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From the New York Times:

Eliud Kipchoge Breaks Two-Hour Marathon Barrier

In Vienna, the Kenyan achieved a milestone once believed to be unattainable. But his time, 1:59:40, will not be recognized as a world record.

By Andrew Keh, Oct. 12, 2019

VIENNA — On Saturday morning in Vienna, on a course specially chosen for speed, in an athletic spectacle of historic proportions, Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya ran 26.2 miles in a once-inconceivable time of 1 hour 59 minutes 40 seconds.

In becoming the first person to cover the marathon distance in less than two hours, Kipchoge, 34, achieved a sports milestone granted almost mythical status in the running world, breaking through a temporal barrier that many would have deemed untouchable only a few years ago.

Still, the eye-popping time will not be officially recognized as a world record because it was not run under open marathon conditions and because it featured a dense rotation of Olympic pacesetters.

This wasn’t a public marathon with thousands of participants, it was a one man about four times around an extremely flat and mostly straight course, with a pacing car and human pace-setters recruited from top athletes like Matthew Centrowitz, the U.S. gold medalist in the 1500m in the 2016 Olympics.

But, still, it was 26.2 miles in under 2 hours.

Kipchoge is from the Nandi district of the Kalenjin highlanders of Kenya who have furnished so many famous runners, such as Kipchoge Keino, who defeated the American Jim Ryun at 7,300 feet elevation in the 1968 Mexico City Olympic Games’ famous 1500m race. (Kenyan runners re-use a lot of the same names, so they can be confusing.)

The current Kipchoge now lives in the Kenyan city of Eldoret, which varies between 7,000 and 9,000 feet of elevation. It’s surrounded by pleasant rolling grassland with a pleasant climate: in all 12 months, the average high temperature is in the 70s F. The all time maximum high is 87 F and the all time max low is 34 F (i.e., pretty nice).

John Manners hypothesizes that the Kalenjin evolved to be ideal horseless cowboys. When a calf strays, Kalenjin herders track him down, but on foot, not on horse like in 19th Century America, which selects for fast distance runners.

Sometimes, the lusty youth of one tribe would go raid the cattle of another tribe and run them home, pursued by their victims.. The slower young bravos would get a spear in the back from their pursuers, while the faster would get home and get several brides.,

 
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  1. Thankfully in modern day England and Europe, one doesn’t have to worry about getting a spear in the back from a pursuer…

    …but with the exploding rise in knife crime in England and Islamist throat-slashers in Western Europe, it is, like in old time Kenya, often the faster to run away who do get home- alive.

    Europeans don’t have the luxury of time to let evolutionary selectionary pressures run their course.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes

    Europeans don’t have the luxury of time to let evolutionary selectionary pressures run their course.
     
    Diddums.

    If flabby white Eurotrash requires the full force of a state security apparatus in order to compete against some chocolate immigrant with a machete, then frankly they shouldn't go out unless they are accompanied.

    Not to mention how that it is a fuckwitted strategy to rely on such an apparatus: governments the world over explicitly disclaim any duty of care towards their citizenry.

    See, e.g., Hill v Chief Constable of West Yorkshire [1988] 2 WLR 1049; canonical in US law all the way back to South v. Maryland, 59 U.S. 396 [1855] - I do note that the Poms very very slightly abridged the immunity arising from Hill in Robinson v Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police [2018] UKSC 4).[****]

    Since it is a 'known known' (in the Rumsfeldian taxonomy) that a member of the proletariat has no right to expect protection from state security apparatus, those who are risk-averse ought to be more circumspect if the environment can reasonably be expected to contain choloates with a machete and a grudge.

    Besides...

    No run-of-the-mill European batted an eyelid during the colonial period, when shitloads of chocolates faced threats that also represented a 'step change' in evolutionary pressure.

    Different type of step change: karma, beyatch!

    HAIL KEK.


    [****] it's really interesting to look at the UK jurisprudence on state duty of care: several people have tried to use their intellectual heft to move the ball towards an onus on the state to run its affairs as if it is liable under tort law - e.g., Denning in Dutton v Bognor Regis Urban District Council [1972] 1 QB 373; Wilberforce in Anns v Merton London Borough Council [1977] UKHL 4 - those judgements were walked back subsequently in most common law jurisdictions (although the 2-stage "Ann's Test" is still canonical in several jurisdictions).

    By stark, stark contrast, the stupid priestly-rabbinical notion of stare decisis has seen the immunity established in South v Maryland reaffirmed a dozen times in the US, the most notable recent case being Castle Rock v. Gonzales, 545 U.S. 748 (2005) where pigs were found to have no duty to respond to a call made by a woman whose house was being invaded her estranged partner (who was the subject of a restraining order). She was raped and murdered.

    TL;DR: if your environment has more machete-wielding Africans than you would like, perhaps you should move house or emigrate. Because nobody's going to help you if it means going out of their way - particularly not if they're someone whose job prospects were so poor that they wound up sucking at the taxpayers' tit.
  2. I am impressed that he was able to keep up his concentration while following the green tracking light. We should get a few actual sub-2-hour times in races in the next year, with the psychological barrier broken.

    • Replies: @Walsh2
    Absolutely amazing for a human to average approximately 4 minute 35 seconds per mile over 26.2 miles. To put this in perspective break it down further and go to your local track and try and run a quarter mile, one lap around the track, in one minute and ten seconds. Break it down even further and try and run the 220 in approximately 35 seconds or even the 100 in 17 seconds. Then imagine keeping that pace for 26.2 miles and a full two hours. Again, simply amazing.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson 3

    We should get a few actual sub-2-hour times in races in the next year, with the psychological barrier broken.
     
    Morphic resonance?
  3. Do pacesetters confer a significant slipstream effect in running?

    • Replies: @Dan
    Yes, both in lowering air resistance and psychologically.
  4. OT

    It’s emblematic today that MEN did not step up and prevent this utter idiocy.

    • Agree: Richard P
    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
    Maybe, at long last, white men at least are no longer volunteering to be White Knights defending the Ladies Fair, when what they seem to get from women more & more is abuse and denigration.

    You're on your own now, "ladies". After all, that's what you are saying to your fathers, brothers, husbands, and sons through your active disparagement and/or eloquent silence.

    More of this, please.
    , @Anonymous
    Tough break, back to the kitchen and HR.

    Think through your next nonsense cause celeb or transition to a cripple.
  5. Sometimes, the lusty youth of one tribe would go raid the cattle of another tribe and run them home, pursued by their victims.. The slower young bravos would get a spear in the back from their pursuers

    Sounds like Ireland, according to the Annals of Ireland:

    1454 Hugh, son of Niall O’Molloy, Lord of Fircall, died; and his son, Cucogry, assumed his place. Cucogry proceeded with his forces to the east of Fircall, to oppose Theobald O’Molloy, who was trying to obtain the chieftainship for him- self, and seized upon great spoils, Theobald having left his fastnesses and his cows to them. The army marched off with their spoils, and O’Molloy’s son was left, attended only by a few, in the rear of the prey. Theobald, the sons of Hugh Boy Mageoghegan, and the Hy-Regan, followed in pursuit of the preys, and, overtaking O’Molloy’s son on the borders of a bog, they slew him, and many others, on the spot.

    And probably, I imagine a lot of other places in Europe too, if, as my old Spanish teacher proposed, the Spanish word “vaca” (cow) is related to the word “vacation.”

    Maybe, there is a limit to the advantage of being fast in Ireland because of all the bogs?

  6. @william munny
    I am impressed that he was able to keep up his concentration while following the green tracking light. We should get a few actual sub-2-hour times in races in the next year, with the psychological barrier broken.

    Absolutely amazing for a human to average approximately 4 minute 35 seconds per mile over 26.2 miles. To put this in perspective break it down further and go to your local track and try and run a quarter mile, one lap around the track, in one minute and ten seconds. Break it down even further and try and run the 220 in approximately 35 seconds or even the 100 in 17 seconds. Then imagine keeping that pace for 26.2 miles and a full two hours. Again, simply amazing.

    • Replies: @Daniel H
    I could probably “sprint” the 100 in 17 seconds, and that’s about it.
    , @Mr. Blank
    I sat down and tried to figure out how close I could get to this guy’s achievement, assuming I dedicated myself to it completely.

    The fastest I’ve ever run a mile was about 8 minutes. That was a decade ago, when I was working out almost every day, but it was just general working out — I wasn’t training specifically to get faster; running was just part of my workout mix.

    If I absolutely poured myself into training specifically for the goal of getting faster, I might be able to get down to a mile in, what, 7:15? I don’t think I could ever break 7, but I don’t really know what the limits are.

    Let’s say I could hit a mile in 7 minutes. Then all I’d have to do is do that 26.2 times in a row. Riiiight.

    But okay, let’s say I had access to world class trainers and equipment and virtually unlimited training time, and I could somehow accomplish even that milestone.

    That would give me a total marathon time of ... 3:03:24. That’s probably as close as it’s humanly possible for me to come to what this guy did, under perfect conditions.

    So: Wow. Just wow.

    , @Olorin
    You think that pace is amazing, try rowing against a headwind for a few days. Or setting and changing tack around Cape Horn for as long as it takes. (Way more than 2 hours.)
  7. Ron Clarke in 1960s had many world records in 5k and 10k but never could perform well in true competition. His records dependent on the presence of pace setters.

  8. OK, but did he do it barefooted?

  9. @william munny
    I am impressed that he was able to keep up his concentration while following the green tracking light. We should get a few actual sub-2-hour times in races in the next year, with the psychological barrier broken.

    We should get a few actual sub-2-hour times in races in the next year, with the psychological barrier broken.

    Morphic resonance?

  10. Why wasn’t Obama ever in to distance running? He’s half Kenyan, half Caucasian, long thin frame? Seems like an interesting iSteve ponderance.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Obama is prickly by personality.

    He would have thought people would see that and put him in a Kenyan box.

    He instead pretended to be a basketball player, because that was cool, even though he was never good at it
    , @Lot
    Too boring. And he’s a smoker.
    , @Henry's Cat
    Too busy walking on water.
    , @JohnnyD
    He does have the ideal build (and probably genetics) for long distance running, but he's been a smoker most of his life. Basketball has always been his favorite activity, but he was a bench warmer on his high school team in Hawaii.
    , @SteveRogers42
    Because he's got the guts of a gerbil.
  11. Kipchoge is from the Nandi district of the Kalenjin highlanders of Kenya who have furnished so many famous runners, such as Kipchoge Keino, who defeated the American Jim Ryun at 7,300 feet elevation in the 1968 Mexico City Olympic Games famous 1500m race.

    I read the name and thought “I’ve heard this ‘Kipchoge’ name before”, and (needlessly) went out searching before reading the rest of your post.

    I figured this guy might be the son of whatever guy i was remembering. So looked this guy up. But no, standard issue African single mom with father gone–dead, absent, whereabouts unknown.

    So looked up “Kipchoge” itself:

    Kipchoge is a name of Kalenjin origin meaning “of the store (he was born in or near a granary)”. The name follows a kalenjin naming custom where the birth name has to describe the time or place of birth (beginning with the prefix ‘kip’ or ‘chep’ or ‘che’) …

  12. Why is this “feat” important? Is humanity going to evolve for surviving on another planet? What does it prove? And his home country-does it have the ability to function as a normal functional entity? Who gives a shit?

    • Replies: @ziggurat

    Why is this “feat” important? Is humanity going to evolve for surviving on another planet? What does it prove? And his home country-does it have the ability to function as a normal functional entity? Who gives a shit?
     
    Ha. Ha. You may get a kick out of these announcers covering the event at 13:35 in the video:
    https://youtu.be/mTYtckgpKB8?t=813

    This is incredible. Eliad's performance is such a gift to all of us. His running is a gift to all of us. I feel so blessed to be here today. .... He is sprinting into the history books here. ... This is history unfolding. ... Neil Armstrong we had on the moon in 1969. ... The first man to run a marathon in under two hours. One final lung-busting stride for Kipchoge. One giant leap for human endeavor. And you know Kipchoge was right, no human is limited.
     
    Because Kimchoge has proven that no human is limited, we can set our sights on the 1-hour marathon. And then the 1-second marathon. And then the light-speed trip to the moon by holding our breath and pushing off the Earth.

    The next man on the moon will be planting a Kenyan flag in running shorts:
    https://www.history.com/.image/ar_16:9%2Cc_fill%2Ccs_srgb%2Cfl_progressive%2Cg_faces:center%2Cq_auto:good%2Cw_768/MTU3ODc4NjA0MDQ5NTU3MjE1/image-placeholder-title.jpg
  13. anonymous[532] • Disclaimer says:

    Speaking of seemingly unbeatable records, and how to go beyond them in a counterfeit way —-

    I think I remember hearing a baseball announcer – this was 10 years ago – talk about Ichiro’s consistent ability to hit singles and doubles, and the announcer said something like this: a few years ago, Paul Molitor (or John Olerud) hit safely in 60 straight afternoon games against West Coast teams that were under .500 –

    which does not really break Joe Dimaggio’s record of 56, just like this runner did not run a marathon in less than 2 hours. However, that is a lot of fast 100 yard dashes all in a row, or an oval, or whatever.

    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
    Whether even Joe DiMaggion himself really hit in 56 straight games has been a subject of serious debate for a heckuva long time.

    (Did DiMaggio actually collect hits in games 30 and 31, or did he merely benefit from Dan Daniel's sympathetic/sycophantic scoring?)

    https://abcnews.go.com/Technology/WhosCounting/story?id=3694104&page=1
  14. Does this mean the 2hr limit could have been broken a long time ago? The breakthrough is figuring out the optimum running surface and aerodynamics. Or is this the fastest marathon runner ever. Why not ditch the pace cars by running on a treadmill?

  15. Finally, made it to the moon!

    moon

    With a token caucasian assist

    token

  16. Why can’t the pacers and car be considered competition?

    • Replies: @Dan
    The pacers started at varying times, working in shifts. None ran the entire distance. The pace car was far enough ahead not to lower air resistance but it projected a lighted bar indicating where the runners should be at the desired pace. Of course Kipchoge still ran the thing. Quite an achievement. 4:34 miles 26 times in a few
  17. Those pacemakers…formed a protective, aerodynamic pocket around Kipchoge, five of them running in front in an open-V formation…

    Ok, so he was drafting all the way.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    The flying wedge lives!


    https://fansguidetofootball.files.wordpress.com/2016/03/article-1905.jpg?w=584
    , @AnotherDad
    Amazing the mileage you can get driving 15 feet behind a semi.
  18. OT Does anyone think that Hunter Biden is innocent and that he really should get millions of dollars from Ukraine and China for his expertise?
    Media still tryna act like the internet doesn’t exist:

    Also Blizzard, the video game company which kowtowed to a brutal dictatorship after one of its demonstration players embarassed that government, has a wierdly high number of staff calling in sick.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    OT Does anyone think that Hunter Biden is innocent and that he really should get millions of dollars from Ukraine and China for his expertise?
     
    He certainly has a lot of explaining to do about what he was being paid for.
  19. @International Jew

    Those pacemakers...formed a protective, aerodynamic pocket around Kipchoge, five of them running in front in an open-V formation...
     
    Ok, so he was drafting all the way.

    The flying wedge lives!

  20. Kipchoge Keino’s son Bob won several state titles in track and cross country at Ridgewood High School in New Jersey. However it wasn’t without controversy as Bob lived with his coach who recruited him from Kenya a la The Air Up There. Bob was banned for awhile because he transferred for “athletic advantage”, but the state athletic association ended up relenting. The real-life story predates the movie.

  21. The current Kipchoge now lives in the Kenyan city of Eldoret, which varies between 7,000 and 9,000 feet of elevation. It’s surrounded by pleasant rolling grassland with a pleasant climate: in all 12 months, the average high temperature is in the 70s F. The all time maximum high is 87 F and the all time max low is 34 F (i.e., pretty nice).

    West Africa isn’t interesting to me at all, and the central African Congo basin rainforest just seems hellish. But East Africa seems to have–I’ve never been–some interesting country. (Great Rift Valley lakes and highlands). And, of course, South Africa is a genuinely nice piece of real estate. Sure, Africa is generally warmish, but not intractable with white man technology like screen doors, sound housing, electricity, clean water, sewers, good roads, medicine, AC. Unpopulated, it would be nice to leave as a wildlife park, but many areas would be nice habitat.

    Africa’s problems stem from being populated by Africans–Africans in possession of white man technology. The Chinese may do something about that … seems doubtful right now with their low birth rates. The future is hard to predict.

    • Replies: @Richard P
    I've been to East Africa and have been heavily invested in it through a multitude of professional engagements. It's a fascinating region and I highly recommend visiting if you can.
    , @Steve in Greensboro
    Fabulous freshwater ichthyofauna (take my word for it), plus the indigenous human population means that it is unlikely there will ever be significant development so it can continue indefinitely as a wildlife park (as you suggest).
  22. @International Jew

    Those pacemakers...formed a protective, aerodynamic pocket around Kipchoge, five of them running in front in an open-V formation...
     
    Ok, so he was drafting all the way.

    Amazing the mileage you can get driving 15 feet behind a semi.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
    In that spot you are much much closer to death than you may realize.
    , @International Jew
    Running this 1:59 was probably easier than running the 2:01 and 2:02 he's run in real marathons. So athletically, what Kipchoge did here is meaningless. But if a billionaire was willing to pay good money for this stunt, why not?
    , @Simply Simon
    In my younger days I followed closely behind a semi a few times even on a motorcycle. At 60 mph it is easy to tell the engine is not working nearly so hard as normal. My question, does the semi engine have to work harder when someone is drafting?
  23. As much as i honor my ancient ancestors who laid the foundations of the West …

    I can’t be the only one to notice that this marathon runner story is pretty stupid. If the Greeks had *lost* then Pheidippides needed to get his ass back to Athens ASAP with details on the Persians force and the scale of the debacle so Athens could arrange defenses, evacuate, etc.

    But since the Greeks won … what’s the rush? P-Dip could take it easy, pull over at any local tavern when he got tired, and be the toast of the town, bask in the attention of the young ladies … and Athens will still be fine, and grateful when it gets the news.

    • Replies: @RickinJax
    The Athenians suspected that there were a substantial numbers of citizens who had been bought by the Persians. It was necessary to get the news of victory to the city quickly to discourage a pro-Persian rising.
    , @JMcG
    Maybe the Rothschilds needed to get the info ASAP to corner the agora?
    , @kaganovitch
    But since the Greeks won … what’s the rush? P-Dip could take it easy, pull over at any local tavern when he got tired, and be the toast of the town, bask in the attention of the young ladies … and Athens will still be fine, and grateful when it gets the news.

    If I ever turn to rapping, ima call myself P-Dip. Thx A-Dog.
  24. When Roger Bannister broke the 4 minute mile, he had had pace setters (Chris Brasher and Chris Chatoway).

    I suppose they have changed the rules since.

    • Replies: @Macumazahn
    A mile is a distance. A marathon is a race.
    There is a distinction, hence this isn't a record marathon.
  25. On the other hand, some things never change….

    This trail-blazing suburb has tried for 60 years to tackle race. What if trying isn’t enough?

    SHAKER HEIGHTS, Ohio — It’s an article of faith in this Cleveland suburb: If any place can navigate the complex issues of race in America, it’s Shaker Heights. Sixty years ago, black and white families came together to create and maintain integrated neighborhoods. The school district began voluntary busing in 1970, and boundary lines were drawn to make schools more integrated. Student groups dedicated themselves to black achievement, race relations and cross-racial friendship.

    But the story of Shaker Heights shows how moving kids of different races into the same building isn’t the same as producing equal outcomes. A persistent and yawning achievement gap has led the district to grapple with hard questions of implicit bias, family responsibility and the wisdom of tracking students by ability level. Last school year, 68 percent of white 11th-graders were enrolled in at least one AP or IB course, but just 12 percent of black students were.

    .

    Any time you break our data out by race, we look like two different schools,” said Chris Rateno, director of student data systems for the district, which is home to about 31,000 people and eight schools.

    The racial tension coursing through the packed auditorium last November traced back to a tense exchange between Olivia and a veteran AP English teacher, Jody Podl, six weeks earlier. Olivia had been dozing in class, playing with her phone. Now, her first big assignment of the year was late. The teacher had admonished and embarrassed Olivia. Olivia’s mom fired off a three-page complaint, suggesting racism and charging bullying. The district put the teacher on leave to investigate.

    By the mid-1990s, integration was well established in Shaker Heights, but so was an unsettling racial achievement gap the district wasn’t talking about. Then came Project Achieve, a committee of parents, teachers and community members formed to dissect the district.

    The report, finalized in March 1997, found that whites made up about half of all students but 93 percent of those in the top 20 percent. Black students made up 82 percent of those who failed at least one portion of a state proficiency exam. Of all grades earned in core high school classes by black students, about 40 percent were a D or an F.

    Shaker was portraying itself as high-achieving — and that was true, for some. No one wanted to talk about the lower achievement levels of black students, fearing the community reaction. “There was this hush-hush about it,” said Scott Stephens, the district’s spokesman.

    Once the data was public, black students and parents became furious. Some felt they were being painted as academic losers. At a community meeting, the crowd was in something of a frenzy when Harris took the microphone.

    The reasons for low achievement are complex. Some black parents detect teacher bias. Almost every black parent seems to have a personal story.

    After Hutchings [A Black man] chose a new principal over the candidate Podl and many faculty members preferred, she was at a tense meeting between Hutchings and teachers. Podl said she must have reacted to something someone said because Hutchings “screamed, ‘Don’t you roll your eyes at me! That’s disrespectful.’ ”

    In 2016, the high school began a program called Bridges, which enrolled promising black students in a summer program to prepare them to take AP American history that fall. The program teaches study skills and creates a cohort of students to support one another.

    On a Monday morning in June, just days after the school year ended, history teacher Brian Berger looked out at dozens of black faces and told them this program was an opportunity, not a penalty.

    “You guys have been selected because you’re smart,” he told them. “Successful people work all year.”

    The next evening, the PTO hosted a program with the head of the high school’s elite IB diploma program, and four students — two black, two white — explained the program. Parents were invited to consider questions such as, “To what extent does perspective shape truth?”

    One of the toughest issues he’ll face is the tracking system — what one administrator called the “giant sorting machine” — that begins separating students by ability as young as second grade, with clear racial patterns from the start. Glasner said last spring he was looking to overhaul the approach for the youngest children, though in September he said it was a subject that needs additional community discussion.

    Hearing Olivia’s story got me thinking about my own. I was in AP classes, and sometimes I struggled, too. Kids in my class were crazy smart, and it seemed to come so easy for them. But I never considered that my classmates might think I didn’t belong there. It never crossed my mind that I didn’t belong. Of course I was in AP English. Where else would I be? I realize now that was a form of white privilege in action — being in AP and knowing that no one questioned it.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2019/10/11/this-trail-blazing-suburb-has-tried-years-tackle-race-what-if-trying-isnt-enough/?arc404=true

    • Replies: @International Jew
    Shaker Heights is where John Ogbu, famously, found that upper-middle-class black kids underperform the poorest white kids.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2002/11/30/arts/why-are-black-students-lagging.html
    , @Dan Hayes
    syonredux:

    Another example of how the Washington Post obscurates reality.
  26. AP history read the book memorize facts answer the multiple choice questions and write an essay.

    Whites bad America bad Southwest should be ruled by Mexico Non Whites good unlimited immigration good Jews always right WASPS demons. Plymouth and Jamestown landings never happened. Just remember this year’s PC propaganda and you’ll be all right.

    The disparity probably rises from the fact that most middle class black’s ( including teachers, civil servant professionals and attorneys) reading ability peaks at 3rd 4th grade not 4th 5th grade and they can’t understand high school texts materials and even test questions.

    History, just read and remember. But if a student can’t read the text book there’s a problem.

  27. Idiaminland not being progressive at all:

    ‘Kill the gays’: Uganda resurrects overturned bill introducing death penalty for homosexuals

    Ethics and Integrity Minister Simon Lokodo said the bill is being reintroduced because of allegedly “massive recruitment of gay people” and current laws are too limited in scope.

    “We want it made clear that anyone who is even involved in promotion and recruitment has to be criminalised,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. “Those that do grave acts will be given the death sentence.”

    The minister said he’s confident the measure will get the backing of the two-thirds of parliamentary members required to pass a bill.

    Several countries cut their financial support and aid to Uganda when the ‘Kill the gays’ bill was first brought forward in 2014, but Lokodo said the country is prepared to stand up to a fresh backlash over the legislation, adding “we don’t like blackmail.”

  28. @AnotherDad
    Amazing the mileage you can get driving 15 feet behind a semi.

    In that spot you are much much closer to death than you may realize.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    In that spot you are much much closer to death than you may realize.
     
    Yep. I was noting the fact, not recommending it.

    Jane Mansfield is for looking at, not imitating.
    , @jim jones
    I used to enjoy following ambulances and police cars on my Kawasaki, pretty lucky not to have been killed.
  29. @AnotherDad
    Amazing the mileage you can get driving 15 feet behind a semi.

    Running this 1:59 was probably easier than running the 2:01 and 2:02 he’s run in real marathons. So athletically, what Kipchoge did here is meaningless. But if a billionaire was willing to pay good money for this stunt, why not?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    ??!!

    try putting your treadmill on 12.5 and see if you can do two laps
    , @CrunchybutRealistCon
    This is significant only insofar as we now know a human can break the 2 hr barrier for the distance with pacer/rabbit assistance under absolutely ideal conditions. Most marathons in the world with over 500 participants won't offer these circumstances:
    -the course will be more difficult with ups & downs, tighter turns or slippery parts
    -the weather, especially the wind is rarely ideal
    -energy is spent- physical & mental energy, to deal with competitors & tactics in the first 15-20 miles before the top few break out.

    So this sub-2 hour feat may not be repeated any time soon.
    What would be significant is to see the top 2 or 3 at future World marathon majors consistently running sub-2:03 or sub-2:02.
  30. @syonredux
    On the other hand, some things never change....


    This trail-blazing suburb has tried for 60 years to tackle race. What if trying isn’t enough?


    SHAKER HEIGHTS, Ohio — It’s an article of faith in this Cleveland suburb: If any place can navigate the complex issues of race in America, it’s Shaker Heights. Sixty years ago, black and white families came together to create and maintain integrated neighborhoods. The school district began voluntary busing in 1970, and boundary lines were drawn to make schools more integrated. Student groups dedicated themselves to black achievement, race relations and cross-racial friendship.
     

    But the story of Shaker Heights shows how moving kids of different races into the same building isn’t the same as producing equal outcomes. A persistent and yawning achievement gap has led the district to grapple with hard questions of implicit bias, family responsibility and the wisdom of tracking students by ability level. Last school year, 68 percent of white 11th-graders were enrolled in at least one AP or IB course, but just 12 percent of black students were.
     
    .
     Any time you break our data out by race, we look like two different schools,” said Chris Rateno, director of student data systems for the district, which is home to about 31,000 people and eight schools.
     

    The racial tension coursing through the packed auditorium last November traced back to a tense exchange between Olivia and a veteran AP English teacher, Jody Podl, six weeks earlier. Olivia had been dozing in class, playing with her phone. Now, her first big assignment of the year was late. The teacher had admonished and embarrassed Olivia. Olivia’s mom fired off a three-page complaint, suggesting racism and charging bullying. The district put the teacher on leave to investigate.

     


    By the mid-1990s, integration was well established in Shaker Heights, but so was an unsettling racial achievement gap the district wasn’t talking about. Then came Project Achieve, a committee of parents, teachers and community members formed to dissect the district.
     

    The report, finalized in March 1997, found that whites made up about half of all students but 93 percent of those in the top 20 percent. Black students made up 82 percent of those who failed at least one portion of a state proficiency exam. Of all grades earned in core high school classes by black students, about 40 percent were a D or an F.
     

    Shaker was portraying itself as high-achieving — and that was true, for some. No one wanted to talk about the lower achievement levels of black students, fearing the community reaction. “There was this hush-hush about it,” said Scott Stephens, the district’s spokesman.
     

    Once the data was public, black students and parents became furious. Some felt they were being painted as academic losers. At a community meeting, the crowd was in something of a frenzy when Harris took the microphone.

     


    The reasons for low achievement are complex. Some black parents detect teacher bias. Almost every black parent seems to have a personal story.
     

    After Hutchings [A Black man] chose a new principal over the candidate Podl and many faculty members preferred, she was at a tense meeting between Hutchings and teachers. Podl said she must have reacted to something someone said because Hutchings “screamed, ‘Don’t you roll your eyes at me! That’s disrespectful.’ ”

     


    In 2016, the high school began a program called Bridges, which enrolled promising black students in a summer program to prepare them to take AP American history that fall. The program teaches study skills and creates a cohort of students to support one another.
     

    On a Monday morning in June, just days after the school year ended, history teacher Brian Berger looked out at dozens of black faces and told them this program was an opportunity, not a penalty.


    “You guys have been selected because you’re smart,” he told them. “Successful people work all year.”

     


    The next evening, the PTO hosted a program with the head of the high school’s elite IB diploma program, and four students — two black, two white — explained the program. Parents were invited to consider questions such as, “To what extent does perspective shape truth?”
     

    One of the toughest issues he’ll face is the tracking system — what one administrator called the “giant sorting machine” — that begins separating students by ability as young as second grade, with clear racial patterns from the start. Glasner said last spring he was looking to overhaul the approach for the youngest children, though in September he said it was a subject that needs additional community discussion.
     

    Hearing Olivia’s story got me thinking about my own. I was in AP classes, and sometimes I struggled, too. Kids in my class were crazy smart, and it seemed to come so easy for them. But I never considered that my classmates might think I didn’t belong there. It never crossed my mind that I didn’t belong. Of course I was in AP English. Where else would I be? I realize now that was a form of white privilege in action — being in AP and knowing that no one questioned it.

     

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2019/10/11/this-trail-blazing-suburb-has-tried-years-tackle-race-what-if-trying-isnt-enough/?arc404=true

    Shaker Heights is where John Ogbu, famously, found that upper-middle-class black kids underperform the poorest white kids.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2002/11/30/arts/why-are-black-students-lagging.html

    • Replies: @El Dato
    That article from 2002 is so sadass that it makes clowns cry

    Mr. Ferguson said that while minorities lag behind whites in things like homework completion, it is wrong to infer that they aren't interested in school. ''High achievers are more often accused of acting white than low achievers, but it's because the low achievers suspect the high achievers believe they are superior.''
     
    Makes sense!!

    ''It's things like talking too properly when you're in informal social settings,'' he continued. ''It's hanging around white friends and acting like you don't want to be with your black friends. It's really about behavior patterns and not achievement.''
     
    Blacks don't get ahead because there are blacks who get ahead. Got it.
  31. OT 2: This is from last month but kinda sad.

    Some Maori (who have generally a strong history of internecine competition & cannibalism), do not like the replica of James Cook’s Endeavour to moor near the village:

    Māori tribe bans replica of Captain Cook’s Endeavour ship from docking for anniversary celebration

    The head of the Ngāti Kahu iwi, or tribe, said his group were not consulted by the government about plans to bring a replica to the region.

    I guess that’s because it’s a ship, so it can moor wherever it wants.

    The ship is set to form part of a flotilla that will travel around New Zealand in October, under a celebration called “Tuia 250” or “Encounters 250.”

    “They never approached Ngāti Kahu,” the iwi’s chief executive Anahera Herbert-Graves told CNN affiliate RNZ. “I don’t think it occurred to them to contact Ngāti Kahu.”

    “Cook never came into our rohe [territory], he sailed by, and apparently cast his eye to the port and said, ‘oh, that’s Doubtless Bay.’ It’s a fiction for him to ‘re-visit’ us because he never came,” she added.

    Damned if you lay anchor, damned if you don’t.

    “He was a barbarian. Wherever he went, like most people of the time of imperial expansion, there were murders, there were abductions, there were rapes, and just a lot of bad outcomes for the indigenous people.

    That’s why it’s called “being discovered”, innit? One part is at the “less options” end of the deal.

    “He didn’t discover anything down here, and we object to Tuia 250 using euphemisms like ‘encounters’ and ‘meetings’ to disguise what were actually invasions,” [iwi’s chief executive Anahera] Herbert-Graves said.

    Can we at least agree that accessing the goods of the industrial revolution and having a telephone is not so bad?

    • Replies: @a reader

    Māori tribe bans replica of Captain Cook’s Endeavour ship from docking for anniversary celebration.
     
    On that occasion, British envoy Laura Clarke managed to pull a Jacinda.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    New Zealand built a vigorous jade processing industry which is a major export. There is plenty of naturally occurring jade in the country, but now it can't be used. At least by Pākehā.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pounamu#Significance_to_Māori

    So the jade now processed in the country is imported. A coals-to-Newcastle situation if there ever was one.


    Assuming it's jade at all. Get this:

    I had a Malaysian gentleman around 73 years of age visit a few years ago, who told me he had factories
    employing 480 people and in them he made fake jade.
    In his words he said “In the world 99.9% of jade articles are just epoxy resin”.

    http://www.jadeartross.co.nz/Page%204.html
     
  32. Few things in life are as uninteresting as human athletic feats.

    • Replies: @Fun
    Obviously the world agrees with you. That's why professional athletes can't earn a dime and are permanent virgins.
    , @SteveRogers42
    I'm sure the ancient Greeks and Romans would agree with you.
  33. @Anonymous
    Why wasn’t Obama ever in to distance running? He’s half Kenyan, half Caucasian, long thin frame? Seems like an interesting iSteve ponderance.

    Obama is prickly by personality.

    He would have thought people would see that and put him in a Kenyan box.

    He instead pretended to be a basketball player, because that was cool, even though he was never good at it

  34. @International Jew
    Shaker Heights is where John Ogbu, famously, found that upper-middle-class black kids underperform the poorest white kids.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2002/11/30/arts/why-are-black-students-lagging.html

    That article from 2002 is so sadass that it makes clowns cry

    Mr. Ferguson said that while minorities lag behind whites in things like homework completion, it is wrong to infer that they aren’t interested in school. ”High achievers are more often accused of acting white than low achievers, but it’s because the low achievers suspect the high achievers believe they are superior.”

    Makes sense!!

    ”It’s things like talking too properly when you’re in informal social settings,” he continued. ”It’s hanging around white friends and acting like you don’t want to be with your black friends. It’s really about behavior patterns and not achievement.”

    Blacks don’t get ahead because there are blacks who get ahead. Got it.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber

    but it’s because the low achievers suspect the high achievers believe they are superior.
     
    By definition the high achievers are superior to the low achievers. They just aren't allowed to feel that way for some reason.

    It's funny how liberals think that no one is innately smarter than anyone else. If there was a foot race in the schoolyard, you would say the winners were faster than the losers. No one would say that the losers had a poor home life, so that's why they were slower, or that the 40yd dash was biased.

    When people say the SAT is biased, I agree, saying it's biased against dumb people.
  35. @syonredux
    On the other hand, some things never change....


    This trail-blazing suburb has tried for 60 years to tackle race. What if trying isn’t enough?


    SHAKER HEIGHTS, Ohio — It’s an article of faith in this Cleveland suburb: If any place can navigate the complex issues of race in America, it’s Shaker Heights. Sixty years ago, black and white families came together to create and maintain integrated neighborhoods. The school district began voluntary busing in 1970, and boundary lines were drawn to make schools more integrated. Student groups dedicated themselves to black achievement, race relations and cross-racial friendship.
     

    But the story of Shaker Heights shows how moving kids of different races into the same building isn’t the same as producing equal outcomes. A persistent and yawning achievement gap has led the district to grapple with hard questions of implicit bias, family responsibility and the wisdom of tracking students by ability level. Last school year, 68 percent of white 11th-graders were enrolled in at least one AP or IB course, but just 12 percent of black students were.
     
    .
     Any time you break our data out by race, we look like two different schools,” said Chris Rateno, director of student data systems for the district, which is home to about 31,000 people and eight schools.
     

    The racial tension coursing through the packed auditorium last November traced back to a tense exchange between Olivia and a veteran AP English teacher, Jody Podl, six weeks earlier. Olivia had been dozing in class, playing with her phone. Now, her first big assignment of the year was late. The teacher had admonished and embarrassed Olivia. Olivia’s mom fired off a three-page complaint, suggesting racism and charging bullying. The district put the teacher on leave to investigate.

     


    By the mid-1990s, integration was well established in Shaker Heights, but so was an unsettling racial achievement gap the district wasn’t talking about. Then came Project Achieve, a committee of parents, teachers and community members formed to dissect the district.
     

    The report, finalized in March 1997, found that whites made up about half of all students but 93 percent of those in the top 20 percent. Black students made up 82 percent of those who failed at least one portion of a state proficiency exam. Of all grades earned in core high school classes by black students, about 40 percent were a D or an F.
     

    Shaker was portraying itself as high-achieving — and that was true, for some. No one wanted to talk about the lower achievement levels of black students, fearing the community reaction. “There was this hush-hush about it,” said Scott Stephens, the district’s spokesman.
     

    Once the data was public, black students and parents became furious. Some felt they were being painted as academic losers. At a community meeting, the crowd was in something of a frenzy when Harris took the microphone.

     


    The reasons for low achievement are complex. Some black parents detect teacher bias. Almost every black parent seems to have a personal story.
     

    After Hutchings [A Black man] chose a new principal over the candidate Podl and many faculty members preferred, she was at a tense meeting between Hutchings and teachers. Podl said she must have reacted to something someone said because Hutchings “screamed, ‘Don’t you roll your eyes at me! That’s disrespectful.’ ”

     


    In 2016, the high school began a program called Bridges, which enrolled promising black students in a summer program to prepare them to take AP American history that fall. The program teaches study skills and creates a cohort of students to support one another.
     

    On a Monday morning in June, just days after the school year ended, history teacher Brian Berger looked out at dozens of black faces and told them this program was an opportunity, not a penalty.


    “You guys have been selected because you’re smart,” he told them. “Successful people work all year.”

     


    The next evening, the PTO hosted a program with the head of the high school’s elite IB diploma program, and four students — two black, two white — explained the program. Parents were invited to consider questions such as, “To what extent does perspective shape truth?”
     

    One of the toughest issues he’ll face is the tracking system — what one administrator called the “giant sorting machine” — that begins separating students by ability as young as second grade, with clear racial patterns from the start. Glasner said last spring he was looking to overhaul the approach for the youngest children, though in September he said it was a subject that needs additional community discussion.
     

    Hearing Olivia’s story got me thinking about my own. I was in AP classes, and sometimes I struggled, too. Kids in my class were crazy smart, and it seemed to come so easy for them. But I never considered that my classmates might think I didn’t belong there. It never crossed my mind that I didn’t belong. Of course I was in AP English. Where else would I be? I realize now that was a form of white privilege in action — being in AP and knowing that no one questioned it.

     

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2019/10/11/this-trail-blazing-suburb-has-tried-years-tackle-race-what-if-trying-isnt-enough/?arc404=true

    syonredux:

    Another example of how the Washington Post obscurates reality.

  36. @eah
    OT

    It's emblematic today that MEN did not step up and prevent this utter idiocy.

    https://twitter.com/joerogan/status/1182039992350072832

    Maybe, at long last, white men at least are no longer volunteering to be White Knights defending the Ladies Fair, when what they seem to get from women more & more is abuse and denigration.

    You’re on your own now, “ladies”. After all, that’s what you are saying to your fathers, brothers, husbands, and sons through your active disparagement and/or eloquent silence.

    More of this, please.

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    Indeed. Women have been at the forefront of identity grievance for more than half a century. They’ve pushed it ever further until they’ve finally pushed it so far that it’s rebounded on them. They’ve brought it on themselves. Nit my problem.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    I stand with Selina. This is not what nth-great-grandpa George had in mind when he disembarked from the Mayflower in indenture.


    http://mayflowerhistory.com/soule
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Soule_(Mayflower_passenger)

    Revenge on feminists is fine, but we need to distinguish between its perpetrators and its innocent victims.

    We need to back those like Miss Soule. We need them on our side.
  37. @AnotherDad
    Amazing the mileage you can get driving 15 feet behind a semi.

    In my younger days I followed closely behind a semi a few times even on a motorcycle. At 60 mph it is easy to tell the engine is not working nearly so hard as normal. My question, does the semi engine have to work harder when someone is drafting?

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
    Drafting supposedly increases efficiency for both the lead and trail vehicles.
    , @res

    My question, does the semi engine have to work harder when someone is drafting?
     
    Not sure how it works with vehicles, but for bicycles the leader actually gets a small benefit.
    https://www.bicycling.com/training/a20026446/how-to-draft/

    When you draft like this, by tucking in close behind another rider, you expend less energy, to the tune of up to a 27 percent reduction in wind resistance.
    ...
    The first cyclist enjoys up to a 3.1 percent reduction in wind resistance courtesy of a low-pressure air bubble between riders, which pushes the leader along, says Bert Blocken, PhD, professor of physics at the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands, who led some of the research.
     
    I am not sure about how a low pressure bubble pushes the leader ahead. The explanation I am more familiar with is that the follower changes the airflow such that it is smoother behind the leader. Here is a graphic talking about this in the context of NASCAR.
    http://onebadwheel.com/nascar-101/aerodynamics-and-drafting-in-nascar/

    http://www.onebadwheel.com/img/articles/nascar-aerodynamics-drafting.gif
  38. @Walsh2
    Absolutely amazing for a human to average approximately 4 minute 35 seconds per mile over 26.2 miles. To put this in perspective break it down further and go to your local track and try and run a quarter mile, one lap around the track, in one minute and ten seconds. Break it down even further and try and run the 220 in approximately 35 seconds or even the 100 in 17 seconds. Then imagine keeping that pace for 26.2 miles and a full two hours. Again, simply amazing.

    I could probably “sprint” the 100 in 17 seconds, and that’s about it.

  39. I do. And many others as well. An amazing achievement.

  40. @eah
    OT

    It's emblematic today that MEN did not step up and prevent this utter idiocy.

    https://twitter.com/joerogan/status/1182039992350072832

    Tough break, back to the kitchen and HR.

    Think through your next nonsense cause celeb or transition to a cripple.

  41. @International Jew
    Running this 1:59 was probably easier than running the 2:01 and 2:02 he's run in real marathons. So athletically, what Kipchoge did here is meaningless. But if a billionaire was willing to pay good money for this stunt, why not?

    ??!!

    try putting your treadmill on 12.5 and see if you can do two laps

  42. @AnotherDad
    As much as i honor my ancient ancestors who laid the foundations of the West ...

    I can't be the only one to notice that this marathon runner story is pretty stupid. If the Greeks had *lost* then Pheidippides needed to get his ass back to Athens ASAP with details on the Persians force and the scale of the debacle so Athens could arrange defenses, evacuate, etc.

    But since the Greeks won ... what's the rush? P-Dip could take it easy, pull over at any local tavern when he got tired, and be the toast of the town, bask in the attention of the young ladies ... and Athens will still be fine, and grateful when it gets the news.

    The Athenians suspected that there were a substantial numbers of citizens who had been bought by the Persians. It was necessary to get the news of victory to the city quickly to discourage a pro-Persian rising.

  43. “my old Spanish teacher proposed, the Spanish word “vaca” (cow) is related to the word “vacation.””

    Your old Spanish teacher was having an old Spanish joke with you. The word ‘vaca’ comes from the Indo-European root ‘wak-‘ (cow), but ‘vacation’ from ‘‌‌euə-‘ (leave, abandon). The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo-European Roots is your friend 😉

  44. @Anonymous
    Why wasn’t Obama ever in to distance running? He’s half Kenyan, half Caucasian, long thin frame? Seems like an interesting iSteve ponderance.

    Too boring. And he’s a smoker.

  45. @Anonymous
    Why wasn’t Obama ever in to distance running? He’s half Kenyan, half Caucasian, long thin frame? Seems like an interesting iSteve ponderance.

    Too busy walking on water.

  46. @AnotherDad
    As much as i honor my ancient ancestors who laid the foundations of the West ...

    I can't be the only one to notice that this marathon runner story is pretty stupid. If the Greeks had *lost* then Pheidippides needed to get his ass back to Athens ASAP with details on the Persians force and the scale of the debacle so Athens could arrange defenses, evacuate, etc.

    But since the Greeks won ... what's the rush? P-Dip could take it easy, pull over at any local tavern when he got tired, and be the toast of the town, bask in the attention of the young ladies ... and Athens will still be fine, and grateful when it gets the news.

    Maybe the Rothschilds needed to get the info ASAP to corner the agora?

  47. @Henry's Cat
    Do pacesetters confer a significant slipstream effect in running?

    Yes, both in lowering air resistance and psychologically.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    He also had the lead vehicle with the laser gun breaking the air for him.
  48. @bjondo
    Why can't the pacers and car be considered competition?

    The pacers started at varying times, working in shifts. None ran the entire distance. The pace car was far enough ahead not to lower air resistance but it projected a lighted bar indicating where the runners should be at the desired pace. Of course Kipchoge still ran the thing. Quite an achievement. 4:34 miles 26 times in a few

  49. @MikeatMikedotMike
    In that spot you are much much closer to death than you may realize.

    In that spot you are much much closer to death than you may realize.

    Yep. I was noting the fact, not recommending it.

    Jane Mansfield is for looking at, not imitating.

    • LOL: JMcG
    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
    No problem. I actually asked my safety director* if we could put stickers that said something like that (If you can read this you are closer to harm than you realize) on our ICC bumpers and was told no.

    OT - I was out working in the yard a few minutes ago and happened upon an underground bee hive and was stung 4 times, once on the face, before I even realized what the fuck was happening and could begin my tactical retreat (running away really fast). I also managed to bring several into the house that got into my clothes that I didn't even realize were still with me (I patted myself down thoroughly before entering) and was stung on the top of my foot through heavy work socks. I just finished going full Dresden on that thing.

    *
    https://pics.me.me/i-have-no-idea-how-to-do-your-job-but-22107629.png
  50. @MikeatMikedotMike
    In that spot you are much much closer to death than you may realize.

    I used to enjoy following ambulances and police cars on my Kawasaki, pretty lucky not to have been killed.

  51. @Walsh2
    Absolutely amazing for a human to average approximately 4 minute 35 seconds per mile over 26.2 miles. To put this in perspective break it down further and go to your local track and try and run a quarter mile, one lap around the track, in one minute and ten seconds. Break it down even further and try and run the 220 in approximately 35 seconds or even the 100 in 17 seconds. Then imagine keeping that pace for 26.2 miles and a full two hours. Again, simply amazing.

    I sat down and tried to figure out how close I could get to this guy’s achievement, assuming I dedicated myself to it completely.

    The fastest I’ve ever run a mile was about 8 minutes. That was a decade ago, when I was working out almost every day, but it was just general working out — I wasn’t training specifically to get faster; running was just part of my workout mix.

    If I absolutely poured myself into training specifically for the goal of getting faster, I might be able to get down to a mile in, what, 7:15? I don’t think I could ever break 7, but I don’t really know what the limits are.

    Let’s say I could hit a mile in 7 minutes. Then all I’d have to do is do that 26.2 times in a row. Riiiight.

    But okay, let’s say I had access to world class trainers and equipment and virtually unlimited training time, and I could somehow accomplish even that milestone.

    That would give me a total marathon time of … 3:03:24. That’s probably as close as it’s humanly possible for me to come to what this guy did, under perfect conditions.

    So: Wow. Just wow.

  52. @El Dato
    That article from 2002 is so sadass that it makes clowns cry

    Mr. Ferguson said that while minorities lag behind whites in things like homework completion, it is wrong to infer that they aren't interested in school. ''High achievers are more often accused of acting white than low achievers, but it's because the low achievers suspect the high achievers believe they are superior.''
     
    Makes sense!!

    ''It's things like talking too properly when you're in informal social settings,'' he continued. ''It's hanging around white friends and acting like you don't want to be with your black friends. It's really about behavior patterns and not achievement.''
     
    Blacks don't get ahead because there are blacks who get ahead. Got it.

    but it’s because the low achievers suspect the high achievers believe they are superior.

    By definition the high achievers are superior to the low achievers. They just aren’t allowed to feel that way for some reason.

    It’s funny how liberals think that no one is innately smarter than anyone else. If there was a foot race in the schoolyard, you would say the winners were faster than the losers. No one would say that the losers had a poor home life, so that’s why they were slower, or that the 40yd dash was biased.

    When people say the SAT is biased, I agree, saying it’s biased against dumb people.

  53. @AnotherDad

    In that spot you are much much closer to death than you may realize.
     
    Yep. I was noting the fact, not recommending it.

    Jane Mansfield is for looking at, not imitating.

    No problem. I actually asked my safety director* if we could put stickers that said something like that (If you can read this you are closer to harm than you realize) on our ICC bumpers and was told no.

    OT – I was out working in the yard a few minutes ago and happened upon an underground bee hive and was stung 4 times, once on the face, before I even realized what the fuck was happening and could begin my tactical retreat (running away really fast). I also managed to bring several into the house that got into my clothes that I didn’t even realize were still with me (I patted myself down thoroughly before entering) and was stung on the top of my foot through heavy work socks. I just finished going full Dresden on that thing.

    *

  54. @Simply Simon
    In my younger days I followed closely behind a semi a few times even on a motorcycle. At 60 mph it is easy to tell the engine is not working nearly so hard as normal. My question, does the semi engine have to work harder when someone is drafting?

    Drafting supposedly increases efficiency for both the lead and trail vehicles.

  55. This article must not be true–I have it on good authority that it is utterly impossible for a difference in performance in any metric to exist among human genetic groups. Everyone is capable of the exact same thing; there can be no difference. The upshot of all this is simply that people of European ancestry should be granted a commensurate head-start in marathons.

  56. this is a stunt they’ve been trying to pull for a while, but i have to say, good stunt.

  57. A significant accomplishment, but he was tremendously aided by technology, pacesetters, and the delivery of nutrition throughout the record attempt — which prevented him from breaking stride.

  58. @AnotherDad

    The current Kipchoge now lives in the Kenyan city of Eldoret, which varies between 7,000 and 9,000 feet of elevation. It’s surrounded by pleasant rolling grassland with a pleasant climate: in all 12 months, the average high temperature is in the 70s F. The all time maximum high is 87 F and the all time max low is 34 F (i.e., pretty nice).
     
    West Africa isn't interesting to me at all, and the central African Congo basin rainforest just seems hellish. But East Africa seems to have--I've never been--some interesting country. (Great Rift Valley lakes and highlands). And, of course, South Africa is a genuinely nice piece of real estate. Sure, Africa is generally warmish, but not intractable with white man technology like screen doors, sound housing, electricity, clean water, sewers, good roads, medicine, AC. Unpopulated, it would be nice to leave as a wildlife park, but many areas would be nice habitat.

    Africa's problems stem from being populated by Africans--Africans in possession of white man technology. The Chinese may do something about that … seems doubtful right now with their low birth rates. The future is hard to predict.

    I’ve been to East Africa and have been heavily invested in it through a multitude of professional engagements. It’s a fascinating region and I highly recommend visiting if you can.

  59. Few things in life are as uninteresting as human athletic feats.

    I dunno. Alex Honnold’s free solo climb up El Capitan was pretty interesting, in an I-can’t-look-away-from-this-disaster sort of way.

    • Replies: @Richard P
    As an alpinist myself, I was impressed by Alex's feat. I've climbed throughout the Sierra Nevada Mountains, including in Yosemite, and El Capitan is a beast. Nonetheless, I'm no longer impressed by the athletic achievements of blacks -- regardless of how impressive they are. Sports are insipid twaddle.
  60. FYI. Construction workers in New Orleans can run faster than Kipchoge.

    https://twitter.com/WWLTV/status/1183032346032922624/video/1

  61. Uh… drafting behind other runners is a mechanical advantage, the record means nothing.

  62. @AnonAnon

    Few things in life are as uninteresting as human athletic feats.
     
    I dunno. Alex Honnold’s free solo climb up El Capitan was pretty interesting, in an I-can’t-look-away-from-this-disaster sort of way.

    As an alpinist myself, I was impressed by Alex’s feat. I’ve climbed throughout the Sierra Nevada Mountains, including in Yosemite, and El Capitan is a beast. Nonetheless, I’m no longer impressed by the athletic achievements of blacks — regardless of how impressive they are. Sports are insipid twaddle.

  63. @Simply Simon
    In my younger days I followed closely behind a semi a few times even on a motorcycle. At 60 mph it is easy to tell the engine is not working nearly so hard as normal. My question, does the semi engine have to work harder when someone is drafting?

    My question, does the semi engine have to work harder when someone is drafting?

    Not sure how it works with vehicles, but for bicycles the leader actually gets a small benefit.
    https://www.bicycling.com/training/a20026446/how-to-draft/

    When you draft like this, by tucking in close behind another rider, you expend less energy, to the tune of up to a 27 percent reduction in wind resistance.

    The first cyclist enjoys up to a 3.1 percent reduction in wind resistance courtesy of a low-pressure air bubble between riders, which pushes the leader along, says Bert Blocken, PhD, professor of physics at the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands, who led some of the research.

    I am not sure about how a low pressure bubble pushes the leader ahead. The explanation I am more familiar with is that the follower changes the airflow such that it is smoother behind the leader. Here is a graphic talking about this in the context of NASCAR.
    http://onebadwheel.com/nascar-101/aerodynamics-and-drafting-in-nascar/

  64. @AnotherDad

    The current Kipchoge now lives in the Kenyan city of Eldoret, which varies between 7,000 and 9,000 feet of elevation. It’s surrounded by pleasant rolling grassland with a pleasant climate: in all 12 months, the average high temperature is in the 70s F. The all time maximum high is 87 F and the all time max low is 34 F (i.e., pretty nice).
     
    West Africa isn't interesting to me at all, and the central African Congo basin rainforest just seems hellish. But East Africa seems to have--I've never been--some interesting country. (Great Rift Valley lakes and highlands). And, of course, South Africa is a genuinely nice piece of real estate. Sure, Africa is generally warmish, but not intractable with white man technology like screen doors, sound housing, electricity, clean water, sewers, good roads, medicine, AC. Unpopulated, it would be nice to leave as a wildlife park, but many areas would be nice habitat.

    Africa's problems stem from being populated by Africans--Africans in possession of white man technology. The Chinese may do something about that … seems doubtful right now with their low birth rates. The future is hard to predict.

    Fabulous freshwater ichthyofauna (take my word for it), plus the indigenous human population means that it is unlikely there will ever be significant development so it can continue indefinitely as a wildlife park (as you suggest).

    • Replies: @(((Owen)))
    But the wildlife park will be overwhelmed and choked by the slums and their garbage and sewage that will spread all around as the population of sub-Saharan Africa rises from 1bn today to 4-5bn by 2100.
  65. @Dan
    Yes, both in lowering air resistance and psychologically.

    He also had the lead vehicle with the laser gun breaking the air for him.

  66. @J.Ross
    OT Does anyone think that Hunter Biden is innocent and that he really should get millions of dollars from Ukraine and China for his expertise?
    Media still tryna act like the internet doesn't exist:

    https://twitter.com/MeetThePress/status/1182773349044408324

    Also Blizzard, the video game company which kowtowed to a brutal dictatorship after one of its demonstration players embarassed that government, has a wierdly high number of staff calling in sick.

    OT Does anyone think that Hunter Biden is innocent and that he really should get millions of dollars from Ukraine and China for his expertise?

    He certainly has a lot of explaining to do about what he was being paid for.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Hunter has now said that if his famous and influential dad wins the presidency, he will no longer receive millions of unearned dollars from foreign governments. He has resigned from his Chinese position. This is what Democrats think ethics looks like.
  67. Even a quick glance at a video of Kipchoge reveals that he was running faster than most of us can run. Kipchoge’s pace of 4:38 per mile over 26.2 miles is about the same as what the women’s record for the single mile was in the early 1970s.

  68. @AnotherDad
    As much as i honor my ancient ancestors who laid the foundations of the West ...

    I can't be the only one to notice that this marathon runner story is pretty stupid. If the Greeks had *lost* then Pheidippides needed to get his ass back to Athens ASAP with details on the Persians force and the scale of the debacle so Athens could arrange defenses, evacuate, etc.

    But since the Greeks won ... what's the rush? P-Dip could take it easy, pull over at any local tavern when he got tired, and be the toast of the town, bask in the attention of the young ladies ... and Athens will still be fine, and grateful when it gets the news.

    But since the Greeks won … what’s the rush? P-Dip could take it easy, pull over at any local tavern when he got tired, and be the toast of the town, bask in the attention of the young ladies … and Athens will still be fine, and grateful when it gets the news.

    If I ever turn to rapping, ima call myself P-Dip. Thx A-Dog.

  69. @Walsh2
    Absolutely amazing for a human to average approximately 4 minute 35 seconds per mile over 26.2 miles. To put this in perspective break it down further and go to your local track and try and run a quarter mile, one lap around the track, in one minute and ten seconds. Break it down even further and try and run the 220 in approximately 35 seconds or even the 100 in 17 seconds. Then imagine keeping that pace for 26.2 miles and a full two hours. Again, simply amazing.

    You think that pace is amazing, try rowing against a headwind for a few days. Or setting and changing tack around Cape Horn for as long as it takes. (Way more than 2 hours.)

  70. I thought of you, Steve, as soon as I saw this headline. Just one more example of your noticing over the years being on the money. No surprise.

  71. @JerseyJeffersonian
    Maybe, at long last, white men at least are no longer volunteering to be White Knights defending the Ladies Fair, when what they seem to get from women more & more is abuse and denigration.

    You're on your own now, "ladies". After all, that's what you are saying to your fathers, brothers, husbands, and sons through your active disparagement and/or eloquent silence.

    More of this, please.

    Indeed. Women have been at the forefront of identity grievance for more than half a century. They’ve pushed it ever further until they’ve finally pushed it so far that it’s rebounded on them. They’ve brought it on themselves. Nit my problem.

    • Agree: jim jones
  72. Can’t hardly wait til he identifies as a female…

    • Replies: @Richard P
    That sort of behavior is only acceptable in the degenerative West.
  73. @Carroll Price
    Can't hardly wait til he identifies as a female...

    That sort of behavior is only acceptable in the degenerative West.

  74. @Ano
    Thankfully in modern day England and Europe, one doesn't have to worry about getting a spear in the back from a pursuer...

    ...but with the exploding rise in knife crime in England and Islamist throat-slashers in Western Europe, it is, like in old time Kenya, often the faster to run away who do get home- alive.

    Europeans don't have the luxury of time to let evolutionary selectionary pressures run their course.

    Europeans don’t have the luxury of time to let evolutionary selectionary pressures run their course.

    Diddums.

    If flabby white Eurotrash requires the full force of a state security apparatus in order to compete against some chocolate immigrant with a machete, then frankly they shouldn’t go out unless they are accompanied.

    Not to mention how that it is a fuckwitted strategy to rely on such an apparatus: governments the world over explicitly disclaim any duty of care towards their citizenry.

    See, e.g., Hill v Chief Constable of West Yorkshire [1988] 2 WLR 1049; canonical in US law all the way back to South v. Maryland, 59 U.S. 396 [1855] – I do note that the Poms very very slightly abridged the immunity arising from Hill in Robinson v Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police [2018] UKSC 4).[****]

    Since it is a ‘known known’ (in the Rumsfeldian taxonomy) that a member of the proletariat has no right to expect protection from state security apparatus, those who are risk-averse ought to be more circumspect if the environment can reasonably be expected to contain choloates with a machete and a grudge.

    Besides…

    No run-of-the-mill European batted an eyelid during the colonial period, when shitloads of chocolates faced threats that also represented a ‘step change’ in evolutionary pressure.

    Different type of step change: karma, beyatch!

    HAIL KEK.

    [****] it’s really interesting to look at the UK jurisprudence on state duty of care: several people have tried to use their intellectual heft to move the ball towards an onus on the state to run its affairs as if it is liable under tort law – e.g., Denning in Dutton v Bognor Regis Urban District Council [1972] 1 QB 373; Wilberforce in Anns v Merton London Borough Council [1977] UKHL 4 – those judgements were walked back subsequently in most common law jurisdictions (although the 2-stage “Ann’s Test” is still canonical in several jurisdictions).

    By stark, stark contrast, the stupid priestly-rabbinical notion of stare decisis has seen the immunity established in South v Maryland reaffirmed a dozen times in the US, the most notable recent case being Castle Rock v. Gonzales, 545 U.S. 748 (2005) where pigs were found to have no duty to respond to a call made by a woman whose house was being invaded her estranged partner (who was the subject of a restraining order). She was raped and murdered.

    TL;DR: if your environment has more machete-wielding Africans than you would like, perhaps you should move house or emigrate. Because nobody’s going to help you if it means going out of their way – particularly not if they’re someone whose job prospects were so poor that they wound up sucking at the taxpayers’ tit.

  75. @Peterike
    Few things in life are as uninteresting as human athletic feats.

    Obviously the world agrees with you. That’s why professional athletes can’t earn a dime and are permanent virgins.

    • Replies: @Richard P
    Capitalism, materialism, consumerism, idolatry, promiscuity, greed and vanity are all self-serving and forms of degeneracy. They're nothing to be proud of.
  76. @International Jew
    Running this 1:59 was probably easier than running the 2:01 and 2:02 he's run in real marathons. So athletically, what Kipchoge did here is meaningless. But if a billionaire was willing to pay good money for this stunt, why not?

    This is significant only insofar as we now know a human can break the 2 hr barrier for the distance with pacer/rabbit assistance under absolutely ideal conditions. Most marathons in the world with over 500 participants won’t offer these circumstances:
    -the course will be more difficult with ups & downs, tighter turns or slippery parts
    -the weather, especially the wind is rarely ideal
    -energy is spent- physical & mental energy, to deal with competitors & tactics in the first 15-20 miles before the top few break out.

    So this sub-2 hour feat may not be repeated any time soon.
    What would be significant is to see the top 2 or 3 at future World marathon majors consistently running sub-2:03 or sub-2:02.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    You'd have to have two world class marathoners as rabbits, one to cut the wind at sub-2 hour pace for the first 16 miles, and an even better one to do it for the next 8 or 9 miles. Marathoning is debilitating, so there would have to be a big payday for the rabbits. It would be kind of like Hillary and Tenzing on Everest with all the climbers in the expedition sacrificing their chance at fame for the two strongest.
  77. @CrunchybutRealistCon
    This is significant only insofar as we now know a human can break the 2 hr barrier for the distance with pacer/rabbit assistance under absolutely ideal conditions. Most marathons in the world with over 500 participants won't offer these circumstances:
    -the course will be more difficult with ups & downs, tighter turns or slippery parts
    -the weather, especially the wind is rarely ideal
    -energy is spent- physical & mental energy, to deal with competitors & tactics in the first 15-20 miles before the top few break out.

    So this sub-2 hour feat may not be repeated any time soon.
    What would be significant is to see the top 2 or 3 at future World marathon majors consistently running sub-2:03 or sub-2:02.

    You’d have to have two world class marathoners as rabbits, one to cut the wind at sub-2 hour pace for the first 16 miles, and an even better one to do it for the next 8 or 9 miles. Marathoning is debilitating, so there would have to be a big payday for the rabbits. It would be kind of like Hillary and Tenzing on Everest with all the climbers in the expedition sacrificing their chance at fame for the two strongest.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    kind of like Hillary and Tenzing on Everest
     
    I wish some Sherpa like Tenzing would take her up, and leave her.
  78. @JerseyJeffersonian
    Maybe, at long last, white men at least are no longer volunteering to be White Knights defending the Ladies Fair, when what they seem to get from women more & more is abuse and denigration.

    You're on your own now, "ladies". After all, that's what you are saying to your fathers, brothers, husbands, and sons through your active disparagement and/or eloquent silence.

    More of this, please.

    I stand with Selina. This is not what nth-great-grandpa George had in mind when he disembarked from the Mayflower in indenture.

    http://mayflowerhistory.com/soule
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Soule_(Mayflower_passenger)

    Revenge on feminists is fine, but we need to distinguish between its perpetrators and its innocent victims.

    We need to back those like Miss Soule. We need them on our side.

    • Replies: @rocko
    No we don't. They acted like petulant children, let them suffer the consequences. By backing them up, they'll learn nothing. Except the adults will always be there to fix their screwups.
  79. @Steve Sailer
    You'd have to have two world class marathoners as rabbits, one to cut the wind at sub-2 hour pace for the first 16 miles, and an even better one to do it for the next 8 or 9 miles. Marathoning is debilitating, so there would have to be a big payday for the rabbits. It would be kind of like Hillary and Tenzing on Everest with all the climbers in the expedition sacrificing their chance at fame for the two strongest.

    kind of like Hillary and Tenzing on Everest

    I wish some Sherpa like Tenzing would take her up, and leave her.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    No sherpa is strong enough to do that.
  80. @Reg Cæsar

    kind of like Hillary and Tenzing on Everest
     
    I wish some Sherpa like Tenzing would take her up, and leave her.

    No sherpa is strong enough to do that.

  81. @Fun
    Obviously the world agrees with you. That's why professional athletes can't earn a dime and are permanent virgins.

    Capitalism, materialism, consumerism, idolatry, promiscuity, greed and vanity are all self-serving and forms of degeneracy. They’re nothing to be proud of.

    • Replies: @Fun
    Maybe, but uninteresting is the last word I would use.
  82. @El Dato
    OT 2: This is from last month but kinda sad.

    Some Maori (who have generally a strong history of internecine competition & cannibalism), do not like the replica of James Cook's Endeavour to moor near the village:

    Māori tribe bans replica of Captain Cook's Endeavour ship from docking for anniversary celebration


    The head of the Ngāti Kahu iwi, or tribe, said his group were not consulted by the government about plans to bring a replica to the region.

     

    I guess that's because it's a ship, so it can moor wherever it wants.

    The ship is set to form part of a flotilla that will travel around New Zealand in October, under a celebration called "Tuia 250" or "Encounters 250."

    "They never approached Ngāti Kahu," the iwi's chief executive Anahera Herbert-Graves told CNN affiliate RNZ. "I don't think it occurred to them to contact Ngāti Kahu."

    "Cook never came into our rohe [territory], he sailed by, and apparently cast his eye to the port and said, 'oh, that's Doubtless Bay.' It's a fiction for him to 're-visit' us because he never came," she added.

     

    Damned if you lay anchor, damned if you don't.

    "He was a barbarian. Wherever he went, like most people of the time of imperial expansion, there were murders, there were abductions, there were rapes, and just a lot of bad outcomes for the indigenous people.
     
    That's why it's called "being discovered", innit? One part is at the "less options" end of the deal.

    "He didn't discover anything down here, and we object to Tuia 250 using euphemisms like 'encounters' and 'meetings' to disguise what were actually invasions," [iwi's chief executive Anahera] Herbert-Graves said.
     
    Can we at least agree that accessing the goods of the industrial revolution and having a telephone is not so bad?

    Māori tribe bans replica of Captain Cook’s Endeavour ship from docking for anniversary celebration.

    On that occasion, British envoy Laura Clarke managed to pull a Jacinda.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    Elsewhere in the Antipodes, there is nothing for the ugliest of a set of well-off triplets to do but fight "climate change":


    The fresh face of the climate war: Camo-clad activist, 23, leads greenies as they chain themselves to a fence in the middle of Brisbane sparking chaos



    These are the other two triplets, who are understandably more successful in life:


    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/10/02/07/15015440-7527691-While_at_school_Elisha_and_Renee_fell_into_modelling_aged_14_whe-a-36_1569996576804.jpg
  83. This event reminds me that many grumbled at Roger Bannister’s sub four minute mile in 1954 being accepted as a world record .
    At that time the rules were that any pacemaking was supposed to make any purported record time to be invalid and there was certainly not very well disguised organised pacemaking in Bannister’s run .
    But of course as everyone concerned was a British chap of good breeding no one important made a fuss

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It's easier to have pacesetter rabbits to break the wind in a mile race than in a marathon. For this marathon, they had 7 pacesetters at all times around the star, and most of the pacesetters only started running part way thru, which is radically different from a real race.
  84. @Anonymous
    Why wasn’t Obama ever in to distance running? He’s half Kenyan, half Caucasian, long thin frame? Seems like an interesting iSteve ponderance.

    He does have the ideal build (and probably genetics) for long distance running, but he’s been a smoker most of his life. Basketball has always been his favorite activity, but he was a bench warmer on his high school team in Hawaii.

  85. @El Dato
    OT 2: This is from last month but kinda sad.

    Some Maori (who have generally a strong history of internecine competition & cannibalism), do not like the replica of James Cook's Endeavour to moor near the village:

    Māori tribe bans replica of Captain Cook's Endeavour ship from docking for anniversary celebration


    The head of the Ngāti Kahu iwi, or tribe, said his group were not consulted by the government about plans to bring a replica to the region.

     

    I guess that's because it's a ship, so it can moor wherever it wants.

    The ship is set to form part of a flotilla that will travel around New Zealand in October, under a celebration called "Tuia 250" or "Encounters 250."

    "They never approached Ngāti Kahu," the iwi's chief executive Anahera Herbert-Graves told CNN affiliate RNZ. "I don't think it occurred to them to contact Ngāti Kahu."

    "Cook never came into our rohe [territory], he sailed by, and apparently cast his eye to the port and said, 'oh, that's Doubtless Bay.' It's a fiction for him to 're-visit' us because he never came," she added.

     

    Damned if you lay anchor, damned if you don't.

    "He was a barbarian. Wherever he went, like most people of the time of imperial expansion, there were murders, there were abductions, there were rapes, and just a lot of bad outcomes for the indigenous people.
     
    That's why it's called "being discovered", innit? One part is at the "less options" end of the deal.

    "He didn't discover anything down here, and we object to Tuia 250 using euphemisms like 'encounters' and 'meetings' to disguise what were actually invasions," [iwi's chief executive Anahera] Herbert-Graves said.
     
    Can we at least agree that accessing the goods of the industrial revolution and having a telephone is not so bad?

    New Zealand built a vigorous jade processing industry which is a major export. There is plenty of naturally occurring jade in the country, but now it can’t be used. At least by Pākehā.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pounamu#Significance_to_Māori

    So the jade now processed in the country is imported. A coals-to-Newcastle situation if there ever was one.

    Assuming it’s jade at all. Get this:

    I had a Malaysian gentleman around 73 years of age visit a few years ago, who told me he had factories
    employing 480 people and in them he made fake jade.
    In his words he said “In the world 99.9% of jade articles are just epoxy resin”.

    http://www.jadeartross.co.nz/Page%204.html

  86. @a reader

    Māori tribe bans replica of Captain Cook’s Endeavour ship from docking for anniversary celebration.
     
    On that occasion, British envoy Laura Clarke managed to pull a Jacinda.

    Elsewhere in the Antipodes, there is nothing for the ugliest of a set of well-off triplets to do but fight “climate change”:

    The fresh face of the climate war: Camo-clad activist, 23, leads greenies as they chain themselves to a fence in the middle of Brisbane sparking chaos

    These are the other two triplets, who are understandably more successful in life:

    • Replies: @Richard P
    The protesters -- along with the police -- in the aforementioned Daily Mail article are disgusting and a far cry from being people of virtue. The woman in the camo shirt has a nose piercing and tattoo on her right arm. These unnatural markings to her body are a sign of mutilation, vanity, and individualism. She's reduced her feminity and disfigured her purity -- as one doesn't have the right to mark the flesh of God's creation. Furthermore, several of the police are tattooed. Their tattoos aren't only unprofessional, but also a sign of mutilation and vanity. They're unorthodox and evil. Period.
    , @a reader
    Thanks for the link.

    ... and the eye candy !
  87. @anonymous
    Speaking of seemingly unbeatable records, and how to go beyond them in a counterfeit way ----

    I think I remember hearing a baseball announcer - this was 10 years ago - talk about Ichiro's consistent ability to hit singles and doubles, and the announcer said something like this: a few years ago, Paul Molitor (or John Olerud) hit safely in 60 straight afternoon games against West Coast teams that were under .500 -

    which does not really break Joe Dimaggio's record of 56, just like this runner did not run a marathon in less than 2 hours. However, that is a lot of fast 100 yard dashes all in a row, or an oval, or whatever.

    Whether even Joe DiMaggion himself really hit in 56 straight games has been a subject of serious debate for a heckuva long time.

    (Did DiMaggio actually collect hits in games 30 and 31, or did he merely benefit from Dan Daniel’s sympathetic/sycophantic scoring?)

    https://abcnews.go.com/Technology/WhosCounting/story?id=3694104&page=1

    • Replies: @anonymous
    Paul Joliffe ---- Thanks for commenting.

    Pretty much everyone who follows baseball knows about the hundreds of times - it literally happens at least 10 times a year, year in and year out - hitters looking for a historic moment had a ball grooved to them, and umpires are umpires because they know who pays their paycheck.
    I mean to say, baseball is mostly honestly officiated, but not always.

    Even my Mets are not immune from it, Bartolo Colon grooved a pitch to a fellow Spanish speaking player on the first pitch after another Spanish speaking player had gotten himself killed by feloniously driving a speedboat at unsafe speeds. It was such an emotional moment, but what really happened was this - a Spanish speaking ball player had gotten himself and a couple of other people killed by speeding, drunk, in his new toy, and in the first ball game after he died, another Spanish speaking ball player, who was paid by the Mets to play baseball, not to cheat, grooved a ball to a third Spanish speaking ball player, who claimed that he had hit that home run in an emotional moment, when we all knew that Colon had grooved the pitch. That was wrong on Bartolo's part, he stole from his employers and he stole from the fans who payed his salary and he disrespected baseball fans by doing that, but nobody called him out on it. Well, Mickey Mantle also got a few grooved pitches at historical moments, and so did poor little steroid-skull Bobby Bonds or his kid, or the other way around, I can never get their names straight - I know the older one was not the bratty one but at this point I don't care much --- I think Barry was the younger one but I don't care enough about cheaters to get their names straight.

    That being said, DiMaggio really knew how to hit, and he is for reals one of the five or six best hitters ever. Not that it matters. It is just a game. I agree with you --- the fix was in for him and against the working class pitchers that year when he "safely" hit in 56 games in a row. Some of the working class pitchers were in on the scam, some were not, they are all long gone now, and only those of us who actually understand baseball know the truth.

  88. anonymous[403] • Disclaimer says:

    Sports are a white thing. They scour the world for genetic outliers who are good at something particular as in this case. Kalenjin would be a totally unknown group except for some whites roaming the world and discovering them. I’d be more interested in seeing what they can do with some random Joe Average and how far he could be transformed. That would make this something a person could identify with more than watching exotic imports do what they do best.

  89. Hmm… Maybe if they were pastoralists, native americans would also develop into good runners.

  90. Alex ran the route 50 times with rope before he free climbed it.That kinda diminished it for me.

  91. @Reg Cæsar
    Elsewhere in the Antipodes, there is nothing for the ugliest of a set of well-off triplets to do but fight "climate change":


    The fresh face of the climate war: Camo-clad activist, 23, leads greenies as they chain themselves to a fence in the middle of Brisbane sparking chaos



    These are the other two triplets, who are understandably more successful in life:


    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/10/02/07/15015440-7527691-While_at_school_Elisha_and_Renee_fell_into_modelling_aged_14_whe-a-36_1569996576804.jpg

    The protesters — along with the police — in the aforementioned Daily Mail article are disgusting and a far cry from being people of virtue. The woman in the camo shirt has a nose piercing and tattoo on her right arm. These unnatural markings to her body are a sign of mutilation, vanity, and individualism. She’s reduced her feminity and disfigured her purity — as one doesn’t have the right to mark the flesh of God’s creation. Furthermore, several of the police are tattooed. Their tattoos aren’t only unprofessional, but also a sign of mutilation and vanity. They’re unorthodox and evil. Period.

  92. @Reg Cæsar
    Elsewhere in the Antipodes, there is nothing for the ugliest of a set of well-off triplets to do but fight "climate change":


    The fresh face of the climate war: Camo-clad activist, 23, leads greenies as they chain themselves to a fence in the middle of Brisbane sparking chaos



    These are the other two triplets, who are understandably more successful in life:


    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/10/02/07/15015440-7527691-While_at_school_Elisha_and_Renee_fell_into_modelling_aged_14_whe-a-36_1569996576804.jpg

    Thanks for the link.

    … and the eye candy !

  93. @Richard P
    Capitalism, materialism, consumerism, idolatry, promiscuity, greed and vanity are all self-serving and forms of degeneracy. They're nothing to be proud of.

    Maybe, but uninteresting is the last word I would use.

  94. @jimmyriddle
    When Roger Bannister broke the 4 minute mile, he had had pace setters (Chris Brasher and Chris Chatoway).

    I suppose they have changed the rules since.

    A mile is a distance. A marathon is a race.
    There is a distinction, hence this isn’t a record marathon.

  95. @Attila
    Why is this “feat” important? Is humanity going to evolve for surviving on another planet? What does it prove? And his home country-does it have the ability to function as a normal functional entity? Who gives a shit?

    Why is this “feat” important? Is humanity going to evolve for surviving on another planet? What does it prove? And his home country-does it have the ability to function as a normal functional entity? Who gives a shit?

    Ha. Ha. You may get a kick out of these announcers covering the event at 13:35 in the video:

    This is incredible. Eliad’s performance is such a gift to all of us. His running is a gift to all of us. I feel so blessed to be here today. …. He is sprinting into the history books here. … This is history unfolding. … Neil Armstrong we had on the moon in 1969. … The first man to run a marathon in under two hours. One final lung-busting stride for Kipchoge. One giant leap for human endeavor. And you know Kipchoge was right, no human is limited.

    Because Kimchoge has proven that no human is limited, we can set our sights on the 1-hour marathon. And then the 1-second marathon. And then the light-speed trip to the moon by holding our breath and pushing off the Earth.

    The next man on the moon will be planting a Kenyan flag in running shorts:

  96. @Anonymous
    Why wasn’t Obama ever in to distance running? He’s half Kenyan, half Caucasian, long thin frame? Seems like an interesting iSteve ponderance.

    Because he’s got the guts of a gerbil.

  97. @Peterike
    Few things in life are as uninteresting as human athletic feats.

    I’m sure the ancient Greeks and Romans would agree with you.

  98. anonymous[546] • Disclaimer says:
    @Paul Jolliffe
    Whether even Joe DiMaggion himself really hit in 56 straight games has been a subject of serious debate for a heckuva long time.

    (Did DiMaggio actually collect hits in games 30 and 31, or did he merely benefit from Dan Daniel's sympathetic/sycophantic scoring?)

    https://abcnews.go.com/Technology/WhosCounting/story?id=3694104&page=1

    Paul Joliffe —- Thanks for commenting.

    Pretty much everyone who follows baseball knows about the hundreds of times – it literally happens at least 10 times a year, year in and year out – hitters looking for a historic moment had a ball grooved to them, and umpires are umpires because they know who pays their paycheck.
    I mean to say, baseball is mostly honestly officiated, but not always.

    Even my Mets are not immune from it, Bartolo Colon grooved a pitch to a fellow Spanish speaking player on the first pitch after another Spanish speaking player had gotten himself killed by feloniously driving a speedboat at unsafe speeds. It was such an emotional moment, but what really happened was this – a Spanish speaking ball player had gotten himself and a couple of other people killed by speeding, drunk, in his new toy, and in the first ball game after he died, another Spanish speaking ball player, who was paid by the Mets to play baseball, not to cheat, grooved a ball to a third Spanish speaking ball player, who claimed that he had hit that home run in an emotional moment, when we all knew that Colon had grooved the pitch. That was wrong on Bartolo’s part, he stole from his employers and he stole from the fans who payed his salary and he disrespected baseball fans by doing that, but nobody called him out on it. Well, Mickey Mantle also got a few grooved pitches at historical moments, and so did poor little steroid-skull Bobby Bonds or his kid, or the other way around, I can never get their names straight – I know the older one was not the bratty one but at this point I don’t care much — I think Barry was the younger one but I don’t care enough about cheaters to get their names straight.

    That being said, DiMaggio really knew how to hit, and he is for reals one of the five or six best hitters ever. Not that it matters. It is just a game. I agree with you — the fix was in for him and against the working class pitchers that year when he “safely” hit in 56 games in a row. Some of the working class pitchers were in on the scam, some were not, they are all long gone now, and only those of us who actually understand baseball know the truth.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    In Colon's defense, when his manager and pitching coach asked him why his fastball had dropped off so much in velocity, he stated he was "overcome with emotion".
    Also, Dee Gordon, the hitter, is from Florida,and English is his native language.
  99. @Jonathan Mason

    OT Does anyone think that Hunter Biden is innocent and that he really should get millions of dollars from Ukraine and China for his expertise?
     
    He certainly has a lot of explaining to do about what he was being paid for.

    Hunter has now said that if his famous and influential dad wins the presidency, he will no longer receive millions of unearned dollars from foreign governments. He has resigned from his Chinese position. This is what Democrats think ethics looks like.

  100. @sb
    This event reminds me that many grumbled at Roger Bannister's sub four minute mile in 1954 being accepted as a world record .
    At that time the rules were that any pacemaking was supposed to make any purported record time to be invalid and there was certainly not very well disguised organised pacemaking in Bannister's run .
    But of course as everyone concerned was a British chap of good breeding no one important made a fuss

    It’s easier to have pacesetter rabbits to break the wind in a mile race than in a marathon. For this marathon, they had 7 pacesetters at all times around the star, and most of the pacesetters only started running part way thru, which is radically different from a real race.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    This is silly. It is like the results from fancy instrument that measures how hard or fast one strikes drumheads being used to say "X is an amazing drummer" or like having some slugger hit as many balls as he can as far as he can, all of them lobbed lazily at him with underhanded pitching, then praising him as the greatest batter ever.

    Stupid, really.
  101. Has anyone here seen a 1970 film called “The Games”? It’s an ensemble piece about marathoners from all over the world preparing for and competing in the Rome Olympic Games- not the actual 1960 Games, but a fictional Games held in the present day (which would have been 1970, of course). Ryan O’Neal played the brash American who resorted to PED’s (provided by his friend played by Sam Elliott). French-Armenian actor-singer Charles Aznavour (star of my favorite Truffaut film “Shoot the Piano Player”) played a beloved former champion lured out of retirement to bring glory to his Eastern European Communist-bloc nation. There was a newcomer, whose name escapes me, playing an Australian Aborigine who decided to compete bare-footed as a screw you to his domineering manager. Obviously, this was a nod to the Ethiopian runner who won the actual Rome Olympics marathon. My favorite character was a working-class Englishman played by future Phantom of the Opera Michael Crawford. His maniacal coach, played by Stanley Baker, convinced the poor lad that it wasn’t good enough just to win the Olympic marathon. See, to be a truly worthy winner, Crawford’s character was expected to break the two hour barrier- despite the hills and heat of Rome. The coach’s preferred method of readying his charge for this feat was to have him trudging around a steam room. SPOILER ALERT!- it didn’t work. The film is currently available on the VUDU streaming service. Incidentally, the world record at the time was 2:08 and change held by an Australian named Derek…uhhh…something. That marathon record may not be the thing Derek Something is most famous for. In 1979 Runner’s World had a cover story on Derek to commemorate the 10th anniversary of his record run. The cover photo had him on a run accompanied by an attractive young blonde woman. Well, people lost their shit complaining that her nipples were protruding too much for their liking. Yes, this was really a thing that happened way back in 1979. This silliness has been going on for a lot longer than most people think.

  102. @anonymous
    Paul Joliffe ---- Thanks for commenting.

    Pretty much everyone who follows baseball knows about the hundreds of times - it literally happens at least 10 times a year, year in and year out - hitters looking for a historic moment had a ball grooved to them, and umpires are umpires because they know who pays their paycheck.
    I mean to say, baseball is mostly honestly officiated, but not always.

    Even my Mets are not immune from it, Bartolo Colon grooved a pitch to a fellow Spanish speaking player on the first pitch after another Spanish speaking player had gotten himself killed by feloniously driving a speedboat at unsafe speeds. It was such an emotional moment, but what really happened was this - a Spanish speaking ball player had gotten himself and a couple of other people killed by speeding, drunk, in his new toy, and in the first ball game after he died, another Spanish speaking ball player, who was paid by the Mets to play baseball, not to cheat, grooved a ball to a third Spanish speaking ball player, who claimed that he had hit that home run in an emotional moment, when we all knew that Colon had grooved the pitch. That was wrong on Bartolo's part, he stole from his employers and he stole from the fans who payed his salary and he disrespected baseball fans by doing that, but nobody called him out on it. Well, Mickey Mantle also got a few grooved pitches at historical moments, and so did poor little steroid-skull Bobby Bonds or his kid, or the other way around, I can never get their names straight - I know the older one was not the bratty one but at this point I don't care much --- I think Barry was the younger one but I don't care enough about cheaters to get their names straight.

    That being said, DiMaggio really knew how to hit, and he is for reals one of the five or six best hitters ever. Not that it matters. It is just a game. I agree with you --- the fix was in for him and against the working class pitchers that year when he "safely" hit in 56 games in a row. Some of the working class pitchers were in on the scam, some were not, they are all long gone now, and only those of us who actually understand baseball know the truth.

    In Colon’s defense, when his manager and pitching coach asked him why his fastball had dropped off so much in velocity, he stated he was “overcome with emotion”.
    Also, Dee Gordon, the hitter, is from Florida,and English is his native language.

  103. @Steve Sailer
    It's easier to have pacesetter rabbits to break the wind in a mile race than in a marathon. For this marathon, they had 7 pacesetters at all times around the star, and most of the pacesetters only started running part way thru, which is radically different from a real race.

    This is silly. It is like the results from fancy instrument that measures how hard or fast one strikes drumheads being used to say “X is an amazing drummer” or like having some slugger hit as many balls as he can as far as he can, all of them lobbed lazily at him with underhanded pitching, then praising him as the greatest batter ever.

    Stupid, really.

  104. @Steve in Greensboro
    Fabulous freshwater ichthyofauna (take my word for it), plus the indigenous human population means that it is unlikely there will ever be significant development so it can continue indefinitely as a wildlife park (as you suggest).

    But the wildlife park will be overwhelmed and choked by the slums and their garbage and sewage that will spread all around as the population of sub-Saharan Africa rises from 1bn today to 4-5bn by 2100.

  105. @Reg Cæsar
    I stand with Selina. This is not what nth-great-grandpa George had in mind when he disembarked from the Mayflower in indenture.


    http://mayflowerhistory.com/soule
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Soule_(Mayflower_passenger)

    Revenge on feminists is fine, but we need to distinguish between its perpetrators and its innocent victims.

    We need to back those like Miss Soule. We need them on our side.

    No we don’t. They acted like petulant children, let them suffer the consequences. By backing them up, they’ll learn nothing. Except the adults will always be there to fix their screwups.

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