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With talk of Russian influence in the news, from the New York Times:

American Fascism, in 1944 and Today
By HENRY SCOTT WALLACE MAY 12, 2017

Seventy-three years ago, The New York Times asked the sitting vice president to write an article about whether there are fascists in America, and what they’re up to.

It was an alarming question. And the vice president took it quite seriously. His article, “The Danger of American Fascism,” described a breed of super-nationalist who pursues political power by deceiving Americans and playing to their fears, but is really interested only in protecting his own wealth and privilege.

That vice president was my grandfather, Henry A. Wallace. And in my view, he predicted President Trump. …

Henry Scott Wallace is a lawyer and a co-chairman of the Wallace Global Fund, a foundation founded by his grandfather.

Of course, Henry A. Wallace, the only geneticist to rise high in American politics, was pretty much of a tool of the Kremlin for much of the 1940s.

The Democratic Party’s big city bosses forced FDR to drop him from the ticket in 1944 and replace him with Harry Truman, a major turning point in the history of WWII. When he ran for President on a 4th party Progressive ticket in 1948, that he was being used by Stalin’s Communist Party as their front man became so obvious that his support collapsed down to a few people in his home region of the upper Midwest and East Coast Communists.

I’m actually fairly sympathetic toward Wallace, who was a man of some talent. A childhood friend of George Washington Carver, he made major advances in breeding improved corn seeds that made him a fortune and a popular man among Midwestern farmers.

As a statesman, making choices in the mid-1940s was difficult, and Wallace, in the 1950s, came to publicly regret his pro-Russian stances and distanced himself from Moscow.

In Taki’s Magazine, Jeffrey Hart wrote a column in 2008 quoting from Marvin Liebman’s autobiography about Wallace’s shameful visit to an outpost of the Gulag Archipelago:

In his autobiography the late Marvin Liebman, a friend of mine, recounts an episode in the Kolyma camp in Siberia, involving then United States Vice President Henry Wallace. (I had heard this story from Marvin before his book appeared.)

“Elinor Lipper told me about the eleven years she spent in the most horrible conditions in Kolyma in Siberia. …

“During the war, a rumor swept Elinor’s camp that the president of the United States was coming. Everything was scrubbed, the watch towers were even taken down. Kolyma now became a vast Potemkin village. But it wasn’t the President who came. It was the vice president Henry A. Wallace. The inmates were gathered together to greet him. Wallace smiled and waved. He was told that this was a camp for incorrigible prisoners who were mentally ill.

“Suddenly, a woman ran from the ranks and threw herself at Wallace’s feet. She screamed in Russian how the prisoners were being treated, how they were dying, how they were innocent, as innocent as the snow at his feet. ‘Please,’ she sobbed, ‘please help us.’

“She was taken away, of course, while Wallace’s translator told him that she was mentally ill and he could not understand what she was saying… I subsequently discovered that Wallace’s translator that day had been Owen Lattimore

Owen Lattimore was a celebrated Old China Hand in the federal government who was later persecuted by anti-Communists for being sympathetic to Mao.

“When we returned to New York in 1952 I arranged for Elinor, at her request, to meet Henry Wallace. I got his number through directory assistance, and he answered the phone himself. I was amazed that it was so easy to et hold of a former vice president of the United States. I told him about Elinor and said she wanted to meet with him. He invited us to his farm in South Salem, New York. She told him what had actually happened that day in Siberia. As she spoke his face paled. ‘I didn’t know,’ he said, ‘I didn’t know – please believe me – I didn’t know’.”

“I saw in him the sense of betrayal that was entangling many of us who had worked with the communists… Now Lattimore was under attack by Sen. Joseph McCarthy for ‘his close association with the communist conspiracy.’ I had been sympathetic to Lattimore’s plight, but when I found out what he had said in Siberia, I felt betrayed by him, too”

So, I think Wallace was more of a tragic dupe of Moscow than a really bad guy.

But, oh, the irony of this oped …

 
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  1. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Steve,

    How many people are going to even be aware of the story you just wrote? I would hope you post a comment at the NY Times with a link to what you just wrote.

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  2. Flip says:

    The NY Times is really cranking it up these days, what with having a communist’s grandson accuse Trump of being a fascist and a leftist professor telling whites that miscegenation will save them from being displaced. It is hard to believe that they really think this way, but it seems they do.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    and a leftist professor telling whites that miscegenation will save them from being displaced
     
    Link?
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  3. Dan Hayes says:

    Steve,

    In one of his book (perhaps the Gulag Archipelago), Solzhenitsyn described a bunch of credulous American visitors to a sham Soviet Potemkin Village prison camp which was “renovated” for the visitors. Among the willingly duped visitors were Eleanor Roosevelt and a bunch of Quakers.

    When I read this my respect and admiration for Solzhenitsyn soared!

    Read More
    • Replies: @robt
    In 1933, Eleanor Roosevelt started her own little Potemkin village at public expense, Arthurdale, West Virginia, an embarrassing money pit, and a flop of course.
    , @Immigrant from former USSR
    Hello, Mr. Hayes.
    I am glad that you remember this Chapter in G.A.
    In Russian this Chapter is called "Почему улыбался будда."
    "Why Budda smiled".
    Your I.f.f.U.
    , @anonymuss
    Solzhenitsyn opened many eyes to the realities inside the USSR. If you could get through his depressing books, there were many lessons for humanity. Of course, the true believers rejected his books and accused him of only writing for the money and the promise of a mistress in the West. That denialist sentiment lingers in a few houses in New York and other places.
    , @James Kabala
    The problem was this often-repeated story is that Eleanor Roosevelt never visited the Soviet Union during the Stalin years. She visited in 1957 and again in 1958. (She also said upon return that "I think I should die if I had to live in Soviet Russia.") Life was certainly not a bowl of cherries under Khrushchev, but my understanding is that the anecdote is supposed to be a Stalin-era anecdote. In fairness to Solzhenitsyn, I don't think he claimed to have witnessed it firsthand. I wonder if the (true) Wallace story is the ultimate origin.
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  4. I think you’re giving Wallace too much credit. People knew the USSR was a totalitarian dictatorship, people knew of the 1930s famine, the show trials, the Nazi-Soviet pact, the invasion of Finland and Baltic, the red terror in Revolution, etc. etc.

    Further, people warned Wallace in 1948 he was surrounding himself with commies. In fact, they warned him when he was Vice President. Eleanor Roosevelt refused to support him in 1948 because of that. And when you lose a pro-commie like Eleanor, you’re way, way, out there.

    Read More
    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @robt
    "People knew the USSR was a totalitarian dictatorship, people knew of the 1930s famine, the show trials ...),

    Not if they were readers of the New York Times and read Duranty's puff pieces and propaganda from the Soviet Union, where he was housed first-class, and for which he got the Pulitzer Prize.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  5. “So, I think Wallace was more of a tragic dupe of Russia than a really bad guy.”

    A tragic dupe of the Soviets, to be more accurate. There’s too much conflation of the former with the latter, these days to avoid parsing closely.

    Read More
    • Agree: Randal
    • Replies: @Alden
    Wallace was a true believer in communism and the Soviet version of it. Had he been younger he would have supported Pol Pot.
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  6. Fun trivia: Wallace’s great-granddaughter is a Tim Burton-esque model and artist.

    http://forums.thefashionspot.com/f52/victoria-wallace-60301.html

    Her artist boyfriend or husband happens to be a Russian-born immigrant. Both their instagrams have a pro-West, anti-globalism bend that is fairly prevalent in their subculture. Check out the hashtag #deathofthewest on Instagram.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/BMnH8BqhuBi/?taken-by=victoria_wallace&hl=en

    Read More
    • Replies: @Candide III

    Both their instagrams have a pro-West, anti-globalism bend that is fairly prevalent in their subculture.
     
    What subculture is that?
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  7. syonredux says:

    Owen Lattimore was a celebrated Old China Hand in the federal government who was later persecuted by anti-Communists for being sympathetic to Mao.

    And his brother was the noted Classicist and translator Richmond Lattimore. His translations of The Iliad and The Odyssey are regarded as pretty much the gold standard in the field.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmond_Lattimore

    Read More
    • Agree: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @Alfa158
    I can't vouch for how literally faithful the Robert Fagles translations of Homer and Virgil are, but I do enjoy his the most. He seems to have captured the poetry and music of the works beautifully.
    Now of course if you were to read them in the original Klingon.....
    , @slumber_j
    Not only that, but R. Lattimore gets a shout-out in Frank O'Hara's poem "The Day Lady Died." Which is pretty cool, if you ask me:

    I go on to the bank
    and Miss Stillwagon (first name Linda I once heard)
    doesn’t even look up my balance for once in her life
    and in the GOLDEN GRIFFIN I get a little Verlaine
    for Patsy with drawings by Bonnard although I do
    think of Hesiod, trans. Richmond Lattimore or
    Brendan Behan’s new play or Le Balcon or Les Nègres
    of Genet, but I don’t, I stick with Verlaine
    after practically going to sleep with quandariness
     
    , @Bro Methylene
    I've always considered E.V. Rieu's prose translation of "The Iliad" to be the standard of excellence.
    Rieu converted to Christianity in 1947 and this apparently made him socio-politically unacceptable, even though he was a co-founder of Penguin Classics.
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  8. The Wallace Global Fund seems to be a “progressive ” group with charitable status. Rather amusingly, 5 of the 6 directors have the surname Wallace. Marxist Mafia seems to spring to mind !

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Wallace was a rich man from his eugenic breeding of seeds.
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  9. What’s the dope on Armand Hammer? Was he working for them, for us or just himself?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    Armand hammer worked for the Soviet Union 30% and 70% for himself. Among his other crimes was looting Spain of machinery and industrial equipment when the communists lost the civil war.

    Hammer had ships standing by in the Mediterranean ports. The loot was loaded and then east to the Black Sea and the Crimean ports.

    He was the Soros of his time. He and his father began as bootleggers with their pharmaceutical "ginger tonic " and proceeded to loot Russia after the Reds took over.

    Every time I go by his museum I want to burn it down. He finally retired to Los Angeles. His PR guys kept the great philanthropist constantly in the papers till thanks be to God he finally died. Then it was a solid 3 years of praise for all his good works.
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  10. @Verymuchalive
    The Wallace Global Fund seems to be a "progressive " group with charitable status. Rather amusingly, 5 of the 6 directors have the surname Wallace. Marxist Mafia seems to spring to mind !

    Wallace was a rich man from his eugenic breeding of seeds.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    Steve,

    Sorry for the OT reply, but I wasn't sure how to draw your attention to the St. Olaf thread. I think you have the wrong thumbnail up—it's of a couple of people murdered in Virginia in 2015.

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/nice-white-people-weigh-in-on-minnesota-hate-hoax/#comment-1868910
    , @Diversity Heretic
    Henry Wallace (from Iowa) also published Wallace's Farmer and founded Pioneer Seed Corn. I believe that he publically recanted his previous Communist tolerant views in a book entitled Why I Was Wrong. Intellectual brilliance does not, unfortunately, always result in political perspicacity. I don't know what Henry Wallace would have made of Donald Trump but I'll bet that he would have been more sympathetic to Trump supporters than is his grandson.
    , @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Wallace was a rich man from his eugenic breeding of seeds.
     
    Yeah, but did he get into it as deep as Eldon Schmidt?
    , @SteveRogers42
    From the looks of his g-granddaughter, he didn't do much eugenic breeding in his personal life.
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  11. Wallace was a security risk during the war in other ways. His sister married the Swiss Ambassador, and Wallace would go to DC parties where his brother-in-law was also invited. And Wallace would be a blowhard, and talk out loud about things he had no business talking about at all.

    Now the ambassador was a thoroughly decent guy and privately pro-Allies. But he had a duty as a diplomat to report back all useful information back to his home capital, and he did. And the diplomatic cable office in the Swiss Foreign Ministry back in Bern was compromised by German agents. Fortunately the British Double-Cross operation had the leaks there controlled, but still, it was a close call.

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    • Replies: @Chris T.
    ‘Wallace was a security risk during the war in other ways. His sister married the Swiss Ambassador, and Wallace would go to DC parties where his brother-in-law was also invited. And Wallace would be a blowhard, and talk out loud about things he had no business talking about at all.’

    This is interesting information. There was a spy case where a Swiss-American was named as the source. I wonder if there is a connection with Wallace.

    http://chris-intel-corner.blogspot.gr/2014/05/naval-enigma-compromise-and-spy-in.html
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  12. robt says:
    @Dan Hayes
    Steve,

    In one of his book (perhaps the Gulag Archipelago), Solzhenitsyn described a bunch of credulous American visitors to a sham Soviet Potemkin Village prison camp which was "renovated" for the visitors. Among the willingly duped visitors were Eleanor Roosevelt and a bunch of Quakers.

    When I read this my respect and admiration for Solzhenitsyn soared!

    In 1933, Eleanor Roosevelt started her own little Potemkin village at public expense, Arthurdale, West Virginia, an embarrassing money pit, and a flop of course.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    robt,

    I was unaware of this fact. Another example of the utility of the UR! My sincere thanks.
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  13. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Flip
    The NY Times is really cranking it up these days, what with having a communist's grandson accuse Trump of being a fascist and a leftist professor telling whites that miscegenation will save them from being displaced. It is hard to believe that they really think this way, but it seems they do.

    and a leftist professor telling whites that miscegenation will save them from being displaced

    Link?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dumbo
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/11/opinion/sunday/the-census-and-right-wing-hysteria.html

    the number of mixed-race people who see themselves as white will grow much more in the coming decades, primarily as a result of increasing Latino-white and Asian-white intermarriages. By the 2040s, when the children of these unions have become adults, a significant number will marry whites themselves and become parents — thereby further increasing the population seen as white and thus the white majority.
     
    "People who see themselves as white" = "People who believe they are white"?
    , @Flip
    See Steve's piece on the census and right wing hysteria.
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  14. robt says:
    @honesthughgrant
    I think you're giving Wallace too much credit. People knew the USSR was a totalitarian dictatorship, people knew of the 1930s famine, the show trials, the Nazi-Soviet pact, the invasion of Finland and Baltic, the red terror in Revolution, etc. etc.

    Further, people warned Wallace in 1948 he was surrounding himself with commies. In fact, they warned him when he was Vice President. Eleanor Roosevelt refused to support him in 1948 because of that. And when you lose a pro-commie like Eleanor, you're way, way, out there.

    “People knew the USSR was a totalitarian dictatorship, people knew of the 1930s famine, the show trials …),

    Not if they were readers of the New York Times and read Duranty’s puff pieces and propaganda from the Soviet Union, where he was housed first-class, and for which he got the Pulitzer Prize.

    Read More
    • Replies: @pepperinmono
    Whatever else her fault's , Ayn Rand knew.
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  15. Dan Hayes says:
    @robt
    In 1933, Eleanor Roosevelt started her own little Potemkin village at public expense, Arthurdale, West Virginia, an embarrassing money pit, and a flop of course.

    robt,

    I was unaware of this fact. Another example of the utility of the UR! My sincere thanks.

    Read More
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  16. Knowing the left’s history with Soviet Russia ,I’ve been in some disbelief with the recent Russia bashing/ lefty saber rattling. Never the less,on and on it goes, pretty awful really.

    Read More
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  17. Alfa158 says:
    @syonredux

    Owen Lattimore was a celebrated Old China Hand in the federal government who was later persecuted by anti-Communists for being sympathetic to Mao.

     

    And his brother was the noted Classicist and translator Richmond Lattimore. His translations of The Iliad and The Odyssey are regarded as pretty much the gold standard in the field.



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmond_Lattimore

    I can’t vouch for how literally faithful the Robert Fagles translations of Homer and Virgil are, but I do enjoy his the most. He seems to have captured the poetry and music of the works beautifully.
    Now of course if you were to read them in the original Klingon…..

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    I can’t vouch for how literally faithful the Robert Fagles translations of Homer and Virgil are, but I do enjoy his the most. He seems to have captured the poetry and music of the works beautifully.
     
    According to the Classicists that I've talked to, Fagles' translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey are quite good, but they are not quite as accurate as Lattimore's.
    , @william munny
    I like Fagles too. I am curious to see the John Dolan's (the War Nerd) prose version this Fall.
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  18. @Dan Hayes
    Steve,

    In one of his book (perhaps the Gulag Archipelago), Solzhenitsyn described a bunch of credulous American visitors to a sham Soviet Potemkin Village prison camp which was "renovated" for the visitors. Among the willingly duped visitors were Eleanor Roosevelt and a bunch of Quakers.

    When I read this my respect and admiration for Solzhenitsyn soared!

    Hello, Mr. Hayes.
    I am glad that you remember this Chapter in G.A.
    In Russian this Chapter is called “Почему улыбался будда.”
    “Why Budda smiled”.
    Your I.f.f.U.

    Read More
    • Agree: Dan Hayes
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  19. Rapparee says:

    “Now Lattimore was under attack by Sen. Joseph McCarthy for ‘his close association with the communist conspiracy.’ I had been sympathetic to Lattimore’s plight, but when I found out what he had said in Siberia, I felt betrayed by him, too”

    As far as I know, nobody has ever found hard proof demonstrating that Lattimore was actively on Stalin’s payroll at any point, but there’s a hair-whitening pile of circumstantial evidence and extremely suspicious coincidences. It’s traditional to castigate Senator McCarthy for baselessly calling Lattimore a Soviet spy, but Lattimore certainly seems to have gone out of his way to surround himself and vociferously agree with Soviet spies at every conceivable opportunity.

    Read More
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  20. Dumbo says:
    @Anonymous

    and a leftist professor telling whites that miscegenation will save them from being displaced
     
    Link?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/11/opinion/sunday/the-census-and-right-wing-hysteria.html

    the number of mixed-race people who see themselves as white will grow much more in the coming decades, primarily as a result of increasing Latino-white and Asian-white intermarriages. By the 2040s, when the children of these unions have become adults, a significant number will marry whites themselves and become parents — thereby further increasing the population seen as white and thus the white majority.

    “People who see themselves as white” = “People who believe they are white”?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    Maybe Asians, but we are getting more and more Hispanic pure Indians who are completely distinct from European Hispanics. It would probably take 7 White and just 1 gr grandparents to make them look White.

    BUT BUT, the most important thing is the Hispanic last name for the purpose of the census and affirmative action. Can't you write any race on the census and no one ever checks?
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  21. Flip says:
    @Anonymous

    and a leftist professor telling whites that miscegenation will save them from being displaced
     
    Link?

    See Steve’s piece on the census and right wing hysteria.

    Read More
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  22. Wallace supported the Soviet Union while Stalin was murdering millions, but turned against the Soviet Union when Khrushchev turned towards moderatism.

    Wallace was never “pro-Russian”, he was pro-Bolshevik. Not the same thing – opposite, in fact.

    The same people who today shed crocodile tears over Putin’s handful of alleged victims cheered themselves hoarse when Warren Beatty’s Reds showered accolades on history’s most bloodthirsty monster, Trotsky. To be fair, Reds did critique Zinoviev – for being too pro-Christian! Is there any word which can adequately describe such brazen effrontery?

    Read More
    • Agree: dfordoom
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Chutzpah, but maybe that's too on-the-nose.
    , @Peripatetic commenter

    The same people who today shed crocodile tears over Putin’s handful of alleged victims cheered themselves hoarse when Warren Beatty’s Reds showered accolades on history’s most bloodthirsty monster, Trotsky.
     
    Surely Stalin's and Mao's victim counts are much larger.

    Also, we don't yet know what Trump's victim count is going to be, as the Democrats would likely remind us.

    , @Jake
    Yep

    Though I do think Wallace was a stupidly naive fool, rather than a happy, knowing Stalinist.

    The key is the role of Russia on the world stage. In the 19th century, it was as the Conservative empire. And it was hated and feared and plotted against by Liberals of every nation. The Bolshevik Revolution meant Liberals loved the new USSR. Now, post-USSR, Liberals hate every thing to do with Russia, because Russia seems to be the only European nation to back away from the Liberal kool-aid.
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  23. unit472 says:

    Perhaps off topic but it irks me to see a non profit foundation being headed by the grandson of its founder. Non profits should be required to disburse their assets within a reasonable period of time after the bequest or donation and not be a sinecure for the founders progeny. Wallace died over half a century ago. Surely whatever it was that Wallace’s foundation intended to do could have been done by now and Wallace’s grandson could devote himself to something more fruitful.

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Oh, if only the Ford family had retained control of the Ford Foundation!
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  24. prosa123 says: • Website

    As a native of Connecticut, I suppose I can take a bit of pride in the fact that Wallace was the only former president or vice president to die in the Nutmeg State. The hospital in Danbury happened to be the closest such facility to Wallace’s retirement home in South Salem, NY.

    Read More
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  25. J.Ross says: • Website

    The wartime propaganda gem “Mission To Moscow” is not about Wallace per se but illustrates the later-inconceivable penetration of Stalinism in the American government and media, and so breaks the false image of McCarthyism as hysterical. In particular it aggressively advocates for show trials and mass purges in the United States. I fell out of my seat when I saw that: they wanted gulags here. The viewer is assured by American technical advisors who have gone “beyond the Urals” to help production that Hitlerites infest every US factory, that only KGB methods can bring security, and that show trials are entirely respectable.

    Read More
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    This is something of a rambling comment, I hope it doesn't annoy you...

    I've always been of the opinion that the American intellectual hatred and disdain for the petty bourgeois class stems not as much from the typical Marxist hatred that stems from their unreliable class struggle status, but from the fact that they are the quintessential backbone of America, as Ben Franklin aptly put it. America is a fundamentally petty bourgeois nation in a way European nations aren't. That they were paranoid that they'd bring fascism, as in Europe, and that they sensed the fact, America's petty bourgeois class didn't particularly fear or respect them. That's why you constantly see the "we need Plato style gatekeepers" undercurrent among American intellectuals-just look at Gopnik's recent rubbish in the New Yorker. Journalists and intellectuals only tend to want democracy insofar as it results in outcomes that are pleasing to them.

    Anyway, more on topic: there's a big difference between making a deal with the devil to prevent Generalplan Ost, and making the devil out to be any sort of idol. A lot of lefties in the 1940s confused the two, with varying degrees of consciousness. (Wallace, to his credit, recognized his mistakes later on.) Switching gears to modern day America, I don't think your typical bien-pensant American left-winger necessary wants violence, given that the Left would probably lose in a civil conflict since the right-wingers would inherit the ex-Marines, cops, prison guards, etc, but I do think they are emphatically authoritarian on groupthink, and increasingly brook no dissent. Radicalization breeds counter-radicalization, hence, Trump shifting the Overton Window. Anyway, it's not particularly shocking that certain sectors of intellectuals tend to be attracted to utopian authoritarian movements. This isn't limited to Stalinism-just look at the profiles of the leaders of the Einsatzgruppen in the East. Parade of doctorates. Cambodia's Khmer Rouge is arguably the closest regime that has come to being dominated by intellectuals.

    As for Tailgunner Joe, I've already mentioned in another thread that he was an utter gift to the Kremlin. People don't often grasped how deeply the Soviets penetrated our government by 1945-Harry Dexter White is a prominent example of how high up it went sometimes. By the early 1950s, the Soviet espionage network in the US was under serious strain-the convictions of prominent spies such as Alger Hiss and Julius Rosenberg was only the tip of the iceberg. Truman had cleaned out the pro-Moscow Left from the Democratic Party and, through the good and willing graces of J. Edgar Hoover and his merry men, cracked down very, very hard on Soviet intelligence activities. On the foreign front, Stalin's plans to intervene in Yugoslavia went down the drain the moment the US intervened in Korea, and the Marshall Plan was taking off in Western Europe, making it clear that the US had the superior model to anyone with a semi-functioning brain. McCarthy and his blindingly obvious violations of civil liberties and exploitation of public fear more or less rescued them.

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  26. J.Ross says: • Website
    @unit472
    Perhaps off topic but it irks me to see a non profit foundation being headed by the grandson of its founder. Non profits should be required to disburse their assets within a reasonable period of time after the bequest or donation and not be a sinecure for the founders progeny. Wallace died over half a century ago. Surely whatever it was that Wallace's foundation intended to do could have been done by now and Wallace's grandson could devote himself to something more fruitful.

    Oh, if only the Ford family had retained control of the Ford Foundation!

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  27. J.Ross says: • Website
    @John Gruskos
    Wallace supported the Soviet Union while Stalin was murdering millions, but turned against the Soviet Union when Khrushchev turned towards moderatism.

    Wallace was never "pro-Russian", he was pro-Bolshevik. Not the same thing - opposite, in fact.

    The same people who today shed crocodile tears over Putin's handful of alleged victims cheered themselves hoarse when Warren Beatty's Reds showered accolades on history's most bloodthirsty monster, Trotsky. To be fair, Reds did critique Zinoviev - for being too pro-Christian! Is there any word which can adequately describe such brazen effrontery?

    Chutzpah, but maybe that’s too on-the-nose.

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  28. syonredux says:
    @Alfa158
    I can't vouch for how literally faithful the Robert Fagles translations of Homer and Virgil are, but I do enjoy his the most. He seems to have captured the poetry and music of the works beautifully.
    Now of course if you were to read them in the original Klingon.....

    I can’t vouch for how literally faithful the Robert Fagles translations of Homer and Virgil are, but I do enjoy his the most. He seems to have captured the poetry and music of the works beautifully.

    According to the Classicists that I’ve talked to, Fagles’ translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey are quite good, but they are not quite as accurate as Lattimore’s.

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  29. As a statesman, making choices in the mid-1940s was difficult, and Wallace, in the 1950s, came to publicly regret his pro-Russian stances and distanced himself from Moscow.

    Shouldn’t that be pro-Soviet stance. After Stalin was gone things changed quite a bit but it took a while for it to become evident on the outside.

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  30. @John Gruskos
    Wallace supported the Soviet Union while Stalin was murdering millions, but turned against the Soviet Union when Khrushchev turned towards moderatism.

    Wallace was never "pro-Russian", he was pro-Bolshevik. Not the same thing - opposite, in fact.

    The same people who today shed crocodile tears over Putin's handful of alleged victims cheered themselves hoarse when Warren Beatty's Reds showered accolades on history's most bloodthirsty monster, Trotsky. To be fair, Reds did critique Zinoviev - for being too pro-Christian! Is there any word which can adequately describe such brazen effrontery?

    The same people who today shed crocodile tears over Putin’s handful of alleged victims cheered themselves hoarse when Warren Beatty’s Reds showered accolades on history’s most bloodthirsty monster, Trotsky.

    Surely Stalin’s and Mao’s victim counts are much larger.

    Also, we don’t yet know what Trump’s victim count is going to be, as the Democrats would likely remind us.

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    • Replies: @John Gruskos
    One of Trotsky's main complaints was that Stalin was too soft on the kulaks.

    Trotsky's goals, export the revolution and permanent revolution, would have entailed a permanent globalized Red Terror.

    Fortunately Trotsky, unlike Stalin and Mao, didn't get a chance to fully slake his blood thirst.
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  31. @Steve Sailer
    Wallace was a rich man from his eugenic breeding of seeds.

    Steve,

    Sorry for the OT reply, but I wasn’t sure how to draw your attention to the St. Olaf thread. I think you have the wrong thumbnail up—it’s of a couple of people murdered in Virginia in 2015.

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/nice-white-people-weigh-in-on-minnesota-hate-hoax/#comment-1868910

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  32. Henry Wallace was a Theosophist and occult obsessive. His guru was Russian Theosophist and painter Nicholas Roerich. It was likely Roerich’s influence that lead Wallace to convince FDR to place The Great Seal (Eye over the Pyramid/ “Novus Ordo Seclorum” you know the drill) on the back of the Dollar Bill. Wallace was so inspired by Roerich that Wallace, then Secretary of Agriculture, used federal funds to send Roerich on an ostensible seed collecting tour of Tibet and Outer Mongolia.

    Unfortunately for Wallace, Roerich apparently was more interested in fomenting political revolution in Mongolia. For what purposes remains somewhat unclear, but likely aligning with Buddhist Lamas against various secular powers in the region to instigate some sort of Theosophy inspired theocracy. One can assume he was searching for the mythical Aryan homeland of Shambhala in the Gobi desert based on the teachings of Madame Blavatsky. Maybe it was all a deep cover US intelligence op to counter the Nazi paranormal Ahnenerbe squads that were also “doing research” in the same general area. Either way, Wallace was operating pretty far off script and revealed as a bit of a kooky embarrassment at best to FDR’s re-election. Wallace’s connections and guru letters with Roerich were revealed when Wallace was FDR’s Vice President. Wallace was replaced with Harry S Truman. One wonders if Wallace with his esoteric Buddhist leanings would have dropped the A-bombs to end the War.

    Roerich’s paintings of the Himalayas are quite haunting and they inspired H.P Lovecraft to write The Mountains of Madness (set in Antartica, not the Himalayas). The Mountains of Madness is a central tome in Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos and likely one of the first manifestations of ancient astronauts theory in literature.

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    • Replies: @Josh
    Wallace made a speech about a world government with nukes that would ensure eternal peace. I think he would have been okay with the bomb.

    Roerich incidentally also was the art director for the original ballet rus production of the rite of spring. Theosophy had a strangely wide reach, and they don't even teach it in schools.
    , @Almost Missouri
    I hadn't heard of Roerich's Asian buccaneering before. I knew of him primarily as a rather good painter of Eastern religio-spiritual themes. There is an engaging museum of his art in upper Manhattan. If memory serves, he also made costume and scenery designs for Stravinsky's Le Sacre du printemps (The Rite of Spring) ballet.

    For good or ill, these kind of political/artistic/literary renaissance men no longer seem to exist. Bill Clinton's saxophone playing doesn't even merit mentioning.
    , @Alden
    Very interesting. That was the same time Ho Chi Minh was planting communist agents in Buddhist monasteries in Vietnam. Thanks for the info.

    But no one cares today about the communist roots of the war against White Americans via discrimination, ethnic cleansing, and black on White terrorism.

    And the capitalists are as involved in exterminating us as much as the communists were. But the capitalists and their non White workers in every job from surgeon to dishwasher are far more successful.

    There was a man named Jorge Ramos on tv last night. He claimed the Hispanics are not invading the USA because they are invited by American business. He told the absolute truth.
    , @Josephbleau
    "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn." ... "In his house at R'lyeh dead Cthulhu waits dreaming."
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  33. @Steve Sailer
    Wallace was a rich man from his eugenic breeding of seeds.

    Henry Wallace (from Iowa) also published Wallace’s Farmer and founded Pioneer Seed Corn. I believe that he publically recanted his previous Communist tolerant views in a book entitled Why I Was Wrong. Intellectual brilliance does not, unfortunately, always result in political perspicacity. I don’t know what Henry Wallace would have made of Donald Trump but I’ll bet that he would have been more sympathetic to Trump supporters than is his grandson.

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    • Replies: @Gringo
    Diversity Heretic:

    I believe that he publically recanted his previous Communist tolerant views in a book entitled Why I Was Wrong. Intellectual brilliance does not, unfortunately, always result in political perspicacity. I don’t know what Henry Wallace would have made of Donald Trump but I’ll bet that he would have been more sympathetic to Trump supporters than is his grandson.
     
    Good point. I wonder what Henry Wallace's grandson thinks of his grandfather's change- surely he is aware of it. Perhaps the grandson believes that there was the the good grandpa and the bad grandpa. The Wikipedia article Henry A. Wallace has more information on Henry Wallace's change. He supported the US effort in the Korean War- which is hardly the position that Henry Wallace would have taken in his communist dupe stage in the 1940s. In addition, Henry Wallace supported Eisenhower and Nixon in their campaigns for President.

    Trivia note: According to Wikipedia, his recanting was named Where I Was Wrong. The article is located:Henry A. Wallace (1952), "Where I Was Wrong", The Week Magazine (September 7):

    Here are startling admissions from a former vice-president of the United States. For years a Russian apologist, he now tells "Where I Was Wrong", by Henry A. Wallace.

    Wallace says his big mistake was not denouncing Red coup in Czechoslovakia.

    Henry A. Wallace:

    Many people have asked me how I reconcile my stand before Korea with my uncompromising anti-Communist attitude of the past two years The answer is simple.

    Before 1949 I thought Russia really wanted and needed peace. After 1949 I became more and more disgusted with the Soviet methods and finally became convinced that the Politburo wanted the Cold War continued indefinitely, even at the peril of accidentally provoking a hot war.

    In this article eI shall speak frankly of some of the circumstances which have caused me to revise my attitude.

    Reports from Czechoslovakia

    Among the fist were the shocking revelations of the activities of Russia's atomic spies. This plus the testimony of American ex-Communists convinced me that Russia had been getting information illegally to which neither she nor any other nation was entitled.

    Next, I was deeply moved by reports of friends who had visited Czechoslovakia shortly after the Communist took control. In the summer of 1949, a member of the Progressive Party visited Czechoslovakia and reported the dispossession of relatives whose only crime was to own a small business. No one, I was told, could amount to anything who was not an outspoken critic of the U.S. and capitalism. Only Moscow-trained Communists were allowed in positions of authority.

    As I look back over the past 10 years, I now feel that my greatest mistake was in not denouncing the Communist take-over of Czechoslovakia of 1948.

    Ruthless Nature of Communism

    At that time I labored under the illusion that the Communists had beaten us to the punch in popular appeal, and that they had the support of most of the people, who feared a resurgent Germany more than a domineering Russia. Therefore I said democratic Czechoslovakia was a victim of the Cold War. Her hatred and fear of the Germans had thrown her into the arms of Russia, and placed first Benes and Masaryk and finally the Czech-born Communists in an impossible position.

    In other words, I blamed the Communist coup in Czechoslovakia partly on geography and partly on history.

    Up to a point, my analysis was sound, but it failed utterly to take into account the ruthless nature of Russian-trained Communists whose sole objective was to make Czechoslovakia completely subservient to Moscow.

    Time has also brought me new understanding of the Korean question. In 1948 I believed both Russia and the U.S. should take their troops out of Korea.

    Today, knowing more about Russia's methods, I am sure it was a serious mistake when we withdrew our troops. Russia may not want a hot war at tang time in the net ten years, but she certainly wants such a continuation of the Col War as will enable her, through her satellites and internally-planted subversives, to take over the greatest amount of territory possible. Russia is still on the march, and the question now is whether she will be able to take over all of Asia, including India and the Near East.

    Turning back to World War II, it is necessary to mention the period in 1944 when I went across Soviet Asia to China on a wartime mission for the President. My only instructions from Roosevelt as far as the Russians were concerned was to take a look at their agricultural experiment stations, factories, and schools. And, of course, Roosevelt was always interested in the Gobi desert and the vegetation there, past, present, and future.

    I was not sent to gain secret information of any kind. No mention was made of slave-labor camps. I had not the slightest idea when I visited Magdan that this far-north Pacific port--center of a vast, sub-arctic gold field--was also the center for administering the labor of both criminals and those suspected of political disloyalty.

    Slave Labor

    Nothing I saw at Magadan or anywhere else in Soviet Asia suggested slave labor. True, I had heard that many kulaks who had their farms taken from them in the early ;30s and been sent to Siberia, but I had not the slightest idea that there ere many slave-labor camps in Siberia in 1944 and that of these the most notorious was Magadan.

    On the other hand, I had long had the idea that the RUssians might actually be doing a better job of developing the agriculture and industry of their Far North than we were doing in Alaska. Therefore I visited every factory, school, and agricultural experiment station I possibly could.

    Russian hospitality is proverbial, and it is not surprising that on this occasion the Russians should do everything possible to impress the Vice-President of the country which was sending them so many billions of dollars of vital necessities of many kinds. So on the whole these visits made a most favorable impression on me.

    But, as I now know, this impression was not the complete one. Elinor Lippor, who was a slave laborer in the Magadan area for many years, has subsequently described the great effort put forth by the Soviet authorities to pull the wool over our eyes and make Magadan into a Potemkin village for my inspection. Watch towers were torn down. Prisoners were herded away out of sight. On this basis, what we was prodded a false impression. I was amazed that the Russians could do so much in such short time--as was Wendell Willkie, who had visited the same region in 1942. But unfortunately neither Willkie nor I knew the full truth. As guests we were shown only one side of the coin.

    Even so, what we saw was important and should never be forgotten in these days when so many people contemplate the possibility of conflict in the Northern Pacific. The Soviets in their totalitarian way have done their best to bring the full power of science to bear on those areas which they deem of strategic importance....


    Willkie as well as I had been greatly impressed with the rapid development of eastern Siberia and had likened it to the American Far West expansion in the 19th century. We were rightly interested in the immense human labor being put forth under the most difficult conditions. What we didn't see were the living conditions of the slave workers.

    "I Was Too Impressed"......

    As I look back across my trip across Soviet Asia to China, I can see after reading accounts by former slave laborers who escaped from Siberia that I was altogether too much impressed by the show put on by high Russian officials, who as human beings seemed just like typical capitalistic "go-getters"....
    More and more I am convinced that Russian Communism in its total disregard of truth, in its fanaticism, its intolerance and its resolute denial of God and religion is something utterly evil.

     
    Wallace made a prescient prediction of the Sino-Soviet split, nearly a decade before it occurred.


    I had seen some evidence of the common man on the march in Asia in 1944, but what I did not see was the Soviet determination to enslave the common man morally, mentally, and physically for its own imperial purposes. Today the Soviet Union has, for the moment, through Mao Tse-tung, millions of Chinese workers at its disposal to be impressed into the Chinese army.

    What Moscow does not seem to realize is that the dragon which she has stirred out of its sleep may turn on her. At the moment, for the sake of chasing the white man out of Korea, the Chinese Communists may profess loyalty to Moscow, but in the long run the Chinese will not love the Russian white man any better than the American or Western European. Chine will find there is no net gain for China in trading Chinese feudalism and colonialism for Russian Communism. ......

     
    He further admits his mistake.

    Many people believe Roosevelt and I tried to appease Russia. It is true that both of us saw the possibility of future conflict and wanted to prevent it. But I am one o those who believe that if Roosevelt had remained alive and in good health the whole course of history would have been changed and we would not today be spending $60 billion a year on arms.

    What I wanted was peace, but not peace at the price of Communist domination. I thought the Soviets had more sense than to do what they have been doing during the past few years.

    There I was proved wrong by subsequent nets. yet I know I am not wrong in predicting that if the Soviets continue along present lines they may possibly cause disaster to the whole Western World--but in the process they will certainly destroy the Politburo, the Communist Party in Russia, and bring misery to the people of Russia and her satellites.

     
    Yes, Henry Wallace in the 1940s was a communist dupe. But even Henry Wallace wised up. Apparently his grandson never got the message- or resolutely tried to ignore the message. Much of what Henry Wallace wrote in "Where I Was Wrong" could have come from the pen of William F. Buckley.
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  34. Chris T. says:
    @The Man From K Street
    Wallace was a security risk during the war in other ways. His sister married the Swiss Ambassador, and Wallace would go to DC parties where his brother-in-law was also invited. And Wallace would be a blowhard, and talk out loud about things he had no business talking about at all.

    Now the ambassador was a thoroughly decent guy and privately pro-Allies. But he had a duty as a diplomat to report back all useful information back to his home capital, and he did. And the diplomatic cable office in the Swiss Foreign Ministry back in Bern was compromised by German agents. Fortunately the British Double-Cross operation had the leaks there controlled, but still, it was a close call.

    ‘Wallace was a security risk during the war in other ways. His sister married the Swiss Ambassador, and Wallace would go to DC parties where his brother-in-law was also invited. And Wallace would be a blowhard, and talk out loud about things he had no business talking about at all.’

    This is interesting information. There was a spy case where a Swiss-American was named as the source. I wonder if there is a connection with Wallace.

    http://chris-intel-corner.blogspot.gr/2014/05/naval-enigma-compromise-and-spy-in.html

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    • Replies: @Alden
    Wallace associated with Donald Maclean as well.
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  35. @Steve Sailer
    Wallace was a rich man from his eugenic breeding of seeds.

    Wallace was a rich man from his eugenic breeding of seeds.

    Yeah, but did he get into it as deep as Eldon Schmidt?

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  36. “Edgar Wallace is Joseph Stalin’s Mortimer Snerd.”

    But I can’t remember who said it.

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    • Replies: @CK
    https://www.thenewamerican.com/culture/history/item/4847-remember-what-about-pearl-harbor
    Claire Booth Luce
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  37. Sailer’s Butterknife.

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  38. IHTG says:

    For a while during the election, David Frum thought it was the most clever thing in the world to say that “Donald Trump is a blend of George Wallace and Henry Wallace”.

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    • Replies: @Jake
    The genius of Frum. If only the white trash of Middle America would just bow before it ....
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  39. Lot says:

    She screamed in Russian how the prisoners were being treated, how they were dying, how they were innocent, as innocent as the snow at his feet.

    To be fair, American prisoners would all say the same thing too.

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  40. dearieme says:

    ” … a tragic dupe of Moscow than a really bad guy”: but it is our duty not to become dupes of the forces ranged against our civilisation, whether it be the Soviet Union, the Germany of the National Socialist Workers Party, or the Democratic National Committee.

    P.S. It’s just occurred to me that “Democratic National Committee” uses ‘Democratic’ in much the same way as German Democratic Republic.

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    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @dfordoom

    P.S. It’s just occurred to me that “Democratic National Committee” uses ‘Democratic’ in much the same way as German Democratic Republic.
     
    It's always wise to be suspicious of any organisation at all that uses the word democratic in its title.
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  41. @Alfa158
    I can't vouch for how literally faithful the Robert Fagles translations of Homer and Virgil are, but I do enjoy his the most. He seems to have captured the poetry and music of the works beautifully.
    Now of course if you were to read them in the original Klingon.....

    I like Fagles too. I am curious to see the John Dolan’s (the War Nerd) prose version this Fall.

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  42. TheJester says:

    Has anyone noticed? The Commies are back (perhaps they never went away)!

    The Cultural Marxism slowly consuming the political, social, and academic institutions in the United States is the Communist social agenda sans state-controlled capitalism. However, Bernie Sanders and his followers have been doing their best to heal this artificial separation by seizing control of private capital via pervasive government regulation to force banks and corporations to redistribute wealth among the masses.

    Europe is even in worse shape. Post-WWII, to fend off Communism there was a formal concordat between labor and capital such that banks and industrialists could keep their wealth in return for giving the Left a free hand in universalizing the socialist social agenda in the reorganization of the European states. However, as the EU developed, the non-elected apparatchiks within the EU slowly seized control of the economies of Europe as well.

    It is with precocious insight and many observers have noticed that the EU is coming to resemble the Soviet Union and its decadent social order in the years before its implosion.

    Are we next?

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    • Replies: @dfordoom

    It is with precocious insight and many observers have noticed that the EU is coming to resemble the Soviet Union and its decadent social order in the years before its implosion.
     
    Compared to the modern United States and EU the social order in the Soviet Union was incredibly healthy!
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  43. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    One might think a smart man like Wallace would have had some doubts pop up in his mind when he visited Kolyma. Considering the remote location and barren landscape it’s hard to imagine it having been cleanable enough to be much of a Potemkin village. This goes beyond gullibility and over to the will to believe.

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    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    It's merely confirmation bias writ large.
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  44. Josh says:

    How can you write a post about Henry Wallace being easily taken in without mentioning Nicolas roerich and the “dear guru letters?”

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  45. Josh says:
    @Clifford Brown
    Henry Wallace was a Theosophist and occult obsessive. His guru was Russian Theosophist and painter Nicholas Roerich. It was likely Roerich's influence that lead Wallace to convince FDR to place The Great Seal (Eye over the Pyramid/ "Novus Ordo Seclorum" you know the drill) on the back of the Dollar Bill. Wallace was so inspired by Roerich that Wallace, then Secretary of Agriculture, used federal funds to send Roerich on an ostensible seed collecting tour of Tibet and Outer Mongolia.

    Unfortunately for Wallace, Roerich apparently was more interested in fomenting political revolution in Mongolia. For what purposes remains somewhat unclear, but likely aligning with Buddhist Lamas against various secular powers in the region to instigate some sort of Theosophy inspired theocracy. One can assume he was searching for the mythical Aryan homeland of Shambhala in the Gobi desert based on the teachings of Madame Blavatsky. Maybe it was all a deep cover US intelligence op to counter the Nazi paranormal Ahnenerbe squads that were also "doing research" in the same general area. Either way, Wallace was operating pretty far off script and revealed as a bit of a kooky embarrassment at best to FDR's re-election. Wallace's connections and guru letters with Roerich were revealed when Wallace was FDR's Vice President. Wallace was replaced with Harry S Truman. One wonders if Wallace with his esoteric Buddhist leanings would have dropped the A-bombs to end the War.

    Roerich's paintings of the Himalayas are quite haunting and they inspired H.P Lovecraft to write The Mountains of Madness (set in Antartica, not the Himalayas). The Mountains of Madness is a central tome in Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos and likely one of the first manifestations of ancient astronauts theory in literature.

    Wallace made a speech about a world government with nukes that would ensure eternal peace. I think he would have been okay with the bomb.

    Roerich incidentally also was the art director for the original ballet rus production of the rite of spring. Theosophy had a strangely wide reach, and they don’t even teach it in schools.

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  46. Jake says:

    Being that the road to Hell is paved with good intentions, i matters not a jot that Wallace was a tragic dupe. The man did much evil, which reverberates to this day, as is seen in that grandson.

    The vast majority of people who are necessary to Leftist evil are like Wallace: they are extremely naive and have the best of intentions. Add bit if self-righteous hubris, and you bring us more Gulags.

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  47. Jake says:
    @IHTG
    For a while during the election, David Frum thought it was the most clever thing in the world to say that "Donald Trump is a blend of George Wallace and Henry Wallace".

    The genius of Frum. If only the white trash of Middle America would just bow before it ….

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  48. Yak-15 says:

    There is no irony in the NYT’s differing narratives.

    Communism and the empowerment of the proletariat is always good. Russian communists were good thinkers who went askew in their methodology.

    Nationalism and the construction of the strong nation state is Hitlerian. Russian attempts to combat their many social problems through local nation-building suffers from horrible ideology defects.

    See the difference?

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  49. slumber_j says:
    @syonredux

    Owen Lattimore was a celebrated Old China Hand in the federal government who was later persecuted by anti-Communists for being sympathetic to Mao.

     

    And his brother was the noted Classicist and translator Richmond Lattimore. His translations of The Iliad and The Odyssey are regarded as pretty much the gold standard in the field.



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmond_Lattimore

    Not only that, but R. Lattimore gets a shout-out in Frank O’Hara’s poem “The Day Lady Died.” Which is pretty cool, if you ask me:

    I go on to the bank
    and Miss Stillwagon (first name Linda I once heard)
    doesn’t even look up my balance for once in her life
    and in the GOLDEN GRIFFIN I get a little Verlaine
    for Patsy with drawings by Bonnard although I do
    think of Hesiod, trans. Richmond Lattimore or
    Brendan Behan’s new play or Le Balcon or Les Nègres
    of Genet, but I don’t, I stick with Verlaine
    after practically going to sleep with quandariness

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  50. Jake says:
    @John Gruskos
    Wallace supported the Soviet Union while Stalin was murdering millions, but turned against the Soviet Union when Khrushchev turned towards moderatism.

    Wallace was never "pro-Russian", he was pro-Bolshevik. Not the same thing - opposite, in fact.

    The same people who today shed crocodile tears over Putin's handful of alleged victims cheered themselves hoarse when Warren Beatty's Reds showered accolades on history's most bloodthirsty monster, Trotsky. To be fair, Reds did critique Zinoviev - for being too pro-Christian! Is there any word which can adequately describe such brazen effrontery?

    Yep

    Though I do think Wallace was a stupidly naive fool, rather than a happy, knowing Stalinist.

    The key is the role of Russia on the world stage. In the 19th century, it was as the Conservative empire. And it was hated and feared and plotted against by Liberals of every nation. The Bolshevik Revolution meant Liberals loved the new USSR. Now, post-USSR, Liberals hate every thing to do with Russia, because Russia seems to be the only European nation to back away from the Liberal kool-aid.

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  51. CK says:
    @Cloud of Probable Matricide
    "Edgar Wallace is Joseph Stalin's Mortimer Snerd."

    But I can't remember who said it.
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    • Replies: @Cloud of Probable Matricide
    Cheers!
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  52. nebulafox says:
    @J.Ross
    The wartime propaganda gem "Mission To Moscow" is not about Wallace per se but illustrates the later-inconceivable penetration of Stalinism in the American government and media, and so breaks the false image of McCarthyism as hysterical. In particular it aggressively advocates for show trials and mass purges in the United States. I fell out of my seat when I saw that: they wanted gulags here. The viewer is assured by American technical advisors who have gone "beyond the Urals" to help production that Hitlerites infest every US factory, that only KGB methods can bring security, and that show trials are entirely respectable.

    This is something of a rambling comment, I hope it doesn’t annoy you…

    I’ve always been of the opinion that the American intellectual hatred and disdain for the petty bourgeois class stems not as much from the typical Marxist hatred that stems from their unreliable class struggle status, but from the fact that they are the quintessential backbone of America, as Ben Franklin aptly put it. America is a fundamentally petty bourgeois nation in a way European nations aren’t. That they were paranoid that they’d bring fascism, as in Europe, and that they sensed the fact, America’s petty bourgeois class didn’t particularly fear or respect them. That’s why you constantly see the “we need Plato style gatekeepers” undercurrent among American intellectuals-just look at Gopnik’s recent rubbish in the New Yorker. Journalists and intellectuals only tend to want democracy insofar as it results in outcomes that are pleasing to them.

    Anyway, more on topic: there’s a big difference between making a deal with the devil to prevent Generalplan Ost, and making the devil out to be any sort of idol. A lot of lefties in the 1940s confused the two, with varying degrees of consciousness. (Wallace, to his credit, recognized his mistakes later on.) Switching gears to modern day America, I don’t think your typical bien-pensant American left-winger necessary wants violence, given that the Left would probably lose in a civil conflict since the right-wingers would inherit the ex-Marines, cops, prison guards, etc, but I do think they are emphatically authoritarian on groupthink, and increasingly brook no dissent. Radicalization breeds counter-radicalization, hence, Trump shifting the Overton Window. Anyway, it’s not particularly shocking that certain sectors of intellectuals tend to be attracted to utopian authoritarian movements. This isn’t limited to Stalinism-just look at the profiles of the leaders of the Einsatzgruppen in the East. Parade of doctorates. Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge is arguably the closest regime that has come to being dominated by intellectuals.

    As for Tailgunner Joe, I’ve already mentioned in another thread that he was an utter gift to the Kremlin. People don’t often grasped how deeply the Soviets penetrated our government by 1945-Harry Dexter White is a prominent example of how high up it went sometimes. By the early 1950s, the Soviet espionage network in the US was under serious strain-the convictions of prominent spies such as Alger Hiss and Julius Rosenberg was only the tip of the iceberg. Truman had cleaned out the pro-Moscow Left from the Democratic Party and, through the good and willing graces of J. Edgar Hoover and his merry men, cracked down very, very hard on Soviet intelligence activities. On the foreign front, Stalin’s plans to intervene in Yugoslavia went down the drain the moment the US intervened in Korea, and the Marshall Plan was taking off in Western Europe, making it clear that the US had the superior model to anyone with a semi-functioning brain. McCarthy and his blindingly obvious violations of civil liberties and exploitation of public fear more or less rescued them.

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    • Replies: @dfordoom

    Journalists and intellectuals only tend to want democracy insofar as it results in outcomes that are pleasing to them.
     
    Nobody wants democracy unless it results in outcomes that are pleasing to them. That's why nobody wants free elections unless they're sure the result will be an "acceptable" one. As long as the choice is confined to parties that are basically interchangeable everyone is happy. Or at least everyone who matters is happy.

    Anyone who thinks elections make a difference hasn't been paying attention.
    , @dfordoom

    Switching gears to modern day America, I don’t think your typical bien-pensant American left-winger necessary wants violence, given that the Left would probably lose in a civil conflict
     
    The American Fake Left (there is no genuine Left in America these days) is not worried about the possibility of violence. They are confident that the police, the military and the intelligence community will back them. And they're right. If it came to civil war it would be all over within 48 hours.
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  53. anonymuss says:
    @Dan Hayes
    Steve,

    In one of his book (perhaps the Gulag Archipelago), Solzhenitsyn described a bunch of credulous American visitors to a sham Soviet Potemkin Village prison camp which was "renovated" for the visitors. Among the willingly duped visitors were Eleanor Roosevelt and a bunch of Quakers.

    When I read this my respect and admiration for Solzhenitsyn soared!

    Solzhenitsyn opened many eyes to the realities inside the USSR. If you could get through his depressing books, there were many lessons for humanity. Of course, the true believers rejected his books and accused him of only writing for the money and the promise of a mistress in the West. That denialist sentiment lingers in a few houses in New York and other places.

    Read More
    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Reading the Gulag was painful. I could not have endured it without knowing that he would address Harvard. Of course the Harvard crew was, and is, too stupid to learn from Solzhenitsyn. Because Harvard Superiorness! And Bigly Bigness!
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  54. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    “Of course, Henry A. Wallace, the only geneticist to rise high in American politics, was pretty much of a tool of the Kremlin for much of the 1940s.”

    I wonder how many people actually know this (besides the readers of iSteve). Or recognize the name “Owen Lattimore.” Or (whilst on the subject of the USSR) recognize the name “Walter Duranty?”

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  55. The Democratic Party’s big city bosses forced FDR to drop him from the ticket in 1944…

    When he ran for President on a 4th party…

    In 1944, FDR needed the votes of two third parties to carry his home state– the American Labor to his left, and the Liberal to his right. But that was also true in 1940, so it doesn’t look like Wallace was a factor in this. (Willkie and Dewey got the most votes on a single line.)

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    • Replies: @Alden
    The southerners the very powerful KKK and the northern democrats united against Wallace. By 1944 it was obvious to every Dr and nurse who saw him on his weekly newsreels that FDR was dying of cardiovascular disease. If Wallace had been VP instead of Truman we would have had a new age mystic communist dupe as President a few months after FDR's 4th inauguration.
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  56. @Peripatetic commenter

    The same people who today shed crocodile tears over Putin’s handful of alleged victims cheered themselves hoarse when Warren Beatty’s Reds showered accolades on history’s most bloodthirsty monster, Trotsky.
     
    Surely Stalin's and Mao's victim counts are much larger.

    Also, we don't yet know what Trump's victim count is going to be, as the Democrats would likely remind us.

    One of Trotsky’s main complaints was that Stalin was too soft on the kulaks.

    Trotsky’s goals, export the revolution and permanent revolution, would have entailed a permanent globalized Red Terror.

    Fortunately Trotsky, unlike Stalin and Mao, didn’t get a chance to fully slake his blood thirst.

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    • Replies: @dfordoom

    One of Trotsky’s main complaints was that Stalin was too soft on the kulaks.

    Trotsky’s goals, export the revolution and permanent revolution, would have entailed a permanent globalized Red Terror.

    Fortunately Trotsky, unlike Stalin and Mao, didn’t get a chance to fully slake his blood thirst.
     
    Stalin ended the Revolution. He was the Soviet Napoleon.
    , @SteveRogers42
    Eventually, Trotsky got the point.
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  57. J1234 says:

    If we’re talking about Russian influence with (and traitorous betrayal by) US politicians, the NYT should pursue the Trump-Russia connection with the same fervor they pursued the Al Gore-Soviet Union connection via Armand Hammer back in the late 1980′s. Which is very little to none at all.

    http://www.wnd.com/2000/10/4294/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armand_Hammer#Hammer.27s_association_with_the_Gore_family

    And here’s the NYT book review (from 1996) of Edward Jay Epstein’s book about Armand Hammer, written after Hammer’s death in the 1990′s. (Hammer was so powerful that he could successfully destroy anyone who wrote anything critical about him. Such criticism had to be posthumous.)

    http://www.nytimes.com/1996/10/13/books/the-last-tycoon.html

    Notice that the NYT reviewer doesn’t make one mention (in 14 long paragraphs) of Hammer’s extensive connections to both Al Gore Sr. and Al Gore Jr., a connection that was emphasized heavily in Epstein’s book. Al Gore Jr. was vice-president at the time of the review.

    I particularly like the last paragraph of the review…I can’t think of a more cowardly display of “journalism”:

    The portrait ought to be repellent. Yet Hammer emerges as one of those larger-than-life figures who somehow hoist themselves above the rules and leave us more timid souls, rather than condemning them, marveling that such people exist.

    Same thing goes for then vice-president Gore, so it seems.

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    • Replies: @Alden
    Right, Armand Hammer went shopping for a useful idiot and found an obscure Tennessean, Al Gore's father and made him into a Senator and Hamner's chief lobbyist in Washington.
    Hammer's father Julius, illegal abortionist and richest bootlegger in America during prohibition was one of the proud founders of the communist party in America.

    Armand Hammer was also a major financial contributor to school busing Brown vs Topeka, Mecklenburg etc and discrimination against Whites, Griggs vs Duke Power and Kaiser vs Weber.

    Julius was an immigrant of course.
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  58. @Clifford Brown
    Henry Wallace was a Theosophist and occult obsessive. His guru was Russian Theosophist and painter Nicholas Roerich. It was likely Roerich's influence that lead Wallace to convince FDR to place The Great Seal (Eye over the Pyramid/ "Novus Ordo Seclorum" you know the drill) on the back of the Dollar Bill. Wallace was so inspired by Roerich that Wallace, then Secretary of Agriculture, used federal funds to send Roerich on an ostensible seed collecting tour of Tibet and Outer Mongolia.

    Unfortunately for Wallace, Roerich apparently was more interested in fomenting political revolution in Mongolia. For what purposes remains somewhat unclear, but likely aligning with Buddhist Lamas against various secular powers in the region to instigate some sort of Theosophy inspired theocracy. One can assume he was searching for the mythical Aryan homeland of Shambhala in the Gobi desert based on the teachings of Madame Blavatsky. Maybe it was all a deep cover US intelligence op to counter the Nazi paranormal Ahnenerbe squads that were also "doing research" in the same general area. Either way, Wallace was operating pretty far off script and revealed as a bit of a kooky embarrassment at best to FDR's re-election. Wallace's connections and guru letters with Roerich were revealed when Wallace was FDR's Vice President. Wallace was replaced with Harry S Truman. One wonders if Wallace with his esoteric Buddhist leanings would have dropped the A-bombs to end the War.

    Roerich's paintings of the Himalayas are quite haunting and they inspired H.P Lovecraft to write The Mountains of Madness (set in Antartica, not the Himalayas). The Mountains of Madness is a central tome in Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos and likely one of the first manifestations of ancient astronauts theory in literature.

    I hadn’t heard of Roerich’s Asian buccaneering before. I knew of him primarily as a rather good painter of Eastern religio-spiritual themes. There is an engaging museum of his art in upper Manhattan. If memory serves, he also made costume and scenery designs for Stravinsky’s Le Sacre du printemps (The Rite of Spring) ballet.

    For good or ill, these kind of political/artistic/literary renaissance men no longer seem to exist. Bill Clinton’s saxophone playing doesn’t even merit mentioning.

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  59. Alden says:
    @Henry's Cat
    What's the dope on Armand Hammer? Was he working for them, for us or just himself?

    Armand hammer worked for the Soviet Union 30% and 70% for himself. Among his other crimes was looting Spain of machinery and industrial equipment when the communists lost the civil war.

    Hammer had ships standing by in the Mediterranean ports. The loot was loaded and then east to the Black Sea and the Crimean ports.

    He was the Soros of his time. He and his father began as bootleggers with their pharmaceutical “ginger tonic ” and proceeded to loot Russia after the Reds took over.

    Every time I go by his museum I want to burn it down. He finally retired to Los Angeles. His PR guys kept the great philanthropist constantly in the papers till thanks be to God he finally died. Then it was a solid 3 years of praise for all his good works.

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  60. Alden says:
    @J1234
    If we're talking about Russian influence with (and traitorous betrayal by) US politicians, the NYT should pursue the Trump-Russia connection with the same fervor they pursued the Al Gore-Soviet Union connection via Armand Hammer back in the late 1980's. Which is very little to none at all.

    http://www.wnd.com/2000/10/4294/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armand_Hammer#Hammer.27s_association_with_the_Gore_family

    And here's the NYT book review (from 1996) of Edward Jay Epstein's book about Armand Hammer, written after Hammer's death in the 1990's. (Hammer was so powerful that he could successfully destroy anyone who wrote anything critical about him. Such criticism had to be posthumous.)

    http://www.nytimes.com/1996/10/13/books/the-last-tycoon.html

    Notice that the NYT reviewer doesn't make one mention (in 14 long paragraphs) of Hammer's extensive connections to both Al Gore Sr. and Al Gore Jr., a connection that was emphasized heavily in Epstein's book. Al Gore Jr. was vice-president at the time of the review.

    I particularly like the last paragraph of the review...I can't think of a more cowardly display of "journalism":


    The portrait ought to be repellent. Yet Hammer emerges as one of those larger-than-life figures who somehow hoist themselves above the rules and leave us more timid souls, rather than condemning them, marveling that such people exist.

     

    Same thing goes for then vice-president Gore, so it seems.

    Right, Armand Hammer went shopping for a useful idiot and found an obscure Tennessean, Al Gore’s father and made him into a Senator and Hamner’s chief lobbyist in Washington.
    Hammer’s father Julius, illegal abortionist and richest bootlegger in America during prohibition was one of the proud founders of the communist party in America.

    Armand Hammer was also a major financial contributor to school busing Brown vs Topeka, Mecklenburg etc and discrimination against Whites, Griggs vs Duke Power and Kaiser vs Weber.

    Julius was an immigrant of course.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    It's traitors -- traitors -- all the way down.
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  61. Alden says:
    @Clifford Brown
    Henry Wallace was a Theosophist and occult obsessive. His guru was Russian Theosophist and painter Nicholas Roerich. It was likely Roerich's influence that lead Wallace to convince FDR to place The Great Seal (Eye over the Pyramid/ "Novus Ordo Seclorum" you know the drill) on the back of the Dollar Bill. Wallace was so inspired by Roerich that Wallace, then Secretary of Agriculture, used federal funds to send Roerich on an ostensible seed collecting tour of Tibet and Outer Mongolia.

    Unfortunately for Wallace, Roerich apparently was more interested in fomenting political revolution in Mongolia. For what purposes remains somewhat unclear, but likely aligning with Buddhist Lamas against various secular powers in the region to instigate some sort of Theosophy inspired theocracy. One can assume he was searching for the mythical Aryan homeland of Shambhala in the Gobi desert based on the teachings of Madame Blavatsky. Maybe it was all a deep cover US intelligence op to counter the Nazi paranormal Ahnenerbe squads that were also "doing research" in the same general area. Either way, Wallace was operating pretty far off script and revealed as a bit of a kooky embarrassment at best to FDR's re-election. Wallace's connections and guru letters with Roerich were revealed when Wallace was FDR's Vice President. Wallace was replaced with Harry S Truman. One wonders if Wallace with his esoteric Buddhist leanings would have dropped the A-bombs to end the War.

    Roerich's paintings of the Himalayas are quite haunting and they inspired H.P Lovecraft to write The Mountains of Madness (set in Antartica, not the Himalayas). The Mountains of Madness is a central tome in Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos and likely one of the first manifestations of ancient astronauts theory in literature.

    Very interesting. That was the same time Ho Chi Minh was planting communist agents in Buddhist monasteries in Vietnam. Thanks for the info.

    But no one cares today about the communist roots of the war against White Americans via discrimination, ethnic cleansing, and black on White terrorism.

    And the capitalists are as involved in exterminating us as much as the communists were. But the capitalists and their non White workers in every job from surgeon to dishwasher are far more successful.

    There was a man named Jorge Ramos on tv last night. He claimed the Hispanics are not invading the USA because they are invited by American business. He told the absolute truth.

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  62. Hammer is buried in the same cemetery as Marilyn Monroe. My mother’s parents are there as well (very near Marilyn) so I always visit when I am in the area.
    Something always leads me by the Hammer mausoleum, an action I accompany with a curse upon his memory.

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    • Replies: @Alden
    Sometimes my Jewish friends ask me to go to. events at the Hammer Museum.
    I am not polite when I refuse. If you don't want your head to explode don't go by in Saint MLK month and the following black history month.
    Know why February is black history month. Because January is Saint MLK month. The propaganda starts the first week of January and doesn't stop till the middle of March, even in schools where the kids are 95 percent Hispanic immigrants.
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  63. Alden says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Democratic Party’s big city bosses forced FDR to drop him from the ticket in 1944...

    When he ran for President on a 4th party...
     
    In 1944, FDR needed the votes of two third parties to carry his home state-- the American Labor to his left, and the Liberal to his right. But that was also true in 1940, so it doesn't look like Wallace was a factor in this. (Willkie and Dewey got the most votes on a single line.)

    The southerners the very powerful KKK and the northern democrats united against Wallace. By 1944 it was obvious to every Dr and nurse who saw him on his weekly newsreels that FDR was dying of cardiovascular disease. If Wallace had been VP instead of Truman we would have had a new age mystic communist dupe as President a few months after FDR’s 4th inauguration.

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    • Replies: @prosa123
    When FDR finally died, his arteries were so atherosclerotic the embalmers had a very difficult task.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    If Wallace had been VP instead of Truman we would have had a new age mystic communist dupe as President a few months after FDR’s 4th inauguration
     
    Instead, we got a failed suit salesman who introduced nuclear war to the world-- by waging it on women and children.

    But at least the economy picked up. That's all that counts.
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  64. Alden says:
    @Old Palo Altan
    Hammer is buried in the same cemetery as Marilyn Monroe. My mother's parents are there as well (very near Marilyn) so I always visit when I am in the area.
    Something always leads me by the Hammer mausoleum, an action I accompany with a curse upon his memory.

    Sometimes my Jewish friends ask me to go to. events at the Hammer Museum.
    I am not polite when I refuse. If you don’t want your head to explode don’t go by in Saint MLK month and the following black history month.
    Know why February is black history month. Because January is Saint MLK month. The propaganda starts the first week of January and doesn’t stop till the middle of March, even in schools where the kids are 95 percent Hispanic immigrants.

    Read More
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  65. prosa123 says: • Website
    @Alden
    The southerners the very powerful KKK and the northern democrats united against Wallace. By 1944 it was obvious to every Dr and nurse who saw him on his weekly newsreels that FDR was dying of cardiovascular disease. If Wallace had been VP instead of Truman we would have had a new age mystic communist dupe as President a few months after FDR's 4th inauguration.

    When FDR finally died, his arteries were so atherosclerotic the embalmers had a very difficult task.

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    • Replies: @Alden
    Even in newsreels it was obvious to medical people and families of people who died from cardiovascular disease.
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  66. Gringo says:
    @Diversity Heretic
    Henry Wallace (from Iowa) also published Wallace's Farmer and founded Pioneer Seed Corn. I believe that he publically recanted his previous Communist tolerant views in a book entitled Why I Was Wrong. Intellectual brilliance does not, unfortunately, always result in political perspicacity. I don't know what Henry Wallace would have made of Donald Trump but I'll bet that he would have been more sympathetic to Trump supporters than is his grandson.

    Diversity Heretic:

    I believe that he publically recanted his previous Communist tolerant views in a book entitled Why I Was Wrong. Intellectual brilliance does not, unfortunately, always result in political perspicacity. I don’t know what Henry Wallace would have made of Donald Trump but I’ll bet that he would have been more sympathetic to Trump supporters than is his grandson.

    Good point. I wonder what Henry Wallace’s grandson thinks of his grandfather’s change- surely he is aware of it. Perhaps the grandson believes that there was the the good grandpa and the bad grandpa. The Wikipedia article Henry A. Wallace has more information on Henry Wallace’s change. He supported the US effort in the Korean War- which is hardly the position that Henry Wallace would have taken in his communist dupe stage in the 1940s. In addition, Henry Wallace supported Eisenhower and Nixon in their campaigns for President.

    Trivia note: According to Wikipedia, his recanting was named Where I Was Wrong. The article is located:Henry A. Wallace (1952), “Where I Was Wrong”, The Week Magazine (September 7):

    Here are startling admissions from a former vice-president of the United States. For years a Russian apologist, he now tells “Where I Was Wrong”, by Henry A. Wallace.

    Wallace says his big mistake was not denouncing Red coup in Czechoslovakia.

    Henry A. Wallace:

    Many people have asked me how I reconcile my stand before Korea with my uncompromising anti-Communist attitude of the past two years The answer is simple.

    Before 1949 I thought Russia really wanted and needed peace. After 1949 I became more and more disgusted with the Soviet methods and finally became convinced that the Politburo wanted the Cold War continued indefinitely, even at the peril of accidentally provoking a hot war.

    In this article eI shall speak frankly of some of the circumstances which have caused me to revise my attitude.

    Reports from Czechoslovakia

    Among the fist were the shocking revelations of the activities of Russia’s atomic spies. This plus the testimony of American ex-Communists convinced me that Russia had been getting information illegally to which neither she nor any other nation was entitled.

    Next, I was deeply moved by reports of friends who had visited Czechoslovakia shortly after the Communist took control. In the summer of 1949, a member of the Progressive Party visited Czechoslovakia and reported the dispossession of relatives whose only crime was to own a small business. No one, I was told, could amount to anything who was not an outspoken critic of the U.S. and capitalism. Only Moscow-trained Communists were allowed in positions of authority.

    As I look back over the past 10 years, I now feel that my greatest mistake was in not denouncing the Communist take-over of Czechoslovakia of 1948.

    Ruthless Nature of Communism

    At that time I labored under the illusion that the Communists had beaten us to the punch in popular appeal, and that they had the support of most of the people, who feared a resurgent Germany more than a domineering Russia. Therefore I said democratic Czechoslovakia was a victim of the Cold War. Her hatred and fear of the Germans had thrown her into the arms of Russia, and placed first Benes and Masaryk and finally the Czech-born Communists in an impossible position.

    In other words, I blamed the Communist coup in Czechoslovakia partly on geography and partly on history.

    Up to a point, my analysis was sound, but it failed utterly to take into account the ruthless nature of Russian-trained Communists whose sole objective was to make Czechoslovakia completely subservient to Moscow.

    Time has also brought me new understanding of the Korean question. In 1948 I believed both Russia and the U.S. should take their troops out of Korea.

    Today, knowing more about Russia’s methods, I am sure it was a serious mistake when we withdrew our troops. Russia may not want a hot war at tang time in the net ten years, but she certainly wants such a continuation of the Col War as will enable her, through her satellites and internally-planted subversives, to take over the greatest amount of territory possible. Russia is still on the march, and the question now is whether she will be able to take over all of Asia, including India and the Near East.

    Turning back to World War II, it is necessary to mention the period in 1944 when I went across Soviet Asia to China on a wartime mission for the President. My only instructions from Roosevelt as far as the Russians were concerned was to take a look at their agricultural experiment stations, factories, and schools. And, of course, Roosevelt was always interested in the Gobi desert and the vegetation there, past, present, and future.

    I was not sent to gain secret information of any kind. No mention was made of slave-labor camps. I had not the slightest idea when I visited Magdan that this far-north Pacific port–center of a vast, sub-arctic gold field–was also the center for administering the labor of both criminals and those suspected of political disloyalty.

    Slave Labor

    Nothing I saw at Magadan or anywhere else in Soviet Asia suggested slave labor. True, I had heard that many kulaks who had their farms taken from them in the early ;30s and been sent to Siberia, but I had not the slightest idea that there ere many slave-labor camps in Siberia in 1944 and that of these the most notorious was Magadan.

    On the other hand, I had long had the idea that the RUssians might actually be doing a better job of developing the agriculture and industry of their Far North than we were doing in Alaska. Therefore I visited every factory, school, and agricultural experiment station I possibly could.

    Russian hospitality is proverbial, and it is not surprising that on this occasion the Russians should do everything possible to impress the Vice-President of the country which was sending them so many billions of dollars of vital necessities of many kinds. So on the whole these visits made a most favorable impression on me.

    But, as I now know, this impression was not the complete one. Elinor Lippor, who was a slave laborer in the Magadan area for many years, has subsequently described the great effort put forth by the Soviet authorities to pull the wool over our eyes and make Magadan into a Potemkin village for my inspection. Watch towers were torn down. Prisoners were herded away out of sight. On this basis, what we was prodded a false impression. I was amazed that the Russians could do so much in such short time–as was Wendell Willkie, who had visited the same region in 1942. But unfortunately neither Willkie nor I knew the full truth. As guests we were shown only one side of the coin.

    Even so, what we saw was important and should never be forgotten in these days when so many people contemplate the possibility of conflict in the Northern Pacific. The Soviets in their totalitarian way have done their best to bring the full power of science to bear on those areas which they deem of strategic importance….

    Willkie as well as I had been greatly impressed with the rapid development of eastern Siberia and had likened it to the American Far West expansion in the 19th century. We were rightly interested in the immense human labor being put forth under the most difficult conditions. What we didn’t see were the living conditions of the slave workers.

    “I Was Too Impressed”……

    As I look back across my trip across Soviet Asia to China, I can see after reading accounts by former slave laborers who escaped from Siberia that I was altogether too much impressed by the show put on by high Russian officials, who as human beings seemed just like typical capitalistic “go-getters”….
    More and more I am convinced that Russian Communism in its total disregard of truth, in its fanaticism, its intolerance and its resolute denial of God and religion is something utterly evil.

    Wallace made a prescient prediction of the Sino-Soviet split, nearly a decade before it occurred.


    I had seen some evidence of the common man on the march in Asia in 1944, but what I did not see was the Soviet determination to enslave the common man morally, mentally, and physically for its own imperial purposes. Today the Soviet Union has, for the moment, through Mao Tse-tung, millions of Chinese workers at its disposal to be impressed into the Chinese army.

    What Moscow does not seem to realize is that the dragon which she has stirred out of its sleep may turn on her. At the moment, for the sake of chasing the white man out of Korea, the Chinese Communists may profess loyalty to Moscow, but in the long run the Chinese will not love the Russian white man any better than the American or Western European. Chine will find there is no net gain for China in trading Chinese feudalism and colonialism for Russian Communism. ……

    He further admits his mistake.

    Many people believe Roosevelt and I tried to appease Russia. It is true that both of us saw the possibility of future conflict and wanted to prevent it. But I am one o those who believe that if Roosevelt had remained alive and in good health the whole course of history would have been changed and we would not today be spending $60 billion a year on arms.

    What I wanted was peace, but not peace at the price of Communist domination. I thought the Soviets had more sense than to do what they have been doing during the past few years.

    There I was proved wrong by subsequent nets. yet I know I am not wrong in predicting that if the Soviets continue along present lines they may possibly cause disaster to the whole Western World–but in the process they will certainly destroy the Politburo, the Communist Party in Russia, and bring misery to the people of Russia and her satellites.

    Yes, Henry Wallace in the 1940s was a communist dupe. But even Henry Wallace wised up. Apparently his grandson never got the message- or resolutely tried to ignore the message. Much of what Henry Wallace wrote in “Where I Was Wrong” could have come from the pen of William F. Buckley.

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    • Replies: @Alden
    Probably did come from the pen of Bill Buckley.
    , @Alden
    Th reason Wallace predicted the Sino Soviet split was probably because his Soviet handlers told him the soviets were worried.
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  67. Alden says:
    @Dumbo
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/11/opinion/sunday/the-census-and-right-wing-hysteria.html

    the number of mixed-race people who see themselves as white will grow much more in the coming decades, primarily as a result of increasing Latino-white and Asian-white intermarriages. By the 2040s, when the children of these unions have become adults, a significant number will marry whites themselves and become parents — thereby further increasing the population seen as white and thus the white majority.
     
    "People who see themselves as white" = "People who believe they are white"?

    Maybe Asians, but we are getting more and more Hispanic pure Indians who are completely distinct from European Hispanics. It would probably take 7 White and just 1 gr grandparents to make them look White.

    BUT BUT, the most important thing is the Hispanic last name for the purpose of the census and affirmative action. Can’t you write any race on the census and no one ever checks?

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  68. Alden says:
    @prosa123
    When FDR finally died, his arteries were so atherosclerotic the embalmers had a very difficult task.

    Even in newsreels it was obvious to medical people and families of people who died from cardiovascular disease.

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  69. Alden says:
    @Fran Macadam
    "So, I think Wallace was more of a tragic dupe of Russia than a really bad guy."

    A tragic dupe of the Soviets, to be more accurate. There's too much conflation of the former with the latter, these days to avoid parsing closely.

    Wallace was a true believer in communism and the Soviet version of it. Had he been younger he would have supported Pol Pot.

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  70. Alden says:
    @Gringo
    Diversity Heretic:

    I believe that he publically recanted his previous Communist tolerant views in a book entitled Why I Was Wrong. Intellectual brilliance does not, unfortunately, always result in political perspicacity. I don’t know what Henry Wallace would have made of Donald Trump but I’ll bet that he would have been more sympathetic to Trump supporters than is his grandson.
     
    Good point. I wonder what Henry Wallace's grandson thinks of his grandfather's change- surely he is aware of it. Perhaps the grandson believes that there was the the good grandpa and the bad grandpa. The Wikipedia article Henry A. Wallace has more information on Henry Wallace's change. He supported the US effort in the Korean War- which is hardly the position that Henry Wallace would have taken in his communist dupe stage in the 1940s. In addition, Henry Wallace supported Eisenhower and Nixon in their campaigns for President.

    Trivia note: According to Wikipedia, his recanting was named Where I Was Wrong. The article is located:Henry A. Wallace (1952), "Where I Was Wrong", The Week Magazine (September 7):

    Here are startling admissions from a former vice-president of the United States. For years a Russian apologist, he now tells "Where I Was Wrong", by Henry A. Wallace.

    Wallace says his big mistake was not denouncing Red coup in Czechoslovakia.

    Henry A. Wallace:

    Many people have asked me how I reconcile my stand before Korea with my uncompromising anti-Communist attitude of the past two years The answer is simple.

    Before 1949 I thought Russia really wanted and needed peace. After 1949 I became more and more disgusted with the Soviet methods and finally became convinced that the Politburo wanted the Cold War continued indefinitely, even at the peril of accidentally provoking a hot war.

    In this article eI shall speak frankly of some of the circumstances which have caused me to revise my attitude.

    Reports from Czechoslovakia

    Among the fist were the shocking revelations of the activities of Russia's atomic spies. This plus the testimony of American ex-Communists convinced me that Russia had been getting information illegally to which neither she nor any other nation was entitled.

    Next, I was deeply moved by reports of friends who had visited Czechoslovakia shortly after the Communist took control. In the summer of 1949, a member of the Progressive Party visited Czechoslovakia and reported the dispossession of relatives whose only crime was to own a small business. No one, I was told, could amount to anything who was not an outspoken critic of the U.S. and capitalism. Only Moscow-trained Communists were allowed in positions of authority.

    As I look back over the past 10 years, I now feel that my greatest mistake was in not denouncing the Communist take-over of Czechoslovakia of 1948.

    Ruthless Nature of Communism

    At that time I labored under the illusion that the Communists had beaten us to the punch in popular appeal, and that they had the support of most of the people, who feared a resurgent Germany more than a domineering Russia. Therefore I said democratic Czechoslovakia was a victim of the Cold War. Her hatred and fear of the Germans had thrown her into the arms of Russia, and placed first Benes and Masaryk and finally the Czech-born Communists in an impossible position.

    In other words, I blamed the Communist coup in Czechoslovakia partly on geography and partly on history.

    Up to a point, my analysis was sound, but it failed utterly to take into account the ruthless nature of Russian-trained Communists whose sole objective was to make Czechoslovakia completely subservient to Moscow.

    Time has also brought me new understanding of the Korean question. In 1948 I believed both Russia and the U.S. should take their troops out of Korea.

    Today, knowing more about Russia's methods, I am sure it was a serious mistake when we withdrew our troops. Russia may not want a hot war at tang time in the net ten years, but she certainly wants such a continuation of the Col War as will enable her, through her satellites and internally-planted subversives, to take over the greatest amount of territory possible. Russia is still on the march, and the question now is whether she will be able to take over all of Asia, including India and the Near East.

    Turning back to World War II, it is necessary to mention the period in 1944 when I went across Soviet Asia to China on a wartime mission for the President. My only instructions from Roosevelt as far as the Russians were concerned was to take a look at their agricultural experiment stations, factories, and schools. And, of course, Roosevelt was always interested in the Gobi desert and the vegetation there, past, present, and future.

    I was not sent to gain secret information of any kind. No mention was made of slave-labor camps. I had not the slightest idea when I visited Magdan that this far-north Pacific port--center of a vast, sub-arctic gold field--was also the center for administering the labor of both criminals and those suspected of political disloyalty.

    Slave Labor

    Nothing I saw at Magadan or anywhere else in Soviet Asia suggested slave labor. True, I had heard that many kulaks who had their farms taken from them in the early ;30s and been sent to Siberia, but I had not the slightest idea that there ere many slave-labor camps in Siberia in 1944 and that of these the most notorious was Magadan.

    On the other hand, I had long had the idea that the RUssians might actually be doing a better job of developing the agriculture and industry of their Far North than we were doing in Alaska. Therefore I visited every factory, school, and agricultural experiment station I possibly could.

    Russian hospitality is proverbial, and it is not surprising that on this occasion the Russians should do everything possible to impress the Vice-President of the country which was sending them so many billions of dollars of vital necessities of many kinds. So on the whole these visits made a most favorable impression on me.

    But, as I now know, this impression was not the complete one. Elinor Lippor, who was a slave laborer in the Magadan area for many years, has subsequently described the great effort put forth by the Soviet authorities to pull the wool over our eyes and make Magadan into a Potemkin village for my inspection. Watch towers were torn down. Prisoners were herded away out of sight. On this basis, what we was prodded a false impression. I was amazed that the Russians could do so much in such short time--as was Wendell Willkie, who had visited the same region in 1942. But unfortunately neither Willkie nor I knew the full truth. As guests we were shown only one side of the coin.

    Even so, what we saw was important and should never be forgotten in these days when so many people contemplate the possibility of conflict in the Northern Pacific. The Soviets in their totalitarian way have done their best to bring the full power of science to bear on those areas which they deem of strategic importance....


    Willkie as well as I had been greatly impressed with the rapid development of eastern Siberia and had likened it to the American Far West expansion in the 19th century. We were rightly interested in the immense human labor being put forth under the most difficult conditions. What we didn't see were the living conditions of the slave workers.

    "I Was Too Impressed"......

    As I look back across my trip across Soviet Asia to China, I can see after reading accounts by former slave laborers who escaped from Siberia that I was altogether too much impressed by the show put on by high Russian officials, who as human beings seemed just like typical capitalistic "go-getters"....
    More and more I am convinced that Russian Communism in its total disregard of truth, in its fanaticism, its intolerance and its resolute denial of God and religion is something utterly evil.

     
    Wallace made a prescient prediction of the Sino-Soviet split, nearly a decade before it occurred.


    I had seen some evidence of the common man on the march in Asia in 1944, but what I did not see was the Soviet determination to enslave the common man morally, mentally, and physically for its own imperial purposes. Today the Soviet Union has, for the moment, through Mao Tse-tung, millions of Chinese workers at its disposal to be impressed into the Chinese army.

    What Moscow does not seem to realize is that the dragon which she has stirred out of its sleep may turn on her. At the moment, for the sake of chasing the white man out of Korea, the Chinese Communists may profess loyalty to Moscow, but in the long run the Chinese will not love the Russian white man any better than the American or Western European. Chine will find there is no net gain for China in trading Chinese feudalism and colonialism for Russian Communism. ......

     
    He further admits his mistake.

    Many people believe Roosevelt and I tried to appease Russia. It is true that both of us saw the possibility of future conflict and wanted to prevent it. But I am one o those who believe that if Roosevelt had remained alive and in good health the whole course of history would have been changed and we would not today be spending $60 billion a year on arms.

    What I wanted was peace, but not peace at the price of Communist domination. I thought the Soviets had more sense than to do what they have been doing during the past few years.

    There I was proved wrong by subsequent nets. yet I know I am not wrong in predicting that if the Soviets continue along present lines they may possibly cause disaster to the whole Western World--but in the process they will certainly destroy the Politburo, the Communist Party in Russia, and bring misery to the people of Russia and her satellites.

     
    Yes, Henry Wallace in the 1940s was a communist dupe. But even Henry Wallace wised up. Apparently his grandson never got the message- or resolutely tried to ignore the message. Much of what Henry Wallace wrote in "Where I Was Wrong" could have come from the pen of William F. Buckley.

    Probably did come from the pen of Bill Buckley.

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  71. Alden says:
    @Gringo
    Diversity Heretic:

    I believe that he publically recanted his previous Communist tolerant views in a book entitled Why I Was Wrong. Intellectual brilliance does not, unfortunately, always result in political perspicacity. I don’t know what Henry Wallace would have made of Donald Trump but I’ll bet that he would have been more sympathetic to Trump supporters than is his grandson.
     
    Good point. I wonder what Henry Wallace's grandson thinks of his grandfather's change- surely he is aware of it. Perhaps the grandson believes that there was the the good grandpa and the bad grandpa. The Wikipedia article Henry A. Wallace has more information on Henry Wallace's change. He supported the US effort in the Korean War- which is hardly the position that Henry Wallace would have taken in his communist dupe stage in the 1940s. In addition, Henry Wallace supported Eisenhower and Nixon in their campaigns for President.

    Trivia note: According to Wikipedia, his recanting was named Where I Was Wrong. The article is located:Henry A. Wallace (1952), "Where I Was Wrong", The Week Magazine (September 7):

    Here are startling admissions from a former vice-president of the United States. For years a Russian apologist, he now tells "Where I Was Wrong", by Henry A. Wallace.

    Wallace says his big mistake was not denouncing Red coup in Czechoslovakia.

    Henry A. Wallace:

    Many people have asked me how I reconcile my stand before Korea with my uncompromising anti-Communist attitude of the past two years The answer is simple.

    Before 1949 I thought Russia really wanted and needed peace. After 1949 I became more and more disgusted with the Soviet methods and finally became convinced that the Politburo wanted the Cold War continued indefinitely, even at the peril of accidentally provoking a hot war.

    In this article eI shall speak frankly of some of the circumstances which have caused me to revise my attitude.

    Reports from Czechoslovakia

    Among the fist were the shocking revelations of the activities of Russia's atomic spies. This plus the testimony of American ex-Communists convinced me that Russia had been getting information illegally to which neither she nor any other nation was entitled.

    Next, I was deeply moved by reports of friends who had visited Czechoslovakia shortly after the Communist took control. In the summer of 1949, a member of the Progressive Party visited Czechoslovakia and reported the dispossession of relatives whose only crime was to own a small business. No one, I was told, could amount to anything who was not an outspoken critic of the U.S. and capitalism. Only Moscow-trained Communists were allowed in positions of authority.

    As I look back over the past 10 years, I now feel that my greatest mistake was in not denouncing the Communist take-over of Czechoslovakia of 1948.

    Ruthless Nature of Communism

    At that time I labored under the illusion that the Communists had beaten us to the punch in popular appeal, and that they had the support of most of the people, who feared a resurgent Germany more than a domineering Russia. Therefore I said democratic Czechoslovakia was a victim of the Cold War. Her hatred and fear of the Germans had thrown her into the arms of Russia, and placed first Benes and Masaryk and finally the Czech-born Communists in an impossible position.

    In other words, I blamed the Communist coup in Czechoslovakia partly on geography and partly on history.

    Up to a point, my analysis was sound, but it failed utterly to take into account the ruthless nature of Russian-trained Communists whose sole objective was to make Czechoslovakia completely subservient to Moscow.

    Time has also brought me new understanding of the Korean question. In 1948 I believed both Russia and the U.S. should take their troops out of Korea.

    Today, knowing more about Russia's methods, I am sure it was a serious mistake when we withdrew our troops. Russia may not want a hot war at tang time in the net ten years, but she certainly wants such a continuation of the Col War as will enable her, through her satellites and internally-planted subversives, to take over the greatest amount of territory possible. Russia is still on the march, and the question now is whether she will be able to take over all of Asia, including India and the Near East.

    Turning back to World War II, it is necessary to mention the period in 1944 when I went across Soviet Asia to China on a wartime mission for the President. My only instructions from Roosevelt as far as the Russians were concerned was to take a look at their agricultural experiment stations, factories, and schools. And, of course, Roosevelt was always interested in the Gobi desert and the vegetation there, past, present, and future.

    I was not sent to gain secret information of any kind. No mention was made of slave-labor camps. I had not the slightest idea when I visited Magdan that this far-north Pacific port--center of a vast, sub-arctic gold field--was also the center for administering the labor of both criminals and those suspected of political disloyalty.

    Slave Labor

    Nothing I saw at Magadan or anywhere else in Soviet Asia suggested slave labor. True, I had heard that many kulaks who had their farms taken from them in the early ;30s and been sent to Siberia, but I had not the slightest idea that there ere many slave-labor camps in Siberia in 1944 and that of these the most notorious was Magadan.

    On the other hand, I had long had the idea that the RUssians might actually be doing a better job of developing the agriculture and industry of their Far North than we were doing in Alaska. Therefore I visited every factory, school, and agricultural experiment station I possibly could.

    Russian hospitality is proverbial, and it is not surprising that on this occasion the Russians should do everything possible to impress the Vice-President of the country which was sending them so many billions of dollars of vital necessities of many kinds. So on the whole these visits made a most favorable impression on me.

    But, as I now know, this impression was not the complete one. Elinor Lippor, who was a slave laborer in the Magadan area for many years, has subsequently described the great effort put forth by the Soviet authorities to pull the wool over our eyes and make Magadan into a Potemkin village for my inspection. Watch towers were torn down. Prisoners were herded away out of sight. On this basis, what we was prodded a false impression. I was amazed that the Russians could do so much in such short time--as was Wendell Willkie, who had visited the same region in 1942. But unfortunately neither Willkie nor I knew the full truth. As guests we were shown only one side of the coin.

    Even so, what we saw was important and should never be forgotten in these days when so many people contemplate the possibility of conflict in the Northern Pacific. The Soviets in their totalitarian way have done their best to bring the full power of science to bear on those areas which they deem of strategic importance....


    Willkie as well as I had been greatly impressed with the rapid development of eastern Siberia and had likened it to the American Far West expansion in the 19th century. We were rightly interested in the immense human labor being put forth under the most difficult conditions. What we didn't see were the living conditions of the slave workers.

    "I Was Too Impressed"......

    As I look back across my trip across Soviet Asia to China, I can see after reading accounts by former slave laborers who escaped from Siberia that I was altogether too much impressed by the show put on by high Russian officials, who as human beings seemed just like typical capitalistic "go-getters"....
    More and more I am convinced that Russian Communism in its total disregard of truth, in its fanaticism, its intolerance and its resolute denial of God and religion is something utterly evil.

     
    Wallace made a prescient prediction of the Sino-Soviet split, nearly a decade before it occurred.


    I had seen some evidence of the common man on the march in Asia in 1944, but what I did not see was the Soviet determination to enslave the common man morally, mentally, and physically for its own imperial purposes. Today the Soviet Union has, for the moment, through Mao Tse-tung, millions of Chinese workers at its disposal to be impressed into the Chinese army.

    What Moscow does not seem to realize is that the dragon which she has stirred out of its sleep may turn on her. At the moment, for the sake of chasing the white man out of Korea, the Chinese Communists may profess loyalty to Moscow, but in the long run the Chinese will not love the Russian white man any better than the American or Western European. Chine will find there is no net gain for China in trading Chinese feudalism and colonialism for Russian Communism. ......

     
    He further admits his mistake.

    Many people believe Roosevelt and I tried to appease Russia. It is true that both of us saw the possibility of future conflict and wanted to prevent it. But I am one o those who believe that if Roosevelt had remained alive and in good health the whole course of history would have been changed and we would not today be spending $60 billion a year on arms.

    What I wanted was peace, but not peace at the price of Communist domination. I thought the Soviets had more sense than to do what they have been doing during the past few years.

    There I was proved wrong by subsequent nets. yet I know I am not wrong in predicting that if the Soviets continue along present lines they may possibly cause disaster to the whole Western World--but in the process they will certainly destroy the Politburo, the Communist Party in Russia, and bring misery to the people of Russia and her satellites.

     
    Yes, Henry Wallace in the 1940s was a communist dupe. But even Henry Wallace wised up. Apparently his grandson never got the message- or resolutely tried to ignore the message. Much of what Henry Wallace wrote in "Where I Was Wrong" could have come from the pen of William F. Buckley.

    Th reason Wallace predicted the Sino Soviet split was probably because his Soviet handlers told him the soviets were worried.

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  72. Alden says:
    @Chris T.
    ‘Wallace was a security risk during the war in other ways. His sister married the Swiss Ambassador, and Wallace would go to DC parties where his brother-in-law was also invited. And Wallace would be a blowhard, and talk out loud about things he had no business talking about at all.’

    This is interesting information. There was a spy case where a Swiss-American was named as the source. I wonder if there is a connection with Wallace.

    http://chris-intel-corner.blogspot.gr/2014/05/naval-enigma-compromise-and-spy-in.html

    Wallace associated with Donald Maclean as well.

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  73. @anonymous
    One might think a smart man like Wallace would have had some doubts pop up in his mind when he visited Kolyma. Considering the remote location and barren landscape it's hard to imagine it having been cleanable enough to be much of a Potemkin village. This goes beyond gullibility and over to the will to believe.

    It’s merely confirmation bias writ large.

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  74. @anonymuss
    Solzhenitsyn opened many eyes to the realities inside the USSR. If you could get through his depressing books, there were many lessons for humanity. Of course, the true believers rejected his books and accused him of only writing for the money and the promise of a mistress in the West. That denialist sentiment lingers in a few houses in New York and other places.

    Reading the Gulag was painful. I could not have endured it without knowing that he would address Harvard. Of course the Harvard crew was, and is, too stupid to learn from Solzhenitsyn. Because Harvard Superiorness! And Bigly Bigness!

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  75. dfordoom says: • Website
    @dearieme
    " ... a tragic dupe of Moscow than a really bad guy": but it is our duty not to become dupes of the forces ranged against our civilisation, whether it be the Soviet Union, the Germany of the National Socialist Workers Party, or the Democratic National Committee.


    P.S. It's just occurred to me that "Democratic National Committee" uses 'Democratic' in much the same way as German Democratic Republic.

    P.S. It’s just occurred to me that “Democratic National Committee” uses ‘Democratic’ in much the same way as German Democratic Republic.

    It’s always wise to be suspicious of any organisation at all that uses the word democratic in its title.

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  76. dfordoom says: • Website
    @TheJester
    Has anyone noticed? The Commies are back (perhaps they never went away)!

    The Cultural Marxism slowly consuming the political, social, and academic institutions in the United States is the Communist social agenda sans state-controlled capitalism. However, Bernie Sanders and his followers have been doing their best to heal this artificial separation by seizing control of private capital via pervasive government regulation to force banks and corporations to redistribute wealth among the masses.

    Europe is even in worse shape. Post-WWII, to fend off Communism there was a formal concordat between labor and capital such that banks and industrialists could keep their wealth in return for giving the Left a free hand in universalizing the socialist social agenda in the reorganization of the European states. However, as the EU developed, the non-elected apparatchiks within the EU slowly seized control of the economies of Europe as well.

    It is with precocious insight and many observers have noticed that the EU is coming to resemble the Soviet Union and its decadent social order in the years before its implosion.

    Are we next?

    It is with precocious insight and many observers have noticed that the EU is coming to resemble the Soviet Union and its decadent social order in the years before its implosion.

    Compared to the modern United States and EU the social order in the Soviet Union was incredibly healthy!

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  77. dfordoom says: • Website
    @nebulafox
    This is something of a rambling comment, I hope it doesn't annoy you...

    I've always been of the opinion that the American intellectual hatred and disdain for the petty bourgeois class stems not as much from the typical Marxist hatred that stems from their unreliable class struggle status, but from the fact that they are the quintessential backbone of America, as Ben Franklin aptly put it. America is a fundamentally petty bourgeois nation in a way European nations aren't. That they were paranoid that they'd bring fascism, as in Europe, and that they sensed the fact, America's petty bourgeois class didn't particularly fear or respect them. That's why you constantly see the "we need Plato style gatekeepers" undercurrent among American intellectuals-just look at Gopnik's recent rubbish in the New Yorker. Journalists and intellectuals only tend to want democracy insofar as it results in outcomes that are pleasing to them.

    Anyway, more on topic: there's a big difference between making a deal with the devil to prevent Generalplan Ost, and making the devil out to be any sort of idol. A lot of lefties in the 1940s confused the two, with varying degrees of consciousness. (Wallace, to his credit, recognized his mistakes later on.) Switching gears to modern day America, I don't think your typical bien-pensant American left-winger necessary wants violence, given that the Left would probably lose in a civil conflict since the right-wingers would inherit the ex-Marines, cops, prison guards, etc, but I do think they are emphatically authoritarian on groupthink, and increasingly brook no dissent. Radicalization breeds counter-radicalization, hence, Trump shifting the Overton Window. Anyway, it's not particularly shocking that certain sectors of intellectuals tend to be attracted to utopian authoritarian movements. This isn't limited to Stalinism-just look at the profiles of the leaders of the Einsatzgruppen in the East. Parade of doctorates. Cambodia's Khmer Rouge is arguably the closest regime that has come to being dominated by intellectuals.

    As for Tailgunner Joe, I've already mentioned in another thread that he was an utter gift to the Kremlin. People don't often grasped how deeply the Soviets penetrated our government by 1945-Harry Dexter White is a prominent example of how high up it went sometimes. By the early 1950s, the Soviet espionage network in the US was under serious strain-the convictions of prominent spies such as Alger Hiss and Julius Rosenberg was only the tip of the iceberg. Truman had cleaned out the pro-Moscow Left from the Democratic Party and, through the good and willing graces of J. Edgar Hoover and his merry men, cracked down very, very hard on Soviet intelligence activities. On the foreign front, Stalin's plans to intervene in Yugoslavia went down the drain the moment the US intervened in Korea, and the Marshall Plan was taking off in Western Europe, making it clear that the US had the superior model to anyone with a semi-functioning brain. McCarthy and his blindingly obvious violations of civil liberties and exploitation of public fear more or less rescued them.

    Journalists and intellectuals only tend to want democracy insofar as it results in outcomes that are pleasing to them.

    Nobody wants democracy unless it results in outcomes that are pleasing to them. That’s why nobody wants free elections unless they’re sure the result will be an “acceptable” one. As long as the choice is confined to parties that are basically interchangeable everyone is happy. Or at least everyone who matters is happy.

    Anyone who thinks elections make a difference hasn’t been paying attention.

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  78. dfordoom says: • Website
    @nebulafox
    This is something of a rambling comment, I hope it doesn't annoy you...

    I've always been of the opinion that the American intellectual hatred and disdain for the petty bourgeois class stems not as much from the typical Marxist hatred that stems from their unreliable class struggle status, but from the fact that they are the quintessential backbone of America, as Ben Franklin aptly put it. America is a fundamentally petty bourgeois nation in a way European nations aren't. That they were paranoid that they'd bring fascism, as in Europe, and that they sensed the fact, America's petty bourgeois class didn't particularly fear or respect them. That's why you constantly see the "we need Plato style gatekeepers" undercurrent among American intellectuals-just look at Gopnik's recent rubbish in the New Yorker. Journalists and intellectuals only tend to want democracy insofar as it results in outcomes that are pleasing to them.

    Anyway, more on topic: there's a big difference between making a deal with the devil to prevent Generalplan Ost, and making the devil out to be any sort of idol. A lot of lefties in the 1940s confused the two, with varying degrees of consciousness. (Wallace, to his credit, recognized his mistakes later on.) Switching gears to modern day America, I don't think your typical bien-pensant American left-winger necessary wants violence, given that the Left would probably lose in a civil conflict since the right-wingers would inherit the ex-Marines, cops, prison guards, etc, but I do think they are emphatically authoritarian on groupthink, and increasingly brook no dissent. Radicalization breeds counter-radicalization, hence, Trump shifting the Overton Window. Anyway, it's not particularly shocking that certain sectors of intellectuals tend to be attracted to utopian authoritarian movements. This isn't limited to Stalinism-just look at the profiles of the leaders of the Einsatzgruppen in the East. Parade of doctorates. Cambodia's Khmer Rouge is arguably the closest regime that has come to being dominated by intellectuals.

    As for Tailgunner Joe, I've already mentioned in another thread that he was an utter gift to the Kremlin. People don't often grasped how deeply the Soviets penetrated our government by 1945-Harry Dexter White is a prominent example of how high up it went sometimes. By the early 1950s, the Soviet espionage network in the US was under serious strain-the convictions of prominent spies such as Alger Hiss and Julius Rosenberg was only the tip of the iceberg. Truman had cleaned out the pro-Moscow Left from the Democratic Party and, through the good and willing graces of J. Edgar Hoover and his merry men, cracked down very, very hard on Soviet intelligence activities. On the foreign front, Stalin's plans to intervene in Yugoslavia went down the drain the moment the US intervened in Korea, and the Marshall Plan was taking off in Western Europe, making it clear that the US had the superior model to anyone with a semi-functioning brain. McCarthy and his blindingly obvious violations of civil liberties and exploitation of public fear more or less rescued them.

    Switching gears to modern day America, I don’t think your typical bien-pensant American left-winger necessary wants violence, given that the Left would probably lose in a civil conflict

    The American Fake Left (there is no genuine Left in America these days) is not worried about the possibility of violence. They are confident that the police, the military and the intelligence community will back them. And they’re right. If it came to civil war it would be all over within 48 hours.

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  79. dfordoom says: • Website
    @John Gruskos
    One of Trotsky's main complaints was that Stalin was too soft on the kulaks.

    Trotsky's goals, export the revolution and permanent revolution, would have entailed a permanent globalized Red Terror.

    Fortunately Trotsky, unlike Stalin and Mao, didn't get a chance to fully slake his blood thirst.

    One of Trotsky’s main complaints was that Stalin was too soft on the kulaks.

    Trotsky’s goals, export the revolution and permanent revolution, would have entailed a permanent globalized Red Terror.

    Fortunately Trotsky, unlike Stalin and Mao, didn’t get a chance to fully slake his blood thirst.

    Stalin ended the Revolution. He was the Soviet Napoleon.

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    One of Trotsky’s main complaints was that Stalin was too soft on the kulaks.

    Trotsky’s goals, export the revolution and permanent revolution, would have entailed a permanent globalized Red Terror.

    Fortunately Trotsky, unlike Stalin and Mao, didn’t get a chance to fully slake his blood thirst.

    Stalin ended the Revolution. He was the Soviet Napoleon.
     
    Dunno. Stalin did quite a bit of "Revolutionary Activity" in the USSR:

    1932-33 Famine: 6 million dead, three million in Ukraine alone

    1937-38 Great Terror: 682,691 deaths. Ethnic operations accounted for 247,157 of the deaths (E.g., the 111,091 people who were killed as part of the "Polish Action")

    Gulag: Approx 1.6 million deaths between 1929 and 1953

    etc, etc
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  80. @Steve Sailer
    Wallace was a rich man from his eugenic breeding of seeds.

    From the looks of his g-granddaughter, he didn’t do much eugenic breeding in his personal life.

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    • Replies: @AnotherGuessModel
    You are being thrown off by her looks because she is obviously not styling herself to look conventionally pretty. She has lovely features.
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  81. @Clifford Brown
    Henry Wallace was a Theosophist and occult obsessive. His guru was Russian Theosophist and painter Nicholas Roerich. It was likely Roerich's influence that lead Wallace to convince FDR to place The Great Seal (Eye over the Pyramid/ "Novus Ordo Seclorum" you know the drill) on the back of the Dollar Bill. Wallace was so inspired by Roerich that Wallace, then Secretary of Agriculture, used federal funds to send Roerich on an ostensible seed collecting tour of Tibet and Outer Mongolia.

    Unfortunately for Wallace, Roerich apparently was more interested in fomenting political revolution in Mongolia. For what purposes remains somewhat unclear, but likely aligning with Buddhist Lamas against various secular powers in the region to instigate some sort of Theosophy inspired theocracy. One can assume he was searching for the mythical Aryan homeland of Shambhala in the Gobi desert based on the teachings of Madame Blavatsky. Maybe it was all a deep cover US intelligence op to counter the Nazi paranormal Ahnenerbe squads that were also "doing research" in the same general area. Either way, Wallace was operating pretty far off script and revealed as a bit of a kooky embarrassment at best to FDR's re-election. Wallace's connections and guru letters with Roerich were revealed when Wallace was FDR's Vice President. Wallace was replaced with Harry S Truman. One wonders if Wallace with his esoteric Buddhist leanings would have dropped the A-bombs to end the War.

    Roerich's paintings of the Himalayas are quite haunting and they inspired H.P Lovecraft to write The Mountains of Madness (set in Antartica, not the Himalayas). The Mountains of Madness is a central tome in Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos and likely one of the first manifestations of ancient astronauts theory in literature.

    “Ph’nglui mglw’nafh Cthulhu R’lyeh wgah’nagl fhtagn.” … “In his house at R’lyeh dead Cthulhu waits dreaming.”

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  82. @John Gruskos
    One of Trotsky's main complaints was that Stalin was too soft on the kulaks.

    Trotsky's goals, export the revolution and permanent revolution, would have entailed a permanent globalized Red Terror.

    Fortunately Trotsky, unlike Stalin and Mao, didn't get a chance to fully slake his blood thirst.

    Eventually, Trotsky got the point.

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    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    SteveRoers42:

    Well said: the point of a climbing axe on Trotsky's skull!
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  83. @Alden
    Right, Armand Hammer went shopping for a useful idiot and found an obscure Tennessean, Al Gore's father and made him into a Senator and Hamner's chief lobbyist in Washington.
    Hammer's father Julius, illegal abortionist and richest bootlegger in America during prohibition was one of the proud founders of the communist party in America.

    Armand Hammer was also a major financial contributor to school busing Brown vs Topeka, Mecklenburg etc and discrimination against Whites, Griggs vs Duke Power and Kaiser vs Weber.

    Julius was an immigrant of course.

    It’s traitors — traitors — all the way down.

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  84. Dan Hayes says:
    @SteveRogers42
    Eventually, Trotsky got the point.

    SteveRoers42:

    Well said: the point of a climbing axe on Trotsky’s skull!

    Read More
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  85. syonredux says:
    @dfordoom

    One of Trotsky’s main complaints was that Stalin was too soft on the kulaks.

    Trotsky’s goals, export the revolution and permanent revolution, would have entailed a permanent globalized Red Terror.

    Fortunately Trotsky, unlike Stalin and Mao, didn’t get a chance to fully slake his blood thirst.
     
    Stalin ended the Revolution. He was the Soviet Napoleon.

    One of Trotsky’s main complaints was that Stalin was too soft on the kulaks.

    Trotsky’s goals, export the revolution and permanent revolution, would have entailed a permanent globalized Red Terror.

    Fortunately Trotsky, unlike Stalin and Mao, didn’t get a chance to fully slake his blood thirst.

    Stalin ended the Revolution. He was the Soviet Napoleon.

    Dunno. Stalin did quite a bit of “Revolutionary Activity” in the USSR:

    1932-33 Famine: 6 million dead, three million in Ukraine alone

    1937-38 Great Terror: 682,691 deaths. Ethnic operations accounted for 247,157 of the deaths (E.g., the 111,091 people who were killed as part of the “Polish Action”)

    Gulag: Approx 1.6 million deaths between 1929 and 1953

    etc, etc

    Read More
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  86. @Dan Hayes
    Steve,

    In one of his book (perhaps the Gulag Archipelago), Solzhenitsyn described a bunch of credulous American visitors to a sham Soviet Potemkin Village prison camp which was "renovated" for the visitors. Among the willingly duped visitors were Eleanor Roosevelt and a bunch of Quakers.

    When I read this my respect and admiration for Solzhenitsyn soared!

    The problem was this often-repeated story is that Eleanor Roosevelt never visited the Soviet Union during the Stalin years. She visited in 1957 and again in 1958. (She also said upon return that “I think I should die if I had to live in Soviet Russia.”) Life was certainly not a bowl of cherries under Khrushchev, but my understanding is that the anecdote is supposed to be a Stalin-era anecdote. In fairness to Solzhenitsyn, I don’t think he claimed to have witnessed it firsthand. I wonder if the (true) Wallace story is the ultimate origin.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    James Kabala,

    Thank you for your welcome comments.

    I never regarded this incidence as being historical fact. What impressed me was the description of the useful idiots: Eleanor Roosevelt and the credulous Quakers. What impressed me about Solzhenitsyn at that time was that he was already aware of these useful idiots and their destructive legacy!

    , @Candide III
    To be fair to Solzhenitsyn, he relates this anecdote not in the "Archipelago", but in the novel "First Circle", and not as a fact, but has one of the protagonists relate it as a maybe-true-story they saw or heard or imagined while in Butyrky prison.
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  87. Mr. Anon says:

    So, I think Wallace was more of a tragic dupe of Moscow than a really bad guy.

    Tragic dupes of bolshevism WERE really bad guys.

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  88. Dan Hayes says:
    @James Kabala
    The problem was this often-repeated story is that Eleanor Roosevelt never visited the Soviet Union during the Stalin years. She visited in 1957 and again in 1958. (She also said upon return that "I think I should die if I had to live in Soviet Russia.") Life was certainly not a bowl of cherries under Khrushchev, but my understanding is that the anecdote is supposed to be a Stalin-era anecdote. In fairness to Solzhenitsyn, I don't think he claimed to have witnessed it firsthand. I wonder if the (true) Wallace story is the ultimate origin.

    James Kabala,

    Thank you for your welcome comments.

    I never regarded this incidence as being historical fact. What impressed me was the description of the useful idiots: Eleanor Roosevelt and the credulous Quakers. What impressed me about Solzhenitsyn at that time was that he was already aware of these useful idiots and their destructive legacy!

    Read More
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  89. @AnotherGuessModel
    Fun trivia: Wallace's great-granddaughter is a Tim Burton-esque model and artist.

    http://forums.thefashionspot.com/f52/victoria-wallace-60301.html

    Her artist boyfriend or husband happens to be a Russian-born immigrant. Both their instagrams have a pro-West, anti-globalism bend that is fairly prevalent in their subculture. Check out the hashtag #deathofthewest on Instagram.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/BMnH8BqhuBi/?taken-by=victoria_wallace&hl=en

    Both their instagrams have a pro-West, anti-globalism bend that is fairly prevalent in their subculture.

    What subculture is that?

    Read More
    • Replies: @AnotherGuessModel
    They seem to be part of the goth-industrial subculture from their style and taste in music and art.
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  90. @Candide III

    Both their instagrams have a pro-West, anti-globalism bend that is fairly prevalent in their subculture.
     
    What subculture is that?

    They seem to be part of the goth-industrial subculture from their style and taste in music and art.

    Read More
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  91. @SteveRogers42
    From the looks of his g-granddaughter, he didn't do much eugenic breeding in his personal life.

    You are being thrown off by her looks because she is obviously not styling herself to look conventionally pretty. She has lovely features.

    Read More
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  92. @James Kabala
    The problem was this often-repeated story is that Eleanor Roosevelt never visited the Soviet Union during the Stalin years. She visited in 1957 and again in 1958. (She also said upon return that "I think I should die if I had to live in Soviet Russia.") Life was certainly not a bowl of cherries under Khrushchev, but my understanding is that the anecdote is supposed to be a Stalin-era anecdote. In fairness to Solzhenitsyn, I don't think he claimed to have witnessed it firsthand. I wonder if the (true) Wallace story is the ultimate origin.

    To be fair to Solzhenitsyn, he relates this anecdote not in the “Archipelago”, but in the novel “First Circle”, and not as a fact, but has one of the protagonists relate it as a maybe-true-story they saw or heard or imagined while in Butyrky prison.

    Read More
    • Agree: Dan Hayes
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  93. @robt
    "People knew the USSR was a totalitarian dictatorship, people knew of the 1930s famine, the show trials ...),

    Not if they were readers of the New York Times and read Duranty's puff pieces and propaganda from the Soviet Union, where he was housed first-class, and for which he got the Pulitzer Prize.

    Whatever else her fault’s , Ayn Rand knew.

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  94. @syonredux

    Owen Lattimore was a celebrated Old China Hand in the federal government who was later persecuted by anti-Communists for being sympathetic to Mao.

     

    And his brother was the noted Classicist and translator Richmond Lattimore. His translations of The Iliad and The Odyssey are regarded as pretty much the gold standard in the field.



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmond_Lattimore

    I’ve always considered E.V. Rieu’s prose translation of “The Iliad” to be the standard of excellence.
    Rieu converted to Christianity in 1947 and this apparently made him socio-politically unacceptable, even though he was a co-founder of Penguin Classics.

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  95. @Alden
    The southerners the very powerful KKK and the northern democrats united against Wallace. By 1944 it was obvious to every Dr and nurse who saw him on his weekly newsreels that FDR was dying of cardiovascular disease. If Wallace had been VP instead of Truman we would have had a new age mystic communist dupe as President a few months after FDR's 4th inauguration.

    If Wallace had been VP instead of Truman we would have had a new age mystic communist dupe as President a few months after FDR’s 4th inauguration

    Instead, we got a failed suit salesman who introduced nuclear war to the world– by waging it on women and children.

    But at least the economy picked up. That’s all that counts.

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  96. @CK
    https://www.thenewamerican.com/culture/history/item/4847-remember-what-about-pearl-harbor
    Claire Booth Luce

    Cheers!

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