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From the East Hampton Star:

Say Hook Pond Lane Will Never Be the Same
By Christopher Walsh | June 29, 2017 – 8:55pm

Howard Dean, the former presidential candidate, was among those who spoke at the East Hampton Village Zoning Board of Appeals on Friday. Christopher Walsh

Over neighbors’ furious protests against what they called an outsized sense of entitlement and Hook Pond Lane’s deteriorating character, the East Hampton Village Zoning Board of Appeals granted a variance allowing a detached 748-square-foot garage in a front yard, which is prohibited by zoning.

Howard Dean, the former governor of Vermont and candidate for president, whose family has owned a house for many years on the private lane that leads to Hook Pond, was among those who argued against the variance. Despite cries of “Enough is enough!” and Mr. Dean’s complaint that development had “fundamentally changed the nature of the town that I grew up in,” the board decided that approval was the better of two options. …

Mr. Heine was rebutting accusations from Mr. Dean, his brother, Jim Dean, and Linda James, whose house is next door, who claimed that Mr. Schneider was presenting his overall plan in segments, and was likely to return with plans for a tennis court, for example.

… While development in East Hampton “has been great because it creates a lot of jobs,” the former governor said, “at some point somebody is going to say we can’t keep doing this to ourselves. It’s not a matter of the community changing; all communities change. But at some point you lose the community.”

Childe Hassam, Maidstone member

Hook Pond Lane is very close to the Maidstone Club, with its Scottish-style oceanfront golf course, where the Dean family have been members at least since Howard’s childhood. The former governor was born in East Hampton in 1948 and grew up split between weekends and summers at Maidstone and their Upper East Side apartment in Manhattan. Dean later white-flighted to Vermont, but still gets back to East Hampton regularly.

Maidstone is considered not the hardest course on the east end of Long Island, which include this year’s U.S. Open venue Shinnecock Hills, but perhaps the best all around club if you have children or grandchildren.

It’s not surprising that Gov. Dean, long the frontrunner for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2004, would fight to keep East Hampton more like it was during his idyllic childhood for himself and his posterity.

 
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  1. Didn’t Howard Dean once say that he left the Episcopalian. Church over a bike lane? The guy is a weirdo.

    OT: More grist for the isteve mill: “A Dubious. Narrative Contributed to the NFL Protests”.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/a-dubious-narrative-contributed-to-the-nfl-protests-1517528010?mod=e2two

  2. The complaint is about a garage, so it will not create any ‘affordable’ housing one way or another. I doubt they will allow plumbing. Probably not Xenophobia as it does not involve people moving in.

    • Replies: @JerryC
    Garages don't vote Democrat, so Howard Dean has no use for them.
    , @Frau Katze
    I agree that the linked article is over a “detached 748-square-foot garage in a front yard, which is prohibited by zoning.”

    This is not going to allow an influx of plebs. It will merely make the place look less rural.

    But it certainly does demonstrate that these Democrat pols would be dead set against a real influx of plebs.

    If they can get this excited over a garage, what would they think of subsidized housing in the vicinity? (I believe it’s called “Section 8” in the US).
  3. Same scene here. A (polite, orderly, respectfully speaking in turn) mob of angry rich people over a 4-car garage in a rural area. At least they had a point it wasn’t zoned for it. Here we will fight a completely conforming structure.

    I support these anti-development activists. I like my neighborhood just as it is. I don’t want a bunch of poors moving into a big new apartment complex, and I don’t want a richy rich guy building something three times the size of other houses and lording it over us merely house-rich people (paper net worth: $800,000; liquid net worth: $87.50) Or to hear construction noise.

    I adore the taste of the technocratic leftist tears of Matt Yglesias and company who impotently point out the 80% Obama areas that won’t let any developments to house the poor anywhere nearby.

    Steve likes to point out the same hypocrisy for sport and spite, but unlike Yglesias I don’t think he actually wants California to replace its beautiful old inner suburbs with favelas and Hong Kong style megatowers.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The problem is that the merely house rich depend on population growth and development to become and stay house rich. So even though they don't want it right in their backyards, they need it nearby, which is why it ends up happening.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Lot, my next door neighbor built a detached garage in his backyard for his two sports cars. He told me of his plans and I had no objections. The Town Board had to issue a variance and a small sign was placed on his front lawn to the effect..."The owner of this property has applied for a building permit that requires a variance." I was talking with my neighbor when two older neighborhood women walked by. They inquired as to what he was building that required a variance. He replied...."An Adult Video store." The petition was circulated the next day...such fun fooling with old people heads. Except now I'm old too.
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "I like my neighborhood just as it is. I don’t want a bunch of poors moving into a big new apartment complex, and I don’t want a richy rich guy building something three times the size of other houses and lording it over us merely house-rich people"

    Hold it, hold it. It's the richy rich neighbor's neighborhood, too. I agree with first part (no section 8's moving in), but if the rich guy has legally bought the land and wants to develop his own property for his own private use, then that's America. Private property is a right and shouldn't be overturned by busybodies. If he has to, let him sue the neighborhood and go to the county. It's his property and if he wants to tear all the trees down, build an 18 foot walled fence, and put in artificial turf on his own property, then that's his right to do so as an American.

    It's HIS property, not yours, not mine, or anyone else's and so he should have (as an American citizen) the right to do what he wants with his own property. After all, he has to live on the property, not anyone else so it really shouldn't matter to busybodies who aren't going to live in the house or on the property.

    Now if he wanted to build a commercial site development on his own property, then that's a different matter. That kind of think does affect the community and should be banned outright. But if he's developing his own land for his own private use? That's his right as an American.
  4. • Replies: @nebulafox
    2030? Maybe-it depends on how inept the Republican Party behaves over the next decade relative to the Democrats. Hard to say. If they continue to fetishize billionaires at the expense of the middle class, who knows?

    But it’s highly unlikely that Texas is going to go blue in the 2020 Presidential election with the way the Democratic Party is going. Even minorities in Texas who are native to the state generally do not like “the Southern bashing” that has become a way of life for Democratic politicians during Presidential election years. (A major reason why Carter and Clinton could make inroads into the South, but Obama couldn’t, among other factors.) This isn’t helped by the fact that Hispanic immigrants (most of Mexican extraction rather than indios from places like El Salvador) generally assimilate better in Texas than in California, which is why the GOP has been able to survive and thrive so far, despite Texas being a minority-majority state.

    Migration from blue states is a different story, but as Steve has documented, when people marry and have kids, they generally become more conservative. I’m not saying it couldn’t happen, but Wilkinson is being quite overly optimistic-and I’m far from unwilling to criticize the GOP or label it as politically idiotic, as my comment history should show.

    One tricky issue is that Texas GOP politicians also tend to be really pro-NAFTA because of the growth that it has given the state, meaning that local politicians will inevitably throw up a huge fuss if Trump touches that. That’s an issue the Dems can exploit, given the highly ambiguous stance the party has on trade.

    , @Kevin O'Keeffe
    When a person from Minneapolis moves to Houston, Texas then, on average, gets very slightly less red. But then, doesn't Minnesota also (on average) become very slightly less blue? I fee like Minnesota swinging to the GOP in 2020, is about ten times more likely than Texas swinging to the Democrats in two years. The media always seizes on these sorts of dynamics, and tries to portray them as unalloyed goods for the Democrats. The "gender gap" is my personal favorite. More women vote for Democrats! Yes, but more men vote Republican, and the votes of men count just as much* as the votes of women.

    Also, affordable family formation will likely aid in pushing many of these ex-blue state transplants rightward, as Nebulafox has already noted.


    *Due to White Supremacy, I guess.

  5. @Lot
    Same scene here. A (polite, orderly, respectfully speaking in turn) mob of angry rich people over a 4-car garage in a rural area. At least they had a point it wasn't zoned for it. Here we will fight a completely conforming structure.

    I support these anti-development activists. I like my neighborhood just as it is. I don't want a bunch of poors moving into a big new apartment complex, and I don't want a richy rich guy building something three times the size of other houses and lording it over us merely house-rich people (paper net worth: $800,000; liquid net worth: $87.50) Or to hear construction noise.

    I adore the taste of the technocratic leftist tears of Matt Yglesias and company who impotently point out the 80% Obama areas that won't let any developments to house the poor anywhere nearby.

    Steve likes to point out the same hypocrisy for sport and spite, but unlike Yglesias I don't think he actually wants California to replace its beautiful old inner suburbs with favelas and Hong Kong style megatowers.

    The problem is that the merely house rich depend on population growth and development to become and stay house rich. So even though they don’t want it right in their backyards, they need it nearby, which is why it ends up happening.

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    They want development 1000 rods away, not 1000 feet away.
    , @Seth Largo
    The "house rich" of California---mostly in their 60s and up---did not ask for the massive influx of human and monetary capital that has sent their real estate sky high. They would be perfectly happy if their homes were still 200k instead of 800k.
    , @Frau Katze
    It can get out of control very quickly as the “house rich” get more and more house wealthy as foreign money pours in.

    Perfect example: Vancouver, BC.

    It seems to be spilling over to Victoria (on an island requiring a 1 ½ hour ferry ride, not including the commute to the ferry terminal. Pretty expensive to take your car, around $70 one way.)

    When I moved to Victoria in 1991, I was only able to afford a modest half duplex on the outskirts of town. The area was a bit run down.

    How things change. There seems to be no end to the amount of house and condo building going on. The place is now all spiffed up.

    I don’t why they’re coming here. It’s the capital of BC, but has no real industry. There’s theories that they’re boomers retiring here (mildest climate in Canada). Most of the real foreigners prefer Vancouver, where their co-ethnics live).
    , @Bill B.

    The problem is that the merely house rich depend on population growth and development to become and stay house rich. So even though they don’t want it right in their backyards, they need it nearby, which is why it ends up happening.
     
    Meh. This sounds dangerously similar to the wisdom of the BBC home affairs correspondent (or some such) who said that mass migration was win-win for white Londoners because it gave them to opportunity to cash in their house wealth and move into the country.
    , @slumber_j
    When your wealth is tied up in your house, it's a pretty illusory sort of wealth. Sane people generally focus on more important things when it comes to their home, I've found.

    It reminds me of a 2003 New Yorker piece about a controversy in rural Norfolk, Connecticut, that pitted the citizenry--at least the fancier among them--against George W. Bush's college roommate and best friend Roland Betts, who wanted to build an ultra-luxe golf course and housing development on land there and in adjoining North Canaan--aka simply Canaan. The residents fighting against it thought the project would ruin Norfolk's bucolically serene New English atmosphere:

    Thus, early on, after Betts promoted the golf course as a boon to property values during a presentation before the North Canaan board of selectmen, Wheaton Byers, one of the abutting landowners, told him, "But I don't want my property values to rise."

    According to Byers, a retired diplomat whose family settled in North Canaan in 1938, "Betts told me, 'Your children will appreciate it.' I said, 'No they won't.' And he said, 'Then you'll just have to learn to live with it.'"
     
    http://archives.newyorker.com/?i=2003-08-11#folio=056
  6. @George
    The complaint is about a garage, so it will not create any 'affordable' housing one way or another. I doubt they will allow plumbing. Probably not Xenophobia as it does not involve people moving in.

    Garages don’t vote Democrat, so Howard Dean has no use for them.

    • LOL: Frau Katze
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Garages don’t vote Democrat...
     
    No, but those who reside in them are counted in the census, which determines representation in Congress.

    Works kinda like the three-fifths rule.
  7. I always thought it was funny that Teddy Kennedy was against Cape Wind. I suspect it was some kind of green energy scam, but he was clearly against it because of Nimbyism. It’s too bad he didn’t grow up in a working class neighborhood. I suspect he would not have supported forced-busing or open immigration, if he had.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
    " It’s too bad he didn’t grow up", period. That fat, drunken bastard was a petulant child to the minute that he died. I've always thought that we would have been better off if young Miss Kopechne had been the one who swam free of that wreck.
    , @Clyde

    I always thought it was funny that Teddy Kennedy was against Cape Wind. I suspect it was some kind of green energy scam, but he was clearly against it because of Nimbyism. It’s too bad he didn’t grow up in a working class neighborhood. I suspect he would not have supported forced-busing or open immigration, if he had.
     
    The forced busing that was imposed on very Irish, very white South Boston (lead to riots) in the early 1970s was ruled on and administered for years by Judge W. Arthur Garrity who lived in the uber wealthy suburb of Wellesley. Wellesley College is where Hillary went.
    , @Kylie
    It's too bad he grew up, period.
  8. @Anonymous
    https://twitter.com/jonathanchait/status/959439710476226560

    2030? Maybe-it depends on how inept the Republican Party behaves over the next decade relative to the Democrats. Hard to say. If they continue to fetishize billionaires at the expense of the middle class, who knows?

    But it’s highly unlikely that Texas is going to go blue in the 2020 Presidential election with the way the Democratic Party is going. Even minorities in Texas who are native to the state generally do not like “the Southern bashing” that has become a way of life for Democratic politicians during Presidential election years. (A major reason why Carter and Clinton could make inroads into the South, but Obama couldn’t, among other factors.) This isn’t helped by the fact that Hispanic immigrants (most of Mexican extraction rather than indios from places like El Salvador) generally assimilate better in Texas than in California, which is why the GOP has been able to survive and thrive so far, despite Texas being a minority-majority state.

    Migration from blue states is a different story, but as Steve has documented, when people marry and have kids, they generally become more conservative. I’m not saying it couldn’t happen, but Wilkinson is being quite overly optimistic-and I’m far from unwilling to criticize the GOP or label it as politically idiotic, as my comment history should show.

    One tricky issue is that Texas GOP politicians also tend to be really pro-NAFTA because of the growth that it has given the state, meaning that local politicians will inevitably throw up a huge fuss if Trump touches that. That’s an issue the Dems can exploit, given the highly ambiguous stance the party has on trade.

  9. “…Mr. Dean’s complaint that development had ‘fundamentally changed the nature of the town that I grew up in,’”

    As someone once remarked, “Everyone is conservative about what they love most.”

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon, Sean
    • Replies: @istevefan

    “…Mr. Dean’s complaint that development had ‘fundamentally changed the nature of the town that I grew up in,’”
     
    That in a nutshell is the biggest reason we oppose mass immigration of dissimilar peoples into our nation. Yet we are ridiculed for opposing change as if it reflects upon us as a people who are static and afraid of change.

    Dean has just revealed, as if it had to be, that this attitude is a basic human tenet. Similar to the discussion over gentrification, we know that humans aren't keen on having their home areas changed. It's just that some humans, namely us, aren't allowed to express it.

    , @Buffalo Joe
    Son, most people on Steve's aren't worried about garages moving into their neighborhood.
  10. OT:
    Hey Steve,

    Haiti’s finest are in the news today with that age old question: how do you do that voodoo that you do so well?

    http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/police-year-girl-burned-voodoo-ritual-charged-52816757

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Thanks, I'll use that.
  11. @SonOfStrom
    “...Mr. Dean’s complaint that development had ‘fundamentally changed the nature of the town that I grew up in,’”

    As someone once remarked, “Everyone is conservative about what they love most.”

    “…Mr. Dean’s complaint that development had ‘fundamentally changed the nature of the town that I grew up in,’”

    That in a nutshell is the biggest reason we oppose mass immigration of dissimilar peoples into our nation. Yet we are ridiculed for opposing change as if it reflects upon us as a people who are static and afraid of change.

    Dean has just revealed, as if it had to be, that this attitude is a basic human tenet. Similar to the discussion over gentrification, we know that humans aren’t keen on having their home areas changed. It’s just that some humans, namely us, aren’t allowed to express it.

    • Replies: @ChrisZ
    A video or audio recording of Dean saying that, with some narration based on your comment, would make a strong political ad, iSteveFan.
    , @Frau Katze
    It’s only going to get worse, unless Trump really slams on the brakes (and isn’t stopped by this or that judge).

    How many more migrants will it take for the left to realize this is not really in their long term interest either?

    The example of England is discouraging. London is now in the category of unaffordable to all but the wealthy.

    It’s a pretty small island. How many more can be packed in? Yet the left line there hasn’t changed at all.
  12. @Anonymous
    The problem is that the merely house rich depend on population growth and development to become and stay house rich. So even though they don't want it right in their backyards, they need it nearby, which is why it ends up happening.

    They want development 1000 rods away, not 1000 feet away.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    As a former land surveyor, I applaud the recognition of my old friend, Rod.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rod_(unit)
  13. Mr. Dean cares nothing but for what is most important to him: Power over others and his own possessions. Typical Prog/Leftist.

    I never really trust those MDs who go into politics to “better serve the public”. Makes me glad I was not one of their patients.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
    "I never really trust those MDs who go into politics to “better serve the public”. "

    You mean like......Ron Paul? ;-)
  14. @istevefan

    “…Mr. Dean’s complaint that development had ‘fundamentally changed the nature of the town that I grew up in,’”
     
    That in a nutshell is the biggest reason we oppose mass immigration of dissimilar peoples into our nation. Yet we are ridiculed for opposing change as if it reflects upon us as a people who are static and afraid of change.

    Dean has just revealed, as if it had to be, that this attitude is a basic human tenet. Similar to the discussion over gentrification, we know that humans aren't keen on having their home areas changed. It's just that some humans, namely us, aren't allowed to express it.

    A video or audio recording of Dean saying that, with some narration based on your comment, would make a strong political ad, iSteveFan.

  15. @Anonymous
    https://twitter.com/jonathanchait/status/959439710476226560

    When a person from Minneapolis moves to Houston, Texas then, on average, gets very slightly less red. But then, doesn’t Minnesota also (on average) become very slightly less blue? I fee like Minnesota swinging to the GOP in 2020, is about ten times more likely than Texas swinging to the Democrats in two years. The media always seizes on these sorts of dynamics, and tries to portray them as unalloyed goods for the Democrats. The “gender gap” is my personal favorite. More women vote for Democrats! Yes, but more men vote Republican, and the votes of men count just as much* as the votes of women.

    Also, affordable family formation will likely aid in pushing many of these ex-blue state transplants rightward, as Nebulafox has already noted.

    *Due to White Supremacy, I guess.

    • Replies: @Anon
    If the Dems want to hype up internal migration, it is only fair we put curbs on that as well.

    There is no fair play when it comes to an enemy that wants you dead and your children brainwashed.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    Ronald Reagan did better losing Minnesota than Hillary Clinton did winning it.

    By the way, one of Minneapolis's first, and most obnoxious, gay publications was founded by a Texan in exile decades ago. But now he's moved back home.

  16. In an abstract sort of way, you have to admire his ability to doubletrack.

  17. Dr. Dean might have been born there, but my first ancestor to settle permanently in the New World (as far as I now know) was one of the nine Puritans who founded the place:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Hampton_(town),_New_York#Settlement

  18. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    Love how Steve manages to weave golf courses into many a narrative. OT but was reading Daily Stormer (only because they say I can’t) and there are some townsfolk in northern Jersey trying to keep the Orthodox Jews out. Sounds pretty miserable if your town is focused on for colonization by these maniacs.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    After all, nobody who becomes President (Trump, Obama, GW Bush, Clinton, GHW Bush) or wants to become President (Howard Dean) cares about golf at all.
    , @Almost Missouri

    "there are some townsfolk in northern Jersey trying to keep the Orthodox Jews out."
     
    I think this has been covered before at iSteve, but I happened to make the acquaintance of some of these townsfolk. Many of them are secular Jews whose vituperation against the Orthodox invaders seems to exceed the Gentiles'.

    On the one hand, the Orthodox houses looked well enough kept and there weren't gangs of idle Hebrew scholars menacing the streets, so I thought it was better than whoever are this year's fake "refugees" moving in. On the other hand, maybe there are school district and property tax issues that are invisible to me as a non-homeowner. The big issue I kept hearing about was "block busting", which I understood to mean that Orthodox advance men show up and try to scare homeowners into panic selling which the Orthodox can then exploit as more methodical buyers. Nobody gave me numbers as to how much $ was being lost to homeowners this way. In light of the yo-yoing property prices of the last two decades, I wondered if some of the resentment was caused by missing out on market peaks and blaming the newcomers.

    The Orthodox did seem to be strangely aggressive drivers. Maybe that's a Brooklyn thing. They sure love them some silver Toyota minivan.

  19. @alaska3636
    OT:
    Hey Steve,

    Haiti's finest are in the news today with that age old question: how do you do that voodoo that you do so well?

    http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/police-year-girl-burned-voodoo-ritual-charged-52816757

    Thanks, I’ll use that.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    Jesus, Steve, you really do not leave "no stone unturned." Death is around my doorstep ( not me) ...and I feel sad; all of you, commenters...the ones I loathe (you know who you are) and the ones I like.... just, STFU for once, in your lifetime.

    The fact that even, my closest friends from the crazy 80's, can't have a conversation without walking off and saying, "You are wrong and I hate you, " is is destroying our country. And, I moved here, in 1960s...so the rest of you all, get it together.

    Haters are gonna hate, a la' beauty, Taylor. Don't hate...just learn to convince all the misconstrued people you have been arguing with (politics...maybe family shit) for a long time; there are so many outlets/sources to learn THE TRUTH.

    For all you people who think it is uncool to be sentimental ( You know who you are who have bashed me) :) ; no, being sentient and caring about people, and what is happening to people is what Steve (and me) and like, a shit-ton of people...is kinda' taking over.

    My sons are gonna be so angry that I am the most embarrassing mother on the internet tonight!

  20. Is this old news? I thought I had already read about Howard Dean’s shocking loss in this heated battle in front of the East Hampton Village Zoning Board of Appeals:

    “That’s nearly 750 square feet! YEAHRGHEAA!

    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
    I view the infamous "Dean Scream" as one of the last triumphs of the controlled Establishment Media. Dean was mildly outside of the mainstream consensus, but still he was effectively kneecapped by the media over some mild overexuberance. At the time, I found the whole episode ridiculous and I still feel that way. Say what you want about Dean, but at least he was against The Iraq War, unlike the eventual Democratic nominee, John Kerry.

    Contrast the media's ability to sideline Dean with the Donald Trump campaign. Internet comments and social media allowed the Trump campaign to leapfrog the Establishment Media framing that traditionally blocked non-conformist politicians. If Dean had access to Twitter and Facebook, his supporters could have transmogrified the "Dean Scream" into a humorous meme and simply moved on.

  21. @Anon
    Love how Steve manages to weave golf courses into many a narrative. OT but was reading Daily Stormer (only because they say I can't) and there are some townsfolk in northern Jersey trying to keep the Orthodox Jews out. Sounds pretty miserable if your town is focused on for colonization by these maniacs.

    After all, nobody who becomes President (Trump, Obama, GW Bush, Clinton, GHW Bush) or wants to become President (Howard Dean) cares about golf at all.

  22. @Lot
    Same scene here. A (polite, orderly, respectfully speaking in turn) mob of angry rich people over a 4-car garage in a rural area. At least they had a point it wasn't zoned for it. Here we will fight a completely conforming structure.

    I support these anti-development activists. I like my neighborhood just as it is. I don't want a bunch of poors moving into a big new apartment complex, and I don't want a richy rich guy building something three times the size of other houses and lording it over us merely house-rich people (paper net worth: $800,000; liquid net worth: $87.50) Or to hear construction noise.

    I adore the taste of the technocratic leftist tears of Matt Yglesias and company who impotently point out the 80% Obama areas that won't let any developments to house the poor anywhere nearby.

    Steve likes to point out the same hypocrisy for sport and spite, but unlike Yglesias I don't think he actually wants California to replace its beautiful old inner suburbs with favelas and Hong Kong style megatowers.

    Lot, my next door neighbor built a detached garage in his backyard for his two sports cars. He told me of his plans and I had no objections. The Town Board had to issue a variance and a small sign was placed on his front lawn to the effect…”The owner of this property has applied for a building permit that requires a variance.” I was talking with my neighbor when two older neighborhood women walked by. They inquired as to what he was building that required a variance. He replied….”An Adult Video store.” The petition was circulated the next day…such fun fooling with old people heads. Except now I’m old too.

    • Replies: @Lot
    People do freak out at small things here that could theoretically affect property values that nobody would care about in the lands of $150,000 4-bedroom houses.

    The citywide marijuana law is so strict only about 1% of commercial lots could even in theory have a weed store in them. The rule says some large minimum distance from any school, park, library, house, and just leaves a few spots in the middle of areas zoned for construction supply warehouses and light industrial. But we can't imagine how backward Arkansas is for banning weed sales in 100% our 99%.
  23. @SonOfStrom
    “...Mr. Dean’s complaint that development had ‘fundamentally changed the nature of the town that I grew up in,’”

    As someone once remarked, “Everyone is conservative about what they love most.”

    Son, most people on Steve’s aren’t worried about garages moving into their neighborhood.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Depends. If it's a black garage or a (((garage))) or el garago, many would object.
    , @Clyde

    Son, most people on Steve’s aren’t worried about garages moving into their neighborhood.
     
    My situation exactly!
  24. @Buffalo Joe
    Son, most people on Steve's aren't worried about garages moving into their neighborhood.

    Depends. If it’s a black garage or a (((garage))) or el garago, many would object.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    De verdad no tengo un garaje todavia; por causa de acciones de la gente buenoblanco perdí mi casa. Mi familia ahora vivemos en apartamentos, como merecen todos que no estan (((elegidos))) ni rico de nacimiento.

    ¡Bienvenidos al futuro!
  25. @songbird
    I always thought it was funny that Teddy Kennedy was against Cape Wind. I suspect it was some kind of green energy scam, but he was clearly against it because of Nimbyism. It's too bad he didn't grow up in a working class neighborhood. I suspect he would not have supported forced-busing or open immigration, if he had.

    ” It’s too bad he didn’t grow up”, period. That fat, drunken bastard was a petulant child to the minute that he died. I’ve always thought that we would have been better off if young Miss Kopechne had been the one who swam free of that wreck.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    I’ve always thought that we would have been better off if young Miss Kopechne had been the one who swam free of that wreck.
     
    Except that Teddy had already done much or most of his damage by then, with Hart-Celler.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    we would have been better off if young Miss Kopechne had been the one who swam free of that wreck.
     
    True.
  26. would fight to keep East Hampton more like it was during his idyllic childhood for himself and his posterity.

    Preserving something for “himself and his posterity” – such a beautiful sentiment, I think. We should amend our Constitution and replace the words about “wretched refuse” and “huddled masses” with something along those lines. They wouldn’t be very useful in any of the articles, of course, where things need to be more concrete, but maybe we could add it to the preamble or something, so people get the idea of what the Constitution is trying to do.

    Anyone else here on board?

    • Replies: @Kylie
    But that's not who we are!
  27. @Brian Reilly
    Mr. Dean cares nothing but for what is most important to him: Power over others and his own possessions. Typical Prog/Leftist.

    I never really trust those MDs who go into politics to "better serve the public". Makes me glad I was not one of their patients.

    “I never really trust those MDs who go into politics to “better serve the public”. ”

    You mean like……Ron Paul? 😉

  28. @songbird
    I always thought it was funny that Teddy Kennedy was against Cape Wind. I suspect it was some kind of green energy scam, but he was clearly against it because of Nimbyism. It's too bad he didn't grow up in a working class neighborhood. I suspect he would not have supported forced-busing or open immigration, if he had.

    I always thought it was funny that Teddy Kennedy was against Cape Wind. I suspect it was some kind of green energy scam, but he was clearly against it because of Nimbyism. It’s too bad he didn’t grow up in a working class neighborhood. I suspect he would not have supported forced-busing or open immigration, if he had.

    The forced busing that was imposed on very Irish, very white South Boston (lead to riots) in the early 1970s was ruled on and administered for years by Judge W. Arthur Garrity who lived in the uber wealthy suburb of Wellesley. Wellesley College is where Hillary went.

  29. @Buffalo Joe
    Son, most people on Steve's aren't worried about garages moving into their neighborhood.

    Son, most people on Steve’s aren’t worried about garages moving into their neighborhood.

    My situation exactly!

  30. @Buffalo Joe
    Lot, my next door neighbor built a detached garage in his backyard for his two sports cars. He told me of his plans and I had no objections. The Town Board had to issue a variance and a small sign was placed on his front lawn to the effect..."The owner of this property has applied for a building permit that requires a variance." I was talking with my neighbor when two older neighborhood women walked by. They inquired as to what he was building that required a variance. He replied...."An Adult Video store." The petition was circulated the next day...such fun fooling with old people heads. Except now I'm old too.

    People do freak out at small things here that could theoretically affect property values that nobody would care about in the lands of $150,000 4-bedroom houses.

    The citywide marijuana law is so strict only about 1% of commercial lots could even in theory have a weed store in them. The rule says some large minimum distance from any school, park, library, house, and just leaves a few spots in the middle of areas zoned for construction supply warehouses and light industrial. But we can’t imagine how backward Arkansas is for banning weed sales in 100% our 99%.

  31. “Mr. Dean, his brother, Jim Dean, and Linda James, whose house is next door, who claimed that Mr. Schneider was presenting his overall plan in segments, and was likely to return with plans for a tennis court, for example.”

    Can easily see their reasoning. A front yard garage today, a tennis court tomorrow, and then perhaps a basketball hoop on the side of the house. Horrors! No wonder Dean fled to Vermont. Obviously he doesn’t want to live near nutjobs building basketball hoops, tennis courts and a garage on private property. Garages, hoops, and courts simply lead a community down the path of the broken window syndrome. The logic is there, you just have to be prescient enough to follow it.

    Reminds one of U2’s The Edge, who wanted to build something for public consumption on his Malibu property. Hopefully Rob Reiner was vigilant to stop him and put an end to such foolishness.

    After all, they’ll thank Dean and Rob Reiner one day for heading it off at the pass, and leaving a pristine ultra super zip code to posterity. After all, they owe it to their children and to their children’s children.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Not a one of them wants to live in (or anywhere near) the nightmares they want for the rest of us. After all, nothing's stopping them if the notion of hypocrisy becomes unduly bothersome. So far it hasn't.
  32. @songbird
    I always thought it was funny that Teddy Kennedy was against Cape Wind. I suspect it was some kind of green energy scam, but he was clearly against it because of Nimbyism. It's too bad he didn't grow up in a working class neighborhood. I suspect he would not have supported forced-busing or open immigration, if he had.

    It’s too bad he grew up, period.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    hahahaahaaaa. No more Kennedies (dead and alive) /Clintonistas/Bushie-ugly creepies/ forevah!!!!!!!!!
  33. @Wilkey
    would fight to keep East Hampton more like it was during his idyllic childhood for himself and his posterity.

    Preserving something for "himself and his posterity" - such a beautiful sentiment, I think. We should amend our Constitution and replace the words about "wretched refuse" and "huddled masses" with something along those lines. They wouldn't be very useful in any of the articles, of course, where things need to be more concrete, but maybe we could add it to the preamble or something, so people get the idea of what the Constitution is trying to do.

    Anyone else here on board?

    But that’s not who we are!

  34. @Lot
    Same scene here. A (polite, orderly, respectfully speaking in turn) mob of angry rich people over a 4-car garage in a rural area. At least they had a point it wasn't zoned for it. Here we will fight a completely conforming structure.

    I support these anti-development activists. I like my neighborhood just as it is. I don't want a bunch of poors moving into a big new apartment complex, and I don't want a richy rich guy building something three times the size of other houses and lording it over us merely house-rich people (paper net worth: $800,000; liquid net worth: $87.50) Or to hear construction noise.

    I adore the taste of the technocratic leftist tears of Matt Yglesias and company who impotently point out the 80% Obama areas that won't let any developments to house the poor anywhere nearby.

    Steve likes to point out the same hypocrisy for sport and spite, but unlike Yglesias I don't think he actually wants California to replace its beautiful old inner suburbs with favelas and Hong Kong style megatowers.

    “I like my neighborhood just as it is. I don’t want a bunch of poors moving into a big new apartment complex, and I don’t want a richy rich guy building something three times the size of other houses and lording it over us merely house-rich people”

    Hold it, hold it. It’s the richy rich neighbor’s neighborhood, too. I agree with first part (no section 8’s moving in), but if the rich guy has legally bought the land and wants to develop his own property for his own private use, then that’s America. Private property is a right and shouldn’t be overturned by busybodies. If he has to, let him sue the neighborhood and go to the county. It’s his property and if he wants to tear all the trees down, build an 18 foot walled fence, and put in artificial turf on his own property, then that’s his right to do so as an American.

    It’s HIS property, not yours, not mine, or anyone else’s and so he should have (as an American citizen) the right to do what he wants with his own property. After all, he has to live on the property, not anyone else so it really shouldn’t matter to busybodies who aren’t going to live in the house or on the property.

    Now if he wanted to build a commercial site development on his own property, then that’s a different matter. That kind of think does affect the community and should be banned outright. But if he’s developing his own land for his own private use? That’s his right as an American.

    • Replies: @bomag

    if the... guy has legally bought the land and wants to develop his own property for his own private use, then that’s America.
     
    One runs into the continuum phenomenon. In my shabby neighborhood, someone occasionally starts piling up trash; car bodies; animal carcasses; etc, until sanitation et al comes out and tell him that freedom has ended.
  35. @Anon
    Love how Steve manages to weave golf courses into many a narrative. OT but was reading Daily Stormer (only because they say I can't) and there are some townsfolk in northern Jersey trying to keep the Orthodox Jews out. Sounds pretty miserable if your town is focused on for colonization by these maniacs.

    “there are some townsfolk in northern Jersey trying to keep the Orthodox Jews out.”

    I think this has been covered before at iSteve, but I happened to make the acquaintance of some of these townsfolk. Many of them are secular Jews whose vituperation against the Orthodox invaders seems to exceed the Gentiles’.

    On the one hand, the Orthodox houses looked well enough kept and there weren’t gangs of idle Hebrew scholars menacing the streets, so I thought it was better than whoever are this year’s fake “refugees” moving in. On the other hand, maybe there are school district and property tax issues that are invisible to me as a non-homeowner. The big issue I kept hearing about was “block busting”, which I understood to mean that Orthodox advance men show up and try to scare homeowners into panic selling which the Orthodox can then exploit as more methodical buyers. Nobody gave me numbers as to how much $ was being lost to homeowners this way. In light of the yo-yoing property prices of the last two decades, I wondered if some of the resentment was caused by missing out on market peaks and blaming the newcomers.

    The Orthodox did seem to be strangely aggressive drivers. Maybe that’s a Brooklyn thing. They sure love them some silver Toyota minivan.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    I have known perfectly gentlemanly Orthodox, but the most bitter and sincere anti-Semitism I've ever read online was from a situation like you describe, because some Orthodox clans behave like miniature mafias, and the less religious Jews feel no restraint in complaining about them. In one case they compelled a municipality to build an entire subdivision of mcmansions on the understanding that the clan would reimburse the city. Then they moved in and declared the residences to be tax-free houses of worship, and announced that they were not paying anything.
    Lakewood NJ has been in the news a lot because of Orthodox scamming (and actually a quartet of people were recently arrested for welfare fraud), it's apparently a kind of center for that sort of thing. They all claim welfare because of the kids but they seem to have a lot of money for welfare recipients. There are videos on YouTube of people dealing with Orthodox bullying -- in one a bicyclist is unlawfully detained by an Orthodox (driving, if I recall correctly, a silver minivan), who then tells his passenger to call the Shomrim. A local third party inserts himself and frees the bicyclist. That tells you plenty about living with them.
    Also Postville -- the now-hilarious hand-wringing book about Agriprocessors from before the scandal broke -- sought out any possible sign of dumb racist Iowans demonstrating intolerance toward their new and better neighbors, so it has lots of little stories of Orthodox being a pain (but nothing like what proved to be the case).
  36. @George
    The complaint is about a garage, so it will not create any 'affordable' housing one way or another. I doubt they will allow plumbing. Probably not Xenophobia as it does not involve people moving in.

    I agree that the linked article is over a “detached 748-square-foot garage in a front yard, which is prohibited by zoning.”

    This is not going to allow an influx of plebs. It will merely make the place look less rural.

    But it certainly does demonstrate that these Democrat pols would be dead set against a real influx of plebs.

    If they can get this excited over a garage, what would they think of subsidized housing in the vicinity? (I believe it’s called “Section 8” in the US).

    • Replies: @George
    They should require that the garage be a reproduction of a barn, so as to look agrarian.

    FWIW, East Hampton does seem to have a section 8 housing program: http://ehamptonny.gov/219/Section-8-Housing-Choice-Voucher-Program
    http://ehamptonny.gov/208/Affordable-Housing-Program

    Section 8 is just one of many housing programs.
  37. @Achmed E. Newman
    Is this old news? I thought I had already read about Howard Dean's shocking loss in this heated battle in front of the East Hampton Village Zoning Board of Appeals:

    "That's nearly 750 square feet! YEAHRGHEAA!"
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9j6xm7e5bJo

    I view the infamous “Dean Scream” as one of the last triumphs of the controlled Establishment Media. Dean was mildly outside of the mainstream consensus, but still he was effectively kneecapped by the media over some mild overexuberance. At the time, I found the whole episode ridiculous and I still feel that way. Say what you want about Dean, but at least he was against The Iraq War, unlike the eventual Democratic nominee, John Kerry.

    Contrast the media’s ability to sideline Dean with the Donald Trump campaign. Internet comments and social media allowed the Trump campaign to leapfrog the Establishment Media framing that traditionally blocked non-conformist politicians. If Dean had access to Twitter and Facebook, his supporters could have transmogrified the “Dean Scream” into a humorous meme and simply moved on.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Yes, Clifford, even though I put that youtube video up here, I myself did not witness this big deal (for the media) Dean Scream. I didn't watch a whole lot of TV even back then now that I think back. I remember hearing about it and thinking the guy had gone completely nuts by what media said. I listened to it for the 1st time just yesteday - so what?

    No, it was nothing really, though I wouldn't have wanted this guy in any office based on what I've learned about him. 1994 was just about the time that the country was getting firmly established politically in the wrong direction on just about everything. The "Contract for America" started out good buy fizzled out a year later. Ross Peret and the Reform Party made much less headway in '96.

    Yeah, the media still had their stranglehold going, and they knew which way they wanted to take everything. Trump had the big advantages of being already famous and rich, used to dealing with the media, and yes the internet helped - youtube alone could have done it, IMO, twitter and facebook aside. Before you could dig out video on almost any thing you want, when the press didn't want to show it, nobody but the people there saw it.
  38. @Almost Missouri

    "there are some townsfolk in northern Jersey trying to keep the Orthodox Jews out."
     
    I think this has been covered before at iSteve, but I happened to make the acquaintance of some of these townsfolk. Many of them are secular Jews whose vituperation against the Orthodox invaders seems to exceed the Gentiles'.

    On the one hand, the Orthodox houses looked well enough kept and there weren't gangs of idle Hebrew scholars menacing the streets, so I thought it was better than whoever are this year's fake "refugees" moving in. On the other hand, maybe there are school district and property tax issues that are invisible to me as a non-homeowner. The big issue I kept hearing about was "block busting", which I understood to mean that Orthodox advance men show up and try to scare homeowners into panic selling which the Orthodox can then exploit as more methodical buyers. Nobody gave me numbers as to how much $ was being lost to homeowners this way. In light of the yo-yoing property prices of the last two decades, I wondered if some of the resentment was caused by missing out on market peaks and blaming the newcomers.

    The Orthodox did seem to be strangely aggressive drivers. Maybe that's a Brooklyn thing. They sure love them some silver Toyota minivan.

    I have known perfectly gentlemanly Orthodox, but the most bitter and sincere anti-Semitism I’ve ever read online was from a situation like you describe, because some Orthodox clans behave like miniature mafias, and the less religious Jews feel no restraint in complaining about them. In one case they compelled a municipality to build an entire subdivision of mcmansions on the understanding that the clan would reimburse the city. Then they moved in and declared the residences to be tax-free houses of worship, and announced that they were not paying anything.
    Lakewood NJ has been in the news a lot because of Orthodox scamming (and actually a quartet of people were recently arrested for welfare fraud), it’s apparently a kind of center for that sort of thing. They all claim welfare because of the kids but they seem to have a lot of money for welfare recipients. There are videos on YouTube of people dealing with Orthodox bullying — in one a bicyclist is unlawfully detained by an Orthodox (driving, if I recall correctly, a silver minivan), who then tells his passenger to call the Shomrim. A local third party inserts himself and frees the bicyclist. That tells you plenty about living with them.
    Also Postville — the now-hilarious hand-wringing book about Agriprocessors from before the scandal broke — sought out any possible sign of dumb racist Iowans demonstrating intolerance toward their new and better neighbors, so it has lots of little stories of Orthodox being a pain (but nothing like what proved to be the case).

  39. @Anonymous
    The problem is that the merely house rich depend on population growth and development to become and stay house rich. So even though they don't want it right in their backyards, they need it nearby, which is why it ends up happening.

    The “house rich” of California—mostly in their 60s and up—did not ask for the massive influx of human and monetary capital that has sent their real estate sky high. They would be perfectly happy if their homes were still 200k instead of 800k.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Thanks to Prop 13, they still get to pay taxes as though it were 1978.

    Where I live we get re-assessed each year, and it's always far more than the market actually justifies. If you try fighting it (crazy) and actually succeed (quite rare) they take their revenge out on you the following year.
  40. But tony areas can be trashed. Near where I grew up in the southern suburbs of Glasgow is a village which was very beautiful with a great mix of house styles from high Victorian wannabe castles to 1920s Art Deco wonders. Last time I walked through there, a couple of magnificent 1920s style houses had been demolished and replaced with aspirants for inclusion in Kunstler’s architectural “Eyesore of the Month.”

    Depressing.

  41. @Anonymous
    The problem is that the merely house rich depend on population growth and development to become and stay house rich. So even though they don't want it right in their backyards, they need it nearby, which is why it ends up happening.

    It can get out of control very quickly as the “house rich” get more and more house wealthy as foreign money pours in.

    Perfect example: Vancouver, BC.

    It seems to be spilling over to Victoria (on an island requiring a 1 ½ hour ferry ride, not including the commute to the ferry terminal. Pretty expensive to take your car, around $70 one way.)

    When I moved to Victoria in 1991, I was only able to afford a modest half duplex on the outskirts of town. The area was a bit run down.

    How things change. There seems to be no end to the amount of house and condo building going on. The place is now all spiffed up.

    I don’t why they’re coming here. It’s the capital of BC, but has no real industry. There’s theories that they’re boomers retiring here (mildest climate in Canada). Most of the real foreigners prefer Vancouver, where their co-ethnics live).

    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
    I like to describe Vancouver as the Chinese Miami of Canada. Why wouldn't you live there? It's basically the only part of the country without a harsh winter and is hands down one of the most beautiful places on Earth. If you open such an area up to the China, well, you are going to have unlimited demand for real estate. Jobs don't really matter when you are trying to park cash overseas away from the PRC. Victoria is just experiencing overflow from Vancouver.

    The colonization of Vancouver by the Chinese is shocking. I live in New York, but nothing in New York is as foreign to a North American as the Chinese suburbs of Vancouver.
  42. One of the reasons for Donald Trump’s obsession with the El Salvadorian gang MS-13, which actually originated in Los Angeles, is their prevalence in Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. Trump’s “people” in the New York metro are basically construction workers and cops. He hires a bunch of both. The White blue collar and lower middle class which once inhabited his Queens birthplace have moved increasingly out to Suffolk County, Long Island. Suffolk County is split between exurban suburban communities of New York City and relatively rural/upscale beach communities.

    The cops and construction workers that live in Suffolk County travel West to New York City via grueling commutes. Meanwhile, the rural areas and the upscale East End communities of the Hamptons employ massive numbers of Latino immigrants from Central America and Mexico. The Latino immigrants in Suffolk County do not commute West to New York City, they commute East for agricultural work or to the Hamptons to care for the estates and golf courses of Howard Dean and other oligarchs.

    There have been several high profile murders in Suffolk County by MS-13 which I think in part inspires Trump’s ire. Trump’s particular obsession is likely driven by the demographics of Suffolk County, New York, where blue collar Whites of the New York City metro are starting to abut the heavily immigrant Latino servant class of the Hamptons.

  43. @istevefan

    “…Mr. Dean’s complaint that development had ‘fundamentally changed the nature of the town that I grew up in,’”
     
    That in a nutshell is the biggest reason we oppose mass immigration of dissimilar peoples into our nation. Yet we are ridiculed for opposing change as if it reflects upon us as a people who are static and afraid of change.

    Dean has just revealed, as if it had to be, that this attitude is a basic human tenet. Similar to the discussion over gentrification, we know that humans aren't keen on having their home areas changed. It's just that some humans, namely us, aren't allowed to express it.

    It’s only going to get worse, unless Trump really slams on the brakes (and isn’t stopped by this or that judge).

    How many more migrants will it take for the left to realize this is not really in their long term interest either?

    The example of England is discouraging. London is now in the category of unaffordable to all but the wealthy.

    It’s a pretty small island. How many more can be packed in? Yet the left line there hasn’t changed at all.

    • Replies: @istevefan

    How many more migrants will it take for the left to realize this is not really in their long term interest either?
     
    That is a good question. If the point of immigration was to elect a new people, mission accomplished. They have so watered down the white vote that the democrats just need 40 percent of the white vote to win. And that will decrease if nonwhites have higher birthrates.

    By continuing this process with no end in sight, they risk turning the US into another India. We are getting close to the point where the newcomers will have too much political power for us to stop them from taking in their entire clans. This is like steering an ocean liner. You need to start making course corrections a couple miles a head. If the democrats don't start to throttle back now, it might be too late.

    They need to realize they've tipped the electorate already. Continuation is just going to ensure the country becomes a shithole.
  44. In light of the yo-yoing property prices of the last two decades, I wondered if some of the resentment was caused by missing out on market peaks and blaming the newcomers.

    Not so much. The ultra Orthodox are a very different and insular race with a bunch of Muslimish habits, beliefs and behaviors, particularly as compared to the shrimp-eating, assimilationist neo-Christian [Rabbi Tendler’s term] Reform types.

    The Reform and the ultra-Orthodox have nothing in common. As you might imagine, a bunch of patriarchal Jews whose women pop out 8-10 kids apiece (with very significant help from social services) are as disturbing to your typical feminist Reform Jew as a town full of Duggars would be.

    As far as “property values” are concerned, Reform and ultra-Orthodox aren’t on the same planet. The ultra-Orthodox need many, many bedrooms in each family unit and don’t need or want lawns, tennis courts, swimming pools, gardens, promenades, band shells in the park, garden clubs, historical societies, statues, opera, library clubs, community orchestras, calculus, cheerleaders, drum corps, soccer teams, baseball diamonds and the like. They’ll build right to the adjacent lot lines, the street in front and the alley behind. They are colonists. And since the ultra-Orthodox are the baby-makers, they will define the community, the schools and the local institutions, God bless ’em. 🙂

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Your descriptions mirror my experiences precisely. Like most religious fundamentalists, they're fundamentally scary. Only, they do demonstrate that some are more scary than others. No one who hasn't been immersed in their society (to the degree that's possible for an outsider) has any idea what it's like.
  45. @Frau Katze
    It can get out of control very quickly as the “house rich” get more and more house wealthy as foreign money pours in.

    Perfect example: Vancouver, BC.

    It seems to be spilling over to Victoria (on an island requiring a 1 ½ hour ferry ride, not including the commute to the ferry terminal. Pretty expensive to take your car, around $70 one way.)

    When I moved to Victoria in 1991, I was only able to afford a modest half duplex on the outskirts of town. The area was a bit run down.

    How things change. There seems to be no end to the amount of house and condo building going on. The place is now all spiffed up.

    I don’t why they’re coming here. It’s the capital of BC, but has no real industry. There’s theories that they’re boomers retiring here (mildest climate in Canada). Most of the real foreigners prefer Vancouver, where their co-ethnics live).

    I like to describe Vancouver as the Chinese Miami of Canada. Why wouldn’t you live there? It’s basically the only part of the country without a harsh winter and is hands down one of the most beautiful places on Earth. If you open such an area up to the China, well, you are going to have unlimited demand for real estate. Jobs don’t really matter when you are trying to park cash overseas away from the PRC. Victoria is just experiencing overflow from Vancouver.

    The colonization of Vancouver by the Chinese is shocking. I live in New York, but nothing in New York is as foreign to a North American as the Chinese suburbs of Vancouver.

    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    Victoria has the mildest climate in Canada.

    I used to live in Vancouver (I was born there).

    But I got into a situation where I ended up living in Ottawa, Ontario...long story, irrelevant.

    I eventually decided to return to BC. I took the first job that would pay my moving costs, and it was in Victoria.

    Vancouver changed greatly in the 8 years I was gone. The traffic was terrible.

    I’m happy with Victoria, it’s slower paced.

    You really can’t find any ethnic group in New York that is comparable to the Chinese in Vancouver?

    It could be worse. It’s better than Sweden. In fact the Swedish government must be the stupidest in existence. Nightly car burnings. En masse rape. Grenades thrown at the police. I might be mixed up: The en masse rapes were in Germany. Car burnings every night are in France.

    We’re pretty well finished as a civilization.
  46. @Not Raul
    They want development 1000 rods away, not 1000 feet away.

    As a former land surveyor, I applaud the recognition of my old friend, Rod.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rod_(unit)

  47. Perhaps the worst ultra-Orthodox sin (from a Reform perspective) is that they voted and will continue to vote for Trump.

    Trump recently commuted the sentence of Rabbi Sholom Rubashkin, the ultra-Orthodox immigration scammer/meat packer of Postville, Iowa.

    When Trump commuted Rubashkin’s sentence, tens of thousands of devout ultra-Orthodox thronged the streets of Israel, Europe and the USA, cheering and celebrating.

    They don’t forget their friends. When Bill pardoned some rabbi welfare- and school funding- scammers in upstate New York, Hillary got something like 1205 of 1215 votes in an ultra-Orthodox Rockland County town for her Senatorial bid.

  48. “At some point somebody is going to say we can’t keep doing this to ourselves. It’s not a matter of the community changing; all communities change. But at some point you lose the community.”

    –Howard Dean

    That looks like good slogan for something.

  49. @Twodees Partain
    " It’s too bad he didn’t grow up", period. That fat, drunken bastard was a petulant child to the minute that he died. I've always thought that we would have been better off if young Miss Kopechne had been the one who swam free of that wreck.

    I’ve always thought that we would have been better off if young Miss Kopechne had been the one who swam free of that wreck.

    Except that Teddy had already done much or most of his damage by then, with Hart-Celler.

  50. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Mr. Dean, his brother, Jim Dean, and Linda James, whose house is next door, who claimed that Mr. Schneider was presenting his overall plan in segments, and was likely to return with plans for a tennis court, for example."

    Can easily see their reasoning. A front yard garage today, a tennis court tomorrow, and then perhaps a basketball hoop on the side of the house. Horrors! No wonder Dean fled to Vermont. Obviously he doesn't want to live near nutjobs building basketball hoops, tennis courts and a garage on private property. Garages, hoops, and courts simply lead a community down the path of the broken window syndrome. The logic is there, you just have to be prescient enough to follow it.

    Reminds one of U2's The Edge, who wanted to build something for public consumption on his Malibu property. Hopefully Rob Reiner was vigilant to stop him and put an end to such foolishness.

    After all, they'll thank Dean and Rob Reiner one day for heading it off at the pass, and leaving a pristine ultra super zip code to posterity. After all, they owe it to their children and to their children's children.

    Not a one of them wants to live in (or anywhere near) the nightmares they want for the rest of us. After all, nothing’s stopping them if the notion of hypocrisy becomes unduly bothersome. So far it hasn’t.

  51. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Seth Largo
    The "house rich" of California---mostly in their 60s and up---did not ask for the massive influx of human and monetary capital that has sent their real estate sky high. They would be perfectly happy if their homes were still 200k instead of 800k.

    Thanks to Prop 13, they still get to pay taxes as though it were 1978.

    Where I live we get re-assessed each year, and it’s always far more than the market actually justifies. If you try fighting it (crazy) and actually succeed (quite rare) they take their revenge out on you the following year.

  52. @Big Bill

    In light of the yo-yoing property prices of the last two decades, I wondered if some of the resentment was caused by missing out on market peaks and blaming the newcomers.
     
    Not so much. The ultra Orthodox are a very different and insular race with a bunch of Muslimish habits, beliefs and behaviors, particularly as compared to the shrimp-eating, assimilationist neo-Christian [Rabbi Tendler's term] Reform types.

    The Reform and the ultra-Orthodox have nothing in common. As you might imagine, a bunch of patriarchal Jews whose women pop out 8-10 kids apiece (with very significant help from social services) are as disturbing to your typical feminist Reform Jew as a town full of Duggars would be.

    As far as "property values" are concerned, Reform and ultra-Orthodox aren't on the same planet. The ultra-Orthodox need many, many bedrooms in each family unit and don't need or want lawns, tennis courts, swimming pools, gardens, promenades, band shells in the park, garden clubs, historical societies, statues, opera, library clubs, community orchestras, calculus, cheerleaders, drum corps, soccer teams, baseball diamonds and the like. They'll build right to the adjacent lot lines, the street in front and the alley behind. They are colonists. And since the ultra-Orthodox are the baby-makers, they will define the community, the schools and the local institutions, God bless 'em. :)

    Your descriptions mirror my experiences precisely. Like most religious fundamentalists, they’re fundamentally scary. Only, they do demonstrate that some are more scary than others. No one who hasn’t been immersed in their society (to the degree that’s possible for an outsider) has any idea what it’s like.

  53. Make Hook Pond great again!

  54. @Frau Katze
    It’s only going to get worse, unless Trump really slams on the brakes (and isn’t stopped by this or that judge).

    How many more migrants will it take for the left to realize this is not really in their long term interest either?

    The example of England is discouraging. London is now in the category of unaffordable to all but the wealthy.

    It’s a pretty small island. How many more can be packed in? Yet the left line there hasn’t changed at all.

    How many more migrants will it take for the left to realize this is not really in their long term interest either?

    That is a good question. If the point of immigration was to elect a new people, mission accomplished. They have so watered down the white vote that the democrats just need 40 percent of the white vote to win. And that will decrease if nonwhites have higher birthrates.

    By continuing this process with no end in sight, they risk turning the US into another India. We are getting close to the point where the newcomers will have too much political power for us to stop them from taking in their entire clans. This is like steering an ocean liner. You need to start making course corrections a couple miles a head. If the democrats don’t start to throttle back now, it might be too late.

    They need to realize they’ve tipped the electorate already. Continuation is just going to ensure the country becomes a shithole.

  55. @Steve Sailer
    Thanks, I'll use that.

    Jesus, Steve, you really do not leave “no stone unturned.” Death is around my doorstep ( not me) …and I feel sad; all of you, commenters…the ones I loathe (you know who you are) and the ones I like…. just, STFU for once, in your lifetime.

    The fact that even, my closest friends from the crazy 80’s, can’t have a conversation without walking off and saying, “You are wrong and I hate you, ” is is destroying our country. And, I moved here, in 1960s…so the rest of you all, get it together.

    Haters are gonna hate, a la’ beauty, Taylor. Don’t hate…just learn to convince all the misconstrued people you have been arguing with (politics…maybe family shit) for a long time; there are so many outlets/sources to learn THE TRUTH.

    For all you people who think it is uncool to be sentimental ( You know who you are who have bashed me) 🙂 ; no, being sentient and caring about people, and what is happening to people is what Steve (and me) and like, a shit-ton of people…is kinda’ taking over.

    My sons are gonna be so angry that I am the most embarrassing mother on the internet tonight!

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    it sucks when your children know who you are and are spewing crap on the internet, are...But, I have not decided to which party I leave my inheritance...teeth gnashing.
    , @Anonymous
    I WANT WHAT SHE'S HAVING
    , @anonymous
    I agree.
    , @Frau Katze
    Are you not using a pseudonym? And keeping it secret?

    It’s true that by the time I discovered we were going to hell in a hand basket, my 2 kids were grown and living elsewhere.

    In due course my son was redpilled by GamerGate. My daughter is still unaware.
    , @Autochthon
    Ain't got nuthin' but love for ya....
  56. @Anonymous
    The problem is that the merely house rich depend on population growth and development to become and stay house rich. So even though they don't want it right in their backyards, they need it nearby, which is why it ends up happening.

    The problem is that the merely house rich depend on population growth and development to become and stay house rich. So even though they don’t want it right in their backyards, they need it nearby, which is why it ends up happening.

    Meh. This sounds dangerously similar to the wisdom of the BBC home affairs correspondent (or some such) who said that mass migration was win-win for white Londoners because it gave them to opportunity to cash in their house wealth and move into the country.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    These are two sides of the same coin: there's nothing close about it (the only point worth emphasis is that the BBC's approach is short-sighted horseshit because the end-game is no country – in either sense of that term – in which to live).

    In neither event is there anything dangerous about the observations. In as much as observations of fact are neither dangerous not safe: they simply are. Warm beds are generally safe. Towering infernos generally dangerous. Observations about either are anodyne.

    What on Earth was your point, in English please?

  57. @Lagertha
    Jesus, Steve, you really do not leave "no stone unturned." Death is around my doorstep ( not me) ...and I feel sad; all of you, commenters...the ones I loathe (you know who you are) and the ones I like.... just, STFU for once, in your lifetime.

    The fact that even, my closest friends from the crazy 80's, can't have a conversation without walking off and saying, "You are wrong and I hate you, " is is destroying our country. And, I moved here, in 1960s...so the rest of you all, get it together.

    Haters are gonna hate, a la' beauty, Taylor. Don't hate...just learn to convince all the misconstrued people you have been arguing with (politics...maybe family shit) for a long time; there are so many outlets/sources to learn THE TRUTH.

    For all you people who think it is uncool to be sentimental ( You know who you are who have bashed me) :) ; no, being sentient and caring about people, and what is happening to people is what Steve (and me) and like, a shit-ton of people...is kinda' taking over.

    My sons are gonna be so angry that I am the most embarrassing mother on the internet tonight!

    it sucks when your children know who you are and are spewing crap on the internet, are…But, I have not decided to which party I leave my inheritance…teeth gnashing.

  58. @Lagertha
    Jesus, Steve, you really do not leave "no stone unturned." Death is around my doorstep ( not me) ...and I feel sad; all of you, commenters...the ones I loathe (you know who you are) and the ones I like.... just, STFU for once, in your lifetime.

    The fact that even, my closest friends from the crazy 80's, can't have a conversation without walking off and saying, "You are wrong and I hate you, " is is destroying our country. And, I moved here, in 1960s...so the rest of you all, get it together.

    Haters are gonna hate, a la' beauty, Taylor. Don't hate...just learn to convince all the misconstrued people you have been arguing with (politics...maybe family shit) for a long time; there are so many outlets/sources to learn THE TRUTH.

    For all you people who think it is uncool to be sentimental ( You know who you are who have bashed me) :) ; no, being sentient and caring about people, and what is happening to people is what Steve (and me) and like, a shit-ton of people...is kinda' taking over.

    My sons are gonna be so angry that I am the most embarrassing mother on the internet tonight!

    I WANT WHAT SHE’S HAVING

    • Replies: @Anon
    The elites say Trump is trying to whiten immigration.

    But is it better to Ottomanize immigration? Do we want to turn the US into something like the Ottoman Empire with all that troublesome diversity? Well, it worked for the Ottomans because diversity meant they could play the various groups against one another. Greeks vs Albanians vs Kurds vs Armenians vs Arabs vs Jews, etc. But how did it all end?

    We don't want Ottomerica.
  59. anon • Disclaimer says:

    I’ve been reading iSteve too long … I found myself wondering just who was the course’s architect?

    Maidstone is routed across the Gardiner Peninsula, which is one of the finest parcels of golfing ground in the world. The Maidstone Club dates back to 1891 and we think William Tucker originally designed a basic nine-hole course. But Maidstone really came of age in the Roaring Twenties when new sandy land became available and the course was extended to 18 holes.

    Scot golfer Willie Park, Jr. was the architect responsible for refashioning Maidstone and it’s a masterpiece, which is undoubtedly Park’s finest architectural ensemble. The holes to the southern end of the peninsula are ringed around by dunes, which protect the course from the Atlantic Ocean beyond. It’s a magical and almost theatrical setting.

    The ground at Maidstone is often firm and fast, which can turn the 6,400-yard layout into a relatively short course. But Maidstone’s greens are small and tough to find and they too are firm and fast. Only the best players will wrestle par from Maidstone’s tight grip.

    If you are fortunate enough to receive an invite to play Maidstone, we advise you accept. You will enjoy the game on a beautifully conditioned course which we are sure would please Willie Park, Jr., if he was alive today, especially following the 2012 Coore & Crenshaw restoration, which has returned the course to its former glory. It’s sheer delight.

    Sayeth the Wik …

    [Park] also worked as a golf course designer, with 170 designs to his credit in the British Isles, Europe, the US and Canada. Park entered this profession, while winding down his competitive play, in his mid-30s, just as golf was beginning an enormous increase in popularity, in both the British Isles and especially North America. New golfers needed new courses to play, and Park took advantage of the opportunities. His services were much in demand, and he became one of the first people, along with fellow Scot Donald Ross, to become a full-time golf course architect.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Willie Park designed Sunningdale's Old course around 1900 near what's now Heathrow Airport. That was a hugely influential design in that it was long considered the first great inland golf course in England (although I think opinion now leans toward another course in that area that might have opened the year before). Before, great courses were all built in grassy sand dunes along the sea, while inland courses were muddy stopgaps. But then they realized there was a lot of sandy soil west of London that would drain almost as well as seaside links. So there was an explosion in interest in golf because now there were all these terrific golf courses in the wealthy western suburbs of London.

    I played Willie Park's Olympia Fields North course south of Chicago. Jim Furyk won the 2003 US Open there. I recall it had two wild holes (the 3rd and 14th) and the rest of the course was very good and very hard but a little hard to remember. I also played Olympia Fields South course, originally designed by Tom Bendelow, which is probably more fun with more variety. Back in the 1990s it had a little too much variety and every couple of holes it seemed like a different architect must have taken a hack at it. I gather a recent revision has made the South course more elegant and cohesive, like the North Course, while preserving the crazy topographical features (which are rare in the largely flat Chicago area).

  60. @Lagertha
    Jesus, Steve, you really do not leave "no stone unturned." Death is around my doorstep ( not me) ...and I feel sad; all of you, commenters...the ones I loathe (you know who you are) and the ones I like.... just, STFU for once, in your lifetime.

    The fact that even, my closest friends from the crazy 80's, can't have a conversation without walking off and saying, "You are wrong and I hate you, " is is destroying our country. And, I moved here, in 1960s...so the rest of you all, get it together.

    Haters are gonna hate, a la' beauty, Taylor. Don't hate...just learn to convince all the misconstrued people you have been arguing with (politics...maybe family shit) for a long time; there are so many outlets/sources to learn THE TRUTH.

    For all you people who think it is uncool to be sentimental ( You know who you are who have bashed me) :) ; no, being sentient and caring about people, and what is happening to people is what Steve (and me) and like, a shit-ton of people...is kinda' taking over.

    My sons are gonna be so angry that I am the most embarrassing mother on the internet tonight!

    I agree.

  61. @anon
    I’ve been reading iSteve too long … I found myself wondering just who was the course’s architect?

    Maidstone is routed across the Gardiner Peninsula, which is one of the finest parcels of golfing ground in the world. The Maidstone Club dates back to 1891 and we think William Tucker originally designed a basic nine-hole course. But Maidstone really came of age in the Roaring Twenties when new sandy land became available and the course was extended to 18 holes.

    Scot golfer Willie Park, Jr. was the architect responsible for refashioning Maidstone and it’s a masterpiece, which is undoubtedly Park’s finest architectural ensemble. The holes to the southern end of the peninsula are ringed around by dunes, which protect the course from the Atlantic Ocean beyond. It’s a magical and almost theatrical setting.

    The ground at Maidstone is often firm and fast, which can turn the 6,400-yard layout into a relatively short course. But Maidstone’s greens are small and tough to find and they too are firm and fast. Only the best players will wrestle par from Maidstone’s tight grip.

    If you are fortunate enough to receive an invite to play Maidstone, we advise you accept. You will enjoy the game on a beautifully conditioned course which we are sure would please Willie Park, Jr., if he was alive today, especially following the 2012 Coore & Crenshaw restoration, which has returned the course to its former glory. It's sheer delight.
     
    Sayeth the Wik …

    [Park] also worked as a golf course designer, with 170 designs to his credit in the British Isles, Europe, the US and Canada. Park entered this profession, while winding down his competitive play, in his mid-30s, just as golf was beginning an enormous increase in popularity, in both the British Isles and especially North America. New golfers needed new courses to play, and Park took advantage of the opportunities. His services were much in demand, and he became one of the first people, along with fellow Scot Donald Ross, to become a full-time golf course architect.
     

    Willie Park designed Sunningdale’s Old course around 1900 near what’s now Heathrow Airport. That was a hugely influential design in that it was long considered the first great inland golf course in England (although I think opinion now leans toward another course in that area that might have opened the year before). Before, great courses were all built in grassy sand dunes along the sea, while inland courses were muddy stopgaps. But then they realized there was a lot of sandy soil west of London that would drain almost as well as seaside links. So there was an explosion in interest in golf because now there were all these terrific golf courses in the wealthy western suburbs of London.

    I played Willie Park’s Olympia Fields North course south of Chicago. Jim Furyk won the 2003 US Open there. I recall it had two wild holes (the 3rd and 14th) and the rest of the course was very good and very hard but a little hard to remember. I also played Olympia Fields South course, originally designed by Tom Bendelow, which is probably more fun with more variety. Back in the 1990s it had a little too much variety and every couple of holes it seemed like a different architect must have taken a hack at it. I gather a recent revision has made the South course more elegant and cohesive, like the North Course, while preserving the crazy topographical features (which are rare in the largely flat Chicago area).

    • Replies: @dfordoom

    Before, great courses were all built in grassy sand dunes along the sea, while inland courses were muddy stopgaps. But then they realized there was a lot of sandy soil west of London that would drain almost as well as seaside links. So there was an explosion in interest in golf because now there were all these terrific golf courses in the wealthy western suburbs of London.
     
    This is one of the reasons I read iSteve. I'm not interested in golf but that's a fascinating snippet of social history.
  62. @Clifford Brown
    I like to describe Vancouver as the Chinese Miami of Canada. Why wouldn't you live there? It's basically the only part of the country without a harsh winter and is hands down one of the most beautiful places on Earth. If you open such an area up to the China, well, you are going to have unlimited demand for real estate. Jobs don't really matter when you are trying to park cash overseas away from the PRC. Victoria is just experiencing overflow from Vancouver.

    The colonization of Vancouver by the Chinese is shocking. I live in New York, but nothing in New York is as foreign to a North American as the Chinese suburbs of Vancouver.

    Victoria has the mildest climate in Canada.

    I used to live in Vancouver (I was born there).

    But I got into a situation where I ended up living in Ottawa, Ontario…long story, irrelevant.

    I eventually decided to return to BC. I took the first job that would pay my moving costs, and it was in Victoria.

    Vancouver changed greatly in the 8 years I was gone. The traffic was terrible.

    I’m happy with Victoria, it’s slower paced.

    You really can’t find any ethnic group in New York that is comparable to the Chinese in Vancouver?

    It could be worse. It’s better than Sweden. In fact the Swedish government must be the stupidest in existence. Nightly car burnings. En masse rape. Grenades thrown at the police. I might be mixed up: The en masse rapes were in Germany. Car burnings every night are in France.

    We’re pretty well finished as a civilization.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    We’re pretty well finished as a civilization.
     
    No, we are not. Maybe you are. But the rest of us will win this.
    , @dfordoom

    We’re pretty well finished as a civilization.
     
    Things are not looking good at the moment. I don't see any evidence that most white Europeans even realise how grim their future is likely to be. And I see no evidence of any desire to fight back on the part of any more than a handful of white Europeans.

    If it's a choice between survival and virtue-signalling white Europeans will unhesitatingly choose virtue-signalling.

    I also see little prospect of our vicious elites being overthrown.
  63. @Lagertha
    Jesus, Steve, you really do not leave "no stone unturned." Death is around my doorstep ( not me) ...and I feel sad; all of you, commenters...the ones I loathe (you know who you are) and the ones I like.... just, STFU for once, in your lifetime.

    The fact that even, my closest friends from the crazy 80's, can't have a conversation without walking off and saying, "You are wrong and I hate you, " is is destroying our country. And, I moved here, in 1960s...so the rest of you all, get it together.

    Haters are gonna hate, a la' beauty, Taylor. Don't hate...just learn to convince all the misconstrued people you have been arguing with (politics...maybe family shit) for a long time; there are so many outlets/sources to learn THE TRUTH.

    For all you people who think it is uncool to be sentimental ( You know who you are who have bashed me) :) ; no, being sentient and caring about people, and what is happening to people is what Steve (and me) and like, a shit-ton of people...is kinda' taking over.

    My sons are gonna be so angry that I am the most embarrassing mother on the internet tonight!

    Are you not using a pseudonym? And keeping it secret?

    It’s true that by the time I discovered we were going to hell in a hand basket, my 2 kids were grown and living elsewhere.

    In due course my son was redpilled by GamerGate. My daughter is still unaware.

  64. @Clifford Brown
    I view the infamous "Dean Scream" as one of the last triumphs of the controlled Establishment Media. Dean was mildly outside of the mainstream consensus, but still he was effectively kneecapped by the media over some mild overexuberance. At the time, I found the whole episode ridiculous and I still feel that way. Say what you want about Dean, but at least he was against The Iraq War, unlike the eventual Democratic nominee, John Kerry.

    Contrast the media's ability to sideline Dean with the Donald Trump campaign. Internet comments and social media allowed the Trump campaign to leapfrog the Establishment Media framing that traditionally blocked non-conformist politicians. If Dean had access to Twitter and Facebook, his supporters could have transmogrified the "Dean Scream" into a humorous meme and simply moved on.

    Yes, Clifford, even though I put that youtube video up here, I myself did not witness this big deal (for the media) Dean Scream. I didn’t watch a whole lot of TV even back then now that I think back. I remember hearing about it and thinking the guy had gone completely nuts by what media said. I listened to it for the 1st time just yesteday – so what?

    No, it was nothing really, though I wouldn’t have wanted this guy in any office based on what I’ve learned about him. 1994 was just about the time that the country was getting firmly established politically in the wrong direction on just about everything. The “Contract for America” started out good buy fizzled out a year later. Ross Peret and the Reform Party made much less headway in ’96.

    Yeah, the media still had their stranglehold going, and they knew which way they wanted to take everything. Trump had the big advantages of being already famous and rich, used to dealing with the media, and yes the internet helped – youtube alone could have done it, IMO, twitter and facebook aside. Before you could dig out video on almost any thing you want, when the press didn’t want to show it, nobody but the people there saw it.

  65. @Kevin O'Keeffe
    When a person from Minneapolis moves to Houston, Texas then, on average, gets very slightly less red. But then, doesn't Minnesota also (on average) become very slightly less blue? I fee like Minnesota swinging to the GOP in 2020, is about ten times more likely than Texas swinging to the Democrats in two years. The media always seizes on these sorts of dynamics, and tries to portray them as unalloyed goods for the Democrats. The "gender gap" is my personal favorite. More women vote for Democrats! Yes, but more men vote Republican, and the votes of men count just as much* as the votes of women.

    Also, affordable family formation will likely aid in pushing many of these ex-blue state transplants rightward, as Nebulafox has already noted.


    *Due to White Supremacy, I guess.

    If the Dems want to hype up internal migration, it is only fair we put curbs on that as well.

    There is no fair play when it comes to an enemy that wants you dead and your children brainwashed.

  66. @Anonymous
    The problem is that the merely house rich depend on population growth and development to become and stay house rich. So even though they don't want it right in their backyards, they need it nearby, which is why it ends up happening.

    When your wealth is tied up in your house, it’s a pretty illusory sort of wealth. Sane people generally focus on more important things when it comes to their home, I’ve found.

    It reminds me of a 2003 New Yorker piece about a controversy in rural Norfolk, Connecticut, that pitted the citizenry–at least the fancier among them–against George W. Bush’s college roommate and best friend Roland Betts, who wanted to build an ultra-luxe golf course and housing development on land there and in adjoining North Canaan–aka simply Canaan. The residents fighting against it thought the project would ruin Norfolk’s bucolically serene New English atmosphere:

    Thus, early on, after Betts promoted the golf course as a boon to property values during a presentation before the North Canaan board of selectmen, Wheaton Byers, one of the abutting landowners, told him, “But I don’t want my property values to rise.”

    According to Byers, a retired diplomat whose family settled in North Canaan in 1938, “Betts told me, ‘Your children will appreciate it.’ I said, ‘No they won’t.’ And he said, ‘Then you’ll just have to learn to live with it.’”

    http://archives.newyorker.com/?i=2003-08-11#folio=056

  67. @Frau Katze
    I agree that the linked article is over a “detached 748-square-foot garage in a front yard, which is prohibited by zoning.”

    This is not going to allow an influx of plebs. It will merely make the place look less rural.

    But it certainly does demonstrate that these Democrat pols would be dead set against a real influx of plebs.

    If they can get this excited over a garage, what would they think of subsidized housing in the vicinity? (I believe it’s called “Section 8” in the US).

    They should require that the garage be a reproduction of a barn, so as to look agrarian.

    FWIW, East Hampton does seem to have a section 8 housing program: http://ehamptonny.gov/219/Section-8-Housing-Choice-Voucher-Program
    http://ehamptonny.gov/208/Affordable-Housing-Program

    Section 8 is just one of many housing programs.

  68. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "I like my neighborhood just as it is. I don’t want a bunch of poors moving into a big new apartment complex, and I don’t want a richy rich guy building something three times the size of other houses and lording it over us merely house-rich people"

    Hold it, hold it. It's the richy rich neighbor's neighborhood, too. I agree with first part (no section 8's moving in), but if the rich guy has legally bought the land and wants to develop his own property for his own private use, then that's America. Private property is a right and shouldn't be overturned by busybodies. If he has to, let him sue the neighborhood and go to the county. It's his property and if he wants to tear all the trees down, build an 18 foot walled fence, and put in artificial turf on his own property, then that's his right to do so as an American.

    It's HIS property, not yours, not mine, or anyone else's and so he should have (as an American citizen) the right to do what he wants with his own property. After all, he has to live on the property, not anyone else so it really shouldn't matter to busybodies who aren't going to live in the house or on the property.

    Now if he wanted to build a commercial site development on his own property, then that's a different matter. That kind of think does affect the community and should be banned outright. But if he's developing his own land for his own private use? That's his right as an American.

    if the… guy has legally bought the land and wants to develop his own property for his own private use, then that’s America.

    One runs into the continuum phenomenon. In my shabby neighborhood, someone occasionally starts piling up trash; car bodies; animal carcasses; etc, until sanitation et al comes out and tell him that freedom has ended.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Not the same thing. If one wants to put in a new garage, a tennis court, swimming pool, etc. those things are improving the overall value of the house. If one wants to remove trees, grass, etc and put in a more desirable front and back yard (changing the landscape), that is also his right as an American to do so.

    Garbage strewn about the yard, broken windows, etc are not developing the house but reducing the house's overall value (and thus bringing down the neighborhood) as well as creating long term problems that can lead to the broken window syndrome.

    Apples to oranges, apples to oranges.
  69. Early Steve sighting:

    The wiki article on Dean quotes somebody who knew him growing up in the Hamptons who opines that the Deans weren’t really rich by Hampton standards: “His family hadn’t founded a company, like my grandfather did” (roughly). Just up my street I though and scrolled down to see the reference, which turned out to be an article on Dean and his kind from a certain Steve Sailer “UPI National Correspondent”, dated 2003.

    Great article too.

  70. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    I WANT WHAT SHE'S HAVING

    The elites say Trump is trying to whiten immigration.

    But is it better to Ottomanize immigration? Do we want to turn the US into something like the Ottoman Empire with all that troublesome diversity? Well, it worked for the Ottomans because diversity meant they could play the various groups against one another. Greeks vs Albanians vs Kurds vs Armenians vs Arabs vs Jews, etc. But how did it all end?

    We don’t want Ottomerica.

  71. @Kevin O'Keeffe
    When a person from Minneapolis moves to Houston, Texas then, on average, gets very slightly less red. But then, doesn't Minnesota also (on average) become very slightly less blue? I fee like Minnesota swinging to the GOP in 2020, is about ten times more likely than Texas swinging to the Democrats in two years. The media always seizes on these sorts of dynamics, and tries to portray them as unalloyed goods for the Democrats. The "gender gap" is my personal favorite. More women vote for Democrats! Yes, but more men vote Republican, and the votes of men count just as much* as the votes of women.

    Also, affordable family formation will likely aid in pushing many of these ex-blue state transplants rightward, as Nebulafox has already noted.


    *Due to White Supremacy, I guess.

    Ronald Reagan did better losing Minnesota than Hillary Clinton did winning it.

    By the way, one of Minneapolis’s first, and most obnoxious, gay publications was founded by a Texan in exile decades ago. But now he’s moved back home.

    • Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Ronald Reagan did better losing Minnesota than Hillary Clinton did winning it.
     
    Yeah, Reagan lost Minnesota in 1984 with 49.5 percent of the vote; Hillary won it with 46.4 percent.

    I accurately predicted that Pennsylvania & Michigan would flip to the GOP in 2016 (although I admit to being somewhat pleasantly surprised about Wisconsin), and I really do think 2020 will be Minnesota's year to finally break the Democratic streak that's run from 1976-2016.

    McGovern lost Minnesota with 46.1 percent in '72, which is only 0.3 percent worse than Hillary did when she carried it, LOL.
  72. …a detached 748-square-foot garage in a front yard, which is prohibited by zoning.

    Fill it with “Dreamers”, and they’ll change their tune.

  73. @JerryC
    Garages don't vote Democrat, so Howard Dean has no use for them.

    Garages don’t vote Democrat…

    No, but those who reside in them are counted in the census, which determines representation in Congress.

    Works kinda like the three-fifths rule.

  74. @Steve Sailer
    Willie Park designed Sunningdale's Old course around 1900 near what's now Heathrow Airport. That was a hugely influential design in that it was long considered the first great inland golf course in England (although I think opinion now leans toward another course in that area that might have opened the year before). Before, great courses were all built in grassy sand dunes along the sea, while inland courses were muddy stopgaps. But then they realized there was a lot of sandy soil west of London that would drain almost as well as seaside links. So there was an explosion in interest in golf because now there were all these terrific golf courses in the wealthy western suburbs of London.

    I played Willie Park's Olympia Fields North course south of Chicago. Jim Furyk won the 2003 US Open there. I recall it had two wild holes (the 3rd and 14th) and the rest of the course was very good and very hard but a little hard to remember. I also played Olympia Fields South course, originally designed by Tom Bendelow, which is probably more fun with more variety. Back in the 1990s it had a little too much variety and every couple of holes it seemed like a different architect must have taken a hack at it. I gather a recent revision has made the South course more elegant and cohesive, like the North Course, while preserving the crazy topographical features (which are rare in the largely flat Chicago area).

    Before, great courses were all built in grassy sand dunes along the sea, while inland courses were muddy stopgaps. But then they realized there was a lot of sandy soil west of London that would drain almost as well as seaside links. So there was an explosion in interest in golf because now there were all these terrific golf courses in the wealthy western suburbs of London.

    This is one of the reasons I read iSteve. I’m not interested in golf but that’s a fascinating snippet of social history.

  75. @bomag

    if the... guy has legally bought the land and wants to develop his own property for his own private use, then that’s America.
     
    One runs into the continuum phenomenon. In my shabby neighborhood, someone occasionally starts piling up trash; car bodies; animal carcasses; etc, until sanitation et al comes out and tell him that freedom has ended.

    Not the same thing. If one wants to put in a new garage, a tennis court, swimming pool, etc. those things are improving the overall value of the house. If one wants to remove trees, grass, etc and put in a more desirable front and back yard (changing the landscape), that is also his right as an American to do so.

    Garbage strewn about the yard, broken windows, etc are not developing the house but reducing the house’s overall value (and thus bringing down the neighborhood) as well as creating long term problems that can lead to the broken window syndrome.

    Apples to oranges, apples to oranges.

  76. @Twodees Partain
    " It’s too bad he didn’t grow up", period. That fat, drunken bastard was a petulant child to the minute that he died. I've always thought that we would have been better off if young Miss Kopechne had been the one who swam free of that wreck.

    we would have been better off if young Miss Kopechne had been the one who swam free of that wreck.

    True.

  77. @Frau Katze
    Victoria has the mildest climate in Canada.

    I used to live in Vancouver (I was born there).

    But I got into a situation where I ended up living in Ottawa, Ontario...long story, irrelevant.

    I eventually decided to return to BC. I took the first job that would pay my moving costs, and it was in Victoria.

    Vancouver changed greatly in the 8 years I was gone. The traffic was terrible.

    I’m happy with Victoria, it’s slower paced.

    You really can’t find any ethnic group in New York that is comparable to the Chinese in Vancouver?

    It could be worse. It’s better than Sweden. In fact the Swedish government must be the stupidest in existence. Nightly car burnings. En masse rape. Grenades thrown at the police. I might be mixed up: The en masse rapes were in Germany. Car burnings every night are in France.

    We’re pretty well finished as a civilization.

    We’re pretty well finished as a civilization.

    No, we are not. Maybe you are. But the rest of us will win this.

  78. @Frau Katze
    Victoria has the mildest climate in Canada.

    I used to live in Vancouver (I was born there).

    But I got into a situation where I ended up living in Ottawa, Ontario...long story, irrelevant.

    I eventually decided to return to BC. I took the first job that would pay my moving costs, and it was in Victoria.

    Vancouver changed greatly in the 8 years I was gone. The traffic was terrible.

    I’m happy with Victoria, it’s slower paced.

    You really can’t find any ethnic group in New York that is comparable to the Chinese in Vancouver?

    It could be worse. It’s better than Sweden. In fact the Swedish government must be the stupidest in existence. Nightly car burnings. En masse rape. Grenades thrown at the police. I might be mixed up: The en masse rapes were in Germany. Car burnings every night are in France.

    We’re pretty well finished as a civilization.

    We’re pretty well finished as a civilization.

    Things are not looking good at the moment. I don’t see any evidence that most white Europeans even realise how grim their future is likely to be. And I see no evidence of any desire to fight back on the part of any more than a handful of white Europeans.

    If it’s a choice between survival and virtue-signalling white Europeans will unhesitatingly choose virtue-signalling.

    I also see little prospect of our vicious elites being overthrown.

  79. @Chrisnonymous
    Depends. If it's a black garage or a (((garage))) or el garago, many would object.

    De verdad no tengo un garaje todavia; por causa de acciones de la gente buenoblanco perdí mi casa. Mi familia ahora vivemos en apartamentos, como merecen todos que no estan (((elegidos))) ni rico de nacimiento.

    ¡Bienvenidos al futuro!

  80. @Lagertha
    Jesus, Steve, you really do not leave "no stone unturned." Death is around my doorstep ( not me) ...and I feel sad; all of you, commenters...the ones I loathe (you know who you are) and the ones I like.... just, STFU for once, in your lifetime.

    The fact that even, my closest friends from the crazy 80's, can't have a conversation without walking off and saying, "You are wrong and I hate you, " is is destroying our country. And, I moved here, in 1960s...so the rest of you all, get it together.

    Haters are gonna hate, a la' beauty, Taylor. Don't hate...just learn to convince all the misconstrued people you have been arguing with (politics...maybe family shit) for a long time; there are so many outlets/sources to learn THE TRUTH.

    For all you people who think it is uncool to be sentimental ( You know who you are who have bashed me) :) ; no, being sentient and caring about people, and what is happening to people is what Steve (and me) and like, a shit-ton of people...is kinda' taking over.

    My sons are gonna be so angry that I am the most embarrassing mother on the internet tonight!

    Ain’t got nuthin’ but love for ya….

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    Love you, I literally, drove 3100 miles . I perhaps, will send an invite to a college graduation at an awesome location.....and, just be part of our dinner for our son - an open invite - place is remote and hard to get to. I love all of you, btw, even the ones who think I am an average dumb ass. I hate the way the Super Bowl worked out, btw.
  81. @Bill B.

    The problem is that the merely house rich depend on population growth and development to become and stay house rich. So even though they don’t want it right in their backyards, they need it nearby, which is why it ends up happening.
     
    Meh. This sounds dangerously similar to the wisdom of the BBC home affairs correspondent (or some such) who said that mass migration was win-win for white Londoners because it gave them to opportunity to cash in their house wealth and move into the country.

    These are two sides of the same coin: there’s nothing close about it (the only point worth emphasis is that the BBC’s approach is short-sighted horseshit because the end-game is no country – in either sense of that term – in which to live).

    In neither event is there anything dangerous about the observations. In as much as observations of fact are neither dangerous not safe: they simply are. Warm beds are generally safe. Towering infernos generally dangerous. Observations about either are anodyne.

    What on Earth was your point, in English please?

  82. @Autochthon
    Ain't got nuthin' but love for ya....

    Love you, I literally, drove 3100 miles . I perhaps, will send an invite to a college graduation at an awesome location…..and, just be part of our dinner for our son – an open invite – place is remote and hard to get to. I love all of you, btw, even the ones who think I am an average dumb ass. I hate the way the Super Bowl worked out, btw.

  83. shut up, Steve 🙂 , I was trying to write correctly for all your international commenters. The Herr Commandants. I really miss all you guys…erascible people and “fighters” are worthy.

  84. @Kylie
    It's too bad he grew up, period.

    hahahaahaaaa. No more Kennedies (dead and alive) /Clintonistas/Bushie-ugly creepies/ forevah!!!!!!!!!

  85. @Reg Cæsar
    Ronald Reagan did better losing Minnesota than Hillary Clinton did winning it.

    By the way, one of Minneapolis's first, and most obnoxious, gay publications was founded by a Texan in exile decades ago. But now he's moved back home.

    Ronald Reagan did better losing Minnesota than Hillary Clinton did winning it.

    Yeah, Reagan lost Minnesota in 1984 with 49.5 percent of the vote; Hillary won it with 46.4 percent.

    I accurately predicted that Pennsylvania & Michigan would flip to the GOP in 2016 (although I admit to being somewhat pleasantly surprised about Wisconsin), and I really do think 2020 will be Minnesota’s year to finally break the Democratic streak that’s run from 1976-2016.

    McGovern lost Minnesota with 46.1 percent in ’72, which is only 0.3 percent worse than Hillary did when she carried it, LOL.

  86. Yeah, Reagan lost Minnesota in 1984 with 49.5 percent of the vote; Hillary won it with 46.4 percent.

    Is that the record vote for a lost state?

    Electors were chosen individually in many states once. In 1916, Charles Evans Hughes and Woodrow Wilson were so close in West Virginia that Wilson’s best elector just beat out Hughes’s worst. Thus, the split delegation that year.

    Had they let women vote (eg, Illinois did), Hughes would have won them all.

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