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From NBC:

Why Trump — and all Americans — must watch Ava DuVernay’s Central Park trial series

by Sen. Kamala Harris

The criminal justice system failed Korey, Raymond, Antron, Kevin and Yusef. We owe it to all of our children to not repeat the injustices of our past.

June 19, 2019, 1:29 PM PDT

On Tuesday, President Donald Trump told reporters that he would not apologize to the five Black men he demonized in 1989 after they were accused of a violent rape they did not commit. Years later they were exonerated, but only after another man admitted to committing the crime and DNA evidence confirmed his account. But Trump refused to acknowledge mistakes had been made, saying “you have people on both sides” of the exoneration, a phrase that should sound very familiar.

Trump and all Americans should watch Ava DuVernay’s recent miniseries “When They See Us,” on the Central Park jogger case.

DuVernay’s retelling of the case is a masterpiece. Her four-part series tells the stories of Korey Wise, Raymond Santana, Antron McCray, Kevin Richardson and Yusef Salaam. In 1989, these five young boys were wrongfully accused of brutally raping a jogger in Central Park. The series chronicles their unjust detainment, illegal interrogation and the dismissal of evidence that pointed to their innocence, further highlighting the flaws in a system that is supposed to be rooted in truth and justice.

Systemic biases and racism cost these boys their childhood. Sensationalized media coverage — including a 1989 full-page ad placed by Trump — made it almost impossible for them to be treated fairly. And the trial also exposed the dehumanization of Black children and life-threatening consequences — things that still occur today. …

The criminal justice system failed Korey, Raymond, Antron, Kevin and Yusef. We owe it to them, and to all of our children, to fundamentally change the way that we treat our most vulnerable.

Yet, the best argument for believing Matias Reyes’ assertion that the Central Park Five didn’t help him rape the Central Park Jogger is that Korey, Raymond, Antron, Kevin and Yusef were too busy violently assaulting other random people in the park to have had the time.

From the Washington Post, an article on all the other crimes the Central Park Five were committing:

‘When They See Us’ tells the important story of the Central Park Five. Here’s what it leaves out.

By Deanna Paul, June 29

There were more than 30 teenagers in New York’s Central Park on the night Trisha Meili was raped. Some in the group brutalized whoever crossed their paths, choosing at random people to rob and to attack. They used stones, metal pipes, their fists and their feet. They left people bruised, bloody or unconscious.

The prosecution involved at least eight victims and 12 arrests. Yet its retelling — in headlines and in film — has taken what happened on April 19, 1989, and boiled it down to the Central Park Five and the Central Park jogger.

“When They See Us,” a series based on the story of the Central Park Five, written and produced by Ava DuVernay, has been Netflix’s most-watched program since its May 31 release, viewed by more than 23 million accounts worldwide at the time of publication. The four-part drama focuses on the mistreatment of five juveniles by the justice system.

The show’s success highlights the genre’s power to shape public perception. But if the series is a viewer’s first or only exposure to the Central Park case, parts of what happened that night are missing.

Kharey Wise, Yusef Salaam, Kevin Richardson, Raymond Santana and Antron McCray, the men widely known as the Central Park Five, were prosecuted for what Georgetown Law professor and former federal prosecutor Paul Butler called “the ultimate crime in the American imagery:” a black man sexually assaulting a white woman.

They suffered the consequences of their convictions for years before newly discovered evidence led prosecutors to vacate their convictions; in 2002, Matias Reyes confessed to, and took sole responsibility for, the rape of Meili. The unknown DNA profile, discussed by prosecution at trial, was a match to Reyes.

Reyes was clearly guilty of raping the Central Park Jogger. He is an incredibly evil serial rapist, who even raped his own mother. He has been convicted of so many other crimes that confessing to this one, and after the statute of limitations had run out, won’t matter. He was in prison for life already.

Whether Reyes’ claim to have done it wholly alone should be credited is a different question. There’s never been a civil trial to adjudicate what happened. Two inmates said “Korey,” who was in the Bloods gang in the same prison, had threatened Reyes.

There isn’t much evidence that Reyes was the only person that night to attack the Central Park Jogger other than his word, for whatever that’s worth, and that his story fits the evidence somewhat better than the various contradictory confessions of the Five.

… There’s an unspoken tension between telling a story artfully and accurately. “When They See Us” stands out as a compelling work of true-crime entertainment. It also takes liberties with facts from the night in Central Park and the prosecution that followed….

There were several assaults, not just the rape on which history has focused

Just after 9 p.m. on April 19, more than 30 teenagers met at Central Park. The plan, according to statements later given to police by Briscoe and Lopez, was to beat up and rob passersby. It didn’t matter who they were. According to the trial testimony and recorded statement that night, in less than an hour, there were unprovoked attacks on eight people.

Michael Vigna, a competitive cyclist out on a training ride, was the first victim. At trial, the 31-year-old described the “rambunctious” group “spread across the roadway” as he approached.

“One of the youths stuck his arm out in the direction of my face, and just barely missed my head,” he said. “I could, in fact, hear the sound of his fist, the force of his blow just nearly nicking my side of my head.”

Vigna testified he sped down the asphalt path, away from the boys, who quickly found their next victim: 50-year-old Antonio Diaz, whom some of the boys referred to as “the bum” or “the homeless man” in statements to police. Diaz was crossing through the park with a beer, chicken, rice and beans in hand.

“They picked me up by my neck and then by my feet,” he told jurors during the trial for Salaam, Santana and McCray. He said the attackers threw him to the ground and “kept kicking at me and hitting me with their fists.” In their statements, Wise, Richardson, Salaam, McCray and Lopez admitted to attacking Diaz and dragging his body off to the side.

Jerry Malone and Patricia Dean were riding a tandem bicycle through the park when they encountered the group. Like Vigna described, the teens spread across the roadway, blocking their path. Dean recalled they pulled up dark hoods, crouched down and made “sort of grunting” noises.

“At that point I was terrified,” she testified. As the couple pedaled into and through the group, Dean said three men on her right side began to push and pull her legs. On her left, she said, another was grabbing at her thigh and trying to lift it up. “They almost ripped me off the bike.”

When speaking to police, McCray, Salaam, Richardson, Wise and Lopez mentioned there were tandem bikers they were unable to catch.

“When They See Us” briefly portrays Dean and one of the assault victims, John Loughlin. There is no mention of the other four people around the park reservoir who were either followed, beaten or robbed.

I haven’t seen this show, but I am told that one scene in it is of the bicycle-built-for-two trying to racistly run over the innocent black baby bodies as they frolic in Central Park. Stephen King should write a horror story about white men and women on tandem bicycles running down black youths.

Four male joggers were chased, robbed or knocked unconscious

The next two victims, joggers David Lewis and David Good, testified that they were chased and pelted with sticks and stones; Lewis remembered “two kids crouched down in a football stance” and about five others approaching him from behind. Both men escaped relatively unscathed.

The last two victims were not as fortunate.

Robert Garner, a 30-year-old research analyst, said he encountered 15 to 20 young men during his run. He said they were yelling and shouting. They surrounded him, forced him off the jogging track and began to punch him. Garner, knocked to the ground, recalled that one “had a grin on his face” while demanding his money. When he explained that he had nothing on him, “another one of the kids said, ‘Get out of here.’ ”

In his statement, Richardson mentioned that Santana had chased a man off the road. When the jogger said he had no money, Santana told him to get away and run, Richardson said.

At trial, the final victim, Loughlin, described approaching the group: “It looked like a fight, there was a center of attention. There seemed to be someone on the ground.” …

Loughlin recalled on the stand: “I don’t remember what happened next. My next memory was lying face down on the ground and being hit very hard with a heavy object in the head.”

Several boys, including Lopez and Briscoe, detailed Loughlin’s assault.

He was struck in the head and legs with a metal pipe and was holding himself, trying to protect his head. According to trial transcripts, he was kicked, robbed and knocked unconscious, then left with large black eyes and bleeding badly from his forehead.

At Richardson and Wise’s sentencing, the judge noted that a police officer described Loughlin as “looking like he was ‘dunked in a bucket of blood.‘ ” Even Richardson described Loughlin’s forehead as “busted and that blood was coming out.”

The group dispersed by 10 p.m. The female Central Park jogger would not be discovered for several hours, and she would awake from a coma two weeks later, on May 2. …

Salaam, Santana and McCray were tried jointly. After eight weeks of testimony, the jury deliberated for 10 days before convicting all three on the first-degree assault and first-degree rape of Meili, three charges of assault and the first-degree robbery of Loughlin, the second-degree assault of Lewis and first-degree riot. All three were acquitted of the attempted murder and first-degree sodomy of Meili.

Richardson and Wise’s trial began two months after the others’ verdict. The jury deliberated for 11 days before convicting Richardson on all 13 counts. Wise was convicted on the first-degree assault and first-degree sexual abuse of Meili and of first-degree riot. He was acquitted of all remaining charges.

By the time the district attorney’s office vacated the Central Park Five’s convictions, four of the men — Richardson, McCray, Salaam and Santana — each served about seven years in prison. Wise — who, at 16, was tried as an adult — spent 13 years in prison. …

If the responsibility to differentiate between a fictional and factual account falls on the audience, it must consider that while what it’s viewing may be based on a true story, there is probably more to the story.

One of the arguments for believing Reyes when he said he worked alone is that the Five were so busy committing other crimes that they wouldn’t have had time to also attack the Jogger.

From the Daily Beast in 2014, NYPD detective/writer Ed Conlon considers the epistemological issues:

The West Memphis Three, the Norfolk Four, and yes, the Central Park Five: All were gruesome and horrible crimes, but did all involve false confessions?

Edward Conlon
Published 10.19.14 5:45AM ET

… Shootings are often more challenging to investigate than homicides. With murders, as has been said, there’s one less liar to deal with. The J-K shooting was simple enough, in that it was a matter of arithmetic logic that one of them was telling the truth. The morality of other cases can be far murkier, the mathematics maddeningly complex, as witnesses, perpetrators, victims, and informants shift roles from felony to felony, related or otherwise. When prosecutors and cops make decisions on who to believe, and how to proceed on those beliefs, the process might be described as a beauty pageant in reverse. …

Do we put the heroin dealer on the stand against an armed robber? Yes, probably, provided we can corroborate his account. Do we take the wife-beater’s word against that of the pedophile? Yes, probably. That of a murderous serial rapist against a gang of teenagers who admitted to assaulting and robbing half a dozen people, and admitted and then denied raping and nearly killing someone else, in the same place, at the same time? Yes, apparently.

… the confessions of the teenagers are partial and contradictory. (A sixth young man was implicated by the others, but he denied responsibility for the rape, and was ultimately allowed to plead to lesser charges.) Some of the Five said they went on to other attacks, after the rape; others said it was the final crime of the night. All said that they only touched the jogger or helped restrain her, while one or more of the others forced themselves on her. It is not unusual for an individual criminal to minimize his part in a collective crime; the turbulent dynamics of crowds drives teenage boys, especially, to do spectacularly awful things together that they never would do alone. It is a corollary of the “bystander effect,” in which notions of personal responsibility are diffused when larger numbers of people are present. …

Testimony was what made the case, chiefly the confessions of the young men. Santana, McCray, and Richardson made video statements in the presence of a parent or guardian, and Wise made several statements, on his own, as the law permits. Salaam told the police he was sixteen, and he produced identification to that effect, allowing police to interrogate him without a parent. After his mother arrived, the questioning ended, but his oral admissions were admitted into testimony. In addition to the confessions, one of the other boys, while in the back of a patrol car, cried that he “didn’t do the murder,” but that he knew who did: Antron McCray. The boy beside him, Kevin Richardson, agreed: “Antron did it.” The jogger hadn’t yet been found. …

There was one witness whose statement had not been solicited by the police. Melonie Jackson, the older sister of a friend of Korey Wise, talked to him after he called the house from Rikers Island. When she expressed her dismay about the rape, Wise said that he’d only held the jogger down. Jackson volunteered this information to detectives, just before the trial, in the mistaken belief that it would help Wise. When ordered to take the stand, she wept, but she still swore that the conversation had occurred, just as she’d said. In his authoritative 1992 account of the trials, Unequal Verdicts, Timothy Sullivan relates that the prosecution thought her a “perfect witness,” but the jurors, oddly, chose not to credit her testimony in their deliberations. …

What are the odds that an entirely unrelated rape should occur in the midst of a violent crime spree lasting some forty-five minutes, in a small, sparsely populated area? That a gang who threatened and assaulted four joggers, among others, had nothing to do with a fifth? And yet, Matias Reyes had raped a woman in the park, two nights before. Was it negligent for the police to fail to consider the two crimes in context?

Conlon goes on to analyze several notorious cases of false confessions.

In viewing the case of the Central Park Five in the context of substantiated false confessions, they are characteristic of them in several ways. The defendants were young, and none had ever been arrested. The first two brought in had waited overnight in a precinct before they were interrogated, although they had eaten and slept at intervals, and one had been with his mother, the other with his friends. Korey Wise was learning disabled and emotionally disturbed, and he’d also been held overnight. …

But the differences are also pronounced. The arrests were far from indiscriminate: Thirty-seven young men were interviewed regarding the attacks in the park; 12 were arrested, with 10 charged as adults; five went to trial for the rape of the jogger. Antron McCray, who had been accused of “the murder” by two boys, appeared at the precinct with his mother, before the body of the jogger had been discovered. He denied any responsibility, and was sent home. Salaam was brought in the next night, and admitted to the rape after 90 minutes of questioning. A large number of detectives were involved, with long and distinguished records, from three different squads. The inconsistencies in the statements suggest, at least, that there was no concerted effort to force admissions to fit the evidence. None of the Five admitted to the actual rape of the jogger; none noticed the copious blood loss, or seeing the victim bound and gagged. Ryan acknowledges errors in Reyes’ later confession—he said he raped the jogger, and then she ran, and then he beat her head with a rock, whereas the rape and skull fractures followed an escape attempt; he recalled nothing of his signature ligature. Armstrong also reminds us that the detectives had to be cognizant of the possibility that the jogger might wake up and say that it hadn’t happened that way at all. For cops, reports from a hospital that a victim is “likely to die” routinely prove to be premature. The judge was dismissive of claims of coercion because the defendants, once reunited after their confessions, laughed and joked, comparing versions of the stories they told. They sang songs—including, infamously, Wild Thing—and catcalled at a female detective.

On the matrix of circumstances under which false confessions have occurred, you have a great number in which police misconduct was the decisive factor; you have a lesser number in which some aspect of disability led a vulnerable suspect to confess, under inherently intimidating circumstances. Instances of multiple false confessions are still more infrequent, though a pair of mentally retarded half-brothers were recently exculpated after serving decades in prison for a murder in Virginia. As for cases of multiple, parentally supervised, false confessions, it’s harder to say. Family members were present for the questioning of three of the five, and they were there for the video recordings. When a teenager is asked about a rape in front of his mother, is he more or less likely to deny it? And when several admit to rape, sitting beside their mothers, sisters, grandmothers, fathers and stepfathers, what do we make of that? On video, Raymond Santana was smug, boastful, and nonchalant by turns, vividly reenacting who did what during the rape. Antron McCray was with his mother for most of his interrogation, his stepfather for all of it. He signed a written confession after an hour and 45 minutes. Even defense counsel would have to acknowledge that there isn’t an abundance of comparable cases in the available literature.

What I do know is that we spent $41 million dollars to avoid asking these questions instead of trying to answer them.

 
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  1. Always love the “you need to watch this movie/TV show or read this book/article/blog so you can educate yourself on the TRUTH!” lecture. Besides the obvious absurdity of the notion, I’ve often wondered how someone like Harris or Ava DuVernay would respond if I or Steve or another white person were to saunter up to them and say “I understand what it is to be a young black man in the American justice system, I learned it from a book!”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  2. Waiting for Netflix to produce a series about another rape, and call it, “Payback For Sally Hemmings”.

    • Replies: @Hail
  3. eah says:

    Whether Reyes’ claim to have done it wholly alone should be credited is a different question.

    In two separate trials, two separate juries found them guilty, including of rape; evidence convincing to ‘beyond a reasonable doubt’ is generally required to convict — for those who may have overlooked the earlier Derbyshire piece on this: While We Can Still Say It—the CENTRAL PARK FIVE COMMITTED A GANG RAPE and LINDA FAIRSTEIN PROVED IT IN COURT!!!

    OT

    Why Democrats Must Talk About Busing in 2020

    Busing was always an imperfect solution, but the problem it sought to address—school segregation—is only getting worse. If busing isn’t the answer, Democrats need to find one.

    A tweet by the author:

    • Replies: @Escher
    , @Alden
    , @eah
  4. Clyde says:

    Richardson, McCray, Salaam and Santana — each served about seven years in prison. Wise — who, at 16, was tried as an adult — spent 13 years in prison. …

    Seven years in prison is about right for going wilding in Central Park at night and bashing in people’s heads. BTW Wise bought a $900.000 condo last week. They might have raped her but their semen was not found.

    Kamala and Biden at 20%……… Beto at 1% lol

  5. BB753 says:

    If you can’t trust Netflix, who can you trust?

    • Replies: @HammerJack
  6. They good boys. They just got caught up in the wrong place at the wrong time.

    “Netflix’s most-watched program”

    Yep. Nothing sells like race hate propaganda, so long as it’s aimed at Whitey.

    And yeah, Kamala learns quick. Her smackdown of that old racist Joe Biden goosed her poll numbers like nothing else could. She’s thinking she can ride that wave right into the White House.

  7. @BB753

    At this point, we can pretty much replace E Pluribus Unum with that.

  8. Anon[201] • Disclaimer says:

    TL;DR

    Can we conclude that Kamala is already assuming she is the nominee (or VP nominee) and is running against Trump?

  9. I had my own brush with NYC wilding while running around the CP reservoir but managed to escape unharmed. Trump’s mother was mugged and seriously injured by a marauding yewt in Queens. NYC was out of control in the Dinkins years. Trump has nothing for which he should apologise, and Netflix and Kamala Harris should STFU.

    In fact, Kamala should try regularly jogging or biking without guards in the non-gentrified parts of an American inner city and get back to us on how well she fares.

  10. Have some tea and tell me, did you see
    When They See Us on Netflix TV?
    I say, what’s the matter?
    You have a weak bladder?
    You say it’s if you see tea, you pee?*

    *You say it’s (it being the matter) f-u-c-t u-p?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  11. Hail says: • Website
    @Redneck farmer

    Going further still, “Sexual Reparations,” as a named concept, hasn’t caught on.

    But when a Julius Malema-like figure emerges in the US mainstream…

    [MORE]

  12. The criminal justice system failed Korey, Raymond, Antron, Kevin and Yusef.

    KRAKY.

    the men widely known as the Central Park Five, were prosecuted for what Georgetown Law professor and former federal prosecutor Paul Butler called “the ultimate crime in the American imagery:” a black man sexually assaulting a white woman.

    As was Bill Cosby.

    I haven’t seen this show, but I am told that one scene in it is of the bicycle-built-for-two trying to racistly run over the innocent black baby bodies as they frolic in Central Park. Stephen King should write a horror story about white men and women on tandem bicycles running down black youths.

    The Odessa steps scene for the 21st century!

    White guys biking down bros. Happens all the time:

  13. ic1000 says:

    Ann Coulter summarized the case against the Central Park Five back in 2014. So Ava DuVernay’s 2019 Netflix retelling must rebut that case, right?

    Perhaps DuVernay and the Netflix showrunners couldn’t follow Coulter’s elaborate arguments and tortured prose.

    [/sarc]

    Here is Coulter returning to the topic this year, on June 12th and June 19th.

    I forgot, left-for-dead jogger Trisha Meili was a Becky. In Who-Whom World, de Blasio’s multimillion dollar payoffs to the Five show that he occupies the moral high ground.

  14. prosa123 says: • Website

    He was in prison for life already.

    Reyes is eligible for parole starting in 2022.

    And yet, Matias Reyes had raped a woman in the park, two nights before.

    He had assaulted a woman and tried to rape her, however approaching passerby scared him off before he could complete the act.
    The victim in this case gave the police a very good description of her attacker, which included an interesting fact: he had fresh-looking stitches in his chin. The police checked with hospitals and found out that a man fitting the description, named Matias Reyes, had gotten stitches in his chin not long before the attack. Yet for reasons never explained they never attempted to question him.

    The Daily Beast article also mentions the West Memphis Three. That’s a very interesting story on its own that is well worth further discussion, especially the issue of Mr. Bojangles.

    • Replies: @BB753
    , @Anonymous
    , @Bugg
  15. slumber_j says:

    That Daily Beast pice by Ed Conlon is very good.

    Ed’s an old friend of mine from college. A while ago he retired from the NYPD after I think 17 years on the force, but a couple of years ago he re-joined and now oddly enough writes long-form journalism for the department website. Here’s a recent example:

    https://nypdnews.com/2019/05/old-hays-and-his-descendants-the-legacy-of-the-last-high-constable-of-new-york-city/

  16. Years later they were exonerated, but only after another man admitted to committing the crime and DNA evidence confirmed his account.

    I think it’s a flat out lie to say they were “exonerated.”

    They were convicted by (multiple) juries. Years later, after they served their sentences, as a political act the DA supposedly “vacated” their convictions. But that can’t really be possible legally. The DA can’t “vacate” a jury verdict any more than he could find someone is guilty without one.

    The DA doesn’t find guilt or innocence and can’t “exonerate” anyone.

    Also, as general matter, in documentaries about court cases it’s incredibly easy to manipulate the viewers by cherry-picking the facts, etc. It’s almost not a challenge to make the guilty look innocent, or vice versa, when you completely control the presentation of the facts.

  17. Dr. X says:

    There were several assaults, not just the rape on which history has focused

    Just after 9 p.m. on April 19, more than 30 teenagers met at Central Park. The plan, according to statements later given to police by Briscoe and Lopez, was to beat up and rob passersby. It didn’t matter who they were. According to the trial testimony and recorded statement that night, in less than an hour, there were unprovoked attacks on eight people.

    Thank God New York City makes it virtually impossible to carry a handgun.

    A victim might hurt one of the criminals, you know…

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    , @Anonymous
  18. Escher says:
    @eah

    Whatever happened to “Happy Independence Day”?
    No one says Happy “last Thursday in November” for Thanksgiving.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  19. Anonymous[177] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    IIRC a judge vacated the convictions at the request of the DA.

    The article on false confessions hits on an important point: if the confessions were indeed toally coerced, why did they all consistently deny committing the rape?

    A broader question:

    The way this case was prosecuted and adjudicated was basically standard for the criminal justice system in the US. People are to this day convicted of rapes without positive rape kits. Police are allowed to manipulate (within limits, which as far as I can tell were observed here) suspects into giving confessions. Minors over a certain age are allowed to be questioned without parents being present. Exculpatory confessions are not always considered definitive (absent some corroborating evidence e.g. the confessor is the only one who knows where the body is). Heck, in cases of domestic violence sometimes a recantation by the *accuser* is not considered definitive.

    The standards are what they are, and in the case of crimes against women police/prosecutor powers are often even stronger and broader than for other crimes. If you think the Central Park 5 are innocent then there are thousands of equally innocent men in prison today. If the left are so outraged about this case, are they pushing for real criminal justice reform (not just phony stuff like releasing the minimal number of non-violent offenders incarcerated for simple posession)?

    The answer is: they’re not, and if anything they’re trying to empower cops and prosecutors to be even more aggressive in going after things like rape and domestic violence, and for judges and probation officers to be even more disregardful of the rights of the accused and convicted. This isn’t about any deep principle: it’s pure identity politics and trying to smear Donald Trump. American leftists are scum; Hollywood producer leftists are the biggest scum of all.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  20. In what universe are 14,15, and 16 year olds still in “childhood”? They are not children, they are young adults.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  21. Anon[817] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    “Also, as general matter, in documentaries about court cases it’s incredibly easy to manipulate the viewers by cherry-picking the facts, etc. It’s almost not a challenge to make the guilty look innocent, or vice versa, when you completely control the presentation of the facts.”

    Excellent point, applying to all these “true crime” shows metastasizing all over the media. At least in the days of Perry Mason they didn’t pretend it wasn’t fiction.

    The Anglo-American legal system has over hundreds of years evolved rather complex rules to determine what evidence to present and how. But as we know that’s just the White Man’s System which Biden and Harris want to overturn and replace with, what? Netflix?

  22. Wilkey says:

    When They See Us,” a series based on the story of the Central Park Five, written and produced by Ava DuVernay, has been Netflix’s most-watched program since its May 31 release, viewed by more than 23 million accounts worldwide at the time of publication.

    #FakeNetflix

  23. BB753 says:
    @prosa123

    The West Memphis Three were guilty as hell but the prosecution did not insist enough on the hard evidence, so the three were finally released due to Hellywood and media pressure, but only after pleading guilty!
    Satanists take care of each other!

    • Replies: @prosa123
  24. Anonymous[409] • Disclaimer says:
    @prosa123

    The victim in this case gave the police a very good description of her attacker

    In which case?

  25. Anonymous[334] • Disclaimer says:
    @Oleaginous Outrager

    It really is quite funny. These are the same folk that will look down upon YouTube conspiracy theorists smugly and uncritically (of course often for good reason) but not see the irony in their own view of well-produced, authoritatively narrated media.

    Here’s a fun exercise, when talking to someone who watches and believes in these shows just casually refer to it as a ‘documentary’. “Hey, did you watch that new documentary on Netflix yet?”

    See how many EVER respond “Yeah, but it’s not a documentary.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  26. Alden says:
    @eah

    Hey, he’s behind the times celebrating July 4. Guess he didn’t get the message that all good liberals now must denounce July 4 because of White supremacy slavery etc.

  27. Bugg says:

    These scum were not railroaded. NY’s law takes into account someone “acting in concert” in a crime. If you hold a woman down and another guy rapes here, you are both guilty. No different from a getaway driver being as guilty of a bank robbery. This concept has for crazy liberals somehow now turned into “No DNA, therefore , INNOCENT”. This case involved a 7-week pretrial hearing known in NY as a “Huntley” hearing to determine the admissibility and constitutionality of the defendants’ statements. They were all represented by attorneys, who cross-examined the cops and assistant district attorneys who took the various statements. Some of their statements were in fact ruled inadmissible. Both Burns and DuVarnay came in with a pre-determined bias that the cops were racist and railroaded these animals. Their “narrative” is a fairy tale. Which is why they completely disregarded the cops. Burns’ daughter worked for their civil attorneys. Said civil attorneys sued all the cops spare one; the first officer at the scene, Detective Eric Reynolds, who happens to be black, and outraged by this fiasco. A black arresting officer does not fit the narrative. Burns also left his conversation with Michael Armstrong, who wrote the NYPD report about the case, on the cutting room floor because it also did not fit the narrative. Mayor Michael Bloomberg adamantly refused to settle the case, but Warren Wilhelm/Bill Deblasio takes office, and suddenly NYC writes these scum a check for $41 million. We have no idea how much his buddy Al Sharpton pocketed of that $41 million. Sadly just last month the lead detective, Mike Sheehan, succumbed to cancer. Were he alive and in good health, Sheehan he would have not been quiet. He became an actor (played a boxing promoter in a “Rocky” movie) and a respected local TV news reporter.

  28. Bugg says:
    @prosa123

    May seem odd that NYPD’s Homicide and Sex Crimes Units at the time did not really communicate. The “jogger” case was assigned to Homicide because Ms. Meili was listed as “likely to die” that night. But having been involved in the system “professionally” back then, what the Burns et al attribute to some racist agenda was bureaucratic inertia. And Homicide detectives were the and still are the top dogs of investigative units(in NYPD, 1st grade rank). Sex Crimes detectives (typically 2nd and 3rd grade)aspire to either becoming Homicide detectives or rotate out and gain civil service ranks like sergeant, lieutenant or captain. There was no computer interaction either because there was no NYPD computer system to speak of then.

    Will also say there were in fact some very bad guys working for NYPD at roughly the same time. You could google Louis Scarcella, Michael Dowd, Lou Eppolito and Steven Carrcappa. But nobody has alleged any bad cop like that was involved in this case.

    • Replies: @ic1000
  29. @Hypnotoad666

    Also, as general matter, in documentaries about court cases it’s incredibly easy to manipulate the viewers by cherry-picking the facts, etc. It’s almost not a challenge to make the guilty look innocent, or vice versa, when you completely control the presentation of the facts.

    It’s not just court cases. It’s everything.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  30. Activity on the Wikipedia article about this case (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Park_jogger_case) has lately been fast and furious, as you might expect. On this page…https://xtools.wmflabs.org/articleinfo/en.wikipedia.org/Central_Park_jogger_case
    …scroll down about 25% to a graph entitled “Year counts”.

  31. Precious says:

    I am curious which Central Park Five defenders from Derbryshire’s column will show up here to rehash their erroneous talking points.

  32. @Hypnotoad666

    documentaries about court cases it’s incredibly easy to manipulate the viewers

    I used to enjoy “60 Minutes with Morley Safer and Mike Wallace”, until it gradually dawned on me that they got, it seemed, half their material from plantiffs attorneys working some angle.

    (You will correctly surmise, from my “Morley Safer and Mike Wallace”, that I reached this conclusion a long time ago!)

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    , @Dan Hayes
  33. @International Jew

    I used to enjoy “60 Minutes with Morley Safer and Mike Wallace”, until it gradually dawned on me that they got, it seemed, half their material from plantiffs attorneys working some angle.

    That’s exactly right. 90% of their vaunted “investigative journalism” is just free-riding on the discovery obtained by some plaintiff’s lawyer, who is only too happy to turn it over to journalists in order to put pressure on the defendant to settle (or to just get publicity for himself).

    And since litigation is ongoing, they know the defendant can’t say anything substantive to defend itself. So it’s just a free shot against a sitting duck.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  34. I’ve accidentally seen the DuVernay woman while watching some classic movies on TV. She plays the race card for all it’s worth. Based on what I’ve seen and heard of her she has to. Without the boost this gave her career she’d probably be copy editing scripts in some studio equivalent of a sweatshop or perhaps serving in a studio commissary.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    , @Mr. Anon
  35. Kamala’s big problem is that we’ve already had a half Negro president and he proved to be a disaster. Smart money has to be on Warren now, as the American people, including even liberal Dems, have a major case of Negress fatigue

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  36. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

  37. “One of the arguments for believing Reyes when he said he worked alone is that the Five were so busy committing other crimes that they wouldn’t have had time to also attack the Jogger.”

    In one of Ann Coulter’s more recent columns, she made the point that in the 5’s confessions, they gave specific details that only someone at the scene of the crime (as it was being committed) could have known, and that during the time of their confessions, the jogger was still in a coma, so it wasn’t as if police were looking for these specific individuals for the crime at the time.

    Is it possible, as Coulter states, that the 5 could have, uh, “assisted” with the rape, or perhaps finished it off after Reyes was finished? If only DNA was prevalent back then, which could have definitely solved more of this puzzle. But Coulter’s two columns this past June appears to dissect some of these questions surrounding the Central Park Jogger crime. And of course Coulter is an attorney as well.

    Hi, Ann!

    April 19, the day of the crime, is also the date when David Koresh’s compound was blown to kingdom come, and the day of the OK City bombing of the Federal building by Timothy McVeigh.

  38. Dan Hayes says:
    @International Jew

    International Jew:

    As you undoubtedly know, Safer and Wallace and their lineal 60 Minutes descendants have also been heavily engaged in the quaint practice of Ambush Journalism, that is the selective and prejudicial editing of broadcast interviews.

  39. Forbes says:

    I was in Central Park that night running the 5-mile loop, which uses the Harlem cut-off at 102nd St, where the jogger was assaulted. From reports of her assault, I was running about an hour earlier. The drive around the interior of the park going up near 110th St. is a 6-mile loop. It was understood by runners that after dark the Harlem cut-off was as far north as one ventured.

    The tactic described in the article where a handful of miscreant youths would spread themselves across the roadway impeding a cyclist’s route was a popular, though infrequent tactic. The road is 3 lanes wide, but harassing behavior was the stock-in-trade back then.

    Unfortunately, I can imagine in the current era of hate/blame whitey, the tactics of intimidation and harassment illustrated in the Netflix production will make a comeback in the park as teens don’t need much encouragement to emulate old trends…

    • Replies: @Western
  40. foulkes says:

    In addition to the confessions, one of the other boys, while in the back of a patrol car, cried that he “didn’t do the murder,” but that he knew who did: Antron McCray. The boy beside him, Kevin Richardson, agreed: “Antron did it.” The jogger hadn’t yet been found

    The teens were lilely referring to the beating of one of the male joogers. He was beaten badly and looked”like a bucket of bloodhad been dumped on him,” according to a detective

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  41. Anonymous[421] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    Also, as general matter, in documentaries about court cases it’s incredibly easy to manipulate the viewers by cherry-picking the facts

    Could you please cite something for this proposition?

  42. Anonymous[421] • Disclaimer says:
    @ben tillman

    It’s not just court cases. It’s everything.

    Could you also please cite something for this proposition? Good books? Research paper?

  43. “Stephen King should write a horror story about white men and women on tandem bicycles running down black youths.”

    Wealthy Stephen King is one of many New Left old hippies who believe in the magic negro theory. That’s why he supports the politicians and local groups welcoming the Congolese and Somali migrants into Maine. He believes the shining souls of the Africans will enchant and eventually transform the racist white working class of his home state. Steve Sailer’s idea can serve as a prologue to another one of his turgid doorstop novels.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
  44. Mr. Anon says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    And since litigation is ongoing, they know the defendant can’t say anything substantive to defend itself. So it’s just a free shot against a sitting duck.

    Hence that oft-heard statement at the end of every other 60 minutes segment: “We contacted X about for their side of the story, but they declined to talk to us”. Why that shifty, no-good X – he obviously must have something to hide.

    That’s the mistake that people (especially Boomers and the WWII generation) make in thinking that the MSM has become biased. It was always biased. It always had an agenda.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  45. PDE says:

    From the motion to vacate:

    “Perhaps most significant, none of the defendants accurately described where the attack on the jogger took place. With the exception of Kharey Wise, who had been to the scene, statements by all of the defendants describe events in such a way as to place the attack at or near the reservoir, at varying points in the sequence of events that actually occurred there. The defendants were not similarly confused about the locations of the other crimes they described.”

    It seems pretty clear after you review the evidence that the Five are 100% guilty of beating those guys up since they were able to all describe the attacks in detail but seems unlikely they committed the rape since their stories regarding the rape were incomplete and contradictory.

    http://big.assets.huffingtonpost.com/wise.pdf

    • Replies: @TWS
    , @Precious
    , @Hypnotoad666
  46. @Meretricious

    “Smart money has to be on Warren now …”

    Nope. The white progressives who still control the Democratic Party prefer a little vanilla with their chocolate. Full negro frightens them. Granted there are some delirious pale progs gathered around Stacey Abrams; but the smart Dems realize she’d be a disaster at the top of the ticket. In hair, voice, and mannerisms Kamala is essentially a vapid white woman. Plus, she has a Jewish spouse. In the wake of doddering, apologizing Joe’s collapse, the smart pesos are on Becky-hair Kamala.

  47. Anon[287] • Disclaimer says:

    Kamala, a former District Attorney for the State of California, knows damn well those guys joined the fray that night.

    Kamala slept with Willie Brown to advance her career when he was 60 and she was 29. She is childless. She probably married the guy she married now (Older Hollywood lawyer) for his political/fundraising help. This woman has been her own Manchurian Candidate her whole life.

    White women: Deep down, do you think Kamala Harris wants you to have a happy family with 3-4 children? Do you think she wants a successful happy life for your sons? I think not.

  48. @Bugg

    I’d like to see the jogger and/or some of the other victims go after some of the $41mm in civil suits.

  49. @Jus' Sayin'...

    Weave-goddess DuVernay’s previous two feature films, the somnolent Selma (2014) and the disastrous A Wrinkle in Time (2018), lost money. But in the intersectional era buckets of cash will continue to be dumped at her feet.

  50. @Hypnotoad666

    We’re rapidly approaching the point where all crimes will be tried in the mass media and only in the mass media.

    Today’s example: the MSM are howling about the very thin connection between President Trump and child molester Jeffrey Epstein. Not a word about Bill Clinton who rode Epstein’s Perv Express plane to Fantasy Island over 20 times, often w/o his Secret Service along.

  51. Mr. Anon says:
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    She was a guest programmer on TCM, which is sickeningly (and predictably) PC.

    • Replies: @David In TN
  52. TWS says:
    @PDE

    No one is going to believe a word the huffpo says. You’ve never posted anything else. Are you just doing a drive-by to put Netflix versions out there.

  53. Kamala Harris, who told has told stories of the white oppression she experienced as a child, was asked why she doesn’t hate Wipeepo because of it.

    Startled by the question, she stammered:

    “Most Americans do not conduct themselves that way and most parents do not conduct themselves that way, so there was no need to create a broad application because of that one experience.”

    Wow. Most Americans aren’t racists, she says. Doesn’t that make it tough to base a campaign on racism? All the other candidates are going to bludgeon her to death fir admitting it

  54. Dan Hayes says:
    @SunBakedSuburb

    SunBakedSuburb:

    A cursory internet search reveals that King’s Bangor, Maine residential area is well insulated from any Congolese or Somali interlopers.

    Stephen King is the usual liberal practitioner of don’t do as I do, do as I say.

    • Agree: David In TN
  55. anonymous[251] • Disclaimer says:

    Pretty much every single police officer, retired police officer or any regular person that lived in New York City in 1988 like I did – they are extremely pissed about the Oprah funded Lugenpresse/lying press producing this shameless lying propaganda mini series claiming the Central Park Wilding attackers DinduNuffin.

    Here are the confessions of the perps – yeah, they did do so much violent mayhem.

    https://centralpark5joggerattackers.com/videos/

    Please spread these true confessions and mercilessly dox anyone spreading these lies.

    JR
    Left Behind in Chicago

    • Replies: @Change that Matters
  56. @Anonymous

    Also, as general matter, in documentaries about court cases it’s incredibly easy to manipulate the viewers by cherry-picking the facts

    Could you please cite something for this proposition?

    It should go without saying that if you only cite evidence from one side it will be a biased representation. Imagine if a jury only got to hear the prosecution’s side of the case, and then the prosecution also got to just summarize and characterize the facts on the other side as well. That’s a documentary.

    Viewers tend to be over-influenced by: (a) the facts they hear first; (b) the amount of time spent talking about an issue; and (c) whether the music in the background is ominous or inspirational.

    One example I can think of was the “Making a Murderer” documentary on Netflix. It was actually a very interesting story. But the documentarians tried to make the guy seem innocent by spending an inordinate amount of time talking about various irrelevant discrepancies and the supposed bad motives of the prosecutors.

    Half the people (including critics) who saw the documentary thought the guy was innocent. But even the facts of the documentary itself proved he was 100% guilty without a doubt (if one was paying attention) because *Spoiler Alert* the victim’s remains were found in the killer’s fire pit and no one else could have put them there. The fact that so many people could be so easily misled, despite the obvious facts, shows how important it is to control the narrative.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  57. Precious says:
    @PDE

    It seems pretty clear after you review the evidence that the Five are 100% guilty of beating those guys up since they were able to all describe the attacks in detail but seems unlikely they committed the rape since their stories regarding the rape were incomplete and contradictory.

    Wrong, you are completely wrong. Ask some professional investigator, who worked in that capacity to review eyewitness accounts, to explain how eyewitness testimony works and they will explain why you are wrong.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  58. @PDE

    seems unlikely they committed the rape since their stories regarding the rape were incomplete and contradictory.

    Meh. So what. These are just the self-serving arguments of their lawyers in a motion. Several juries that heard all the evidence found that they were guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. And none of that evidence was ever found to be false.

    Besides, once you acknowledge that they were all engaged in a joint gang crime spree through the park why are you going to doubt they were in on this particular crime during this same spree. Also, holding her down while someone else rapes her would still make them guilty of rape. DNA is irrelevant, even if it could have been obtained.

    It’s utterly pathetic how Leftists bitch about “rape culture,” but then give a free rape-pass to PoC.

    I know NYC is cucked beyond belief, but I can’t imagine how angry I would be if my tax dollars were used to make multimillionaires out of blatantly guilty rapists.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  59. @Bugg

    Prominent attorney Michael Armstrong, who had been counsel to the early 1970s Knapp Commission (Serpico) hearings, and who prepared a massive report on the Central Park Jogger case for the NYPD, spent app. seven hours being interviewed for the Burns Gang’s “documentary” (the Central Park Five) only to have them refuse to use any of his material, because it contradicted the racial fairly tale they were telling. In 2014, he gave me a 90-minute interview in which he said the ending of the Burns documentary,

    “… was like watching a movie about the Holocaust, and have some guy come on at the end in a Nazi uniform, and say it didn’t happen.”

    https://vdare.com/articles/ken-burns-the-central-park-five-the-new-to-kill-a-mockingbird-fiction-designed-to-induce-white-guilt

  60. @Dr. X

    Thank God New York City makes it virtually impossible to carry a handgun.

    A victim might hurt one of the criminals, you know…

    Yeah. They don’t have a big problem with wilding teenagers in, say, Waco Texas.

  61. Western says:
    @Forbes

    It’s interesting that so many people were jogging in Central Park between 9 and 10 pm. I read that CP was the and probably still is the safest precinct in the city but most people who don’t live there think it is really dangerous. Many people had no qualms about jogging there fairly late at night even when the crime rate in the city was much worse than it is now.

    New York’s crime, while bad in the ’70s through the early ’90s wasn’t near the worst city in the country in terms of the murder rate. I believe they ranked around 30th or so in the ’80s.

    Manhattan now is practically turning into what white suburbs were.Many suburbs that were 99% white in the ’70s and ’80s are more diverse than large parts of Manhattan.

    • Replies: @Forbes
  62. @anonymous

    Thank you for the link to these important videos.

    How surprising it was someone here alerting me to there existence and not the MSM media. Or Ava DuVernay herself.

    What was surprising is that not one of those videos has more than 2,000 views, with several having less than 300.

    More proof news is fake.

  63. prosa123 says: • Website
    @BB753

    While the case against the West Memphis Three does look strong, there’s the issue of Mr. Bojangles, which has never been resolved.

    For the uninitiated, about a mile from where the three young boys were found murdered, and an hour or two after they’d been reported missing, a disoriented black man with blood on his clothing went into the single-person restroom of a Mr. Bojangles restaurant and remained inside for about twenty minutes. At that time the restaurant workers were unaware of the crime. Just as the workers were about to call the police, the man left the restroom, walked out of the restaurant, and was never seen again. The workers then cleaned the restroom and in the process destroyed almost all of the physical evidence that might have existed.

    After the news broke about the crime, the restaurant management summoned the police, who examined the now-cleaned restroom. A police officer was able to find a few very small blood fragments, but unfortunately lost them before any testing could occur.

    • Replies: @BB753
  64. BB753 says:
    @prosa123

    Maybe this guy was involved in some other unresolved crime. Or he could have given the West Memphis Three a hand! Who knows.

  65. did any of the criminals trump stupidly let out of prison rape anybody yet?

    what a political dead weight move that was. absolutely zero credit from democrats, who want trump in prison. they are now attacking trump over criminals from 30 years ago.

    good work, Jack Kemp, er, i mean Donald Trump. you’re a real Detroit Republican, Rand Paul, er, i mean, Ronald Blumpf. getting big time credit from democrats for letting those criminals out of prison. big poll numbers. Yuge, in fact.

    it’s all so tiresome.

  66. Anonymous[235] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    trying to smear Donald Trump

    That’s it. That’s all it’s about.

    It similar to the Kate Steinle case. The jury turned her killer loose simply to spite Trump.

  67. ic1000 says:
    @Bugg

    Bugg, appreciate that you took the time to provide that detailed background in your comments.

  68. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dr. X

    Thank God New York City makes it virtually impossible to carry a handgun.

    A victim might hurt one of the criminals, you know…

    The wealthy and connected have no problem.

    Per Lautenpig, maybe we should withhold funds to cities and states who don’t respect reciprocal common carry….It was good for seat belt laws, 55 mph and the 21 drinking age.

  69. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    I know NYC is cucked beyond belief, but I can’t imagine how angry I would be if my tax dollars were used to make multimillionaires out of blatantly guilty rapists.

    NYC is the bull, not the cuck.

  70. Anon[249] • Disclaimer says:

    Kamala Harris’ slave-owning ancestor sure knew how to use race to his own personal career advantage, and Kamala is a chip off the old block.

  71. Like Steve apparently is, I am unsure what happened after spending several hours reading various articles. I was going to watch the taped confessions available on YouTube, but it was too difficult to listen to the dumb teens. I’ll give up trying to come to my conclusion. I think Conlon hit the nail on the head, though–thanks to de Blasio, we won’t have a chance to see many possible salient points addressed in court.

  72. J1234 says:

    The judge was dismissive of claims of coercion because the defendants, once reunited after their confessions, laughed and joked, comparing versions of the stories they told. They sang songs—including, infamously, Wild Thing—and catcalled at a female detective.

    Too bad that behavior wasn’t captured on video. Probably not admissible as evidence, but it could help protect a police department from agenda driven defamation in strange cases like this.

  73. Anonymous[356] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Here’s a fun exercise, when talking to someone who watches and believes in these shows just casually refer to it as a ‘documentary’. “Hey, did you watch that new documentary on Netflix yet?”

    Documentaries are considered factual. I’m not sure what your point is.

  74. Anonymous[356] • Disclaimer says:
    @foulkes

    The teens were lilely referring to the beating of one of the male joogers. He was beaten badly and looked”like a bucket of bloodhad been dumped on him,” according to a detective.

    Interesting. Has anyone addressed this theory?

    • Replies: @foulkes
  75. Anonymous[353] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    Thank you.

  76. Anonymous[356] • Disclaimer says:
    @Precious

    Wrong, you are completely wrong. Ask some professional investigator, who worked in that capacity to review eyewitness accounts, to explain how eyewitness testimony works and they will explain why you are wrong.

    What would the professional investigator tell us?

    • Replies: @Precious
  77. Anonymous[235] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Anon

    That’s the mistake that people (especially Boomers and the WWII generation) make in thinking that the MSM has become biased. It was always biased. It always had an agenda.

    Right. I was just reading about the Goldwater vs. Johnson campaign in 1964. It was the same story then, with the media ignoring the scandals and gaffes of one side while smearing and libeling the other side. Nothing has changed.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    , @David In TN
  78. 95Theses says:
    @Bugg

    Eric Reynolds gives a discussion of his role as arresting officer along with an air-clearing about the Central Park 5 case in this YT video that appeared late last year:

    Central Park 5
    2018, November 12 | scccmediaproduction

  79. Precious says:
    @Anonymous

    What would the professional investigator tell us?

    Key statement in the video…

    Witnesses never agree.

  80. @Chris Mallory

    In what universe are 14,15, and 16 year olds still in “childhood”?

    A universe without Phillippe Rushton and all the millions of Southerners whose empirical observations dovetailed with Rushton’s theories about accelerated physical maturity of blacks.

  81. @Anonymous

    Of course, you’re right. The Internet means that we can see the bias now in a way we couldn’t before. However, I’ve never seen anyone raise this question before. Is it possible that Goldwater threw the election even more enthusiastically than McCain did in 2008?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @David In TN
  82. @the one they call Desanex

    *You say it’s (it being the matter) f-u-c-t u-p?

    What the heck is up in Fup, the weird tale of a mallard hen?

    (And yes, Fup lives with Tiny. Check it out.)

  83. Not the way to present oneself in court– even if one’s name really is Char:

    Road rage attacker wears blackface in racist courtroom rant

  84. @Escher

    Cuatro de julio to you, gringo.

  85. @ben tillman

    Goldwater and McGovern got creamed, but their people started movements that have had more influence than most of those actually elected, especially the two men they lost to.

  86. eah says:
    @eah

    As mentioned above (comment #3), anyone interested in this case should read the John Derbyshire piece, including the comments, where there is a lot of good additional info.

    THE CENTRAL PARK FIVE JOGGER ATTACKERS — Guilty — In Their Own Words

    Also the above website is a great resource, eg it has a full review of the evidence, as well as all of the interrogration/confession videos — you can watch and judge how proper and/or credible they are for yourself.

    Unfortunately, today the ‘narrative’ totally dominates, and things like the two jury trials and all of the evidence presented then are deliberately suppressed, including the other crimes these guys committed and were convicted for — inexplicably, those convictions were also vacated.

  87. @Mr. Anon

    TCM has her on the Saturday Night “Essential.” The favorite shtick for TCM hosts is and always has been wailing about “the McCarthy witch-hunts.”

    The funny thing is the film noirs from the early 50’s show “Dark City” LA and New York looking like pretty civilized places. An irony the TCM hosts miss.

  88. @Anonymous

    “Nothing has changed.”

    Actually, the MSM has gotten worse, but the internet has lessened their power somewhat.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  89. @ben tillman

    No, Goldwater didn’t throw the election. It was impossible for him to win in the tactical situation existing in 1964. The public didn’t want three presidents within a year.

    The MSM still went after Goldwater hammer and tongs.

  90. Anonymous[249] • Disclaimer says:
    @David In TN

    Actually, the MSM has gotten worse

    Has it? How? Maybe the audience just has access to more criticism now.

  91. Forbes says:
    @Western

    Since no one lives in the Central Park precinct, it would be impossible to calculate a crime rate, which is made on a population basis, e.g., per 1,000 or 100,000 residents. So perceptions of safety vary as nearly every crime committed in the Park received media attention, whereas other crimes throughout the city, unless horrific, didn’t receive the same attention.

    The rest of your commentary seems equally ill-informed, reliant as it appears from your perceptions from afar.

  92. foulkes says:
    @Anonymous

    Interesting. Has anyone addressed this theory?

    It wouldn’t help the defendants. They would be admitting they were assaulting other joggers , which would make their guilt even more likely of assaulting the female jogger

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