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I was driving down Sunset Boulevard when I noticed that the logo on advertising banners for a Los Angeles institution resembles an IQ test question:

The message this logo sends is: If you’ve got a 2 digit IQ, we’re not for you.

 



 

MOCA: Museum of Contemporary Art

The square is an M, the disk an O, the C is a C, and the triangle is an A.

 
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  1. I guessed BOCA but MOCA makes more sense considering their theme colors look like DUNKIN DONUTS.

  2. I got this after skimming Wikipedia’s list of Los Angeles museums. Figured it was a museum because arty and 4 letters/symbols (like MOMA in New York).

  3. BTW My 2 digit IQ is 9Fh.

  4. Somebody just bought their toddler a Playskool Shape Sorter for Christmas.

  5. For extra credit, the East Asian IQ edition, the logo for the Japanese Marui department store.

  6. This logo exemplifies how “cultural institutions” play their part in The Great Dumbing-Down.

    • Agree: fish
  7. I thought it was intended to spell out LOCA, as in crazy. So it was actually for a Museum of modern art? Well, then I wasn’t far off the mark.

  8. It’s brilliant because it’s message isn’t “if you’ve got a 2-digit IQ, we’re not for you,” it’s “if you feel anxiety about about your IQ not being high enough to get this immediately, you’ll remember and look it up later.”

    People with IQ and status anxiety–that’s the target demographic for museums of modern art the world over.

  9. A square looks like an M?

    Seems like whoever designed this has a 2 digit IQ.

    They probably also drop a lot of LSD.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @anon
    I read it as ioca without a second thought but not because the square looks anything like an i but because in the context of the other letters and little other context that seemed to be the only possible word or as i assumed in this case a name, probably a last name now used as a business name.

    So no not that a square looked like an i but the context tells you what the game is; shapes as letters the circle and square are almost standards o/a in graphics and do in fact look like their correlatives so you know you have to guess the square,- moca boca coca ioca. i guess steves "LA INSTITUTION" made me discount boca and moca as too trivial because they are more obvious but likely a would be coffee shop or restaurant.
    Of course it was a split second of thought, but the point is its a riddle and the clue is the context; the other shapes tell you its a shapes as letters game, their order gives you the clue of possible words/names/acronyms, now if i had seen this on a museum looking building instead of in a box in a blog i would probably have guessed moca and acronym, and then tried to guess the museum's full name, (but Im from NYC where moma has been annoying us for decades) -instead of guessing it was a word or name and guessing which word. If i saw it on a cafe i would know it was a M and was a play on mocha if on a nightclub or restaurant B and assumed it was a carribeanish establishment.

    Im not saying youre dumb but although a lot of smart people like puzzles some people that are smart just hate them I think they see them as frivolous, also there's a type of smart person i think im one , that really its impreciseness, so if taking an IQ or other test and i see that question that's ambiguous or even outright wrong because of the way they have phrased it, you know the questions im talking about the ones where you know what answer they want or probably want but their clumsy way of phrasing it is ambiguous or actually defeating their intent- well i go ahead and check the answer i know they will mark wrong but i know is right just because it annoys the fuck out of me that people who actually right IQ tests can be so fucking stupid yeah its stupid to do that they wont notice and call an inquiry but whateva and i do it on all sorts of things so you probably just cant stand that there really is no resemblance between the shape and an m where as the other two shapes have a resemblance they are switching the rules you say thats not fair and youre right and an autist life is an art not a formula- but i hear ya bruddah
    , @J1234
    That's what I think, but I guess the intent was to have the three basic geometric shapes - square, circle and triangle (rudimentary artistic concepts) - in the acronym.

    I personally think that the cryptic often veers towards stupidity. Kind of like gang signs and slang.

  10. Dumbing down, yes, and infantilization. A logo does not necessarily be readable, it can be symbolic. But elementary forms like square and triangle are for the kindergarden. Google also simplified its logo to age two.

  11. Everyone knows that the Real Power in LA is the Museum of Jurassic Technology.

  12. In South Florida it would read “Boca.”

    • Replies: @South Texas Guy
    I was getting 'Boca' at first, too. I'm not familiar with LA museums.
  13. I thought this would be about Logo, the programming language.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logo_programming_language

    Logo was created in 1967 at Bolt, Beranek and Newman (BBN), a Cambridge, Massachusetts research firm, by Wally Feurzeig, Cynthia Solomon, and Seymour Papert. Its intellectual roots are in artificial intelligence, mathematical logic and developmental psychology. The first four years of Logo research, development and teaching work was done at BBN. The first implementation of Logo, called Ghost, was written in LISP on a PDP-1. The goal was to create a mathematical land where children could play with words and sentences. Modeled on LISP, the design goals of Logo included accessible power[clarification needed] and informative error messages. The use of virtual Turtles allowed for immediate visual feedback and debugging of graphic programming.

    What is still appreciated are the Turtle Graphics:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turtle_graphics

  14. Terrible lettering – the “romantic” c grouped together with three geometry signs looks awful.

    Plus the whole thing signals a submission (Michel Houellebecq) of aesthetics to mathematics and natural sciences.

    All in all: Nothing beautiful, or playful, or nice – – – a manifestation of bad taste.

    • Replies: @bomag
    The ancient Greeks tended to view geometry in religious terms; I see this as a kind of reverence: holy Geometry used to grace the lettering of a museum name.

    You may view it as a "c", but I see a fancy toroidal unit.

    It's all good, man. All good.

    , @MC
    In other words, the perfect logo for a museum of contemporary art.
    , @El Dato

    signals a submission (Michel Houellebecq) of aesthetics to mathematics and natural sciences.
     
    OKSign.jpg

    As mathematics at least is essentially driven by aesthetics, I'm ok with that! (But see this discussion about beauty and HEP: "Lost in Math")

    Natural sciences is driven by aesthetics to a lesser degree as it has to describe real-world phenomena, which, however, often turn out to be aesthetically pleasing, once formalized and purified of ancillary complexity.

  15. @Dieter Kief
    Terrible lettering - the "romantic" c grouped together with three geometry signs looks awful.

    Plus the whole thing signals a submission (Michel Houellebecq) of aesthetics to mathematics and natural sciences.

    All in all: Nothing beautiful, or playful, or nice - - - a manifestation of bad taste.

    The ancient Greeks tended to view geometry in religious terms; I see this as a kind of reverence: holy Geometry used to grace the lettering of a museum name.

    You may view it as a “c”, but I see a fancy toroidal unit.

    It’s all good, man. All good.

    • Agree: European-American
    • Replies: @European-American
    Also made me think of Sendai Gibon’s 18th century Zen painting
    https://cdn.japantimes.2xx.jp/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/p7-tokyo-sengai-a-20160921-870x516.jpg
    https://www.japantimes.co.jp/culture/2016/09/20/arts/openings-in-tokyo/grand-sengai-exhibition-spirit-zen-assembled/
    More Japanese square circle triangle stuff:
    http://www.greenshinto.com/wp/2016/01/31/zen-and-shinto-4-square-triangle-circle/
  16. But two digit IQ people can be incredibly good at putting names to faces ect. Arthur Jensen said this kind of Level I, or associative learning is an area in which blacks are, on average, clearly superior to whites, and I suppose the same is often true of artists relative to art critics.

    Weekend Australian’s ‘Review’ headlined a thought-provoking essay by Nicolas Rothwell challenging the ‘reluctance to criticise and evaluate’ Indigenous art, resulting in a ‘crisis of authenticity’ in both the artform and the market

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Remembering faces is a big part of written police tests.

    In the movie Snake Eyes, its utility is dramatized when Nicholas Cage’s slacker cop character rises to the occasion.
    , @res

    Arthur Jensen said this kind of Level I, or associative learning is an area in which blacks are, on average, clearly superior to whites
     
    Pretty sure you are wrong about this. People often spin it that way (dishonestly), but the reality is the W-B difference still appears. It is just smaller. You often see your sentiment expressed with the caveat "after correcting for IQ." Which is true, but misleading.

    From Jensen's The nature of the Black–White difference on various psychometric tests: Spearman's hypothesis
    https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1986-18910-001

    Test W-B Diff. gW gB
    Raven .91σ .80 .82
    Columbia .63σ .77 .74
    Peabody 1.15σ .70 .76
    Benton .65σ .74 .77
    Paired-associates .36σ .60 .50
     
    Description of the tests:

    five tests: Raven Matrices, Columbia Mental Maturity Scale, Peabody Picture Vocabulary, Benton Visual Retention Test (conceptual memory for designs), and a paired-associates rote learning task.
     
  17. This is the result of about, oh, $250,000 of student debt.

  18. The message this logo sends is: If you’ve got a 2 digit IQ, we’re not for you.

    Right. People involved in contemporary art are nothing if not individuals with high triple digit IQ’s.

  19. It’s a glyph. It speaks more to the symbolic mind – glyph of Isaac, the moon, almanach, paleography etc – than to the left brain. That’s both cool and clever for a museum.

  20. @Dieter Kief
    Terrible lettering - the "romantic" c grouped together with three geometry signs looks awful.

    Plus the whole thing signals a submission (Michel Houellebecq) of aesthetics to mathematics and natural sciences.

    All in all: Nothing beautiful, or playful, or nice - - - a manifestation of bad taste.

    In other words, the perfect logo for a museum of contemporary art.

    • Agree: Barnard
  21. @Dieter Kief
    Terrible lettering - the "romantic" c grouped together with three geometry signs looks awful.

    Plus the whole thing signals a submission (Michel Houellebecq) of aesthetics to mathematics and natural sciences.

    All in all: Nothing beautiful, or playful, or nice - - - a manifestation of bad taste.

    signals a submission (Michel Houellebecq) of aesthetics to mathematics and natural sciences.

    OKSign.jpg

    As mathematics at least is essentially driven by aesthetics, I’m ok with that! (But see this discussion about beauty and HEP: “Lost in Math”)

    Natural sciences is driven by aesthetics to a lesser degree as it has to describe real-world phenomena, which, however, often turn out to be aesthetically pleasing, once formalized and purified of ancillary complexity.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Natural sciences is driven by aesthetics to a lesser degree as it has to describe real-world phenomena, which, however, often turn out to be aesthetically pleasing, once formalized and purified of ancillary complexity.
     
    That's correct; and there are some constructivists, who made artworks I like a lot (Max Bill for example).
  22. Pac-Man is a game for discerning tastes

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    This might be the root cause for the awful lettering.
  23. @Sean
    But two digit IQ people can be incredibly good at putting names to faces ect. Arthur Jensen said this kind of Level I, or associative learning is an area in which blacks are, on average, clearly superior to whites, and I suppose the same is often true of artists relative to art critics.

    Weekend Australian's 'Review' headlined a thought-provoking essay by Nicolas Rothwell challenging the 'reluctance to criticise and evaluate' Indigenous art, resulting in a 'crisis of authenticity' in both the artform and the market
     

    Remembering faces is a big part of written police tests.

    In the movie Snake Eyes, its utility is dramatized when Nicholas Cage’s slacker cop character rises to the occasion.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Facial recognition is dealt with in Kevin Mitchell's "Innate." It's less something that you are good at than something you are less bad at. Faces are stored and analyzed in a certain part of the brain, and name's in another, with connections between them and to other parts of the brain.

    If your genome contains no major mutations in the genes leading up to and directly building these brain parts, and if no glitches occur during development in these parts, you'll have max facial memory. If there are any problems you will have diminished facial recognition ability, mostly not to a clinical level, but a test like you mention can detect smaller differences.

    Facial recognition is not completely independent of IQ, since the both are mediated by what they call "general fitness," if your intelligence is low it's because of mutations or development glitches, which tend to be sprinkled around the whole genome and whole brain. Many intelligence problems are caused by glitches that occur early in the building of the brain, and then fan out affecting different parts of the brain. General fitness is also what they're looking at with facial asymmetry: developmental glitches can happen after the bilateral split, and some of these can be detrimental in various ways beyond your appearance.
    , @res

    Remembering faces is a big part of written police tests.
     
    Any idea if that is a recent development? I ask because it is a good way of minimizing the W-B test difference. And I wonder if it may have been added (or given increased emphasis) to that end.
  24. Completely OT:

    > Drive people half-crazy with permanent greenfagging bereft of serious economic logic
    > People are actually going a bit crazy
    > “It was the Russians wot done it”

    Merkel’s spokesman backpedals on her suggestion that Russia is behind kids’ protest after outrage

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel enraged local activists after she appeared to suggest that the Kremlin was pulling the strings behind student climate protests. But her spokesman later said that she supported the demonstrations.

    Merkel’s spokesman Steffen Seibert was left to do some urgent damage control after the chancellor appeared to pin the blame for schoolchildren-led environmental protests across Europe on the long arm of Moscow.

  25. Why hasn’t there been an organized protest over the Columbia Sportswear logo, which looks Exactly Like A Swastika? It seems like a great cause and a rich source of news clicks in this our age of total fuckin’ stupidity.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    https://www.google.com/search?q=columbia+sportswear+logo&rlz=1C5CHFA_enUS503US503&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiUkNqBsMTgAhWaCjQIHbk0BcsQ_AUIDigB&biw=1067&bih=571#imgrc=2y5NCXgT8LcfgM:
    , @Rosamond Vincy
    It can't be a swastika. One leg always has to go the wrong to way to qualify.
  26. Shoot. I tried to get this one before reading on, and I failed.

    I thought the message was–‘If you voted Trump, we’re not for you.’

    But I think that’s because I was too dumb to get it in the first place. And, sooooo I was mad! This made me lash out at the creators of this logo–I even called them ‘pretentious assholes’ while trying to figure this out.

    But they anticipated this reaction from MAGA country–and they are telling me to stay away.

    Maybe Steve’s construction and mine are the same thing, so maybe I’m correct after all. What a cool, and creative logo this is!

    Art.

  27. Any interest in “contemporary” art proves someone is a poseur of limited intelligence and creativity.

  28. Read the OCA part right away, but couldn’t figure out the M. Maybe if you live in LA and are familiar with MOCA, you can work out the M as part of a puzzle.

    Is the ability to read ambigrams also a sort of IQ test? There is a popular retail store in Europe called Oysho that used to have a font that turned the name into an ambigram. It was clever and very elegant to look at.

    But it seems the branding wasn’t legible enough for shoppers, because in recent years both its website and stores write OYSHO with capitals.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    And then there's French Connection United Kingdom, affectionately known as FCUK.
  29. anon[393] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon1
    A square looks like an M?

    Seems like whoever designed this has a 2 digit IQ.

    They probably also drop a lot of LSD.

    I read it as ioca without a second thought but not because the square looks anything like an i but because in the context of the other letters and little other context that seemed to be the only possible word or as i assumed in this case a name, probably a last name now used as a business name.

    So no not that a square looked like an i but the context tells you what the game is; shapes as letters the circle and square are almost standards o/a in graphics and do in fact look like their correlatives so you know you have to guess the square,- moca boca coca ioca. i guess steves “LA INSTITUTION” made me discount boca and moca as too trivial because they are more obvious but likely a would be coffee shop or restaurant.
    Of course it was a split second of thought, but the point is its a riddle and the clue is the context; the other shapes tell you its a shapes as letters game, their order gives you the clue of possible words/names/acronyms, now if i had seen this on a museum looking building instead of in a box in a blog i would probably have guessed moca and acronym, and then tried to guess the museum’s full name, (but Im from NYC where moma has been annoying us for decades) -instead of guessing it was a word or name and guessing which word. If i saw it on a cafe i would know it was a M and was a play on mocha if on a nightclub or restaurant B and assumed it was a carribeanish establishment.

    Im not saying youre dumb but although a lot of smart people like puzzles some people that are smart just hate them I think they see them as frivolous, also there’s a type of smart person i think im one , that really its impreciseness, so if taking an IQ or other test and i see that question that’s ambiguous or even outright wrong because of the way they have phrased it, you know the questions im talking about the ones where you know what answer they want or probably want but their clumsy way of phrasing it is ambiguous or actually defeating their intent- well i go ahead and check the answer i know they will mark wrong but i know is right just because it annoys the fuck out of me that people who actually right IQ tests can be so fucking stupid yeah its stupid to do that they wont notice and call an inquiry but whateva and i do it on all sorts of things so you probably just cant stand that there really is no resemblance between the shape and an m where as the other two shapes have a resemblance they are switching the rules you say thats not fair and youre right and an autist life is an art not a formula- but i hear ya bruddah

  30. Hmm, I read the square as a squat “I”.

  31. I guess I must have a two digit IQ. The O and A were obvious, but lots of letters fit inside a square. Of course you had the advantage of seeing the exhibit sign.

  32. Anon[578] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Remembering faces is a big part of written police tests.

    In the movie Snake Eyes, its utility is dramatized when Nicholas Cage’s slacker cop character rises to the occasion.

    Facial recognition is dealt with in Kevin Mitchell’s “Innate.” It’s less something that you are good at than something you are less bad at. Faces are stored and analyzed in a certain part of the brain, and name’s in another, with connections between them and to other parts of the brain.

    If your genome contains no major mutations in the genes leading up to and directly building these brain parts, and if no glitches occur during development in these parts, you’ll have max facial memory. If there are any problems you will have diminished facial recognition ability, mostly not to a clinical level, but a test like you mention can detect smaller differences.

    Facial recognition is not completely independent of IQ, since the both are mediated by what they call “general fitness,” if your intelligence is low it’s because of mutations or development glitches, which tend to be sprinkled around the whole genome and whole brain. Many intelligence problems are caused by glitches that occur early in the building of the brain, and then fan out affecting different parts of the brain. General fitness is also what they’re looking at with facial asymmetry: developmental glitches can happen after the bilateral split, and some of these can be detrimental in various ways beyond your appearance.

  33. The Abstract art movement turned out to largely be a CIA operation designed to show the Soviets how culturally superior capitalism was. This museum is like those abandoned fall out shelters in Nebraska.

  34. A square doesn’t make an M whatever the style it’s in. That’s not an IQ test, that’s bad design or rather clumsily pretentious design. They could have chosen two triangles to represent the M but I guess that would’ve been too obvious to keep out the proles, who couldn’t be expected to understand the myriad metaphors and sub-meanings of a turd in a jar.

  35. You want indecipherable? You should check out the the logos for some black metal bands.

  36. It took me some time to decipher the logo on David Bowie’s last album too

  37. @El Dato

    signals a submission (Michel Houellebecq) of aesthetics to mathematics and natural sciences.
     
    OKSign.jpg

    As mathematics at least is essentially driven by aesthetics, I'm ok with that! (But see this discussion about beauty and HEP: "Lost in Math")

    Natural sciences is driven by aesthetics to a lesser degree as it has to describe real-world phenomena, which, however, often turn out to be aesthetically pleasing, once formalized and purified of ancillary complexity.

    Natural sciences is driven by aesthetics to a lesser degree as it has to describe real-world phenomena, which, however, often turn out to be aesthetically pleasing, once formalized and purified of ancillary complexity.

    That’s correct; and there are some constructivists, who made artworks I like a lot (Max Bill for example).

  38. @anonymous
    Pac-Man is a game for discerning tastes http://www.mejorescasinosonline.mx/wp-content/uploads/Logo-pacman-1.png

    This might be the root cause for the awful lettering.

  39. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    In South Florida it would read “Boca.”

    I was getting ‘Boca’ at first, too. I’m not familiar with LA museums.

  40. There is a very similar looking test for Russianness (regardless of IQ):

    https://pics.livejournal.com/felbert/pic/00e0s72d

    (meaning arse)

  41. A good example of a culturally biased IQ test. Not to mention geographically biased. How many out-of-state American visitors are aware of MOCA? The Getty has name recognition around the country (and the world, in all likelihood), and quite a few people know about the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

    All of this to say that I didn’t recognize that square as an “M” and failed the test.

  42. Museum??? I thought it was a big coffee shop.

  43. Is that a square, or is that a mem?

    Their kah is backwards, though.

    Hell, the whole word is. Perhaps it is like ecnalubmA, meant to be read in a mirror?

    • Replies: @reactionry
    [Caesar's post (which was over my head) sorta' beat me to it, but what the hell]

    Things Go Better With Balfour
    Or: In The Beginning There Was The Logo

    It would seem that Israel is a "haven" for this beyond-smirking Hyman Monamensch:

    http://www.israeli-t.com/hebrew-coca-cola-shirt-416


    See also: I'd like to buy the world a Coke and for me, some "Palestinian" property,
    Things Go Better With Beneš *[Decrees] & [Anders] Breivik

    * See The Turd (Third) Defenestration of Prague
    https://www.radio.cz/en/section/curraffrs/norwegian-gunman-sought-weapons-in-prague

    , @reactionry
    Got Wood?
    (No word of a lie - the name of a guy who used to live across the street was "Richard Wood" - and nope, never greeted him while getting the newspaper with, "Morning, Wood!" - and the name of a mob-ish person who dated my sister-in-law was "Richard Steele")

    This is off-topic, but never got around to replying to a Reg Caesar LOL comment on the Marco Rubio's DNA thread: "Radio ventriloquism isn't very demanding." Googling reminded me that there were *two* Twilight Zone episodes related to wooden dummies, one of which was....drum roll...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caesar_and_Me


    Also see: Man & Superman, Daily Planet, Perry White, Great [Reg] Caesar's post!
    See also: "Kaf/Khaf," Naf Naf Grill
  44. @Sean
    But two digit IQ people can be incredibly good at putting names to faces ect. Arthur Jensen said this kind of Level I, or associative learning is an area in which blacks are, on average, clearly superior to whites, and I suppose the same is often true of artists relative to art critics.

    Weekend Australian's 'Review' headlined a thought-provoking essay by Nicolas Rothwell challenging the 'reluctance to criticise and evaluate' Indigenous art, resulting in a 'crisis of authenticity' in both the artform and the market
     

    Arthur Jensen said this kind of Level I, or associative learning is an area in which blacks are, on average, clearly superior to whites

    Pretty sure you are wrong about this. People often spin it that way (dishonestly), but the reality is the W-B difference still appears. It is just smaller. You often see your sentiment expressed with the caveat “after correcting for IQ.” Which is true, but misleading.

    From Jensen’s The nature of the Black–White difference on various psychometric tests: Spearman’s hypothesis
    https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1986-18910-001

    Test W-B Diff. gW gB
    Raven .91σ .80 .82
    Columbia .63σ .77 .74
    Peabody 1.15σ .70 .76
    Benton .65σ .74 .77
    Paired-associates .36σ .60 .50

    Description of the tests:

    five tests: Raven Matrices, Columbia Mental Maturity Scale, Peabody Picture Vocabulary, Benton Visual Retention Test (conceptual memory for designs), and a paired-associates rote learning task.

    • Replies: @Sean
    Jensen said teachers with experience of how much faster that white, new black children at a could learn the names of everyone in their new school were certain he was wrong.

    An important part of the brain involved in reading is the face recognition area

    https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2013/05/24/face-blindness/

    In 2006, Ingo Kennerknecht and associates published a study indicating that about 2.5% of people in Germany had a hereditary, congenital form of prosopagnosia (face blindness). Looking at the pattern of occurrence in families, they concluded that it is inherited as an autosomal dominant.

    That’s strange. Once in a while, a recessive allele with negative effects in homozygotes can get that common – for example, malaria defenses like sickle-cell. In a case like that, big disadvantage in homozygotes are balanced by smaller (still sizeable) advantages in heterozygotes. The frequency of the sickle-cell allele stabilizes at an intermediate frequency, say 10%.

    But here, the negative effects are in heterozygotes. There’s no way that they could be balanced by advantages in homozygotes, which are much rarer.

    So how can prosopagnosia exist at such a high frequency?
     
    There is a price to be paid for everything.
  45. @Dave Pinsen
    Remembering faces is a big part of written police tests.

    In the movie Snake Eyes, its utility is dramatized when Nicholas Cage’s slacker cop character rises to the occasion.

    Remembering faces is a big part of written police tests.

    Any idea if that is a recent development? I ask because it is a good way of minimizing the W-B test difference. And I wonder if it may have been added (or given increased emphasis) to that end.

  46. @Reg Cæsar
    Is that a square, or is that a mem?


    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/15/63/89/1563898093574f9581ad963238d7991f.jpg


    Their kah is backwards, though.


    https://www.hebrew4christians.com/Grammar/Unit_One/Aleph-Bet/Kaf/kaf-h.gif


    Hell, the whole word is. Perhaps it is like ecnalubmA, meant to be read in a mirror?

    [Caesar’s post (which was over my head) sorta’ beat me to it, but what the hell]

    Things Go Better With Balfour
    Or: In The Beginning There Was The Logo

    It would seem that Israel is a “haven” for this beyond-smirking Hyman Monamensch:

    http://www.israeli-t.com/hebrew-coca-cola-shirt-416

    See also: I’d like to buy the world a Coke and for me, some “Palestinian” property,
    Things Go Better With Beneš *[Decrees] & [Anders] Breivik

    * See The Turd (Third) Defenestration of Prague
    https://www.radio.cz/en/section/curraffrs/norwegian-gunman-sought-weapons-in-prague

  47. @res

    Arthur Jensen said this kind of Level I, or associative learning is an area in which blacks are, on average, clearly superior to whites
     
    Pretty sure you are wrong about this. People often spin it that way (dishonestly), but the reality is the W-B difference still appears. It is just smaller. You often see your sentiment expressed with the caveat "after correcting for IQ." Which is true, but misleading.

    From Jensen's The nature of the Black–White difference on various psychometric tests: Spearman's hypothesis
    https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1986-18910-001

    Test W-B Diff. gW gB
    Raven .91σ .80 .82
    Columbia .63σ .77 .74
    Peabody 1.15σ .70 .76
    Benton .65σ .74 .77
    Paired-associates .36σ .60 .50
     
    Description of the tests:

    five tests: Raven Matrices, Columbia Mental Maturity Scale, Peabody Picture Vocabulary, Benton Visual Retention Test (conceptual memory for designs), and a paired-associates rote learning task.
     

    Jensen said teachers with experience of how much faster that white, new black children at a could learn the names of everyone in their new school were certain he was wrong.

    An important part of the brain involved in reading is the face recognition area

    https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2013/05/24/face-blindness/

    In 2006, Ingo Kennerknecht and associates published a study indicating that about 2.5% of people in Germany had a hereditary, congenital form of prosopagnosia (face blindness). Looking at the pattern of occurrence in families, they concluded that it is inherited as an autosomal dominant.

    That’s strange. Once in a while, a recessive allele with negative effects in homozygotes can get that common – for example, malaria defenses like sickle-cell. In a case like that, big disadvantage in homozygotes are balanced by smaller (still sizeable) advantages in heterozygotes. The frequency of the sickle-cell allele stabilizes at an intermediate frequency, say 10%.

    But here, the negative effects are in heterozygotes. There’s no way that they could be balanced by advantages in homozygotes, which are much rarer.

    So how can prosopagnosia exist at such a high frequency?

    There is a price to be paid for everything.

    • Replies: @res

    Jensen said ...
     
    Statements like "Jensen said" are much more compelling when they contain an actual reference. And failing that, just being grammatically correct with the rest would help.

    There is a price to be paid for everything.
     
    Alternatively, sometimes mutational load is what matters.

    Do you actually know anything about this topic or are you just spouting off? I'm guessing the latter given your comments, but feel free to prove me wrong.
  48. @Reg Cæsar
    Is that a square, or is that a mem?


    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/15/63/89/1563898093574f9581ad963238d7991f.jpg


    Their kah is backwards, though.


    https://www.hebrew4christians.com/Grammar/Unit_One/Aleph-Bet/Kaf/kaf-h.gif


    Hell, the whole word is. Perhaps it is like ecnalubmA, meant to be read in a mirror?

    Got Wood?
    (No word of a lie – the name of a guy who used to live across the street was “Richard Wood” – and nope, never greeted him while getting the newspaper with, “Morning, Wood!” – and the name of a mob-ish person who dated my sister-in-law was “Richard Steele”)

    This is off-topic, but never got around to replying to a Reg Caesar LOL comment on the Marco Rubio’s DNA thread: “Radio ventriloquism isn’t very demanding.” Googling reminded me that there were *two* Twilight Zone episodes related to wooden dummies, one of which was….drum roll…

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caesar_and_Me

    Also see: Man & Superman, Daily Planet, Perry White, Great [Reg] Caesar’s post!
    See also: “Kaf/Khaf,” Naf Naf Grill

  49. @Anon1
    A square looks like an M?

    Seems like whoever designed this has a 2 digit IQ.

    They probably also drop a lot of LSD.

    That’s what I think, but I guess the intent was to have the three basic geometric shapes – square, circle and triangle (rudimentary artistic concepts) – in the acronym.

    I personally think that the cryptic often veers towards stupidity. Kind of like gang signs and slang.

  50. Speaking of logos, what is the Amazon logo supposed to be…a smiley phallic?

  51. @bomag
    The ancient Greeks tended to view geometry in religious terms; I see this as a kind of reverence: holy Geometry used to grace the lettering of a museum name.

    You may view it as a "c", but I see a fancy toroidal unit.

    It's all good, man. All good.

  52. I thought it was a coffee shop.

  53. try this on your nigerian bodybuilder “friends” steve.

    i assume it stands for MOCA which i assume stands for “Museum of Contemporary Art”.

    BUT ALL ART AFICIONADOS HAVE LOW IQs.

    do i get a prize?

  54. if i’m right about what it stands for then it’s a demonstration of the low IQ of the person who designed it as the “O” should be lower case.

    is gallagher into art?

  55. I got it in under one second.

    MOCA is a fun date. It features lotsa high-concept garbage that tests one allusive and associative faculties. The pieces are really stupid, it’s a smorgasbord of low-hanging fruit for the comedy-minded — the jokes write themselves. I think the museum might be some kind of Dadaist inside-joke.

    I went on Free Tuesdays (or maybe it’s Thursdays) and there was a young Mexican dude wearing a “Fuck Surenos” T-shirt accompanied by his hoochie-mama chola girlfriend.

    Low-IQ Tuesdays, everybody!

    LIQT @ MOCA

  56. The decline and fall of effective logo design may have begun with the MIT Press logo: http://www.elischiff.com/blog/2016/4/12/do-almost-anything

    “Cooper made the decision to simplify the logo by arbitrarily omitting all horizontal lines–having done so, the form could just as easily be read as ‘imlji,’ ‘nnlji,’ ‘uolp,’ or ‘oulji,’ among many other possibilities. By design, the logo cannot stand meaningfully on its own. Strangely enough, this became part of the charm of the logo for those in the modern minimalist establishment, for whom ambiguity is a virtue.”

  57. @Faraday's Bobcat
    Why hasn't there been an organized protest over the Columbia Sportswear logo, which looks Exactly Like A Swastika? It seems like a great cause and a rich source of news clicks in this our age of total fuckin' stupidity.
  58. @Sean
    Jensen said teachers with experience of how much faster that white, new black children at a could learn the names of everyone in their new school were certain he was wrong.

    An important part of the brain involved in reading is the face recognition area

    https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2013/05/24/face-blindness/

    In 2006, Ingo Kennerknecht and associates published a study indicating that about 2.5% of people in Germany had a hereditary, congenital form of prosopagnosia (face blindness). Looking at the pattern of occurrence in families, they concluded that it is inherited as an autosomal dominant.

    That’s strange. Once in a while, a recessive allele with negative effects in homozygotes can get that common – for example, malaria defenses like sickle-cell. In a case like that, big disadvantage in homozygotes are balanced by smaller (still sizeable) advantages in heterozygotes. The frequency of the sickle-cell allele stabilizes at an intermediate frequency, say 10%.

    But here, the negative effects are in heterozygotes. There’s no way that they could be balanced by advantages in homozygotes, which are much rarer.

    So how can prosopagnosia exist at such a high frequency?
     
    There is a price to be paid for everything.

    Jensen said …

    Statements like “Jensen said” are much more compelling when they contain an actual reference. And failing that, just being grammatically correct with the rest would help.

    There is a price to be paid for everything.

    Alternatively, sometimes mutational load is what matters.

    Do you actually know anything about this topic or are you just spouting off? I’m guessing the latter given your comments, but feel free to prove me wrong.

    • Replies: @Sean
    https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/23d9/2d72793ac8677124dd7a8b1872f88786c0fd.pdf
  59. @Faraday's Bobcat
    Why hasn't there been an organized protest over the Columbia Sportswear logo, which looks Exactly Like A Swastika? It seems like a great cause and a rich source of news clicks in this our age of total fuckin' stupidity.

    It can’t be a swastika. One leg always has to go the wrong to way to qualify.

  60. @AnotherGuessModel
    Read the OCA part right away, but couldn't figure out the M. Maybe if you live in LA and are familiar with MOCA, you can work out the M as part of a puzzle.

    Is the ability to read ambigrams also a sort of IQ test? There is a popular retail store in Europe called Oysho that used to have a font that turned the name into an ambigram. It was clever and very elegant to look at.

    But it seems the branding wasn't legible enough for shoppers, because in recent years both its website and stores write OYSHO with capitals.

    And then there’s French Connection United Kingdom, affectionately known as FCUK.

  61. @res

    Jensen said ...
     
    Statements like "Jensen said" are much more compelling when they contain an actual reference. And failing that, just being grammatically correct with the rest would help.

    There is a price to be paid for everything.
     
    Alternatively, sometimes mutational load is what matters.

    Do you actually know anything about this topic or are you just spouting off? I'm guessing the latter given your comments, but feel free to prove me wrong.
    • Replies: @res
    So you at least have some knowledge here. Good. That makes it worth continuing the conversation. Including the actual quote substantiating your point would have been even better, but I am willing to do my own work.

    Here are your original assertions for context:


    Arthur Jensen said this kind of Level I, or associative learning is an area in which blacks are, on average, clearly superior to whites
    ...
    Jensen said teachers with experience of how much faster that white, new black children at a could learn the names of everyone in their new school were certain he was wrong.

     

    The second is clearly garbled (perhaps you could clarify?) so I will focus on the first.

    In that paper I see the following relevant excerpts:

    Previous studies (listed above) have found highly significant interactions of Level I and II abilities with ethnic groups. In general, the ethnic groups (white, black, Mexican) differ from one another on the average, much less (or even hardly at all) in Level I ability than in Level II ability, on which these groups differ quite markedly, usually by about one standard deviation or more.

     

    OK. That roughly takes the form of the point I made above about "after correcting for IQ" so let's keep looking.

    Figure 1 is a plot of Level II vs. Level I results for each race. Which clearly shows blacks are not superior to whites in average Level I ability.

    Table 3 gives actual numbers for the differences (in SD units). There we see that the W-B difference for Level I is 0.27 and for Level II is 1.13 (similar to the numbers I showed in my earlier Jensen excerpt). Thus not only aren't blacks "clearly superior" to whites in Level I (which you asserted), they are actually 0.27 SD worse on average.

    So you made exactly the error I originally postulated. And then doubled down on it.

    I guess you are the type of person who thinks linking to a paper will send me away because I can't understand it. Wrong.

    P.S. Thanks for the link to an interesting paper!
  62. @Sean
    https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/23d9/2d72793ac8677124dd7a8b1872f88786c0fd.pdf

    So you at least have some knowledge here. Good. That makes it worth continuing the conversation. Including the actual quote substantiating your point would have been even better, but I am willing to do my own work.

    Here are your original assertions for context:

    Arthur Jensen said this kind of Level I, or associative learning is an area in which blacks are, on average, clearly superior to whites

    Jensen said teachers with experience of how much faster that white, new black children at a could learn the names of everyone in their new school were certain he was wrong.

    The second is clearly garbled (perhaps you could clarify?) so I will focus on the first.

    In that paper I see the following relevant excerpts:

    Previous studies (listed above) have found highly significant interactions of Level I and II abilities with ethnic groups. In general, the ethnic groups (white, black, Mexican) differ from one another on the average, much less (or even hardly at all) in Level I ability than in Level II ability, on which these groups differ quite markedly, usually by about one standard deviation or more.

    OK. That roughly takes the form of the point I made above about “after correcting for IQ” so let’s keep looking.

    Figure 1 is a plot of Level II vs. Level I results for each race. Which clearly shows blacks are not superior to whites in average Level I ability.

    Table 3 gives actual numbers for the differences (in SD units). There we see that the W-B difference for Level I is 0.27 and for Level II is 1.13 (similar to the numbers I showed in my earlier Jensen excerpt). Thus not only aren’t blacks “clearly superior” to whites in Level I (which you asserted), they are actually 0.27 SD worse on average.

    So you made exactly the error I originally postulated. And then doubled down on it.

    I guess you are the type of person who thinks linking to a paper will send me away because I can’t understand it. Wrong.

    P.S. Thanks for the link to an interesting paper!

    • Replies: @Sean
    The link was an afterthought but I already have lost two much longer and ones short that this replies to you so I have gone to some trouble over this and would like you to stop complaining.

    Jensen said three decades ago in an interview in a magazine (Psychology Today I think) that many teachers were sure he was wrong because they had seen black children at a new school be able to to put a name to the face of a hundred other kids far faster that white children could.

    IMO this is a kind of social skill not exactly rote learning because there is a part of the brain specializing in recognizing faces, it is the same one used in reading. You may think mutational load explains low black IQ but it seems to me that blacks are quite extroverted, and STEM geniuses are nerdy, on average.
  63. The message this logo sends is: If you’ve got a 2 digit IQ, we’re not for you.

    Or they found out that it is very difficult to trademark four normal letters from the alphabet.
    Logos are not made to be read, but to be recognized and acknowledged. Even 2 digits can, after some training, recognize this.

  64. @res
    So you at least have some knowledge here. Good. That makes it worth continuing the conversation. Including the actual quote substantiating your point would have been even better, but I am willing to do my own work.

    Here are your original assertions for context:


    Arthur Jensen said this kind of Level I, or associative learning is an area in which blacks are, on average, clearly superior to whites
    ...
    Jensen said teachers with experience of how much faster that white, new black children at a could learn the names of everyone in their new school were certain he was wrong.

     

    The second is clearly garbled (perhaps you could clarify?) so I will focus on the first.

    In that paper I see the following relevant excerpts:

    Previous studies (listed above) have found highly significant interactions of Level I and II abilities with ethnic groups. In general, the ethnic groups (white, black, Mexican) differ from one another on the average, much less (or even hardly at all) in Level I ability than in Level II ability, on which these groups differ quite markedly, usually by about one standard deviation or more.

     

    OK. That roughly takes the form of the point I made above about "after correcting for IQ" so let's keep looking.

    Figure 1 is a plot of Level II vs. Level I results for each race. Which clearly shows blacks are not superior to whites in average Level I ability.

    Table 3 gives actual numbers for the differences (in SD units). There we see that the W-B difference for Level I is 0.27 and for Level II is 1.13 (similar to the numbers I showed in my earlier Jensen excerpt). Thus not only aren't blacks "clearly superior" to whites in Level I (which you asserted), they are actually 0.27 SD worse on average.

    So you made exactly the error I originally postulated. And then doubled down on it.

    I guess you are the type of person who thinks linking to a paper will send me away because I can't understand it. Wrong.

    P.S. Thanks for the link to an interesting paper!

    The link was an afterthought but I already have lost two much longer and ones short that this replies to you so I have gone to some trouble over this and would like you to stop complaining.

    Jensen said three decades ago in an interview in a magazine (Psychology Today I think) that many teachers were sure he was wrong because they had seen black children at a new school be able to to put a name to the face of a hundred other kids far faster that white children could.

    IMO this is a kind of social skill not exactly rote learning because there is a part of the brain specializing in recognizing faces, it is the same one used in reading. You may think mutational load explains low black IQ but it seems to me that blacks are quite extroverted, and STEM geniuses are nerdy, on average.

    • Replies: @res

    The link was an afterthought but I already have lost two much longer and ones short that this replies to you so I have gone to some trouble over this and would like you to stop complaining.
     
    You must be kidding. You keep making unsubstantiated assertions invoking Jensen as an authority and then when you finally post a link it supports me. And you want me to stop complaining?!

    Jensen said three decades ago in an interview in a magazine (Psychology Today I think) that many teachers were sure he was wrong because they had seen black children at a new school be able to to put a name to the face of a hundred other kids far faster that white children could.
     
    Without a reference to his exact words this is worthless. I have already shown how his research (including your citation!) does not support what you are saying about Level I skills.

    IMO this is a kind of social skill not exactly rote learning because there is a part of the brain specializing in recognizing faces, it is the same one used in reading. You may think mutational load explains low black IQ but it seems to me that blacks are quite extroverted, and STEM geniuses are nerdy, on average.
     
    Don't try to put words into my mouth. You clearly don't understand this topic well enough to do so.

    I don't think mutational load explains low black IQ. I think that is explained by differing frequencies of IQ alleles along with some environmental differences (relative magnitudes of each unclear as of yet).

    And then you redirect to blacks are extroverted and STEM geniuses are nerds?! What do extroversion and nerdiness have to do with the question of which groups have better Level I skills?

    Go ahead and celebrate black extroversion if you like, but don't confuse it with Level I skills.
  65. To me it says “Loca” which is the feminine of crazy. But it’s usual meaning is “boy crazy.” It is also used in Spanish to mean, Homosexual.

    You’re welcome.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

    It is also used in Spanish to mean, Homosexual

     

    Which Spanish dialect? The slang I've heard is "pato" or "maricon."
  66. @Sean
    The link was an afterthought but I already have lost two much longer and ones short that this replies to you so I have gone to some trouble over this and would like you to stop complaining.

    Jensen said three decades ago in an interview in a magazine (Psychology Today I think) that many teachers were sure he was wrong because they had seen black children at a new school be able to to put a name to the face of a hundred other kids far faster that white children could.

    IMO this is a kind of social skill not exactly rote learning because there is a part of the brain specializing in recognizing faces, it is the same one used in reading. You may think mutational load explains low black IQ but it seems to me that blacks are quite extroverted, and STEM geniuses are nerdy, on average.

    The link was an afterthought but I already have lost two much longer and ones short that this replies to you so I have gone to some trouble over this and would like you to stop complaining.

    You must be kidding. You keep making unsubstantiated assertions invoking Jensen as an authority and then when you finally post a link it supports me. And you want me to stop complaining?!

    Jensen said three decades ago in an interview in a magazine (Psychology Today I think) that many teachers were sure he was wrong because they had seen black children at a new school be able to to put a name to the face of a hundred other kids far faster that white children could.

    Without a reference to his exact words this is worthless. I have already shown how his research (including your citation!) does not support what you are saying about Level I skills.

    IMO this is a kind of social skill not exactly rote learning because there is a part of the brain specializing in recognizing faces, it is the same one used in reading. You may think mutational load explains low black IQ but it seems to me that blacks are quite extroverted, and STEM geniuses are nerdy, on average.

    Don’t try to put words into my mouth. You clearly don’t understand this topic well enough to do so.

    I don’t think mutational load explains low black IQ. I think that is explained by differing frequencies of IQ alleles along with some environmental differences (relative magnitudes of each unclear as of yet).

    And then you redirect to blacks are extroverted and STEM geniuses are nerds?! What do extroversion and nerdiness have to do with the question of which groups have better Level I skills?

    Go ahead and celebrate black extroversion if you like, but don’t confuse it with Level I skills.

  67. @Tim
    To me it says "Loca" which is the feminine of crazy. But it's usual meaning is "boy crazy." It is also used in Spanish to mean, Homosexual.

    You're welcome.

    It is also used in Spanish to mean, Homosexual

    Which Spanish dialect? The slang I’ve heard is “pato” or “maricon.”

    • Replies: @Bizarro World Observer
    Or, in Mexico, "joto".
  68. As long as we’re dumbing things down, just remember that in Spanish “moca” is the feminine form of “moco”, which means … booger.

  69. @Rosamond Vincy

    It is also used in Spanish to mean, Homosexual

     

    Which Spanish dialect? The slang I've heard is "pato" or "maricon."

    Or, in Mexico, “joto”.

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