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We’ve been blessed with an update to the topic of my recent post “Who We Are (Or Will Be):”

Screenshot 2018-06-23 15.24.12

The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward Santa Muerte coming to your hometown, you intolerant nativist white bigot, you.

 
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  1. syonredux says:

    It’s hard for me to imagine that people *wanted* to be sacrificed, but that’s my own biases and cultural conditioning talking. How I see the world, filtered through centuries of colonial oppression and destruction, is irrelevant to understanding how they saw the world.

    Of course, the Classical Greeks and Romans would have been equally repulsed by the Mexica…..as would the Ottoman Turks and Ming Dynasty-era China…..Perhaps that says something about the Mexica…

  2. Anon[144] • Disclaimer says:

    How about a compromise?

    Muertians sacrifice only the progs.

    They’d be doing us a favor.

    Begin with Lizzie.

    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  3. Anonymous[241] • Disclaimer says:

    How I see the world, filtered through centuries of colonial oppression and destruction, is irrelevant to understanding how they saw the world.

    How she sees the world, filtered through many thousands of pages and dollars of subversive ivory tower bullshit and noble-savage-worshipping white guilt, is irrelevant to understanding how I see threats to the integrity of my slice of the world.

    Yet, strangely, I feel like she’s passing judgement on me…

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Wally
  4. Anonym says:

    If there is a white person who should be blood sacrificed to the multicult so that we can determine whether she actually wants to be sacrificed, let it first be multicultists like Lizzie Wade.

  5. The comments call her out on her moral relativism and special pleading.

  6. Anonymous[294] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

  7. Rosie says:

    But it’s time for a discussion on why this practice was not “horrific” or “loaded [with] evil,” as some of you have said

    It’s time for a discussion on whether there is any moral assumption that takes priority over racial egalitarianism. I would have thought that if there was one, it would be that premeditated killing of other human beings is not morally permissible. I guess this is where we are now.

  8. Achilles says:

    How I see the world, filtered through centuries of colonial oppression and destruction

    What is this lady, a bristlecone pine? Just how old is this woman?

    It’s hard for me to imagine that people *wanted* to be sacrificed, but that’s my own biases and cultural conditioning talking.

    If we shouldn’t assume that the victims of the Aztec empire didn’t *want* to be captured in war and sacrificed, then by the same reasoning perhaps we shouldn’t assume that the Aztecs themselves didn’t *want* to be conquered by the Spanish empire.

    • Replies: @WowJustWow
    , @donut
    , @Olorin
  9. syonredux says:

    Anyway, yes, the tzompantli seems weird and violent and gruesome to our Western colonial gaze. But don’t for a second think that’s the only way to see it, or the “right” way to see it.

    Yeah, I mean, Auschwitz looks pretty weird and violent and gruesome, but’s that’s just from the perspective of my Anglo gaze. If I looked at it with the gaze of a committed Nazi…..

    And the Cultural Revolution looks pretty unpleasant to my Anglo-Occidental mindset (beating people up for the crime of wearing glasses, etc), but, to a committed Maoist, the whole thing would have had the beauty of true revolution…..

    • Replies: @Hockamaw
  10. Drake says:

    I feel like this attitude is similar to the attitude that allowed the British rape gangs to go unstopped for decades.

    The idea that fighting racism takes precedence over every other moral value. To make excuses and coverups whenever we encounter immorality from nonwhites.

    Extremist anti-racism leads to an impoverished moral world view.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Reg Cæsar
  11. So I guess my cultural background keeps me from seeing the redeeming features of Pot Pol’s “killing fields.” Yeah right.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  12. syonredux says:

    That’s what’s so fun about archaeology, especially in Mesoamerica — trying to understand a worldview that is fundamentally, deeply different than the one we have been trained to think is natural and right. Try it sometime! /fin

    Of course, I’m just talking about POC. I’m not suggesting that good-thinking SJWs try to truly understand the worldview of Trump supporters…..That’s clearly a bridge too far….

  13. Anonymous[294] • Disclaimer says:

    ???

    Who’s colonizing who, Ms. Wade?

  14. Tyrion 2 says: • Website

    Perhaps rather than sending those children to baseball games, Trump should ritually disembowel them on top of a pyramid to a maddened and bloodthirsty crowd.

    Things get weirder every day.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  15. Luke Lea says:

    Value free “social science.” How could it go wrong?

  16. syonredux says:

    (Now, sacrifice also may have served some political purposes, as I write about. But this was not a cynical use of some outdated or fringe religious belief during an imperial power grab. The religious function of sacrifice was the basis of everything.)

    So atrocity is OK if it’s committed in the name of a religious belief that is both sincerely held and widespread? I guess that that means that the auto-da-fé should not be condemned…..

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auto-da-f%C3%A9

  17. Ibound1 says:

    Note to Ms. Wade: “Colonial oppression and destruction” are what the Aztecs brought to their neighbors.

    • Replies: @ThirdWorldSteveReader
  18. syonredux says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Perhaps rather than sending those children to baseball games, Trump should ritually disembowel them on top of a pyramid to a maddened and bloodthirsty crowd.

    Things get weirder every day.

    Get WOKE, bigot. That would be cultural appropriation. Now, if Hoolian Castro were President and decided to revive the ritual practices of his noble Mexica ancestors, that would be a different story….

  19. Hockamaw says:
    @Rosie

    It’s time for a discussion on whether there is any moral assumption that takes priority over racial egalitarianism. I would have thought that if there was one, it would be that premeditated killing of other human beings is not morally permissible. I guess this is where we are now.

    Absolutely spot on.

  20. Hockamaw says:
    @syonredux

    Sure cannibalism *seems* wrong to our colonialist gaze. But in fact, it is we who are wrong – the cannibals who are right!

  21. The perennial, wanton spilling of blood is unique to no culture, and has usually been sanctioned by one or another of the great, celestial Justification Hamsters, by way of various earthbound semi-deities.

    “Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction.” – Blaise Pascal

  22. Somebody on Twatter needs to recommend she read Bernal Diaz’s “Conquest of Mexico” stat!

    Sure, a white supremacist like Lizzie is confident a couple hundred horny white conquistadors should be able to conquer a nation of 200,000 brownskins no probs, but in reality Cortes convinced and organized surrounding villages to attack heavily-defended Mexico City because Montezuma & Co. were kidnapping, sacrificing, and eating said local villagers. They certainly weren’t into it.

    And why hasn’t Mel Gibson created the obvious sequel to Apocalpyto showing how Cortes conquered Mexico and put a (temporary) end to Mexican human sacrifice?

    • Replies: @anon
  23. @Anon

    It looks like the sacrifice has already begun. They’ve started by removing her brain.

    • LOL: Escher
  24. Anonymous[413] • Disclaimer says:

    IIRC, most of the sacrificed were tribute from the various vassal states conquered by the Aztecs over the years. It’s unlikely these victims liked this arrangement.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  25. CCZ says:
    @AndrewR

    A 2008 comparative literature graduate (BA) of Barnard College, a resident of Mexico City since 2013, and apparently a legal “permanent resident” of Mexico, who may become a Mexican citizen.

    “I love the excitement (some would say chaos) and history of Mexico City, and at this point it really feels like home. I’m going to become a permanent resident of Mexico this summer [2017], and since I’m married to a Mexican I could be a citizen within a couple years, though I’m still pondering the pros and cons of that.”

    https://www.theopennotebook.com/2017/07/25/a-day-in-the-life-of-lizzie-wade/

    The article illustrates their dog and cat, but no mention of children that they could sacrifice.

    • Replies: @bored identity
    , @Corn
    , @Olorin
  26. Hubbub says:

    Cultures all over the world practiced human sacrifice, and their reasons varied. Some offered people in times of environmental stress, some when a ruler died, some ritually killed captives. More on all that here, by my colleague @evolutionscribe — Lizzie Bord..(oops!) Wade

    “Cultures all over the world practices human [slavery], and their reasons varied…” Not so bad after all given one’s filtering through colonialism, etc., huh?

  27. Whiskey says: • Website

    Lizzie Wade is Exhibit A on how White women are the eternal and natural enemy of the White beta male which is 90% of White men.

    • Troll: AndrewR
  28. I am disgusted by the comments so far. NOT ONE OTHER PERSON SEES THE SOLUTION TO THE PRISON POPULATION PROBLEM?

  29. Thea says:

    Several years ago the governing body for American Anthropology removed the word science from their statement on what constitutes professional anthropology.

    So this type of writing is the result.

  30. @syonredux

    bored identity has only three simple questions for Elizabeth Lizzie Wade, after watching this educational video:

    1.

    “¿Por qué Marvin está deprimido”

    2.

    “Are the Mexicans culturally biased against consumption of Chianti?”

    3.

    “Did she drive a Prius when she gave Uncle Mauricio a ride out of town?”

  31. @syonredux

    bored identity has only three simple questions for Elizabeth Lizzie Wade, after watching this educational video:

    1.

    “¿Por qué Marvin está deprimido”

    2.

    “Are the Mexicans culturally biased against consumption of Chianti?”

    3.

    “Did she drive a Prius when she gave Uncle Mauricio a ride out of town?”

  32. @Rosie

    It’s time for a discussion on whether there is any moral assumption that takes priority over racial egalitarianism. I would have thought that if there was one, it would be that premeditated killing of other human beings is not morally permissible. I guess this is where we are now.

    Very well said, Rosie. Once you start down that road, this is where you end up.

  33. “Gomóz Valdás found that about 75% of the skulls examined so far belonged to men, most between the ages of 20 and 35—prime warrior age. But 20% were women, and 5% belonged to children.”

    –Lizzie Wade

    “Tlaloc required the tears of the young so their tears would wet the earth. As a result, if children did not cry, the priests would sometimes tear off the children’s nails before the ritual sacrifice”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_sacrifice_in_pre-Columbian_cultures#Aztec_culture

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  34. Big Bill says:

    Temujin (aka Ghengis Khan) organized a bunch of Mongolian horsemen, swept out of Mongolia and (with his family) massacred roughly one-tenth of all humanity, genociding countless peoples and exterminating many cities.

    He slaughtered more people than the Aztecs could even dream of, and left monster piles of tens of thousands of rotting heads to commemorate his victories.

    If Hitler slaughtered 20 times as many (220 million instead of a measly 11 million) he would rank as an equal to Ghengis Khan.

    The Mongolians, ever proud of their local boy made good (er … bad), erected a huge pavillion and 40 m high silver statue to honor him.

    Pics here:

    http://www.amusingplanet.com/2013/09/enormous-statue-of-genghis-khan-in.html

  35. @Rosie

    It’s time for a discussion on whether there is any moral assumption that takes priority over racial egalitarianism. I would have thought that if there was one, it would be that premeditated killing of other human beings is not morally permissible. I guess this is where we are now.

    Premeditated killing can be moral in certain circumstances. We are not just dealing with premeditated killing, but with wholesale ritualistic mass human sacrifice involving the most sadistic torture imaginable. And let’s not forget the blood drinking, organ removals from live victims and the CANNIBALISM!

  36. If we could only harness the energy of her rationalization hampster we could shut down a nuclear plant.

  37. Svigor says:

    LOL. I have some sympathy for cultural relativism. That said, I have a lot of sympathy for a couple dozen Spaniards riding in there, recruiting some local help (were they insensitive imperialistic bastards, too, btw?), and slaughtering the natives until they got their minds right. That was the Spaniards’ culture, right?

  38. Svigor says:

    “Tlaloc required the tears of the young so their tears would wet the earth. As a result, if children did not cry, the priests would sometimes tear off the children’s nails before the ritual sacrifice”

    Gary Gygax wasn’t exactly pozzed back when he wrote AD&D, but he wasn’t right-wing by any stretch of the imagination, AFAICT. There’s a reason that Deities & Demigods, his sourcebook on the world’s more salient pantheons, largely sought balance in assigning good and evil within each pantheon, but made the Aztec pantheon largely evil; they were.

  39. Anonymous[359] • Disclaimer says:

    Doesn’t she sound like a Manson Familiy girl repeating Charlie’s gibberish?

    All the postmoderns do.

    Silly but dangerous.

  40. @CCZ

    bored identity will add that Lizzie loves so much the excitement (some would say chaos) of Mexico City, that at this point, she really felt obligated to pen a one thousand word long panegyric to some local JAMP, whose Royal Sheinbaum-Pardo heritage reeks of business as triple usual bracketed privilege :

    “Can this environmental engineer—poised to become mayor—fix Mexico City?”

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/06/can-environmental-engineer-poised-become-mayor-fix-mexico-city

    P.S. mark bored identity’s words:

    As a result of Mexico City 2018 mayoral elections, Lizzie and her clique will end with moar bicycle lines, Mexico capital with a moar clunkers for cash, and our poor Trumplandia with moar Santa Muerte cultists that could have not afford a Prius, or Volt in their native country…

    • Replies: @CCZ
    , @Achmed E. Newman
  41. @syonredux

    Now, if Hoolian Castro were President and decided to revive the ritual practices of his noble Mexica ancestors, that would be a different story…

    What do you mean ‘if?”. Castro has been eating the children Trump ripped from their mothers’ arms at the border, and has built a temple to the Aztec gods with their skulls. Have you seen Mel Gibson lately? No? That’s because Castro abducted him so that he could torture Mel into telling Hoolian how to replicate Apocolypto in Texas.

    And Hoolian has done it.

    Which is why Hoolian is smiling. And I am not. :-(

  42. @Svigor

    That was the Spaniards’ culture, right?

    Yes, and some things never change.

  43. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:
    @Drake

    The idea that fighting racism takes precedence over every other moral value. To make excuses and coverups whenever we encounter immorality from nonwhites.

    Extremist anti-racism leads to an impoverished moral world view.

    Well said.

  44. But it’s time for a discussion on why this practice was not “horrific” or “loaded [with] evil,” as some of you have said

    “Horrific” and “evil” are very strong words, and should be used only in the most serious of situations. Like when the cops shoot a black thug, or when a Guatemalan is sent back, or when someone writes in triple parenthesis – in short, when the right people suffer any slight from the wrong people.

    Indians sacrificing other Indians? Not that bad. No white liberal actually cares about them anyway.

    • LOL: Rosie
  45. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Maybe Germans can be clever and excuse their bloodbath in WWII with Teutonism.

    You see, the Germans are really pagans and victims of Christo-cultural-genocide that removed all the pagan Norse gods. And so, Nazism was really return of Teutonic paganism where the gods demanded blood sacrifice of many folks.

    And who are we to judge? Germanics have been victimized by Christian-Latin-Roman colonization for many centuries.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Svigor
    , @Olorin
  46. @Svigor

    That was the Spaniards’ culture, right?

    The funniest thing is that an actual cultural relativism could be useful to understand the horrible behaviour of the colonists. Imagine the shock of Cortez & Co. arriving in Mexico and seeing what was, to their Catholic culture, a textbook example of demonic sacrifice. How were these devout and hardy men from devout and hardy Extremadura to have reacted?

    Yup, Cortez was pretty bad; but then, the people he was fighting against were at least just as bad.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  47. @Ibound1

    In her world, “colonial oppression” only applies to things white people do to non-whites. Just like “horrific” and “evil” don’t apply to human sacrifice, only to things like white people saying ethnic slurs on the Internet. Implied is the notion that only white people are moral agents whose actions can be judged.

    Deep inside, these people don’t care about what Africans or Indians do to each other unless whites are also around. Their concern for non-whites is more akin to animal welfare than to human rights.

    • Replies: @asimpleperson
    , @Anonymous
  48. CCZ says:
    @bored identity

    Looks like chaos is her life’s calling.

    BY ELIZABETH WADE
    “There’s a myth in New York that everything was once better than it is now. I often wish I lived in the New York of the 70s and 80s, where I imagine that performance art happened almost as frequently as mob-controlled garbage collection strikes. So for my semester abroad, I sought out a place with faux hawks and pickpockets, organized crime and underground clubs. When I decided to head to el otro lado for six months in Mexico City, I was told it was “the new Brooklyn,” but it could just as easily be called “the old New York.”

    If New York was always better before, Mexico City will always be better tomorrow.”
    (April 19, 2007)

    http://spectatorarchive.library.columbia.edu/cgi-bin/columbia?a=d&d=cs20070419-02.2.25

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  49. @CCZ

    “If New York was always better before, Mexico City will always be better tomorrow.”

    Not a bad line …

    • Replies: @syonredux
    , @Forbes
  50. @bored identity

    I can forgive their history of ritual sacrifice and cannibalism, if they’re actually going to put in more bike lanes. I hope the iStevers, including iSteve, himself can eventually rid themselves of their cultural lenses of fuel-injected V-8′s and “traffic regulations”.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  51. @ThirdWorldSteveReader

    Yep, I was just going to write something similiar, 3rd-worlder. Weren’t Cortez and his men the ones that kidnapped the God/King for the ransom of all the gold in the whole land that they could round-up on short notice, get ahold of the gold, and then kill the God/King anyway just for shits and giggles?

    I can’t blame ‘em as much as I used to. That’s not due to this Lizzie’s asinine writings but more just to my imaginings after seeing that clip of Apocalypto that someone embedded in the last post. Yeah, I know that it’s just a movie, but piles of skulls don’t lie either.

    It’s the kind culture that make one glad the white men invented the machine gun.

  52. In his documentary on the Vikings, the Icelandic-British television presenter Magnus Magnusson held the skull of a teenage sacrifice victim, and lovingly explained the joy she must have felt.

  53. Lizzie Wade took an ax
    and gave her children forty whacks.
    When he saw what she had done,
    she gave Steve Sailer forty-one.

  54. @Drake

    Extremist anti-racism leads to an impoverished moral world view.

    People come in races. Thus, anti-racism is genocidal.

    The Afro-Mexicans, of whom Steve has written, were wiped off the face of the earth by antiracists.

  55. @Buffalo Joe

    So I guess my cultural background keeps me from seeing the redeeming features of Pot Pol’s “killing fields.” Yeah right.

    Cambodia has nothing on Buffalo, if you’re a chicken. I’m reminded of the cartoon in which a chicken tells a man, “To you he’s Col. Sanders, but to me he’s Adolf Eichmann.”

  56. syonredux says:
    @Steve Sailer

    “If New York was always better before, Mexico City will always be better tomorrow.”

    Not a bad line …

    It’s up there with “Brazil is the country of the future… and always will be.”

  57. @Achilles

    It’s said the Aztecs believed Hernando Cortes was Quetzalcoatl. It’s hard for me to imagine them submitting to what they thought was a god, but I suppose that’s my 21st-century secular cultural conditioning talking.

  58. donut says:
    @Achilles

    It’s hard for me to imagine that people *wanted* to be gassed , but that’s my own biases and cultural conditioning talking.

  59. Wally says:
    @Anonymous

    Not mentioned:
    Sacrifices occurred in Mexico, Central America & South America long before colonialism & ‘white oppression’.

    In fact, when the Spaniards did arrive, the sacrificing & ruthless rulers, Aztecs, Mayans, & Incas, were so hated by the other tribes that the Spaniards had little difficulty finding allies.

    Now we really know why so few Spaniards accomplished so much. Gunpowder not.

  60. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Svigor

    Tragically, red-bearded Hernan Cortez had no helicopters.

  61. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Big Little Miss Muffett, that Savitri Devi of rock and roll, says…..well, I don’t read French, so I have no idea.

  62. Olorin says:

    Her maiden name was Borden.

    And I’ll bet someone above beat me to that.

    Anyway, it’s always multicultural enrichment when it’s someone else’s skulls. We can guarantee that if, say, some Celtic ancestry Trump voters were to decide to start collecting professor or pundit skulls a la Entremont or Walbrook, it would not be received with anywhere near the above level of passive aggressive equanimity and practiced female smuggerie.

    Which is to say methinks she’s a bit tingly to have been noticed by Darth Sailer. Prolly the biggest thing to happen since she “stumbled into an internship” at Fermilab, teehee.

    http://lizziewade.com/

  63. She isn’t completely wrong. Many GoodWhites do wish to sacrifice themselves and their children in order to get rid of their White Guilt. A religious impulse can indeed compel people to self harm.

  64. Anonymous[109] • Disclaimer says:

    ‘It’s hard for me to imagine that people wanted to be sacrificed….’.

    Yep. That one puzzles me too. A very clear instance of it happened in historical times, a little less than 3 years’ ago, in fact.

    Angela Merkel – the ‘supreme and sovereign’ ruler of Germany, of whom 80 millions of Germans have obseiance more or less on a whim decided to sacrifice the future of untold generations of Germans yet born, and to sacrifice the sacred ancient home of the German people to a gang of thieves who just showed up and demanded it.

    Beats me.

  65. Anonymous[109] • Disclaimer says:

    If someone made a defence of antebellum slavery as practised in the USA using a similar ‘argument’, guarantee you that Lizzie Wade would be the first on her high moral horse.

  66. @Reg Cæsar

    The writing on the sign is Thai. It says Pepsi and fried chicken.

  67. Newyorker says:

    A comparison that comes to mind is the British practice of putting heads on spikes at the citiy’s gates even when capital punishment was overkill, but at least that was only done with presumed criminals. As a warning to those say contemplating treason or grand theft.

    Crucifixtion by romans where the body was left as a warning-same thing.

    But both were prolly considered regrettable actions by the authorities, necessary in a brutal age To keep social order.

    Probably the Aztecs they were stuck in devil worship, living as they were in a world where catastrophe and death happened without rhyme or reason. Being proactive by killing others to please the ‘demons’, giving them what they clearly wanted was the ticket out out for the elites and society as a whole.

    To kill so many to insure the sun comes up seems a feeble excuse. They were bloodthirsty devil worshippers whose deathdealing had no moral meaning, compared to other cultures who executed to maintain the moral order, as imperfect and over the top as we may see it from a modern perspective.

  68. @ThirdWorldSteveReader

    I whispered “holy shit that is profound” upon reading this observation. Well done.

  69. anon[199] • Disclaimer says:
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    Is this the same Tower that Bernal mentioned in his account, perhaps? Because as far as I remember, him and his companion, while on liberty with Moctezuma under house-arrest, walked around the city and discovered a wall built of approximately 120,000 skulls (Diaz’s estimate), and a tower with an incalculable number more. This is in addition, of course, to the two pyramids of skulls near the foot of the stairs of the main temple, which he estimated at containing 70,000 skulls each. So about a cool half a million people died to provide street decor for the Aztecs. Kind of gives the whole Day of the Dead thing a new feel. Catholics and their hijacking of native rituals, I guess.

    The brutality of the Mexico tribe against the coastal peoples is to me, hard to comprehend. Equally hard for me to understand is the ongoing slandering of Cortez, who for the period, was quite a reasonable guy. Pizarro gets lauded all over Peru and he was an insane moron, but Cortez handled the takeover of Mexico relatively bloodlessly until Alvarado saw that ritual dance of the priests and massacred them. Then of course, there was nothing Cortez could do at that point. I wonder if his reputation will ever be rehabilitated.

    Interesting though that Dona Marina, the native guide, has suffered no such evil portrayal, although the conquest would have certainly failed without her prodigious resourcefulness. I wonder why…

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  70. It’s hard for me to imagine that people *wanted* to be sacrificed, but that’s my own biases and cultural conditioning talking.

    The left’s denial of human nature, like stupidity, knows no bounds.

  71. @twentycent

    A casual but unexamined assumption of modern liberals/SJWs/multicultists is that the virtues of a Christian-based society are natural, automatic or default, so therefore they conclude that you don’t really need all that burdensome Christianity.

    But in the Aztecs, we can see what an anti-Christian, we might even say Satanic, society actually looks like. Need child tears to wet the earth? No prob, just pull out their fingernails before disemboweling them. Perfectly logical.

    Why isn’t that natural, automatic or default?

    It is, once everyone is sufficiently de-Christianized.

    “I have seen the future, and it works.”

  72. David says:

    John Stephens, first excavator of Copan, whose book Incidents of Travel in Central America forced Western scholars to accept that civilizations had arisen independently of the middle east, was the first Westerner to describe Mayan sculpture to the wider world. He immediately recognized its inhumanity. He praised its sophistication but thanked fate that’d he had not lived within the societies that produced it.

    He commented about Central Americans that in any town, ten thugs with guns can easily take charge because the people will never unite to resist them.

    By the way, on another topic, I’m trying to understand why it’s okay for the employees of a restaurant to be able to vote on which customers they want to serve and which to throw out, but it’s not okay for citizens of a country to vote on which foreign nationals they want to allow into their country. One is totally righteous and the other is pure evil, I know, but I don’t know why.

  73. Corn says:
    @CCZ

    “The article illustrates their dog and cat, but no mention of children that they could sacrifice”

    Have icky babies?? That’s something for proles to do.

  74. Forbes says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Not a bad line…

    Excepting that it’s a myth that New York was better before.

    You know, come for the performance art and garbage strikes, and stay for the muggings and murders, the stench and filth, the squeegee men, and the homeless sleeping in your doorway. What’s not to like?

    Somehow, Millennials hankering for NYC of the ’70s & ’80s is nothing like boomer nostalgia for America in the ’50s.

    Two hundred stitches in your face from a mugging will disabuse you of that hankering for pre-Giuliani New York…

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  75. The best I can say about this latest retardette is that at least she is peddling her BS in Mexico instead of from a “professorship” at Taxpayer U.

  76. Cultural Relativists: They all think they’re Einstein and that any frame of reference is as good as another.

    Hey, how about a new Twin Paradox: One twin grows up in Bedford Falls, New York, becomes Jimmy Stewart and manages a bank, while the other one comes of age in Tenochtitlan and becomes a canibal priest who sacrifices humans.

    Tabula Rasa and Relativism, baby! The two major ingredients of the poison that is being spoon fed to the American public.

    “It’s all relative.” One is just as good as another, and the speed of human consciousness is constant:

  77. What if Jefferson Davis commemerated the victory at Bull Run by sacrificing 1000 negro slaves at Richmond?

  78. Bleeding heart liberals

  79. Svigor says:
    @Anon

    We should actually be deploying these arguments against leftism. They are valid from a lefty POV and blankets infected with this should be launched into their camps.

  80. @anon

    Maybe POTUS should build Trump Skull Tower on the border.

    The Turks were still building them in the nineteenth century, following Tamerlane/Timur’s tradition.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skull_Tower

  81. @Achmed E. Newman

    That was Pizarro (a relative of Cortez) and his men, when they conquered the Inca Empire from Atahualpa. They were also very mean people fighting other very mean people. Montezuma, according to the sources, was killed by the Aztecs during the civil war that followed the Spanish contact.

    But the point you made stands solid.

  82. @David

    Sarah Sanders should have said that she was identifying that day as a transgendered Muslim who wanted to be addressed as “they”. That would have done the trick.

    The guy who was running the Mexican restaurant where the antifa wannabees chased out Kirstjen Nielsen did nothing to prevent or stop it and said he was glad it happened.

    Pretty soon somebody’s gonna get shot.

  83. @Anonymous

    Those other tribes also practiced human sacrifice when they could get the captives. Human life was cheap to conquerors.

    Read up on the Huns, the Mongols, the various steppe warriors. They were as blood thirsty and brutal as the Mexica, but their victims were spread out over a much bigger area so we don’t see the same concentration of skulls. Was there a religious justification for their slaughter, or was it just for kicks?

  84. syonredux says:
    @David

    John Lloyd Stephens’ Incidents of Travel in Central America, Chiapas and Yucatán is a great read. And Frederick Catherwood’s illustrations are outstanding:

    I can also recommend his Old World travel writings:Incidents of Travel in Egypt, Arabia Petraea, and the Holy Land (1837) and Incidents of Travel in Greece, Turkey, Russia and Poland (1838).

  85. syonredux says:
    @Svigor

    Gary Gygax wasn’t exactly pozzed back when he wrote AD&D, but he wasn’t right-wing by any stretch of the imagination, AFAICT. There’s a reason that Deities & Demigods, his sourcebook on the world’s more salient pantheons, largely sought balance in assigning good and evil within each pantheon, but made the Aztec pantheon largely evil; they were.

    If the Aztecs didn’t exist, and someone invented them for a Robert E Howard-JRR Tolkien style fantasy novel, critics would hit the roof (“Come on! Nothing that psychotically deranged could ever exist, even in a Sword-and-Sorcery context.”)

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
  86. anonymous[356] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Couldn’t we put a happy face on motor vehicle vs bicycle fatalities and call them ritual sacrafices?

  87. @David

    I’m trying to understand why it’s okay for the employees of a restaurant to be able to vote on which customers they want to serve and which to throw out, but it’s not okay for citizens of a country to vote on which foreign nationals they want to allow into their country

    Well, to start with it’s absolutely not okay for the employees of a restaurant to [r]eject (reject or eject) a patron … except when the power to do so has expressly been delegated to them by the proprietor of the establishment. If they do so without the owner’s express consent, then they are putting his capital at risk and they should be fired.

    Now – assuming that the power to do so has been delegated to them by the owner of the establishment, the difference between the two sets of circumstances you are “trying to understand” is really very straightforward.

    For the two things to be comparable, the ‘vote’ on immigration control must be an up-or-down single issue poll, framed in a very precise manner.

    No election in any party-based system is that type of poll: you get to choose between two bundles of policies.

    It’s like you’re given a choice between a McDonalds Happy Meal and a Burger King Meal Deal – but you’re never presented with the option to take a McD’s burger, BK’s fries, and a sundae instead of a drink. Actually,make it KFC chips – those are better.

    [MORE]

    No. You must choose “list A” or “list B”. No ‘line item veto’ for us proletarians.

    What that means, is that no political party can ever claim a genuine mandate for a specific policy. That’s literally just how the mathematics works when people do not vote on a single-policy basis. (It’s also the actual legal basis invoked by governments when they break a ‘core’ political promise: the government is not responsible to fulfil promises made by the party that was competing for, and won, government: they are completely different legal entities.)

    You might try to make a case that ‘X%’ of the ‘R’ religion agree with a Trumpian Wall and so forth (where ‘X’ is a majority): I would reply that the poll in question – whichever poll it was – was not a vote. So sad, too bad.

    You might also claim that the ‘mandate’ acquired by scheming lying shitbag politicians, is simply a mandate to do whatever they want for some period: that is far too scary to contemplate (although it’s an approximation to reality, it would be horrendous if it was actually given genuine legal force).

    .
    For the ‘vote to eject the patron’ thing, I reckon you’re referring (albeit obliquely – why be oblique?) to the [r]ejection of “Puddin’-Butt Daddy’s- a-Governor” Huckabee-Sanders.

    Doubtless the ‘R’ side of politico-religion is aghast that her fat ass was told to waddle the fuck out – just as the ‘D’ side was aghast that a baker wanted to refuse to make a wedding cake for a couple (I don’t give a shit that they were gay: he had the right to refuse to give his services for whatever reason he wanted, including “just… fuck you“).

    In a free world, proprietors are free to refuse service to anybody - gay wedding cake customers, black rest-room wanna-users, or obese political flacks on a nepotism ride. I reckon they’re idiots if they delegate their right to refuse service to their employees, but they can if they want, coz they’re the ones taking the capital risk.

    Hell, I’m a capitalist: I would give soda-fountain owners the right to have a ‘No blacks’ lunch counter. (And that despite being part spear-chucker myself).

    People who commit private capital to private ventures, ought to be able to refuse service to whoever the fuck they like. It will only hurt the feelings of those who think that being excluded from anything is ipso facto a denial of some fictional right. (This is why I don’t give a fuck that there are women-only gyms: I literally don’t give a shit if there are).

  88. @syonredux

    If the Aztecs didn’t exist, and someone invented them…

    What if they existed, but their story was embellished and made significantly more brutal and primitive than it was… in order to justify invading the place and taking all their shit?

    Coz here’s the thing: the various Western Empires had no qualms about just making shit up when they decided to fuck a place up for money.

    You would think that anyone who was aware of

    the Maine;
    the Lusitania;
    Huns Bayonetting Babies (and raping nuns);
    Pearl Harbour (happened, but after almost a decade of goading Japan);
    Gulf of Tonkin/USS Maddox;
    “The Domino Effect” and Team B;
    the “Missile Gap”
    Babies from incubators;
    Saddam ♥ al-Qaeda;

    … (you get where I’m going here? The political class lies, always has done).

    I hold no brief for the Aztecs (or any of the other ‘-ec’s), but there are a bunch of things that don’t pass a basic bullshit test.

    Ritual sacrifice on the scale claimed by the Dago invaders is one of those things. (So is the claim that any of the sacrifice-ees were willing – maybe the odd mentally deranged person – so the OP is still a fucking idiot).

    Sure makes for good cinema though.

    Imagine how widespread starvation must have been, when they dedicated such massive resources to such an immensely wasteful set of displays: it’s as wasteful as transporting people 1000s of kilometers by train, de-lousing them, feeding them for a while, killing them by asphyxiation in sealed chambers with cyanide bug killer, then cremating the remains.

    Staggeringly inefficient – no wonder the Nazis lost.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  89. Hahaha. She’s not very bright.

  90. Joe H says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    No, that was Pizarro, a more evil man than Cortes, during his conquest of the Inca Empire in South America.

  91. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Forbes

    The New York of Breakfast at Tiffany’s was a pretty cool place. There was depravity but you had to be looking for it. By the New York of Taxi Driver it was pretty disgusting.

  92. Anonymous[364] • Disclaimer says:
    @ThirdWorldSteveReader

    - Only they *do* cars about what Africans and Indians do to each other.

    They concoct elaborate theories about that – the upshot of every theory being that whites are ultimately to blame.

    Hence, the assertion that the Belgians ‘invented’ the distinction between Tutsi and Hutu, and the utter utter absurdity that British colonialists ‘devised’ the Indian caste system.

  93. Man, the worst thing about that mistake is that someone right here on unz corrected me on this last year or so. I could have duckduckwent this stuff. Thanks for the correction, Joe.

    More on Cortez from Neil Young (no matter what you think of his lyrics, it’s a hell of a guitar lead):

  94. syonredux says:
    @Kratoklastes

    What if they existed, but their story was embellished and made significantly more brutal and primitive than it was… in order to justify invading the place and taking all their shit?

    Dunno. The Mexica extensively documented their practices…..And why not? They were proud of what they did….

    Annually, slaves or captives were selected as sacrifices to Xipe Totec.[33] After having the heart cut out, the body was carefully flayed to produce a nearly whole skin which was then worn by the priests for twenty days during the fertility rituals that followed the sacrifice.[33] This act of putting on new skin was a ceremony called ‘Neteotquiliztli’ translating to “impersonation of a god”.[34] The skins were often adorned with bright feathers and gold jewellery when worn.[35] During the festival, victorious warriors wearing flayed skins carried out mock skirmishes throughout Tenochtitlan, they passed through the city begging alms and blessed whoever gave them food or other offerings.[6] When the twenty-day festival was over, the flayed skins were removed and stored in special containers with tight-fitting lids designed to stop the stench of putrefaction from escaping. These containers were then stored in a chamber beneath the temple.[36]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xipe_Totec#Human_sacrifice

    I hold no brief for the Aztecs (or any of the other ‘-ec’s), but there are a bunch of things that don’t pass a basic bullshit test.

    Ritual sacrifice on the scale claimed by the Dago invaders is one of those things.

    Why?

    when they dedicated such massive resources to such an immensely wasteful set of displays:

    To the Mexica, it wasn’t wasteful; it was an essential religious rite, one upon which their survival depended. Plus, there’s the intimidation factor….

    Human sacrifice is defined as the ritualized, religiously motivated killing of a human being. It is no longer sanctioned by any state, but it was once practiced by societies across the globe. Chiefs and priests routinely strangled, bludgeoned, drowned, and burned their victims to death in order to please various ancestors or deities. Invariably, those ordaining the sacrifices were of higher status than their victims, prompting researchers to ask whether the violence served a social purpose—namely, keeping the lower orders in line. “Social elites used human sacrifice as a tool to instill fear and show their power,” Joseph Watts of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany, says. “As far as tools go, it was a pretty bloody and dramatic one.”

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2018/02/did-human-sacrifice-help-people-form-complex-societies/554327/

    Of course, that kind of terror creates enemies…..And Cortes had little trouble finding allies among the subjugated peoples of the Aztec Empire….

    Aztecs (1375-1419)
    Estimated Total of human sacrifices among Aztecs:
    Michael Harner (1977): “In 1946 Sherburne Cook, a demographer specializing in American Indian populations, estimated an over-all annual mean of 15,000 victims in a central Mexican population reckoned at two million [i.e. 1.5M sacrificed per century]. Later, however, he and his colleague Woodrow Borah revised his estimate of the total central Mexican population upward to 25 million. Recently, Borah, possibly the leading authority on the demography of Mexico at the time of the conquest, has also revised the estimated number of persons sacrificed in central Mexico in the fifteenth century to 250,000 per year” [i.e. 25.0M per century]

    A single incident….

    Dedication of a temple of Huitzilopochtli in Tenochtitlan by Aztec king Ahuitzotl (1487)

    Mark Cocker, Rivers of Blood, Rivers of Gold (1998): 20,000
    Harris, Cannibals and Kings (1977): 14,100 est. by Sherburne Cook

    : it’s as wasteful as transporting people 1000s of kilometers by train, de-lousing them, feeding them for a while, killing them by asphyxiation in sealed chambers with cyanide bug killer, then cremating the remains.

    Staggeringly inefficient – no wonder the Nazis lost.

    The Nazis also used bullets to good effect. Approx 2 million of the 5 million plus Jews killed by the Nazis were simply shot…..

  95. Olorin says:
    @CCZ

    The article illustrates their dog and cat, but no mention of children that they could sacrifice.

    They’ve already sacrificed them, CCZ.

  96. MBlanc46 says:
    @Rosie

    Premeditated killing of other human beings? It’s all a matter of who, whom.

  97. Olorin says:
    @Anon

    The Holocaust as Tenochtitlán?

    Could work, Anon. Could work.

    • Replies: @Pepe
  98. Olorin says:
    @Achilles

    What is this lady, a bristlecone pine?

    So much yoink.

  99. Pepe says:
    @Olorin

    In “Mexico: Volume 1, From the Beginning to the Spanish Conquest” (2002), historian Alan Knight used the term “holocaust” when referring to Aztec (Mexica) human sacrifice. That can’t be by accident.

    Speaking of the reaction of Bernal Díaz to the Tzompantli:

    “He counted over 100,000 skulls at Xocatlan (Zautla): ‘I repeat that there were more than 100,000 skulls.’ At the inauguration of the Great Temple, 1487, 80,400 victims were said to have perished in a mighty holocaust lasting four days, which left the sacrificers, including the Emporer Ahuítzotl, blood-drenched and exhausted.”

    p. 155

  100. Anonymous[170] • Disclaimer says:

    This is from Hugh Thomas’s book about the conquest:

    I refer to the people called Aztecs as the Mexica (pronounced “Mesheeca”), the word by which they called themselves. Neither Cortes, nor Bernal Diaz, nor Fr. Bernardino de Sahagun used the word “Aztecs”. “Aztec”, from Aztlan, was not a word used in the sixteenth century (though it may have been in the thirteenth). It was made popular by the Jesuit scholar, Francisco Javier Clavijero, in the eighteenth century, and then by Prescott.

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