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From The Atlantic:

Worry About the Black Students Who Get In

I’m concerned for the kids continually locked out of elite schools. I’m equally concerned for those about to enter them.

APR 22, 2019
Kimberly Reyes
Author of the upcoming poetry book Running to Stand Still

A few weeks back, when New York City announced the minuscule number of black students admitted to its elite specialized high schools, the report generated the usual dialogues around how the system is broken and what, if anything, can be done to fix it. There is no doubt that the numbers are abysmal: Only 12 black students scored high enough on the citywide test to win a seat at my alma mater, Bronx Science, and just seven to Stuyvesant. While I’m concerned for the black students continually locked out of these spaces, I’m equally concerned for those about to enter them. Remembering my academic career as a black kid in mostly nonblack settings, I’m exhausted for them. …

More than anything, I wanted to fit in, to be like the other kids, except when singularity was deserved, in the form of academic recognition. Neither wish was granted. I was a top performer in my mostly white and Asian elementary school in Queens, coming in first or second on standardized tests most years. Yet at my sixth-grade graduation, I wasn’t acknowledged. I watched my nonblack competitors walk away with about a dozen awards each. Meanwhile, I spent the ceremony crying, confused, and enraged in pink polyester tulle. My favorite teacher tried to calm me down by explaining that I just didn’t have the same “leadership skills” as my peers.

The writing had always been on the wall, or at least in the comments section of my report cards. My kindergarten teacher noted that although I was perhaps her most gifted student, I was too serious and diligent at that age, and didn’t play enough. “Sassy” was written on most of my subsequent report cards. My grades were consistently exceptional, as was my classroom participation, but I was “sassy,” the post-civil-rights equivalent of “uppity.” The mixed feedback was confounding: Speak more, speak up, speak less …

I also remember two instances when white male teachers screamed at me in physically threatening ways that reduced me to tears. Once it was because I spoke too loudly in class. (I guess black voices carry.) The other time, I repeated a joke that an Asian friend had told, something “sassy” but unserious about being too emotional to handle class. When I began to leave—I thought obviously in jest—I was again screamed at, within an inch of my face, and forced to leave, shaking, as my stunned classmates—including my Asian friend—watched.

And so forth and so on.

How much of Wokeness is just an excuse for rehashing ancient personal grievances under the guise of condemning whites or men or, ideally, white men?

 
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  1. newrouter says:

    >but I was “sassy,” the post-civil-rights equivalent of “uppity.” The mixed feedback was confounding: Speak more, speak up, speak less …”dunnit nuthing” privilege speaks! oh lordy<

  2. I’d love to hear classmates’ and teachers’ versions of these events.

  3. Dan Hayes says:

    It all started in 1619 and shows no signs of abating – actually it’s accelerating.

    And well-deserved infamy to those who profited from their transgressions. The rest of us are paying the price of their good fortune!

  4. Danindc says:

    Not to mention it’s total bs. People bend over backward to recognize black academic achievement. Nobody here believes this bs right???

    • Agree: Prodigal son
  5. anon[786] • Disclaimer says:

    When I began to leave—I thought obviously in jest—I was again screamed at, within an inch of my face, and forced to leave, shaking, as my stunned classmates—including my Asian friend—watched.

    So was she an inch away from the teacher when she got up to leave, or did he run over so he could scream directly in her face?

    Was her teacher R Lee Ermey? Because that’s really the only way I can visualize this.

  6. songbird says:

    I’m calling it: They never called her “sassy” or screamed within an inch of her face. Nor was she a “top” performer. I don’t doubt that she was an obnoxious, disruptive loudmouth though.

    • Agree: jim jones
  7. Flip says:

    It sounds like Michelle Obama complaining that people said she didn’t score well enough on the SAT to deserve to be at Princeton.

  8. CTD says:

    I have sympathy for her. On the right hand side of the bell curve, but still stymied by hidden cultural codes no one explained to her.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  9. Anonymous[298] • Disclaimer says:

    If you want to imagine a woke future, picture your wife’s endless pointless meandering bitchfests about her friends/family/coworkers…all the time, everywhere, forever

    • LOL: YetAnotherAnon
  10. TheBoom says:
    @TheBoom

    NYT tweet

    The New York Times
    @nytimes
    Mobs of Christian men in Sri Lanka have been threatening and beating Muslims, dozens of residents said. “They even beat my kids,” said a Pakistani refugee who has lived in Sri Lanka for 2 years.

  11. She sounds pretty sassy.

  12. AKAHorace says:

    Part of the problem may be that as teachers have less and less power to overtly discipline students they may start using marks as a way of punishing bad behaviour. This may have been what happened to Reyes.

    If students are assessed by externally marked exams there is a clearer distinction between academic ability and classroom behaviour.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  13. From her Linkedin page, I see she went to Lehigh for college. Lehigh? Something about her self-reported standardized test prowess doesn’t stack up. If what she says about herself is true, she’d have been one of those kids that gets accepted at all eight Ivy League schools, with full scholarship to boot.

    Maybe she suffered a head injury somewhere along the way… Or maybe she’s lying.

  14. J.Ross says: • Website

    She scored better than anyone else at a competitive school and got no recognition of any kind? My executive consultancy panel of aerobics instructors insists on telling me, after I asked them to change their answer to something more polite, that she’s lying. Now, why would they say that?

  15. Moses says:
    @International Jew

    Or maybe she’s lying.

    And maybe the sea lies below the clouds.

  16. Wilkey says:
    @TheBoom

    “They even beat my kids,” said a Pakistani refugee who has lived in Sri Lanka for 2 years.

    A Muslim “refugee” from Pakistan in Sri Lanka?

    1) Why are Muslim-majority countries creating Muslim refugees?

    2) When Muslims wind up fleeing their home countries why do so many of them move to non-Muslim countries, rather than to any one of ~50 countries in the world with Muslim majorities?

    3) If they’d prefer not to live in any of the world’s ~50 Muslim-majority countries perhaps that’s reason to question why they want to remain Muslim.

    • Agree: bomag
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Anon
  17. Lot says:

    “I’m exhausted for them.”

    Emotional labor is almost as tiring as writing poetry that doesn’t have rhyme or meter.

    “More than Pop Tarts or Bruce Banner,
    my mom’s quick wit was my gift,
    our shared triumph,
    her beam, still fighting,
    still light in irises
    the color of her skin.

    Hearing her ignite
    through the voice
    of her childhood dog,
    a silent sponge
    for weathering waves
    of the strange hide and seek
    he obediently observed,
    was easy.”

    I am Lot, an oppressor,
    who never quite knows when there should be
    a line break. My mother was a strong
    white woman with a
    Knapsack of privilege, though we called them
    bookbags.

  18. Mr. Anon says:

    OT – Feds raid home and office of the mayor of Baltimore. She’s nowhere to be found:

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-04-25/baltimore-mayor-bolts-pugh-missing-after-fbi-irs-raid

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  19. Anonymous[299] • Disclaimer says:
    @Wilkey

    Muslims should live in Muslim countries. Full stop.

  20. Anon[346] • Disclaimer says:

    Something smells in that piece.

    More than anything, I wanted to fit in, to be like the other kids, except when singularity was deserved, in the form of academic recognition. Neither wish was granted. I was a top performer in my mostly white and Asian elementary school in Queens, coming in first or second on standardized tests most years. Yet at my sixth-grade graduation, I wasn’t acknowledged. I watched my nonblack competitors walk away with about a dozen awards each. Meanwhile, I spent the ceremony crying, confused, and enraged in pink polyester tulle. My favorite teacher tried to calm me down by explaining that I just didn’t have the same “leadership skills” as my peers.

    Is she talking about the New York State English Language Arts and Mathematics tests? How would she know that she was first or second? Were they publicly ananouncing results by name back then, rather than sending numerical results home to parents?

    And in the sixth grade she would only have been assessed four times, since third grade, so “most years” means three times she was first or second?

    There was an academic awards ceremony and she got nothing besides being first or second? Because “leadership skills” were encluded in the definition of “academics”? And others got 12 or more awards each? Something’s missing here. How the hell many awards did they issue? A hundred? Would they be basing school awards on (probably confidential) standardized testing results (where her “first or second” claim is fishy)?

    How the heck would multiple kids be getting 12 or more awards each? They must have be very granular awards (“Best long division using three-digit numbers”). Would a teacher tell her she didn’t have “leadership skills”?–unless the award was in fact for leadership and not standardized test results?

    White and Asian boys didn’t want to date a Blacko-Rican girl. Incipient Sailer’s First Law? Boys must be forced to date darker girls!

    Detached and unmotivated, I stopped trying. My parents couldn’t afford private SAT tutors or Princeton Review, things that gave some of my classmates a clear edge. What exactly was the point in competing in this rigged game. I continued to flounder in undergrad, where my anxiety was so severe that at times I couldn’t leave my dorm to go to class. It took more than a decade for me to regain my confidence and academic footing.

    So she was “first or second,” academically, but in her new, hotshot high school she wasn’t, anymore. That’s weird? Why might that me (hint: “big pond,” not tutors). And by college the pond is bigger. The first or second sixth grader is flounding. Anxiety? That’s a genetic condition, Plomin, but expressed here because of university mismatch, probably.

    She wrote another piece in the Atlantic late last year, also to flog her upcoming poetry book:

    Affirmative Action Shouldn’t Be About Diversity
    It should be about reparations—not about the supposedly unique perspectives that minorities would offer white students.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2018/12/affirmative-action-about-reparations-not-diversity/578005/

    I was a 16-year-old student at the Bronx High School of Science, scribbling Concrete Blonde lyrics at my desk, when my English teacher abruptly called on me, without a heads-up or any preparation, to explain my thoughts on the word n***** in Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. As one of two black students in the class, I was expected to enhance the learning experiences of my mostly white counterparts.

    Affirmative action is about helping blacks. Who thinks it’s about helping whites? Are there people that think that people take “diversity” seriously, “Oh, I don’t want my little one harmed by not being exposed to cognitively lower examples of minority students”?

    She goes on about how she “earned my way into Bronx Science.” Come to think of it, what was her score on the entrance exam. More than her elementary school tests, her percentile on the high school exam would tell us where she stood.

  21. I went on a tour of the FBI HQ today. It’s really a Disney World-like visitor’s center at FBI HQ. They stopped giving tours of the real thing after 9/11. They built this visitor’s center only two years ago. It was designed by Smithsonian personnel.

    In any case, at several points they have these recruitment-style posters showcasing the four main job areas in today’s FBI: special agent, intelligence analyst, lab worker, and admin. Perhaps needless to say, none of the four images accompanying those professional categories are of white men.

    But the last exhibit in the center is a photo memorial to the FBI agents killed in the line of duty. I would guess there are 200-300 of them. Included are four white women and one black man. The rest, to a man, are white men.

    Makes you wonder about that disconnect between reality and projected fantasy.

  22. trev006 says:

    There’s something ironic about a black complaining about the “leadership skills” portion of the competition. When objectively measured at universities, minorities and “Special Americans” get an absurd number of Race Points, while whites and Asians are assured their leadership ability is inferior compared to Ben Shapiro.

    Of course, given the huge level of risk- discrimination lawsuits, articles tearing down your school, civil rights investigations- private schools really deserve everything they get if they don’t urgently winnow out all but the most pliant and able NAMs.

  23. Anon7 says:

    “My kindergarten teacher noted that although I was perhaps her most gifted student…” “My grades were consistently exceptional…”

    Endless narcissism.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  24. @TheBoom

    That is just perfect. So obvious. Sheer propaganda, designed, premeditated, and precisely aimed.

    Good catch.

  25. Miss Reyes omits the most shameless act of racism she endured at school: her failure to be named “Most Popular” in her high school year book.

  26. El Dato says:

    except when singularity was deserved, in the form of academic recognition

    It’s exhausting being locked out of a Black Hole forever. You deserve singularity.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  27. Mr. Anon says:
    @Lot

    My mother was a strong
    white woman with a
    Knapsack of privilege, though we called them
    bookbags.

    Pack up your privilege,
    In your invisible knapsack,
    And smirk, smirk, smirk!

  28. This reads very, very closely to the way a trouble-making kid would go to the principal to try and get a teacher in trouble. By law, students attend classes/sessions/whatever-the-word-is where they talk about feelings, did the teacher make you feel bad, on and on.
    I was very skeptical of homeschooling before I became a public school teacher, but I’m a believer now. At least, that is, if a kid has to go to a school with a large black student body. Most Mexicans can get with the program, blacks seem to not be able to. But I’d still go for homeschooling if the financial wherewithal was there.

  29. Alfa158 says:

    Never mind “How much of Wokeness is just an excuse…” The more significant question is how much of what she wrote actually happened? Any of it at all?

    • Replies: @bomag
  30. Alden says:
    @Percy Gryce

    Every recruiting poster I’ve seen for the last 30 years is like that.

  31. @Percy Gryce

    As the Obama administration demonstrated, people of color are pretty good at ignoring the Bill of Rights, spying on political opponents, and intimidating White communities. Maybe the good ol’ FBI just wants more of those people to do its dirty work.

  32. JimB says:

    I was a top performer in my mostly white and Asian elementary school in Queens, coming in first or second on standardized tests most years. Yet at my sixth-grade graduation, I wasn’t acknowledged. I watched my nonblack competitors walk away with about a dozen awards each.

    Proof? A lot of blacks are legends in their own mind. That’s why blacks graduating from Harvard with a degree in Ebonic Rhetoric walk around in Brooks Brothers suits wearing a monocle and sounding like Homer Simpson at a cocktail party trying to impress Mr Burns. The likelihood that Kimberly Reyes was the top of her class is minuscule. When only 12 blacks qualify for 700 spaces in a high school where candidates are admitted based on academic ability only, it is most likely that they are on the sharply rising left tail of the distribution, and highly likely they are among the fifty least qualified students to gain admission.

  33. Your adult life has misfired when you look for any opportunity to publicly crow about how smart you allegedly were back in kindergarten.

  34. @International Jew

    None of the facts are described with enough detail to know what was really going on. That’s intentional. It’s all about her felt experience which, of course, no one is allowed to question.

  35. I spent the ceremony crying, confused, and enraged in pink polyester tulle.

    Well now, if that doesn’t scream ‘leadership material’ I don’t know what does!

    “Sassy” was written on most of my subsequent report cards.

    Liar.

    I also remember two instances when white male teachers screamed at me in physically threatening ways that reduced me to tears.

    Liar. Except I might believe the part about the tears.

    Once it was because I spoke too loudly in class. (I guess black voices carry.)

    I guess certain “sassy” black girls refuse to STFU when the teacher asks them to.

    The other time, I repeated a joke that an Asian friend had told, something “sassy” but unserious about being too emotional to handle class.

    Ha! Sounds like they had you pegged, but sure–pin it on the Asian kid.

  36. J.Ross says: • Website

    Suicides are up in the US but down globally; Pentagon still hopes that men asked to shoot children in illegal wars can be pharmacologically zombified

    Study: Suicide Rates Decline Globally While U.S. Rate Rises

    Declines in suicide rates in China and India accounted for much of the estimated decline, but the rate in the U.S. is on the rise.

    The global suicide rate has declined by nearly a third since 1990, a new report finds, despite high rates and increases in suicide rates in multiple countries, including the United States.

    Using data from the Global Burden of Disease Study of 2016, University of Washington professor and study author Mohsen Naghavi estimated suicide rates by age, sex, location and country development status between 1990 and 2016 for 195 countries and territories. He found that, while the total number of deaths by suicide increased globally in that time period, the age-adjusted suicide mortality rate decreased by 32.7 percent, from 16.6 deaths per 100,000 in 1990 to 11.2 deaths per 100,000 in 2016. There were 817,000 deaths globally from suicide in 2016, according to the report, published Wednesday in The BMJ, a peer-reviewed medical journal.

    “Suicide deaths were in the leading 10 causes of death across eastern Europe, central Europe, high-income Asia Pacific, Australasia and high-income North America,” according to the report. “Whether the decline in suicide mortality is due to suicide prevention activities, or whether it reflects general improvements in population health, warrants further research.”

    But the decline in the global suicide rate draws attention away from countries that have high suicide rates and experienced statistically significant increases in their rates between 1990 and 2016. According to the report, Zimbabwe, Jamaica, Paraguay and Belize all experienced statistically significant increases in their mortality rates from suicide over the time period, and Lesotho (at 39 deaths per 100,000), Lithuania (31), Russia (30.6) and Zimbabwe (27.8) had the highest suicide mortality rates among countries with populations greater than 1 million. Further, suicide rates in the U.S., at 14.0 per 100,000 in 2017, increased by a third since 1999, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, especially among its rural communities.

    Meanwhile, deaths from suicide in China and India – the countries with the highest populations – accounted for 44.2 percent of global suicide deaths in 2016. Both countries experienced significant decreases of 64.1 and 15.2 percent, respectively.

    “Much of the global estimated decline is owing to the large decrease in suicide mortality in China during the study period, and the lower but still important decrease in India,” the study says. “Moreover, although the decrease in suicide mortality has been substantial during the period 1990 to 2016, if current trends continue, only 3 percent of 118 countries will attain the Sustainable Development Goals target to reduce suicide mortality buy one third between 2015 and 2030.”

    Despite the decline pointing toward progress in recent decades, suicide remains a global and preventable public health concern, the report says. Suicide accounts for about 800,000 related deaths annually, according to the World Health Organization.

    Men, younger adults and older adults reportedly have higher rates of suicide than women and middle-aged adults. The rate of suicide among women only exceeded men for the 15 to 19 age group, the study found, though the gap “narrowed between 1990 and 2016 to almost parity in 2016.”

    Overall, suicide deaths are under-reported. Despite reclassifying some death codes to account for misclassification and under-reporting, the researchers admitted that their study could be affected by sociocultural factors, causing results to show lower suicide rates in countries with religious and cultural sanctions against the practice.

    https://archive.fo/QTwGb

  37. I guess black voices carry.

    What exactly causes black voices to carry?

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    , @Laugh Track
  38. @Mr. Anon

    It sounds like the mayor of Baltimore isn’t really on the lam, which is too bad for iSteve Content Generating purposes

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  39. None of this happened as described.

    “Yet at my sixth-grade graduation (!?!!) I wasn’t acknowledged. (sob!)”

    Granted it’s different for boys than for girls, though not by much: I was a nerdy White gentile hyper achiever/overachiever in a working-class NYC outer-boroughs elementary school, and let me tell you, I PRAYED every day to NOT be acknowledged, to be completely ignored, and I /dreaded/ being put on honor rolls or being singled out for /anything/ noteworthy, and all the other nerds felt the same way, and of course you know why.

    The really funny thing was that about circa 5th/6th grade, the teachers just sort of gave up on all the lost-cause hard cases and dumped all those dumb kids on me, making me their “peer to peer” tutor. I had my own classroom in the back of the classroom, trying to teach remedial math and remedial what-not to the f!cking Bowery Boys and the Wu Tang Clan. I quickly figured out they weren’t going to ever learn a damn thing, and so we spent our time designing Death Race 2000-style weaponized death cars. I did their class work for them, and in return, they put the word out on the street that nobody could lay a finger on me. And from that time forward, and for years after, I was legendarily untouchable in da hood.

    Missed my calling, I probably should be teaching game theory.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Dtbb
  40. A few weeks back, when New York City announced the minuscule number of black students admitted to its elite specialized high schools, the report generated the usual dialogues around how the system is broken and what, if anything, can be done to fix it.

    Like our immigration system, everything they want to break they say is broken.

  41. Kyle says:

    Maybe she would have done better being the valedictorian and a mostly black school.

  42. Wow, if I had a quarter for every time a teacher yelled at me … someone tell Frances to lighten up already.

  43. @Anon7

    “My grades were consistently exceptional…”

    I remember being too modest to open any of those dozens of emails from my tutors headed “Outstanding Work“.

    • LOL: bomag
  44. More than anything, I wanted to fit in, to be like the other kids, except when singularity was deserved, in the form of academic recognition.

    More than anything, what I want is for one of these sages to get a sense of balance, and perhaps a does of reality, and maybe a handbook of what adjectives go with which nouns.

  45. Ibound1 says:

    I was a top performer in my mostly white and Asian elementary school in Queens, coming in first or second on standardized tests most years. Yet at my sixth-grade graduation, I wasn’t acknowledged.

    Strange. In my school and my children’s schools, awards were not given for performance on standardized mandated testing in middle school. They were given for performance – actual grades. Not only that, at least in my state, scores on standardized tests were not shared with the class at all. And I am sure that plenty of kids did well on the state tests without winning any awards at graduation. I just don’t know any that cried about it.

  46. @Anon

    According to standardized tests, several of us in my high school class should have had higher GPAs than we did.

  47. @Steve Sailer

    C’mon, “Not On The Underground Railroad” would be a great title for a post!

  48. @El Dato

    No, she’s the one with the Black Hole. Doesn’t sound like “locking out ” was the issue, either.

  49. @Anon

    scribbling Concrete Blonde lyrics

    “I won’t let the monkeys make a mess of me,” perhaps?

    I could never hear the name Janet Napolitano without thinking of Johnette:

  50. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Granted it’s different for boys than for girls

  51. nebulafox says:
    @TheBoom

    I thought they were called “Easter Worshippers” now, though?

    It’s South Asia. Communal violence is a pretty deeply entrenched feature there. The East Asians have a propensity to separate ethnic identity from religious affiliation. The South Asians are precisely the opposite. Just like the Middle East or the Balkans, that means religious conflict takes on a nationalist or identity politics flavor with all the predictable nastiness you’d expect from that.

    In 2002, there was mass communal violence in Gujurat against local Muslims after a train full of Hindu pilgrims was burnt by Islamist radicals: and Modi, with his Hindu nationalist background, is accused of having condoned and encouraged the violence. In 1993, there were anti-Muslim pogroms, as portrayed in Slumdog Millionaire: which were followed by retaliatory Islamist bombings, backed by Dawood Ibrahim and (probably) Pakistan’s ISI. This was all started by a mosque being demolished in a Hindu holy city. The mass anti-Sikh orgy of violence in 1984 was triggered by Indira Gandhi’s assassination by her Sikh bodyguards: which was in turn triggered by her having the army assault Sikhism’s holiest site, which was being occupied by separatist radicals.

    None of these incidents were triggered by anything as bloody as this. Even the Sikh temple assault-which was an open military attack on their equivalent to the Vatican-probably had less aggregate casualties, if the numbers I read earlier are right.

    So, if you are anything remotely approximating surprised that there are now Christian mobs loose looking for vengeance, you don’t know anything about the subcontinent-and as to be expected, the nebbishkeit-exuding folks at the Grey Lady don’t. They don’t really know anything.

    And you want to know something else? I’ll bet anything I own the Islamist scumbugs who killed all those people were expecting this kind of reaction, and wanted it. The more radicalization, the more counter-radicalization, the more counter-counter-radicalization. This is the kind of thing that ideological nuts fester off of.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  52. @TheBoom

    Christian? What happened to the “Easter Worshippers?”

  53. Dtbb says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Doesn’t elementary school end after fifth grade? It does here now. I am 54 and was in the last 6th grade elementary class.

  54. Thirdtwin says:

    “I was a top performer in my mostly white and Asian elementary school in Queens, coming in first or second on standardized tests most years.”

    She probably was the top performer among her fellow black students. Also, is it NYC school policy to publicly post standardized test scores?

    • Replies: @bomag
  55. peterike says:

    Sailer’s Law of Female Journalism surely applies:

    Also, her idea of “poetry” seems to be stringing words together with no especial purpose.

    On still Saturdays, I’d disappear
    into a plush brown
    love seat in grandmother’s faded beige
    living room. We’d watch white
    dead-eyed, slashers
    expose eager, screaming bodies.
    Jason, Freddy, and Michael-
    masked stowaways
    (I understood to be)
    birthed beneath the red Atlantic,
    explaining gore and the many doors of
    no return to a child, prying
    for a way back home.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Yngvar
  56. peterike says:

    This is a complete “poem” published by Ms. Reyes. Keats it ain’t.

    Intermission
    by Kimberly Reyes

    When they’ve had you before they’ve met you it’s difficult to decide on which terms they can have you and look pretty when you smile.

  57. @nebulafox

    Whoms are Easter Worshippers.

    Whos are Christians.

    Western supremacism in a nutshell.

  58. Flemur says:

    coming in first or second on standardized tests most years

    They show elementary school children the test scores of other children?

    That didn’t happen.

    Anyway, compare Kimberly Reyes’ trivial and probably mostly false complaints with Asians brutalized by blacks and Hispanics in the inner-cities of America
    by the
    Chinese Girl in the Ghetto

  59. Arclight says:

    What are the odds that like many high IQ people she’s slightly spergy and misses a lot of social cues others are sending, which results in uncomfortable social situations now and again?

  60. ic1000 says:
    @Anon

    anon[346]: “Something smells in that piece.”

    The masthead of The Atlantic features 38 people with “Editor” in their title. What do they do? Which one was tasked with repairing sassy Kimberley Reye’s submission?

    Get me rewrite. On second thought — intellectuals of this ilk can recognize the Albert-Hall-filling holes in Kimberley’s story. Not a big challenge.

    It must be discouraging to work at today’s Atlantic, a servant of clickbait world.

    If something doesn’t repel our target demographic, it ain’t broke. So don’t fix it.

  61. OT:

    PARIS (Reuters) – The Ecole Nationale d’Administration has for decades churned out presidents, ambassadors and industry leaders but on Thursday, President Emmanuel Macron said he would abolish what has become a symbol of inequality in his drive for a fairer society.

    The president’s eye-catching move against his own prestigious alma mater …

    “There are two types of Enarques: the top 15 and then the rest,” said historian Marc-Olivier Baruch, who studied at the ENA nearly 40 years ago. “The top 15 know they will be the bosses of the rest, and the rest know they will obey the 15.”

    Shutting down the ENA is unlikely to solve France’s two-tier education system, as students continue to pass through other grandes ecoles – highly competitive institutions that sit apart from the broader university system.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-france-macron-ena/frances-macron-to-shut-elite-ena-school-in-drive-for-fairness-idUSKCN1S12GZ

  62. David says:
    @TheBoom

    Interesting that the readers’ picks are uniformly against the article’s narrative angle. The first one begins,

    Let me get this straight. Hundreds of Christians died of terror attacks on their holiest holiday. While violence is never the right answer, they were understandably upset and sought revenge, but as yet no Muslims have died. Yet the venerable Times has seemed fit to publish an article sympathetic to the terrified … Muslims???

    Which is not to suggest the boot will ever stop stomping.

  63. CCZ says:

    Maybe she had “white nationalist” teachers who unfairly disciplined blacks, like the NAACP representative fears in the below news report.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  64. David says:

    Amherst College has published a “Common Language Guide.”

    https://howiecarrshow.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/11/2019/03/Common-Language-Guide_March-2019-1.pdf

    Example quote, “Reverse Oppression: There is no such thing as reverse oppression.” I searched the name of the office that put it together, “Office of Diversity & Inclusion,” and find there are hundreds of them across the continent. But I suppose you all knew that.

    • Replies: @bomag
  65. How much of Wokeness is just an excuse for rehashing ancient personal grievances under the guise of condemning whites or men or, ideally, white men?

    All of it. Next question.

  66. Here’s some BSS alumni dish from 23 years ago, including re physics teacher Peter Melzer, who was canned for his orientation, then appeared in ChickenHawk a few years later:

    https://groups.google.com/forum/m/#!topic/alt.alumni.bronx-science/2PrCXAT7MeI

  67. @CTD

    I have sympathy for her. On the right hand side of the bell curve, but still stymied by hidden cultural codes no one explained to her.

    Good comment CTD. Like others, i’m guessing the stories she relates aren’t quite accurate. But what is accurate is that she felt like “a fish out of water” racially and culturally as an adolescent.

    People should give this a read:

    Perhaps I should feel lucky that I wasn’t suspended, changing the trajectory of my academic life, which happens all too often to students of color, black children in particular. I remember being more scared and confused than incensed, as I didn’t have the language or perspective to understand where this antagonism was coming from. I couldn’t see the intruder I was to this space. I couldn’t see that I was the inconvenient interruption of race in the school day, and that I was going to continually pay for that. A sense of my seemingly inherent unlikability started to congeal.

    My disorientation was compounded by the fact that I didn’t have black female teachers to ask for support. My mother, who grew up in a neighborhood where most of the women looked like her, could never understand my low self-esteem, which, she told me, was the most unwarranted case she had ever seen.

    I did have one black teacher in high school, a man, and my friends would tease me because they saw me as his pet. While it’s true that he would encourage me to speak up more than other students, I remember thinking he felt as much relief that I was in his classroom as I did. He, too, was the other in that space. I wasn’t his pet; I was his lifeline.

    Ok, i’m a guy not a girl and never felt i required all this “role model” stuff. I had confidence in my smarts (not absolutely, but relative to my fellow humans) and knew i wanted to do physics and learn how the world, the universe worked. I’m not the type to hero worship and slap up a poster of some dude be it Pete Rose or Albert Einstein. (Heck, I’m better looking, with–back then–much nicer hair.)

    But i get that a lot of folks–women in particular–are not like me, are more conforming, value role models, want more hand holding, etc. etc.

    And being a minority–feeling like an outsider–in some environment isn’t great for some people. I think there’s a little psychological “damage”. (Being ruled by people who see themselves as outsiders sure hasn’t been great for the US.)

    I don’t want to hear all this whining–or have it affecting my nation’s politics–but i somewhat understand it. Fish out of water.

    So … let’s put the fish back in the water!

    Let give blacks or Mexicans or Jews or Chinese or Indians or women or men, and yes, even white gentiles, their share of the money and … let them build the schools they want!

    Blacks seem to have a particular resentment on being asked to conform to white “sit still and behave” norms and feel out of place in “white spaces”. Fine. Let black parents setup and run schools that have black teachers and black norms for their kids.

    Girls who feel like the boys don’t take them intellectually seriously while they’re touching up their makeup? I’ve got an incredible new idea: Girls schools! Yes, they could go to school just with other girls where they wouldn’t have to put up with male gaze or mansplaining. Radical, i know, but AnotherDad is a font of breakthrough ideas.

    There is no way to make everyone happy in the same “space”. Diversity creates conflict and contention. That’s what diversity is–difference. Difference in everything–capability and conduct.

    But what we can easily do is let different people and different peoples have their “own spaces” as they would like, where they can organize and live life as they see fit.

    • Agree: Desiderius, Gordo
  68. @Triumph104

    “said historian Marc-Olivier Baruch”

    No further questions, your honor.

    Honestly, it just never, ever stops.

    Every.

    Single.

    F$cking.

    Time.

  69. @International Jew

    This page

    https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/kimberly-reyes

    says that a writer called Kimberly Reyes, who looks pretty black, graduated from Columbia. So those seem to be two different peope.

    • Replies: @International Jew
  70. bomag says:
    @Danindc

    Agree.

    It’s all too pat; My favorite [sixth grade] teacher tried to calm me down by explaining that I just didn’t have the same “leadership skills” as my peers.

    Leadership skills as a metric in the sixth grade? Sounds more like a theme she adopted from the complaints of high scorers who don’t get accepted by Harvard.

  71. bomag says:
    @AnotherDad

    Excellent point, and highlights that this complaining is a form of warfare: we moved into the area; the locals were different than us, but after enough of our constant complaining, they eventually conformed to our aesthetics and ceded the territory to us.

  72. TSOL says:

    Low scoring or “locked out”?? She’s implying blacks should be admitted in spite of their shitty test scores.

  73. Anon[192] • Disclaimer says:
    @TheBoom

    Why is it only “Pakistani refugees” (Ahmadis who have lived in peace among SL Christians, not even among SL Muslims, apparently, when they have been unable to live with standard Pakistani Muslims) who are complaining?

    Is it because actual Sri Lankan Muslims realize that by the standards of Ceylonese communal violence extroadinary forbearance is being shown despite the extremely incendiary fact that hundreds of people were just buried in mass funerals?

    Frankly the comments on the article are encouraging, though.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  74. Anon[192] • Disclaimer says:
    @Wilkey

    1,2, and 3: They’re Ahmadis and other Muslims regard them as heretics. No self-respecting Muslim country would let them in. Apparently they don’t feel comfortable even among Muslims in a Buddhist country, so they are living among Christians.

    As NYT readers have pointed out, the captions on the photos are rather … presumptuous, to say the least.

  75. @Percy Gryce

    Forty-years ago the coolest part of the FBI tour was when they had a G-Man demonstrate a .45ACP Thompson sub-machine gun for the visitors. Only time I’ve ever seen an automatic weapon being used.

    Do they still do that?

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  76. bucky says:

    Basically, blacks saw the attention and adulation heaped upon Jews for their victimhood and copied it.

    Hence, Toni Morrison’s 60 million (10x the Holocaust). The reference point, the center of it all, is the Holocaust.

  77. Anon[192] • Disclaimer says:
    @TheBoom

    Another bizarre thing is that a certain Dharisha Bastians in Sri Lanka is given co-author credit, but if you go to her Twitter page, it’s all about Christian-Muslim solidarity stuff and she cites this thread about the article in question: https://twitter.com/Amaliniii/status/1121280221292969987

    Heavy editorial job maybe? Or am I just misreading?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  78. @Danindc

    Dan, who in grammar school refers to their classmates as “competitors”?

  79. @AKAHorace

    AKA, not being able to discipline kids in school is now, she is talking about a long time ago.

  80. @Lot

    Lot, a Gold Border for you, outstanding work.

  81. bomag says:
    @Triumph104

    …in his drive for a fairer society.

    LOL

    As if anybody different is going to occupy those positions.

    Mao and Zhou would be proud.

  82. bomag says:
    @David

    Office of Diversity & Inclusion

    And every large corporation has them. Their overt purpose is to stop the hiring of White hetero men.

  83. @AnotherDad

    Another, they tried Afrocentric schools in Canada, black faculty and staff. Results were not what the black parents expected.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  84. @Anon

    I also call BS about her being told she didnt have the same “leadership skills” as her Asian peers. Because as we know, Asian kids are known for their people skills and gregariousness.

  85. @Danindc

    They’re reactionaries. They live in the past. That’s why they talk about Emmitt Till so much.

  86. @Buffalo Joe

    Black parents are far more supportive of discipline than administrators and advocates, black or white.

  87. @Anon

    SJWism headed downscale. Will be interesting to see how it all plays out.

  88. I am stark, pasty white. Yet, except for most of my kindergarten year, I have overlapping complaints. I was a white kid, but still had the screaming, control-freak teachers and uncomfortable, polyester togs not of my own choosing, including polyester dresses over equally uncomfortable turtleneck sweaters.

    My complaints stop at being denied my just place in a math / science magnet school due to my math skills (or the lack thereof). Most of my school life revolved around the harsh social scene in schools where nothing was more important than the approval of peers, clothing styles and sports.

    During most of my kindergarten year, my best friend was the most popular—and the blondest—girl in school, so I got an easy ride, basking in her blonde glory. But even there, I did not escape the wrath of the teacher at all moments. The reflected glory of blonde peer goddesses has its limits.

    Despite being quite a few shades lighter than the shade of near-brown white that was popular in the tanning-bed era, my secondary school life unfolded in many shades of miserable.

    Since her bio references a book on poetry, her troubles might have arisen more from her intellectual interests. However difficult it is to pull off, poetry, like other liberal arts and artistic skills, is rarely a marketable skill in adulthood. And artistic skills are rarely given equivalent respect to mathematical & scientific skills in school.

    I can see why she wanted to be with the math / science types, though, especially in youth but even in adulthood since America’s workplaces are mostly a rerun of junior high school. The math / science types are a little less absorbed in the petty trivialites of social life, or so it seems from a distance.

  89. @CCZ

    Enemies of the people.

  90. @LemmusLemmus

    Her Linkedin page mentions Columbia too, but as a grad student. (She has masters degrees from both Columbia and the third-rate San Francisco State.)

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  91. @AnotherDad

    Blacks seem to have a particular resentment on being asked to conform to white “sit still and behave” norms and feel out of place in “white spaces”. Fine. Let black parents setup and run schools that have black teachers and black norms for their kids.

    I had this discussion a few years ago with a black coworker who had an MBA, though his employment at the time was not MBA-related.

    He constantly complained about how difficult it was for black kids like himself in racially integrated schools, and I–not having myself attended schools in the US–suggested that perhaps black kids could get more culturally appropriate education in schools with all black students and teachers, so that teaching styles and standards of student conduct could be tailored for the needs of black students and their families, pointing out that where this situation existed in some of the Caribbean islands, or in Bermuda, where I had once lived, it did not seem to be particularly problematic, and at the very least it would remove the whole question of racism from education.

    However, he did not think this was a good idea.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Anonymous
  92. “(I guess black voices carry.)”

    Yes, black people are loud.

  93. @International Jew

    ” … the third-rate San Francisco State.)”

    Hey. San Francisco State is second-rate; Sacramento State is third-rate. Get your damn facts straight.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  94. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Anon

    Of course reports of helpless Muslims cowering in fear in the mosque lead back to professional activists, of course someone took the time to CAIR.
    There was a little girl in Sweden who starred in a screamingly fake astroturf campaign for environmentalism (because Swedes don’t already care enough about the environment?). Classic tells, like in that professionally shot and edited YouTube video out of Ukraine with the scared-looking telegenic young lady holding a candle. Professional photography and instant talking-up on day one, quick social media pickup by about twenty characters who, impossibly enough, turn out to be the board of a Soros “charity.” One in particular has now been identified as the girl’s handler.
    https://www.nyatider.nu/soros-finansierad-organisation-bakom-klimat-greta/
    http://archive.fo/91IC2
    Really first rate work was done on this by a leftist investigative journalist who is actually sincere in his desire to not be manipulated by billionaires.
    We will not be free until we deal with the foundations and quangos.
    http://www.theartofannihilation.com/the-manufacturing-of-greta-thunberg-for-consent-the-political-economy-of-the-non-profit-industrial-complex/

  95. J.Ross says: • Website
    @peterike

    Why is there a comma between “dead-eyed” and “slashers”? When Vladimir Mayakovsky broke up his sentences it was to
    command
    the reader to use a different emphasis or accomodate a
    pause. Nothing in this piece looks artistically purposeful. Restored to prose, it’s a meaningless self-indulgence. Insofar as it has meaning at all it, raises the question of what she would think of a white person opinionating on black people, when that white person’s introduction to black people had been the art of (that one guy, you know the one, he painted an installation under the Eiffel Tower and literally depicts white genocide fantasies, his name is counterintuitively ordinary and I can neither remember it nor find it in a search).

  96. bomag says:
    @Thirdtwin

    …publicly post standardized test scores?

    Doubtful.

    As you indicate, this is no doubt a massaged memory; maybe told that she was in the top one or two percent (nationwide). Current day poets were seldom the nerdy types who fussed over conquering the tests at the awards level. Besides, those who fuss over winning test competitions know ahead of time who is going to get the prize; they don’t stand around crying on awards day.

    This is far too poetic of a narrative:

    I was told I was the smartest kid in the five boroughs, but on awards day, as I approached the podium, the principal announced that because of holistic reasons, they weren’t giving me the prize. I stopped; frozen in my tracks; unable to process information. My astral essence was floating above the auditorium; lost and broken. I felt the first tear start on my cheek…

  97. bomag says:
    @Alfa158

    …how much of what she wrote actually happened?

    I suspect this poet is a pretty good storyteller.

    Stretching the veracity of things in service to the narrative is no vice in her world.

  98. gp says:

    “I was a top performer in my mostly white and Asian elementary school in Queens, coming in first or second on standardized tests most years.”

    Good! That should be easy to document. Show us the documentation, then I might be interested in your story. (BTW, I’m snowy white, and high test scores never got me sh!t. It’s against the law in the USA to hire based on IQ scores.)

  99. Yngvar says:
    @peterike

    That poem was easy enough to understand.

    Gist: She’d watch slasher films as a kid, but when she finished seeing them, and wanted to be a playful child again, she couldn’t, because she had watched slasher films.

    Analysis: The image of white people doing horrible things rests in a corner of the memory of her own childhood.

    Fix: More Candyman.

  100. Or it could simply be that whites in authority, whites in general feel disposed to exert towards blacks based on the notion that “blacks require more force” on what normative behaviors. The hyperfocus from 200 years of false narratives about blacks engages to ensure the self fulfilling prophecy about blacks. Akin to the excuse of “choke holds” on blacks because they have larger thicker necks.

    Our society has convinced themselves of no small amount of self reinforcing narratives to justify said treatment of the same. Hence an article denigrates a childhood experience experienced by all children as something unique to wokness and then compound the matter with suggestions the author does not make

    as hatred of whites advocacy — she never even hints at the notion. What she does say is the value of similar in appearance demographic by which her experience might be acknowledged or framed in light of.
    ————————

    “I also call BS about her being told she didnt have the same “leadership skills” as her Asian peers.”

    You’ll have to explain how your comment diminishes the accuracy of her experience/recollection.

  101. Ian M. says:

    Anyone remember this Onion article from way back when?

    I Am So Starving vs. I Am So Starving

    Someone should write a similar parody article: “My childhood was traumatized by racism v. My childhood was traumatized by racism”

    Point:

    I grew up a black girl in a tony white neighborhood surrounded by white privilege. I experienced thousands of microaggressions every day at my overwhelmingly white school. One of my teachers told me I was too loud. The basketball coach wanted me to try out for the basketball team. She told me: “You look like you’d be a good basketball player.” Never mind that I hated sports and my passion was writing. But no one ever told me I should write for the school paper or that “you look like you’d be a good writer.” In contrast, my white friend Caitlyn was recruited to write for the school paper, even though I consistently got better grades than she in writing class. The worst though, was when white Becky’s would ask to touch my hair.

    It was all so exhausting. …

    Counterpoint:

    I grew up a white kid in a black neighborhood. I get serious migraines that incapacitate me for several days at a time because of the metal plate permanently inside my head from the time my skull got cracked open on the cement. That was from of a few blacks who decided it would be fun to play the knockout game on me. They shouted “Die, m—–f—— cracker!” right before one of them cold-cocked me, but the authorities assured me that it wasn’t a hate crime. I got beat up at least once a week at school for being white, and sometimes daily. I got knifed once by a black kid because he said I gave him a look. I heard later that he told others that the real reason was because he was pissed that I was dating a white girl who had rejected him. I was in the hospital for a couple weeks for that one. I’m in chronic pain as a result of these and other incidents and am addicted to painkillers now.

    I had dreams of getting married one day, but being a quadriplegic really puts damper on your game. Oh, I didn’t mention that part? That was from a stray bullet that got lodged in my lower spine from the neighbor’s house resulting from some gunplay after an ‘unwanted houseguest’ showed up at their party. I also had dreams of playing Div 1 football. I was a pretty good high school player. Although to be honest, I probably wouldn’t have made it anyway, because Coach just couldn’t believe I was the fastest guy on the team since I was white, and so he started Tyrone over me at corner. But I beat Tyrone in the 40. Coach said I must have cheated.

  102. eggplant says:

    I’m betting she’s a good 80 pounds and 6 inches taller than everyone else as well. Just another oversized “sassy” oaf.

  103. Cato says:
    @TheBoom

    Communal violence. We’re just damn lucky we don’t have it. If they beat your kids, I would bet that you would not rest until they were very, very sorry.

    • Replies: @Anon
  104. Her açcount rings false.

  105. Gordo says:

    More than anything, I wanted to fit in, to be like the other kids,

    I’m worried about the underrepresented White kids trying to fit in with the overrepresented Orientals, Ashkenazim and blacks.

  106. Gordo says:
    @AnotherDad

    But what we can easily do is let different people and different peoples have their “own spaces” as they would like, where they can organize and live life as they see fit.

    Often known as ‘countries’.

  107. JRM says:

    Wow, I was just mulling over the comment in a different article that women were never going to forget the slights (real or imagined) they suffered in Junior High (Middle) School.

    Now, I’ve got to run that back to Kindergarten. We really have no choice but to meditate deeply about this woman’s heroic Kindergarten struggles, when so much promising virtue was nearly snuffed out before it could blossom.

    “Meanwhile, I spent the ceremony crying, confused, and enraged in pink polyester tulle.”

    This sentence should probably be etched in stone and placed somewhere like the base of the Statue of Liberty to become our new National Motto. I can’t think of anything else I’ve read that sums up 21st century America so sensitively.

  108. @ScarletNumber

    What exactly causes black voices to carry?

    The volume dial is turned all the way up. It’s the factory setting, apparently.

  109. NYMOM says:

    This woman writes poetry, yet was accepted into one of NY’s elite ‘science’ schools????

    I don’t get the point of that…

    I think her teachers might have over praised her because she was a minority so she got the impression she was much more advanced than the other pupils in the school…but report cards and grades on projects are very subjective.

    She probably didn’t ever get any actual awards in school because she didn’t merit any compared to other students who were in the class….

  110. NYMOM says:

    Again why does NYC need to expend extra resources to fund elite schools like Bronx Science for someone who is going to become a poet…probably majored in English in college…

    You can go to any high school to eventually become an English major.

    No wonder our city is going broke….

  111. NYMOM says:

    “He constantly complained about how difficult it was for black kids like himself in racially integrated schools, and I–not having myself attended schools in the US–suggested that perhaps black kids could get more culturally appropriate education in schools with all black students and teachers, so that teaching styles and standards of student conduct could be tailored for the needs of black students and their families…”

    I’ve been thinking this for years now…but, of course, if you say it to anyone white or black you are immediately tagged as a racist…

  112. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    If blacks really desired education they would do it through the black churches, which have money, or set up their own charter schools. They have evinced no such tendencies.

    The teacher unions are who block any new ideas from being brought in externally, such as hiring black drill sergeants as assistant principals and disciplinarians.

    • Replies: @Prodigal son
  113. I suspect a majority of students develop feelings of being wronged and lingering resentments against teachers and school. Many get some happy outcome, like a valuable degree and great job prospects, and that really makes it easy to forgive and forget all of their past resentments.

    There are millions of people with this type of old resentment about school, but typically the world doesn’t want to hear it. With racial politics, these typical resentment stories have some political use and get published in relatively mainstream outlets like The Atlantic.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  114. @Massimo Heitor

    You can also get your school age resentments published if you are a really good writer or are famous or both. English schools tended to be awful places plus they tended to turn out famous people who could write well, so, for example, Churchill’s memories of how much he hated school are well-known because he was famous and he was hilarious.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  115. “mostly white and asian” of course she had to mention white first, despite being like 80% asians in the school

  116. @Lot

    “I am Lot, an oppressor,
    who never quite knows when there should be
    a line break.”

    “Lot the Oppressor” has a nice ring to it, like Conan the Barbarian.

  117. @Anonymous

    While the teachers unions do attempt to block charter schools and work to keep enrollment higher at public schools it is the superintendents and school administrators who are to blame for the lack of discipline in the schools. Even union teachers complain about the lack of discipline and would welcome a drill sergeant to keep the kids in line .
    Regardless , we do not have enough former drill sergeants willing to work in our public schools.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Desiderius
  118. @Prodigal son

    If you did the admins would find an excuse not to hire them. Pearson is also universally loathed among teachers while also pushing SJW history (sic) into the curriculum. There are opportunities to peel off significant numbers of teachers if the right issues are addressed. That process has already started with the rollback on the Obama discipline guidance but much more can be done.

  119. “I’m bossy
    I’m the first girl to scream on a track
    I switched up the beat of the drum
    That’s right I brought all the boys to the yard
    And that’s right, I’m the one that’s tattooed on his arm
    I’m bossy
    I’m the bitch ya’ll love to hate
    I’m the chick that’s raised the stake
    I told young stunna he should switch debate
    I’m back with an 808 ’cause I’m bossy”

    Is there an island somewhere we can eventually escape to?

  120. @Joe Stalin

    I saw a guy shoot one at the NRA range one time. It was awesome.

  121. @SunBakedSuburb

    I hate to break this to you, but San Francisco State and Sacramento State are both third rate.

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