The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Me and My Flashlight
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

About 15 years ago the Los Angeles Police Department was banned from equipping policemen with the trusty Maglite flashlight, because its weight and durability made it excessively useful in bashing suspects. Eventually, the LAPD and its overseers settled upon an extremely bright lithium battery powered Pelican flashlight that only weighs about 10 ounces. You can temporarily blind people with it, but you can’t beat them.

In recent months when I go for a walk at night, I’ve taken to carrying a Maglite-style flashlight. I’m less likely to trip on all the sidewalk segments uplifted by tree roots, the pool of light bobbing around my feet makes me less likely to be run over by motorists, and so far I haven’t been accosted by any homeless crazy guys since I started carry a big club-like flashlight.

 
Hide 182 CommentsLeave a Comment
182 Comments to "Me and My Flashlight"
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. Anonymous[564] • Disclaimer says:

    I never knew the San Fernando Valley has devolved into Bedrock, the home Fred Flintstone and Barney Rubble. And Dino.

  2. How long before someone in CA proposes flashlight control? We can’t have armed old white dudes roaming the streets of CA at night.

    • Agree: Liza
    • Replies: @Dr. X
    , @Kronos
    , @SunBakedSuburb
  3. … so far I haven’t been accosted by any homeless crazy guys since I started carry a big club-like flashlight.

    Have you been accosted by any homeless crazy guys before you started carrying this one? We need more data.

    Maybe the LA cops were given those new light-weight flashlights because they kept requesting those 6 D-cell Mag-Lights ;-} (I recall the biggest having 3 D batteries.)

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Polynikes
  4. Walk lightly, and carry a big light.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  5. Anonymous[179] • Disclaimer says:

    I recommend putting an after market LED kit in the maglite. Shines better and uses less juice.

    If you have one in your car you can get a pointy end for it capable of smashing glass. Again, ebay.

    Apparently the 6C model made the best club, but the 4C seems pretty effective. 6c is no longer made. 6D is too unweildy IMO.

    Can’t you carry a firearm where you live?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Harry Baldwin
  6. “EXT. VALLEY VILLAGE – NIGHT: STEVE SAILER, trivia whiz and diversity apostate, listens to his footsteps echo through the quiet streets. Up ahead glow the lights of the 7-Eleven, where he will purchase an apple from a silent West African clerk. ” I’m not sure if you’ll be picked up by Harry Dean Stanton in a repossessed car, quietly observed on behalf of Pritzker-esque gangsters by Ryan Gosling in his Malibu from “Drive,” or run over by Bronze Age Pervert’s jet-powered, monkey-navigated DeLorean before it heads to its first stop on its journey into the artifice of antiquity: Turin, 1889.

  7. @Achmed E. Newman

    About 12 years ago a homeless guy at the corner of Ventura and Laurel Canyon said to me, “Hey, you look just like the psychiatrist who sent me to the state mental hospital. You’re younger but otherwise you look just like him! Why do you put me away in the asylum? Huh? Why did you do that to me?” This did not appear to be a topic upon which careful argumentation would profit me any, so I skedaddled.

    There have been two or three minor incidents of being accosted over the last 18 months, which seem to correlate with the increasing homelessness in Southern California.

    The increase in the pedestrian deaths from traffic accidents over the last decade is also concerning. This area has more nightspots than it used to and therefore more Men With Gold Chains driving BMWs at 70 mph down surface streets at midnight. There were three hit and run deaths of pedestrians a few years ago on Ventura Blvd in the wee hours. The LAPD had largely ignored the southern San Fernando Valley since it’s a low crime area. But then they put more patrol cars on Ventura, which seems to have helped. But there’s the general trend toward drivers being more distracted, so having your own eye-catching source of light can’t hurt when walking at night.

    And my night vision is declining, so bad sidewalks are more of a problem for me to see. As you get older, the last thing you want to do is trip and break a hip.

    A big flashlight helps with all three dangers.

  8. Does it affect night vision much i.e. make you less likely to see homeless crazy guys?

    OT, interesting UK study using the 100,000-genetic-sample (human) UK Biobank found that one in every 3,652 dna samples is the product of “extreme inbreeding”.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-11724-6

    I immediately committed thoughtcrime in wondering if they were all from Bradford, but the authors didn’t want any racial confounds.

    “individuals of European ancestry born in the UK between 1938 and 1967”

    And then I thought it’s likely an underestimate because inbreeders typically don’t volunteer for things.

    “our estimate of the UK prevalence of EI is likely downwardly biased partly because of the ascertainment of UKB participants, who are on average healthier and more educated than the rest of the UK population”

    They’ve thought of everything. Unfortunately you have to apply to the Biobank with your research proposal – I have a feeling that “do the same checks but for UK Pakistanis” might not make the cut.

    • Agree: jim jones
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Gordo
  9. JackOH says:

    Zebralight, Streamlight, and something under the Eveready name I bought at AutoZone, and later gave to a relative, are what I’ve been using.

    I wrote about them in 2016.

    “How can pedestrians make themselves more visible in darkness to motorists when they’re walking on parking lots and parking decks, along berms, in marked crosswalks, or when forced to share a roadway with motor vehicles due to unplowed sidewalks and impassable roadsides?”

    “Modern, high-quality LED flashlights can help.”

    “What advantages do modern, high-quality LED flashlights offer over older and more familiar incandescent flashlights powered by D cells?”

    “They’re lightweight, often under three ounces. They’re pocketable, fitting easily into a shirt or jacket pocket. They throw a useful, powerful beam of light that can illuminate your walkway, and can clearly be seen by alert motorists. Many offer features such as water resistance, focusability, shock resistance, multi-mode switches, programmability, machined housings, and much more.”

    “Prices start at around $20. See your sporting goods or other specialty retailer for the available selection. Armband-type LED lights are also made for bicyclists.”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  10. @Steve Sailer

    Thanks for the story. I agree with the big flashlight idea for the problems with people. As far as light goes, the LED ones are amazing and just easier to carry, I’m sure. You could light yourself up like a Christmas tree.

    To relate this to bicycling which is a thing of mine, I’ve seen cyclists with such bright LEDs nowadays that they truly need a high/low beam switch! They are just blinding, which is a bad thing to do to a driver no matter what your vehicle. However, a cyclist can now have great tail lights (especially those female ones!) and a very-easy-to-be-seen headlight, with no weight or drag penalty*.

    For me at night, in neighborhoods with hardly any cars, I’d rather have no lights. I have enough ambient light to see the road, but any other light is just distraction (yes, of course I know the cars can’t see me, and I keep well away).

    .

    * Do you remember those old generators that were driven by the wheel rim? That torque would slow you down enough to really notice.

  11. Dan Hayes says:

    Steve,

    A Harlem bystander exclaimed “that n****r got some thick scull” when dispatched by a cop’s Maglite in The Godfather. Or so I vaguely recall from the book, although I doubt that juicy incident would have made it to the big screen.

  12. @YetAnotherAnon

    1 out of 3,600 is quite low.

    Among Pakistanis in Bradford, would the rate of first cousin breeding be, what, 1 out of 3.6?

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    , @HFR
  13. Charon says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Please stop using the preposition “concerning” as an adjective. Please stop now, while there’s still time. Do it for the children. Please.

    • Replies: @HFR
    , @Anonymous
  14. @Achmed E. Newman

    * Do you remember those old generators that were driven by the wheel rim?

    Yes, I had one in the early 1970s on my ten-speed when I biked to school every day.

    The two big improvements in bike safety since then are helmets and LEDs. In contrast, there have probably been 50 to 100 distinct improvements in auto safety between 1972-2019.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
  15. Stuart says:

    In fact in the book “The Godfather” we have the tale of why Neri left the police ……

    He frequently patrols with a large flashlight, which he uses to assault Italian youths who run with gangs or shattering the windshields of diplomats who disregard traffic or parking laws. After his wife leaves him, Neri kills a drug dealer and pimp by cracking his skull with the flashlight and is convicted of manslaughter.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  16. @JackOH

    Yes, I should probably get an LED armband as well.

    When I got a new parka for Christmas that was a solid gray with no contrasting colors, I just barely dodged getting hit two nights in a row at the same corner by motorists making left turns.

    Sure, it was their fault, but I’d be dead, so the smarter thing is to spend a little money to get some contemporary safety equipment.

  17. Yeah, but, Steve, at your upper-crusty, elitist, Pinker-like BMI, can you still swing the Mag-lite?

    My father is older than you, but more mobile and more physically confidant. Perfect health. Lifts weights.

    Get some kettlebells. Then you don’t have to walk anymore, let alone worry.

  18. @Steve Sailer

    “Of 5,127 babies of Pakistani origin, 37% had married parents who were first cousins” – not too far off, one in 2.7.

    Whether a single cousin marriage would be “extreme inbreeding” I’m not qualified to say (it’s a definition involving “runs of homozygosity”). But it tends to happen again and again through generations.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leeds-23183102

    Bradford Council are trying their best.

    https://www.bradford.gov.uk/media/3276/cousin-marriage-and-genetic-inheritance-leaflet.pdf

  19. @Cline felt her song dumb

    Steve gets his best ideas listening to retrowave on /nightwalks/. Few know this.

  20. Gordo says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    OT, interesting UK study using the 100,000-genetic-sample (human) UK Biobank found that one in every 3,652 dna samples is the product of “extreme inbreeding”.

    I’m suspecting this is worse than cousin marriage, first degree is really icky and disgusting stuff.

    Double first cousin would be part of second degree and is very possible in inbred communities, e.g. the subcon colony in Bradford.

    Yes big Maglite torches are a great way of illuminating while walking at night and even the UK police would find it difficult to arrest you for carrying one.

  21. JackOH says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Yeah, they work for me. When I’m walking on the poorly lit and unimproved road shoulder to the BP station for my morning cigarette fix, many drivers will steer slightly away from me once they spot my light. It’s noticeable.

    We go on a bit here about our realism versus ideology, and rightly so, too. Well, 200 lb. man versus 3000 lb. car, 5000 lb. SUV, or 50,000 lb. tractor-trailer rig. Sounds like realism to me. Maybe the big difference is motor vehicle drivers seem to respect my flashlight for their reasons as well as mine. Our ideological masters–not so much. LOL. Hey, it’s early, coffee, etc.

    • Replies: @Lockean Proviso
  22. Dr. X says:
    @The Alarmist

    How long before someone in CA proposes flashlight control? We can’t have armed old white dudes roaming the streets of CA at night.

    Yeah… if you ever need to use that Maglite in self-defense, let-wing prosecutor will probably charge you with assault with a deadly weapon and a black jury will convict you.

    I can hear it now… “Nobody NEEDS a flashlight that big!”

    • Replies: @El Dato
  23. Dr. X says:

    About 15 years ago the Los Angeles Police Department was banned from equipping policemen with the trusty Maglite flashlight, because its weight and durability made it excessively useful in bashing suspects.

    …but they have AR-15 rifles now, don’t they? Modern policing: can’t hit ’em over the head with a flashlight… just shoot ’em on sight instead.

  24. HFR says:
    @Steve Sailer

    When I read “extreme inbreeding,” I immediately thought father/daughter or brother/sister. That might be more consistent with 1 out of 3,600.

    • Replies: @miss marple
  25. Anonymous[389] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    As Teddy Roseveldt said, “Walk softly, but carry a big stick”.

  26. HFR says:
    @Charon

    I have a dim memory of Steve actually mocking the use of the term “concerning.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  27. @Achmed E. Newman

    Do you remember those old generators that were driven by the wheel rim? That torque would slow you down enough to really notice.

    As usual, The Simpsons did it.

  28. watson79 says:

    Walking at night is fun (raccoons!) but see what a brief nighttime stroll did to Countenance. Who now lives in Germany and is just starting to walk again after getting blindsided.

  29. Anonymous[208] • Disclaimer says:

    Did you know that once upon a time, the hallmark of an English gentleman undertaking his leisurely perambulations and excursions was a ‘rapier’ or other dinky fine bladed gent’s sword affixed in its sheath to the gentleman’s belt. A relict, apparently, of the lawless middle ages and the depredations of ‘villains’, that is ‘villiens’ or rougher peasants.

    Sometime in the 19th century the proper equipage of sword got substituted for the less lethal walking stick, no doubt due to the squeamishness which characterised that century, and later still to a rolled up umbrella. Thus the absurd combo of umbrella and bowler hat – as in John Cleese and right up to the 1970s – has a meatier origin than meets the eye.

    • Replies: @Cortes
  30. JR Ewing says:

    I had never heard the story about Maglights being banned because they could be weaponized. That’s hilarious and not surprising. Gotta make it a fairer fight for the crooks, you see.

    I used to love gigantic Maglights back in the day. Kept a big one in my truck and one next to the bed. And then they all disappeared once LED’s came into vogue about 20 years ago. I remember being amazed at the time by how bright they were.

    Going to look into the conversion kits mentioned above. That sounds pretty cool.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  31. Clyde says:

    Good idea with the flashlight. Also when you walk during day time be aware of where the sun is, that may blind drivers that cannot see you crossing the road.
    With all our “migrants” the chance of idiotic, totally avoidable accidents has risen greatly. And put accidents in quotation marks too, because 90% are due to peak stupidity driving. Especially the combo of stupidity plus drugs and alcohol. And that might be prescription drugs.

  32. Might I suggest you carry this:

    • LOL: Twinkie
  33. El Dato says:
    @Dr. X

    Especially as a maglite is cultural appropriation of African Fertility Symbols.

  34. Twinkie says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    I don’t like the instability of lithium rechargeable for EDC.* I carry a Zebra light with an NiMH rechargeable (Eneloop) AA and a sidearm.

    The idea of bashing someone on the head with an impact weapon is not a practical one. Also, unlike in the movies, in which people are harmlessly knocked out with blows to the head (usually with a rifle butt), blunt force head trauma is freaking serious and often lead to grave injuries or death.

    *In more extreme circumstances (e.g. very low or high temp, etc.), I’d carry a lithium primary-powered flashlight (Surefire).

  35. Twinkie says:
    @JR Ewing

    I had never heard the story about Maglights being banned because they could be weaponized.

    Rather dubious since “nightsticks” such as PR-24 and extendable batons like ASP were widely issued until recently. 2D cell Maglite is rather unwieldy and poorly balanced IMO as an impact weapon.

  36. @HFR

    British mysteries often feature brother/sister lovers. It’s no longer a shock when the adult siblings living in the same household turn out to be a couple. Statistically speaking these fictional sibling romances are overrepresented, I guess. Still I would think living in a densely populated country would make the practice unlikely because it’s so unnecessary. Concerning!

  37. @Steve Sailer

    #BanAssaultFlashlights ~Alexandria Obsidian-Crepuscule

  38. NickG says:

    I’ve taken to carrying a Maglite-style flashlight. I’m less likely to trip on all the sidewalk segments uplifted by tree roots, the pool of light bobbing around my feet makes me less likely to be run over by motorists, and so far I haven’t been accosted by any homeless crazy guys since I started carry a big club-like flashlight.

    In the UK that would be an offence. Carrying anything with the intent of using it as a weapon, even defensively, is an offence in Blighty. People have been prosecuted for carrying maglight flashlights in the UK and admitting part of their reasoning is that it would make for a handy defensive weapon. If you do this, mindful of mens rea — guilty intent — you have to shut up about it have plausible deniability in place, even for carrying a stout stick for a walk in the woods.

    By the way, collapsible pocket batons are very effective weapons. Naturally illegal to carry in the UK, as is pepper spray.

    The legal definition of an offensive weapon is…
    “any article made or adapted for use to causing injury to the person, or intended by the person having it with him for such use”.

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
    , @Jack D
  39. snorlax says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    If Steve were to shoot someone, then regardless of the actual facts, as an SPLC-identified Hate Person the LA District Attorney would charge him with first degree murder.

    • Replies: @Astonished
  40. Jack D says:
    @Anonymous

    Yes, an LED lightbulb upgrade helps but aside from their usefulness as weapons, time has really passed Maglite by. The Maglite was the best flashlight you could buy…. in 1979. The ratio of light to weight and light to price is a fraction of what you get in more modern designs. If you are not interested in using a Maglite as a weapon then you can do much better in the flashlight department nowadays.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    , @Anonymous
  41. Jack D says:
    @Steve Sailer

    If you go walking at night you should either get a jacket that has reflective material built in or wear a reflective vest on top. The little pool of light you throw with your flashlight may go unnoticed but the reflective material will light you up like a Christmas tree when it is hit by the car’s headlights. It really works. You can claim that you are wearing it in sympathy with the French protesters. Whatever happened to them, Btw?

    • Agree: MEH 0910, Dissident
    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @J.Ross
  42. @snorlax

    In Steve’s case, I actually think there’s a boomerang effect they’d wish to avoid.

    On the one hand, the DA would have a National News Bombshell!!!!!!! But the SPLC-DA’s enthusiasm would instantly wane when she realized that the subset of Americans who can still read might be inclined to actually LOOK UP unz.com to READ iSteve.

    Ooops.

    Can’t have that.

    • Replies: @snorlax
  43. @Twinkie

    I’m too lazy to look up if Sabre Red (OC gel spray) is illegal in Commiefornia.

    I guess the intimidation factor of swinging a club with a light on it might dissuade some homeless kooks, but the idea of having to be within striking distance to use it is extraordinarily unattractive.

    Sabre’s “cop sized” offering has a claimed range of 18 feet, and as far as I know, there are no jurisdictions where OC is allowed where it’s a crime to “brandish” it. If the gibbering kook looks aggressive and threatening, pointing it at him might be relatively legally non-hazardous.

    Count me among those who try to (1) walk in daylight, (2) walk where there are literally zero homeless people, (3) walk where cars don’t drive too fast, and (4) walk where there would be a fairly large amount of warning if someone approached aggressively. Flight to the suburbs (and ex-urbs) isn’t folly. (When I had a dog and had to be thoughtful about aggressive dogs attacking my pooch I carried an ASP. That was the only time I could see such a tool being useful to me.)

    Other’s mileage may vary.

    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
  44. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:

    Test

  45. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:

    Me and My Shadow

  46. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve, Why not take your walks when it’s light out?

    • Replies: @Olorin
  47. Dan Hayes says:
    @Stuart

    Stuart:

    Slight disagreement: I believe Neri’s wife abandoned him after conviction. Otherwise your plot memory is way better than mine!

  48. @Steve Sailer

    About 12 years ago a homeless guy at the corner

    If the United States truly becomes Brazilianized, things like these are bound to happen nearly every other day one gets out for a walk. It certainly does with me, and I believe with everyone else whose life is not ”gated community apartment-bulletproof car-office” and back. I don’t see that coming, however, not while American unemployment stays below 10%.

  49. AnonAnon says:

    Definitely get some reflective gear to wear at night – any run store will have numerous pieces – hats, jackets, shirts, shorts, vests, bands, etc. Nathan and Amphipod make tons of lightweight reflective “vests” for runners to enhance visibility – check out the Nathan Bandolier. Blinking lights are nice for cyclists but the lightweight reflective vests (or any clothing with reflectivity) that runners wear show up a lot better in headlights imo, and the larger area you have reflectivity on, the better. Lululemon makes nice athletic stuff that has reflectivity built in – the Lightspeed hat has reflective strips on the front and back. Also, most run sneakers have reflective strips on them, if yours don’t change out your shoes to ones that do – the motion of your feet snag driver’s attention. As for walking during the daylight, any dayglow yellow or orange top is great for visibility and will snag a driver’s attention – bike and run stores will have numerous offerings in these colors.

    As for safety when walking, why not get a decent-sized dog? They truly are man’s best friend and deter troublemakers, both at home and away from home. A few of my friends have gotten Rhodesian Ridgebacks lately. They’re intimidating looking but supposed to be good pets. We have Australian shepherds, who are very good at barking at anything out of the ordinary on your property and don’t care for strangers much but are super furry, require a lot of exercise, and don’t like to be left alone for too long so perfect for someone who works from home. You don’t have to pay breeder prices or deal with puppy issues either, check out rescue organizations for adult dogs that need rehoming.

  50. Polynikes says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    In my hyper liberal city homelessness is increasingly bad. Basically the local government caters to them. Is it like that everywhere or just where moronic nice white libs rule?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  51. Lugash says:
    @Stuart

    One of the biker gangs carry Maglites as weapons as well. And a a big padlock on a hankerchief.

  52. @Anonymous

    Steve didn’t say he had a Maglite, just a Maglite-style flashlight. These days even Maglites use an LED.

    I think a C-cell flashlight is optimal. Unless you have big hands, you can’t get as good a grip around a D-cell flashlight. (That’s my experience, anyway.)

  53. Attention Steve Sailer:

    I would advise against the urge to get another flashlight so as to do upper body exercises with both arms while walking. A person who likes balance in life might be inclined to do such a thing, but it will distract you from the main thing which is walking.

    I would also advise against listening to music while walking. It could distract you from your surroundings and moving objects which might intersect with your path and the like.

    How about doing some hikes in the mountains to get away from cars and trucks and motorcyclists and bicyclists and pedestrians and homeless people and dogs and headlights and cracks in the sidewalk?

    Walking or hiking uphill is good for your heart and lung conditioning and if you are careful on the way down it doesn’t put that much stress on your legs.

    I also say that 180 pounds at 6 feet 4 inches sounds very slender and thin to me. I ain’t bothering to lose any weight because winter is coming and like most people in New England and other parts of the USA with cold winters, I like to have some extra fat for insulation. Some of the Wal-Mart walrus waddlers go too far in adding insulation for the winter.

    • Replies: @anon
  54. @Anonymous

    I never knew the San Fernando Valley has devolved into Bedrock, the home Fred Flintstone and Barney Rubble. And Dino.

    But we were promised The Jetsons, and Orbit City! The futurists said so! All those splashy covers on magazines called Popular…

    ‘Jetsons’ Revival Brings Limelight to Composer

    People live in housing in the sky, work a three-day workweek, drive aerocars that look like flying saucers and have incredible conveniences that leave them with plenty of leisure time…

    living the average life in the future with flying space cars, instant transport tubes, and various robots and gadgets than can get their work done for them in a matter of seconds.

    http://www.tv.com/shows/the-jetsons/

    • Replies: @njguy73
    , @njguy73
  55. @Steve Sailer

    But then they put more patrol cars on Ventura, which seems to have helped.

    You’d think it would be animal control, what with all those alligator lizards in the air…


    Unless the patrol cars are on this Ventura. But he’s in Mexico with Fred Reed and the “I Wanna Drive the Zamboni” guy.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @95Theses
  56. Lurker says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I had one of those set-ups as a kid.

    Apart from the drag issue the other problem was what happened when you weren’t moving – no light!

    I seem to remember a boy from school rigging up something with capacitors to keep the lights on, at least for short stops.

    The real appeal to me was the lights themselves – streamlined and chromed. Far more attractive than the boring utilitarian battery powered alternatives commonly available at the time.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  57. Cortes says:
    @Anonymous

    The swordstick was a useful device *

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swordstick

    * Damn you, modern world! I nearly wrote “app.”

  58. Steve

    A flashlight is considered a lethal weapon. If you carry one of those, there’s a possible setup where somebody approaches you, claims that you threatened him with the deadly flashlight, and fabricates a charge of assault. Might work if the prosecutor is highly political.

    To neutralize that, you want a pre-paid legal plan that covers use of any weapon. Web search should find it. Additionally, you could take a course in use of the extensible baton. Police take this course (gives POST [1] credit), and afterwards their use of the extensible baton _according to course guidelines_ is considered use of a non-lethal weapon.

    If you don’t want to do either, remember to go for the elbow and knee joints or the forearms, and you have to to hit _hard_ to be effective. Also, shout a lot to tell witnesses what’s happening. Things like “Get Back! You’re scaring me!”. Helps a lot if the witnesses can tell you tried to de-escalate.

    Counterinsurgency

    1] Peace Officer Standards and Training Council

    • Replies: @Jack D
  59. Wencil says:

    Steve, I walk frequently on Ventura Boulevard around Laurel Canyon. The number of vagrants appears to be way up recently. One tried charging at me but I was able to run past him. Also my favorite news stand, the one on Laurel Canyon just south of Ventura was robbed at gunpoint this week.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  60. @Steve Sailer

    When walking or bicycling at night, I always wear an orange or yellow safety vest with the reflective stripes. Those reflective stripes were the first thing that I saw on a pedestrian one rainy night in a Vermont parking lot and that experience made a believer out of me.

    I do agree with your practice of carrying a flashlight. One simply can’t be too visible in this era of distracted drivers.

  61. I carry my red MAGAlite flashlight when i walk my Rhodesian Attila

  62. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Diversity is Wrong

    They will assume he is a retired cop most likely. Who else walks around late at night with a big flashlight. Either that or a peeping tom ?

    • Replies: @anon
  63. @Steve Sailer

    A big flashlight helps…

    Indeed, a man does derive a certain self-confidence from having a big, swinging… flashlight.

    There have been two or three minor incidents of being accosted over the last 18 months…

    Have you ever considered cashing in what must be a valuable home and moving somewhere more open and peaceful? I highly recommend it.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  64. @Lurker

    They WERE cool (looking), Lurker, but even cooler was the “engine” noise you’d get from those baseball cards in the spokes. (I wonder if that’s where I lost that now 2 million dollar Babe Ruth card…)

  65. @Dr. X

    Less Workman’s Comp from wrist injuries.

  66. @Stuart

    Cops used to refer to these alternate night sticks as “tonks” due to the sound they made on contact.

  67. @Twinkie

    I think it was a case of the Maglite was in hand when the justice involved person start attacking the cops.

  68. Last evening a derelict hippie
    Flipped the bird, meaning me as the flippee.

    I gave him a quick flashlight-whuppin’
    That left him half-conscious and supine.

    Through loose bloody chiclets, the hippie
    Mumbled something; I doubt it was “yippee”.

    • Replies: @Cortes
  69. The old Mag-Lites were great back in the 20th Century. Fortunately, they can be converted into useful tools for the 21st Century. I’ve upgraded three of mine and they’re nearly as good as new high-end LED flashlights while retaining huge runtime on D-Cell primary or rechargeable batteries and all the heft (clubbing potential).

    https://malkoffdevices.com/collections/maglite-drop-ins-and-accessories

  70. @Steve Sailer

    The two big improvements in bike safety since then are helmets and LEDs.

    Disc brakes aren’t a big improvement?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Lockean Proviso
  71. El Dato says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    The black guy seems to doubt whitey’s capacity at trigger control.

    • LOL: Twinkie
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  72. El Dato says:
    @Jack D

    You can claim that you are wearing it in sympathy with the French protesters. Whatever happened to them, Btw?

    Chill out. Currently it’s holiday season. I’m sure activity will pick up again in October.

  73. @Steve Sailer

    And my night vision is declining, so bad sidewalks are more of a problem for me to see. As you get older, the last thing you want to do is trip and break a hip.

    Less of this acquiescence to age, please, Mr S. It is self-fulfilling. I have nearly ten years on you and walk and bike as much as I did when I was 20, with no intention whatever of slowing down. Yesterday, for example, I took my 72″ single-speed 5 miles away (down a steep valley and up the other side), walked 5 miles, much of it along an unforgiving shingle beach (descending and ascending a total of 400 feet in the process), and cycled home again in time for tea. Not a big deal in the scheme of things, and I’m sure a youngster like you could do better!

    • Replies: @Jack D
  74. 95Theses says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    alligator lizards

    I believe “alligator” is Spanish for “the lizard”. Was the pun intentional?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  75. @Jack D

    They seem to waited too long and let the Asian countries eat their lunch with respect to LED lighting. I guess Mr. Maglight (Anthony “Tony” Maglica) got distracted from fighting with his girlfriend, who wanted piece of the action.

    Maglite flashlights have been known to be used as a ready substitute for a baton. In 2004, the Los Angeles Police Commission moved to use smaller flashlights, with Alan Skobin, the commission vice-president, stating that “This policy makes clear flashlights are for illumination and discourages their use as an impact tool. And it ensures officer safety as well as protects the public.”[5][citation needed] Security and police personnel often carry Maglite flashlights in red as they can be employed as a defensive weapon, especially at night or in dark locations. Police officers will often use Maglites during traffic stops or suspect confrontation, as the beam can disorient an attacker and the flashlight can be swung as a baton as a measure of last resort in self-defense.[6]

    On March 30, 2007, the Los Angeles Police Department announced that they would be switching to a smaller, lighter LED flashlight that cannot be used as a baton, in response to a highly publicized incident where an officer was accused of using excessive force against a suspect by using a Maglite.[7]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maglite

    On the other hand, compared to Home Depot flashlights, they seem to be made of the finest materials.

    I once had a piece of advice come across my desk about Maglite purchasing 8,000 pounds of Valox plastic on a continuing order basis for their business. This the same stuff they advertised in engineering magazines for making the grips on the Commando Arms .45ACP semi-auto rifle.

    As a matter of fact, I recall an engineering show in Chicago in Chicago where the Valox makers actually had a Chrome-plated Commando Arms gun on display, which I actually picked up.

    The Chicago Communists would have a had conniption fit had they known it was there for techies to examine!

    • Replies: @Jack D
  76. aside from whatever self defense issues may arise, the issue of being seen by motorists is fairly well solved by some of the small led lights with silicone straps which fit around bicycle bars… the ones SWMBO has for her bike are USB chargeable… a bigger headlight (say a qtr inch bigger than a std bic lighter), but the more interesting ones are the small (size of a flattish walnut) red leds which have several flashing modes…
    .
    when cyclists have one or more of these flashing, it is pretty damn hard to miss… weigh nothing, and a couple clipped to your pants/jacket/whatever is a hands-free means of being seen… of course, a more prosaic solution is some reflective tape on the jacket…
    .
    even better, an optic yellow/reflective work vest ! ! ! a white dude wearing one of those, holding a clipboard and pen, measuring tape on your hip, with a hardhat on, can pretty much go anyplace on the planet and not be questioned… based on a true story…

  77. J.Ross says:
    @Twinkie

    He won’t get the distance for a head crack, he almost certainly won’t hit hard enough, and none of this helps if the bad guy has friends. But what about a straight jab into the gut (or bringing the light up from his hip ibto the bad guy’s gut) followed by running away or, if possible, ducking into a busy store and calling for help?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  78. J.Ross says:
    @Jack D

    Yellow Vests are still ongoing but the news media is memory holing them. A recent BBC roundtable on major long-burning protests focused on Sudan (rightly), Hong Kong (rightly), Venezuela (mehly), Russia ( … what?), and said not a word about France.

  79. @Astonished

    I guess the intimidation factor of swinging a club with a light on it might dissuade some homeless kooks, but the idea of having to be within striking distance to use it is extraordinarily unattractive.

    The foreign policy version of your understandable aversion to getting too close to trouble is called offshore regional balancing. The ruling class of the American Empire wants to keep the US military cheek by jowl with the trouble in-country while dragging the trouble back to the USA.

    The American colonists in the American Secessionary War From The British Empire thought it was just peachy to plunk the British from a distance from behind a tree or rock wall or some other cover rather than in formation close by the enemy.

  80. Kronos says:
    @The Alarmist

    Now here’s a hypothetical legal case for the century.

    Your walking to your smart car and suddenly your attacked/mugged by a black man. The car see’s you in dire need and turns itself on. It calls the police, records everything, flashes its high beams lights at the perpetrator and partially runs him over when all the previous stuff didn’t work. (The mugger was armed.)

    Will the car be sued for a hate crime? That the algorithms within that “machine spirit” is hatefully racist. How do you send Herbie to jail?

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  81. Jack D says:
    @Counterinsurgency

    Also remember to shout “Stop Resisting” even if the guy you are hitting is curled up in the fetal position. As long as you shout “stop resisting” you can keep beating the crap out of him. They teach you that in cop school too.

  82. Jack D says:
    @Simon Tugmutton

    72″ single-speed

    The body is still good but the mind is going.

    • Replies: @res
    , @Simon Tugmutton
  83. Steve, ain’t I done told you running is easier than walking? Find a nice flat or flattish track or trail where no motor vehicles are allowed. In my experience, running or jogging for 20 to 40 minutes at a go puts less wear and tear on your legs than walking for 2 hours. Run in the daytime. You might meet some cute chicks. It’s nice when they pass you (and they will pass you). That might inspire you to run faster (after they pass).

  84. snorlax says:
    @Astonished

    Unz dot com would immediately get the same treatment as Daily Stormer and 8chan.

  85. Jack D says:
    @Stan d Mute

    Actually there are a couple of generations of better brakes between the old center pulls rubbing on slick chromed steel wheels of Steve’s 1970s 10 speed and today’s discs – cantilevers, linear- pulls, etc.

    But the fundamental problem with bikes is, TBH, not the bike itself but cars – in any contest between a car and a bike, the car is going to win. It’s hard to see how that is fixable other than by segregating cars from bikes (and I don’t mean by painting a magical line in the street). When you get on that bike, you are naked to the blows of any vehicle and that hasn’t changed one bit since the Wright Brothers, except that now there are a lot more vehicles on the road (and a lot more drivers named Jose instead of Orville). Air bag vests or other garments might help. The problem with separate bike lanes is a chicken and egg thing – there is limited street space in older cities so whatever you give over to bikes is taken away from something else (cars). At first (and maybe always) the space taken up by the bike lane doesn’t seem justified because hardly anyone is using it – it seems like half the street is taken away so that 1 guy on a bike can use it. Truthfully, the # of bikes doesn’t have to be that high to break even – surprisingly few cars fit on one city block and most cars have only 1 person in them.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  86. Jack D says:
    @Joe Stalin

    That’s the problem with Maglites – they are so well made that they are functionally obsolete long before they become defective. The original incandescent bulbs are a joke by modern standards – they give off as much light as a candle. The flashlight that is in your phone is much brighter. Most of the upgrades are ridiculously overpriced – they take a $1 Chinese LED and charge you $42 for it. For $42 you could have a very nice rechargeable lithium LED flashlight that is 10x brighter than your maglite will ever be and is 1/10th the size and weight. Sometimes you just have to accept that your formerly state of the art (flashlight, VCR, 8-track, fax machine) etc. is now just a paperweight even if it refuses to break.

    • Replies: @res
  87. I can’t be the only one who read this as “my fleshlight”.

  88. captflee says:

    May I recommend the Peak Beam Systems “Maxa Beam Handheld Searchlight”? While a bit bulkier and heavier than many alternatives, with it one might well to be able to set potential assailants alight at decent standoff range…

  89. Wencil says:

    Steve, I don’t know if you saw but the huge fire in Glendale last month turns out to have been set by an Upper Middle class 25 year old who lives in Eagle Rock. He was targetting a homeless encampment, not clear if he wanted to kill the homeless or just drive them out of Eagle Rock. The decision by the powers that be to allow homeless to invade residential neighborhoods just isn’t that good for anyone.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    , @J.Ross
  90. @The Alarmist

    “We can’t have old white dudes roaming the streets of CA at night.”

    I’m an old (ish) white dude who roams the streets in another part of California. Sometimes I’m armed when I roam. I advise all old white people in California who insist on staying in the state to keep a firearm within close reach. Because a significant number of brown and black people believe you have it coming. CCW permits are difficult to obtain in the Golden State, so decide if the risk is worth it. I have zero interest in becoming a victim, so it’s worth it. If firearms make you uneasy then buy Mace. If you’re curious about firearms then learn how to shoot; take classes. A 12 gauge pump-action shotgun is the best home defense weapon.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  91. Many years ago I was an MP. The 3 D cell Maglight is the best size, as you can get around swinging it quickly, and can aim it. I knew guys who tried the 4 cell, but it is too long and heavy to get in good hits.

    We held it by the head, but that was long before LED bulbs.

  92. @Cline felt her song dumb

    Robert McKee asks: But what is Steve Sailer’s arc? How does his journey change him?

    • Replies: @Bunghole
  93. @Wencil

    Governor Gavin Getty wants to disarm legal citizens while opening the borders to squat Central American men, ages teens through forties. You know, males of fighting, raping, and killing age.

  94. @El Dato

    The black guy seems to doubt whitey’s capacity at trigger control.

    So do I. He was my governor for four years.

  95. @95Theses

    I believe “alligator” is Spanish for “the lizard”. Was the pun intentional?

    No, a pun would be “allitigator lizard”, which are no doubt also common in California.

    “Ventura Highway” came out almost 50 years old, but I didn’t know until now that alligator lizards are a thing. I thought they were a hallucination, an acid vision, or heat stroke, or whatever.

    Identifying Alligator Lizards in California

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  96. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @HFR

    Your memory lapses are problematic.

  97. Freytag says:

    In The Godfather Al Neri used a big metal flashlight to cave in the skull of Wax Baines, the notorious pimp and abuser of young girls. He was dismissed from the force for excessive violence, and wondered what kind of world punished a man like him for taking care of an animal like Baines. But Michael heard of his plight, and invited him to lunch– a lunch where the Italian Neri felt like he was among his own people. The elder Don would later remark to Michael that he had “found his Luca.”

  98. Steve has had big flashlights since he was a kid. Look in the lower left corner of his famous Christmas picture:

    That’s the front end of a big, red flashlight with a handle on top and a six-volt battery inside.

    My parents gave me that very same model for Christmas when I was a kid too. We had it around the house for years.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  99. Roger says:

    White people own and use flashlights more than any other ethnic group. Maybe it would be better if you did not talk about your like of flashlights here, or someone might accuse of being a white supremacist.

  100. Joe H says:

    Maglites are proof that great high quality products can still be made in the USA and more would be made if our elites cared enough to make it a priority.

  101. Cortes says:

    For fans of locked room murder stories who wander crime-infested areas late at night I think a plastic bottle of ice might be a suitable item to carry.
    Once you’re past the danger spots- a nice cool drink.
    Before…

  102. res says:
    @Jack D

    One solution is to buy that $1 (actually more like $2-4 at retail) Chinese LED replacement from China directly.

    But as you said, for most purposes the LED rechargeable Li-ion replacements are simply better.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  103. @Steve Sailer

    Go Occam’s razor and follow your gut instincts. Make some deadline changes and exercise during daylight, if possible. That eliminates most of the illumination/visibility worries. Carry a decent knife, just in case. Situational awareness stuff.

    Just got back from LA, and some parks (well, the ones I visited) are quite nice after dark.

  104. @Twinkie

    I don’t like the instability of lithium rechargeable for EDC.* I carry a Zebra light with an NiMH rechargeable (Eneloop) AA and a sidearm.

    *In more extreme circumstances (e.g. very low or high temp, etc.), I’d carry a lithium primary-powered flashlight (Surefire).

    AA isn’t going to get you more than a couple hundred lumens whereas CR123A primaries can get you over 1,000 lumens. I don’t use CR123A rechargeable (primaries are just a couple bucks and last me a couple months typically), but do use 18650’s in quite a few lights and other devices. The key is buying only known top-shelf batteries such as Panasonic and proper chargers.

    Given the OCD levels around here, I hesitate to even suggest this. Candlepowerforums is Aspie OCD flashlight heaven (www.candlepowerforums.com).

    • Replies: @JackOH
  105. J.Ross says:
    @Wencil

    The one point of Californian totalitarianism that makes sense (and which be kept after liberation) is oversensitivity regarding outdoor firestarting for any reason. Californians should be trained and held to standard regarding firestarting the way people are in other states with firearms.

  106. freddie says:

    If youre old and frail a kevlar cane is good to help you walk.

  107. J.Ross says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    >”long, alligator-like snout”
    >”alligator-like”
    https://postimg.cc/YjpZgNnz

  108. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    The old Motorola two way radios were known effective perp whackers in the day too. Get a ham radio license (no code needed any more) and get an eighties Motorola Jedi series HT programmed for the local 2 meter or 440 repeaters.

  109. Veracitor says:

    Maglite was a derivative of Kel-Lite, designed by police officer D Keller for extreme durability, with use as a baton in mind: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kel-Lite. Kel-Lite ended up as part of Streamlight, so there is that connection. Because those flashlights were even harder than wooden or composite batons, some folks called them ‘kill lights’ in a mocking tone. Of course cops are trained not to strike at the head because that is too often lethal.

    Old-style Kel-Lites or Maglites with pop-in LED lamps replacing their old bulbs are great for home and car use. Their batteries are huge by modern LED standards so they will run for a looong time in the post-earthquake survival scenario. They can be used to fend-off feral dogs, and they are much harder to lose.

    I put in relatively low-wattage LED’s to get longer battery life; I have other flashlights for extreme brightness.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  110. Anonymous[138] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    The point of a Maglite is basically to be a plausibly deniable club, which doubles/triples as a tool to help you see at night and blind potential assailants. If you live in a country with tough firearms laws, I think they are a good option. The club aspect hasn’t needed to be improved on since 1979, in fact with the removal of the 6C they even nerfed it a bit. You need sufficient weight to function as a club, so light/weight is pointless. With LED upgrade they are more than sufficient for what they do. And the upgraded price is workable.

    That being said I don’t use a maglite if walking my dog at night (just my phone’s light to see) because I think the dog can do enough intimidation/assistance in a confrontation situation, and I don’t walk in a bad area. But for things that go bump in the night, you bet your ass I have my upgraded 4c maglite with me.

    Just don’t use cheap batteries that leak and weld themselves in the chamber.

  111. Anonymous[138] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross

    Steve is 6’4″+ with arms to suit, plus another 25cm or so if Maglite. If he whacks you on the head with a 4c Maglite it’s going to ruin your day. And… who is going to try? There are easier targets.

  112. Anonymous[138] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    I think it’s better to cry out in pain as you strike them, but to each their own.

  113. @Steve Sailer

    You might want to get some pepper spray too.

  114. anon[414] • Disclaimer says:
    @Charles Pewitt

    The only time I don’t carry pepper spray is when I carry three pound weights for each hand. They are like little bar bells, coyotes, other dogs squirrels little furry rodents, bunnies are all frightened. No but really they are.
    I don’t go at night but a vest and carry weights at night or glow sticks on the weights might be good, they could be good defense without looking like it.If you don’t like the three lb then you could get the 1.5s

  115. @Polynikes

    Is it like that everywhere or just where moronic nice white libs rule?

    I think it’s in the inner part of the cities most everywhere, Polynikes, but more likely where there’s more welfare and/or a nicer climate. I think local government in cities where nice white libs rule caters to them more than in other places. It’s gotten to where the public libraries anywhere, even though used by plenty of others such as yours truly, are daytime-hour homeless shelters.

    What started homelessness getting so ubiquitous, IMO, was the outsourcing of the funny farms.

  116. Anonymous[308] • Disclaimer says:
    @Charon

    replace with “of concern” ? Or something else entirely ?
    * asking for a friend

  117. Twinkie says:
    @res

    Chinese… rechargeable Li-ion

    Those words shouldn’t go together.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @res
  118. Anonymous[308] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    We four kids got flashlights for Christmas every year and used them to open our presents in the dark while our parents slept in. It took a couple of decades for me to figure it out. A flashlight is not a very exciting present but it sure comes in handy for stealth operations.

  119. Twinkie says:
    @Veracitor

    I put in relatively low-wattage LED’s to get longer battery life; I have other flashlights for extreme brightness.

    Anything more than 200 lumens or so will bounce back on a light-colored surface and mess with your own vision, esp. indoors. I don’t get this crazy quest for more lumens. Companies ought to be working on ruggedness, extended runtime, and battery stability. I guess the market is driven by tech geeks who own things for bragging value and novelty rather than actual use under rugged conditions.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  120. @MikeatMikedotMike

    Or, if Steve keeps losing weight, he might need one of these for his daily walks…

  121. anon[183] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    I do. A 3 D-cell Maglite. There is lots of coyotes around, no homeless or crime where I live. Also have a Maglite in my car.

  122. Liza says:
    @Steve Sailer

    @Steve. You might want to try Vitamin A (preformed vitamin A or retinyl palmitate) for your declining night vision. Works quite well for some, I’m told.

  123. @Twinkie

    Also, unlike in the movies, in which people are harmlessly knocked out with blows to the head

    Who said anything about not wanting to harm?

    blunt force head trauma is freaking serious and often lead to grave injuries or death

    Yeah, better just shoot with a pistol. Trauma guys got the routine down pat, he’ll be none the worse for wear.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Twinkie
  124. @Twinkie

    So, you recommend carrying Mace™ in bad neighborhoods.

    Testing the Medieval Flanged Mace

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  125. @NickG

    People have been prosecuted for carrying maglight flashlights in the UK and admitting part of their reasoning is that it would make for a handy defensive weapon

    A droogie out for some ultraviolence could get his gulliver all vred by one of those shlagas, brattfy.

  126. Marty says:

    Somebody questioned the legality of pepper spray in CA, so I’ll relate my experience 2 yrs. ago in SF. I was on my way to the golf course when I drove by a parked car whose driver, a young Latino amazon delivery guy, was dumping trash out the window. Pissed me off, so I gave him some guff. He pulled in front of me, stopped his car, and began walking toward my window. Big guy. When he was about 12 feet away I fired my Kimber Pepper Blaster (a 2-shotter) and hit him square between the eyes with the first shot, which surprised me because the few times I’ve been at a gun range I’ve never hit anything.

    He called the cops, I stuck around, and 4 cop cars arrived. A white lesbian came over to question me, and asked how close the guy was before I pulled the trigger. When I told her, she said, “hmm, that’s kind of far away.” Then they asked me where the supposed trash was, and when I walked right to it they seemed impressed. They took my Blaster, and as I left the paramedics were treating the guy. Never heard anything.

  127. J.Ross says:
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    The dead don’t sue.

    • Replies: @Joe Joe
  128. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @SunBakedSuburb

    A 12 gauge pump-action shotgun is the best home defense weapon.

    If you don’t mind deafening yourself, close family members, and tearing massive holes in drywall, sure.

    If you have to have a long gun, get a 20, even 28 or magnum .410 shotgun or carbine firing a pistol cartridge with minimal penetration. A pistol is best if you have any skills whatsoever.

  129. Olorin says:
    @Anonymous

    Nightwalking is more based.

  130. @Jack D

    I’m sorry to hear that, though there is compelling evidence of it in your recent posts.

    • LOL: Liza
  131. Bunghole says:
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Assuming he clings to BAP’s bumper long enough to reach Troy, he will first cling to facts–many, intricate, and, along tentative lines, interrelated – in a world of singular, heroic men. All around, Junger’s storm of steel – or bronze, at least. No facts, except in the skulking merchant class – just living and dying flesh, imagining itself, its pantheon, everything in a series of boldly colored narratives. To what end a mind like Steve’s? Someone will have to take notes – but not on a precious tablet. No, someone will have to remember what happened.

    15 years later, Sailer – old, feeble, blind, but strangely content – has just finished telling the story to BAP’s second-born Greek son. Another unlikely poet, and the tale will no doubt grow in his telling.

    • Replies: @Liza
  132. @Kronos

    They’ll say that the Ghost in the Machine is a white-sheeted KKK hater, and you are its conspirator. You and your car will end up sentenced to 472 years in prison.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  133. @Anonymous

    A pistol is best if you have any skills whatsoever.

    Concur. In close quarters combat, your average street thug only gets two or three shots out of ten on target. With a requisite training you can get your hits up to seven or eight out of ten. There are no guarantees in life, but those are good odds.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  134. Someone should do a Flashlight version of this:

  135. JackOH says:
    @Stan d Mute

    Stan, +1 on candlepowerforums.

    That site’s geekiness helped me identify flashlights that suited me before I knew what the heck suited me.

    The flashlights I bought work for me at concerts where the steps are poorly lit, looking under the car seat when I’ve dropped stuff, a whole mess of other uses where you need 10 or 20 seconds of good light, and, of course, the purposes we already mentioned. They are everyday carry for me, or pretty close to it. Far superior, in my opinion and for my purposes, than the “techni-cool” flashlights I got as a kid.

  136. @The Alarmist

    I considered it, but there’s not much to work with there. How about this?

    Me and my flashlight
    I call it my bashlight
    Don’t mess with me, asswipe
    When I walk at night
    It’s me and my flashlight

  137. Jack D says:
    @Anonymous

    If you have to kill an intruder in your home, a hole in your drywall will be the least of your problems.

  138. @Jack D

    Yes, the whole shouting business was overdone at one point. Courts are a bit more skeptical these days, so I’ve been told. That’s one reason why I recommended shouting out what was happening rather than making things up. One loss of credibility in court and the prosecutor can claim everything you say is a lie. That’s also why you don’t talk to the police (except to say “get me a lawyer”) until you calm down and talk to your lawyer. Any inconsistency between your account of what happened (which inconsistency will crop up if you recount events more than once) can lose your case.

    Counterinsurgency

  139. @Dr. X

    …but they have AR-15 rifles now, don’t they? Modern policing: can’t hit ’em over the head with a flashlight… just shoot ’em on sight instead.

    Contemporary police rely on firepower too much. Perhaps that’s because their enforcement activities are not supported by the societies they police. Transformation of police forces from peace officers to regime protection does that.

    Counterinsurgency

  140. Jack D says:
    @Twinkie

    Most Li-ion flashlights take 18650s – the same batteries found in laptops and Teslas. You can buy the cheap Chinese aluminum flashlight and load it with decent (Samsung, Panasonic) batteries. A flashlight that will fit in the palm of your hand throws more light than a club sized Maglite. If you are looking for light and not a weapon then it’s no contest.

    Although TBH I’d never had any safety issues with Chinese 18650s. Their main problem is that they perform far below their claimed spec but I don’t really care. Even the better batteries harvested from a worn out laptop pack are good enough for casual flashlight use.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  141. Jack D says:
    @NickG

    1. Never talk to the police.
    2. Never talk to the police.
    3. Never talk to the police.

    If you don’t talk to them, they can’t establish your intent from your “confession”. Even in Blighty, the Crown has the burden of proof in establishing intent. Without being able to twist your words, it’s hard to prove that you intended to use a dual use object as a weapon. People think that they can talk their way out of trouble and all they do is dig the hole deeper.

  142. Jack D says:
    @Twinkie

    If 200 lumens is too much for indoor use, why does an ordinary plug in worklight with a 60w incandescent bulb give off 800 lumens and you are not blinded? Sure if you have it all focused into a dot it’s going to be really bring – the key is to spread the beam – you use the extra lumens to light up a larger area and not just a tiny spot. Modern flashlights allow you to adjust the focus of the projector lens. For outdoor use, more lumens allow you to light up more distant objects. This is why car headlights have 1500 lumens or more.

    The issue in the past with more lumens was that with carbon zinc batteries and an incandescent filament an 800 lumen bulb would last 5 minutes. But with more powerful batteries and more efficient LEDs, the old limitations don’t apply.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  143. Anonymous[536] • Disclaimer says:

    I definitely roll with a light like that at night. Also don’t carry my wallet on evening exercise walks (why tempt fate). I have thought about concealed carry or a knife, but I get into confrontations sometimes (e.g. with motorists) and I figure being less armed makes it less likely I’m tried by 12. There is of course the other side of that…avoiding carried by 6. But I just know my anger factor.

  144. Kronos says:
    @The Alarmist

    Hopefully the car can help bust me out.

  145. @Jack D

    Best thing to say is that you wish to consult counsel before making a statement to the police. Then say nothing until you’ve had that counsel. The likely counsel you’ll get is say nothing.

  146. res says:
    @Twinkie

    Those words shouldn’t go together.

    Well, they were in separate sentences/paragraphs. ; )

    I tend to agree with Jack D’s response. Have you had specific issues with Chinese Li-ion batteries/chargers/lights?

    FWIW, I like the single cell 14650 LED lights which can also use an AA in a pinch for a basic low power short duration light. For higher power/duration I am becoming a fan of tool company lights which use their swappable battery packs. Tool company (OEM, not Chinese copies!) batteries usually contain pretty to very good cells and can often be found on sale for a price which translates to a good per cell price for quality cells. Also they are typically available in a wide variety of Ah ratings usable with the same light. Main issue is form factor, but anything containing 5/10/15 18650s or equivalent is likely to be a bit clunky. Also the chargers are relatively good/cheap/convenient given tool company volumes. And being able to use the same batteries in cordless tools is a nice side benefit.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  147. njguy73 says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Where’s my Foodarackacycle?

    Never mind the flying car.

  148. njguy73 says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Where’s my Foodarackacycle?

    Never mind the flying car.

  149. @Chrisnonymous

    This. Mr. Sailer needs some resistance training and 15 lbs of additional muscle. I want him to live forever.

  150. I’ve taken to carrying a Maglite-style flashlight.

    I found my old forgotten maglites in box a couple years back. I had stopped using them as I had “upgraded” to some really nice small bright lithium powered flashlights of various sizes and flavors. It seemed a shame to let these once loved, high quality flashlights languish in a junk box. As much as I really love my small bright lithium flashlights, there is something nice about the way the maglite fits in the hand.

    So… I upgraded them to lithium ion/led’s with some simple “3aa to d cell” adapters. I use ceramic MR16 sockets and MR16 led light bulbs. The stock on/off switch is robust. (I was a little worried that 24v through the switch might be problematic.) It takes about 10 minutes to disassemble the flashlight, remove the incandescent socket from the switch assembly, trim a little plastic off the switch assembly, wire in the new MR16 socket, reassemble and pop in the new bulb.

    The 2d cell maglite runs 2 series adapters (6 cells in series) providing 25v. The 3d cell maglites use 3 parallel adapters in series delivering 12.6v. They all use 3.7v 14500 lithium ion cells overcharged to 4.2v.

    It was a little tricky finding MR16 bulbs that could handle 24v, as most of them are made for 12v track lights. But they are out there. Most MR16 bulbs fit perfectly in the maglite head, though some of the higher wattage bulbs are a little long.

    Here are what the parts look like.

    Maglite switch assembly:

    MR16 socket:

    24v bulb:

    12v bulb:

    12v RGB color changing light bulb:

    14500 batteries:

    Parallel adapter:

    Series adapter:

    The series adapters have a smaller circumference so I cut rubber bands out of bike inner tube so the batteries would fit snug and not rattle around. The parallel adapters didn’t have this problem.

    The 24v bulb is a flood light, and probably my favorite. The 12v is more of a thrower, and the RGB party bulb is fun and kind of a novelty as most people have not seen a flashlight with a color changing light bulb operated by remote control. They are very bright and burn for several hours on a charge. Obviously the 3d maglites run longer as they have 9 cells instead of 6. They could burn quite a bit longer if I used lower wattage bulbs. I prefer “cool white” light bulbs. (I find the “warm white” bulbs to be too yellow.)

    The batteries are the most expensive part of the upgrade and cost about $1 per cell.
    A 2d maglite costs about $10 to upgrade. 3d costs about $15.

    They provide a ton of light, run for a long time and don’t get as hot as some of those smaller 18650 or 10440 lights do. They are great when the power goes out and especially great if you have to work under the hood in the dark. It’s like having a hand held battery powered drop light.

    It’s great to have my maglites back!

    • Replies: @Jack D
  151. Chinese… rechargeable Li-ion

    Those words shouldn’t go together.

    The world’s largest source of lithium at the moment is the Atacama Salt Flats in Chile, which just happen to be antipodal to Wuzhou, China. The Chinese are as far from their raw materials as you can get and still be on Earth.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salar_de_Atacama#Lithium_production

    Atacama ‘s flats dwarf Bonneville’s, but in turn are dwarfed by Bolivia’s Uyuni, where lithium extraction is in its infancy. Imagine the state of Connecticut with a total elevation span of one centimeter.

    The Chinese interest in South America will match that of theirs in Africa.

  152. Jack D says:
    @Adam Smith

    Cool idea.

    I was a little worried that 24v through the switch might be problematic.

    Switches/ wires/ etc. are mostly rated on amperage, not voltage (especially in the range 0 to 25V where arcing is not a big consideration). This is why the jumper cables on your car are thicker than the wires that bring the 200 amp electrical service into your house and not much thicker than the high tension cables that power a whole neighborhood. Upping the voltage is good in the sense that you can cut the amperage thru the switch for a given wattage.

    Doing some quick math, a 2 D stock Maglite has, I think, a 3w incandescent bulb (pathetic amount of light) at 3V so 1 amp draw. At 25V, 1 amp gets you 25 watts. An MR16 LED usually draws maybe 7 watts so 1/3 of an amp. So you are more than good – you are running less current thru the switch than in the old days.

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
  153. @Anonymous

    The Brendan Fraser vehicle “Encino Man” will bring you up to date.

  154. @Jack D

    It’s not the volts that kill (or burn up a switch or wire), it’s the amps. I should have chosen my words a bit more carefully. Thank you for clearing that up for anyone who may have been confused. I think you’re correct about the original krypton bulb being 3w.

    Your quick math matches my quick math.

    The 24v MR16 led in the 2d maglite (if I remember correctly) is 7w. So 1/3 of an amp.

    The 12v MR16 led in the 3d maglite (again if memory serves) is 9w. So 3/4 of an amp.

    The 12v RGB led is 3w on high so 1/4 of an amp. As you would guess this bulb has the longest run time and is about as bright as the original bulb.

  155. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    1. Never talk to the police.
    2. Never talk to the police.
    3. Never talk to the police.

    More people talk their way into prison than are put there by detective work or obvious evidence.
    Respectfully ask for your attorney and keep quiet until he gets there.

    You should have the right lines rehearsed ahead of time. Do what the cop says, but say nothing, and let the attorney do his job.

    But don’t be a smart ass. Don’t give cops any personal animus against you. and make no threatening moves or noises whatever. Be polite, but protect your right to the fullest.

  156. @Jack D

    1. Never talk to the police.
    2. Never talk to the police.
    3. Never talk to the police.

    ☮ ♥ ☮ ♥

    P.S. Kill ’em with kindness. Keep your mouth shut. Be gentle, meek, sincere, friendly, fun, kind non-threatening, peaceful, funny and honest. But mostly silent… Be silent!

    You have a right to remain silent….

    Your government is more than capable of conducting an investigation without your help…

    So don’t help…

    Most of what your government will learn about you… Your government will learn from you…

    So, shut up and be quiet… And non-threatening… And Quiet….

    If you are free to leave… Leave… Go!… Get out of there… Ask many times if you need to…

    “Am I free to go?” , “Am I free to leave?”

    If yes, Go… Go quietly… Go quickly… Be gone… Go Home… Or where ever… I don’t care… Go!

    “Am I being detained?”

    If you are not free to go… If you are being detained… Be friendly, kind gentle and meek… But do not say anything… Say nothing incriminating… Say nothing inflammatory or double plus bad thought crime… Shhh!!! Quiet!… Zip it!!! It sucks… It’s unfair… It’s uncomfortable… But Shut up… Shut the h e double hockey sticks… the fuck up!…

    Helpful hint: Do NOT call the cop a nazi… You’d be surprised how fast cops can become nazis, when you call them nazis… (It’s pretty fast, surprisingly fast, for those of you who might be wondering)(I’ve tried it… I know)(I’m kind of a scientist like that)

    Try something like this…

    “I am at your mercy… please show me grace… I have no weapons (or weapons, whatever the case may be…) and no drugs… I am peaceful and no threat to you… etc…” (I’ve tried this too…)(More than twice…)(Works much better than calling them a bunch of baby eating nazi’s…)(Much better… Believe me!)(Not kidding) (Much Better!)(#ScientificMethod)

    Please let me go free… no victim no crime, yada bla blah ba…

    Be quiet… Be silent… And go quietly… And peacefully…

    Hopefully home… Or where ever…

    And hope for the best… Godspeed…

  157. @JackOH

    You could vape instead and order the juice on the internet, but maybe then not having a reason to walk would lead to new sedentary health issues.

  158. JackOH says:
    @Jack D

    “Never talk to the police.”

    Wise words, Jack D.

    I’ve been under police scrutiny. The Hick Town chief had his balls in the pocket of a local money guy. Local money guy was upset by my writing and radio stuff. That’s how I got to be under police scrutiny. Fancy that! LOL.

    A half-year ago I volunteered a witness statement in a criminal incident. I was asked to do that by the very same people who had me scrutiny. Fuck all!

    Be nice. Be respectful. Stick to the business at hand. Be a citizen. Then get the fuck out. That 22-year-old police kid looking for full-time cop job may find a reason to cuff you if you’re retarded enough to act all high-handed ‘n’ shit.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  159. @Stan d Mute

    They definitely are, especially for wet weather braking. Hydraulic disc brakes especially- easy modulation, much power with light effort. After 25 years of riding rim brakes, this year I got a belt-drive single speed with hydraulic discs and it’s been my exclusive mount all season.

    I would also add to the list of safety improvements wide rims, which give better traction and predictable cornering, oversized steer tubes, handlebars, and stems, which give flex free control, and the design of many serious road bikes with more upright riding positions, which keep the center of gravity back and make going over the bars less likely.

  160. @Jack D

    Bike lanes can take the place of street parking, but they still have to contend with cars at intersections.

    I could imagine picking one street every couple of miles and banning on-street parking in order to create a major bikelane. Of course, the people who live on the street would complain like crazy.

    Bike lanes that have their own right-away, like the lakefront bike path in Chicago, are wonderful things.

    Unfortunately, we don’t have many of them and they are hard to create de novo.

  161. NickG says:
    @Jack D

    I remember one incident where a fellow would use a cut through via some unlit woods to get to his local pub. He would take his Maglite to illuminate the way. Whilst in the pub the Maglite came up in conversation and he mentioned that it was also handy as a defensive weapon. One of the patrons was an off duty copper and our punter was duly charged and convicted.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
  162. @NickG

    Huh? Does that mean if I pick up a rock off the ground and just say: “This is a deadly ASSAULT ROCK!” I am now guilty of the Cosmopolitan Crime of “Unauthorized Use of a Weapon” in the UK?

  163. Twinkie says:
    @Jack D

    If 200 lumens is too much for indoor use, why does an ordinary plug in worklight with a 60w incandescent bulb give off 800 lumens and you are not blinded? Sure if you have it all focused into a dot it’s going to be really bring – the key is to spread the beam – you use the extra lumens to light up a larger area and not just a tiny spot.

    You answered your own question. The vast majority of very high lumen flashlights are focused. Next time, starting with complete darkness, shine a 1,000 lumen flashlight at a white wall and see what happens to your sight.

    Modern flashlights allow you to adjust the focus of the projector lens.

    Most do not. Flashlights with adjustable focus are less rugged, less water-resistant, and are fiddly to use in emergencies or in high stress situations.

    For outdoor use, more lumens allow you to light up more distant objects. This is why car headlights have 1500 lumens or more.

    Outdoor search lights are a niche. When you carry ONE flashlight (or even a couple), it has to be useful and practical for both outdoor and indoor situations.

  164. Twinkie says:
    @Jack D

    the same batteries found in laptops and Teslas.

    The chemistry may be the same, but build-quality, redundant safety features, and the computer processing power to regulate them are vastly different between those high-end batteries and the ones that go in your “cheap Chinese aluminum flashlights” (even so, laptops spontaneously combust every so often – hence the recent recall of Apple laptop).

    Furthermore, what you don’t seem to realize is that a flashlight is typically highly water- and dust-resistant. It is essentially a sealed tube, unlike a computer or a car. Should the unfortunate strike and that lithium rechargeable battery decides to “vent with flames,” the result is going to be pretty catastrophic for someone holding that pipe bomb. It doesn’t happen often, but it does happen once in a blue moon.

    For other safety issues with the lithium rechargeable batteries, see my reply to “res.”

    • Replies: @Jack D
  165. Twinkie says:
    @res

    The main problem with the lithium rechargeable batteries for me is stability. They don’t take kindly to over-charging, over-discharging, and impact. And when they decide to go “poof,” they create a fireball, smoke, and lots of highly toxic gases.

    For me, a flashlight is not a fun gadget, but a vital lifesaving tool along with a sidearm and a knife. I go with reliable and stable (and light weight). For daily carry, I use a ZebraLight. The particular model I carry uses ONE rechargeable NiMH battery (Japanese-made Eneloop). It can put out about 200-300 lumens for about an hour, and longer with lower lumens. It can also use lithium primary AA’s or alkalines. It’s made by an American company (though manufactured overseas now) and is generally well-built.

    For something a bit more “mission critical,” I use a Surefire (I have also used a Malkoff) with a lithium primary that can operate in extreme temperatures. Both are American-made and are quite rugged.

  166. Twinkie says:
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    So, you recommend carrying Mace™ in bad neighborhoods.

    I recommend not going into “bad” neighborhoods, but if you must, be heavily armed with partners and be quick about it. 😉

    • Agree: JMcG
  167. Twinkie says:
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    Yeah, better just shoot with a pistol.

    I suggest you read up on the concept of force continuum. For civilians, though, the use of deadly force is more “on or off.”

    Trauma guys got the routine down pat, he’ll be none the worse for wear.

    Not in all cases, unfortunately. Brain swelling is pretty serious.

  168. Jack D says:
    @Twinkie

    Does a lithium battery carry it’s own oxidizer or does it depend on the atmosphere to burn? Not much oxygen inside a flashlight.

    The flip side of being a sealed tube is that it is going to contain the fire (and even small explosions) in most cases. If it does blow it’s probably going to blow the lens out the front rather than fragment the metal like a pipe bomb.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  169. Joe Joe says:
    @J.Ross

    yes but the dead man’s family can sue. especially if Ben Crump gets involved 🙁

  170. J.Ross says:
    @JackOH

    A Pennsylvania man transporting lawfully owned guns and ammo through New Jersey was just arrested and will almost certainly lose his property if he does not go to prison. The idiot states have decided to aggressively entrap and overpunish law-abiding people whose home states have different laws, which sounds like a job for real legislative or judicial leadership, or a presidential pardon. There was an Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode about a town of scumbags who prey on anyone who has to drive through, but [spoiler] the couple they harass turn out to be FBI with recording equipment. That was back when the FBI could figure out motive.
    This isn’t just New Jersey, all the outlands of the Blue Metropoli are doing this. If they can’t amend the Bill of Rights their plan is to pick us off one at a time with lawfare or false madness accusations. We need a top level recognition and a response to this, we will not be able to fight it ourselves, and some people find themselves having to drive through the idiot states.
    The suggestion that this guy was an idiot who deserved it brought forth terrifying examples of the New Jersey State Trooper’s sense of cause to stop: “Your seat belt looked like it was off.”
    Bonus: the dzirnamalist reporting the story informs us that the fearsome criminal was carrying “high capacity ammunition.” Now that must’ve been a big caliber!

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    , @JackOH
  171. @Anonymous

    If you have to have a long gun, get a 20, even 28 or magnum .410 shotgun or carbine firing a pistol cartridge with minimal penetration.

    Taurus offers a revolver (The Judge) which allows for a .410 shell.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  172. Liza says:
    @Bunghole

    old, feeble, blind, but strangely content

    I am not making this up: I was reading this topic real fast and thought for a minute you said, “strangely continent”.

    It would have fit in, would it not.

  173. Twinkie says:
    @William Badwhite

    Friends don’t recommend Taurus to friends.

    All indications are that Taurus products have high defect and return ratios, except the Beretta 92 knockoffs that are built on Beretta tooling (and former license).

  174. Twinkie says:
    @J.Ross

    NJ and MD have been doing this a while now.

  175. JackOH says:
    @J.Ross

    J. Ross, thanks.

    “Lawfare” is a new term for me, although I’m familiar with the idea of unjustifiable, abusive and disproportionate law enforcement to achieve a political end (I. e., non-justice) by means other than free and open debate. We’re swamped with “non-free and open debate” work-arounds by our masters.

    I grew up with the cop gene in my blood. My Dad had been a police cadet in the 1930s before making a first career in the Air Force. My boyhood illusions are taking a real whoopin! LOL.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  176. J.Ross says:
    @JackOH

    Of all the general legal principles which are deformed, neglected, or growing complex, but which are supposed to be Who We Are, one if the most onerous is that it is supposed to be possible (not cheap, not easy, but neither a good reason to commit suicide) to deal with the courts. Instead the courts are so expensive that, regardless of the eventual verdict, nobles can threaten peasants with court action (including spurious court action) and the threatened expenses do the work of a raised knife.

  177. J.Ross says:
    @The Alarmist

    Good advice.
    There’s an interesting study I keep forgetting the url to, where a guy simply went through reports and recorded how many shots it took to stop the bad guy. He did not find the big-caliber one-shot incapacitation that is widely touted. In fact, the number of shots (about two and half to three) was constant across the board.
    There’s also the anecdote of the municipal morgue worker who claimed to have seen .380 ACP bring more bodies to him by far than any other caliber, but always with multiple hits.

Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments become the property of The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
How America was neoconned into World War IV
Our Reigning Political Puppets, Dancing to Invisible Strings
Shouldn't they recuse themselves when dealing with the Middle East?
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.