעל

    That is not an actual Hebrew word.

    The word used by Hebrew-speaking Israeli Christians (there’s plenty) for “Christmas” is :

    חג המולד

    khag ha-moh-lahd

    “holiday of the birth”

    You can write a check to:

    Christian Empowerment Council
    16 Gilboa Street
    17682 Upper Nazareth
    Israel

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    • Replies: @International Jew

    That is not an actual Hebrew word.
     
    It is, nonetheless, a word. You should Google it.
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  54. @Dave Pinsen
    This is another example of Beltway Republicans pushing policy ideas that made sense in 1980 but don't today. In 1980, federal income taxes were high enough on the middle class that tax cutting was broadly popular. Now (thanks in large part to W.), the federal income tax is so progressive that it's not an issue for most voters. So there's no constituency for tax cuts now. Income taxes will have to go up on the left half of the income distribution before the GOP can run with this issue again.

    “This is another example of Beltway Republicans pushing policy ideas that made sense in 1980 but don’t today. In 1980, federal income taxes were high enough on the middle class that tax cutting was broadly popular.”

    For Beltway Republicans it’s always 1980 and Laverne & Shirley and Happy Days are still airing on ABC, while the rubik’s cube is the hottest new toy on the block. They are stuck in a time capsule.

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  55. @Ed
    "Always wondered why Christians never tried to figure out a more accurate estimate for Jesus’ birth than the beginning of winter."

    I've been thinking about that.

    Jesus was probably not born on December 25th or anywhere near that. It happened to be the birthday of the Roman Emperor when the fixed the date, and it also was an attempt, as the Church liked to do, a pagan celebration around that time.

    Easter quite clearly took place during Passover. Easter is a movable feast, but in theory you could fix the date by determining the year Jesus was crucified, then looking up when Passover was that year. Its interesting that no one tried to do that, though apparently there has been a tradition of March 25th being the day. But with the Feast of the Nativity there are not clues at all as to the exact date.

    Scholars now think that the original Dark Ages scholars fixed the year that Jesus was born too late, and that he was actually born sometime around 6 BC, and crucified sometime around 30 BC. Everyone seems to agree that they killed him within three years after he started preaching, so that puts his ministry when he was in his 30s. But who knows? Maybe he was a brash young adult in his late teens or early twenties, or was an old man (for the time) and started preaching and pissing off the authorities because he figured he didn't have much to lose at that point, which had been the case with Socrates. Mohammed did not start revealing his visions until he was past 40, and Siddhartha and Kung-fu were at least middle aged when they did most of their work.

    We do have a window of a century for when Jesus could have lived. The Gospels are clear that his birth coincided with a tax assessment covered under Octavian, who took control of the Mediterranean in 30 BC. And the second Temple, which plays a prominent part in the story, was destroyed in 70 AD (I might be a couple of years off). But if Christians were active enough in Rome under Nero for him to start persecuting them, Jesus probably lived towards the earlier half of this period. Tiberius ran a proto-Stalinist style government, especially during his later years, so dating the crucifixion as allowed by an insecure procurator to that time is reasonable.

    “Scholars now think that the original Dark Ages scholars fixed the year that Jesus was born too late, and that he was actually born sometime around 6 BC, and crucified sometime around 30 BC. ”

    And that inspired the plot of the movie “Back to the Future.”

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  56. Few immigrants and no government benefits to them whatsoever–not in cash and not in kind–for ten years, so as to discourage the parasites.

    Also, a stiff, non-refundable nightclub-like cover charge payable in full on admission–and maybe even a two-drink minimum.

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  57. My Guido cousin who lives in Long Island told me he recently purchased a used 2012 Lincoln Navigator from a Ukrainian immigrant woman. He joked that he thinks she might be a Ukrainian Jew, because after they closed the deal she wished him Happy Holidays instead of Merry Christmas, LOL. That must surely be a sign that she is not a Ukrainian Christian.

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  58. @frizzled
    This seems too elaborate and centralized.

    How about the Swiss system: leave naturalization up to the municipal parliament, or in some cases, a local popular vote. Devolve decision making over immigration, as much as possible, to the local citizens affected by it.

    Much of the extraordinary political friction over immigration comes from stakeholder disenfranchisement - the inability of citizens to influence decision making that directly impacts their neighborhoods. Immigration outcomes are felt, correctly, to reflect a democratic deficit. The effects of immigration take place in neighborhoods and municipalities, but the Feds/central government gets to regulate it. Maybe they shouldn't.

    There are a lot of things the federal government should not regulate yet they do.

    When the voters detected Ron Paul they showed themselves to be OK with it.

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  59. Merry Christmas to you and yours, Steve, and to all the other subversives frequenting iSteve!

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  60. @Anonymous
    One reason there are many Syrian emigrants right now is that they are fleeing massive American bombing. The Washington Post reported that the US has dropped more bombs (22,478) on Syria this year than the past five years in Afghanistan. This is all part of a failed four-year American attempt to overthrow the government of Syria.

    Since the American people refuse to rein in such behavior by its leadership, and many of them condone or support such behavior, then obviously they're liable for producing these emigrants, millions of whom are fleeing to neighboring countries and Europe.

    Since the American people refuse to rein in such behavior by its leadership, and many of them condone or support such behavior, then obviously they’re liable for producing these emigrants, millions of whom are fleeing to neighboring countries and Europe.

    So… immigration is collective punishment. Good to know. I’ll see what I can do to rein in the bad behavior by our leaders.

    We usually bomb at the behest of some group inside Syria. What should be their punishment? Maybe they should suffer some kind of immigrant dispossession.

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  61. “How about the Swiss system: leave naturalization up to the municipal parliament, or in some cases, a local popular vote”

    I’ve thought of that before, but I am afraid if naturalization was left to local control there would be too much inconsistency. In most of the USA naturalization rates probably would decrease, however in some areas, (California’s Central Valley, Texas border country, some white liberal enclaves) the de facto open border policy would probably remain in place or amp up.

    And Merry Christmas Steve.

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  62. @BenKenobi
    Unless that's from a DVD extra you got that completely wrong, the real/original version was a subtle dig at how everything BUT Islam is fair game, and many years ahead of schedule.

    "Have a Merry Christmas, a happy Hannukah, a *kwazy* Kwanzaa, a tip-top Tet, and a solemn and dignified Ramadan."

    Like I said, atypical forum … Great, I’ve been misquoting it all these years, app.

    All I know is, when Maggie gets scanned at the grocery store, the display says “NRA4EVER”

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  63. @frizzled
    This seems too elaborate and centralized.

    How about the Swiss system: leave naturalization up to the municipal parliament, or in some cases, a local popular vote. Devolve decision making over immigration, as much as possible, to the local citizens affected by it.

    Much of the extraordinary political friction over immigration comes from stakeholder disenfranchisement - the inability of citizens to influence decision making that directly impacts their neighborhoods. Immigration outcomes are felt, correctly, to reflect a democratic deficit. The effects of immigration take place in neighborhoods and municipalities, but the Feds/central government gets to regulate it. Maybe they shouldn't.

    There are cheating communities that grant citizenship to all applicants for a hefty fee. Because once citizenship is granted, there’s nothing to prevent naturalized citizens from moving elsewhere, this slowly eroded the whole process. Or maybe it’s just the general liberal zeitgeist, I don’t know. Anyway, since the 1990s the number naturalizations has exploded in Switzerland.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    In the same way, the vaunted Canadian "points" system has also eroded, affecting maybe one in five immigrants. The rest are "reunifications", as in the US.
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  64. @Dave Pinsen
    This is another example of Beltway Republicans pushing policy ideas that made sense in 1980 but don't today. In 1980, federal income taxes were high enough on the middle class that tax cutting was broadly popular. Now (thanks in large part to W.), the federal income tax is so progressive that it's not an issue for most voters. So there's no constituency for tax cuts now. Income taxes will have to go up on the left half of the income distribution before the GOP can run with this issue again.

    Now (thanks in large part to W.), the federal income tax is so progressive that it’s not an issue for most voters.

    The big, unspoken issue with the income tax is that immigrants– legal ones– almost never pay any. Most probably profit from EITC, an unjustified subsidy.

    Requiring prospective immigrants to reach the tax threshold on day one here would be an effective back-door method to reduce immigration levels.

    Well, Merry Christmas, everybody. Yuul! Ciid wanaagsan iyo sanad cusub oo fiican and nyob zoo xyoo tshiab. I have to go to work now… with underpaid immigrants!

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Yes, and I had a follow up comment about that I deleted. But here's the tl;dr version:

    The complex federal mishmash of taxes and grants such as the EITC obscures who is a net tax payer, which helps mass immigration advocates. If everyone realized that most unskilled immigrants are net tax consumers, public opinion would be even more opposed to it (this was a big, unspoken reason why the media jumped on Mitt over his "47%" comment).

    Years ago, Charles Murray proposed a basic income / negative income tax to replace the EITC, etc., and there's been more punditry about that recently (Finland also started a basic income experiment). One virtue of basic income is, if it were phased out at a certain income level, it would be obvious that everyone below that level was a net tax consumer, and that it made no economic sense to import more tax consumers.
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  65. @reiner Tor
    There are cheating communities that grant citizenship to all applicants for a hefty fee. Because once citizenship is granted, there's nothing to prevent naturalized citizens from moving elsewhere, this slowly eroded the whole process. Or maybe it's just the general liberal zeitgeist, I don't know. Anyway, since the 1990s the number naturalizations has exploded in Switzerland.

    In the same way, the vaunted Canadian “points” system has also eroded, affecting maybe one in five immigrants. The rest are “reunifications”, as in the US.

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  66. @tbraton
    "Always wondered why Christians never tried to figure out a more accurate estimate for Jesus’ birth than the beginning of winter.

    Easter’s different."

    Well, for one thing, the four Gospels say nothing about the time of year he was born. (Easter is different since, according to the Gospels, the crucifixion of Jesus occurred after Passover, which is a "moveable feast," changing from year to year, based on the lunar calendar, which is why the Eastern Orthodox celebrate Easter at a different time most years than the Catholics and Protestants, who long ago moved to the Gregorian calendar.) Long before the Christians came along, the ancient peoples were celebrating the spring equinox (which corresponds to Easter) and the winter equinox (which corresponds to Christmas). Over the 300+ years it took the Christians to become the official religion of the Roman Empire, the pagans were complaining that the Christians were usurping or copying their traditional celebrations to garner more followers. Edward Gibbon has chapters on this in his "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire" and Gore Vidal's "Julian," a historical novel which is largely a reprise of the chapters in Gibbon's great work dealing with the grandson of Constantine the Great who briefly ruled as Emperor in the 4th century A.D., describes in detail how the Christians were aping the rituals and traditions of the pagan religions they were replacing. The problem with determining Jesus' birthday is the same as determining Rhett Butler's birthday. Unlike real persons, fictional characters can have whatever birthday and date of death the author chooses. BTW what year was Jesus born and what year did he die? We know with certainty which year Alexander the Great was born and which year he died, down to the day, and he lived more than 300 years before Jesus. If the calendar was changed to mark the birth of Jesus (A.D. and B.C.), how come later scholars were able to determine that Herod the Great actually died in 4 B.C.? According to the Gospels, Herod was living when Jesus was born. Strange, isn't it? Anyway, a Merry Christmas to you.

    Birth Date of Jesus vs. Alexander The Great and only one is known?

    What else is to be expected?

    On one hand is a conqueror, a killer, a temporal destructor of nations and peoples who would make history still felt today. On the other hand is a commoner who was during his life of no import and was executed as a common criminal. Who of the two do you expect to have the records actually recorded?

    Dan Kurt

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    • Replies: @tbraton
    Well, the "commoner" was no ordinary commoner. After all, he reputedly brought people back from the dead, miraculously cured ill people from devastating illnesses that they had been suffering from for years, fed thousands of people on multiple occasions when they only had a handful of fish and a few loaves of bread, walked on water on occasion. You think somebody who was a contemporary would have noticed and recorded these astounding feats. After all, the Roman Empire had quite a few literate men who were recording contemporary events during the time that Jesus supposedly lived. Instead we have four accounts written anywhere from 70 to 110 A.D., a good 40 years or more after Jesus' death, and they differ considerably on the details of his life. And they weren't the first to write about Jesus. Instead Paul was the first, and he never met the man, and his writings reveal none of the dramatic facts of Jesus's life that the later written Gospels contain. Apart from Alexander the Great, there are any number of much lesser known Greeks who lived before Alexander about whom we are able to reconstruct their approximate birth dates and death dates and about whom we have some historical evidence they actually lived. The problem is that so much of the ancient written records were lost due to the passage of time or deliberate destruction by barbarian invaders, the Christian Church and later the Muslims that it is a wonder we are able to reconstruct as much as we know about the ancient peoples.
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  67. The date is September 11, 3BC.

    See: “The Star That Astonished the World” by Ernest L. Martin, (August, 1991).

    Martin had a planetarium show explaining the whole thing. He died shortly before we came to associate 9/11 with another event.

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  68. @International Jew
    I'm afraid that if this idea ever gets off the ground, the gov and the media will work harder than ever to cover up perps' identities and motivations.

    Case in point, remember that incident at UC Merced a couple months ago? Every time I check back, it gets more interesting:
    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/12/09/with-spotlight-on-san-bernardino-yet-more-questions-about-college-knife-attack.html

    Anyway, you have yourself a merry ניטעל and a happy Rosh Hashanah!

    Presumably “terrorism” depends on the motivations of the attacker. But even in the situation of an attack by a known terrorist organization with a clear political agenda, I would guess that a lot of the time, politics are more of an excuse than an actual reason. Is it so strange to think that some people engage in brutal acts against defenseless people because they enjoy getting attention and/or they think it will improve their status in some way?

    Let’s call this the “performance art” hypothesis.

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  69. “Tis [sic] the season!” is all that Larry and Sergey are willing to concede:

    https://www.google.com/

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  70. Every immigrant must have an American citizen sponsor. The sponsor is completely responsible for any action by the immigrant. The immigrant gets sent to jail for 30 years, so does the sponsor. The immigrant gets a dui, the sponsor loses their own driver’s license. Immigrant gets caught cheating on their taxes, the IRS comes after the sponsor. Immigrant gets deported, so does the sponsor. If the immigrant goes on welfare, it comes completely out of the sponsor’s pocket.

    The sponsor can only sponsor one immigrant, families must find several sponsors. The sponsor’s responsibility lasts until the immigrant becomes a citizen themselves. Only one immigrant may ever be sponsored by a citizen.

    Given the opportunity to put up or shut up, under the above program, I imagine the silence from our immigration advocates would be deafening.

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    • Replies: @Peter Lund
    Which would lead to paid off strawman sponsors from the lower classes or the old or terminally ill.
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  71. Read More
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  72. @Elites
    From vaguely in my youth, I remember reading that the birth of Christ is the birth of light and right around the 21st,22nd,23rd is the solstice, the shortest day of the year. St. Paul wrote to use the pagan's symbols against them, make their holy days your holy days, twist the pagan ideas to your cause (proto Alinsky? Democrat?). When I read this a long time ago, I suspected that Marx got his ideas to instill communism from St. Paul. Paulie seemed to know how to make his ideas stick.

    Saul of Tarsus was a clever fellow. His descendants who control your culture today share that quality.

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  73. @Jimi
    This idea does not sound very palatable to me. Sounds like a lot of rules and financial devices that clever people can spin to profit. Also its very dehumanizing.

    Admitting an immigrant is having someone join the American family. Immigrants should only be admitted in small numbers and after very careful vetting. The criteria should be based on how they benefit US society. That way we don't have to worry about immigrants' behavior once they are admitted.

    As Derbyshire says, "maximum security at the borders and maximum liberty within the borders."

    Also its very dehumanizing.

    Admitting an immigrant is having someone join the American family.

    That’s my reaction too. Either genuinely welcome someone in, or keep him out altogether. But don’t bring him in on a leash.

    Come to think of it, bringing people in as slaves — someone’s property for which he’s fully responsible — is the ultimate way to privatize immigration risk!

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    • Replies: @hosswire
    Making individuals fully responsible seems like a pretty good idea to me.

    Potential immigrants could post their particulars onto an online exchange.

    U.S. citizens could opt to sponsor these immigrants. Judging from the vehemence of my pro-immigration facebook friends they would undoubtedly be snapped up in no time, especially the Muslims.

    The downside would be that these sponsor are responsible for any costs associated with accommodating these new immigrants. There would be NO public assistance for these new arrivals. If they cannot support themselves, their sponsor must pick up the slack. Further, if these new arrivals or their offspring commit a crime, their sponsor could be sued for damages.

    For an upside, in addition to helping America "live up to our values" and welcome the vibrant diversity that "is our strength" the sponsor could negotiate with the immigrant for a piece of whatever positive gains that immigrant generates. For instance, whoever sponsors the next Elon Musk could be getting a stream of income from whatever businesses he generates.

    These sponsorships could be bought and sold, and naturally a robust market for evaluating risk & rewards of various demographic groups would develop, created by people with genuine interest in best-case scenarios for America.

    Privatized gains and losses, harnessing the power of the market to identify risk/reward, plus the opportunity for individuals to put their money where their mouths are... what's not to like?
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  74. Read More
    • Replies: @rule of 3208
    This is, or should be, obvious on its face. You have racism-call it patriotism, nativism, whatever-or you have Wordism. Wordism is loyalty to words and disagreement is treason.

    Singapore is as close to a true "fascist state" as exists anywhere in the world. Its People's Action Party which has total rule uses as its logo the lightning bolt of Sir Oswald Mosley's British Union of Fascists. It has as a principal purpose the existence of a nation-state suitable for Chinese, Malaysians, and Indians. It is economically successful, clean, safe and orderly. But no one would call it a "free country" in the usual sense of the word. Draconian punishments for trivial crimes, a great deal of regulation in everyday life, and an overwhelming sense of dissent being unwelcome are the accepted fact of life. Among Singaporeans, the general idea is that if one doesn't like how Singapore is run one should leave.
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  75. @Anonymous
    One reason there are many Syrian emigrants right now is that they are fleeing massive American bombing. The Washington Post reported that the US has dropped more bombs (22,478) on Syria this year than the past five years in Afghanistan. This is all part of a failed four-year American attempt to overthrow the government of Syria.

    Since the American people refuse to rein in such behavior by its leadership, and many of them condone or support such behavior, then obviously they're liable for producing these emigrants, millions of whom are fleeing to neighboring countries and Europe.

    One reason there are many Syrian emigrants right now is that they are fleeing massive American bombing. The Washington Post reported that the US has dropped more bombs (22,478) on Syria this year than the past five years in Afghanistan. This is all part of a failed four-year American attempt to overthrow the government of Syria.

    Since the American people refuse to rein in such behavior by its leadership, and many of them condone or support such behavior, then obviously they’re liable for producing these emigrants, millions of whom are fleeing to neighboring countries and Europe.

    1. The American people can’t rein in its rulers.
    2. Any support for aggression among Americans is due to lies told to them by their rulers.
    3. Your argument that the American people is somehow responsible for the plight of Syrians fails.

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    • Replies: @The most deplorable one
    Also, I would not be surprised if one of the goals of Russian involvement in Syria is to accelerate the flow of 'refugees' to the US ...
    , @Mike1
    The American people are not responsible for the American military dropping bombs on Syria?! Who is responsible then? Magic fairies?

    This country is still technically a democracy when people get upset about citizens of other countries getting blown to pink mist the bombing does stop.

    The reality is if you have factories building bombs they need to get used somewhere or the factories grind to a halt. I have friends who are very nice and extremely smart who trot off to work each day and work out more efficient ways to kill people. In the rest of their life they would not kill a fly and would wet themselves if someone pulled out a gun.
    , @Anonymous
    Of course they can rein in its leaders. They can vote, engage in civil disobedience, armed revolt, etc. Ignorance and moral turpitude are no excuse, and they are ultimately liable for producing these emigrants and the refugee crisis being visited upon the neighboring countries and Europe.
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  76. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @ben tillman

    One reason there are many Syrian emigrants right now is that they are fleeing massive American bombing. The Washington Post reported that the US has dropped more bombs (22,478) on Syria this year than the past five years in Afghanistan. This is all part of a failed four-year American attempt to overthrow the government of Syria.

    Since the American people refuse to rein in such behavior by its leadership, and many of them condone or support such behavior, then obviously they’re liable for producing these emigrants, millions of whom are fleeing to neighboring countries and Europe.
     
    1. The American people can't rein in its rulers.
    2. Any support for aggression among Americans is due to lies told to them by their rulers.
    3. Your argument that the American people is somehow responsible for the plight of Syrians fails.

    Also, I would not be surprised if one of the goals of Russian involvement in Syria is to accelerate the flow of ‘refugees’ to the US …

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Check out UN numbers: http://data.unhcr.org/mediterranean/download.php?id=318
    During December the % of Syrians declined to 36% whereas the % of Iraqis and Afghans rose to ~ 25% each. Thus, Russians have absolutely nothing to do with the flood.
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  77. @scrivener3
    As long as you are being technical: I think the cig cos always won on assumption of the risk. Smokers knew it was harmful and they freely used the product. Particularly after the boxed health warnings, there was no chance of winning. I think a few plaintiff victories were argued: plaintiff started before the dangers were known and then because it was addictive he could not stop after he knew the dangers. But of course the risk of that was vanishing as all smokers could see the warnings when they started smoking other than the oldest few.

    Cigarette cos really were close to printing money. Look at a 20 year chart of Phillip Morris (MO) it went from 44 cents a share in 1982 to $88.42 in 2007 while paying a hefty yield in dividends. About as good as Apple.

    From the Wikipedia article quoting a critic:


    For 40 years, tobacco companies had not been held liable for cigarette-related illnesses. Then, beginning in 1994, led by Florida, states across the country sued big tobacco to recover public outlays for medical expenses due to smoking. By changing the law to guarantee they would win in court, the states extorted a quarter-trillion-dollar settlement, which was passed along in higher cigarette prices. Basically, the tobacco companies had money; the states and their hired-gun attorneys wanted money; so the companies paid and the states collected. Then sick smokers got stuck with the bill
     

    For 40 years, tobacco companies had not been held liable for cigarette-related illnesses. Then, beginning in 1994, led by Florida, states across the country sued big tobacco to recover public outlays for medical expenses due to smoking. By changing the law to guarantee they would win in court, the states extorted a quarter-trillion-dollar settlement, which was passed along in higher cigarette prices. Basically, the tobacco companies had money; the states and their hired-gun attorneys wanted money; so the companies paid and the states collected. Then sick smokers got stuck with the bill.

    And then the states and big tobacco colluded to exclude new (non-settling) low-cost manufacturers from the marketplace.

    And the settlement was, as you suggest, a complete scam. It’s blackletter law that a “volunteer” has no right of subrogation, and the states were volunteers since they had no duty to pay anyone’s medical expenses. The settlements were in the nature of treaties negotiated between the states and the tobacco companies, and the job should have been done by secretaries of state or attorneys general. It’s obscene that a bunch of lawyers received billions of dollars simply for being well-connected.

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Moreover, smokers' healthcare costs probably aren't even much higher (if at all) than others' costs. AFAIK by far the most expensive illnesses are serious terminal illnesses like cancer. The problem is that smokers don't have a much higher incidence of cancer, they just have it earlier. (And a special type of cancer, lung cancer.) Non-smokers die, too, and they often die of cancer, too, except it happens later, and is usually a different type of cancer.

    Because smokers' lung cancer tends to happen around the end of one's productive lifespan, and governments tend to subsidize the elderly (I'm not sure about US state governments, but there's an international tendency for all types of governments to do that), and smokers pay the usually very high tobacco sales taxes, smoking tends to be a net positive for government budgets.
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  78. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:

    And we have been given another Christmas present by the Japanese:

    Declassified: US secretly told Japan that USSR downed Korean Boeing in 1983 by mistake

    Whoa. Seems even the USSR was not as evil as we were told it was.

    What else have they been lying about?

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    This goes both ways. The Soviets also claimed our mistakes were deliberate. What did Napoleon's henchman say? Never ascribe to malice what can be explained by mere stupidity?

    I landed that week at JFK during a flash flood. We pulled up to a gate next to a KAL 747, and I've always wondered if that was the one shot down. Weather history shows the flood was on the 28th. KE007 took off about 53 hours later. Could it have gotten to Seoul and back in that time?

    There were two KAL flights that day, one 15 minutes behind the other. Rep. Larry McDonald, president of the Birch Society, was on the one shot down. That raised suspicions. Sens. Jesse Helms and Steve Symms were on the second plane.
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  79. @JohnnyWalker123
    Trump was in Home Alone 2.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXE3Ku-mGrk

    In Hungary for the last 15 or 20 years at least one major tv channel shows Home Alone at Christmas. Is it similar in other countries?

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    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "In Hungary for the last 15 or 20 years at least one major tv channel shows Home Alone at Christmas. Is it similar in other countries?"

    Every year during the November to December period, several major metropolitan areas in the U.S screen the movie It's A Wonderful Life in theaters.
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  80. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:

    When self-driving vehicles become a thing, what are all those immigrant cab drivers going to do?

    Have we imported another disaffected group of people who will turn to violence because they cannot get work?

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  81. @Jimi
    This idea does not sound very palatable to me. Sounds like a lot of rules and financial devices that clever people can spin to profit. Also its very dehumanizing.

    Admitting an immigrant is having someone join the American family. Immigrants should only be admitted in small numbers and after very careful vetting. The criteria should be based on how they benefit US society. That way we don't have to worry about immigrants' behavior once they are admitted.

    As Derbyshire says, "maximum security at the borders and maximum liberty within the borders."

    The other risk that this would bring is to create another huge corporate sector that gains from the level of immigration. In fact, it would owe its very existence to immigration. That means yet more pressure for the zeroth amendment and the US as “nation of immigrants”, world without end, amen.

    Be careful what you wish for.

    You may counter that although the level of immigration would increase or stay similar, at least the immigrants would be safer. My guess is that you’d end up with those most able to afford the premiums and arrange loopholes to suit their own ethnic character. So the USA would become a Chinese colony.

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  82. @ben tillman

    For 40 years, tobacco companies had not been held liable for cigarette-related illnesses. Then, beginning in 1994, led by Florida, states across the country sued big tobacco to recover public outlays for medical expenses due to smoking. By changing the law to guarantee they would win in court, the states extorted a quarter-trillion-dollar settlement, which was passed along in higher cigarette prices. Basically, the tobacco companies had money; the states and their hired-gun attorneys wanted money; so the companies paid and the states collected. Then sick smokers got stuck with the bill.
     
    And then the states and big tobacco colluded to exclude new (non-settling) low-cost manufacturers from the marketplace.

    And the settlement was, as you suggest, a complete scam. It's blackletter law that a "volunteer" has no right of subrogation, and the states were volunteers since they had no duty to pay anyone's medical expenses. The settlements were in the nature of treaties negotiated between the states and the tobacco companies, and the job should have been done by secretaries of state or attorneys general. It's obscene that a bunch of lawyers received billions of dollars simply for being well-connected.

    Moreover, smokers’ healthcare costs probably aren’t even much higher (if at all) than others’ costs. AFAIK by far the most expensive illnesses are serious terminal illnesses like cancer. The problem is that smokers don’t have a much higher incidence of cancer, they just have it earlier. (And a special type of cancer, lung cancer.) Non-smokers die, too, and they often die of cancer, too, except it happens later, and is usually a different type of cancer.

    Because smokers’ lung cancer tends to happen around the end of one’s productive lifespan, and governments tend to subsidize the elderly (I’m not sure about US state governments, but there’s an international tendency for all types of governments to do that), and smokers pay the usually very high tobacco sales taxes, smoking tends to be a net positive for government budgets.

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    • Replies: @D. K.
    My father took early retirement from the steel mill, at age 62. He died less than five months later, thanks to decades of smoking (first cigarettes, for close to a quarter of a century, and then cigars and pipes, for the last twenty-plus years of his life). His first Social Security check arrived the day that he died. Because he had died about six hours before that month had ended, the Social Security Administration required my mother to repay the money. The government makes a fortune off of smokers, both in taxes extracted and in benefits saved.
    , @ben tillman

    Moreover, smokers’ healthcare costs probably aren’t even much higher (if at all) than others’ costs. AFAIK by far the most expensive illnesses are serious terminal illnesses like cancer. The problem is that smokers don’t have a much higher incidence of cancer, they just have it earlier.
     
    Yes, good point.
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  83. I bet my Canadian dollar, Steve Sailer not going to like a truth coming from an Afro-American anti-Israel Minister Louis Farrakhan, who in a message to Christian clerics urged them to “Dump Santa Claus and bring back Christ into their lives.”

    But as a Muslim hater, he may agree with Ben-Zion Gopstein, leader of Israeli Jew extremist Lehava party in a Christmas message has called Christianity accursed religion and Christians being blood-sucking vampires. Lehava is an anti-assimilation Jewish group that’s famous for burning churches.

    http://rehmat1.com/2015/11/30/farrakhan-down-with-santa-long-live-christ/

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  84. @reiner Tor
    Moreover, smokers' healthcare costs probably aren't even much higher (if at all) than others' costs. AFAIK by far the most expensive illnesses are serious terminal illnesses like cancer. The problem is that smokers don't have a much higher incidence of cancer, they just have it earlier. (And a special type of cancer, lung cancer.) Non-smokers die, too, and they often die of cancer, too, except it happens later, and is usually a different type of cancer.

    Because smokers' lung cancer tends to happen around the end of one's productive lifespan, and governments tend to subsidize the elderly (I'm not sure about US state governments, but there's an international tendency for all types of governments to do that), and smokers pay the usually very high tobacco sales taxes, smoking tends to be a net positive for government budgets.

    My father took early retirement from the steel mill, at age 62. He died less than five months later, thanks to decades of smoking (first cigarettes, for close to a quarter of a century, and then cigars and pipes, for the last twenty-plus years of his life). His first Social Security check arrived the day that he died. Because he had died about six hours before that month had ended, the Social Security Administration required my mother to repay the money. The government makes a fortune off of smokers, both in taxes extracted and in benefits saved.

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    • Replies: @tbraton
    "The government makes a fortune off of smokers, both in taxes extracted and in benefits saved."

    I totally agree. My father's experience differs from yours. My father started smoking when he was 16 years old and continued smoking a pack a day until the Surgeon General came out with his report, when he went cold turkey (although he kept a pack of cigarettes hidden in the dining room dresser and sneaked a smoke every month or so). That was despite the fact that he was uneducated, never finishing high school. He lived to be 83 and died of an illness not related to his smoking for nearly 50 years, as far as I know. So he collected SS and Medicare for nearly 18 years. Since he smoked in my presence, I have no problem with others smoking (my ex-wife was an occasional smoker)---I actually liked the smell of a cigarette when it was first lit), but I and my brothers never acquired the habit. I gather it's a very hard habit to give up, which made me more impressed by my father's action in going cold turkey.
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  85. @ben tillman

    One reason there are many Syrian emigrants right now is that they are fleeing massive American bombing. The Washington Post reported that the US has dropped more bombs (22,478) on Syria this year than the past five years in Afghanistan. This is all part of a failed four-year American attempt to overthrow the government of Syria.

    Since the American people refuse to rein in such behavior by its leadership, and many of them condone or support such behavior, then obviously they’re liable for producing these emigrants, millions of whom are fleeing to neighboring countries and Europe.
     
    1. The American people can't rein in its rulers.
    2. Any support for aggression among Americans is due to lies told to them by their rulers.
    3. Your argument that the American people is somehow responsible for the plight of Syrians fails.

    The American people are not responsible for the American military dropping bombs on Syria?! Who is responsible then? Magic fairies?

    This country is still technically a democracy when people get upset about citizens of other countries getting blown to pink mist the bombing does stop.

    The reality is if you have factories building bombs they need to get used somewhere or the factories grind to a halt. I have friends who are very nice and extremely smart who trot off to work each day and work out more efficient ways to kill people. In the rest of their life they would not kill a fly and would wet themselves if someone pulled out a gun.

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  86. @International Jew

    Also its very dehumanizing.

    Admitting an immigrant is having someone join the American family.
     
    That's my reaction too. Either genuinely welcome someone in, or keep him out altogether. But don't bring him in on a leash.

    Come to think of it, bringing people in as slaves -- someone's property for which he's fully responsible -- is the ultimate way to privatize immigration risk!

    Making individuals fully responsible seems like a pretty good idea to me.

    Potential immigrants could post their particulars onto an online exchange.

    U.S. citizens could opt to sponsor these immigrants. Judging from the vehemence of my pro-immigration facebook friends they would undoubtedly be snapped up in no time, especially the Muslims.

    The downside would be that these sponsor are responsible for any costs associated with accommodating these new immigrants. There would be NO public assistance for these new arrivals. If they cannot support themselves, their sponsor must pick up the slack. Further, if these new arrivals or their offspring commit a crime, their sponsor could be sued for damages.

    For an upside, in addition to helping America “live up to our values” and welcome the vibrant diversity that “is our strength” the sponsor could negotiate with the immigrant for a piece of whatever positive gains that immigrant generates. For instance, whoever sponsors the next Elon Musk could be getting a stream of income from whatever businesses he generates.

    These sponsorships could be bought and sold, and naturally a robust market for evaluating risk & rewards of various demographic groups would develop, created by people with genuine interest in best-case scenarios for America.

    Privatized gains and losses, harnessing the power of the market to identify risk/reward, plus the opportunity for individuals to put their money where their mouths are… what’s not to like?

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  87. @tbraton
    "Always wondered why Christians never tried to figure out a more accurate estimate for Jesus’ birth than the beginning of winter.

    Easter’s different."

    Well, for one thing, the four Gospels say nothing about the time of year he was born. (Easter is different since, according to the Gospels, the crucifixion of Jesus occurred after Passover, which is a "moveable feast," changing from year to year, based on the lunar calendar, which is why the Eastern Orthodox celebrate Easter at a different time most years than the Catholics and Protestants, who long ago moved to the Gregorian calendar.) Long before the Christians came along, the ancient peoples were celebrating the spring equinox (which corresponds to Easter) and the winter equinox (which corresponds to Christmas). Over the 300+ years it took the Christians to become the official religion of the Roman Empire, the pagans were complaining that the Christians were usurping or copying their traditional celebrations to garner more followers. Edward Gibbon has chapters on this in his "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire" and Gore Vidal's "Julian," a historical novel which is largely a reprise of the chapters in Gibbon's great work dealing with the grandson of Constantine the Great who briefly ruled as Emperor in the 4th century A.D., describes in detail how the Christians were aping the rituals and traditions of the pagan religions they were replacing. The problem with determining Jesus' birthday is the same as determining Rhett Butler's birthday. Unlike real persons, fictional characters can have whatever birthday and date of death the author chooses. BTW what year was Jesus born and what year did he die? We know with certainty which year Alexander the Great was born and which year he died, down to the day, and he lived more than 300 years before Jesus. If the calendar was changed to mark the birth of Jesus (A.D. and B.C.), how come later scholars were able to determine that Herod the Great actually died in 4 B.C.? According to the Gospels, Herod was living when Jesus was born. Strange, isn't it? Anyway, a Merry Christmas to you.

    I recall hearing something about December 25 being 9 months after Passover or some other festival. Recall that only a small fraction of Christians lived in Rome, or even in Italy— they were Eastern Empire based. Was Saturnalia celebrated in Asia Minor?

    Read More
    • Replies: @tbraton
    What most people don't realize is that Christianity did not emerge wholly formed like Athena from the head of Zeus but was formed by fits and starts over several hundred years. That's why we had the Arians and the Donatists and the Montanists and numerous other "heresies." And that's why Church conclaves were called every so often, like the Council of Nisaea, to iron out major issues of doctrinal dispute. In addition, there were other lesser issues like the birthday of Jesus. Some people argued that a God could not have a birthday, but others pointed to the dual nature of Christianity's God, being part God and part human. As I understand it, they were operating in the context of the times. One of the assumptions of the time was the Jewish belief that great men lived a whole number of years, not a fraction of a year, so that if Jesus was believed to have been Annunciated on March 25, which just happened to coincide with the spring equinox, it was natural to assume that he was born 9 months later on December 25, which just happened to coincide with the winter equinox, which was already celebrated by the pagans. It should be emphasized that the Gospels, which constitute the only evidence we have that Jesus even lived, are completely silent on his birthday, even as to the season of the year when he was born.
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  88. As an economist, I like talking finance on Christmas Day. The insurance idea is very good. The post suggested on wrinkle, cohorts.

    1. Here’s how cohorts could work. Immigrants are organized in cohorts of 200. They have to find a cohort willing to let them join. People who don’t know anybody will have to join a cohort of the friendless. One way to get in would be to post a money bond. The bond would be forfeited (or partially reduced) if any single member misbehaves. They would have to keep their addresses on file with a cohort leader, so there’d be some chance of keeping track of each other. If a member turns in another member, he gets bonus points, a specially large share of the bond back. (Of course, this would have to be verified for double-crossings.) If a member is especially helpful to police, same thing. After 20 years they get their bond plus interest. Or this could be privatized and they’d get back whatever rate competitive bidding results in.

    Most people wouldn’t be able to afford to post much of a bond— though I bet every one could post $2000. Remember, they have enough money to bribe people and get over here. This would be a different category. They would pay for their bond ex post. They would pay nothing initially, but after 20 years they would have to pay the bond plus interest. If nobody misbehaves, they pay nothing. If somebody does, then they pay up to their share of the bond amount. If they don’t pay, it is like not paying income tax— the government seizes your truck and garnshees your wages– or, better, yet, like student loans and not dischargeable in bankruptcy. Better yet, your assets are seized PLUS you are deported together with any children you had.

    A part of this would be that death does not discharge the debt. The heirs are liable for the parents’ bond.

    2. Another idea. FOr the impecunious cohorts, an American citizen can act as guarantor. He pays the bond, and he gets it back in 20 years. Thus, someone who likes immigration coudl invest in it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "As an economist, I like talking finance on Christmas Day. The insurance idea is very good. The post suggested on wrinkle, cohorts."

    I appreciate the Coalition Of The Right Fringe Groups contribution to yuletide cheer. No, this "idea" is a pipe dream, a fantasy for economists and lawyers. Haven't you done enough, sir, haven't you done enough?
    , @TangoMan
    Your idea is entirely immigrant-centered and seems to simply model the existing paradigm - immigration exists for the benefit of the immigrant.

    I prefer the idea I posted above - tie right to immigrate to right of citizens to INVITE and be RESPONSIBLE for particular immigrants. If a person is opposed to immigration they can act in the marketplace by not acting, thus lowering the immigration level. Secondly, my innovation is to make the sponsor group jointly and severally responsible, thus focusing the negative externalities that pro-immigration create for society back onto the sponsor group rather than entangling the no-immigration people with cost-sharing those externalities. That second policy should have a nice depressive effect on levels of immigration, there's nothing like forcing people to put skin in the game.
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  89. @reiner Tor
    In Hungary for the last 15 or 20 years at least one major tv channel shows Home Alone at Christmas. Is it similar in other countries?

    “In Hungary for the last 15 or 20 years at least one major tv channel shows Home Alone at Christmas. Is it similar in other countries?”

    Every year during the November to December period, several major metropolitan areas in the U.S screen the movie It’s A Wonderful Life in theaters.

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  90. @ziel
    I've seen the theory that theologians believed that Jesus must have been conceived on the same day he died - and thus 12/25 represented that date + 9 months. Not sure if there's any validity to that, or if it was just piggybacking on other solstice celebrations.

    Here’s an excellent article on the dating of Christmas. It’s by a professor at Yale, but is written so we all can read it easily. He seems to favor the Passover-connection theory. He lays out all the data— the ancient scholars who said what when. See http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org/daily/biblical-topics/new-testament/how-december-25-became-christmas/

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  91. @Jimi
    This idea does not sound very palatable to me. Sounds like a lot of rules and financial devices that clever people can spin to profit. Also its very dehumanizing.

    Admitting an immigrant is having someone join the American family. Immigrants should only be admitted in small numbers and after very careful vetting. The criteria should be based on how they benefit US society. That way we don't have to worry about immigrants' behavior once they are admitted.

    As Derbyshire says, "maximum security at the borders and maximum liberty within the borders."

    “Immigrants should only be admitted in small numbers and after very careful vetting. The criteria should be based on how they benefit US society. That way we don’t have to worry about immigrants’ behavior once they are admitted.”

    We already have this process in place. Don’t you pay attention?

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    • Replies: @D. K.
    You either are insane or just a bald-faced liar. We admit well over one million legal immigrants, every year, while countless thousands of illegals still stream across our borders, or overstay their visas, every year. The vast majority of our immigrants, over these past fifty years, have been low-IQ and poorly educated Third World peasants, who suck up government benefits, either directly or through their offspring.
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  92. @Eric Rasmusen
    As an economist, I like talking finance on Christmas Day. The insurance idea is very good. The post suggested on wrinkle, cohorts.

    1. Here's how cohorts could work. Immigrants are organized in cohorts of 200. They have to find a cohort willing to let them join. People who don't know anybody will have to join a cohort of the friendless. One way to get in would be to post a money bond. The bond would be forfeited (or partially reduced) if any single member misbehaves. They would have to keep their addresses on file with a cohort leader, so there'd be some chance of keeping track of each other. If a member turns in another member, he gets bonus points, a specially large share of the bond back. (Of course, this would have to be verified for double-crossings.) If a member is especially helpful to police, same thing. After 20 years they get their bond plus interest. Or this could be privatized and they'd get back whatever rate competitive bidding results in.

    Most people wouldn't be able to afford to post much of a bond--- though I bet every one could post $2000. Remember, they have enough money to bribe people and get over here. This would be a different category. They would pay for their bond ex post. They would pay nothing initially, but after 20 years they would have to pay the bond plus interest. If nobody misbehaves, they pay nothing. If somebody does, then they pay up to their share of the bond amount. If they don't pay, it is like not paying income tax--- the government seizes your truck and garnshees your wages-- or, better, yet, like student loans and not dischargeable in bankruptcy. Better yet, your assets are seized PLUS you are deported together with any children you had.

    A part of this would be that death does not discharge the debt. The heirs are liable for the parents' bond.

    2. Another idea. FOr the impecunious cohorts, an American citizen can act as guarantor. He pays the bond, and he gets it back in 20 years. Thus, someone who likes immigration coudl invest in it.

    “As an economist, I like talking finance on Christmas Day. The insurance idea is very good. The post suggested on wrinkle, cohorts.”

    I appreciate the Coalition Of The Right Fringe Groups contribution to yuletide cheer. No, this “idea” is a pipe dream, a fantasy for economists and lawyers. Haven’t you done enough, sir, haven’t you done enough?

    Read More
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  93. Asian Americans are like Orthodox Jews/Hasidic Jews and Muslims, in that they do not celebrate Christmas unless they are Catholic Filipinos who were colonized by the Spaniards who brought this yearly European tradition to The Philippines.

    The vast majority of Asian Americans who are not Filipino practice Eastern Oriental religions like Buddhism, Shinto, and Taoism for example. And these religions do believe in celebrating Christmas.

    The vast majority of people who celebrate Christmas are either Europeans or Nonwhite people who were colonized and or enslaved by Europeans.

    Either way the vast majority of people who celebrate Christmas have some kind of tie to Europe either racially, religiously, language wise, or all 3.

    Christmas would not be an extremely popular holiday in Brazil for example, if that nation had been colonized by Saudi Arabians or the Han Chinese instead of the Portuguese.

    If White people had never existed, neither would have Christmas.

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    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "If White people had never existed, neither would have Christmas."

    Jesus was Jewish. I thought Jews weren't "white people".
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  94. @D. K.
    My father took early retirement from the steel mill, at age 62. He died less than five months later, thanks to decades of smoking (first cigarettes, for close to a quarter of a century, and then cigars and pipes, for the last twenty-plus years of his life). His first Social Security check arrived the day that he died. Because he had died about six hours before that month had ended, the Social Security Administration required my mother to repay the money. The government makes a fortune off of smokers, both in taxes extracted and in benefits saved.

    “The government makes a fortune off of smokers, both in taxes extracted and in benefits saved.”

    I totally agree. My father’s experience differs from yours. My father started smoking when he was 16 years old and continued smoking a pack a day until the Surgeon General came out with his report, when he went cold turkey (although he kept a pack of cigarettes hidden in the dining room dresser and sneaked a smoke every month or so). That was despite the fact that he was uneducated, never finishing high school. He lived to be 83 and died of an illness not related to his smoking for nearly 50 years, as far as I know. So he collected SS and Medicare for nearly 18 years. Since he smoked in my presence, I have no problem with others smoking (my ex-wife was an occasional smoker)—I actually liked the smell of a cigarette when it was first lit), but I and my brothers never acquired the habit. I gather it’s a very hard habit to give up, which made me more impressed by my father’s action in going cold turkey.

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    • Replies: @D. K.
    I started smoking, at age 23, because of (a) being drunk, at the time, and (b) cognitive dissonance: the young woman that I planned to marry was a smoker; so, by smoking myself, I no longer could hold that filthy habit against her! On Leap Day 1984, a little more than a quadrennium after that first drunken smoke, and nine months after my father's death, I chain-smoked a pack of Benson & Hedges Menthol 100s, down to their filters, in fifty minutes flat-- and I have not smoked another cigarette since. (The first time that I chain-smoked an entire pack, it took me nearly three hours-- and, I literally vomitted, within about a minute of my finishing the pack!) I recall reading, many years ago, that lung cancer occurs in smokers who have a certain gene allele. Of course, cigarettes can kill you in a lot of other ways, instead. On the other hand, after seeing several of my relatives live well into their eighties, and some into their nineties, a "premature death" does not necessarily strike me as the worst fate imaginable....
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  95. Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year, Steve! Gasoline is
    $1. 60 per gallon in parts of the Midwest. That’s equivalent to
    23 cents in the 1960s, a price that was only this low during
    “Gas wars” (between gas stations), as I recall. Texas, Venezuela,
    Nigeria, and Russia must be really suffering, in fact Russia’s GDP
    is expected to contract about 3.6% this year, while the inflation
    rate is 15% and the ruble lost 48% of its value against the dollar.
    The Russian tourists have almost vanished from Europe.

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  96. The commenters on iSteve are so strange. I would love to see them all together.

    Merry Christmas to all.

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  97. @Eric Rasmusen
    As an economist, I like talking finance on Christmas Day. The insurance idea is very good. The post suggested on wrinkle, cohorts.

    1. Here's how cohorts could work. Immigrants are organized in cohorts of 200. They have to find a cohort willing to let them join. People who don't know anybody will have to join a cohort of the friendless. One way to get in would be to post a money bond. The bond would be forfeited (or partially reduced) if any single member misbehaves. They would have to keep their addresses on file with a cohort leader, so there'd be some chance of keeping track of each other. If a member turns in another member, he gets bonus points, a specially large share of the bond back. (Of course, this would have to be verified for double-crossings.) If a member is especially helpful to police, same thing. After 20 years they get their bond plus interest. Or this could be privatized and they'd get back whatever rate competitive bidding results in.

    Most people wouldn't be able to afford to post much of a bond--- though I bet every one could post $2000. Remember, they have enough money to bribe people and get over here. This would be a different category. They would pay for their bond ex post. They would pay nothing initially, but after 20 years they would have to pay the bond plus interest. If nobody misbehaves, they pay nothing. If somebody does, then they pay up to their share of the bond amount. If they don't pay, it is like not paying income tax--- the government seizes your truck and garnshees your wages-- or, better, yet, like student loans and not dischargeable in bankruptcy. Better yet, your assets are seized PLUS you are deported together with any children you had.

    A part of this would be that death does not discharge the debt. The heirs are liable for the parents' bond.

    2. Another idea. FOr the impecunious cohorts, an American citizen can act as guarantor. He pays the bond, and he gets it back in 20 years. Thus, someone who likes immigration coudl invest in it.

    Your idea is entirely immigrant-centered and seems to simply model the existing paradigm – immigration exists for the benefit of the immigrant.

    I prefer the idea I posted above – tie right to immigrate to right of citizens to INVITE and be RESPONSIBLE for particular immigrants. If a person is opposed to immigration they can act in the marketplace by not acting, thus lowering the immigration level. Secondly, my innovation is to make the sponsor group jointly and severally responsible, thus focusing the negative externalities that pro-immigration create for society back onto the sponsor group rather than entangling the no-immigration people with cost-sharing those externalities. That second policy should have a nice depressive effect on levels of immigration, there’s nothing like forcing people to put skin in the game.

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  98. Citizenship should be bought and sold.

    To become a citizen, a buyer purchases citizenship from an existing citizen. The buyer is now a citizen, but the seller has sold his citizenship, and must leave the nation.

    Buying citizenship is a big investment. The new citizen wants the price of citizenship to increase over time, so that he may eventually re-sell his citizenship at a profit.

    In order to increase the price of citizenship, citizens want government to increase the demand for citizenship.

    Government increases the demand for citizenship by increasing the standard of living of the nation.

    In addition to buying citizenship, citizens should also be required to buy insurance to pay for unexpected costs such as prison, illness or children.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    You could make citizens shareholders of the country. Have an IPO with two classes of shares: one with voting rights (A shares; every citizen gets one share. Transferable only on death or by an heir.), and one share class (B) without voting rights (can be bought by citizens or foreigners). Both share classes pay the same dividends when there's a federal budget surplus. Owners of B shares are eligible for green cards.

    Would be the biggest IPO in world history: "The business of America is business, and now America just became a business. Own a piece of it.". The US could issue 1 million B shares and set the initial price at $100k each. Immigration advocates could buy shares and give them to whomever they wanted, but the more demand, the pricier the shares would get.

    A-shareholders would immediately ban birthright citizenship to avoid dilution. Their heirs could either sell the extra A-shares they inherit, or they could keep them and have additional votes. The only way for someone to become a citizen, other than to be born to two citizen parents, would be to buy an A-share from someone who inherited it. Over time, those whose ancestors had been here longer could end up with more voting power than new immigrants/A-shareholders.
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  99. @reiner Tor
    Moreover, smokers' healthcare costs probably aren't even much higher (if at all) than others' costs. AFAIK by far the most expensive illnesses are serious terminal illnesses like cancer. The problem is that smokers don't have a much higher incidence of cancer, they just have it earlier. (And a special type of cancer, lung cancer.) Non-smokers die, too, and they often die of cancer, too, except it happens later, and is usually a different type of cancer.

    Because smokers' lung cancer tends to happen around the end of one's productive lifespan, and governments tend to subsidize the elderly (I'm not sure about US state governments, but there's an international tendency for all types of governments to do that), and smokers pay the usually very high tobacco sales taxes, smoking tends to be a net positive for government budgets.

    Moreover, smokers’ healthcare costs probably aren’t even much higher (if at all) than others’ costs. AFAIK by far the most expensive illnesses are serious terminal illnesses like cancer. The problem is that smokers don’t have a much higher incidence of cancer, they just have it earlier.

    Yes, good point.

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  100. @tbraton
    "The government makes a fortune off of smokers, both in taxes extracted and in benefits saved."

    I totally agree. My father's experience differs from yours. My father started smoking when he was 16 years old and continued smoking a pack a day until the Surgeon General came out with his report, when he went cold turkey (although he kept a pack of cigarettes hidden in the dining room dresser and sneaked a smoke every month or so). That was despite the fact that he was uneducated, never finishing high school. He lived to be 83 and died of an illness not related to his smoking for nearly 50 years, as far as I know. So he collected SS and Medicare for nearly 18 years. Since he smoked in my presence, I have no problem with others smoking (my ex-wife was an occasional smoker)---I actually liked the smell of a cigarette when it was first lit), but I and my brothers never acquired the habit. I gather it's a very hard habit to give up, which made me more impressed by my father's action in going cold turkey.

    I started smoking, at age 23, because of (a) being drunk, at the time, and (b) cognitive dissonance: the young woman that I planned to marry was a smoker; so, by smoking myself, I no longer could hold that filthy habit against her! On Leap Day 1984, a little more than a quadrennium after that first drunken smoke, and nine months after my father’s death, I chain-smoked a pack of Benson & Hedges Menthol 100s, down to their filters, in fifty minutes flat– and I have not smoked another cigarette since. (The first time that I chain-smoked an entire pack, it took me nearly three hours– and, I literally vomitted, within about a minute of my finishing the pack!) I recall reading, many years ago, that lung cancer occurs in smokers who have a certain gene allele. Of course, cigarettes can kill you in a lot of other ways, instead. On the other hand, after seeing several of my relatives live well into their eighties, and some into their nineties, a “premature death” does not necessarily strike me as the worst fate imaginable….

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  101. @Corvinus
    "Immigrants should only be admitted in small numbers and after very careful vetting. The criteria should be based on how they benefit US society. That way we don’t have to worry about immigrants’ behavior once they are admitted."

    We already have this process in place. Don't you pay attention?

    You either are insane or just a bald-faced liar. We admit well over one million legal immigrants, every year, while countless thousands of illegals still stream across our borders, or overstay their visas, every year. The vast majority of our immigrants, over these past fifty years, have been low-IQ and poorly educated Third World peasants, who suck up government benefits, either directly or through their offspring.

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    • Replies: @Corvinus
    D.K., haven't you done enough by throwing your own ancestors under the bus?

    "The vast majority of our immigrants, over these past fifty years, have been low-IQ and poorly educated Third World peasants..."

    Observably no different than immigrants who came to America in the 19th century if we are using your metrics.

    "who suck up government benefits, either directly or through their offspring."

    Read “Why Europe Leaves Home” by Kenneth Roberts. Written about 100 years ago, it is full of descriptions of “filthy”, “ignorant” and “backward” people coming to America by the millions from central and eastern Europe, i.e., the same rhetoric used to describe current immigrants.
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  102. @Eric Rasmusen
    I recall hearing something about December 25 being 9 months after Passover or some other festival. Recall that only a small fraction of Christians lived in Rome, or even in Italy--- they were Eastern Empire based. Was Saturnalia celebrated in Asia Minor?

    What most people don’t realize is that Christianity did not emerge wholly formed like Athena from the head of Zeus but was formed by fits and starts over several hundred years. That’s why we had the Arians and the Donatists and the Montanists and numerous other “heresies.” And that’s why Church conclaves were called every so often, like the Council of Nisaea, to iron out major issues of doctrinal dispute. In addition, there were other lesser issues like the birthday of Jesus. Some people argued that a God could not have a birthday, but others pointed to the dual nature of Christianity’s God, being part God and part human. As I understand it, they were operating in the context of the times. One of the assumptions of the time was the Jewish belief that great men lived a whole number of years, not a fraction of a year, so that if Jesus was believed to have been Annunciated on March 25, which just happened to coincide with the spring equinox, it was natural to assume that he was born 9 months later on December 25, which just happened to coincide with the winter equinox, which was already celebrated by the pagans. It should be emphasized that the Gospels, which constitute the only evidence we have that Jesus even lived, are completely silent on his birthday, even as to the season of the year when he was born.

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  103. @Jimi
    This idea does not sound very palatable to me. Sounds like a lot of rules and financial devices that clever people can spin to profit. Also its very dehumanizing.

    Admitting an immigrant is having someone join the American family. Immigrants should only be admitted in small numbers and after very careful vetting. The criteria should be based on how they benefit US society. That way we don't have to worry about immigrants' behavior once they are admitted.

    As Derbyshire says, "maximum security at the borders and maximum liberty within the borders."

    Also its very dehumanizing.

    Life is dehumanizing, and so is mass immigration/replacement/invasions. I give not a damn if some people find self defense very dehumanizing.

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  104. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    I would structure it as a bond rather than as insurance. Reform immigration so we have three initial immigration pathways:

    1. Unsponsored immigration: 5 year residence and work permit, bought with a $1 million cash payment to the Treasury, of which $500K goes straight to the general fund and $500K goes into a quasi-insurance pool to cover injuries due to immigrants. US government is the payor of last resort if the pool is exhausted.

    2. Sponsored immigration: must be sponsored by a US person (with a US citizen company representative agreeing to be personally jointly liable if sponsored by a company), and backed by a $50K bond, which rolls over for each year of sponsorship. Injuries caused by immigrant are his financial responsibility in the first instance, but his assets may be overseas and difficult to access. $50K bond is to cover excess liability above US recovery from the immigrant (what he voluntarily pays in response to a judgment + recovery from his US assets), and after the $50K, the sponsor is liable. I would imagine the insurance industry would develop insurance products to cover the sponsor liability portion. Possibly require a $5,000 payment to the Treasury for each year of residency with a work permit, to be put into a fund to support unemployment and retraining for US workers.

    3. Refugees: 5 year residence and work permit, backed out of the same quasi-insurance pool funded with fees from unsponsored immigrants. US government is payor of last resort if the pool is exhausted.

    I’d also keep education and training visas; you could roll these into the “sponsored immigration” column, though. Given the expense of a college education, keeping a $50K bond for 4 years of college shouldn’t be impossible, and if a college really wants a student, they can pay it out of their endowment. They get it back at the end (assuming good behaviour by the student), so it just ties up a portion of their assets for 4 years.

    Immigrants would be eligible for permanent residence after 10 years of peaceful residence in the US (two 5 year periods = $2 million, or 10-years sponsored residence). You’d get a lot of fraud in sponsorship (or people just sponsoring their kin — that’s what I would do), but by requiring the bond and making US citizen sponsors liable for the acts of their sponsorees, you can establish the necessary financial disincentives against unrestrained and irresponsible immigration. If you wanted to staff a workforce with 500 immigrants, that would require you to tie up $25 million for the bonds. And if they cause a bunch of car accidents, get into fights, etc., then you won’t get that $25 million back.

    Families and children of immigrants wouldn’t be eligible independently (although one could save up and get a US citizen to sponsor them as well, potentially, or bring children in under student visas). But they ought to have comparatively easy access to temporary visas (e.g. a 30 or 90 day stay), with liability for any injuries they cause running to the immigrant and thence to his sponsor.

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  105. Read More
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  106. @ben tillman

    One reason there are many Syrian emigrants right now is that they are fleeing massive American bombing. The Washington Post reported that the US has dropped more bombs (22,478) on Syria this year than the past five years in Afghanistan. This is all part of a failed four-year American attempt to overthrow the government of Syria.

    Since the American people refuse to rein in such behavior by its leadership, and many of them condone or support such behavior, then obviously they’re liable for producing these emigrants, millions of whom are fleeing to neighboring countries and Europe.
     
    1. The American people can't rein in its rulers.
    2. Any support for aggression among Americans is due to lies told to them by their rulers.
    3. Your argument that the American people is somehow responsible for the plight of Syrians fails.

    Of course they can rein in its leaders. They can vote, engage in civil disobedience, armed revolt, etc. Ignorance and moral turpitude are no excuse, and they are ultimately liable for producing these emigrants and the refugee crisis being visited upon the neighboring countries and Europe.

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    • Replies: @ben tillman

    Of course they can rein in its leaders. They can vote, engage in civil disobedience, armed revolt, etc. Ignorance and moral turpitude are no excuse, and they are ultimately liable for producing these emigrants and the refugee crisis being visited upon the neighboring countries and Europe.
     
    Ignorance and moral turpitude are no excuse? There is no moral turpitude on the part of Americans, and ignorance most certainly is an excuse if one is evolved to rely on others for one's information. What the hell is wrong with you?

    Possible correct answers:

    (1) I am part of a group that has a conflict of interest with Americans.
    (2) I have been indoctrinated to think that I am part of a group that has a conflict of interest with Americans.
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  107. @tbraton
    "(or, in the cases of failed states, the UN). "

    Uh, doesn't the U.S. pick up a substantial portion of the U.N.'s bill?

    22.000% of the regular budget in 2015. 35.015% for the EU — more if you add in crypto members (Norway!), protectorates, and enclosed microstates.

    Source:

    http://www.un.org/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=ST/ADM/SER.B/910

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    • Replies: @tbraton
    Thanks for looking up the actual numbers. I was going to say around 20% based on memory alone, but then I decided not to say anything because I wasn't sure if the number had changed recently.
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  108. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Something worth reading about the corrupt so called ‘social sciences.’

    “How a rebellious scientist uncovered the surprising truth about stereotypes”

    A section:

    “His fellow psychologists shifted in their seats. Jussim pointed out that the level of obfuscation the authors went to, in order to disguise their actual data, was intense. Statistical techniques appeared to have been chosen that would hide the study’s true results. And it appeared that no peer reviewers, or journal editors, took the time, or went to the effort of scrutinizing the study in a way that was sufficient to identify the bold misrepresentations.

    While the authors’ political motivations for publishing the paper were obvious, it was the lax attitude on behalf of peer reviewers – Jussim suggested – that was at the heart of the problems within social psychology. The field had become a community in which political values and moral aims were shared, leading to an asymmetry in which studies that reinforced left-wing narratives had come to be disproportionately represented in the literature. And this was not, to quote Stephen Colbert, because “reality had a liberal bias”. It was because social psychology had a liberal bias.”

    Read the whole thing at:

    http://quillette.com/2015/12/04/rebellious-scientist-surprising-truth-about-stereotypes/

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    I've been following Claire Lehmann on Twitter for a while. Really impressive how much traction she's gotten with her new site. Charles Murray tweeted a link to that article, IIRC.
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  109. @The most deplorable one
    Also, I would not be surprised if one of the goals of Russian involvement in Syria is to accelerate the flow of 'refugees' to the US ...

    Check out UN numbers: http://data.unhcr.org/mediterranean/download.php?id=318
    During December the % of Syrians declined to 36% whereas the % of Iraqis and Afghans rose to ~ 25% each. Thus, Russians have absolutely nothing to do with the flood.

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    • Replies: @The most deplorable one
    Ahhh, so it seems that the US is trying to engineer the break up of the EU.
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  110. http://2kevins.com/archives/309

    2 have-beens on Christmas movies

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  111. @Dan Kurt
    Birth Date of Jesus vs. Alexander The Great and only one is known?

    What else is to be expected?

    On one hand is a conqueror, a killer, a temporal destructor of nations and peoples who would make history still felt today. On the other hand is a commoner who was during his life of no import and was executed as a common criminal. Who of the two do you expect to have the records actually recorded?

    Dan Kurt

    Well, the “commoner” was no ordinary commoner. After all, he reputedly brought people back from the dead, miraculously cured ill people from devastating illnesses that they had been suffering from for years, fed thousands of people on multiple occasions when they only had a handful of fish and a few loaves of bread, walked on water on occasion. You think somebody who was a contemporary would have noticed and recorded these astounding feats. After all, the Roman Empire had quite a few literate men who were recording contemporary events during the time that Jesus supposedly lived. Instead we have four accounts written anywhere from 70 to 110 A.D., a good 40 years or more after Jesus’ death, and they differ considerably on the details of his life. And they weren’t the first to write about Jesus. Instead Paul was the first, and he never met the man, and his writings reveal none of the dramatic facts of Jesus’s life that the later written Gospels contain. Apart from Alexander the Great, there are any number of much lesser known Greeks who lived before Alexander about whom we are able to reconstruct their approximate birth dates and death dates and about whom we have some historical evidence they actually lived. The problem is that so much of the ancient written records were lost due to the passage of time or deliberate destruction by barbarian invaders, the Christian Church and later the Muslims that it is a wonder we are able to reconstruct as much as we know about the ancient peoples.

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    The problem is that however improbable that looks now, in the lifetime of Jesus illiterate people didn't know their exact age. This means that by the time Jesus became famous there was no way to write down the year of his birth.

    If you ask me, he was probably a cult leader in his lifetime, whose teachings and cult have changed beyond recognition by the time his life was finally written down decades later. But I'm no believer, so that's just an educated guess on my part.
    , @reiner Tor
    The problem is that however improbable that looks now, in the lifetime of Jesus illiterate people didn't know their exact age. This means that by the time Jesus became famous there was no way to write down the year of his birth.

    If you ask me, he was probably a cult leader in his lifetime, whose teachings and cult have changed beyond recognition by the time his life was finally written down decades later. But I'm no believer, so that's just an educated guess on my part.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    You think somebody who was a contemporary would have noticed and recorded these astounding feats.
     
    Gee, He escaped the notice of the Main Stream Media. Imagine that.

    And nobody thought to preserve the Imperial Enquirer and other marketplace tabletoids.
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  112. @Reg Cæsar

    Now (thanks in large part to W.), the federal income tax is so progressive that it’s not an issue for most voters.
     
    The big, unspoken issue with the income tax is that immigrants-- legal ones-- almost never pay any. Most probably profit from EITC, an unjustified subsidy.

    Requiring prospective immigrants to reach the tax threshold on day one here would be an effective back-door method to reduce immigration levels.

    Well, Merry Christmas, everybody. Yuul! Ciid wanaagsan iyo sanad cusub oo fiican and nyob zoo xyoo tshiab. I have to go to work now… with underpaid immigrants!

    Yes, and I had a follow up comment about that I deleted. But here’s the tl;dr version:

    The complex federal mishmash of taxes and grants such as the EITC obscures who is a net tax payer, which helps mass immigration advocates. If everyone realized that most unskilled immigrants are net tax consumers, public opinion would be even more opposed to it (this was a big, unspoken reason why the media jumped on Mitt over his “47%” comment).

    Years ago, Charles Murray proposed a basic income / negative income tax to replace the EITC, etc., and there’s been more punditry about that recently (Finland also started a basic income experiment). One virtue of basic income is, if it were phased out at a certain income level, it would be obvious that everyone below that level was a net tax consumer, and that it made no economic sense to import more tax consumers.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Years ago, Charles Murray proposed a basic income / negative income tax to replace the EITC, etc…
     
    Years before that, Richard Nixon and Milton Friedman did the same.
    , @ben tillman

    Years ago, Charles Murray proposed a basic income / negative income tax to replace the EITC, etc., and there’s been more punditry about that recently (Finland also started a basic income experiment). One virtue of basic income is, if it were phased out at a certain income level....
     
    Why would you phase it out? And, if it were phased out, how would it be a "basic income"?
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  113. @frizzled
    This seems too elaborate and centralized.

    How about the Swiss system: leave naturalization up to the municipal parliament, or in some cases, a local popular vote. Devolve decision making over immigration, as much as possible, to the local citizens affected by it.

    Much of the extraordinary political friction over immigration comes from stakeholder disenfranchisement - the inability of citizens to influence decision making that directly impacts their neighborhoods. Immigration outcomes are felt, correctly, to reflect a democratic deficit. The effects of immigration take place in neighborhoods and municipalities, but the Feds/central government gets to regulate it. Maybe they shouldn't.

    This suffers from a similar problem as those proposals to import Syrians or whomever to revitalize Detroit: how do you keep them in Detroit?

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    • Replies: @frizzled
    It's important to note the Swiss use this method to decide on naturalization, not on immigration. It isn't about who you let in, it's about who you allow to become a citizen after a number of years.

    In other words, only those who have put down deep roots in the area have a chance of being accepted for naturalization. And who better to judge that than their neighbors?
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  114. @Peter Lund
    22.000% of the regular budget in 2015. 35.015% for the EU -- more if you add in crypto members (Norway!), protectorates, and enclosed microstates.

    Source:
    http://www.un.org/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=ST/ADM/SER.B/910

    Thanks for looking up the actual numbers. I was going to say around 20% based on memory alone, but then I decided not to say anything because I wasn’t sure if the number had changed recently.

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  115. About IQ, how would you account for the high IQ Japanese admirals and generals and German generals in Operation Barbarossa failing so spectacularly in 1941, so the extent of forgetting everything they learned in WW1 about the limits of logistics, or even the basics of running a campaign in Russia? It seems as if they forgot everything about Napoleons’ and Charles XII’s campaign in Russia. I would estimate Guderian and von Manstein as having IQs somewhere in the 140s? And about Hitler, remember that his IQ was somewhere in the mid-140s. And how do you account for Mcnamara and his performance in Vietnam?

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    About IQ, how would you account for the high IQ Japanese admirals and generals and German generals… [etc]
     
    Ever heard of a little thing called hubris?
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  116. Remember that even if Hitler had authorized an attack on Moscow after Smolensk, Guderian was till in danger of running out of steam.

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  117. @The most deplorable one
    And we have been given another Christmas present by the Japanese:

    Declassified: US secretly told Japan that USSR downed Korean Boeing in 1983 by mistake

    Whoa. Seems even the USSR was not as evil as we were told it was.

    What else have they been lying about?

    This goes both ways. The Soviets also claimed our mistakes were deliberate. What did Napoleon’s henchman say? Never ascribe to malice what can be explained by mere stupidity?

    I landed that week at JFK during a flash flood. We pulled up to a gate next to a KAL 747, and I’ve always wondered if that was the one shot down. Weather history shows the flood was on the 28th. KE007 took off about 53 hours later. Could it have gotten to Seoul and back in that time?

    There were two KAL flights that day, one 15 minutes behind the other. Rep. Larry McDonald, president of the Birch Society, was on the one shot down. That raised suspicions. Sens. Jesse Helms and Steve Symms were on the second plane.

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  118. @Dave Pinsen
    Yes, and I had a follow up comment about that I deleted. But here's the tl;dr version:

    The complex federal mishmash of taxes and grants such as the EITC obscures who is a net tax payer, which helps mass immigration advocates. If everyone realized that most unskilled immigrants are net tax consumers, public opinion would be even more opposed to it (this was a big, unspoken reason why the media jumped on Mitt over his "47%" comment).

    Years ago, Charles Murray proposed a basic income / negative income tax to replace the EITC, etc., and there's been more punditry about that recently (Finland also started a basic income experiment). One virtue of basic income is, if it were phased out at a certain income level, it would be obvious that everyone below that level was a net tax consumer, and that it made no economic sense to import more tax consumers.

    Years ago, Charles Murray proposed a basic income / negative income tax to replace the EITC, etc…

    Years before that, Richard Nixon and Milton Friedman did the same.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    That's true.
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  119. @Pittsburgh Thatcherite
    Citizenship should be bought and sold.

    To become a citizen, a buyer purchases citizenship from an existing citizen. The buyer is now a citizen, but the seller has sold his citizenship, and must leave the nation.

    Buying citizenship is a big investment. The new citizen wants the price of citizenship to increase over time, so that he may eventually re-sell his citizenship at a profit.

    In order to increase the price of citizenship, citizens want government to increase the demand for citizenship.

    Government increases the demand for citizenship by increasing the standard of living of the nation.


    In addition to buying citizenship, citizens should also be required to buy insurance to pay for unexpected costs such as prison, illness or children.

    You could make citizens shareholders of the country. Have an IPO with two classes of shares: one with voting rights (A shares; every citizen gets one share. Transferable only on death or by an heir.), and one share class (B) without voting rights (can be bought by citizens or foreigners). Both share classes pay the same dividends when there’s a federal budget surplus. Owners of B shares are eligible for green cards.

    Would be the biggest IPO in world history: “The business of America is business, and now America just became a business. Own a piece of it.”. The US could issue 1 million B shares and set the initial price at $100k each. Immigration advocates could buy shares and give them to whomever they wanted, but the more demand, the pricier the shares would get.

    A-shareholders would immediately ban birthright citizenship to avoid dilution. Their heirs could either sell the extra A-shares they inherit, or they could keep them and have additional votes. The only way for someone to become a citizen, other than to be born to two citizen parents, would be to buy an A-share from someone who inherited it. Over time, those whose ancestors had been here longer could end up with more voting power than new immigrants/A-shareholders.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    There's also the model of machine-gun licenses, which have been restricted and traded for thirty years now.
    , @Corvinus
    And I am assuming you are able to offer how this plan is constitutional, right? Please, I am all ears.
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  120. @Reg Cæsar

    Years ago, Charles Murray proposed a basic income / negative income tax to replace the EITC, etc…
     
    Years before that, Richard Nixon and Milton Friedman did the same.

    That’s true.

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  121. @Dave Pinsen
    You could make citizens shareholders of the country. Have an IPO with two classes of shares: one with voting rights (A shares; every citizen gets one share. Transferable only on death or by an heir.), and one share class (B) without voting rights (can be bought by citizens or foreigners). Both share classes pay the same dividends when there's a federal budget surplus. Owners of B shares are eligible for green cards.

    Would be the biggest IPO in world history: "The business of America is business, and now America just became a business. Own a piece of it.". The US could issue 1 million B shares and set the initial price at $100k each. Immigration advocates could buy shares and give them to whomever they wanted, but the more demand, the pricier the shares would get.

    A-shareholders would immediately ban birthright citizenship to avoid dilution. Their heirs could either sell the extra A-shares they inherit, or they could keep them and have additional votes. The only way for someone to become a citizen, other than to be born to two citizen parents, would be to buy an A-share from someone who inherited it. Over time, those whose ancestors had been here longer could end up with more voting power than new immigrants/A-shareholders.

    There’s also the model of machine-gun licenses, which have been restricted and traded for thirty years now.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    You could have a secondary offering of B shares, down the road, if demand was really high, and A shareholders agreed to it.
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  122. @Reg Cæsar
    There's also the model of machine-gun licenses, which have been restricted and traded for thirty years now.

    You could have a secondary offering of B shares, down the road, if demand was really high, and A shareholders agreed to it.

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  123. @Karl
    >> have yourself a merry ניטעל

    That is not an actual Hebrew word.


    The word used by Hebrew-speaking Israeli Christians (there's plenty) for "Christmas" is :


    חג המולד

    khag ha-moh-lahd

    "holiday of the birth"




    You can write a check to:

    Christian Empowerment Council
    16 Gilboa Street
    17682 Upper Nazareth
    Israel

    That is not an actual Hebrew word.

    It is, nonetheless, a word. You should Google it.

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  124. @rienzi
    Every immigrant must have an American citizen sponsor. The sponsor is completely responsible for any action by the immigrant. The immigrant gets sent to jail for 30 years, so does the sponsor. The immigrant gets a dui, the sponsor loses their own driver's license. Immigrant gets caught cheating on their taxes, the IRS comes after the sponsor. Immigrant gets deported, so does the sponsor. If the immigrant goes on welfare, it comes completely out of the sponsor's pocket.

    The sponsor can only sponsor one immigrant, families must find several sponsors. The sponsor's responsibility lasts until the immigrant becomes a citizen themselves. Only one immigrant may ever be sponsored by a citizen.

    Given the opportunity to put up or shut up, under the above program, I imagine the silence from our immigration advocates would be deafening.

    Which would lead to paid off strawman sponsors from the lower classes or the old or terminally ill.

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  125. All of these fancy schmantzy schemes run afoul of one thing: it’s certain those who will be in charge of enforcing them, will have no desire to do so, except against the few people who they really don’t want in, e.g., heterosexual non-Jewish white males and their spouses.

    The simplest rule has the best chance of enforcement, which is: no immigrants, period.

    Of course they will hate that too, but it’s tough to get around absolute prohibitions.

    No immigrants for at least one full generation, and foreign students being sorely limited to a few specific programs designed to train people who will go back and “fix their own countries”.

    No H-1B program, and tariff all products and services of companies who do “inversions”.

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  126. @Curle
    Multi-culturalism = authoritarian rule. http://www.conservativewoman.co.uk/mark-ellse-the-price-of-a-multicultural-society-is-authoritarian-rule/

    This is, or should be, obvious on its face. You have racism-call it patriotism, nativism, whatever-or you have Wordism. Wordism is loyalty to words and disagreement is treason.

    Singapore is as close to a true “fascist state” as exists anywhere in the world. Its People’s Action Party which has total rule uses as its logo the lightning bolt of Sir Oswald Mosley’s British Union of Fascists. It has as a principal purpose the existence of a nation-state suitable for Chinese, Malaysians, and Indians. It is economically successful, clean, safe and orderly. But no one would call it a “free country” in the usual sense of the word. Draconian punishments for trivial crimes, a great deal of regulation in everyday life, and an overwhelming sense of dissent being unwelcome are the accepted fact of life. Among Singaporeans, the general idea is that if one doesn’t like how Singapore is run one should leave.

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  127. Selling citizenship and requiring citizens to buy insurance is politically impossible in any existing nation.

    In order to implement these ideas, a new nation must be created.

    This new nation, unencumbered by dysfunctional citizens, would have a very high standard of living.

    This new nation could be a corporation which sells citizenships for profit.

    This nation-corporation could buy a vast swath of land, provide effective government, sell a billion citizenships, and collect trillions of dollars in profit.

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    • Replies: @Mike
    PT,

    Your are getting really close to another of Steve's favorite topics: Country Clubs.

    Heh... Didn't even think of "Country" until I typed it out...
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  128. @tbraton
    Well, the "commoner" was no ordinary commoner. After all, he reputedly brought people back from the dead, miraculously cured ill people from devastating illnesses that they had been suffering from for years, fed thousands of people on multiple occasions when they only had a handful of fish and a few loaves of bread, walked on water on occasion. You think somebody who was a contemporary would have noticed and recorded these astounding feats. After all, the Roman Empire had quite a few literate men who were recording contemporary events during the time that Jesus supposedly lived. Instead we have four accounts written anywhere from 70 to 110 A.D., a good 40 years or more after Jesus' death, and they differ considerably on the details of his life. And they weren't the first to write about Jesus. Instead Paul was the first, and he never met the man, and his writings reveal none of the dramatic facts of Jesus's life that the later written Gospels contain. Apart from Alexander the Great, there are any number of much lesser known Greeks who lived before Alexander about whom we are able to reconstruct their approximate birth dates and death dates and about whom we have some historical evidence they actually lived. The problem is that so much of the ancient written records were lost due to the passage of time or deliberate destruction by barbarian invaders, the Christian Church and later the Muslims that it is a wonder we are able to reconstruct as much as we know about the ancient peoples.

    The problem is that however improbable that looks now, in the lifetime of Jesus illiterate people didn’t know their exact age. This means that by the time Jesus became famous there was no way to write down the year of his birth.

    If you ask me, he was probably a cult leader in his lifetime, whose teachings and cult have changed beyond recognition by the time his life was finally written down decades later. But I’m no believer, so that’s just an educated guess on my part.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    There are still people who dint know their ages today. Like like Clock Boy's grandma.
    , @tbraton
    "The problem is that however improbable that looks now, in the lifetime of Jesus illiterate people didn’t know their exact age. This means that by the time Jesus became famous there was no way to write down the year of his birth."

    reiner Tor, that's a fair point, although I would point out that Luke attempts to pinpoint the date of Jesus' birth by alluding to a decree issued by Caesar Augustus that everybody in the Roman Empire be registered, which supposedly accounts for Joseph and the pregnant Mary being in Bethlehem when Jesus was born because it was the "city of David" and Joseph "was of the house of David by descent." (That fact also served the purpose of fulfilling the biblical requirements for the "Messiah" who was prophesized to appear.) No other Gospel mentions this factor, not even Mathew. (Mark and John say nothing surrounding the birth of Jesus.) It turns out that historians have had difficulty finding that famous decree which supposedly pinpoints the year of Jesus' birth.

    One further complication is that Luke mentions that Augustus' decree went out "when Quirinius was governor of Syria." It turns out that Quirinius served as governor of Syria from 6 A.D. until 12 A.D. ("After the banishment of the ethnarch Herod Archelaus in 6 AD, Iudaea (the conglomeration of Samaria, Judea and Idumea) came under direct Roman administration with Coponius appointed as prefect. At the same time, Quirinius was appointed Legate of Syria. . .Quirinius served as governor of Syria with nominal authority over Iudaea until 12 AD, when he returned to Rome as a close associate of Tiberius. Nine years later he died and was given a public funeral.") As I pointed out earlier, we have known since 1896 that Herod the Great, who was supposed to be King at the time of Jesus' birth, actually died in 4 B.C. From 4 B.C. until 6 A.D., when Quirinius was appointed governor of Syria, leaves a gap of 10 years, which tells me that the writers of the Gospels were not terribly good historical novelists.

    More importantly, while your explanation may account for the absence of information about his date of birth, it doesn't explain why there is difficulty in pinpointing his date of death. By that time, Jesus must have been a notorious and well-known figure who was performing marvelous miracles and drawing vast crowds. A real tip-off about the elusiveness of the person we call Jesus is the range of dates from birth to death to account for all the events described in the four Gospels. For example, Wikipedia starts off describing Jesus thus: "Jesus (/ˈdʒiːzəs/; Greek: Ἰησοῦς Iesous; 7–2 BC to AD 30–33), also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus Christ."

    One further complicating factor has to do with Jesus' cousin, John the Baptist. Ironically, I believe we can say with some certainty that John the Baptist was a real person who actually existed. The famous Jewish/Roman historian of the 1st century A.D., Josephus (37 A.D.-100 A.D.), actually refers to John the Baptist in his history, "Antiquities of the Jews." Now, according to the Gospels, Jesus was baptized by John the Baptist, and started preaching after John's death. The problem comes in when we try to pinpoint the year of John's death. He was famously beheaded by Herod Antipas for questioning his marriage to the ex-wife of his brother. Now we can date Herod Antipas and, thus, date John the Baptist's death. According to two footnotes in Wikipedia's account: "4. Goldberg, G. J (2001) "John the Baptist and Josephus" – "Having said that, it does appear that Josephus is giving John's death as occurring in 36 CE, which is at least 6 years later than what is expected from the New Testament, and after the crucifixion of Jesus."
    5. Lang, Bernhard (2009) International Review of Biblical Studies Brill Academic Pub ISBN 9004172548 Page 380 – "33/34 CE Herod Antipas's marriage to Herodias (and beginning of the ministry of Jesus in a sabbatical year); 35 CE – death of John the Baptist" " Thus, we have two scholars who date John the Baptist's death from 33/34 A.D. to 36 A.D., much later than the traditional DOD of 30 A.D. The net effect is to push the date of Jesus' death much later than is comfortable for traditional biblical scholars. Since it is assumed traditionally that Jesus was 30 when he started preaching and preached for three years until his crucifixion, you can see what difficulties are created by pushing John the Baptist's death so far.
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  129. @tbraton
    Well, the "commoner" was no ordinary commoner. After all, he reputedly brought people back from the dead, miraculously cured ill people from devastating illnesses that they had been suffering from for years, fed thousands of people on multiple occasions when they only had a handful of fish and a few loaves of bread, walked on water on occasion. You think somebody who was a contemporary would have noticed and recorded these astounding feats. After all, the Roman Empire had quite a few literate men who were recording contemporary events during the time that Jesus supposedly lived. Instead we have four accounts written anywhere from 70 to 110 A.D., a good 40 years or more after Jesus' death, and they differ considerably on the details of his life. And they weren't the first to write about Jesus. Instead Paul was the first, and he never met the man, and his writings reveal none of the dramatic facts of Jesus's life that the later written Gospels contain. Apart from Alexander the Great, there are any number of much lesser known Greeks who lived before Alexander about whom we are able to reconstruct their approximate birth dates and death dates and about whom we have some historical evidence they actually lived. The problem is that so much of the ancient written records were lost due to the passage of time or deliberate destruction by barbarian invaders, the Christian Church and later the Muslims that it is a wonder we are able to reconstruct as much as we know about the ancient peoples.

    The problem is that however improbable that looks now, in the lifetime of Jesus illiterate people didn’t know their exact age. This means that by the time Jesus became famous there was no way to write down the year of his birth.

    If you ask me, he was probably a cult leader in his lifetime, whose teachings and cult have changed beyond recognition by the time his life was finally written down decades later. But I’m no believer, so that’s just an educated guess on my part.

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  130. @Dave Pinsen
    This suffers from a similar problem as those proposals to import Syrians or whomever to revitalize Detroit: how do you keep them in Detroit?

    It’s important to note the Swiss use this method to decide on naturalization, not on immigration. It isn’t about who you let in, it’s about who you allow to become a citizen after a number of years.

    In other words, only those who have put down deep roots in the area have a chance of being accepted for naturalization. And who better to judge that than their neighbors?

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  131. @Anonymous
    One reason there are many Syrian emigrants right now is that they are fleeing massive American bombing. The Washington Post reported that the US has dropped more bombs (22,478) on Syria this year than the past five years in Afghanistan. This is all part of a failed four-year American attempt to overthrow the government of Syria.

    Since the American people refuse to rein in such behavior by its leadership, and many of them condone or support such behavior, then obviously they're liable for producing these emigrants, millions of whom are fleeing to neighboring countries and Europe.

    Since the American people refuse to rein in such behavior by its leadership

    Dude, show me the reins. I’ll be glad to take over.

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  132. @Anonymous
    Something worth reading about the corrupt so called 'social sciences.'

    "How a rebellious scientist uncovered the surprising truth about stereotypes"

    A section:

    "His fellow psychologists shifted in their seats. Jussim pointed out that the level of obfuscation the authors went to, in order to disguise their actual data, was intense. Statistical techniques appeared to have been chosen that would hide the study’s true results. And it appeared that no peer reviewers, or journal editors, took the time, or went to the effort of scrutinizing the study in a way that was sufficient to identify the bold misrepresentations.

    While the authors’ political motivations for publishing the paper were obvious, it was the lax attitude on behalf of peer reviewers – Jussim suggested – that was at the heart of the problems within social psychology. The field had become a community in which political values and moral aims were shared, leading to an asymmetry in which studies that reinforced left-wing narratives had come to be disproportionately represented in the literature. And this was not, to quote Stephen Colbert, because “reality had a liberal bias”. It was because social psychology had a liberal bias."

    Read the whole thing at:

    http://quillette.com/2015/12/04/rebellious-scientist-surprising-truth-about-stereotypes/

    I’ve been following Claire Lehmann on Twitter for a while. Really impressive how much traction she’s gotten with her new site. Charles Murray tweeted a link to that article, IIRC.

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  133. @reiner Tor
    The problem is that however improbable that looks now, in the lifetime of Jesus illiterate people didn't know their exact age. This means that by the time Jesus became famous there was no way to write down the year of his birth.

    If you ask me, he was probably a cult leader in his lifetime, whose teachings and cult have changed beyond recognition by the time his life was finally written down decades later. But I'm no believer, so that's just an educated guess on my part.

    There are still people who dint know their ages today. Like like Clock Boy’s grandma.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    There are still people who dint know their ages today. Like like Clock Boy’s grandma.
     
    Then he should have designed a calendar. They don't go "click", and he'd still be in Texas.
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  134. @DQDF
    About IQ, how would you account for the high IQ Japanese admirals and generals and German generals in Operation Barbarossa failing so spectacularly in 1941, so the extent of forgetting everything they learned in WW1 about the limits of logistics, or even the basics of running a campaign in Russia? It seems as if they forgot everything about Napoleons' and Charles XII's campaign in Russia. I would estimate Guderian and von Manstein as having IQs somewhere in the 140s? And about Hitler, remember that his IQ was somewhere in the mid-140s. And how do you account for Mcnamara and his performance in Vietnam?

    About IQ, how would you account for the high IQ Japanese admirals and generals and German generals… [etc]

    Ever heard of a little thing called hubris?

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    • Replies: @D. K.
    The Germans, in June 1941, and the Japanese, in December 1941, both did what they then believed that they had to do, in order to secure their own national survival as great world powers. Hitler apparently believed that the Soviet Union was on the verge of overrunning not only Germany, but the entire European continent; and, there is a recent school of historians who totally agree with that assessment, based on the old Soviet archives. Japan always has been devoid of bounteous natural resources, especially fuel stuffs, and felt that it needed to expand its empire, at that very moment, or risk imploding. Both Germany and Japan were being relentlessly goaded into war with the United States, on FDR's own initiative. That is why Hitler felt fully justified in declaring war against the U.S., after Pearl Harbor. I can see his point, although I still believe that it was an enormous mistake, because the American public otherwise would have demanded that all our resources be brought to bear against the Japanese, with no more diverted to aid Britain in the European Theater of war, in its fight against the Germans and their European allies.

    The fact that neither Germany nor Japan was successful, in the longer run, nearly four years down the road, does not mean that they necessarily made the wrong choices, from among those plausible choices that they had at their respective disposal, back in 1941. Remember, Britain unilaterally declared war on Germany-- but not on the Soviet Union!-- for its invasion of Poland, in September 1939, and then went on to "victory;" but, it also virtually bankrupted itself, to do so, and then had to relinquish its worldwide empire, as a result of its diminished post-war stature. The depravations of World War II led directly to Labour's victory, ousting Churchill's wartime Tory government, before victory even was secured in the Pacific Theater (overwhelmingly by the United States, especially in the contrasting forms of its two successfully delivered atomic bombs), which then led to Britain's former colonies colonizing the British Isles themselves-- such that the English now find themselves a minority in their own capital! King Pyrrhus must be laughing his otherworldly ass off....
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  135. @Dave Pinsen
    There are still people who dint know their ages today. Like like Clock Boy's grandma.

    There are still people who dint know their ages today. Like like Clock Boy’s grandma.

    Then he should have designed a calendar. They don’t go “click”, and he’d still be in Texas.

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  136. @tbraton
    Well, the "commoner" was no ordinary commoner. After all, he reputedly brought people back from the dead, miraculously cured ill people from devastating illnesses that they had been suffering from for years, fed thousands of people on multiple occasions when they only had a handful of fish and a few loaves of bread, walked on water on occasion. You think somebody who was a contemporary would have noticed and recorded these astounding feats. After all, the Roman Empire had quite a few literate men who were recording contemporary events during the time that Jesus supposedly lived. Instead we have four accounts written anywhere from 70 to 110 A.D., a good 40 years or more after Jesus' death, and they differ considerably on the details of his life. And they weren't the first to write about Jesus. Instead Paul was the first, and he never met the man, and his writings reveal none of the dramatic facts of Jesus's life that the later written Gospels contain. Apart from Alexander the Great, there are any number of much lesser known Greeks who lived before Alexander about whom we are able to reconstruct their approximate birth dates and death dates and about whom we have some historical evidence they actually lived. The problem is that so much of the ancient written records were lost due to the passage of time or deliberate destruction by barbarian invaders, the Christian Church and later the Muslims that it is a wonder we are able to reconstruct as much as we know about the ancient peoples.

    You think somebody who was a contemporary would have noticed and recorded these astounding feats.

    Gee, He escaped the notice of the Main Stream Media. Imagine that.

    And nobody thought to preserve the Imperial Enquirer and other marketplace tabletoids.

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    • Replies: @tbraton
    Well, actually the Romans of that age were a very literate people. I was thinking of Pliny the Younger and other contemporaries who left us accounts of the eruption of Vesuvius and the destruction of Pompei in 79 A.D., about the time the four Gospels were being composed. According to Wikipedia: "Pliny the Younger provided a first-hand account of the eruption of Mount Vesuvius from his position across the Bay of Naples at Misenum, in a version he wrote 25 years after the event. His uncle, Pliny the Elder, with whom he had a close relationship, died while attempting to rescue stranded victims. As admiral of the fleet, Pliny the Elder had ordered the ships of the Imperial Navy stationed at Misenum to cross the bay to assist evacuation attempts. Volcanologists have recognised the importance of Pliny the Younger's account of the eruption by calling similar events "Plinian". The eruption was documented by contemporary historians and is generally accepted as having started on 24 August 79, relying on one version of the text of Pliny's letter. However the archeological excavations of Pompeii suggest that the city was buried about three months later.[17] This is supported by another version of the letter,[18] which gives the date of the eruption as November 23." As I pointed out in another post, the famous Jewish/Roman Josephus lived from 37 A.D. to 100 A.D. and wrote a history of the Jews. You think someone like that would be highly conversant with the events of his own people in his own century.
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  137. @Pittsburgh Thatcherite
    Selling citizenship and requiring citizens to buy insurance is politically impossible in any existing nation.

    In order to implement these ideas, a new nation must be created.

    This new nation, unencumbered by dysfunctional citizens, would have a very high standard of living.

    This new nation could be a corporation which sells citizenships for profit.

    This nation-corporation could buy a vast swath of land, provide effective government, sell a billion citizenships, and collect trillions of dollars in profit.

    PT,

    Your are getting really close to another of Steve’s favorite topics: Country Clubs.

    Heh… Didn’t even think of “Country” until I typed it out…

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  138. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    If you ask me, he was probably a cult leader in his lifetime, whose teachings and cult have changed beyond recognition by the time his life was finally written down decades later.

    Isn’t there also the theory that a bunch of Greeks (people like Origen) came up with the religion about 100 years later, built it on an earlier narrative that was sufficiently tractable and esoteric, and designed it specifically to appeal to the Roman lower class and to women of all classes (but in particular upper-class women). It worked. Among other things, stories of upper class women going to there death in the colosseum ‘went Trump’.

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  139. @Jefferson
    Asian Americans are like Orthodox Jews/Hasidic Jews and Muslims, in that they do not celebrate Christmas unless they are Catholic Filipinos who were colonized by the Spaniards who brought this yearly European tradition to The Philippines.

    The vast majority of Asian Americans who are not Filipino practice Eastern Oriental religions like Buddhism, Shinto, and Taoism for example. And these religions do believe in celebrating Christmas.

    The vast majority of people who celebrate Christmas are either Europeans or Nonwhite people who were colonized and or enslaved by Europeans.

    Either way the vast majority of people who celebrate Christmas have some kind of tie to Europe either racially, religiously, language wise, or all 3.

    Christmas would not be an extremely popular holiday in Brazil for example, if that nation had been colonized by Saudi Arabians or the Han Chinese instead of the Portuguese.

    If White people had never existed, neither would have Christmas.

    “If White people had never existed, neither would have Christmas.”

    Jesus was Jewish. I thought Jews weren’t “white people”.

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    • Replies: @ben tillman

    “If White people had never existed, neither would have Christmas.”

    Jesus was Jewish. I thought Jews weren’t “white people”.
     
    You are a monumental moron. Everyone else here can understand that there is no contradiction between the statements that (1) "Jesus was Jewish" and (2) "If White people had never existed, neither would have Christmas".
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  140. @Dave Pinsen
    You could make citizens shareholders of the country. Have an IPO with two classes of shares: one with voting rights (A shares; every citizen gets one share. Transferable only on death or by an heir.), and one share class (B) without voting rights (can be bought by citizens or foreigners). Both share classes pay the same dividends when there's a federal budget surplus. Owners of B shares are eligible for green cards.

    Would be the biggest IPO in world history: "The business of America is business, and now America just became a business. Own a piece of it.". The US could issue 1 million B shares and set the initial price at $100k each. Immigration advocates could buy shares and give them to whomever they wanted, but the more demand, the pricier the shares would get.

    A-shareholders would immediately ban birthright citizenship to avoid dilution. Their heirs could either sell the extra A-shares they inherit, or they could keep them and have additional votes. The only way for someone to become a citizen, other than to be born to two citizen parents, would be to buy an A-share from someone who inherited it. Over time, those whose ancestors had been here longer could end up with more voting power than new immigrants/A-shareholders.

    And I am assuming you are able to offer how this plan is constitutional, right? Please, I am all ears.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    As constitutional as a right to gay marriage?
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  141. @D. K.
    You either are insane or just a bald-faced liar. We admit well over one million legal immigrants, every year, while countless thousands of illegals still stream across our borders, or overstay their visas, every year. The vast majority of our immigrants, over these past fifty years, have been low-IQ and poorly educated Third World peasants, who suck up government benefits, either directly or through their offspring.

    D.K., haven’t you done enough by throwing your own ancestors under the bus?

    “The vast majority of our immigrants, over these past fifty years, have been low-IQ and poorly educated Third World peasants…”

    Observably no different than immigrants who came to America in the 19th century if we are using your metrics.

    “who suck up government benefits, either directly or through their offspring.”

    Read “Why Europe Leaves Home” by Kenneth Roberts. Written about 100 years ago, it is full of descriptions of “filthy”, “ignorant” and “backward” people coming to America by the millions from central and eastern Europe, i.e., the same rhetoric used to describe current immigrants.

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    • Replies: @D. K.
    The Eastern and Southern European immigrants of the Great Wave Era very often were filthy, backward and ignorant. Many of them were turned back as unsuitable, especially if they proved diseased, or merely seemed likely to prove burdensome. Those admitted also shared the crux of European civilization, however, and later proved to have IQ distributions fairly close to native-born Americans-- and, in the case of Eastern-European Jews, markedly higher! Ergo, they and, especially, their offspring were able to assimilate, once the immigration flood gates were finally closed, in the 1920s, limiting the flow to a relative trickle, for the next two generations.

    The endless millions of Latin American and other Third World peasants of the current tidal wave of immigration mostly do not have IQs close to the American median, and they also are coming to an advanced, 21st-Century, First World country, not to a largely agrarian, 19th-Century one, where brawn still was needed en masse, both on the farms and in the mills and factories, inter alia. They also are coming now to a welfare state that did not exist, back during the Great Wave. A large portion of immigrants to America, in that earlier era, returned to Europe, either because they could not succeed here or because they simply did not readily assimilate to American society, and wished to go home. Today, the American government goes out of its way not to screen out low-quality, or even outright criminal, aliens; it practically refuses to deport them, even when they are here illegally. America's current welfare state gives those Third World immigrants every reason to remain here, rather than to return to their own countries of origin-- even when they dislike, or outright despise, the dwindling European-American majority and its traditional European-American culture.

    The earlier immigrants also tended to be from European peoples without strong national ties to the governments ruling them-- e.g., the Austro-Hungarian Empire-- and usually became patriotic Americans, often making sure that their children spoke only English, not their ancestral languages too. A large portion of today's immigrants to America come bearing historical grudges against America-- like the national loathing that most Mexicans have for America, as a country, and for gringos, generally-- and they relate to their ancestral countries and peoples, not to traditional Americans and to Western Civilization, generally. Identity politics, today, is largely based on recent immigrants and their native-born descendants who refuse to assimilate fully, as previous immigrants and their descendants did. The contemporary Democratic Party and ethnic lobbies all are dependent, now, upon maintaining the alienness of even native-born minorities.

    It is beyond peradventure that the immigration deluge unleashed by the 1965 act has proved a boon, economically and otherwise, to only two appreciable groups: the immigrant communities themselves and the plutocratic ownership class that has grown ever-richer off of cheap labor and resource scarcity (e.g., housing stock). The rest of us have been virtually transplanted to a modern-day version of Babylon.
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  142. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @Anonymous
    Check out UN numbers: http://data.unhcr.org/mediterranean/download.php?id=318
    During December the % of Syrians declined to 36% whereas the % of Iraqis and Afghans rose to ~ 25% each. Thus, Russians have absolutely nothing to do with the flood.

    Ahhh, so it seems that the US is trying to engineer the break up of the EU.

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  143. In the old testament there was no heaven, no hell, no eternal life. The old testament writers thought that people would see the sense of the old testament and act accordingly. If human beings had sense they wouldn’t have needed a testament. So they redid the old testament and added a stick and a carrot because they realized that they were dealing with children. Heaven is the carrot, hell is the stick and you need eternal life because heaven/hell are post death. Another nice feature of post death heaven and hell is you don’t have to worry about customer complaints and you can pitch whatever positives/ negatives you want. But you need a proof of concept and that is where Jesus comes in. If anybody says how do I know there’s a heaven? Jesus is the son of god who came to earth. How do I know Jesus is the son of god? Jesus did miracles. How do I know there is life after death and a heaven? Jesus was resurrected and ascended to heaven. Okay, I’m in. Great! Just do what we tell you to and pay our way! There is no heaven, there is no hell, there is no god, there is no devil other than in our minds. Where do you see anything to indicate the existence of these things. We are protons, neutrons and electrons.

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  144. @reiner Tor
    The problem is that however improbable that looks now, in the lifetime of Jesus illiterate people didn't know their exact age. This means that by the time Jesus became famous there was no way to write down the year of his birth.

    If you ask me, he was probably a cult leader in his lifetime, whose teachings and cult have changed beyond recognition by the time his life was finally written down decades later. But I'm no believer, so that's just an educated guess on my part.

    “The problem is that however improbable that looks now, in the lifetime of Jesus illiterate people didn’t know their exact age. This means that by the time Jesus became famous there was no way to write down the year of his birth.”

    reiner Tor, that’s a fair point, although I would point out that Luke attempts to pinpoint the date of Jesus’ birth by alluding to a decree issued by Caesar Augustus that everybody in the Roman Empire be registered, which supposedly accounts for Joseph and the pregnant Mary being in Bethlehem when Jesus was born because it was the “city of David” and Joseph “was of the house of David by descent.” (That fact also served the purpose of fulfilling the biblical requirements for the “Messiah” who was prophesized to appear.) No other Gospel mentions this factor, not even Mathew. (Mark and John say nothing surrounding the birth of Jesus.) It turns out that historians have had difficulty finding that famous decree which supposedly pinpoints the year of Jesus’ birth.

    One further complication is that Luke mentions that Augustus’ decree went out “when Quirinius was governor of Syria.” It turns out that Quirinius served as governor of Syria from 6 A.D. until 12 A.D. (“After the banishment of the ethnarch Herod Archelaus in 6 AD, Iudaea (the conglomeration of Samaria, Judea and Idumea) came under direct Roman administration with Coponius appointed as prefect. At the same time, Quirinius was appointed Legate of Syria. . .Quirinius served as governor of Syria with nominal authority over Iudaea until 12 AD, when he returned to Rome as a close associate of Tiberius. Nine years later he died and was given a public funeral.”) As I pointed out earlier, we have known since 1896 that Herod the Great, who was supposed to be King at the time of Jesus’ birth, actually died in 4 B.C. From 4 B.C. until 6 A.D., when Quirinius was appointed governor of Syria, leaves a gap of 10 years, which tells me that the writers of the Gospels were not terribly good historical novelists.

    More importantly, while your explanation may account for the absence of information about his date of birth, it doesn’t explain why there is difficulty in pinpointing his date of death. By that time, Jesus must have been a notorious and well-known figure who was performing marvelous miracles and drawing vast crowds. A real tip-off about the elusiveness of the person we call Jesus is the range of dates from birth to death to account for all the events described in the four Gospels. For example, Wikipedia starts off describing Jesus thus: “Jesus (/ˈdʒiːzəs/; Greek: Ἰησοῦς Iesous; 7–2 BC to AD 30–33), also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus Christ.”

    One further complicating factor has to do with Jesus’ cousin, John the Baptist. Ironically, I believe we can say with some certainty that John the Baptist was a real person who actually existed. The famous Jewish/Roman historian of the 1st century A.D., Josephus (37 A.D.-100 A.D.), actually refers to John the Baptist in his history, “Antiquities of the Jews.” Now, according to the Gospels, Jesus was baptized by John the Baptist, and started preaching after John’s death. The problem comes in when we try to pinpoint the year of John’s death. He was famously beheaded by Herod Antipas for questioning his marriage to the ex-wife of his brother. Now we can date Herod Antipas and, thus, date John the Baptist’s death. According to two footnotes in Wikipedia’s account: “4. Goldberg, G. J (2001) “John the Baptist and Josephus” – “Having said that, it does appear that Josephus is giving John’s death as occurring in 36 CE, which is at least 6 years later than what is expected from the New Testament, and after the crucifixion of Jesus.”
    5. Lang, Bernhard (2009) International Review of Biblical Studies Brill Academic Pub ISBN 9004172548 Page 380 – “33/34 CE Herod Antipas’s marriage to Herodias (and beginning of the ministry of Jesus in a sabbatical year); 35 CE – death of John the Baptist” ” Thus, we have two scholars who date John the Baptist’s death from 33/34 A.D. to 36 A.D., much later than the traditional DOD of 30 A.D. The net effect is to push the date of Jesus’ death much later than is comfortable for traditional biblical scholars. Since it is assumed traditionally that Jesus was 30 when he started preaching and preached for three years until his crucifixion, you can see what difficulties are created by pushing John the Baptist’s death so far.

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  145. Correction to my prior post (the edit function didn’t appear). I said originally:
    “Thus, we have two scholars who date John the Baptist’s death from 33/34 A.D. to 36 A.D., much later than the traditional DOD of 30 A.D. ”

    That should read: “Thus, we have two scholars who date John the Baptist’s death from 35 A.D. to 36 A.D., much later than the traditional DOD of 30 A.D.”

    The problem with such a late date for John’s death (35 or 36 A.D.) is that, when you add the three years of Jesus’ preaching, that moves up the date of Jesus’ death to 38 A.D. or 39 A.D. The problem with that is that Tiberius, Caesar at the time of Jesus’ crucifixion, died in 37 A.D.

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  146. @Reg Cæsar

    About IQ, how would you account for the high IQ Japanese admirals and generals and German generals… [etc]
     
    Ever heard of a little thing called hubris?

    The Germans, in June 1941, and the Japanese, in December 1941, both did what they then believed that they had to do, in order to secure their own national survival as great world powers. Hitler apparently believed that the Soviet Union was on the verge of overrunning not only Germany, but the entire European continent; and, there is a recent school of historians who totally agree with that assessment, based on the old Soviet archives. Japan always has been devoid of bounteous natural resources, especially fuel stuffs, and felt that it needed to expand its empire, at that very moment, or risk imploding. Both Germany and Japan were being relentlessly goaded into war with the United States, on FDR’s own initiative. That is why Hitler felt fully justified in declaring war against the U.S., after Pearl Harbor. I can see his point, although I still believe that it was an enormous mistake, because the American public otherwise would have demanded that all our resources be brought to bear against the Japanese, with no more diverted to aid Britain in the European Theater of war, in its fight against the Germans and their European allies.

    The fact that neither Germany nor Japan was successful, in the longer run, nearly four years down the road, does not mean that they necessarily made the wrong choices, from among those plausible choices that they had at their respective disposal, back in 1941. Remember, Britain unilaterally declared war on Germany– but not on the Soviet Union!– for its invasion of Poland, in September 1939, and then went on to “victory;” but, it also virtually bankrupted itself, to do so, and then had to relinquish its worldwide empire, as a result of its diminished post-war stature. The depravations of World War II led directly to Labour’s victory, ousting Churchill’s wartime Tory government, before victory even was secured in the Pacific Theater (overwhelmingly by the United States, especially in the contrasting forms of its two successfully delivered atomic bombs), which then led to Britain’s former colonies colonizing the British Isles themselves– such that the English now find themselves a minority in their own capital! King Pyrrhus must be laughing his otherworldly ass off….

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    Hitler apparently believed that the Soviet Union was on the verge of overrunning not only Germany, but the entire European continent
     
    Is there a quote of Hitler saying this at the time? In Antony Beevor's Stalingrad book, he quotes Hitler as saying, on the eve of Operation Barbarossa, something to the effect that Russia was a rotting structure that would collapse once he kicked the door in.

    Beevor also writes that no European country in 1941 was impressed with Russia's military prowess, particularly after the trouble tiny Finland had given them . He says the only foreign intelligence service that respected Russian military prowess was Japan's, because they had gotten beaten by the Russians at Khalkin Gol in Mongolia in '39.
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  147. @Reg Cæsar

    You think somebody who was a contemporary would have noticed and recorded these astounding feats.
     
    Gee, He escaped the notice of the Main Stream Media. Imagine that.

    And nobody thought to preserve the Imperial Enquirer and other marketplace tabletoids.

    Well, actually the Romans of that age were a very literate people. I was thinking of Pliny the Younger and other contemporaries who left us accounts of the eruption of Vesuvius and the destruction of Pompei in 79 A.D., about the time the four Gospels were being composed. According to Wikipedia: “Pliny the Younger provided a first-hand account of the eruption of Mount Vesuvius from his position across the Bay of Naples at Misenum, in a version he wrote 25 years after the event. His uncle, Pliny the Elder, with whom he had a close relationship, died while attempting to rescue stranded victims. As admiral of the fleet, Pliny the Elder had ordered the ships of the Imperial Navy stationed at Misenum to cross the bay to assist evacuation attempts. Volcanologists have recognised the importance of Pliny the Younger’s account of the eruption by calling similar events “Plinian”. The eruption was documented by contemporary historians and is generally accepted as having started on 24 August 79, relying on one version of the text of Pliny’s letter. However the archeological excavations of Pompeii suggest that the city was buried about three months later.[17] This is supported by another version of the letter,[18] which gives the date of the eruption as November 23.” As I pointed out in another post, the famous Jewish/Roman Josephus lived from 37 A.D. to 100 A.D. and wrote a history of the Jews. You think someone like that would be highly conversant with the events of his own people in his own century.

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor

    the Romans of that age were a very literate people
     
    Except that Greg Clark cites partial data IIRC from the Claudian census. A surprisingly high number of people appear to have been aged multiples of five (i.e. 25, 30, 35, 40, etc.), for which the only explanation is that they really didn't know how old they were, and just gave an approximate age. This means probably they were born to illiterate families. He also cites data from inscriptions on gravestones of wealthy merchants - they have the same phenomenon, i.e. rich merchants were also often illiterate (or at least born to illiterate families).
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  148. Cat bonds are the string theory of insurance. Most people who claim to have made a living structuring cat bonds have never actually underwritten and sold any cat bonds.

    A cat bond is just a mix of an insurance product and a fixed income investment. There is no advantage to mixing them except maybe as a way to access ignorant capital. Someone somewhere must still price the risk.

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  149. @Corvinus
    D.K., haven't you done enough by throwing your own ancestors under the bus?

    "The vast majority of our immigrants, over these past fifty years, have been low-IQ and poorly educated Third World peasants..."

    Observably no different than immigrants who came to America in the 19th century if we are using your metrics.

    "who suck up government benefits, either directly or through their offspring."

    Read “Why Europe Leaves Home” by Kenneth Roberts. Written about 100 years ago, it is full of descriptions of “filthy”, “ignorant” and “backward” people coming to America by the millions from central and eastern Europe, i.e., the same rhetoric used to describe current immigrants.

    The Eastern and Southern European immigrants of the Great Wave Era very often were filthy, backward and ignorant. Many of them were turned back as unsuitable, especially if they proved diseased, or merely seemed likely to prove burdensome. Those admitted also shared the crux of European civilization, however, and later proved to have IQ distributions fairly close to native-born Americans– and, in the case of Eastern-European Jews, markedly higher! Ergo, they and, especially, their offspring were able to assimilate, once the immigration flood gates were finally closed, in the 1920s, limiting the flow to a relative trickle, for the next two generations.

    The endless millions of Latin American and other Third World peasants of the current tidal wave of immigration mostly do not have IQs close to the American median, and they also are coming to an advanced, 21st-Century, First World country, not to a largely agrarian, 19th-Century one, where brawn still was needed en masse, both on the farms and in the mills and factories, inter alia. They also are coming now to a welfare state that did not exist, back during the Great Wave. A large portion of immigrants to America, in that earlier era, returned to Europe, either because they could not succeed here or because they simply did not readily assimilate to American society, and wished to go home. Today, the American government goes out of its way not to screen out low-quality, or even outright criminal, aliens; it practically refuses to deport them, even when they are here illegally. America’s current welfare state gives those Third World immigrants every reason to remain here, rather than to return to their own countries of origin– even when they dislike, or outright despise, the dwindling European-American majority and its traditional European-American culture.

    The earlier immigrants also tended to be from European peoples without strong national ties to the governments ruling them– e.g., the Austro-Hungarian Empire– and usually became patriotic Americans, often making sure that their children spoke only English, not their ancestral languages too. A large portion of today’s immigrants to America come bearing historical grudges against America– like the national loathing that most Mexicans have for America, as a country, and for gringos, generally– and they relate to their ancestral countries and peoples, not to traditional Americans and to Western Civilization, generally. Identity politics, today, is largely based on recent immigrants and their native-born descendants who refuse to assimilate fully, as previous immigrants and their descendants did. The contemporary Democratic Party and ethnic lobbies all are dependent, now, upon maintaining the alienness of even native-born minorities.

    It is beyond peradventure that the immigration deluge unleashed by the 1965 act has proved a boon, economically and otherwise, to only two appreciable groups: the immigrant communities themselves and the plutocratic ownership class that has grown ever-richer off of cheap labor and resource scarcity (e.g., housing stock). The rest of us have been virtually transplanted to a modern-day version of Babylon.

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    • Replies: @Corvinus
    “The Eastern and Southern European immigrants of the Great Wave Era very often were filthy, backward and ignorant.”

    As were considered by nativists the Germans and Irish, who came from Western and Northern European, especially those “nasty” Catholics. It’s really a matter of one’s personal opinion. Were not your ancestors, I believe it was ‘nana, from Hungary, or some other similar “shithole”? (I am unable to specifically recall?) Yet, you have the audacity to claim citizenship here in MY country. Go back to where you came from.

    “Many of them were turned back as unsuitable, especially if they proved diseased, or merely seemed likely to prove burdensome.”

    As were the English, the Welsh, the Irish, the Germans, etc., any and all who failed to meet certain criteria.

    “Those admitted also shared the crux of European civilization, however, and later proved to have IQ distributions fairly close to native-born Americans– and, in the case of Eastern-European Jews, markedly higher!”

    Later proved, huh. Do you have a source? Because these newcomers “sharing the crux of European civilization” were NOT viewed by nativists in that glorious light you shine on them. In 1917, Robert Yerkes argued from his army test score samples there were consistently lower IQ levels amongst those from Eastern and Southern Europe. He surmised that their presence would lead to an overall decline in national IQ. You are saying they rose above their status. I am interested in what information you can offer to disprove Yerkes.

    “Ergo, they and, especially, their offspring were able to assimilate, once the immigration flood gates were finally closed, in the 1920s, limiting the flow to a relative trickle, for the next two generations.”

    As have the Chinese, the Vietnamese, the Kenyans, the Assyrians, etc.

    “The endless millions of Latin American and other Third World peasants of the current tidal wave of immigration mostly do not have IQs close to the American median”

    Assuming that IQ is the end all and be all, given how it has become highly politicized. If one subscribes to the controversial work of Robert Lynn, he posits that apparent low IQ’s is the result of poor nutrition and other social factors. Of course, you do realize that several of his data points in his seminal work conducted over a decade ago were NOT based on the residents of the named countries. Until the United Nations makes itself useful and decides to settle this controversy once and for all by conducting a longitudinal study involving all nations of the world on this subject, parroting the phrase “The IQ of Third Worlders is not on par with First Worlders” is merely a meme.

    “…advanced, 21st-Century, First World country.”

    I thought America today was a Third World country. It's really difficult to keep up with people’s descriptions of our country.

    “Today, the American government goes out of its way not to screen out low-quality, or even outright criminal, aliens; it practically refuses to deport them, even when they are here illegally.

    You’re going to have to do more than spew out the company line here.

    “America’s current welfare state gives those Third World immigrants every reason to remain here, rather than to return to their own countries of origin.””


    Yes, there’s truth in this statement.

    
“even when they dislike, or outright despise, the dwindling European-American majority and its traditional European-American culture.”

    [Squawk] more parroting.

    “The earlier immigrants also tended to be from European peoples without strong national ties to the governments ruling them– e.g., the Austro-Hungarian Empire– and usually became patriotic Americans, often making sure that their children spoke only English, not their ancestral languages too.”

    [Laughs] no, Eastern and Southern Europeans in particular clung on to their language and customs, exactly the reasons why nativists despised them!

    “A large portion of today’s immigrants to America come bearing historical grudges against America– like the national loathing that most Mexicans have for America, as a country, and for gringos, generally– and they relate to their ancestral countries and peoples, not to traditional Americans and to Western Civilization, generally.”

    [Squawk] more parroting.

    “Identity politics, today, is largely based on recent immigrants and their native-born descendants who refuse to assimilate fully, as previous immigrants and their descendants did.”

    Identity politics, today and yesterday, has always been predicated on newly arrived immigrants.

    “The contemporary Democratic Party and ethnic lobbies all are dependent, now, upon maintaining the alienness of even native-born minorities.”

    [Squawk] more parroting.

    “the immigrant communities themselves and the plutocratic ownership class that has grown ever-richer off of cheap labor and resource scarcity (e.g., housing stock).”

    Are you that impotent as a white male in that you lack any plan to thwart the machinations of these “plutocrats”? Do not this group of people have the liberty to do what they want with their property?
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  150. Singapore has an effective government and low taxes.
    But Singapore only has 278 square miles of land.

    The Congo is ⅔ the size of Western Europe.
    A twenty year genocide has claimed 5.4 million lives so far.

    If Singapore stopped the genocide, Singapore could be paid with land in the Congo.

    With a nation-sized piece of land, Singapore could sell citizenship to a billion insured immigrants,and earn trillions of dollars.

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  151. This is confusing stuff to me so I’m inclined to believe this suggestion will never be enacted because believing that excuses me from having to think too deeply about the details of this stuff.

    Is there anyone out there who understands this stuff well yet also believes that it will never happen due to political barriers?

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  152. @Dave Pinsen
    Yes, and I had a follow up comment about that I deleted. But here's the tl;dr version:

    The complex federal mishmash of taxes and grants such as the EITC obscures who is a net tax payer, which helps mass immigration advocates. If everyone realized that most unskilled immigrants are net tax consumers, public opinion would be even more opposed to it (this was a big, unspoken reason why the media jumped on Mitt over his "47%" comment).

    Years ago, Charles Murray proposed a basic income / negative income tax to replace the EITC, etc., and there's been more punditry about that recently (Finland also started a basic income experiment). One virtue of basic income is, if it were phased out at a certain income level, it would be obvious that everyone below that level was a net tax consumer, and that it made no economic sense to import more tax consumers.

    Years ago, Charles Murray proposed a basic income / negative income tax to replace the EITC, etc., and there’s been more punditry about that recently (Finland also started a basic income experiment). One virtue of basic income is, if it were phased out at a certain income level….

    Why would you phase it out? And, if it were phased out, how would it be a “basic income”?

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  153. @Corvinus
    And I am assuming you are able to offer how this plan is constitutional, right? Please, I am all ears.

    As constitutional as a right to gay marriage?

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    • Replies: @Corvinus
    I am interested in your take how the plan of "making citizens shareholders of the country" meets constitutional scrutiny, NOT gay marriage, something you are all too familiar with.
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  154. @Corvinus
    "If White people had never existed, neither would have Christmas."

    Jesus was Jewish. I thought Jews weren't "white people".

    “If White people had never existed, neither would have Christmas.”

    Jesus was Jewish. I thought Jews weren’t “white people”.

    You are a monumental moron. Everyone else here can understand that there is no contradiction between the statements that (1) “Jesus was Jewish” and (2) “If White people had never existed, neither would have Christmas”.

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    • Replies: @Corvinus
    Your obsession with everything white is duly noted. It still stands that Christmas, as a celebration of the birth of Jesus to the Virgin Mary as a fulfillment of the Old Testament's Messianic prophecy, was "invented" by da Joos, who are not white.
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  155. @D. K.
    The Germans, in June 1941, and the Japanese, in December 1941, both did what they then believed that they had to do, in order to secure their own national survival as great world powers. Hitler apparently believed that the Soviet Union was on the verge of overrunning not only Germany, but the entire European continent; and, there is a recent school of historians who totally agree with that assessment, based on the old Soviet archives. Japan always has been devoid of bounteous natural resources, especially fuel stuffs, and felt that it needed to expand its empire, at that very moment, or risk imploding. Both Germany and Japan were being relentlessly goaded into war with the United States, on FDR's own initiative. That is why Hitler felt fully justified in declaring war against the U.S., after Pearl Harbor. I can see his point, although I still believe that it was an enormous mistake, because the American public otherwise would have demanded that all our resources be brought to bear against the Japanese, with no more diverted to aid Britain in the European Theater of war, in its fight against the Germans and their European allies.

    The fact that neither Germany nor Japan was successful, in the longer run, nearly four years down the road, does not mean that they necessarily made the wrong choices, from among those plausible choices that they had at their respective disposal, back in 1941. Remember, Britain unilaterally declared war on Germany-- but not on the Soviet Union!-- for its invasion of Poland, in September 1939, and then went on to "victory;" but, it also virtually bankrupted itself, to do so, and then had to relinquish its worldwide empire, as a result of its diminished post-war stature. The depravations of World War II led directly to Labour's victory, ousting Churchill's wartime Tory government, before victory even was secured in the Pacific Theater (overwhelmingly by the United States, especially in the contrasting forms of its two successfully delivered atomic bombs), which then led to Britain's former colonies colonizing the British Isles themselves-- such that the English now find themselves a minority in their own capital! King Pyrrhus must be laughing his otherworldly ass off....

    Hitler apparently believed that the Soviet Union was on the verge of overrunning not only Germany, but the entire European continent

    Is there a quote of Hitler saying this at the time? In Antony Beevor’s Stalingrad book, he quotes Hitler as saying, on the eve of Operation Barbarossa, something to the effect that Russia was a rotting structure that would collapse once he kicked the door in.

    Beevor also writes that no European country in 1941 was impressed with Russia’s military prowess, particularly after the trouble tiny Finland had given them . He says the only foreign intelligence service that respected Russian military prowess was Japan’s, because they had gotten beaten by the Russians at Khalkin Gol in Mongolia in ’39.

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    There's a lot of confusion and misunderstanding out there. Hitler said Russia was England's ultimate hope (as it was against Napoleon), and that once Russia was finished, she'd have no more hope of returning to the continent. In other words, he thought Russia would ultimately join the war against Germany. For many reasons this appears to have been true. This makes Hitler's war a preventive war.

    It was also, simultaneously, a war of conquest to conquer lebensraum for the German people.

    (Similarly, Stalin's war was a war of self-defense. It was also, simultaneously, a war of ideological conquest to spread communism.)

    Had Stalin been on the verge of attacking, and had Hitler known this, that would have made Hitler's war a pre-emptive war. It would, nevertheless, still have been a war of conquest.
    , @D. K.
    Here is an old column, posted at the left-wing "Huffington Post" Web site, written by left-leaning journalist Eric Margolis, who has since had his new columns reposted here, at "The Unz Review":

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/eric-margolis/time-to-face-the-truth-ab_b_282379.html

    EXCERPT:

    ***

    From digging in GRU files, Suvarov asserts that in the spring of 1941, Stalin was poised to launch 170 divisions, 24,000 tanks and thousands of warplanes in a surprise blitzkrieg against Western Europe, supported by mountains of munitions and more reserve armies from Asia and the Far East. One of the first targets was Ploesti, Romania, Germany's sole source of oil (except for ersatz fuel from coal). Germany was also Italy's sole source of oil. Losing Ploesti would have knocked both industrially weak Axis powers out of the war.

    The Red Army and Air Force were deployed in vulnerable offensive formations hard on the new German-Soviet border. Stalin ordered all 1,000-plus defensive casemates of the formidable Stalin Line defending the USSR's western border destroyed to emphasize the offensive mission of the Red Army.

    But Hitler struck first. Learning of the Soviet threat, Hitler secretly massed his armies and attacked on 22 June, 1941. Operation Barbarossa caught the Russians flat-footed: warplanes on the ground, tanks on rail cars, munitions in the open. The US Navy accomplished the same feat against the Japanese carrier force at Midway.

    Soviet ground forces were quickly enveloped, cut off and destroyed in vast numbers. Had they been positioned in defensive deployments behind the casemates and artillery positions of the Stalin Line, which ran unbroken from the Baltic to the Black Sea, this rout would not have happened.

    Soviet propaganda later tried to cover up Stalin's plan to attack Europe, claiming his forces were outmoded and unprepared, and generals incompetent. According to the party line, Stalin only signed the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact to buy time to prepare for war. This view still prevails today.

    Not so, claims Suvarov. His view will infuriate mainstream historians. I poured through Suvarov's meticulous military analysis. To me, as a veteran military analyst, teacher of strategic studies, and war correspondent, his figures appear to confirm that Stalin was just about to attack Western Europe when Hitler pre-empted him.

    Four years later, in 1945, Stalin's Red Army had taken half of Europe. But, contends Suvarov, had Hitler not attacked first in 1941, Stalin's 30-million man army, backed by mammoth industrial production, would have overwhelmed all of Europe in a 1941 surprise blitz.

    Suvarov's unstated conclusion: Hitler saved Western Europe from Stalin. He argues, less convincingly, that Hitler's offensive into Russia led to the inevitable downfall of the Soviet Union in 1991 - and the real end of WWII.

    ***

    This relatively recent line of historical research is the basis of my own revisionist views on that particular aspect of World War II.
    , @Steve Sailer
    Countries have lots of plans sitting around in file cabinets to invade other countries.

    Stalin had lots of warning in 1941 that Hitler would invade but he failed to either go on the offense or the defense, so the Soviets' losses were particularly bad for the first half year of the war.

    Stalin had been counting on a repeat of the WWI stalemate between Germany and France, which would allow the Soviet Union to eventually attack opportunistically when the the two sides were exhausted. But the German triumph of 1940 surprised him and left Stalin without much of a plan.
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  156. @Anonymous
    Of course they can rein in its leaders. They can vote, engage in civil disobedience, armed revolt, etc. Ignorance and moral turpitude are no excuse, and they are ultimately liable for producing these emigrants and the refugee crisis being visited upon the neighboring countries and Europe.

    Of course they can rein in its leaders. They can vote, engage in civil disobedience, armed revolt, etc. Ignorance and moral turpitude are no excuse, and they are ultimately liable for producing these emigrants and the refugee crisis being visited upon the neighboring countries and Europe.

    Ignorance and moral turpitude are no excuse? There is no moral turpitude on the part of Americans, and ignorance most certainly is an excuse if one is evolved to rely on others for one’s information. What the hell is wrong with you?

    Possible correct answers:

    (1) I am part of a group that has a conflict of interest with Americans.
    (2) I have been indoctrinated to think that I am part of a group that has a conflict of interest with Americans.

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  157. @Dave Pinsen

    Hitler apparently believed that the Soviet Union was on the verge of overrunning not only Germany, but the entire European continent
     
    Is there a quote of Hitler saying this at the time? In Antony Beevor's Stalingrad book, he quotes Hitler as saying, on the eve of Operation Barbarossa, something to the effect that Russia was a rotting structure that would collapse once he kicked the door in.

    Beevor also writes that no European country in 1941 was impressed with Russia's military prowess, particularly after the trouble tiny Finland had given them . He says the only foreign intelligence service that respected Russian military prowess was Japan's, because they had gotten beaten by the Russians at Khalkin Gol in Mongolia in '39.

    There’s a lot of confusion and misunderstanding out there. Hitler said Russia was England’s ultimate hope (as it was against Napoleon), and that once Russia was finished, she’d have no more hope of returning to the continent. In other words, he thought Russia would ultimately join the war against Germany. For many reasons this appears to have been true. This makes Hitler’s war a preventive war.

    It was also, simultaneously, a war of conquest to conquer lebensraum for the German people.

    (Similarly, Stalin’s war was a war of self-defense. It was also, simultaneously, a war of ideological conquest to spread communism.)

    Had Stalin been on the verge of attacking, and had Hitler known this, that would have made Hitler’s war a pre-emptive war. It would, nevertheless, still have been a war of conquest.

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  158. @tbraton
    Well, actually the Romans of that age were a very literate people. I was thinking of Pliny the Younger and other contemporaries who left us accounts of the eruption of Vesuvius and the destruction of Pompei in 79 A.D., about the time the four Gospels were being composed. According to Wikipedia: "Pliny the Younger provided a first-hand account of the eruption of Mount Vesuvius from his position across the Bay of Naples at Misenum, in a version he wrote 25 years after the event. His uncle, Pliny the Elder, with whom he had a close relationship, died while attempting to rescue stranded victims. As admiral of the fleet, Pliny the Elder had ordered the ships of the Imperial Navy stationed at Misenum to cross the bay to assist evacuation attempts. Volcanologists have recognised the importance of Pliny the Younger's account of the eruption by calling similar events "Plinian". The eruption was documented by contemporary historians and is generally accepted as having started on 24 August 79, relying on one version of the text of Pliny's letter. However the archeological excavations of Pompeii suggest that the city was buried about three months later.[17] This is supported by another version of the letter,[18] which gives the date of the eruption as November 23." As I pointed out in another post, the famous Jewish/Roman Josephus lived from 37 A.D. to 100 A.D. and wrote a history of the Jews. You think someone like that would be highly conversant with the events of his own people in his own century.

    the Romans of that age were a very literate people

    Except that Greg Clark cites partial data IIRC from the Claudian census. A surprisingly high number of people appear to have been aged multiples of five (i.e. 25, 30, 35, 40, etc.), for which the only explanation is that they really didn’t know how old they were, and just gave an approximate age. This means probably they were born to illiterate families. He also cites data from inscriptions on gravestones of wealthy merchants – they have the same phenomenon, i.e. rich merchants were also often illiterate (or at least born to illiterate families).

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  159. @ben tillman

    “If White people had never existed, neither would have Christmas.”

    Jesus was Jewish. I thought Jews weren’t “white people”.
     
    You are a monumental moron. Everyone else here can understand that there is no contradiction between the statements that (1) "Jesus was Jewish" and (2) "If White people had never existed, neither would have Christmas".

    Your obsession with everything white is duly noted. It still stands that Christmas, as a celebration of the birth of Jesus to the Virgin Mary as a fulfillment of the Old Testament’s Messianic prophecy, was “invented” by da Joos, who are not white.

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  160. @Dave Pinsen
    As constitutional as a right to gay marriage?

    I am interested in your take how the plan of “making citizens shareholders of the country” meets constitutional scrutiny, NOT gay marriage, something you are all too familiar with.

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  161. @D. K.
    The Eastern and Southern European immigrants of the Great Wave Era very often were filthy, backward and ignorant. Many of them were turned back as unsuitable, especially if they proved diseased, or merely seemed likely to prove burdensome. Those admitted also shared the crux of European civilization, however, and later proved to have IQ distributions fairly close to native-born Americans-- and, in the case of Eastern-European Jews, markedly higher! Ergo, they and, especially, their offspring were able to assimilate, once the immigration flood gates were finally closed, in the 1920s, limiting the flow to a relative trickle, for the next two generations.

    The endless millions of Latin American and other Third World peasants of the current tidal wave of immigration mostly do not have IQs close to the American median, and they also are coming to an advanced, 21st-Century, First World country, not to a largely agrarian, 19th-Century one, where brawn still was needed en masse, both on the farms and in the mills and factories, inter alia. They also are coming now to a welfare state that did not exist, back during the Great Wave. A large portion of immigrants to America, in that earlier era, returned to Europe, either because they could not succeed here or because they simply did not readily assimilate to American society, and wished to go home. Today, the American government goes out of its way not to screen out low-quality, or even outright criminal, aliens; it practically refuses to deport them, even when they are here illegally. America's current welfare state gives those Third World immigrants every reason to remain here, rather than to return to their own countries of origin-- even when they dislike, or outright despise, the dwindling European-American majority and its traditional European-American culture.

    The earlier immigrants also tended to be from European peoples without strong national ties to the governments ruling them-- e.g., the Austro-Hungarian Empire-- and usually became patriotic Americans, often making sure that their children spoke only English, not their ancestral languages too. A large portion of today's immigrants to America come bearing historical grudges against America-- like the national loathing that most Mexicans have for America, as a country, and for gringos, generally-- and they relate to their ancestral countries and peoples, not to traditional Americans and to Western Civilization, generally. Identity politics, today, is largely based on recent immigrants and their native-born descendants who refuse to assimilate fully, as previous immigrants and their descendants did. The contemporary Democratic Party and ethnic lobbies all are dependent, now, upon maintaining the alienness of even native-born minorities.

    It is beyond peradventure that the immigration deluge unleashed by the 1965 act has proved a boon, economically and otherwise, to only two appreciable groups: the immigrant communities themselves and the plutocratic ownership class that has grown ever-richer off of cheap labor and resource scarcity (e.g., housing stock). The rest of us have been virtually transplanted to a modern-day version of Babylon.

    “The Eastern and Southern European immigrants of the Great Wave Era very often were filthy, backward and ignorant.”

    As were considered by nativists the Germans and Irish, who came from Western and Northern European, especially those “nasty” Catholics. It’s really a matter of one’s personal opinion. Were not your ancestors, I believe it was ‘nana, from Hungary, or some other similar “shithole”? (I am unable to specifically recall?) Yet, you have the audacity to claim citizenship here in MY country. Go back to where you came from.

    “Many of them were turned back as unsuitable, especially if they proved diseased, or merely seemed likely to prove burdensome.”

    As were the English, the Welsh, the Irish, the Germans, etc., any and all who failed to meet certain criteria.

    “Those admitted also shared the crux of European civilization, however, and later proved to have IQ distributions fairly close to native-born Americans– and, in the case of Eastern-European Jews, markedly higher!”

    Later proved, huh. Do you have a source? Because these newcomers “sharing the crux of European civilization” were NOT viewed by nativists in that glorious light you shine on them. In 1917, Robert Yerkes argued from his army test score samples there were consistently lower IQ levels amongst those from Eastern and Southern Europe. He surmised that their presence would lead to an overall decline in national IQ. You are saying they rose above their status. I am interested in what information you can offer to disprove Yerkes.

    “Ergo, they and, especially, their offspring were able to assimilate, once the immigration flood gates were finally closed, in the 1920s, limiting the flow to a relative trickle, for the next two generations.”

    As have the Chinese, the Vietnamese, the Kenyans, the Assyrians, etc.

    “The endless millions of Latin American and other Third World peasants of the current tidal wave of immigration mostly do not have IQs close to the American median”

    Assuming that IQ is the end all and be all, given how it has become highly politicized. If one subscribes to the controversial work of Robert Lynn, he posits that apparent low IQ’s is the result of poor nutrition and other social factors. Of course, you do realize that several of his data points in his seminal work conducted over a decade ago were NOT based on the residents of the named countries. Until the United Nations makes itself useful and decides to settle this controversy once and for all by conducting a longitudinal study involving all nations of the world on this subject, parroting the phrase “The IQ of Third Worlders is not on par with First Worlders” is merely a meme.

    “…advanced, 21st-Century, First World country.”

    I thought America today was a Third World country. It’s really difficult to keep up with people’s descriptions of our country.

    “Today, the American government goes out of its way not to screen out low-quality, or even outright criminal, aliens; it practically refuses to deport them, even when they are here illegally.

    You’re going to have to do more than spew out the company line here.

    “America’s current welfare state gives those Third World immigrants every reason to remain here, rather than to return to their own countries of origin.””


    Yes, there’s truth in this statement.

    
“even when they dislike, or outright despise, the dwindling European-American majority and its traditional European-American culture.”

    [Squawk] more parroting.

    “The earlier immigrants also tended to be from European peoples without strong national ties to the governments ruling them– e.g., the Austro-Hungarian Empire– and usually became patriotic Americans, often making sure that their children spoke only English, not their ancestral languages too.”

    [Laughs] no, Eastern and Southern Europeans in particular clung on to their language and customs, exactly the reasons why nativists despised them!

    “A large portion of today’s immigrants to America come bearing historical grudges against America– like the national loathing that most Mexicans have for America, as a country, and for gringos, generally– and they relate to their ancestral countries and peoples, not to traditional Americans and to Western Civilization, generally.”

    [Squawk] more parroting.

    “Identity politics, today, is largely based on recent immigrants and their native-born descendants who refuse to assimilate fully, as previous immigrants and their descendants did.”

    Identity politics, today and yesterday, has always been predicated on newly arrived immigrants.

    “The contemporary Democratic Party and ethnic lobbies all are dependent, now, upon maintaining the alienness of even native-born minorities.”

    [Squawk] more parroting.

    “the immigrant communities themselves and the plutocratic ownership class that has grown ever-richer off of cheap labor and resource scarcity (e.g., housing stock).”

    Are you that impotent as a white male in that you lack any plan to thwart the machinations of these “plutocrats”? Do not this group of people have the liberty to do what they want with their property?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Divine Right
    “Ergo, they and, especially, their offspring were able to assimilate, once the immigration flood gates were finally closed, in the 1920s, limiting the flow to a relative trickle, for the next two generations.”

    "As have the Chinese, the Vietnamese, the Kenyans, the Assyrians, etc."

    But not the Arabs, apparently. Muslim/Arab populations in Europe also seem to be having some difficulty in assimilating, but I'm sure things will somehow be different here for some reason. Or perhaps you think those groups and cultures are all interchangeable?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dzhokhar_Tsarnaev

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2005_French_riots

    "[Squawk] more parroting."

    I'm assuming that you couldn't rebut those points, so you just typed something and moved on.

    "Are you that impotent as a white male in that you lack any plan to thwart the machinations of these “plutocrats”?"

    The plan is easy: don't give them what they want.

    "Because these newcomers “sharing the crux of European civilization” were NOT viewed by nativists in that glorious light you shine on them."

    Which is irrelevant. I think you're trying to imply that since previous European immigrants were not always looked upon kindly but turned out okay, current non-European immigrants who aren't being welcomed with open arms will yield the same outcome. Obviously, that's not supportable given the data that is already available (i.e. 3rd and 4th generation Hispanics do no better academically than 2nd generation Hispanics and all plateau below the white average; given our inability to close the racial gap in performance between whites and blacks, despite enormous effort and time, it is likely a similar outcome awaits the progeny of many of the immigrant groups we are admitting into our country).

    "Identity politics, today and yesterday, has always been predicated on newly arrived immigrants."

    Also predicated on their descendants.

    http://mearsheimer.uchicago.edu/pdfs/IsraelLobby.pdf

    “A large portion of today’s immigrants to America come bearing historical grudges against America– like the national loathing that most Mexicans have for America, as a country, and for gringos, generally– and they relate to their ancestral countries and peoples, not to traditional Americans and to Western Civilization, generally.”

    "[Squawk] more parroting."

    http://www.nationalmecha.org/about.html

    http://www.mayorno.com/WhoIsMecha.html

    "As were the English, the Welsh, the Irish, the Germans, etc., any and all who failed to meet certain criteria."

    Do any of those criteria apply today?

    "I thought America today was a Third World country. It’s really difficult to keep up with people’s descriptions of our country."

    Why? People seem to have been down on it for quite some time. Doesn't seem so difficult.
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  162. Steve, this is a brilliant idea, required insurance for immigrants. I was about to propose a security tax on Mexicans and Moslems.These two groups are the reason we have this vast internal security state, so they should pitch in and contribute more than their fair share. My only fear is that this will become a reliable revenue stream that more of these people will be encouraged to come here.
    Your insurance plan is even better. This must be encouraged.

    Read More
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  163. @Dave Pinsen

    Hitler apparently believed that the Soviet Union was on the verge of overrunning not only Germany, but the entire European continent
     
    Is there a quote of Hitler saying this at the time? In Antony Beevor's Stalingrad book, he quotes Hitler as saying, on the eve of Operation Barbarossa, something to the effect that Russia was a rotting structure that would collapse once he kicked the door in.

    Beevor also writes that no European country in 1941 was impressed with Russia's military prowess, particularly after the trouble tiny Finland had given them . He says the only foreign intelligence service that respected Russian military prowess was Japan's, because they had gotten beaten by the Russians at Khalkin Gol in Mongolia in '39.

    Here is an old column, posted at the left-wing “Huffington Post” Web site, written by left-leaning journalist Eric Margolis, who has since had his new columns reposted here, at “The Unz Review”:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/eric-margolis/time-to-face-the-truth-ab_b_282379.html

    EXCERPT:

    ***

    From digging in GRU files, Suvarov asserts that in the spring of 1941, Stalin was poised to launch 170 divisions, 24,000 tanks and thousands of warplanes in a surprise blitzkrieg against Western Europe, supported by mountains of munitions and more reserve armies from Asia and the Far East. One of the first targets was Ploesti, Romania, Germany’s sole source of oil (except for ersatz fuel from coal). Germany was also Italy’s sole source of oil. Losing Ploesti would have knocked both industrially weak Axis powers out of the war.

    The Red Army and Air Force were deployed in vulnerable offensive formations hard on the new German-Soviet border. Stalin ordered all 1,000-plus defensive casemates of the formidable Stalin Line defending the USSR’s western border destroyed to emphasize the offensive mission of the Red Army.

    But Hitler struck first. Learning of the Soviet threat, Hitler secretly massed his armies and attacked on 22 June, 1941. Operation Barbarossa caught the Russians flat-footed: warplanes on the ground, tanks on rail cars, munitions in the open. The US Navy accomplished the same feat against the Japanese carrier force at Midway.

    Soviet ground forces were quickly enveloped, cut off and destroyed in vast numbers. Had they been positioned in defensive deployments behind the casemates and artillery positions of the Stalin Line, which ran unbroken from the Baltic to the Black Sea, this rout would not have happened.

    Soviet propaganda later tried to cover up Stalin’s plan to attack Europe, claiming his forces were outmoded and unprepared, and generals incompetent. According to the party line, Stalin only signed the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact to buy time to prepare for war. This view still prevails today.

    Not so, claims Suvarov. His view will infuriate mainstream historians. I poured through Suvarov’s meticulous military analysis. To me, as a veteran military analyst, teacher of strategic studies, and war correspondent, his figures appear to confirm that Stalin was just about to attack Western Europe when Hitler pre-empted him.

    Four years later, in 1945, Stalin’s Red Army had taken half of Europe. But, contends Suvarov, had Hitler not attacked first in 1941, Stalin’s 30-million man army, backed by mammoth industrial production, would have overwhelmed all of Europe in a 1941 surprise blitz.

    Suvarov’s unstated conclusion: Hitler saved Western Europe from Stalin. He argues, less convincingly, that Hitler’s offensive into Russia led to the inevitable downfall of the Soviet Union in 1991 – and the real end of WWII.

    ***

    This relatively recent line of historical research is the basis of my own revisionist views on that particular aspect of World War II.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The most deplorable one
    Well, Stalin/USSR did attack Finland in 1939 but the usual suspects claim that Suvarov was on drugs.
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  164. @Corvinus
    “The Eastern and Southern European immigrants of the Great Wave Era very often were filthy, backward and ignorant.”

    As were considered by nativists the Germans and Irish, who came from Western and Northern European, especially those “nasty” Catholics. It’s really a matter of one’s personal opinion. Were not your ancestors, I believe it was ‘nana, from Hungary, or some other similar “shithole”? (I am unable to specifically recall?) Yet, you have the audacity to claim citizenship here in MY country. Go back to where you came from.

    “Many of them were turned back as unsuitable, especially if they proved diseased, or merely seemed likely to prove burdensome.”

    As were the English, the Welsh, the Irish, the Germans, etc., any and all who failed to meet certain criteria.

    “Those admitted also shared the crux of European civilization, however, and later proved to have IQ distributions fairly close to native-born Americans– and, in the case of Eastern-European Jews, markedly higher!”

    Later proved, huh. Do you have a source? Because these newcomers “sharing the crux of European civilization” were NOT viewed by nativists in that glorious light you shine on them. In 1917, Robert Yerkes argued from his army test score samples there were consistently lower IQ levels amongst those from Eastern and Southern Europe. He surmised that their presence would lead to an overall decline in national IQ. You are saying they rose above their status. I am interested in what information you can offer to disprove Yerkes.

    “Ergo, they and, especially, their offspring were able to assimilate, once the immigration flood gates were finally closed, in the 1920s, limiting the flow to a relative trickle, for the next two generations.”

    As have the Chinese, the Vietnamese, the Kenyans, the Assyrians, etc.

    “The endless millions of Latin American and other Third World peasants of the current tidal wave of immigration mostly do not have IQs close to the American median”

    Assuming that IQ is the end all and be all, given how it has become highly politicized. If one subscribes to the controversial work of Robert Lynn, he posits that apparent low IQ’s is the result of poor nutrition and other social factors. Of course, you do realize that several of his data points in his seminal work conducted over a decade ago were NOT based on the residents of the named countries. Until the United Nations makes itself useful and decides to settle this controversy once and for all by conducting a longitudinal study involving all nations of the world on this subject, parroting the phrase “The IQ of Third Worlders is not on par with First Worlders” is merely a meme.

    “…advanced, 21st-Century, First World country.”

    I thought America today was a Third World country. It's really difficult to keep up with people’s descriptions of our country.

    “Today, the American government goes out of its way not to screen out low-quality, or even outright criminal, aliens; it practically refuses to deport them, even when they are here illegally.

    You’re going to have to do more than spew out the company line here.

    “America’s current welfare state gives those Third World immigrants every reason to remain here, rather than to return to their own countries of origin.””


    Yes, there’s truth in this statement.

    
“even when they dislike, or outright despise, the dwindling European-American majority and its traditional European-American culture.”

    [Squawk] more parroting.

    “The earlier immigrants also tended to be from European peoples without strong national ties to the governments ruling them– e.g., the Austro-Hungarian Empire– and usually became patriotic Americans, often making sure that their children spoke only English, not their ancestral languages too.”

    [Laughs] no, Eastern and Southern Europeans in particular clung on to their language and customs, exactly the reasons why nativists despised them!

    “A large portion of today’s immigrants to America come bearing historical grudges against America– like the national loathing that most Mexicans have for America, as a country, and for gringos, generally– and they relate to their ancestral countries and peoples, not to traditional Americans and to Western Civilization, generally.”

    [Squawk] more parroting.

    “Identity politics, today, is largely based on recent immigrants and their native-born descendants who refuse to assimilate fully, as previous immigrants and their descendants did.”

    Identity politics, today and yesterday, has always been predicated on newly arrived immigrants.

    “The contemporary Democratic Party and ethnic lobbies all are dependent, now, upon maintaining the alienness of even native-born minorities.”

    [Squawk] more parroting.

    “the immigrant communities themselves and the plutocratic ownership class that has grown ever-richer off of cheap labor and resource scarcity (e.g., housing stock).”

    Are you that impotent as a white male in that you lack any plan to thwart the machinations of these “plutocrats”? Do not this group of people have the liberty to do what they want with their property?

    “Ergo, they and, especially, their offspring were able to assimilate, once the immigration flood gates were finally closed, in the 1920s, limiting the flow to a relative trickle, for the next two generations.”

    “As have the Chinese, the Vietnamese, the Kenyans, the Assyrians, etc.”

    But not the Arabs, apparently. Muslim/Arab populations in Europe also seem to be having some difficulty in assimilating, but I’m sure things will somehow be different here for some reason. Or perhaps you think those groups and cultures are all interchangeable?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dzhokhar_Tsarnaev

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2005_French_riots

    “[Squawk] more parroting.”

    I’m assuming that you couldn’t rebut those points, so you just typed something and moved on.

    “Are you that impotent as a white male in that you lack any plan to thwart the machinations of these “plutocrats”?”

    The plan is easy: don’t give them what they want.

    “Because these newcomers “sharing the crux of European civilization” were NOT viewed by nativists in that glorious light you shine on them.”

    Which is irrelevant. I think you’re trying to imply that since previous European immigrants were not always looked upon kindly but turned out okay, current non-European immigrants who aren’t being welcomed with open arms will yield the same outcome. Obviously, that’s not supportable given the data that is already available (i.e. 3rd and 4th generation Hispanics do no better academically than 2nd generation Hispanics and all plateau below the white average; given our inability to close the racial gap in performance between whites and blacks, despite enormous effort and time, it is likely a similar outcome awaits the progeny of many of the immigrant groups we are admitting into our country).

    “Identity politics, today and yesterday, has always been predicated on newly arrived immigrants.”

    Also predicated on their descendants.

    http://mearsheimer.uchicago.edu/pdfs/IsraelLobby.pdf

    “A large portion of today’s immigrants to America come bearing historical grudges against America– like the national loathing that most Mexicans have for America, as a country, and for gringos, generally– and they relate to their ancestral countries and peoples, not to traditional Americans and to Western Civilization, generally.”

    “[Squawk] more parroting.”

    http://www.nationalmecha.org/about.html

    http://www.mayorno.com/WhoIsMecha.html

    “As were the English, the Welsh, the Irish, the Germans, etc., any and all who failed to meet certain criteria.”

    Do any of those criteria apply today?

    “I thought America today was a Third World country. It’s really difficult to keep up with people’s descriptions of our country.”

    Why? People seem to have been down on it for quite some time. Doesn’t seem so difficult.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Corvinus
    “But not the Arabs, apparently.”

    You would be in error. Read about Yusuf Arbeely and his cohorts.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=SOvskj0HNt8C&pg=PT270&lpg=PT270&dq=Yusif+Arbeely&source=bl&ots=Ia4nl_J6ED&sig=Hrj07hwdTshV5TGIT0i1sRsDh9w&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwir5d68pP3JAhWE2T4KHWUDB5YQ6AEIJzAC#v=onepage&q=Yusif%20Arbeely&f=false

    “Or perhaps you think those groups and cultures are all interchangeable?”

    Riots between nativists and newcomers are not surprisingly. Damn Catholics, right?

    http://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/archive/nativist-riots-of-1844/

    “I’m assuming that you couldn’t rebut those points…”

    

It was actually a Coalition Of The Fringe Right talking point. I used the appropriate refutation.

    “The plan is easy: don’t give them what they want.”

    Assuming you are a competent white male, and assuming this “plan is easy”, I imagine that you will be at the forefront of its implementation?

    “Obviously, that’s not supportable given the data that is already available (i.e. 3rd and 4th generation Hispanics do no better academically than 2nd generation Hispanics and all plateau below the white average…”

    The question is, why? What drives success in humans? A superiority complex, a feeling that what you’ve done is not good enough, and impulse control. These are individual characteristics found in ALL cultures and societies. Some groups are instilling hem more frequently than other groups, in part due to parental socioeconomic status, the communities these families reside in, and the overall economic climate.

    We can look at Hispanics overall, or we can look at specific groups. By 1990, United States-born Cuban children — whose parents had arrived as pauper exiles— were twice as likely as non-Hispanic whites to earn over $50,000 a year.

    Some food for thought…

    “Ethnic and Racial Disparities in Education: Psychology’s Contributions to Understanding and Reducing Disparities”, American Psychological Association, 2012 —>

    Controlling for socioeconomic status, immigrants from Asian and Latin American nations report valuing educational achievement and working harder, relative to their U.S. born counterparts. However, aggregated together, Asian Americans match or exceed the academic performance of Whites whereas Latinos have poorer performance on most markers of educational achievement. Some of these differences in achievement are due to the differential selectivity of immigrants from these two regions in the world, where proportionally more Latino immigrants are allowed to immigrate for family reunification, while relatively more immigrants from Asian countries enter the U.S. to fill employment shortages in the U.S. economy and, thus arrive in the U.S. with higher levels of education. Additionally, recent research suggests that the differences between Latinos and Asian Americans may be due to different levels of access to educational resources, the access of which is partly due to relatively higher socioeconomic status for Asian Americans. Many of the Asian Americans who succeed are able to convert educational and socioeconomic resources into supports for the academic achievements of the children. On the other hand, Latinos’ rates of educational performance are commensurate with their overrepresentation in the lower socioeconomic strata.

    “Also predicated on their descendants.”

    I am well aware of da Joo lobbyists, who are no different than “white” lobbyists who show their disdain for “whites who are anti-white” (whatever that means--perhaps you could fill me in).

    “Considering the ample time and opportunity liberals have had, you would think that some elite institution would have done it themselves by now…unless they’re afraid they’ll end up proving the opposition correct.”

    Maybe since you have time on your hands you could do the legwork, I mean, with your immense brainpower and all…
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  165. “Until the United Nations makes itself useful and decides to settle this controversy once and for all by conducting a longitudinal study involving all nations of the world on this subject, parroting the phrase “The IQ of Third Worlders is not on par with First Worlders” is merely a meme.”

    Why does the UN have to do this? Considering the ample time and opportunity liberals have had, you would think that some elite institution would have done it themselves by now…unless they’re afraid they’ll end up proving the opposition correct.

    “If one subscribes to the controversial work of Robert Lynn, he posits that apparent low IQ’s is the result of poor nutrition and other social factors”

    Also, genetic factors – which you left out.

    Read More
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  166. @Divine Right
    “Ergo, they and, especially, their offspring were able to assimilate, once the immigration flood gates were finally closed, in the 1920s, limiting the flow to a relative trickle, for the next two generations.”

    "As have the Chinese, the Vietnamese, the Kenyans, the Assyrians, etc."

    But not the Arabs, apparently. Muslim/Arab populations in Europe also seem to be having some difficulty in assimilating, but I'm sure things will somehow be different here for some reason. Or perhaps you think those groups and cultures are all interchangeable?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dzhokhar_Tsarnaev

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2005_French_riots

    "[Squawk] more parroting."

    I'm assuming that you couldn't rebut those points, so you just typed something and moved on.

    "Are you that impotent as a white male in that you lack any plan to thwart the machinations of these “plutocrats”?"

    The plan is easy: don't give them what they want.

    "Because these newcomers “sharing the crux of European civilization” were NOT viewed by nativists in that glorious light you shine on them."

    Which is irrelevant. I think you're trying to imply that since previous European immigrants were not always looked upon kindly but turned out okay, current non-European immigrants who aren't being welcomed with open arms will yield the same outcome. Obviously, that's not supportable given the data that is already available (i.e. 3rd and 4th generation Hispanics do no better academically than 2nd generation Hispanics and all plateau below the white average; given our inability to close the racial gap in performance between whites and blacks, despite enormous effort and time, it is likely a similar outcome awaits the progeny of many of the immigrant groups we are admitting into our country).

    "Identity politics, today and yesterday, has always been predicated on newly arrived immigrants."

    Also predicated on their descendants.

    http://mearsheimer.uchicago.edu/pdfs/IsraelLobby.pdf

    “A large portion of today’s immigrants to America come bearing historical grudges against America– like the national loathing that most Mexicans have for America, as a country, and for gringos, generally– and they relate to their ancestral countries and peoples, not to traditional Americans and to Western Civilization, generally.”

    "[Squawk] more parroting."

    http://www.nationalmecha.org/about.html

    http://www.mayorno.com/WhoIsMecha.html

    "As were the English, the Welsh, the Irish, the Germans, etc., any and all who failed to meet certain criteria."

    Do any of those criteria apply today?

    "I thought America today was a Third World country. It’s really difficult to keep up with people’s descriptions of our country."

    Why? People seem to have been down on it for quite some time. Doesn't seem so difficult.

    “But not the Arabs, apparently.”

    You would be in error. Read about Yusuf Arbeely and his cohorts.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=SOvskj0HNt8C&pg=PT270&lpg=PT270&dq=Yusif+Arbeely&source=bl&ots=Ia4nl_J6ED&sig=Hrj07hwdTshV5TGIT0i1sRsDh9w&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwir5d68pP3JAhWE2T4KHWUDB5YQ6AEIJzAC#v=onepage&q=Yusif%20Arbeely&f=false

    “Or perhaps you think those groups and cultures are all interchangeable?”

    Riots between nativists and newcomers are not surprisingly. Damn Catholics, right?

    http://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/archive/nativist-riots-of-1844/

    “I’m assuming that you couldn’t rebut those points…”

    

It was actually a Coalition Of The Fringe Right talking point. I used the appropriate refutation.

    “The plan is easy: don’t give them what they want.”

    Assuming you are a competent white male, and assuming this “plan is easy”, I imagine that you will be at the forefront of its implementation?

    “Obviously, that’s not supportable given the data that is already available (i.e. 3rd and 4th generation Hispanics do no better academically than 2nd generation Hispanics and all plateau below the white average…”

    The question is, why? What drives success in humans? A superiority complex, a feeling that what you’ve done is not good enough, and impulse control. These are individual characteristics found in ALL cultures and societies. Some groups are instilling hem more frequently than other groups, in part due to parental socioeconomic status, the communities these families reside in, and the overall economic climate.

    We can look at Hispanics overall, or we can look at specific groups. By 1990, United States-born Cuban children — whose parents had arrived as pauper exiles— were twice as likely as non-Hispanic whites to earn over $50,000 a year.

    Some food for thought…

    “Ethnic and Racial Disparities in Education: Psychology’s Contributions to Understanding and Reducing Disparities”, American Psychological Association, 2012 —>

    Controlling for socioeconomic status, immigrants from Asian and Latin American nations report valuing educational achievement and working harder, relative to their U.S. born counterparts. However, aggregated together, Asian Americans match or exceed the academic performance of Whites whereas Latinos have poorer performance on most markers of educational achievement. Some of these differences in achievement are due to the differential selectivity of immigrants from these two regions in the world, where proportionally more Latino immigrants are allowed to immigrate for family reunification, while relatively more immigrants from Asian countries enter the U.S. to fill employment shortages in the U.S. economy and, thus arrive in the U.S. with higher levels of education. Additionally, recent research suggests that the differences between Latinos and Asian Americans may be due to different levels of access to educational resources, the access of which is partly due to relatively higher socioeconomic status for Asian Americans. Many of the Asian Americans who succeed are able to convert educational and socioeconomic resources into supports for the academic achievements of the children. On the other hand, Latinos’ rates of educational performance are commensurate with their overrepresentation in the lower socioeconomic strata.

    “Also predicated on their descendants.”

    I am well aware of da Joo lobbyists, who are no different than “white” lobbyists who show their disdain for “whites who are anti-white” (whatever that means–perhaps you could fill me in).

    “Considering the ample time and opportunity liberals have had, you would think that some elite institution would have done it themselves by now…unless they’re afraid they’ll end up proving the opposition correct.”

    Maybe since you have time on your hands you could do the legwork, I mean, with your immense brainpower and all…

    Read More
    • Replies: @D. K.
    http://www.jbhe.com/latest/news/1-22-09/satracialgapfigure.gif
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  167. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @D. K.
    Here is an old column, posted at the left-wing "Huffington Post" Web site, written by left-leaning journalist Eric Margolis, who has since had his new columns reposted here, at "The Unz Review":

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/eric-margolis/time-to-face-the-truth-ab_b_282379.html

    EXCERPT:

    ***

    From digging in GRU files, Suvarov asserts that in the spring of 1941, Stalin was poised to launch 170 divisions, 24,000 tanks and thousands of warplanes in a surprise blitzkrieg against Western Europe, supported by mountains of munitions and more reserve armies from Asia and the Far East. One of the first targets was Ploesti, Romania, Germany's sole source of oil (except for ersatz fuel from coal). Germany was also Italy's sole source of oil. Losing Ploesti would have knocked both industrially weak Axis powers out of the war.

    The Red Army and Air Force were deployed in vulnerable offensive formations hard on the new German-Soviet border. Stalin ordered all 1,000-plus defensive casemates of the formidable Stalin Line defending the USSR's western border destroyed to emphasize the offensive mission of the Red Army.

    But Hitler struck first. Learning of the Soviet threat, Hitler secretly massed his armies and attacked on 22 June, 1941. Operation Barbarossa caught the Russians flat-footed: warplanes on the ground, tanks on rail cars, munitions in the open. The US Navy accomplished the same feat against the Japanese carrier force at Midway.

    Soviet ground forces were quickly enveloped, cut off and destroyed in vast numbers. Had they been positioned in defensive deployments behind the casemates and artillery positions of the Stalin Line, which ran unbroken from the Baltic to the Black Sea, this rout would not have happened.

    Soviet propaganda later tried to cover up Stalin's plan to attack Europe, claiming his forces were outmoded and unprepared, and generals incompetent. According to the party line, Stalin only signed the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact to buy time to prepare for war. This view still prevails today.

    Not so, claims Suvarov. His view will infuriate mainstream historians. I poured through Suvarov's meticulous military analysis. To me, as a veteran military analyst, teacher of strategic studies, and war correspondent, his figures appear to confirm that Stalin was just about to attack Western Europe when Hitler pre-empted him.

    Four years later, in 1945, Stalin's Red Army had taken half of Europe. But, contends Suvarov, had Hitler not attacked first in 1941, Stalin's 30-million man army, backed by mammoth industrial production, would have overwhelmed all of Europe in a 1941 surprise blitz.

    Suvarov's unstated conclusion: Hitler saved Western Europe from Stalin. He argues, less convincingly, that Hitler's offensive into Russia led to the inevitable downfall of the Soviet Union in 1991 - and the real end of WWII.

    ***

    This relatively recent line of historical research is the basis of my own revisionist views on that particular aspect of World War II.

    Well, Stalin/USSR did attack Finland in 1939 but the usual suspects claim that Suvarov was on drugs.

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    Well, Stalin/USSR did attack Finland

     

    ... , Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland.
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  168. @The most deplorable one
    Well, Stalin/USSR did attack Finland in 1939 but the usual suspects claim that Suvarov was on drugs.

    Well, Stalin/USSR did attack Finland

    … , Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland.

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  169. @Dave Pinsen

    Hitler apparently believed that the Soviet Union was on the verge of overrunning not only Germany, but the entire European continent
     
    Is there a quote of Hitler saying this at the time? In Antony Beevor's Stalingrad book, he quotes Hitler as saying, on the eve of Operation Barbarossa, something to the effect that Russia was a rotting structure that would collapse once he kicked the door in.

    Beevor also writes that no European country in 1941 was impressed with Russia's military prowess, particularly after the trouble tiny Finland had given them . He says the only foreign intelligence service that respected Russian military prowess was Japan's, because they had gotten beaten by the Russians at Khalkin Gol in Mongolia in '39.

    Countries have lots of plans sitting around in file cabinets to invade other countries.

    Stalin had lots of warning in 1941 that Hitler would invade but he failed to either go on the offense or the defense, so the Soviets’ losses were particularly bad for the first half year of the war.

    Stalin had been counting on a repeat of the WWI stalemate between Germany and France, which would allow the Soviet Union to eventually attack opportunistically when the the two sides were exhausted. But the German triumph of 1940 surprised him and left Stalin without much of a plan.

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  170. @Corvinus
    “But not the Arabs, apparently.”

    You would be in error. Read about Yusuf Arbeely and his cohorts.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=SOvskj0HNt8C&pg=PT270&lpg=PT270&dq=Yusif+Arbeely&source=bl&ots=Ia4nl_J6ED&sig=Hrj07hwdTshV5TGIT0i1sRsDh9w&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwir5d68pP3JAhWE2T4KHWUDB5YQ6AEIJzAC#v=onepage&q=Yusif%20Arbeely&f=false

    “Or perhaps you think those groups and cultures are all interchangeable?”

    Riots between nativists and newcomers are not surprisingly. Damn Catholics, right?

    http://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/archive/nativist-riots-of-1844/

    “I’m assuming that you couldn’t rebut those points…”

    

It was actually a Coalition Of The Fringe Right talking point. I used the appropriate refutation.

    “The plan is easy: don’t give them what they want.”

    Assuming you are a competent white male, and assuming this “plan is easy”, I imagine that you will be at the forefront of its implementation?

    “Obviously, that’s not supportable given the data that is already available (i.e. 3rd and 4th generation Hispanics do no better academically than 2nd generation Hispanics and all plateau below the white average…”

    The question is, why? What drives success in humans? A superiority complex, a feeling that what you’ve done is not good enough, and impulse control. These are individual characteristics found in ALL cultures and societies. Some groups are instilling hem more frequently than other groups, in part due to parental socioeconomic status, the communities these families reside in, and the overall economic climate.

    We can look at Hispanics overall, or we can look at specific groups. By 1990, United States-born Cuban children — whose parents had arrived as pauper exiles— were twice as likely as non-Hispanic whites to earn over $50,000 a year.

    Some food for thought…

    “Ethnic and Racial Disparities in Education: Psychology’s Contributions to Understanding and Reducing Disparities”, American Psychological Association, 2012 —>

    Controlling for socioeconomic status, immigrants from Asian and Latin American nations report valuing educational achievement and working harder, relative to their U.S. born counterparts. However, aggregated together, Asian Americans match or exceed the academic performance of Whites whereas Latinos have poorer performance on most markers of educational achievement. Some of these differences in achievement are due to the differential selectivity of immigrants from these two regions in the world, where proportionally more Latino immigrants are allowed to immigrate for family reunification, while relatively more immigrants from Asian countries enter the U.S. to fill employment shortages in the U.S. economy and, thus arrive in the U.S. with higher levels of education. Additionally, recent research suggests that the differences between Latinos and Asian Americans may be due to different levels of access to educational resources, the access of which is partly due to relatively higher socioeconomic status for Asian Americans. Many of the Asian Americans who succeed are able to convert educational and socioeconomic resources into supports for the academic achievements of the children. On the other hand, Latinos’ rates of educational performance are commensurate with their overrepresentation in the lower socioeconomic strata.

    “Also predicated on their descendants.”

    I am well aware of da Joo lobbyists, who are no different than “white” lobbyists who show their disdain for “whites who are anti-white” (whatever that means--perhaps you could fill me in).

    “Considering the ample time and opportunity liberals have had, you would think that some elite institution would have done it themselves by now…unless they’re afraid they’ll end up proving the opposition correct.”

    Maybe since you have time on your hands you could do the legwork, I mean, with your immense brainpower and all…

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