The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Just Another Day at Google ...
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From the Daily Caller:

‘DISRESPECTFUL’: GOOGLE EMPLOYEES MELT DOWN OVER THE WORD ‘FAMILY’
10:10 PM 01/16/2019, Peter Hasson | Reporter

A Google executive sparked a fierce backlash from employees by using the word “family” in a weekly, company-wide presentation, according to internal documents obtained by The Daily Caller News Foundation.

Many Google employees became angry that the term was used while discussing a product aimed at children, because it implied that families have children, the documents show. The backlash grew large enough that a Google vice president addressed the controversy and solicited feedback on how the company could become more inclusive.

One employee stormed out of the March 2017 presentation after a presenter “continued to show (awesome) Unicorn product features which continually use the word ‘family’ as a synonym for ‘household with children,’” he explained in an internal thread. That employee posted an extended rant, which was well-received by his colleagues, on why linking families to children is “offensive, inappropriate, homophobic, and wrong.”

He wrote:

This is a diminishing and disrespectful way to speak. If you mean “children”, say “children”; we have a perfectly good word for it. “Family friendly” used as a synonym for “kid friendly” means, to me, “you and yours don’t count as a family unless you have children”. …

“Using the word ‘family’ in this sense bothers me too,” wrote another employee, who felt excluded by the term because she was neither married nor a parent. …d

“My family consists of me and several other trans feminine folks, some of whom I’m dating. We’re all supportive of each other and eventually aspire to live together. Just because we aren’t a heterosexual couple with 2.5 kids, a white picket fence, and a dog doesn’t mean we’re not a family,” another employee added in agreement. …

By the way, English really ought to have more words for different meanings of “family.” For example, it would be convenient to have different terms for the nuclear family that you were born into and the nuclear family that you form. For example, “Where is your family from?” for me would be either Los Angeles, if it’s referring to where I was born, or Chicago if it’s referring to where I was married and my children were born. 95% of the time you can tell by context, but I bet some other languages have separate words.

In general, English is rather lacking in family words. For example, we have “siblings” as a somewhat rare but convenient word for brothers and sisters, but we don’t have any similar word for nephews and nieces. My impression is that the English tended to less interested in extended families than just about anybody, and not even very interested in them: e.g., the rather horrifying English goal is to be rich enough to pack your children off to boarding school when they reach 7 or 8. Even tough guys like Winston Churchill found it incredibly traumatic.

 
Hide 162 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. tsotha says:

    Hahaha. You reap what you sow. Working at Gulag has got to be like living in 1960s China – things that were perfectly reasonable to say yesterday will get you a public self criticism session today.

  2. Anonymous[420] • Disclaimer says:

    In St. Louis, the question, always, is: “Where did you go to school?’

    The secret is that they mean high school, whether you are a cab driver or a cardiologist.

    • Replies: @NolaPerson
    , @Mike Zwick
  3. Dan Hayes says:

    Steve,

    In the days of the British empire the purported rationale for packing off 7 or 8 year old children to boarding school was to toughen them up to run the empire – or so the excuse went.

    More likely it was disdain; as exemplified by Evelyn Waugh’s statement that he couldn’t stand any of his own children!

  4. Gapeseed says:

    In a normal company in a bygone era, that kind of remark would have ensured a dressing down, a demotion, or a dismissal, unless the objector was a superstar talent who management felt needed catering to. Google, a company reputed to have plenty of superstar talent and a superior cafeteria, apparently needs a lot of catering.

  5. Hail says: • Website

    English really ought to have more words for different meanings of “family.”

    “Where is your family from?” for me would be either Los Angeles, if it’s referring to where I was born, or Chicago if it’s referring to where I was married and my children were born

    This is exactly (a variant of) the question that InviteTheWorld-immigrant descendants, for some reason especially Asians, always claim to be highly offended at. The supposed example of White racism, is, on close inspection, really a linguistic weakness:

    White person: So where is your family from?
    East Asian in America: Oh, we’re from Orange County, California.
    White person: No, I mean, uh, Where are they really from?
    East Asian in America: Oh. [deeply, deeply offended]

    I vote to revive the term “stock” or coin a suitable replacement.

    It would cover one possible implied meaning of “family” in that question.

  6. Anon[751] • Disclaimer says:

    Cancer of lunacy. Legitimize just a little, and it grows and grows.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  7. Tyrion 2 says:

    I will never pretend that a gaggle of childless drag queens are a family.

    • Agree: AnotherDad
  8. @Dan Hayes

    In the days of the British empire the purported rationale for packing off 7 or 8 year old children to boarding school was to toughen them up to run the empire

    and it worked all too well. The discipline and bravery of British forces walking into the meatgrinder of WW I were made possible by the British Public School. Goes to show — no universal answer.

    Counterinsurgency

  9. Anonymous[529] • Disclaimer says:

    That late, great curmudgeonly English comedian, Les Dawson, was famous for using the phrases ‘mother-in-law’ and the mild expletive ‘old bag’ in the same sentence.

  10. jim jones says:

    I told some of my Malaysian students that I rarely visit my family in the North of England and they were just confused. Family means everything to them.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @bomag
  11. Cortes says:

    Certain Britons advertise their family history through the use of surnames as first names. Very common among Presbyterian Scots. Lots of Crawfords, Bruces, Stewarts etc for men, Lindsays for men and women. For women the use of surname middle names is common – my wife’s middle name is Campbell (her mother’s maiden name) – same for her siblings.

    On the boarding school matter: in October 1979 I travelled by train from SW England to Scotland and had to switch trains at Bristol. It was astonishing to see little girls of 8 or 9 laden with baggage headed to their ?prep school unattended by any adults I could see. That said, the railway staff was obviously well used to dealing with the flow of midget Marples and guided them efficiently.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    , @TheJester
  12. @Dan Hayes

    In the days of the British empire the purported rationale for packing off 7 or 8 year old children to boarding school was to toughen them up to run the empire . . .

    I don’t know what went on in those boarding schools, but it seems like about half the upper class ended up being at least a little bit gay afterward.

    But I just finished watching A Very English Scandal, so my reference point may be skewed.

    • Replies: @kihowi
    , @sb
    , @Anon
  13. George says:

    “English is rather lacking in family words”

    That employee posted an extended rant, which was well-received by his colleagues, on why linking families to children is “offensive, inappropriate, homophobic, and wrong.”

    Object oriented programing (OOP) modeling might provide a starting point of analysis.

    Implicitly assuming various family instances can be instantiated from a single Class:Family can lead to unforeseen problems further on in the development cycle.

    “If two objects apple and orange are instantiated from the class Fruit, they are inherently fruits and it is guaranteed that you may handle them in the same way; e.g. a programmer can expect the existence of the same attributes such as color or sugar content or is ripe.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object-oriented_programming#Class-based_vs_prototype-based

    But the criticism of object oriented programing remains valid.

    “The problem with object-oriented languages is they’ve got all this implicit environment that they carry around with them. You wanted a banana but what you got was a gorilla holding the banana and the entire jungle.”

    “I find OOP technically unsound. It attempts to decompose the world in terms of interfaces that vary on a single type. To deal with the real problems you need multisorted algebras — families of interfaces that span multiple types. I find OOP philosophically unsound. It claims that everything is an object. Even if it is true it is not very interesting — saying that everything is an object is saying nothing at all.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object-oriented_programming#Criticism

    I recommend further studies to determine if a single abstract Class:Family will provide a proper framework for future development efforts.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Paolo Pagliaro
  14. Mrs. Gryce’s mother was sent to a Catholic girls boarding school run by Ursuline sisters for a couple of years. Judging from her endless stories, it was one of the happiest, most formative experiences of her life. Think The Trouble with Angels.

  15. @jim jones

    Are you the second coming of Anthony Burgess?

    • Replies: @jim jones
  16. @Dan Hayes

    It worked for a couple of centuries.

    • Replies: @Anonym
  17. So is Google having their employees drop acid, hoping they’ll create the next Steve Jobs and keep Google dominant? That would make the comments make more sense.

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @International Jew
  18. kihowi says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    “goodbye to all that” was hilariously casual about that.

    “…of course boarding school was full of gay sex. Anyway, about the war…”

    he also says somewhere that 9 out of 10 english homosexuals are only that way because of school. you don’t hear that quoted a lot.

  19. DFH says:

    “My family consists of me and several other trans feminine folks, some of whom I’m dating. We’re all supportive of each other and eventually aspire to live together.

    Why are ‘trans’ ‘people’ really into ‘polyamory’, when other homos don’t really care about keeping up the pretense of ‘dating’?

    • Replies: @TheMediumIsTheMassage
  20. There probably aren’t many words for family because formerly there was no need to distinguish between cohabiting, transgender, same sex, nonbinary, furry, otherkin, etc ‘families’ and… well, the family.
    I’d be surprised if the situation was very different in most of europe (or anywhere else for that matter – though I’m sure there are some interesting contrary examples).

    ‘Where is your family from’ probably made more sense till about 30 years ago since most families were from the same place, too.
    I’ve noticed it’s a question americans tend to ask a more, early into the conversation – I guess it’s a better conversation starter over there as people come from a wider range of places (both within america and in terms of their European (or otherwise!) ancestors.

  21. @Hail

    The crazy thing (at least is certain ‘prog’ metros) is that they affect this fury at being asked where they’re from even when English is clearly not their first language. But even that wasn’t very inclusive of me, was it.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  22. @Cortes

    As we’ve observed from time to time, it wasn’t odd back then for children to do all sorts of things unaccompanied by adults. It was called freedom, and we enjoyed it until our ‘betters’ decided that flooding our nations with third-world migrants was more important. Not to mention the fact that we’ve almost stopped prosecuting lawbreaking upon any minorities here in the USA. Once in awhile now a black person is actually apprehended, and it makes headlines throughout the western world.

    • Replies: @Rex Little
  23. I always thought we should have adopted words to distinguish in-laws better too, like other languages. If I am mentioning a brother or sister-in-law, I often have to explain if it is my sibling’s spouse or my wife’s sibling, or my wife’s sibling’s spouse. “My brother-in-law works there. Your wife’s brother? No my sister’s husband. Oh okay,” is a lot of words. Same with nieces and nephews. My sibling’s children or my wife’s sibling’s children. Some of the people on the other side of the Hajnal use these kind of words regularly.

    IIRC, some of the Balkan languages have specific words for each great-grandfather and great-grandmother going back many generations. Wouldn’t be useful in our culture, but if you engage in blood feuds it would be nice to know why you need to kill someone.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
  24. Graham says:

    If you’re English and of a rather higher class than me you would refer to your parents, grandparents, uncles and aunts, and so on as your people, as in ‘my people are from Shropshire’. That is a useful way of distinguishing them from your spouse and children.

  25. Graham says:
    @Dan Hayes

    Any evidence for that, Dan? My impression, from my understanding of history, is that no excuse was needed – it was just what one did – and that the Empire was largely regarded as a second choice for second sons, and others who didn’t inherit or couldn’t find something to do at home. As for Waugh, he was joking.

    • Replies: @DFH
    , @Art Deco
  26. sb says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    Humph .
    Didn’t do Sparta any harm

  27. jim jones says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Thanks to the Commonwealth they all come to London to study

  28. mmack says:

    If these “Googlers” (ugh) are so insulted about not having a family, I have the perfect solution: Adopt a Mexican or Guatemalan family trying to sneak across the border and bring them to San Francisco. Presto! Instant Family, um, familia. And you stick it to Trump (See Orange Man, WALLS DON’T WORK!) as you virtue signal. And you can adopt a homeless person for the crazy uncle every family seems to have. Granted, figuring out where to fit everyone in your $1900 a month communal living set up that gives you one bunk bed will be an issue, but I’m told these are smart people, so they’ll figure it out.

    • Replies: @OFWHAP
    , @Ron Mexico
  29. Cindy says:

    “For example, we have “siblings” as a somewhat rare but convenient word for brothers and sisters, but we don’t have any similar word for nephews and nieces”

    My sister calls them niblings. Not sure where she got that, but she has a fancy college education, so I guess it’s the right word for it.

  30. DFH says:
    @Graham

    As for Waugh, he was joking.

    Evelyn’s oldest son, Auberon, who would later go on to write five novels before renouncing novel-writing (allegedly out of fear of being compared to his father but like, a little late for that, Auberon, after the five novels) claimed that during World War II that Evelyn Waugh’s second wife, Laura Herbert, somehow managed to get her hands on three bananas and brought them home for their then-five children, whereupon Evelyn sat all the children down, peeled the bananas in front of them and sliced them (the bananas, not the children) into a bowl, covered them with cream and sugar, and ate them all himself. Which:

    • Replies: @Sean
    , @Dan Hayes
    , @Prendy
  31. iffen says:

    but I bet some other languages have separate words.

    Late in life I have learned that German has some very good words that English could make use of.

  32. Uncharacteristically non sympathetic, Sailer. Not being evil is a tough job. You should know this.

  33. Anonymous[117] • Disclaimer says:

    For what it’s worth, the word ‘family’ is derived from the Latin ‘famulus’ meaning ‘household slave or servant’.

  34. Discovery docs reveal Google had a blacklist of conservative job candidates:
    https://www.businessinsider.com/conservative-google-employees-are-blacklisted-lawsuit-alleges-2018-1

    Google managers kept blacklists of conservative employees and one manager considered holding ‘trials,’ a new lawsuit alleges

    QUESTION:
    Why can’t republicans start requiring government contractors to adhere to their principles as a requirement for a contract?

    Right now essentially to be a government contractor for ANYTHING you have to embrace the principles of diversity.

    What if you had to adapt the principle of free speech and view point diversity?

  35. Sword says:

    Regarding family words:

    In Swedish, we have a lot of them. I will explain them with the example of Barron Trump, since he is both well-known, and has a lot of well-known relatives.

    In Swedish, the president is “far” of Barron, and Melania is “mor”. Those are formal family words, more common are “pappa” and “mamma”.

    In Swedish, Ivanka is “storasyster” to Barron, and Eric is “storebror”. “Stor” means big – notice that it has different female and male declensions.

    To Ivanka, Tiffany is “lillasyster” and Barron is “lillebror”. “Liten” is small, and note the same gendered declensions.

    Also, Ivanka is “halvsyster” to Barron. “Halv” is half in Swedish.

    Altogether, the President has five children who are siblings to one another, sibling being “syskon” in Swedish.

    So far, the Swedish and English family words are quite similar. Now we go to the more distant relatives, and that is where the languages start to differ.

    In English, both Maryanne Trump Barry and Irene Knauss are “aunts” to Barron. However, there are two different terms in Swedish. Maryanne is his “faster”, and Irene is his “moster”. Those two words are ancient portmanteaus of far+syster and mor+syster, respectively.

    Likewise, Swedish has two distinct words for uncle: farbror and morbror. So, Robert Trump is “farbror” to Barron.

    If the siblings to the parents are halfsiblings, then one could tack on a halv- in front of the specific word for aunt or uncle, but that is very rarely done.

    Barron has/had two grandmothers, but that term cannot be translated into Swedish. The term used for Melanias mother is “mormor”, and the term used for Donalds mother is “farmor”.

    Likewise for grandfathers – in Swedish, the terms are either “morfar” (father of Melania) or “farfar” (father of Donald)

    For relatives further up, we simply keep stacking up “far” or “mor” – we do not use any collective terms such as great-grandparent, great-great-grandparent, etc. So: The man who was father of Donald´s father is “farfarsfar” to Barron. Notice the genitive s smashed into that. The woman who was mother to the mother of Melania was “mormorsmor” to Barron.

    Personally, I happen to be 1/64th German, since my “farmorsmorfarsfarmor” was a German woman. Parse that one!

    Swedish also has terminology for lateral relations. In addition to those that I previously noted, there is “kusin” for first cousin. Swedish uses the same word for female and male cousins, in contrast to Danish, where “kusine” is a female cousin, and “Vaetter” is a male one. “Syssling” is 2nd cousin, “Brylling” is 3rd cousin. “Pyssling” is 4th cousin.

    Swedish also has terms for descendants. To the parents of Melania Barron is “dotterson”, while he would be “sonson” to his american grandparents. To Irene Knauss he is “systerson”, and to Maryanne Trump he is “brorson”. So, two different words for nephew. Likewise, there are two different words for niece, “systerdotter” and “brorsdotter”. Ivanka and Tiffany Trump are then “brorsdöttrar” to Maryannne – notice the plural form of dotter.

    Donald has several grandchildren, and the general term for those is “barnbarn”

    Since Maryanne Trump Barry does not have any sisters, all her nephews and nieces are “brorsbarn” to her – literally, brother-children. Swedish also has the corresponding term “systerbarn” for those newphews and nieces that are the children of your sisters. Combined, those terms form “syskonbarn” – literally, sibling-children. That means all your nephews and nieces, no matter the gender of the parent that you are sibling to.

    Swedish also has specific terms for inlaws – svärmor, svärfar, svärson, svärdotter. “Svär” is the general prefix for in-law, and it also happens to be the word stem for swearing/cussing. We also have more distant in-law words, but they are very rarely used.

    If someone is related by adoption, we tack on the prefix adoptiv- infront of ordinary relationship term – adoptivson (adoptive son) adoptivmor (adoptive mother), and so on.

    Not many languages have the precision that Swedish has when describing relationships – the only other languages that I know of are Latin and Chinese.

  36. slumber_j says:

    In the Spanish spoken in Spain at least there’s an excellent expression that means “the family one married into”: la familia política. Broadly I guess it can mean the same as “the in-laws,” but it offers a bulwark against ambiguity: “in-laws” in the strict sense of “parents-in-law” is suegros.

    Of course the “siblings” and “nieces and nephews” problem is addressed in Spanish by introducing more ambiguity: you just use the masculine plural and it means either the several male members of each category or everyone in the category, of either sex. Hence, respectively, hermanos and sobrinos.

  37. TheBoom says:

    Steve, I get that the experience of chronicling daily the demise and stupification of our culture must get very tiresome. However, in the wake of the insanity du jour, I don’t think a discussion of how to improve the applicable verbiage is really the most pressing or interesting matter. Let’s put it this way, 20 years ago, if presented with a greatest crisis on earth such as this one, I doubt that the need to expand the words for family would have been your first reaction

  38. Whiskey says: • Website

    Gays are around 1.5% of the population. That this meltdown occurred and was greeted with applause shows Google is a broken company, reaping huge monopoly profits from advertising and not much else.

    Appealing to 1.5% of the population and bowing down to what most people figure is weirdo freakism is not a good long term strategy. But hey if you have a monopoly and the company is run by managers looking for social approval from their peers not profits then why worry.

    • Replies: @sondjata
    , @Kratoklastes
  39. @Anonymous

    We do that in New Orleans, too, where it is often remarked upon by puzzled outsiders as a particularly odd quirk of the city’s culture. Interesting to learn of another place where this happens.

    • Replies: @OFWHAP
  40. Jay Fuge says:

    By the way, English really ought to have more words for different meanings of “family.”

    In a similar vein, John Derbyshire referred to his home town in the most recent Radio Derb:

    …My own home town of Huntington, Long Island…

    I had always thought “home town” referred to the place where one was born, not the place where one lived now.

    • Replies: @OFWHAP
  41. @Anonymous

    I really old school Chicago, nobody would ask what neighborhood you were from, they would ask what parish you grew up in. You don’t hear that much any more. It pretty much died out with the WWII generation.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  42. TheBoom says:
    @TheBoom

    It should terrify all of us that many of the most powerful and influential companies in the US are becoming asylums where the most vicious and insane determine what is culturally acceptable. (Their stockholders should also be worried).

    • Replies: @bomag
  43. Sean says:
    @DFH

    Evelyn was a self consciously and defiantly bad father but as John Cary points out in his Sunday Times review of a bio of Aubron (“prejudices as a substitute for thinking”) Waugh, he worshiped his father.

  44. Barnard says:

    In England, would it have been that common for the nuclear family you are born into and the one that you form to be from different places prior to industrialization? It seems like this would be a fairly recent phenomenon.

  45. Jimi says:

    1/3 of people who turn 18 in 2019 were born outside of wedlock and vast majority have less than ideal relationships with their fathers.

    Unsurprisingly in schools and universities there is a push back against Father’s Day. This day is considered to be insensitive to those kids.

    Going forward expect public celebrations or even acknowledgement of fatherhood to be considered “problematic” by the SJW movement.

    The white upper middle class males in their 30s in my social circle put up 100s of photos hanging out with their kids. The resentment from people with families that have absentee fathers (mostly NAMs) is palpable.

    • Replies: @Prof. Woland
  46. @Hail

    I tend to ask “from whence do your forebears hail?”

    • Replies: @Hail
  47. Thea says:

    Between Bezos and these clowns, our betters are miserable people.

    Be careful what you wish for. Urdu has many specific words for various cousins to point you toward your future spouse.

  48. Don E says:

    The census and most governments define family as two or more persons related by blood or marriage.

  49. @iffen

    Weltanschauung‘s always a hit
    To display you’re an erudite wit.
    Angst and Gestalt
    Prove you’re hip to a fault,
    But Krautknobslobber is the best fit.

    • Replies: @Prester John
    , @iffen
  50. Man, what a fucking world we live in. I hope Barr brings anti-trust cases against all these shits. I used to really like Google. Now I just see a bunch of thin-skinned perverts ruled over by some brown non-descript non-American.

  51. Anon[421] • Disclaimer says:

    Does Google report the number of transsexual employees in its annual diversity report? I get the feeling that it’s pretty high.

  52. @Mr McKenna

    They’re not Americans so shouldn’t take offense at being assumed to not be Americans. If they do seem offended, well that’s their issue.

    My response when receiving such a reaction is to just repeat the question, maybe with an edge: “You know what I mean. Where is your family from, before they came here?”

  53. Some of these people probably think it is a big micro aggression to have pictures of your children displayed in your office. An aggression even.

    The Chinese agents who write government reports on the American threat have to love this shit.

    • Replies: @bomag
  54. SBrin says:

    Most people misunderstand the nature of Google. Google is not a tech company in any meaningful way. It doesn’t manufacture and distribute tech products to make money. Rather, it provides software as a service, most of which is free to the user, virtually all of which is paid for by advertising. At the end of the day, Google is the worlds largest advertising agency. The advertising people call the shots, and they are ovewhelmingly female and leftists. Ergo, drama.

    Most of Google’s profit is made through Adsense, which is a ten-year old product. The rest of the company is either pie-in-the-sky projects that lose money or, quite frankly, a holding pen to keep their best engineers from defecting to other companies. When was the last time you saw a new Google product and said: wow!? Adsense is a cash cow that finances a bunch of silliness.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @CJ
  55. @Eustace Tilley (not)

    “But add some ‘Scheiss’ (just a bit).”

  56. Andy says:

    with silliness like this, it’s increasingly hard to see how Google can compete with a refreshingly non-PC Chinese Google-like company in say 2029

  57. KevinL says:

    Surprisingly, Italian is even more ambiguous than English about relations, with “nipote” (where the word nepotism comes from) meaning grandson or granddaughter or niece or nephew.

  58. The English were much bigger proponents of primogenitor inheritance. Being an in-law meant that you were in the family but not the will.

  59. Aside from anything else, notice the spectacular lack of logic:

    ‘Just because we aren’t a heterosexual couple with 2.5 kids, a white picket fence, and a dog doesn’t mean we’re not a family,” another employee added in agreement. …’

    No one said he/she/it wasn’t part of a ‘family.’ Okay you’re a family.

    So why is it offended by the reference to ‘families?’

    • Replies: @Fredrik
  60. Dan Hayes says:
    @DFH

    DFH:

    Joking? Certainly Evelyn Waugh had a malicious sense of humor!

    BTW, I yield to no one in my appreciation and respect for Waugh as a writer and Catholic!

  61. @Tyrion 2

    They know. It’s far better that they remain childless too.

    Unlike others, I’m okay with the mentally unwell mutilating their bodies and taking hormones. It means they will never reproduce and this curse can be stopped. Also if they congregate together, they spare the rest of society their presence.

  62. Art Deco says:
    @Graham

    As for Waugh, he was joking.

    Don’t think so. See the vignettes of his son.

  63. Lot says:
    @Redneck farmer

    It’s called microdosing bro.

    Take enough to feel it, not so much you can’t put in a full day of coding.

    • LOL: bomag
    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
  64. Family is offensive for more than one reason. In its Latin origin, it referred to domestic slaves. Talk about white supremacist!
    https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/family

    If I’d been at that meeting, I might have trolled them along these lines.

  65. In general, English is rather lacking in family words. For example, we have “siblings” as a somewhat rare but convenient word for brothers and sisters, but we don’t have any similar word for nephews and nieces.

    True that. English is poor in that way. In Latin, you have different words for your mother’s brother (avunculus) and your father’s (patruus).
    https://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/arts/anthropology/tutor/kinterms/latin.html

    Russian has a word for your wife’s sister’s husband (svoyak). How specific is that!?

  66. MEH 0910 says:

    Sister Sledge – We Are Family (Official Music Video)

  67. @Redneck farmer

    So is Google having their employees drop acid, hoping they’ll create the next Steve Jobs

    To create the next Steve Jobs you don’t drop acid, you drop pants.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  68. @stillCARealist

    The man who gave birth:

    https://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=5302756&page=1

    Best line:

    The birth, at St. Charles Medical Center in Bend, Oregon, was natural, according to a source, who added that reports that Beatie had had a Caesarean section are false.

    Lolz

    Second place:

    “His wife, Nancy, inseminated him at home with a device she said was like a syringe without the needle. They bought it from a veterinarian and it is typically used to feed birds.”

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @bomag
  69. I view this much like gay “marriage” These people believe they are entitled to the same respect that is given to time-honored institutions without realizing that the REASON they are time-honored institutions is that they have substance.

    Their perverted version (in the dictionary sense of the word) does not even come close to approximating the substance of a real family or marriage. Yet, they seem to think that by using these same words, they are getting the same benefits. Magical incantations if you will

    • Replies: @TheMediumIsTheMassage
  70. anon[393] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dan Hayes

    didn’t we used to use cousin for nephews and nieces as well as cousins? also didn’t we refer to our extended families as our race?
    Im not sure if i would extrapolate from the lack of specific extended family words that we were only concerned with immediate family i would think it was the opposite that the hajinal nuclear was so recent we dont yet have words to exclude the newest iteration of family, that family has always meant clan and so far we have only come up with nuclear family in the nuclear age

  71. “on why linking families to children is “offensive, inappropriate, homophobic, and wrong.””

    I am a gay living with my gay boyfriend of eight years and despite being a loving long-term partnership (and honestly, coupling up is the best way for a middle class late twentiesomething to thrive in a big coastal city these days-you split rent, build equity and savings much faster, etc.) we do not consider ourselves a ‘family’. Family has never meant just two people, it’s always implied adult(s) + children. Everyone understands that. And gay people are basically like infertile straight couples in that they can adopt or do surrogacy or whatever and voila, now they’re a family. But it takes kids to become a family. In fact if anything this wacko’s rant is homophobic because it implies gay couples can’t or shouldn’t have kids. I can’t even follow the “logic” of these people anymore.

    ““My family consists of me and several other trans feminine folks, some of whom I’m dating.”

    This is why ‘LGBT’ needs to stop being a thing. Most gay men have absolutely nothing in common with this and I have a hard time imagining most gay men would consider their regular Grindr hook ups to be their ‘family’. Family is meant as an almost unbreakable bond, a support network, an essential part of your history and identity and your place in the world when everything else is removed. At least that’s my definition.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    , @ben tillman
  72. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @George

    Netflix has a category of “ children and family” movies.

  73. @DFH

    It might have something to do with the urge to fit in. A lot of trans people spend a lot of time worrying about whether or not they ‘pass’ as the opposite gender. They may be subconsciously applying that same desire to be seen as normal to other parts of their life. Calling your casual sex relationships a form of dating may be trying to approximate them to the ‘heterosexual 2.5 kids white picket fence’ ideal.

  74. @TheBoom

    You’re wrong. This is important to take note of because Google essentially controls the flow of information nowadays. And this are the values and ideas their employees have.

  75. El Dato says:

    More stuff directly from a Ballard novel.

  76. @penskefile

    Ok but we live in 2019, where, what is it, half of marriages end up in divorce? There are plenty of “marriages” with no substance (unless we’re talking about substance abuse) among straights, gays, and the confused.

  77. TheJester says:
    @Cortes

    Once in the 1990s, I ran into two children (unaccompanied) on their way from Australia to their boarding schools in the UK while going through customs at Heathrow Terminal 4. The boy about 10; the girl about 7. The boy’s charge was to drop his sister at her boarding school and then go on to his boarding school.

    I would have thought the project dangerous and impossible at those ages. But the boy had the whole thing down pat … the addresses, the taxis, the process. I was impressed and saddened. We raised two sons. Now, we’re helping raise our eight-year-old grandson. At similar ages, we would not think of letting them out of the neighborhood without adult oversight.

    But that’s what happens when you live in an inclusive, multicultural society where everything that was sacred is now decadent … and everything that was decadent is now sacred. The Boy Scouts with homosexual scoutmasters and older homosexual scouts serving as role models … not on my watch!

    P.S. I was seated next to a little girl on an airline flight a few years ago (the impossible-not-to-notice exchange of children-of-divorce over the holidays). We quickly found ourselves in a lively exchange. Then I noticed the stewardess was giving me the evil eye. Good for her!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Cortes
  78. sondjata says:
    @Whiskey

    No. It took me a while to figure this out but it’s not an appeal to the 1.5%. It is an appeal to the 40-50% who are sympathetic to the 1.5% to the point that they are hostile to the other 50-60% who are not sympathetic.

    Target didn’t open the bathrooms to whomever because their research showed that there was a huge untapped market of cross-dressers. They did it because of the people who sympathize with them.

    Similarly, Gillette did their thing because their target audience is sympathetic to the ideas that were put into the commercial.

  79. My effort to embed an image failed when I attempted to use a URL generated by a competitor to Alphabet, Inc.’s engine. What’s the collective noun for multiple ironies?

    • Replies: @peterike
  80. @Cindy

    “Niblings” has been around for awhile. Just web search on it. Google returns:

    About 76,700 results (0.32 seconds)

  81. Anonym says:
    @Redneck farmer

    It seems to me that boarding school is a very decadent luxury to indulge in… you send your children away so that someone else can be the parent for most of the time, while your parents socialize/party. I suppose on the plus side you can probably be more effective at making money if you are not spending your life parenting.

    Most of what I know or think I know about boarding school comes from Roald Dahl via his autobiographical “Boy”. I didn’t know what they meant by “the fag system”, maybe I should re-read the book. Just why were the junior subordinates called “fags”, exactly?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fagging

  82. Garlic says:

    I think the offense at the word “family” shows a general tendency amongst the goodthinkers.

    In fact, I think I’ll call it Garlic’s Law:

    Traditional terminology is only acceptable if used in a non-traditional way.

    Examples of acceptable usage:
    Family = People who aren’t related
    Marriage = Gay marriage
    Wife = Wife/husband in a gay marriage
    Husband = Husband/wife in a gay marriage
    Woman = Person with a penis
    Man = Person with a vagina
    He = She
    She = He
    Beautiful = Weighing 300 pounds and covered in tattoos
    Compassionate = Pro-abortion

  83. @Jimi

    Most of the provisioning in single mother (black) households is done through government (white people) largess. So the “family” is more than moral slap in the face. It is an existential threat from those who do not need gibs that someday they will pull back on their generosity in favor of their own.

    This is why you hear how health care and a living wage, etc. are a right instead of a privileged. That is the fall back position. These people are just sitting on our neck.

    • Replies: @bomag
  84. Beliavsky says:

    If you fill your tech company with childless homosexuals, they can program all the time without being distracted by family (that word!) concerns.

  85. CJ says:
    @SBrin

    Google is not a tech company in any meaningful way.

    Couldn’t agree with you more, Sergey, and that doesn’t apply only to Google. Facebook Instagram Snapchat Tumblr PayPal and pretty much all the rest of today’s Silicon Valley aren’t tech companies either.

    • Agree: Autochthon
  86. @Dan Hayes

    More likely it was disdain; as exemplified by Evelyn Waugh’s statement that he couldn’t stand any of his own children!

    But dogs! Don’t you ever be mean to a dog!

    Of course, they mean their own dogs. Yours has to sit in a box for six months before he can immigrate.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  87. istevefan says:

    There is a youtube video of Frank Abagnale, of Catch Me if You Can fame, giving a speech to Google in employees in late 2017. I was surprised when he started to talk about himself and how important it is for him to be a good father, husband and Christian. He really pounded those points home. I was surprised the Googlers didn’t have a melt down. The ones there seemed to like him.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  88. @TheJester

    Then I noticed the stewardess was giving me the evil eye. Good for her!

    They’d have had the police waiting at the arrival gate for Mister Rogers. And you don’t get more innocent than him.

  89. Just Another Day at Google …

    I suppose you could call them Alphabet Soup Nazis.

  90. Hail says: • Website
    @YetAnotherAnon

    “from whence do your forebears hail?”

    Why not step it up further and drop the unnecessary ‘from’?

    Or go all in and drop the ‘do,’ as well. Leaving us neat-and-tidily with:

    Whence hail your forebears?

    I would advise keeping the ‘your’ and not falling back onto an archaic form. Some things just go too far.

    • Replies: @Abe
  91. OFWHAP says:
    @mmack

    Trust me, there’s no shortage of Mexicans or Central Americans in San Francisco…

  92. OFWHAP says:
    @NolaPerson

    I heard that when applying for jobs in New Orleans, the most valuable thing you could have on your resume is “Jesuit High School, Class of ‘XX”

  93. peterike says:
    @Autochthon

    What’s the collective noun for multiple ironies?

    A head-shake of ironies?

  94. OFWHAP says:
    @Jay Fuge

    I consider home town to be the place you most identify with. For instance my dad only lived in his place of birth for less than a year and had already moved again by his 4th birthday to his eventual home town.

  95. Cortes says:
    @TheJester

    Family members and friends were horrified when they learned that we were allowing our daughter (then aged 13 or 14) to travel to the city centre unaccompanied to attend summer drama and Spanish classes we’d signed her up for during school holidays. At the time my office was about 3 minutes away from both venues (vetted personally).

    A couple of years later some of the friends who’d expressed horror previously were content to have their 16 year old daughters attend “pre-discos” for teens. Having researched the places with a colleague whose daughter was giving him grief about going there, we found them unacceptable due to the all-too-evident presence of older, Asian males plying scantily clad kids with alcohol.

    “Bad Dad!” – to be fair, our wives agreed totally.

  96. J.Ross says: • Website
    @istevefan

    Christianity is tolerated in positions of ultimate subversion, especially with prisoners; blacks are allowed to be Christian just like they are allowed to be masculine.

  97. GMR says:

    Are there languages that have more general terms for family members? Most languages seem to have more specific words:

    For instance, in Polish, there are separate words for niece (brother’s daughter or sister’s daughter); there are similar separate words for nephews. Sister-in-law has two different words, one for brother’s wife and one for husband’s sister. But brother-in-law has only one term… There are also separate words for your mother’s brother and father’s brother for “uncle” although the father’s brother term is falling out of use…

    German and Danish have separate words for female cousin and male cousin.

    Swedish has separate words for grandfather if it’s your mother’s father or father’s father; same with grandmother. Swedish also has separate words for maternal and paternal aunts, and maternal and paternal uncle. Swedish also has separate words for nephew and niece, if it’s your brother’s or sister’s child. Swedish also has separate words for granddaughter and grandson, depending on if it’s your son’s or daughter’s child. However, for in-laws, Swedish does not distinguish.

    Arabic distinguishes between uncle if it’s father’s brother or mother’s brother. Same principle for aunt.

  98. Abe says:
    @Hail

    Whence hail your forebears?

    “Yonda lies the White Castle where grease monkied my fodda!”

  99. Speaking of Google, and search engines in general, I did a little iSteve-y search engine test the other day; started to type in “David Webb Whi”

    Google and Bing gave “David Webb White Sox” and nothing else. Apparently the Southsiders had or have a player by that name.

    DuckDuckGo gave “David Webb White Privilege” as soon as I’d typed in “David Webb.” Didn’t even need the second “W.”

  100. @stillCARealist

    I’m okay with the mentally unwell mutilating their bodies and taking hormones. It means they will never reproduce and this curse can be stopped. Also if they congregate together, they spare the rest of society their presence.

    Why can’t we just reopen the remaining old sanitariums and build some new ones?

    • Replies: @bomag
  101. @sb

    Athens not Sparta. The Spartans like the Romans tried to be ramrod straight.

  102. Fredrik says:
    @Colin Wright

    Million dollar question. Was the protesting employee and its supporters White or Asian? I have a guess…

    Btw,
    the Swedish language separates between paternal and maternal grandparents/uncles/aunts/newphews/nieces(but typically not grandchildren even though words do exist).

  103. Chinese has more words for family relations than most native speakers can even remember. It starts with specific terms for older and younger male and female siblings (older brother – gēgē; younger brother – dìdì, etc.), and expends from there. Want to refer to your father’s older brother’s eldest son? No problems, there’s a term for him.

    It does lead to interesting conversations at family gatherings when people try to remember the term for a remote cousin. Usually some old timer will pipe up with the answer.

    Of course, the one-child policy made many of these terms redundant in mainland China; lots of single children had no gēgē or dìdì, making all other terms pointless.

    At some point the Googlypuffs will start killing each other, à la the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, leaving the Indians and Chinese to fight it out for control.

  104. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mike Zwick

    There was a little of that. My family (grandparents, and father when still in Chicago) went to St. Francis De Sales, on Ewing Ave.

    https://discovermass.com/church/st-francis-de-salesvirgen-de-san-juan-chicago-il/
    which now seems to be steezered to the max

    Our cousins and aunts and uncles to St. Florians in Hegewisch
    http://florian.hegewisch.net/
    or
    http://saintmichaelchicago.org/

    also steezered out from Web appearances.

    Then I became an atheist, and then a Calvinist.
    Hard to figure which they’d detest more.

  105. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Transgenders should be required to be all the way (meaning sterilized) or not at all.

  106. Ian M. says:

    Many Google employees became angry that the term was used while discussing a product aimed at children, because it implied that families have children, the documents show. The backlash grew large enough that a Google vice president addressed the controversy and solicited feedback on how the company could become more inclusive.

    So for family to become more inclusive, we must exclude children.

    Got it.

  107. I can’t but help think that Sundar Pichai was rapidly promoted up the ranks at Google by Sergei Brin and Larry Page so that they could bow out, leaving Pichai to handle all the craziness. He gets paid well to suffer the kookery, $1.7 billion in net worth at last count, up from very little indeed at the time he became CEO.

    There is nothing in Pichai’s background or temperament to suggest that he actually subscribes to any of this kind of thinking—he seems about as conventionally bourgeois and socially conservative as you would expect an immigrant engineer from a high-caste background from India to be—but in the workplace, his pronouncements and handling suggest that he is a pc professional. That is, he’s being paid (really) well to be pc, and to be on top of this kind of stuff.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @SBrin
  108. J.Ross says: • Website
    @PiltdownMan

    Look at it this way. Maybe this is random decadence and maybe it has a program and a target. Would these same people be happy with a situation of white middle class family values time tunnelled from midcentury, plus some Desi trannies subverting Indian culture?

  109. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    They are serious about keeping rabies out.

  110. BB753 says:

    Google is doomed. Short Google stock. Adults are no longer in charge of the company.

  111. The Google guy used the word family in the same sense as “family restaurant”, which means a place you can get a plate of chicken tenders and fries for $6.99 and nobody will care if some of the fries end up on the floor.

  112. bomag says:
    @jim jones

    I rarely visit my family…

    That sentiment might partly account for the British excellence at sailing the world for years on end in the Age of Exploration.

  113. @Mr McKenna

    we’ve almost stopped prosecuting lawbreaking upon any minorities here in the USA.

    I think you’re exaggerating just a bit. Blacks still make up a considerably larger percentage of the prison population than of the general population. How do you suppose they got there?

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
  114. Paleoconn says:

    Steve, on the English language and its limitations when it comes to family terms, I agree. One of my gripes is with ‘brother-in-law’ and ‘sister-in-law’. You never know whether somebody is referring to the sibling of their spouse or the spouse of their sibling. Greeks are more precise: my gambro is the husband of my sister, my kouniado is the brother of my spouse, my batzinaki is my wife’s sister’s husband. The female versions are nyphi, kouniada, batzinakissa. The one place where the Greeks get lazy: gambro and nyphi also mean son-in-law and daughter-in-law, respectively. The only time the meaning is 100% unambiguous is when it is a young person invoking a gambro or nyphi, ie. a person too young to have a child who is married.

  115. Other English language peculiarities:

    – We have no words to distinguish a male cousin from a female one. I know French does (“cousin” and “cousine”); what about other languages?

    – We have no specific words to indicate your son- or daughter-in-law’s parents. Again, do other languages have these?

  116. Personally, I like the word `nibling’ as a collective term for nieces and nephews, but it
    looks like it is very obscure:

    https://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2018/01/22/nibling-nieces-nephews-collective-term/

  117. Note that they are “white picket fences” that trigger them.

  118. @International Jew

    That’s very old fashioned of you. Don’t say it in mixed company or you might get Watsoned. See Ghost of Bull Moose, comment #69, after yours.

  119. Svigor says:
    @iffen

    What’s the Deutsche for “”task forces” or “deployment groups”? Asking for a friend.

    (Comment #88, bitches)

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  120. @Dan Hayes

    In the days of the British empire the purported rationale for packing off 7 or 8 year old children to boarding school was to toughen them up to run the empire – or so the excuse went.

    Actually, if you go back to Tom Brown’s Schooldays, you will see that much of the English squirearchy lived in rural parts of the country, so the choice was either employ a private tutor, which many did, or send the boys to boarding schools where they could associate with other youth of their class, usually located in airy rural locations and away from the disease-ridden cities.

    When parents were overseas working in empire locations the same applied, as they wanted their sons to get an English education, (and probably to keep them away from the local empire maidens).

    To what extent they were a breeding ground for homosexuality is hard to say. Certainly boys going through puberty and adolescence are likely to experiment with the nearest thing that moves, in the absence of girls, through prostitution did exist on a massive scale in nineteenth century England. I think for the most part they will have outgrown it by the late teens. Homosexuality was illegal, and gay marriage had not yet been thought of and seems to have developed as an idea chiefly in the former colonies of North America.

    Also, developments over the last few decades have shown that boarding schools are not at all necessary to nurture homosexual urges.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Dan Hayes
  121. Svigor says:
    @sondjata

    Kinda. Leftists are “sympathetic” to (aggressive on behalf of) whatever the TMotU tell them to be sympathetic to. If TMotU loudly withdrew their support tomorrow, the rank and file would turn on a dime the day after.

    (It’s a battleship, not a fighter jet, so it never just turns on a dime, but the basic point remains)

    And leftists were hostile to )))uppity huwhites(((* long before globo became globo-homo. Hating them on behalf of -homo is just their latest, added excuse.

    *not some abstract “50-60%. Lots of blacks (for example) are anti-homo, and leftists couldn’t give less of a shit. Inform them, and you’re the bad guy.

    Target and Gillette are just catering to TMotU. Whiskey can’t say this because Jewish overlap/adjacency.

  122. Just because we aren’t a heterosexual couple with 2.5 kids, a white picket fence, and a dog doesn’t mean we’re not a family,

    I guess that people who don’t have children are not aware that they do not come in fractions, only whole numbers.

    Also while lesbians are famous for preferring cats as pets, dogs are pack animals to a much greater extent than cats and thus self-identify as family members in a way that cats do not.

    The interesting thing really is that these freaky people who get upset about the mention of families as domestic units where children are raised are actually reacting to their own insecurities. I mean, really, if you are a voluntary eunuch and your friends likewise, then you will only ever have an ersatz family, and will probably live to regret it.

  123. Anon[218] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    They’re not gay just English.

  124. Anon[332] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    I read a biography of George Mallory that had him coming down with some sort of boy crush as a student. The cover of the book had a tasteful nude photo of him that somehow got taken somewhere along the line.

    He later married and had children, before he was killed on Everest. His love letters seem authentically hetero.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  125. Alice says:

    I’m always frustrated that “children” in English means both “one’s sons and “daughters” and “people under the age of 18”. “Minor children” seems redundant, and is too difficult to parse in speech.

    I have also a need for one word which means “my husband, the man who is the father of my children”, because neither “their father” nor “my husband ” conveys the complete concept anymore.

  126. @mmack

    From one of the greatest speeches ever…”Hispanics were gifted in family structure, and you can see a Hispanic person, and they can put 20, 30 people in one home.” The Minister of Defense Reggie White. Reggie knew what was up.

  127. @Anon

    Mallory of Everest was on the fringes of the Bloomsbury coterie.

    Mountain climbing is very literary for some reason. E.g., Auden and Isherwood’s best play The Ascent of F6 is based on Auden’s brother’s expedition to K2.

  128. Prendy says:
    @DFH

    A few years ago Waugh’s youngest son Septimus had an article in The Spectator in which he remembered his father warmly, as did the other Waugh children; only Auberon spoke bitterly about his father (maybe with cause; Waugh could be cold and insulting with his oldest son). Septimus Waugh wrote about an incident which sounded curiously like the infamous banana incident, only that it involved caviar (something children obviously wouldn’t care for). The implication seemed to be that his older brother misremembered what had happened. The evidence is there that Waugh could be mean-spirited and peevish, but a lot of the stories of his cruelty are made up or exaggerated or a misunderstanding of his outrageous sense of humor. The recent biographies have uncovered stories of remarkable acts of charity which Waugh kept quiet.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  129. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Svigor

    Very interesting: I have what you did there seen.

  130. @George

    I fail to see the validity of the criticism you quoted.
    I prefer to know what is true before accepting what is “interesting” to anybody: the consequences of his “interests” assumed as true might be very bad.

  131. @Rex Little

    Perhaps: I may well be exaggerating, but it’s just as possible that I’m underestimating the phenomenon. It is a logical fallacy to take the black population in prison as a proxy for their general level of criminality. In fact, the answer is unknowable but there is ample evidence that cops–white cops in particular–are loath to enforce laws against black criminals. Particularly when it comes to the use of firearms: this is well-documented. Cops don’t want to become infamous and imprisoned themselves. Yes, this runs directly counter to MSM narratives, but so does much truth.

  132. bomag says:
    @TheBoom

    It should terrify all of us that many of the most powerful and influential companies in the US are becoming asylums where the most vicious and insane determine what is culturally acceptable.

    Agree, but it should also terrify us that a large chunk of the internet and modern social media is becoming a leftist asylum where the most vicious and insane determine what is culturally acceptable.

  133. bomag says:
    @Prof. Woland

    These people are just sitting on our neck.

    More like they are sitting on our genitals: it won’t kill us, but we are in constant pain and we can’t reproduce.

  134. bomag says:
    @simple_pseudonymic_handle

    The Chinese agents who write government reports on the American threat have to love this shit.

    Funny.

    “When your opponent is destroying himself, just get out of the way.”

  135. bomag says:
    @Stan d Mute

    Why can’t we just reopen the remaining old sanitariums and build some new ones?

    I guess the lord of the manor, along with cramming diversity down their throats, continues to abuse the serfs by showering them with the insane.

    • Agree: Stan d Mute
  136. bomag says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Kids are tough, but does this one have any chance of a “normal” life?

  137. @stillCARealist

    “It’s far better that they remain childless too.”

    True. Also spares the non-existent children the abuse of being raised by the insane.

    “I’m okay with the mentally unwell mutilating their bodies and taking hormones.”

    I disagree. We shouldn’t help the insane be even more insane.

    “It means they will never reproduce and this curse can be stopped.”

    One hopes. But absent the responsibilities of child-rearing, they seem to have plenty of time, energy and money to propagate their illnesses in other ways.

    “Also if they congregate together, they spare the rest of society their presence.”

    Have you ever known these people to spare the rest of society anything? Living together gives them synergy and reinforcement to inflict their illness further and wider.

  138. @Tyrion 2

    “Gaggle”?

    Personally, I’d use “superfluity” (as in “a ‘superfluity’ of nuns”), or “faith” as in “a faith of merchants.”

    Of course, that raises the unanswerable question: would “childless drag queens” be a “faithless”?

  139. iffen says:
    @Eustace Tilley (not)

    schadenfreude, heimat, urheimat, kenntnisse, verständnis

    I’m not sure I got the last two correct. Distinguishing between knowing about and understanding is what I am trying to get at.

  140. SBrin says:
    @PiltdownMan

    Brin and Page largely bowed out of managing Google in 2001 when they hired Eric Schmidt to run the company. Schmidt, in conjunction with (((Jared Cohen))) created the environment that transformed Google into the leftist hellhole it is today.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  141. @Anon

    Cancer of lunacy. Legitimize just a little, and it grows and grows.

    That’s the deal. Though i’d say it’s something like “cancer of tolerance” or “cancer of minoritarianism”.

    You can bet that even at Google there are hordes–probably most–of employees who see this and think “oh please! stop your drama queen bullshit”. But … “tolerance”/”diversity” (i.e. minoritarianism) they can’t say that because then *they* would be in a world of hurt.

    There are groups (minorities) whom you just can not direct criticism toward in polite society. And as Steve has pointed out, once a group is beyond criticism then its behavior simply grows worse and worse. Essentially–in old middle class speak–it’s “spoiled”.

    We have a society full of spoiled-brat minorities.

    • Replies: @Lot
  142. What % of these FREAKS actually do something productive at google. Like, are there many shims doing engineering on autonomous driving by day and then leaving to beat up biological women in MMA matches by night?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  143. Stealth says:

    “My family consists of me and several other trans feminine folks, some of whom I’m dating. We’re all supportive of each other and eventually aspire to live together…”

    I’m sorry, but am I the only one who finds that shit to be hilarious?

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  144. J.Ross says: • Website
    @BigDickNick

    None of them do anything necessary, that’s exactly why they’re diversity officers and noisemakers. Without them we lose nothing good and avoid a lot of problems.

  145. @TheMediumIsTheMassage

    Thanks for that replay. I asked a long time female friend who is a lesbian what she thought about the Ts in the LGQTs and she was not impressed.

    The Ts have been riding hard on society’s acceptance of the LGs.

  146. @Dan Hayes

    In the days of the British empire the purported rationale for packing off 7 or 8 year old children to boarding school was to toughen them up to run the empire – or so the excuse went.

    Surely one of the reasons was that children are inconvenient. I don’t have an estate with servants, but being a father has certainly changed my lifestyle.

  147. Meanwhile, I went to the Google search page and typed in the following: “family definition”.

    Google gave me the following result from its own dictionary at the top of the page:

    fam·i·ly
    /ˈfam(ə)lē/
    noun
    noun: family; plural noun: families

    1.
    a group consisting of parents and children living together in a household.

  148. @TheMediumIsTheMassage

    Family is meant as an almost unbreakable bond, a support network, an essential part of your history and identity and your place in the world when everything else is removed. At least that’s my definition.

    That was good.

  149. @SBrin

    Brin and Page largely bowed out of managing Google in 2001 when they hired Eric Schmidt to run the company.

    Of course! Thanks for the correction. I should say that I don’t know, with certainty, who Sundar Pichai’s godfather and mentor was. But he must have had one, and had a sufficiently strong reputation with the founders, that they were comfortable with him becoming CEO. Schmidt was likely the person.

  150. we don’t have any similar word for nephews and nieces.

    We are both ignorant savages, you and I.

    You are an ignorant savage because you’ve never seen the word ‘sibspring’; I am an ignorant savage because I was absolutely certain that I invented the term, but it was first recorded by the UD (Urban Dictionary) in 2011 and The Mighty Zoltan used it on Ars Technica in 2007.

    The UD entry genuinely reads like something I wrote – I have always emphasised the value of being able to send sibspring back to their parents when they get tedious (i.e., after about 90 seconds)… but I only have 8, and I didn’t have 8 in 2012.

  151. Participation in constant workplace chit chat about the kids and families of employees and managers, along with enthusiastic participation in frequent workplace celebrations of parenthood for employees, is most certainly not required for childless employees to meet and exceed sales quotas every month, to provide excellent customer service or to design a quality product in a job, even if the product or service is directly related to kids and families, albeit work-related talk about kids and families in the service of customers is, of course, necessary in the case of kid-and-family-related products or services. When designing or selling a product for children, the needs of the customers must be the foremost concern, not the feelings of employees, even if it is one of the rare American workplaces outside of the low-wage, youth-dominated, fun-employment jobs and the T&A jobs, like Hooters, that is dominated by single, childless employees.

    But in the America’s many absenteeism-friendly corporate and government workplaces——-staffed with between 98–100% parent employees in cities where less than 30% of the residents are in households with kids under 18—the kid-and-family themed social-clique activities for employees that have nothing to do with serving customers or clients are not just occasional, in which case objections by childless employees would be petty. The family-centric / customers-last atmosphere is constant. The focus on the family lives of employees overrides the work. Take the furloughed government employees, given a forum by the MSM to whine about the shutdown for weeks. Few of them are making an argument about the essential nature of their jobs, based on the needs of their clients or the nature of their work. They are going into excruciating detail about their own kids and families. Although childless citizens are expected to pay taxes to keep government jobs afloat, few of them have access to those jobs, which are almost exclusively held by dual-earner parents, doubling up on steady, rent-covering, full-time jobs with benefits.

  152. @Whiskey

    Appealing to 1.5% of the population and bowing down to what most people figure is weirdo freakism is not a good long term strategy.

    I think you pulled the 1.5% out of your butt; seems kinda faggy to go around with statistics up your butt, but whatevs.

    Anyhow: let’s accept that the gheys are only 1.5% of the population; that makes them a demographic significantly more important than, oh, I dunno… lets pick a tiny minority… Jews. I don’t think you’ll object to the idea that Da Joooz are a tiny constituency that wields disproportionate social power – hell, a single rich Red Sea Pedestrian controls US foreign policy regarding Occupied Palestine (and the greater Middle East).

    So proportions are not important, really.

    Gay households tend to be DINK (double-income, no kids); they are over-represented among ‘creatives’ (i.e., people who will overpay for iCrap); and with relatively few (Yiannopoulos-esque) exceptions, they invest significant mental energy in ‘Nerf the World’ SJW bullshit.

    They are a relatively affluent demographic with relatively high disposable income… and they’re also pretty gullible and almost as well organised (politically and as a commercial lobby) as Da Jooooz.

    And a lot of them have families (i.e., parents, siblings and sibsprings): the non-retarded majority of those are not hostile to the gheys (and may be hostile to tards who are hostile to the gheys).

    nohomo (I’m untidy as fuck, I hate the iCult, and I have the design flair of an autistic rhinoceros), but seriously… gay-focused commerce is a multi-billion dollar high-margin goldmine.

  153. Lot says:
    @AnotherDad

    “probably most”

    I wish I were that optimistic.

  154. @Lot

    not so much you can’t put in a full day of coding

    Depends how it interacts with the [ar]modafinil.

    Jokes aside…

    People should not imagine that the SJW retard-o-rama at tech companies is subscribed to by the coders: it might be true once you go far enough down the skill spectrum and arrive at the glorified ’rounded corners’ presentation-layer[1] dickwads (the coder subset most likely to insist on being called ‘engineers’).

    James Damore is reasonably representative of a non-‘glass button’ fuckwit – although for back-end guys, Guilfoyle from Silicon Valley is a more useful archetype (i.e., not an Ass-burger: just not tolerant of fuckwits).

    [1] Because ‘presentation layer’ was always pejorative (i.e., guys who just make shit look OK – box sizing and CSS), it’s now “UX” (‘User Experience’) – because they make sure to fill in the fucking alt attribute for tags. Fuck those guys.

  155. @william munny

    my wife’s sibling’s spouse

    I don’t think that relationship is counted in the ‘in-laws’ (at least in my observation of the usage over the last 30 years).

    As I understand the usage: my sister’s husband is my brother-in-law, and some people claim that his brother is, too – but my brother-in-law’s brother’s wife?

    That’s just a woman I know socially; biologically she gives no relevant information on ‘his’ side of the family, and her DNA is not going to infect my family.

    At my youngest sister’s wedding, I noticed that her fiancé’s brother had a club foot – which confirmed my assessment that her fiancé’s eyes were way too close together.

    So I took her to one side and asked if she was absolutely sure she wanted to go through with it; she said ‘Yes’, and 18 months later she filed for divorce.

    If it had been Al’s sister’s boyfriend who had a club foot, I would not have given much of a shit; he’s nothing to me.

  156. @Cindy

    My sister calls them niblings. Not sure where she got that

    nephew/niece + siblings = niblings

  157. Dan Hayes says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan Mason:

    Lord Kenneth Clark of Civilisation fame in his autobiography seemed to make excuses for the fact that he was not in the homoerotic milieu of his boarding school!

  158. @Stealth

    What does it even mean to aspire to live with a group of other people?

    One aspires to become a physician. One aspires to save enough money to retire. One aspires to write and publish his novels.

    Living with other people is hardly mastering organic chemistry for the MCAT or refining the manuscript for Les Miserables.

    Even very destitute people have little or no obstacles to living with other people. Just rent a place as flat-mates, or, Hell, if you’re truly skint, stake out adjacent places to camp on skid row. Done. No apirations necessary.

  159. I recall that the two main characters in the book Pope of Greenwich Village are 5th cousins. A line from one of them is “Italian 5th cousins are closer than Irish brothers”.

  160. @sondjata

    The problem is that the majority of that sympathetic 40-50% will be sympathetic to virtually ANYTHING the TV or their Facebook feed tells them to be.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
The sources of America’s immigration problems—and a possible solution