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Men's and Women's Differing Tastes in Movies
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Below are the highly rated movies that differ the most between the sexes in Internet Movie DataBase rankings.

Earlier this year, commenter Lex posted some tables from Reddit of movies female vs. male taste differences in movies, based on Internet Movie DataBase rankings on a 10 point scale.

IMDB ratings are based on up two million votes each, and they are reasonably reliable: e.g., to pick two neo-sword & sandal movies, Ridley Scott’s Gladiator is an 8.5 overall (both sexes) while Oliver Stone’s Alexander is only a 5.6. I would guess that over 95% of viewers of both would say that the former is objectively a movie that works better than the latter.

Men and women mostly are pretty much in agreement on IMDB ratings (e.g., The Shawshank Redemption is #1 with both sexes, which I don’t really get, but whatever). But when you look at where they disagree most, it’s hardly surprising.

The male vs. female difference results are quite plausible, although I don’t quite understand how the ranks and scores line up. Also, I have various various quibbles about the methodology:

- Far more males than females rate movies on IMDB; ranking cultural products is just kind of a guy thing to do (e.g., High Fidelity).

- Presumably, women who go on IMDB to share their movie ratings have tastes more like men who go on IMDB to share their movie rating than to the women who don’t see much of point in doing this.

- The methodology of looking at size of differences in ratings selects for mid-ranked movies, whereas movies near the top are less likely to show up and consensus bad movies are considered at all. For example, to take two David Lean war epics that appeal more to men than to women, The Bridge on the River Kwai was ranked the 581st best movie of all time by IMDB women and the 180th best movie of all time by men, for a difference of 401. In contrast, Lawrence of Arabia was rated 396th and 105th for a difference of 291. Does this really mean that ratings of The Bridge over the River Kwai is more sex divergent than Lawrence of Arabia or just that the latter was rated somewhat higher by both sexes? If you divided the rankings, then the gap for the former is 3.22 and for the latter is 3.77. I think all you can really say definitively is that both are fine movies and unsurprisingly appeal more to men than to women.

Most of the movies that women like a lot more than men are ones that men think are pretty good but not so great (male ratings of 7.2 to 7.8). The movies that women don’t like as much as men tend to be ones that men think are terrific.

 
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  1. anonymous[397] • Disclaimer says:

    Oliver North’s Alexander ?

    Too funny.

    Maybe you are thinking of that other Republican admirer of Reagan and Nixon, Oliver Stone.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Lot
  2. AKAHorace says:

    So in general if the man picks the movie how happy will the woman be and vice versa ?

    • Replies: @27 year old
  3. Just curious: why is the women’s rating for Dangal in green?

  4. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:

    Dangal is apparently a Bollywood movie that was the highest grossing Indian movie ever and did well in China.

    Why is Brokeback Mountain rated so highly by women? Bizarre.

  5. Jack D says:

    I think women love movies where there is a clearly defined social hierarchy in which woman can participate and advance by working within the framework of the hierarchy and by befriending powerful men – Hermione, though low born, advances by being a teachers pet who excels at her studies and also thru her friendship with the high status Harry Potter. Harry himself is well liked and admired by his peers and even by the school power structure – he is no rebel though he sometimes gets into a little trouble.

    Men are more interested in movies about frontier or war settings in which there are few if any women and few if any rules. In these settings men who come from the lowest ranks of society advance beyond their birth rank through bravery and merit and often in outright defiance of the existing power structure and the laws and norms of polite society.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  6. Anonymous[314] • Disclaimer says:

    Women are directly adapted to act as the nurses and educators of our early childhood, for the simple reason that they themselves are childish, foolish, and short-sighted—in a word, are big children all their lives, something intermediate between the child and the man, who is a man in the strict sense of the word. Consider how a young girl will toy day after day with a child, dance with it and sing to it; and then consider what a man, with the very best intentions in the world, could do in her place.

    Sorry to be mean, but Wonder Woman above Platoon? Frozen over Raging Bull? Harry Potter(s) the superior of Das Boot?

    Perhaps apropos: back when I was on one of the big online dating sites (OKCupid, I think) I would searching under “Keywords” serious novels that I liked but that weren’t the type of thing one would be assigned in high school. Of the women who listed the same books amongst their favorites I noticed a disproportionate number were European (Russians were especially well represented as I recall; they seem to love Dreiser for some reason). The men’s list here seems much more “international” than the woman’s list, in any event.

  7. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:

    What’s immediately striking is that the men’s picks are great movies, some of the best of all time, whereas the women’s picks are basically trash. Women really do seem to have terrible taste in movies, as men have been saying for decades.

    Makes you wonder if the decline in movies is really due to Hollywood, like most consumer industries, catering to women’s tastes.

  8. @anonymous

    Sorry, I didn’t mean Oliver North, I meant that other celebrity of 1987, Oliver Sachs.

    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
  9. In these settings men who come from the lowest ranks of society advance beyond their birth rank through bravery and merit and often in outright defiance of the existing power structure and the laws and norms of polite society.

    Pretty much the mythology about the talented woman, nonwhite person or individual with broken sexuality who has the goods to compete with normal white men, in other words.

    Only this magical thinking doesn’t reflect the distribution of agency, intelligence and competence in the real world.

    • Replies: @Anon
  10. @Anonymous

    We see plenty of young adult men in our century who spend their days playing computer games like children, instead of doing something bankable which would make them husband material. I don’t think Schopenhauer could have anticipated that our society would become wealthy enough to make this lifestyle possible.

    Though he didn’t have to work himself because his father succeeded in business, and he inherited enough money to live comfortably for the rest of his life.

  11. @Anonymous

    Hollywood in the U.S. has to cater to the tastes of the growing population of nonwhite people. They just tend to have coarser minds than white people.

  12. @Anonymous

    Dangal is good; it’s about a kind of Indian Richard Williams who’s determined his two daughters will become world-class wrestlers. It’s based on a true story.

    The premise sounds pretty corny, but it stars the very talented actor Aamir Khan as the dad, and as a whole it works well.

  13. anon[133] • Disclaimer says:

    In the female list, I count 11 children’s movies; in the male, zero.

    Interpretation #1: women are childish and stupid and gay. Girls drool, boys rule, etc.

    Interpretation #2: women are mothers, and spend a lot more time with children; in that vein, their movie ratings are more about what children find engrossing.

    Perhaps there are a lot of women who, when recommending a movie, are more concerned with whether that movie can be relied upon to keep their children occupied for an hour or two.

    This might mean that the female list of great movies contains the reviews of women who don’t actually care about movies all that much. Meanwhile, the male list is clearly heavily skewed by the recommendations of film buffs – 1931′s black-and-white German language M? Really? – with men who don’t care about movies presumably not reviewing anything at all.

    Put another way: a survey of the general public asking “What’s the best movie ever?” would yield very different results.

    More data is needed. For instance, how old are the reviewers, how many movies have they seen, how many of those movies were in black-and-white and needed subtitles, etc.

  14. syonredux says:
    @Anonymous

    Why is Brokeback Mountain rated so highly by women? Bizarre.

    Slash fiction:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slash_fiction

    • Replies: @Lagertha
  15. @AKAHorace

    So in general if the man picks the movie how happy will the woman be and vice versa ?

    The woman will always happier if the man picks than she would be if he let her pick, regardless of movie quality.

    And god help the poor SOB if he starts a “no, you decide honey” circle of death.

  16. @Anonymous

    Women are directly adapted to act as the nurses and educators of our early childhood, for the simple reason that they themselves are childish, foolish, and short-sighted—in a word, are big children all their lives, something intermediate between the child and the man, who is a man in the strict sense of the word.

    I’m not seeing where that quote is from. It has a certain brusk early 20th century feel to it, but I’m not seeing who wrote it.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @Dumbo
  17. Anonymous[314] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    Perhaps there are a lot of women who, when recommending a movie, are more concerned with whether that movie can be relied upon to keep their children occupied for an hour or two.

    By that logic is womens’ most beloved TV show Barney the Dinosaur?

    Women like romance, singing/dancing and anything upper-class English. Ass-kicking grrrrl power fantasies round out the list.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
  18. @advancedatheist

    We see plenty of young adult men in our century who spend their days playing computer games like children, instead of doing something bankable which would make them husband material.

    A computer game simulates a male environment. The white collar office environment is childlike by comparison.

    See the descriptions by Jack D. Frontier/war, men to rise in rank despite starting as a nobody vs social scheming by participation in and affirmation of an existing power structure.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
  19. Shawshank has been at the top of IMDB’s list for a really long time but I don’t know anyone who ranks it as their favorite movie, or even in their top ten, and I know a lot of film buffs.

    What the frick is the deal with women and Harry Potter? Admittedly I’m not a fan of those movies but I’ve seen them and don’t understand why they appeal to women so much. They don’t seem particularly feminine from what I remember.

  20. HFR says:

    Francois Truffaut published a book in which he interviewed Alfred Hitchcock about all his movies. In their discussion of To Catch a Thief, Hitchcock said: “…it’s generally the woman who has the final say on which picture a couple is going to see. In fact, it’s generally the woman who will decide, later on, whether it was a good or a bad picture.” I’m guessing that he was referring to married couples rather than a boy and a girl just dating.

    Since I’m the one who got my husband into the habit of seeing at least one movie a week, I’ve definitely been the engine in deciding which movies to see. But since we’ve seen thousands of movies in a half-century of marriage, we’ve pretty much covered everything. As for deciding how good a movie is, we’ve been in agreement most of the time.

  21. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    The non-children’s movie picks are terrible too though. Also a lot of adult childless women are unironically huge fans of the Harry Potter movies and Frozen.

  22. @advancedatheist

    We’re constantly hearing how men can’t get jobs because of immigration and outsourcing, so are there jobs out there and men are choosing not to do them or are they unable to get jobs and turn to amusing themselves instead? I’m not trolling, it’s a legit question.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  23. Lagertha says:
    @syonredux

    because the main characters (duh) express their feelings so much. Women (watchin’ the movie) realize: men after all, think and worry, too!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Anonymous
  24. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    What’s the interpretation that puts children’s movies and Brokeback Mountain on the same list? Hopefully, mothers aren’t watching Brokeback Mountain with their kids.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  25. Lagertha says:
    @27 year old

    before video games, there were board games; and, games with actual tin soldiers & regiments & ordnance- board games for World War. I am cleaning my games of 100 years! An auction house is my first call. However, Warhammer is a retro game with actual figures, mutants, cyborgs, and regiments….so, complicated. Who wants to buy my games? I have too many toys and games in my house!

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  26. OT: Remember that New Mexico observatory that the FBI shut down for 11 days? From NPR:

    Shutdown Of New Mexico Observatory Was Part Of Investigation Into Child Pornography

    Officials have explained the mysterious closure of a New Mexico observatory earlier this month, saying they were investigating one of the facility’s janitors for possession and distribution of child pornography.

    The FBI says it closed the observatory in case the suspect posed a danger to other employees. The observatory reopened on Monday.

    They had to close it for 11 days to ensure the safety of other employees? And do they employ children at this observatory?

    Sheriff Benny House told the Alamogordo Daily News when the observatory closed, “For the FBI to get involved that quick and be so secretive about it, there was a lot of stuff going on up there. There was a Blackhawk helicopter, a bunch of people around antennas and work crews on towers but nobody would tell us anything.

    Authorities have not arrested or charged the suspect they were investigating, and no arrest warrant has been issued.

  27. @Jean Ralphio

    I think J.K. Rowling intended her books to appeal to boys and girls equally, but they wound up by the end appealing more to girls.

  28. @Lagertha

    because the main characters (duh) express their feelings so much. Women (watchin’ the movie) realize: men after all, think and worry, too!

    Why would anyone watch that?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  29. @Steve Sailer

    I think J.K. Rowling intended her books to appeal to boys and girls equally, but they wound up by the end appealing more to girls.

    Beverly Cleary started out intending to write for boys, too. The ones she read to at Yakima’s library wanted stories about kids like themselves, but she couldn’t find any. So, a decade or so later, she decided to write them herself.

    But somehow a minor character, the little sister of the girl-next-door, ended up dominating the whole series. Even getting her own TV show.

    Mrs Cleary is still kickin’ at 102, by the way.

    • Replies: @Curle
  30. They’re right, ‘Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire’ was total shit compared to the rest of them.

  31. @anon

    ‘…Perhaps there are a lot of women who, when recommending a movie, are more concerned with whether that movie can be relied upon to keep their children occupied for an hour or two…’

    Or women are just more likely to see children’s movies. You can become quite a connoisseur of the genre if you raise kids.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @anon
  32. @Steve Sailer

    Girls? Try grown women. #1 on the New York City subway for years running, always women.

  33. @Colin Wright

    My aunt really got into Harry Potter novels reading them to her grandchildren.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  34. J.Ross says: • Website

    There’s a category of films debated over on 4chan, “movies women will never understand,” and within it, the deceptively cheap-looking Rolling Thunder, and within that, just before the climax, a man who has lost everything to violent home invaders and has then taken up with a younger girlfriend is now dropping the girlfriend. She looks perplexed and protests, “but I’m all you’ve got!”

  35. J.Ross says: • Website
    @larry lurker

    They explain the other stuff as responding to credible threats that were made after the initial CP investigation.
    There were other sunspot observatories closed at the same time (Tenerife, one in Australia, about eight in all), but the initial claims that all sunspot observatories had been closed is not true.
    There was an anon on 4chan for several days claiming to be an engineer at the facility, and he was so useless that he was probably who he said he was. He did say
    >This is the most advanced facility for observing sunspot activity in the world, but
    >they’ve been working on a new, better one in Hawaii, and a lot of the gear and personnel was moved out there before this incident.
    >The facility uses large quantities of mercury in the carriage of the telescope, and it was speculated that someone tried to steal it for some terrorist application.
    The CP claim is interesting because
    >the perp was using a government computer and connection as a mask, and was not caught right away, and
    >the sheer volume he was supposedy processing was insane; he was a major source while he was working.

  36. I guess ‘Dangal’ is the best movie on those lists. 8.6/8.5 F/M

    What the hell is ‘Dangal?’

  37. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Lagertha

    Do you have Twixt or Feudal? Any “bookshelf games”? I’m getting into board games in a plot to keep my nephews and nieces away from the viewscreen and social media. It’s a thriving subculture in spite of the availability of video games.
    A while before this I browsed an outlet for Games Workshop (the company that makes Warhammer), thinking, how could something this specific have its own store? It was packed and the cash register never stopped ringing. People still love tabletop games.

  38. anon[133] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright

    Yeah, but just because you tolerate or even enjoy the movies you see with your kids, it doesn’t necessarily mean that any of those movies will supplant some more adult fare as your personal favourite.

    Nor does being a connoisseur of children’s movies mean you think any of them are as good as Gone With The Wind or whatever.

    Bear in mind, these same film buffs comprising the men surveyed are almost certainly connoisseurs of children’s movies too. They’ve surely seen all the Pixar and Studio Ghibli movies, for instance. But neither Toy Story nor Spirited Away made the cut.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  39. Johnmark says:
    @Jean Ralphio

    From what I’ve seen of the movies (never read the books) which are dreck, the girl character, Hermione, pretty much takes things over in terms of intelligence, ability, and sensibleness. She observes and notices. Harry and his red head friend seem to stumble about in the dark most of the time.

    Hermione is Nancy Drew and Mary Sue.

    • Replies: @Rapparee
  40. jim jones says:

    I thought the “FANTASTIC BEASTS” movies were excellent. They mirror the female worldview in that things just happen for no reason:

  41. @anon

    I referred to “men and women,” but I’d hardly be surprised if a large fraction of IMDB ratings are from teens.

    [Looks up]

    No, guess not: most raters are 18 to 44.

    Toy Story (1995) is rated 8.3 by males and 8.2 by females. Overall, it is #92. Basically, everybody likes Toy Story.

  42. anon[133] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jean Ralphio

    There was a terrific essay somewhere that posited that Harry is a vessel for idealised mother-love, and that the books appealed to women’s maternal instinct, or something.

    I feel I’m not quite doing it justice.

    And I can’t find it online either, because there’s an ocean of fanfiction and flimflam getting picked up by the relevant keywords.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    , @Anon
  43. Lot says:
    @anonymous

    I’ve liked all of Stone’s movies I have seen.

    “I would guess that over 95% of viewers of both would say that the former is objectively a movie that works better than the latter”

    Count me in the 5% that liked Alexander better. Gladiator was entertaining, but also very Hollywood and formulaic. Alexander was slow but actually made me feel like I was in antiquity.

    • Replies: @Anon
  44. Wish they had polled Mad Max: Fury Road . My hunch is that more men than women loved it, even though it a strong feminist angle to it. Fantastic movie.

  45. @greysquirrell

    Fury Road:

    Men 8.1
    Women 7.9

    But, lots more men than women voted. There really aren’t that many women who feel motivated to vote a Mad Max movie down, while no doubt there are more guys who feel it important to register their ambivalence about the movie. In general, ranking stuff is a male thing to do.

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1392190/ratings/

    It’s kind of hard to find the links to the IMDB demographic breakdowns, so I get to them thru Google.

  46. sb says:

    I’ve always thought that making lists and ranking stuff is a very male activity (making order out of chaos or an intolerance of ambiguity -take your pick )
    Is there evidence supporting this ?

    • Replies: @slumber_j
  47. Altai says:

    Don’t ignore the fact that most of the female list is relatively new implying a generational divide in more committed internet usage. Prior to social media leading to more serious engagement we had the line ‘There are no girls on the internet’. Women really weren’t creating much of the content or engaging actively until fairly recently.

    What’s interesting about Twitter is that it’s the modern version of internet discussion boards and the one which has become most politically and socially influential, except it has maybe more women than men on it. (And it discourages anonymity. Leading people to say things they mightn’t otherwise really believe in or care about in order to get social status points.)

    • Replies: @Silva
    , @Nathan
  48. The lists need more actual “Chick Flicks” like Four Weddings and a Funeral (interestingly 7.1 for both) or <Pretty Woman (6.7 male, 7.4 female) to actually gauge the disparity of opinions by gender.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  49. @The Alarmist

    Right. Pretty Woman is a pretty good movie, but it’s not high enough ranking to make whatever the cutoff is being used here.

    One issue is that if you extended the rankings lower then the deltas would grow to immense size because of the huge number of movies in, say, the 6.0 to 7.0 range. So the biggest ranking differences would be for lower ranked movies. For example, Romy and Michelle’s High School Reunion, in which Mira Sorvino and Lisa Kudrow sit around watching “Pretty Woman,” is 6.0 for males and 6.5 for females. That movie might have a delta of 5000 just because there are so many movies in that range.

    In contrast, The Godfather has a delta of only 8. It’s ranked 2 by men and 10 by women. But at that level, maybe 8 is a pretty big delta?

    Or you could use point differences, although one question is whether the two sexes use points exactly the same. That could be adjusted for.

    I’m sure somebody somewhere on the Internet has thought this through mathematically and come up with an optimal system for thinking about this stuff.

    One issue is that the ceiling of 10 is a problem for the handful of movies like The Godfather, where 52% of voters rated it a 10. If they extended the scale up to, say, 12, I wouldn’t be hugely surprised if The Godfather then outranked The Shawshank Redemption.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    , @Lot
  50. @Jean Ralphio

    IMDb was at its peak when Shawshank was being shown ad nauseum on TNT. Therefore, it collected a lot of high ratings then that haven’t disappeared. I haven’t been to IMDb much since they got rid of their message boards. Most of the information on there can be found on Wikipedia.

    Having said all that, I think it’s one of the best movies ever made. I am curious why Steve doesn’t think so, if he cares to expound.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @jackmcg
  51. @ScarletNumber

    I finally watched Shawshank at home a couple of years ago and it didn’t do much for me, but I don’t really have the patience anymore to sit through movies at home, so I don’t put much stock in my reaction one way or another.

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Curle
  52. Judging from the list, women are more into fantasy, emotions & interpersonal relations; men are into (military) action, physicality & dark drama for Joe Sixpack.

  53. Hey! Seven Samurai looks like the highest ratest among men. Makes me proud of my gender.

  54. The Shawshank Redemption is a good movie ( I never read the book), but it is mostly a rip off of Escape from Alcatraz, which was released 3 years before the book was published.

  55. Dumbo says:
    @Laugh Track

    Pretty sure it’s from Schopenhauer, “On women”.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  56. @greysquirrell

    Fury Road was terrible.

    Tom Hardy’s screen presence is a shadow of Mel Gibson’s.

    Marketing the film as a Mad Max vehicle, then making the character a passenger in the story is a disgusting piece of feminist bait and switch.

  57. DFH says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Do boys really read books at all anymore?
    For some reason they have just decided, more than a decade and a half after it ws published, to make a film out of my favourite book from when I was a child in the early 2000s (Mortal Engines), which suggests a lack of more recent material.

  58. JMcG says:
    @Jean Ralphio

    I agree with both your points. Shawshank seemed cartoonish to me, I could never forget that I was watching a MOVIE, if that makes sense. I thought Stand by Me was far superior, though uneven. I’m certainly no movie expert though.

  59. jackmcg says:
    @ScarletNumber

    Good point. Shawshank is probably in my top ten, I think its a great flick. But I also don’t watch many movies, so I am probably biased towards movies that are overexposed. Shawshank really is on all the time.

  60. Mark G. says:
    @advancedatheist

    Young guys who don’t pursue a career aren’t being totally irrational. If you make a lot of money then a lot will be taken away in taxes and you’ll end up supporting other people. If you work hard on your job to get a promotion then the promotion will go to someone else for affirmative action reasons. A lot of times the affirmative action promotion will go to a female who then won’t want to marry you because she makes more than you. Because of their welfare benefits, affirmative action jobs and a culture that denigrates marriage a lot of women won’t even care if you are a good breadwinner. They’ll pick guys on the basis of looks or personality instead. Do you really want to be the sucker who works hard and watches the benefits go to someone else?

  61. Silva says:
    @Altai

    “Women really weren’t creating much of the content”

    With the well-established exceptions of feminism (sane and not), fanfiction, and videos showing tits (passing as “commentary”), are they now? Maybe I missed something interesting.

  62. slumber_j says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I’m sure somebody somewhere on the Internet has thought this through mathematically and come up with an optimal system for thinking about this stuff.

    I’m always interested in the ratings on Yelp and certain other sites, which are clearly engineered so that just about everything comes out to be around a 4 out of 5.

    One issue is that the ceiling of 10 is a problem for the handful of movies like The Godfather, where 52% of voters rated it a 10. If they extended the scale up to, say, 12, I wouldn’t be hugely surprised if The Godfather then outranked The Shawshank Redemption.

    I see what you mean, but this sounds an awful lot like the Spinal Tap Fallacy.

  63. slumber_j says:
    @sb

    I’ve always thought that making lists and ranking stuff is a very male activity (making order out of chaos or an intolerance of ambiguity -take your pick )
    Is there evidence supporting this ?

    Yes: my 50+ years of conscious lived experience, for starters.

  64. Rapparee says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Rowling slightly resembles a mirror image of Tom Wolfe, both of them expressing an unusual combination of very masculine and very feminine perspectives. In Wolfe, though, the masculine mode usually predominated, whilst Rowling constantly returns to her feminine concern for romance and the dynamics of personal friendships. She bid for male readers by making her protagonist a hot-tempered jock and including a lot of deadly combat, but the relationships frequently outshine the conflict. There’s a representative and amusing passage mid-series in which Hermione exasperatedly explains to Harry the clueless male just what it was he did to offend his date; reading it as a grown man, I found it very funny and true-to-life, but teenaged boy readers probably don’t care to be reminded of how maladroit they are with the fairer sex.

  65. @Anonymous

    no, actually men and women have pretty similar tastes, at least based on how the list was constructed. “Wide” sentimental movies with content few will find objectionable are the sorts of movies that will average out highest; think Forrest Gump, Raiders of the Lost Ark or Shawshank Redemption. Spielberg in particular is a master of this genre. The lists being displayed are a subset this group; the movies men and women most disagree about, and even on these they don’t disagree that much (.5-1.5 points).

  66. It’s possible the ratings by female voters were dominated by mothers who were largely putting movies on for their children. They were likely really grateful for movies like the Harry Potter series and Frozen that would occupy the kids while they did something else. No adult who wasn’t mentally addled would rank Despicable Me as a great movie.

    Based on my sample size of 1, I would have thought Mamma Mia! and Mad Max: Fury Road would show up as the ones with significant differences. I would rank the latter as one of the best action movies of the past ten years while my wife called it “Well-made but disgusting.”

    • Replies: @Anon
  67. Nathan says:
    @Altai

    I don’t know if it’s that the women’s movies are so much newer, as it is the men’s movies are so old. I think women aren’t as willing to watch movies made before they were born, or even just older movies in general.

    I also think Hollywood’s output has gotten less manly over the years. The only Hollywood movie from the 2000s is Blade Runner 2049, and the women’s list is stuffed with 2000s blockbusters.

    • Replies: @Altai
  68. Nathan says:

    Also, check out the propaganda you get when you Google “movies women don’t get.”

  69. Anon[244] • Disclaimer says:

    Wow. I glanced through a few comments. Bitter cynical and somewhat clueless. Guys, c’mon.

    For what it’s worth, having grown up with brothers and zero stats to back it up.. guys like movies with some achieving to get done, so to speak. A war to win, an enemy to defeat, that sort of thing. The women, even when it’s a “childish” movie.. It’s the love story. Harry Potter is a love story. So is Gladiator.

    • Replies: @Ian M.
  70. At the end of every year, my brother and I share our IMDB ratings for the year. Usually, we each discover 2-3 movies we otherwise might not have come across, and we can debate our top rankings.

    My wife laughs at this, and thinks we are insane. She doesn’t rank things, or debate such things. She is also very feminine. (Not to mention wrong, and missing out, heh.)

    I laugh, and tell her to leave us alone. The sooner we get through this task, the sooner we can get back to memorizing baseball-reference, and sharing obscure stats with each other.

  71. @Steve Sailer

    Oliver Reed was a bibulous English nut who was forced to wrestle Kathy Bates in the nude by the director Ken Griffey.

    Irish Curse all the way around the world to my favorite all time fish and chip shop owner Pauline Hanson.

    It’s OK to accidentally type out North when you meant Stone.

    It’s OK to be White.

  72. @Jean Ralphio

    I was walking down the local commercial street with its profusion of HELP WANTED signs yesterday, wondering about the same question.

    I think what may be happening is that immigration hasn’t just crowded out native employment, it has also driven down wages. Native workers are aware of this, and since they have found ways to subsist in the meantime (those who haven’t succumbed to opioids), they are in no hurry to take sub-wage jobs. There may even be a conscious element of “The business owners ['capitalists' if you're a Marxist] have ground us down so long that let’s see how they like having to do more work themselves now!” Now that workers know their wages can rise again, why not let them rise a little more before rewarding capital with our participation?

  73. Pat Boyle says:
    @Jack D

    This is a plausible theory.

  74. sayless says:
    @larry lurker

    The town was evacuated too, not just the observatory. Maybe they found child pornography, but originally they said there was a potential physical threat and everyone had to go.

  75. Rapparee says:
    @Johnmark

    Currently working on finishing the series for the first time, and Rowling has a remarkable knack for winning back the reader’s interest and sympathy just at the moment they’re about to vanish. If I start to find a particular character insufferable or a plot twist illogical and begin feeling the urge the throw the book against the wall, it’s a safe bet that within the next five pages or so Rowling will address and cleverly answer my objection. Whenever Miss Granger’s precocity grows unbearably grating, there’s usually a scene where another character chastises her for being an insufferable goody-two-shoes, or some other device to pull the character back down to Earth a bit.

    All in all, the series is a crackling good page-turner, albeit not one aligned with my usual tastes. Rowling certainly understands the storyteller’s craft. And she also earns the distinction of having invented the most thoroughly Dickensian character names in fiction since Charles himself shuffled off this mortal coil.

  76. Svigor says:

    e.g., The Shawshank Redemption is #1 with both sexes, which I don’t really get, but whatever).

    Maybe deep down everyone knows we need to escape the madhouse run by a psychotic authoritarian prude.

    Harry himself is well liked and admired by his peers and even by the school power structure – he is no rebel though he sometimes gets into a little trouble.

    This is sorta backwards, in that Harry is fawned over by the dominant faction of the school power structure, while he’s just sort of another kid to his peers.

  77. Svigor says:
    @Anonymous

    True.

    Why is Blade Runner Deux on that list, but not Blade Runner? Makes no sense.

  78. Pat Boyle says:

    I last time I hit a guy was in 1959. I was playing basketball and I knocked down a guy on the other team going for a rebound. He started hitting so I hit him back and in so doing broke my hand.

    So I know from personal experience that it makes no sense to hit someone with your hand. If you have a beef with some guy – hit him with a rock or a club. Knives and guns are also widely available.

    This is logical yet I can’t help but notice that approximately one third of all movies that men prefer have a fist fight in them. Currently we have a spate of superhero films. By the rules of the genre anyone can have any power, but in the climatic confrontation they likely will fight it out with their fists.

    This week the red headed Mexican Canelo is going to fight the Russian again and I really want to see it. I’ll wait because I’m cheap but I’ll watch it all, just as I will watch all of the Tyson Fury match and just as I will watch all the those old boxing videos on YouTube.

    What’s wrong with me?

    Hitting someone with your fist is stupid. Your arm starts out at the shoulder with one big bone (the humerus). Then it splits into two at the elbow and finally resolves in a myriad of little wrist and finger bones. So if you are going to use part of your arm as a club you should use the big humerus not the tiny phalanges. What army prepares to defend its homeland with its soldier’s fists? Superheroes do it, but not real people. Even the legendary unarmed London Bobbies carried a club. My ancestors carried a shillelagh. No one really resolves a dispute barehanded.

    So what does it mean that we have all these fist fights on film? It means we are not really in charge of our lives. We are protoplasmic robots acting out a set of instructions that we didn’t write.

    • Replies: @Song For the Deaf
  79. Ian M. says:

    The Shawshank Redemption is #1 with both sexes, which I don’t really get, but whatever

    Ha, I agree. It’s not that I think it’s a bad movie, I just regard it as ridiculously overrated. I have met an alarming number of men from my generation (Millennial) who regard it as their favorite movie.

    By the way, were prisons desegregated in that time? (I think the 1940s).

  80. Ian M. says:

    Huh, I’ve seen 14 movies on the female list and only 5 on the men’s list.

    Not sure what that says about me.

    • Replies: @3g4me
  81. @Ian M.

    Never wanted to see The Shawshank Redemption. Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, and prison was all I needed to know that it would be one big preach fest.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    , @Anon
  82. Tyrion 2 says:
    @J.Ross

    As a kid I used to laugh at Warhammer nerds, but as an adult contemplating parenthood I’ve considered going down to the store to get a head start. It is a pretty great hobby for a child and one that I might enjoy sharing in.

    Also, from a cursory reading of the 40k Wikia, the Coalition of the Fringes is adequately represented by the Warhammer Chaos Gods. Or “Entropy” Gods, as Trudeau would say.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  83. @Steve Sailer

    Women mature earlier, and thus less fully, than men. The implicit morality of Harry Potter is that of the typical teen at the stage where most women reach maturity. Being at heart a morality tale, it’s no surprise that it appeals overwhelmingly to women.

    Next to Tolkien, it really is mind-numbingly puerile. I had trouble sitting through the second movie and had to walk out of the third ten minutes in. Only time I’ve ever done that.

    The Golden Compass is similar, as is late night TV.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  84. @Ian M.

    It’s Cool Hand Luke with half the sperm count.

  85. Ian M. says:
    @Anonymous

    Although some of the men’s picks, while considered great by the chattering classes, are really just nihilistic garbage.

    For instance, Casino.

    • Agree: Rosie
    • Replies: @Rosie
    , @Curle
    , @Lot
    , @Anon
  86. Altai says:
    @Nathan

    I don’t know. I don’t know many women over 35 who would put ‘Harry Potter’ as their favourite film.

    Just like I don’t know many women over 35 who actively use sites like Reddit or IMDB.

  87. Rosie says:
    @anon

    There was a terrific essay somewhere that posited that Harry is a vessel for idealised mother-love, and that the books appealed to women’s maternal instinct, or something.

    The appeal for me was in the romance of the Harry-Ron-Hermione bond of friendship. Hermione is an appealing heroine in that she is respected for her knowledge, by which I mean not trivial knowledge but rather the kind of knowledge that translates as power, which is very much prized among women. In that sense, a story about witchcraft can’t help but resonate to some degree with women.

  88. Rosie says:
    @Dumbo

    Pretty sure it’s from Schopenhauer, “On women”.

    LMAO! I take it as a compliment to be insulted by a nihilistic, antinatalist, suicidal old codger like Schopenhauer.

  89. Rosie says:
    @Desiderius

    Women mature earlier, and thus less fully, than men. The implicit morality of Harry Potter is that of the typical teen at the stage where most women reach maturity. Being at heart a morality tale, it’s no surprise that it appeals overwhelmingly to women.

    Horseshit. If most men never learn to rediscover the joy of childhood with their own kids that says more about their deficiencies than ours. C.S. Lewis to the girl who inspired TNC:

    My Dear Lucy,
    I wrote this story for you, but when I began it I had not realized that girls grow quicker than books. As a result you are already too old for fairy tales, and by the time it is printed and bound you will be older still. But some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again. You can then take it down from some upper shelf, dust it, and tell me what you think of it. I shall probably be too deaf to hear, and too old to understand a word you say but I shall still be…Your affectionate Godfather.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  90. Rosie says:
    @Ian M.

    Although some of the men’s picks, while considered great by the chattering classes, are really just nihilistic garbage.

    For instance, Casino.

    Nihilism is very much en vogue among the chattering classes. It’s kind of like the post-high school version of “cool.”

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Desiderius
  91. Altai says:
    @anon

    I think it’s actually Gen Y/Z women who come to relove, partly from nostalgia, a lot of Disney (Particularly from the 90s) and Harry Potter films in their early to mid 20s. Teen drama (And quite a few Disney movies) is more long-lasting to women too because it deals heavily with romance and relationships in a very pure and heightened way. Plus the cutesey nature of Disney films has longer lasting appeal to adult women than to men.

    I don’t think much older women (Maybe late Xers) would think to list a Harry Potter film too high.

  92. @Mark G.

    Do you really want to be the sucker who works hard and watches the benefits go to someone else?

    No, but I am that guy.

    Growing up on Main Street USA in a virtual Hallmark card they told us, “Work hard, play by the rules, and you’ll get ahead!”

    And I believed this crap!

    What a maroon! Or maybe just moron.

  93. Lurker says:
    @J.Ross

    A happy memory from 1982/83 – painting a skeleton warrior while listening to Iron Maiden. *sigh*

  94. @Rosie

    I knew you’d reply and be wrong (on this topic, the typical female solipsism clouding your judgement) as usual. The Lewis quote agrees exactly with what I said (growing up too fast) and the problem with Potter is that it isn’t a fairy tale. It’s ultimate concerns are all too mundane.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    , @Rosie
  95. @Rosie

    Well all have plenty of time to be cool (68 degrees, give or take) when we’re dead. My high school students always got a kick out of that take. Many are desperate to not have to be cool.

  96. Rosie says:
    @Desiderius

    Female solipsism…

    You’re a liar and a slanderer no better than Whiskey.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    , @Desiderius
  97. Rosie says:
    @Desiderius

    It’s ultimate concerns are all too mundane.

    That’s a function of the direction Rowling chose to take the series.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  98. Anon[562] • Disclaimer says:

    That reminds me of the very Sailer-esque editorial cartoon inThe Onion this week.

    https://www.theonion.com/casting-bawl-1829027721

  99. Rosie says:
    @Rosie

    The Female Hypergamy hoax at least had the strength of being relatively straightforward, nd therefore easy to refute. I expect to hear more and more about “female solipsism” now that “female Hypergamy” has gone up in flames. I shall have to try and make some sense of it.

  100. JMcG says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    Stay far, far away from “The Green Mile” in that case.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  101. Women are suckers for Sleepless in Seattle. It’s on HBO this month.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  102. @Rosie

    Agreed.

    Also not surprising for a female author.

    Also not fairy and, not coincidentally, not particularly interesting. We all have our fill of the mundane right outside our door should we muster the courage to face it.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_Fairy-Stories

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Rosie
  103. @Rosie

    So guilty as charged then. Self-awareness is the first step toward self-improvement.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  104. Lot says:
    @Steve Sailer

    “I’m sure somebody somewhere on the Internet has thought this through mathematically and come up with an optimal system for thinking about this stuff.”

    Logarithmic scale.

  105. Lot says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Shawshank was a saccharine cliche-fest.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  106. Lot says:
    @Ian M.

    “By the way, were prisons desegregated in that time? (I think the 1940s).”

    Wasn’t it set in 99.5% white Maine? Not in that circumstance. Prisons were probably desegregated around 1950 for the federal system and 1968 in the South.

    • Replies: @Anon
  107. Lot says:
    @Desiderius

    Fairest of Mortals, thou distinguish’d Care
    Of thousand bright Inhabitants of Air!

    Some secret Truths from Learned Pride conceal’d,
    To Maids alone and Children are reveal’d:
    What tho’ no Credit doubting Wits may give?
    The Fair and Innocent shall still believe.
    Know then, unnumbered Spirits round thee fly,
    The light Militia of the lower Sky;
    These, tho’ unseen, are ever on the Wing,
    Hang o’er the Box, and hover round the Ring.
    Think what an Equipage thou hast in Air,
    And view with scorn Two Pages and a Chair.
    As now your own, our Beings were of old,
    And once inclos’d in Woman’s beauteous Mold;
    Thence, by a soft Transition, we repair
    From earthly Vehicles to these of Air.
    Think not, when Woman’s transient Breath is fled,
    That all her Vanities at once are dead:
    Succeeding Vanities she still regards,
    And tho’ she plays no more, o’erlooks the Cards.
    Her Joy in gilded Chariots, when alive,
    And Love of Ombre, after Death survive.
    For when the Fair in all their Pride expire,
    To their first Elements the Souls retire:
    The Sprights of fiery Termagants in Flame
    Mount up, and take a Salamander’s Name.
    Soft yielding Minds to Water glide away,
    And sip with Nymphs, their Elemental Tea.
    The graver Prude sinks downward to a Gnome,
    In search of Mischief still on Earth to roam.
    The light Coquettes in Sylphs aloft repair,
    And sport and flutter in the Fields of Air.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Desiderius
  108. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lagertha

    Is that actually true? I haven’t seen the movie, but I thought the premise was that two laconic paragons of masculinity – cowboys out west – explode in a paroxysm of homosexuality. In other words, they’re stereotypically masculine characters who don’t spend a lot of time expressing their feelings. Or is the movie actually about cowboys who spend all their time not on the range but writing love letters and chatting with their girlfriends about their feelings, like in romantic comedies that women love?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Lagertha
  109. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Tyrion 2

    There’s a million variations, with plenty of non-violent or non-competitive games, and with this you’re getting social interaction (advantage over video games) and judgment outside one’s own head (which is probably the single most important thing developmentally).
    There’s also games that rely on cards instead of models, which is a bit cheaper and easier. I happened to buy some “NetRunner” (a computer hacker card game) sets right before their publisher (which makes a certain rival fantasy combat card game which will not be named) killed it.

  110. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Lot

    Every year there’s one of those that nobody is allowed to openly dislike, and Stephen King has contributed a disproportionate number of them.

    • Replies: @Lot
  111. Rosie says:
    @Desiderius

    So guilty as charged then. Self-awareness is the first step toward self-improvement.

    Hardly. The solipsism slander will go the way of the Hypergamy hoax.

    Some initial thoughts:

    Is the concept of Female Solipsism an important one? To which I answer yes, because mastery of the concept has the potential to be a tremendous aid in anticipating, understanding, and manipulating (emphasis mine) female behavior

    .

    http://alphagameplan.blogspot.com/2012/09/why-solipsism-matters.html

    So here you have a man explaining that you have to understand that women are solipsistic so that you can manipulate them into allowing them to use you for their own instrumental purposes.

    I’ll grant that’s not solipsism. He certainly acknowledges the existence of the physical world. He just claims that physical objects (which he understands to include women) exist to serve his needs and wants. In short, he is egocentric. Egocentrism, not solipsism, is the root of all evil. It is the defining essence of psychopathy.

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/psychopathy

    Human beings are ends in themselves, not means to an end. To objectify is to dehumanize, the ultimate expression of this being chattel slavery, of women or men.

    https://medium.com/@firasd/human-beings-are-not-a-means-to-an-end-but-an-end-in-

    themselves-f989b7ee2518

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  112. Jason Liu says:

    Harry Potter fandom was an early indicator of SJW bullshit. Now it’s a clear red flag.

    I liked Harry Potter when I was 8, then by the third book I just suddenly lost all interest and dropped it.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  113. @Lot

    But where ’s the man who counsel can bestow,
    Still pleas’d to teach, and yet not proud to know?
    Unbiass’d or by favour or by spite;
    Not dully prepossess’d nor blindly right;
    Tho’ learn’d, well bred, and tho’ well bred sincere;
    Modestly bold, and humanly severe;
    Who to a friend his faults can freely show,
    And gladly praise the merit of a foe;
    Bless’d with a taste exact, yet unconfin’d,
    A knowledge both of books and humankind;
    Gen’rous converse; a soul exempt from pride;
    And love to praise, with reason on his side?
    Such once were critics; such the happy few
    Athens and Rome in better ages knew.

    Sailer’s close enough for interweb work.

    • Agree: Lot
    • Replies: @Lagertha
  114. Rosie says:
    @Desiderius

    Also not surprising for a female author.

    Living in a Jewish-dominated culture that White male Gentiles surrendered without a fight.

    • Replies: @Svigor
  115. @Rosie

    Can you find another windmill at which to tilt? I prefer my Donna Quixotes less tiresomely predictable/obtuse.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    , @EH
  116. @Lot

    I can’t tell if you’re agreeing or disagreeing, which I suppose is high praise considering. Great allusion in any case. Very much on point.

  117. Curle says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    I just looked her up. An UW grad and I’ve never heard of her though that university celebrates any alumnus at all who ever put pen to paper on behalf of social justice even or especially rapper alumni like Macklemore, so I’m assuming she’s not an SJW or a rapper.

    Her wiki bio says: “Her parents disapproved of her relationship with Cleary, a Roman Catholic, so the couple eloped and were married in 1940.”

    If only we could return to the days where open-mindedness meant Presbyterians marrying Catholics.

  118. Curle says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Didn’t do anything for me either aside from the final scene on the Mexican beach. Made me want to vacation on a Mexican beach.

  119. Anonymous[241] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Cuz it’s about tortured relationships n’ stuff.

    The higher-female-rated “Unforgiven” confirms my prejudice that it’s overrated even by Eastwood’s erratic standard. Otoh– are that many people still watching “M” (1931)???

    Big typo on that delta for Seven Samurai, which is of course a man’s man’s film

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  120. Anonymous[377] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ian M.

    In the short story Freeman’s character was white (hence Freeman’s quip in the film about being called Red “because I’m Irish”).

  121. Anonymous[241] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    “Crazy Rich Big Fat Gay Cowboys”– someone will greenlight this by year’s end

  122. Lot says:
    @J.Ross

    “Every year there’s one of those that nobody is allowed to openly dislike, and Stephen King has contributed a disproportionate number of them.”

    Tom Hanks is probably the worst offender.

  123. Curle says:
    @Ian M.

    I’m biased in favor of Casino. It’s the only example in popular culture I know of where firing a patronage hire forms part of the story. For survivors of the patronage hire co-worker this is a bigger deal than you might imagine.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    , @J.Ross
  124. Rosie says:
    @Jason Liu

    I liked Harry Potter when I was 8, then by the third book I just suddenly lost all interest and dropped it.

    That is also when the series went PC if memory serves.

  125. Anonymous[241] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve, surely it’s for reasons similar to your thesis on Saturday morning cartoons (R.I.P.): the male Mugwumps quit because the girls took to it with such alacrity. The female-to-male ratio of Harry Potter fanfic’ers has got to be higher than any other major fandom’s– witness how concerted four-quadrant efforts to get girls into Star Wars and Ghostbusters misfired catastrophically. Yet somehow the public-school Oxbridge-dandy redoubt of “magic wielders” was more easily breached, go figure…

    Monitoring the fan preferences without sufficient professional remove, Rowling also stumbled into character glut on the level of the “It’s a Small World” ride– boys prefer a core cast, not the weekly debut of new dolls sporting minor tweaks, e.g. announcing the Hogwarts gang’s new friend, a biotech heiress wizard in a wheelchair from Micronesia. Eventually the Fast/Furious franchise will succumb to this condition

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  126. Lot says:
    @Ian M.

    Casino was well made and fun to watch. Nihilism? Bad things happened to the mostly bad characters.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Ian M.
  127. Rosie says:
    @Desiderius

    Can you find another windmill at which to tilt? I prefer my Donna Quixotes less tiresomely predictable/obtuse.

    I only wish that, like DQ, I were in fact tilting at windmills thinking they’re giants. Unfortunately, I am not. You are a real, bond fide misogynist pig, objectively speaking.

    My repeated calls for a truce in the gender wars have been studiously ignored despite the clearly very dire political situation in which we find ourselves. It’s almost like it’s you, a “man,” who struggles with objective reality, a very grim reality for our people if your ilk are allowed to destroy White solidarity.

  128. @JMcG

    Tom Hanks + black guy + prison = preachy snooze fest. Definitely on my Never Watch List. See also Philadelphia (Tom Hanks + black guy + AIDS) and Captain Phillips (Tom Hanks + misunderstood black guy + hijacking).

  129. @Bragadocious

    Women are suckers for Sleepless in Seattle.

    Also for Pretty Woman and Runaway Bride and 4 Weddings and a Funeral.

  130. @Curle

    This is a good point. It’s a great movie overall, but I never thought of the patronage angle. DeNiro was too stubborn to just put the patronage hire in a place where he couldn’t do any damage and it ended up costing him.

  131. EH says:
    @Desiderius

    A great anecdote on the female reflex to assume that everything is about them, their status and feelings, rather than actually getting anything done: “The Tangled Chains On The Swing Set of Solipsism” (“Ian Ironwood”). Most amusing and instructive thing I’ve read in the last million words or so – the whole thing is good, but the story begins: “About 18 years ago I was working in a medical office with 13 women as a temp…”

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  132. kihowi says:
    @Anonymous

    Women love gay porn.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  133. @anon

    I don’t think women with children are going onto imdb or anywhere else to rate movies. The kind of women who would take the time and effort to go online to rate movies are butch, childless women who’s priority in life is to remain childless so that they can watch tv and movies without being inconvenienced by children.

  134. @Jack D

    Men seem to like movies that feature men doing something fantastic. Not necessarily rising in a hierarchy, but always doing something amazing.

    Also, women seem to be turned off by violent movies, but men seem to like them.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  135. @Steve Sailer

    JK Rowling certainly has a male side in terms of musical tastes. Her favourite rock band is Blue Oyster Cult, and she says she has a thing for bass guitarists. Her 2015 crime novel Career of Evil is full of references to old Blue Oyster Cult songs.

    • Replies: @Curle
  136. @Rosie

    You’re the only one fighting, Donna. That you take observations re: the relative shortcomings of women (a) as hatred and (b) personally is the dictionary definition of solipsism.

    The rest of us know, and love, that women are just as human as the rest of us, and thus have shortcomings as we all do. That this is the one forum where such heresies may be spoken makes it awfully odd that you choose this very same forum to wage your one woman jihad for great justice. As for white solidarity, thanks but no thanks. I’m proud to be an American.

    That is all.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    , @Kylie
  137. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Curle

    Casino is a classic as a “guy movie” (that is, as a narrative illustration of how complex processes actually work), but the other guy is right that it’s not a complete epic. There are many movies that achieve a particular fame separate from their success because of a particular sequence or speech serving to quickly illustrate an idea.
    Godfather II illustrating neocolonialism in Cuba is the really obvious example, but there are many like this, especially less well done or performing movies which remain in discussion because of a “fictional” laying out of a real concept.
    The fourth Bourne movie (the one without MATT DAA MON) illustrates a Manchurian shooting cleaned up by poisoned psychiatry.
    Peeping Tom (which is a refreshingly beautiful and un-sordid film, to be enjoyed by Hitchcock fans) is said to have been on the censored list for a long time (to ill effect for the director) because of remarkable parallels between the experiments described in the film and since-declassified experiments done for intelligence services.
    Set It Off illustrated bank robbery so effectively that one family was able to use it as a textbook for their own crimes.
    And of course Glen Ford’s Trial illustrates Alinskyism.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  138. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    M will never die, it is the film student’s film student’s film. When I finally got the Criterion disc with the commentary I was excited until I heard every little thing in the film described as either Brechtian or Kafka-esque (or both). Then I switched it off and watched Mishima.

  139. Rosie says:
    @Desiderius

    That you take observations re: the relative shortcomings of women (a) as hatred

    No, I just take your claim that women are solipsistic as stupidity. The fact that you won’t STFU about it is the tell for your hatred. I think men have all kinds of shortcomings. I just make it a point to bite my tongue about it.

    (b) personally is the dictionary definition of solipsism.

    To the contrary, it is the dictionary definition of logic.

    Women are solipsistic.
    Rosie is a woman.
    Therefore, Rosie is solipsistic.

    You see, when you intend to exclude present company, it’s usually advisable to say, “Present company excluded.” Otherwise, your audience is of course perfectly justified in “taking it personally” when you insult them.

    That this is the one forum where such heresies may be spoken makes it awfully odd that you choose this very same forum to wage your one woman jihad for great justice.

    You must not get out much. The manosphere has taken over the White advocacy movement wholesale. Otherwise, I wouldn’t GAF what you get up to.

    As for white solidarity, thanks but no thanks. I’m proud to be an American.

    Spoken like a true cuck.

  140. Rosie says:
    @President Barbicane

    Also, women seem to be turned off by violent movies, but men seem to like them.

    I really hated violent movies before I met my husband. Because I didn’t watch them, I was very sensitive to the gore and depravity of wanton murder and mayhem. I started watching some with him, and eventually got used to it, a fact which I kind of regret.

  141. Rosie says:
    @kihowi

    Women love gay porn.

    Ewwww.

  142. Svigor says:
    @Rosie

    Yeah lotta resistance from the women though.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  143. @EH

    That was a long read, but pretty funny and spot on.

  144. 3g4me says:
    @Ian M.

    @ 83 Ian M: “Huh, I’ve seen 14 movies on the female list and only 5 on the men’s list.

    Not sure what that says about me.”

    I’ve seen 10 on the women’s list (only one in the theater – “Sound of Music” as a child) and 4 on the men’s list (none in the theater). What that says about me is that movies are not my preferred form of entertainment except when forced to watch some (such as the Harry Potter movies, which were not particularly good) with my kids. I don’t know that I have any favorites – I have movies attached to certain memories (I enjoyed “7 Brides for 7 Brothers” on t.v. as a kid; my father took me to see a midnight showing of “Gone With The Wind” when I was a teen in the ’70s; my husband and I watched “Pretty Woman” with subtitles in Belgrade in 1990 or 1991, years before America bombed it, etc.).

    My husband, on the other hand, watches tons of movies – most on tv, and many of them over and over and over again (I’ve overheard the soundtrack of “Legend” about three dozen times from my computer in the kitchen). When we were overseas, we often watched videos of American movies together as a taste of “home,” and as a break from endless embassy functions or parties.

    Nowadays you couldn’t pay me to go sit among all the diversity and be subjected to Hollywood’s narrative.

    • Replies: @Ian M.
  145. Curle says:
    @unpc downunder

    I don’t immediately think of BOC when I think of male-oriented rock bands. The vocals were too melodic perhaps. When I think of male oriented bands I think of raw power and ragged vocals so my list includes the seeming (but is it?) paradox of The Stooges and the two great ragged and powerful bands who drew their inspiration from the Stooges 1) The New York Dolls (dressed like girls so they could rock like guys?); and 2) The Ramones. Here’s video of The Ramones in 1977, not a woman in sight.

  146. I can’t think of a single cultural artifact where I’m more out of step with the majority opinion than The Shawshank Redemption. I saw it with three friends in college and groaned, cringed and laughed through the whole thing, it was the schmaltziest, clumsiest exercise in heart-string pulling I’d ever seen and I expected my buddies to say the same. They all came out of the theater raving about it. I couldn’t believe my ears, they’re calling it their favorite movie of all time, etc. then over the years I’ve seen more and more people with the same opinion.

    I just do not get it.

    • Agree: Kylie
    • Replies: @Rosie
  147. Is Mishima any good? I see quotes by him online and he sounds fascinating.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  148. Kylie says:
    @Desiderius

    For God’s sake, don’t encourage it.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  149. @Rosie

    Wish the Agree function worked on your posts but for some reason it doesn’t.

    Anyway, truce accepted. Any white woman who’s woke to the problems facing white people and rejects all the cultural efforts to make white women more and more antagonistic to white men is a rare breed and gets a hearty tip of the fedora from me. Cheers.

  150. Lagertha says:
    @J.Ross

    hahaa! Yes, Warhammer is yuge – and high IQ kids in school are into it, more than ever – ergo, the stores*. I was very weirded-out by driving my sons to play Magic more than a decade ago…often, met at game stores with other players who were in their 40′s! It was such a weird memory that I am now channeling, a la’ Ford! – ok, hahaaa, my sons never reported old guys wanting to touch them – they were only obsessed with winning Magic that night.

    * all those figures are very expensive! and the paints! – paints are cheaper at boiler paint art supply stores. And, to answer your last ?, I will write down the names of the war games (Feudal sounds familiar) and get back to yah.

  151. Rosie says:
    @Svigor

    Yeah lotta resistance from the women though.

    I’m not saying we’re blameless. I’m just saying it’s not all our fault.

  152. Rosie says:
    @Song For the Deaf

    I’ve seen it, but I don’t remember much about it, so obviously it didn’t make an impression.

  153. @J.Ross

    The fourth Bourne movie (the one without MATT DAA MON) illustrates a Manchurian shooting cleaned up by poisoned psychiatry.

    Holy shit.

    Someone else on this planet who doesn’t reflexively hate the fourth Bourne film bcuz REASONS.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  154. @Rosie

    In our defense, the vast majority of us didn’t even know there was a fight going on.

    • Agree: Rosie
  155. Lagertha says:
    @Rosie

    I’m gonna regret this, but….

    Rosie, it is not all our fault (despite the fact I often say I loathe 99% of women) but the men here, (you may not even realize some are actually women – everyone is anonymous) are fully aware of that. And, of course there are men here, who have other opinions than you, and are 30+ years older. People don’t change much after 50.

    No one wants to fight with you over the points you make. Everyone realizes that we are living in a precarious time. You must have thicker skin if you get all riled up (and, I’ve done that plenty of times, which was/is dumb and useless, and I always regret it when I go off the rails) by commenters here. You must focus on the outside world to fight for your views and your childrens’ future. This is just a forum of venting, so to speak. This is…hahaaaa…a safe space for views-of-the-last-kind. Tick tock-tick tock.

    • Replies: @Kylie
  156. J.Ross says: • Website
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    That “Australian”-accented sweatshop supervisor at the very end sure resembles a certain famous purveyor of iodine and water filtration accessories …

  157. Lagertha says:
    @J.Ross

    and, of course, teach them Chess. Every community, the world over, has chess clubs/forums/cafes/parks. Chess is such a great game to learn, enjoy, compete in, for life – my kids learned at 3-4. And, fencing: a kid gets to actually, be a real fighter with a weapon. And, horseback riding, or sailing, surfing, downhill snow sports; also gets kids to earn great confidence and understand the nature of animals, and well, nature. And, of course, fishing. I got my kids (they were obsessed Xbox/PS1 gamers; Game-boy gamers, ) outdoors as much as possible – they would drop the controller in a heartbeat if I said, “fresh snow – get in the car,” in winter. I always had the equipment ready in the car.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  158. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Song For the Deaf

    See Paul Schrader’s Mishima. It’s one of the best films ever made, probably the best film of the eighties, about a maddeningly complex man, which is startlingly honest despite having been made under the approval of the guy’s wife. The film uses black and white flashbacks for biography and a color “present day” thread for the spectacular death, between dramatizations of his short stories. It is a stunning production and has some of the best work Philip Glass has done on the soundtrack.
    The guy himself is harder to endorse without conditions, as he was a Fascist and an award winning author, and a cosmopolitan and wanted to restore the Empire, and happily married and a promiscuous homosexual.

    • Replies: @Song For the Deaf
  159. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Lagertha

    Feudal and more recently Loka are “fairy chess,” that is, they start with the same pieces and framework as chess and then innovate (like that one episode of the Big Bang Theory). Feudal is much sought after on the auction sites and Loka was a successful gofundme-type project. But of course the nicest thing about regular chess is it’s like learning a widely spoken foreign language, you can now interact with a broad range of interesting people.

  160. People who hang out on forums posting about female narcissism need to put down their keyboard and hit the gym. It’s healthier for you mentally and physically to stop stewing on women’s flaws and go lift some weights. In 3-4 months you will hate yourself far less and have far less need to psychoanalyze them. Let’s go.

  161. Lagertha says:
    @Anonymous

    you have to see the movie for me to answer any questions you have. I stand by my previous words. Of course, yes: they don’t talk so much, but their unspoken feelings about their frustration and loneliness with their day-to-day lives is perhaps, more evident to women (who are watching the movie). Of course, and this is a new point: Heath Ledger had died before the movie opened, and, he was the biggest rising star until his untimely death…a new Clark Gable, a young Robert Redford, Steve McQueen.

    Women were also sympathetic to his widow & child. When the movie broke out, many women viewers were sympathetic to Ennis, regardless if he was interested in Jack (women just wanted to see/watch Heath). Many people found Heath to be that guy they would follow through thick and thin. He was The Patriot. Ledger epitomized the noble man who would do anything for his family – this is why women overlook the homo stuff of the movie. Well, my spin.

  162. @Anonymous

    You left out historical costumes. This is why Shakespeare often works so well as a date movie: lots of cotehardies and parti-colored hose to keep female viewers happy, while male viewers can watch people killing each other.

  163. Kylie says:
    @Lagertha

    For God’s sake, don’t encourage it.

  164. @Kylie

    We all fall shot of the glory of God.

    Mea culpa.

    • Replies: @Kylie
  165. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    You’re right I read the first one. Poor little orphan Harry living with his mean relatives. We women just want to rescue him and take him home.

    My favorite movies are Mars Attacks, the Hitchcock one about a serial killer of rich widows who hides out with his sisters family and Braveheart

  166. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    Young White men loved Gladiator. I knew some that went back every day for a week or more.

  167. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mark G.

    This site should be renamed “ Men Who Hate Women “

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Mark G.
  168. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ali Choudhury

    I love Despicable Me. Other great movies the kids introduced me to were the Interview the comedy about N. Korea and The Martian.
    The Martian created a fad of kids planting potatoes in their yards.

  169. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    I don’t go to movies with blacks in them or watch them on TV or Netflix TCM seems to be having a black movie month. A lifetime of affirmative action women bullying me and the men harassing me I can’t stand to see or hear them.

    That’s why I can’t stand Gone With The Wind, too many blacks. The script even reversed the races in an attempted rape ala Law and Order. evil white trash try to drag Scarlett off her buggy to rape her and a black man rescues her. Until the KKK installed law and order the blacks went on a rape rampage after the war

    The worst thing about the movie is that 6 ft tall 500 pd woman with the bulldog face. She ruins it in the first few minutes. There’s Scarlett in her pretty dress and a minute later the bulldog face sticks out of a window and the massive creature starts cackling and screeching . That woman is in every scene bustling around cackling and screeching in Ebonics And Pansy. I can see why blacks complain about the blacks in the old movies.

    Yuck I see enough ugly screeching blacks in everyday life. I don’t need to watch them on TV.

    Favorite genres are gangster movies like Goodfellas Casino. I love the old cheap 30s 40s noir detective movies. It’s interesting to speculate about how cheaply those noir movies were made.

    Often there’s not one car. The detective’s in his office. Next scene he’s in the living room of a witness. Often not one outdoor scene just cheap interior sets. The detective wears the same clothes all thru the movie I love them

    Can anyone explain why baby boomer men loved Woody Allen movies and ugly Woody?

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
  170. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ian M.

    Loved Casino and all those gangster movies. I was so happy when it showed up on Netflix

    • Replies: @Ian M.
  171. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    I doubt state prisons and city and county jails were ever segregated outside of the solid south. Why spend the extra money?

  172. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    It’s also a true story. The real Ginger was more beautiful than Sharon Stone. The real Rosenstein looked like he was dying of cancer about 50 pounds underweight

  173. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rosie

    This is a White men who hate women site. Accept and give it right back to the ignorant old codgers. Celibacy and rejection makes old codgers cranky.

    Some of the ignorance is appalling as in poor women have many children because they can’t afford contraceptives

    My favorite is White women should have more children. It’s like the celibate old codgers don’t even know it needs a man and a woman to make a baby

    Some of these old codgers claim to be married and have kids. But if you read enough of their posts you realize all their knowledge of women comes from reading the internet.

  174. @J.Ross

    Alright, well a movie about a gay Japanese fascist sounds too good to miss.

  175. Surprised and confused that Goodfellas didn’t even crack the top 20.

  176. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    This site should be renamed “ Men Who Hate the Monstrous Regiment of Women“

    fixed it for you.

    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualNLs/firblast.htm

    The First Blast of the Trumpet
    Against the Monstrous Regiment of Women
    1558
    John Knox

    Extracted from: Selected Writings of John Knox: Public Epistles, Treatises, and Expositions to the Year 1559

    Editor’s Note

    The First Blast of the Trumpet is, perhaps, Knox’s most famous and controversial work. In the twentieth century, few people have read the book, and still fewer have made an attempt to understand the reformer’s position.

    For Knox, the teaching of scripture alone is sufficient to prove that women should not bear rule over men. The testimony of scripture is so plain, he wrote, that “to add anything were superfluous, were it not that the world is almost now come to that blindness, that whatsoever pleases not the princes and the multitude, the same is rejected as doctrine newly forged, and is condemned for heresy” (p. 390).

    Knox knew that his 16th-century opponents expected citations from classical and patristic sources. Therefore, the reformer takes aim at both the position and polemical methods of his critics by quoting some of the stoutest comments imaginable, refuting the government of women. Whether Knox personally joins with the ancient authors in every detail is immaterial; by numerous references to antiquity, the reformer demonstrates that there is a venerable history of opposition to the rule of women. Still, Knox points out that his main argument, even if stripped of the patristic citations, is fundamentally based upon the authoritative word of God. “For as I depend not upon the determinations of men, so I think my cause no weaker, albeit their authority is denied unto me; provided that God by his revealed will, and manifest word, stands plain and evident on my side” (p. 400).

    Contemporary readers should also recall that, when Knox speaks of “nature,” he is often making reference to human nature. Even so, he states, “this part of nature is not my most sure foundation” (p. 385). Again, his principal concern is with the revealed will of God, written in the Bible.

    The treatise was published in Geneva in 1558. As indicated in the preface, the work was published anonymously. The author wished to conceal his identity, until he had issued two more blasts, intending to disclose his name with the publication of the Third Blast. The reformer’s plan to write two sequels remained unfulfilled, although he later published a summary of the contents which he proposed to treat in the Second Blast. The summary of the Second Blast was appended originally to his Appellation (1558), but readers will find this summary following the First Blast in the present volume (pages 435-36).

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
  177. @Pat Boyle

    “So what does it mean that we have all these fist fights on film? It means we are not really in charge of our lives. We are protoplasmic robots acting out a set of instructions that we didn’t write.”

    Either that or they all know to hit only with their outer two knuckles, which don’t get jammed nearly as much when you throw a punch.

  178. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Mark G.

    If we don’t fix no-fault divorce then we deserve the die-off. If we do fix no-fault divorce I will expose myself to all ridicule, not only away from keyboard but in the surface, in the light of the sun, and go a-wifing.
    But aside from the divorce disaster, a guy thirty years ago would be as insane to turn down a white collar career as he would be to accept one now. So much is burnt and twisted. But Detroit voted in a white mayor after things got to a certain point. Maybe there must be suffering before things can be fixed.

  179. Kylie says:
    @Desiderius

    Not blaming you. Just noting that its kudzu-like properties can easily get and maintain a stranglehold on an otherwise enjoyable discussion.

  180. Mark G. says:
    @Anon

    I don’t hate women but I think it’s good to have a realistic appraisal of them so you won’t be taken advantage of by them. There are women who treat men fairly and women who don’t. For the ones who don’t, you don’t play the game by whatever rules they’ve decided to set up. If the rules are rigged then it’s better not to play at all. Of course, if you don’t play by their rigged rules then you may be called a “woman hater” but I just laugh that kind of thing off.

  181. Blame away, I was mistaken.

  182. Ian M. says:
    @Lot

    Yeah, and there’s a place for that sort of movie. But do we really need so many of them? Since the ‘70s, it seems that the sort of movie that focuses on the criminal, base, and ignoble has gotten a lot more common, with a corresponding decline in movies that attempt to elevate our minds to the noble and heroic. This trend seems to me to be a symptom of a nihilistic culture.

    I would also say that movies such as Casino are quite often intended more to appeal to men’s prurient fascination with seeing depictions of the seedy and sordid than they are to serve as cautionary morality tales.

  183. Ian M. says:
    @3g4me

    I like movies, but I was raised on old movies (movies from the ‘40s through ‘60s, mostly, and some from the ’30s) because my father enjoys old movies. I haven’t seen a lot of the ‘classics’ from the ’70s and ’80s.

    I tend not to like stereotypically male action movies and war movies as much as most men. However, I do really like Bridge on the River Kwai, listed above, but that’s more of a POW movie than it is a typical war movie.

  184. Ian M. says:
    @Anon

    In my opinion, the mafia gangster film genre inaugurated by the Godfather films jumped the shark in the ’90s (or maybe before: I’m not really familiar with mafia movies from the ’80s). All those gangster movies from the ’90s try too hard to recapture the magic of the first two Godfather movies and inevitably fail to live up to that empyrean standard. I think Casino, Goodfellas, A Bronx Tale are all overrated (I especially dislike the last one). The Western genre and the film noir genre (itself a type of gangster film) had better overall runs, if perhaps not as high peaks as represented by the Godfather films.

    I did like The Departed though (I suppose not technically a mafia movie), despite Nicholson’s hamming it up and the sudden death of the protagonist with no warning. I thought that movie had the potential to reinvigorate the genre somewhat by taking it in an innovative new direction.

    At any rate, I acknowledge that my opinion of the mafia film genre is a minority view, and I can at least understand why someone would like Casino.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  185. Ian M. says:
    @Anon

    I would say the most salient theme of Gladiator is the revenge theme, not the love aspect.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  186. @Anonymous

    boys prefer a core cast, not the weekly debut of new dolls sporting minor tweaks

    Exactly. Vin Diesel’s cameo at the end of Tokyo Drift is the reason we have 8 F&F films instead of 3.

    Eventually the Fast/Furious franchise will succumb to this condition

    Unfortunately the leaders of that franchise have shifted gears and conspired with CBS to bring us a reboot of Magnum, P.I.

    Indeed.

  187. @Ian M.

    There was also a political angle that was relegated to deleted scenes that should have been left in the film.

    Gladiator also had some nice little cultural touches, like Maximus revering the figurines of the three Roman household deities in his tent after the first battle.

  188. @Ian M.

    Marky Mark was the protagonist in The Departed.

  189. @Anon

    The script even reversed the races in an attempted rape ala Law and Order. evil white trash try to drag Scarlett off her buggy to rape her and a black man rescues her.

    Big Sam (Tara’s former overseer) does rescue her in the book. However, the book did not have an interracial tag team attack her as the movie does.

    And I object to your take on Mammy. Hattie McDaniel got an Oscar for that role, and she damned well deserved it, if only for the incredulous look on her face as she listens to Scarlett stealing her sister’s fiance just to get money to pay Tara’s taxes.

  190. @Anonymous

    For context, he was writing during the reigns of Elizabeth Tudor and Mary Queen of Scots. The second was unwise enough to attempt tolerance; the first would have eaten him for breakfast and ten more like him.

  191. @Mark G.

    Because of their welfare benefits, affirmative action jobs and a culture that denigrates marriage a lot of women won’t even care if you are a good breadwinner. They’ll pick guys on the basis of looks or personality instead.

    Is it so bad if women get to pick men on the basis of looks or personality, instead of marrying just to avoid starvation and homelessness?

    • Replies: @Mark G.
  192. Mark G. says:
    @Rosamond Vincy

    It’s not bad if women pick guys on the basis of looks or personality if they don’t expect the guys they didn’t pick to provide economic support for them. If a woman rejects me as a boyfriend or husband I accept that and wish her well in her future without me. The problem is that many of these women then vote for leftist politicians who advocate a big welfare state my taxes will pay for and affirmative programs that treat men like myself unfairly. If me and guys like me object to that then we are not “women haters”. The women who do that are “men haters”. Women who actually like men will look for a husband to support them or go out and get a job to support themselves.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
  193. @Mark G.

    OK, this makes sense. They want government freebies to pick up the slack for themselves or their toyboys. I can certainly understand resenting that.

  194. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @advancedatheist

    That’s every folk tale in the world.

    Poor boy joins the army wins the war and King marries him to the Princess

    Poor boy solves 3 problems, 3 riddles does 3 impossible deeds and wins the Princess and becomes the King’s heir.

    Nothing new

  195. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @larry lurker

    Thanks for the information, but if it’s on NPR how can the info be trusted?

  196. Anonymous[104] • Disclaimer says:

    I like most male adventure movies genuinely: The Great Escape, High Noon, Twelve O’clock High, etc. But I also think The Sound of Music, The Wizard of Oz, and It’s a Wonderful Life are great.

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