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July 7, 2016: Was This the Turning Point of the Election?
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My first thought when I heard the news about the Black Lives Matter protest in Dallas was: “So Donald Trump is going to be President.”

Hillary’s response:

 
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  1. For me, this was the turning point in the election: June 16, 2015.

    • Agree: (((Owen))), Trelane, CK
    • Replies: @bored identity
    I haven't stopped shaking since then.
  2. I really think Trump, or someone like Trump, winning was inevitable. From the moment he descended to announce his candidacy there wasn’t a doubt in my mind I was watching the next President of the United States.

  3. I wonder if the pollsters didnt help Trump out, it kept Hillary confident in her failing plan, and let the media create a false narrative about a failing Trump campaign that they will never live down.

    • Replies: @Thrasymachus
    Constantly saying Trump was certain to lose in a landslide, and providing numbers to show it, was necessary for the moral of the establishment and their supporters. Even giving Trump a serious chance was something they could not cope with. At the same time, it suppressed their turnout, probably enough to make a difference.

    Leftism depends a lot on the sense of inevitability.
  4. Could very well be true.

    OT-

    Trump’s Secret Agenda Revealed: The Completion of German Idealism!

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    Not too long ago the proprietor of this site, the ineffable Ron Unz, made reference to some "loons" who frequented this web site. At the time I took a slight amount of umbrage to his reference. It looks like I overreacted to the proprietor's comment - mea culpa.
  5. I thought it was when the whole media shut up about the Orlando night club as soon as it was clear the perp was a Islamist. You don’t unring a bell like that without completely discrediting everything else you argue for. Then hrc ran a campaign that depended on the media shoriing her up. If you shore your mine with rotted timber you get cave ins

  6. My first thought when I heard the news about the Black Lives Matter protest in Dallas was: “So Donald Trump is going to be President.”

    My first thought, or close to it, was, “My wife is definitely going to vote for Trump.”

  7. But he got clocked in the popular vote – it may turn out that she wins by an unconscionable two percentage points, and she did very well for a Democrat in Texas. A Rose Bowl of votes in three states and the entire post election narrative would be different. Sometimes things are about chance and there is no great lesson to be learned.

    • Agree: International Jew
    • Replies: @5371
    Your comment is silly - both sides knew the rules before the election, and acted accordingly - but it is true that the three states where the Democrats most improved their performance, excluding the special case of Utah, were Arizona, California and Texas. The vast numbers of Mexicans that have entered, though still apathetic and disappointing to their side, are having some effect.
    , @G Pinfold
    This has been covered in half a dozen posts already. If Trump had been in a popular vote contest, he would have campaigned differently, and voters would have behaved differently.
    , @The Practical Conservative
    Essentially the entirety of her lead is provisional ballots in CA. This is not really as decisive as you think it is.
    , @anon
    right, mass immigration is why
    - she got more votes in California
    - she got less elsewhere
    , @WJ
    How can a vote margin be "unconscionable"? Was the margin unethical or immoral? Not trying to be a grammar cop but that word is absurd in this context. Leftists like the word as in unconscionable profits or unconscionable tax cuts, etc.
    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    Let's think about this: (1) Trump was outspent by about five-to-one; (2) This was primarily because (a) Trump relied on small donations from ordinary folks, his personal fortune, and one big bucks donor, Sheldon Adelson, a long-time personal friend and business associate and (b) Clinton got most of her campaign cash from the usual pay-to-play, big bucks donors; (3) All the major news and entertainment outlets were totally in the bag for Clinton including fixing the presidential debttes and spiking anti-Clinton stories that should have been front page news; (4) all the nation's establishments worked actively for Clinton and against Trump, even that of his own party; (5) Trump's campaign was so ad hoc that it was a running joke for prog commenters, SNL, the Onion, etc., while Clinton's was a long-stranding, finely honed political machine.

    Despite this, Trump ran neck-to-neck with Clinton across most of the country, swamped her in all but the largest urban agglomerations, and won an overwhelming victory in the Electoral College.

    I don't think it is unfair to speculate that in an election characterized by honest and unbiased reporting by the MSM Trump might well have won 60%-40% or better in the popular vote.
    , @bomag
    She still hasn't won a majority of eligible voters.

    You can spin elections in many different ways.
    , @Steve in Greensboro
    No great lesson to be learned, other than the Dems are the party of voter fraud and one of the elements of American renewal besides deporting the illegals is establishing a uniform requirement of voter verification.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Andra, Every time I forced myself to watch campaign coverage, not election coverage, on MSNBC, CNN or PBS, the talking heads always had an interactive state map of the USA and constantly shilled how HRC was winning the Electoral College number. Lose the game, change the rules.
    , @S. Anonyia
    She probably did well as a Democrat in TX for 3 reasons:

    A. Lots of neo-con types who have served as officers in the military or worked for the DoD in some capacity. I suspect these were the only "moderates" who were susceptible to the nutty talk about the Russian menace.

    B. hispanic/Asian demographic shift

    C. Mega-church going, wealthy "neverTrump" Conservative Inc. type people. Probably one of the few places they exist in any kind of numbers. Not saying they voted Hillary, they probably just stayed home or voted for Johnson.
    , @George Taylor

    But he got clocked in the popular vote
     
    So?

    A popular strategy does not always translate into a winning strategy, as pointed out by leftie icon Michael Moore and her own husband. "It's the economy stupid" In the swing states that Trump won in, that was more true today than when James Carville, Bill Clinton's campaign manager, uttered them back in 1992.

    The man who made the Sailor Strategy a reality is Jewish.
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevenbertoni/2016/11/22/exclusive-interview-how-jared-kushner-won-trump-the-white-house/#35d4b7482f50
    , @cbone
    I'm tired of the popular vote argument. It's a game no one was playing. If popular vote mattered, WAY more people vote. Republicans in California, New York, and Massachusetts etc turn out, as well as dems in red states. So who knows.
    , @Dare Tuitt
    Trump didn't "get clocked" in the popular vote. Hillary lost the popular vote, too. VoteFraud.org just completed their investigation of the votes cast in the election and determined 3 million were cast by illegal aliens. This means Trump won the Presidency by majority of Electoral College votes AND the popular vote. Greg Phillips, President of VoteFraud.org, Tweeted the findings: "We have verified more than three million votes cast by non-citizens. We are joining [email protected] to initiate legal action."

    Couple this with the millions of dead voters registered illegally by Democrats, the disappearance of valid Trump votes in Democrat-controlled areas, the usual suppression of the overseas military vote and the switching votes for Trump to HRC on thousands of electronically-cast voting machines, means Trump won in a landslide of popular votes, too. Most likely somewhere in the range of 3-million to 7-million more votes for Trump.

  8. Dallas is not a swing state. But consider the September 20th Black Lives riot in North Carolina. That could have been the turning point.

    • Replies: @Lugash
    North Carolina was nothing compared to the San Bernadino and Pulse nightclub massacres.
    , @Lugash
    Urp, I get your point. Nationally thought it was overshadowed by other incidents.
  9. My first thought

    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That’s disappointing, Mr. Sailer.

    What happened to being a human being? Sadness for the officers and their families didn’t come to mind first? Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?

    • Troll: NickG, TWS
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That’s disappointing, Mr. Sailer.

    What happened to being a human being? Sadness for the officers and their families didn’t come to mind first? Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?
     

    Twinkie, I remember there was a point last summer where it seemed as though there was one BLM protest/riot or terrorist attack in Europe after the next. I started to become jaded about it. And, yes, I found it a little disconcerting to feel so jaded. The riots and attacks seemed to be happening on a fairly regular and predictable basis, and yet I did not hear elites condemn them in the strongest possible language or take actions to deal with these problems the most serious manner possible.
    , @ben tillman

    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That’s disappointing, Mr. Sailer.
     
    This is ridiculous moral preening. Sadness for oneself (or other self-referential emotion) naturally and understandably comes before emotion for others. It's involuntary.

    None of us knew any of the officers shot that day. Their suffering was completely abstract from our perspective. Even here in Dallas, I can't name a single one of the victims, though I can tell you the name of the DPD officer who died 43 years ago today: J.D. Tippit.
    , @Mr. Anon
    C'mon, concern trolling, Twinkie? I'm disappointed. You're better than that. This is a political blog - politics comes to mind.
    , @theo the kraut
    The reply function seems to have been broken or I did something wrong, my comment at 1660622 was for Twinkie.
    , @27 year old
    Being human means that your first thought is often not a socially approved "good" response.
    , @Kylie
    If you're that upset over Steve's first thought, then mine will definitely give you the vapors.

    It was along the lines of "Those cops sacrificed their lives protecting a bunch of leftists in a proudly 'progressive' city. What a waste."
    , @Desiderius

    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That’s disappointing, Mr. Sailer.

    What happened to being a human being? Sadness for the officers and their families didn’t come to mind first? Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?
     
    My thought as well. Nobody's perfect.
    , @Olorin
    Pre-planned assassination of law enforcement officers IS politics, meathead.
    , @Nico
    The first thing left-wingers have been doing in response to deaths, if they comment on them at all, is to push sensationalistic political interpretations through the popular media. They have diffused this mentality and this viscerality and I am perfectly at ease with the thesis that it is their fault.
  10. I’d say it was when he refused to back down from his immigration ideas during the summer of 2015. His poll numbers went from about 6% to over 20% in the span of just two weeks (per RCP averages) when he held firm on immigration, overtaking the lukewarm Jeb, who nobody was excited to see run.

    It’s also worth reminiscing about the primaries. Remember when Carly Fiorina of all people was supposed to be the one to take down Donald Trump? Good times.

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...

    Remember when Carly Fiorina of all people was supposed to be the one to take down Donald Trump?
     
    Not an unreasonable assumption at the time. After all she took down Hewlett-Packard.
  11. Dallas and other similar events tempered the resolve of the silent Trump voters. I say ‘silent’ because ‘shy Trump voters’ does not capture the anger and alienation.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    "I say ‘silent’ because ‘shy Trump voters’ does not capture the anger and alienation."

    Doesn't even begin to. Nor has a Trump victory lessened that anger and alienation. Instead the vile response of the left has increased and deepened them.

    Ceterum censeo.
  12. It’s always hard to get into the minds of persuadables, Steve, since if they thought like us they wouldn’t be at all . . . persuadable. There was a score of reasons in each election that McCain should have beaten Obama, and Romney beaten him, and anyone beaten Clinton – but of these the only victory is Trump over Clinton. Maybe the thought of domestic black terrorist wantonly killing cops in retribution for justified killings of blacks in the act of committing crimes (and Clinton’s steadfast embrace of BLM regardless) should have done it, but I think we’re kidding ourselves if we think Trump would have won had Clinton not been such a horrible candidate subject to the ill fortune of a series of events rather than the one.

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    There was a score of reasons in each election that McCain should have beaten Obama....
     
    I challenge you to name just one.
    , @ben tillman

    . . . I think we’re kidding ourselves if we think Trump would have won had Clinton not been such a horrible candidate subject to the ill fortune of a series of events rather than the one.
     
    Horrible candidate? Compared to whom? Dufus Dukakis? Madman McCain? Rapist and maybe murderer W.J. Clinton? Former cokehead G.W. Bush? Sweaty, beady-eyed Nixon? The Gerald Ford Chevy Chase made fun of? Goofy Jimmy Carter? Bob Dole? Al Gore?
  13. Speaking as a Brit, who toggles between the UK and South Africa, I thought he may well win about the time he took out ‘low-energy’, Jeb Bush who looked like a deer in the headlights.

    It’s been the most entertaining election ever; it still causes me to spontaneously chortle. I don’t think there was any one incident after that.

    I realised early on he isn’t nearly as stupid as the great and good would have us believe and that he is a tremendous communicator. No ‘normal’ candidate could have smashed through the establishment – the bubble – to borrow from Mencius Moldbug – The Cathedral. Prevailing against not just the Democratic Party, but the Republican Party establishment, most of the press, phalanxes of virtue signalling celebrities, foreign political leaders – including much of the UK Tory party. Trump’s work rate is just incredible and he has far more honed communication intuitions than most of us.

    It was clear that Trump was connecting at his rallies in a whole new way and that much of the great and good couldn’t see what was happening – they still can’t. Given the massive opprobrium and the recent UK shy Tory effect, and earlier this year the shy Brexiter effect, the shy -Trumper being worth a few points on the polls seemed likely. So his win was no surprise or shock.

    • Agree: G Pinfold, MG
    • Replies: @Dr. X

    I thought he may well win about the time he took out ‘low-energy’, Jeb Bush who looked like a deer in the headlights.
     
    I agree with this entirely. When Trump ripped Jeb to shreds, I said to myself "He's the only candidate willing to do this to Hillary, and that's what it's going to take to win."

    Aside from that it's hard to identify a "turning point" because the polls and the media coverage were so blatantly rigged. When ABC News was reporting a 12-point lead for Clinton 10 days before the election, I was screaming at the television that it was a lie. I was right.

  14. Probably didn’t help but I don’t think it was a turning point. Blacks are into blackety, black, black all the time but whites in America are just not interested in a race war.

    What’s an interesting question (to me at least) is whether there is any strategy for the Democrat party that includes both blacks and blue collar whites? From FDR to LBJ, the Democrat party was the party of both. When factories in the Midwest close, both black and white workers are affected. I’ve heard it said that there’s no way that Hillary could let white men ride the bus with the rest of the coalition of the fringes because she needed them to be standing outside the bus as the common target that everyone on the bus could hate on, but is this really true? Could she have taken Bill’s advice and run a more traditional Democrat campaign or do the modern dynamics of the party require Democrats to treat blue collar whites as targets or at the very least have no more love to give to them?

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    What’s an interesting question (to me at least) is whether there is any strategy for the Democrat party that includes both blacks and blue collar whites?

     

    This is the question the short- to medium-term future of American politics turns upon, isn't it?

    If things go even reasonably well economically in the next four years, it may be hard for the Dems to turn the upper midwest back to blue anytime soon.

    A Dem candidate can try to appeal to white, blue-collar voters, but the other identity groups in their constituency are bound to be jealous.

    Another way to look at the question: can the Dems find a strategy for suppressing the jealousy (and increasingly vicious white-men-focused rage) of their identity-group base so that their candidates are able to campaign for white votes?

    It seemed in the past few elections that the Dems were able to 'call off' the most fervid members of their constituency with a wink and an under-the-table promise that appeals to stale pale males might be necessary to win an election, but all things would be put to rights after a win was declared. But this time Hillary, whether because of hubris, or of taking white working-class votes for granted, or of fear of offending her core constituency, seemed to give up on this.

    , @Kevin O'Keeffe

    I’ve heard it said that there’s no way that Hillary could let white men ride the bus with the rest of the coalition of the fringes because she needed them to be standing outside the bus as the common target that everyone on the bus could hate on, but is this really true?
     
    I think there's some wishful thinking going on here ie., many Democrats really like the idea of excoriating straight White males, Christians, rural folks, gun owners, etc., and so they've convinced themselves that this is a winning strategy. They basically believe anyone who doesn't want to do those things, is some kind of a Nazi, hence they're trapped perpetually (one hopes) in an ineffective strategy.
  15. Nah. This election didn’t turn on a single event. It turned on hundreds or even thousands of them. Those events painted a picture of leftist extremism and denial that made their accusations against right wing “extremists” seem patently absurd. Take away all those other events and Dallas would be all but forgotten and Hillary would be our president-elect.

  16. @Andra
    But he got clocked in the popular vote - it may turn out that she wins by an unconscionable two percentage points, and she did very well for a Democrat in Texas. A Rose Bowl of votes in three states and the entire post election narrative would be different. Sometimes things are about chance and there is no great lesson to be learned.

    Your comment is silly – both sides knew the rules before the election, and acted accordingly – but it is true that the three states where the Democrats most improved their performance, excluding the special case of Utah, were Arizona, California and Texas. The vast numbers of Mexicans that have entered, though still apathetic and disappointing to their side, are having some effect.

  17. I have always said that Hillary’s connection to black lives matter was going to cost her, big time. The problem was, she (in concert with blm) treated all of the blm associated cases as if they were carbon copies of each other, which was a very un-lawyerly thing to do. This was to pander to ghetto black emotion and fear, which isn’t very often nuanced or discerning. Aside from involving typically irresponsible males from a dysfunctional American minority culture, the Michael Brown case and the Walter Scott case had very little to do with each other. Walter Scott was running away from a cop, while Michael Brown was charging a cop, trying to take his gun (presumably to shoot him.) Insinuating that every dead black guy in a blm case was equally innocent displayed Hillary’s unjust notions about justice for the world to see.

    Yes, it’s true – lots of internet conservatives (unfortunately) tried to portray all of the dead black guys as equally guilty, but they weren’t running for president. Her demagoguery on this matter was way beyond anything Trump ever did, by a factor of five, but was never described by the MSM as such.

    OT, but as far as Trump saying he won’t prosecute her on email stuff…I
    honestly believe (at this point) that he’s saying these things to get beyond December 19th, when the Electoral College votes. The EC has never overturned election day results before, but this election has been like no other, so who knows? I think it’s correct to be nice until then.

    • Replies: @dearieme
    Later on, he need only say that new evidence has emerged so that, reluctantly, he must restart investigations. It is also more useful simply not to pursue an investigation than to pardon, to keep the Clintons worried indefinitely. Or maybe he's keen to shift the burden of a pardon on to Obama, where her name would doubtless appear amongst a roll of dishonour of appalling and undeniable crooks. Including, perhaps, Slick Willie himself.
    , @gda
    My thoughts are that 2018, and 60 seats in the Senate is the real goal in mind. He will play (generally) nice with the Dems by promoting and proceeding quickly with mostly non-partisan measures until then (corporate tax reform, infrastructure spending etc.).

    After 2018 he will have unimpeded power to implement his plan to drain the swamp for real. The Clinton Foundation FBI investigation will then likely come to the forefront as well.

    It will be interesting to see whether Obama issues a blanket pardon as he slinks out the door in January.
    , @AnotherDad

    OT, but as far as Trump saying he won’t prosecute her on email stuff…I
    honestly believe (at this point) that he’s saying these things to get beyond December 19th, when the Electoral College votes.
     
    He's saying those things because prosecuting Crooked Hillary is not important.

    -- Building the wall is important.
    -- E-verify is important.
    -- Not inviting in 650,000 Syrian "refugees" is important.
    -- Stopping Muslim immigration is important.
    -- On shoring jobs is important.
    -- Getting male labor force employment rate up is important.
    -- Not messing around in Syria imposing a no-fly zone and creating conflict with Russia is important.
    -- Dialing back Obama's attacks--e.g. AFFH--on whites is important.
    -- Even "pump-priming" infrastructure improvement is important.

    Hillary is ... no longer important. Her behavior was a very critical in making the case for why she was unfit for the Presidency. Prosecuting her is not an important part of the Trump agenda. It does not matter to the lives of Americans.
  18. @Andra
    But he got clocked in the popular vote - it may turn out that she wins by an unconscionable two percentage points, and she did very well for a Democrat in Texas. A Rose Bowl of votes in three states and the entire post election narrative would be different. Sometimes things are about chance and there is no great lesson to be learned.

    This has been covered in half a dozen posts already. If Trump had been in a popular vote contest, he would have campaigned differently, and voters would have behaved differently.

    • Replies: @dearieme
    "voters would have behaved differently": well, except the dead ones.
  19. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    The baseball bats thing has been memed into the wider culture via Tarantino’s Inglorious Basterds, and the media has been blasting for the past couple weeks now about Nazis being everywhere. How long before some nut or nuts actually go on a baseball bat rampage?

    “Politico Editor RESIGNS After Publishing Home Addresses Of Alt-Right Icon Richard Spencer, Advocating For ‘Baseball Bats’”

    http://dailycaller.com/2016/11/22/national-politico-editor-publishes-home-addresses-of-alt-right-icon-richard-spencer-advocates-for-baseball-bats/

    Hirsh responded in an unhinged manner: “I wasn’t thinking of a fucking letter, Doug. He lives part of the time next door to me in Arlington. Our grandfathers brought baseball bats to Bund meetings. Want to join me?”

    Hirsh’s mention of Bund meetings is a reference to the German-American Bund, a Nazi organization in the United States active in the mid-to-late 1930s, which promoted National Socialist ideology and was often subject to violent attacks by Jewish mobsters in New York City and Newark, New Jersey, using baseball bats.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "The baseball bats thing has been memed into the wider culture via Tarantino’s Inglorious Basterds, and the media has been blasting for the past couple weeks now about Nazis being everywhere. How long before some nut or nuts actually go on a baseball bat rampage?"

    When it comes to baseball bats I think of The Warriors before I think of Nazis, lol.
    , @ogunsiron
    I get the feeling that Hirsh wasn't raised to be ashamed of his granfather's politics.

    I suppose that's because the "raising" was done by Hirsh's mom and aunt at school and by Hirsh's dad and uncle on tv and in the newspapers. It'd have indeed been strange for such people to raise Hirsh to despise Bubby.

    The typical american conservative is in a quite different situation. He's been raised by Hirsch's older relatives to think of his own grandfather who was in the John Birch society as an incomprehensible monster. He has even been raised to think of Hirsh's bubby as a good guy and his own grandfather as someone to be ashamed of.

    , @Anonymouse
    Yeah sure, violent attacks by Jewish mobsters on pacific followers of Hitler. Relatives of our jewish family (domiciled in Brooklyn), lived in Yorksville in the late 1930s, then as now, a heavily German neighborhood centered around East 86th street in Manhattan. The father of the family carried a baseball bat with a lead insert when he went outdoors for self-protection against local home-grown Nazis. So my father told me, so I'm assuming its a true story.
  20. I tend to take a Freudian view.

    The turning point was the Wiener.

  21. Obama probably hurt Hillary’s campaign, when he lectured people at the cops’ funeral service about “systematic racism” and the need for more gun control.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    JohnnyD, I think you are spot on. Obama and his condescending manner hurt HRC by addressing topics, inner city crime and gun control, when HRC would have liked to back away from those topics.
  22. The problem for the Dems is that if they become more populist on economics issues, they run the risk of losing their SWPL voters. Consider what would have happened if Bernie ran instead of Hillary. He would have done somewhat better in the rust belt, but would probably have lost some state prosperous blue states like Nevada and Colorado, so he would still have lost overall.

    Both parties now have a careful balancing act to do in terms of satisfying their supporters, and the Dems have the added problem that they have to satisfy their Wall Street donors as well.

  23. I like your comments here and at Razib’s mostly, but you’re moralising and imputing here like those fake progressives do, not good at all.

    > Sadness for the officers and their families didn’t come to mind first?
    > Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?

    Do you honestly expect anyone here except tiny duck et al not to feel that? When things like that happen lots of things happen in your mind in split seconds, sometimes even conflicting ones, maybe Steve thought about the political implications first or he just chose it as a rhetorical or journalistic device for pertinent reasons. You’re choosing the most unkind interpretation possible to preen morally, humbling others and exalting yourself. We all are funny sometimes, so just say that you’re sorry and let’s forget about this.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    you’re moralising and imputing here like those fake progressives do
     
    I understand the distaste at the often hypocritical and inane "moralizing" that leftists do, but that doesn't make attempting to keep some semblance of civilized morality alive in any discussion, politics or otherwise, "fake."

    This is one of my major problems with some elements in the so-called alt-right. They seem to obsess about lampooning* and destroying their enemies, closing ranks around their tribe, and achieving power - not trying to build a harmonious and just society for all. Like leftist activists, it's always a war on the Other.

    To believe otherwise - to inject "moral preening" - seems to invite distasteful ad hominem labels such as "cuck" et al.

    *Sebastian Junger makes an excellent point in "Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging" that the kind of contempt that politically opposed Americans express toward each other is extremely jarring to returning veterans and contributes to their sense of broken community and alienation from the society which they served.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    I agree. As an example, after the massacre at the Sandy Hook school in December 2012, I'm sure Obama felt genuine grief and horror, as did we all. However, I'm also sure that in that same moment Obama thought, "This is the ideal time to ram through my gun control agenda, now that the election has passed."

    That sounds like a cynical thing to say but I'm certain it was the case.
  24. Hillary very nearly won. As others pointed out, she won the popular vote and will do so by a couple of million. About 3 million of them illegals but they were still counted. And a few hundred thousand here and there in swing states and she’d have won the Electoral College and be hunting down the last few straight White men as we speak.

    What was the Schwerpunkt of the election was Hillary’s insistence on absolute loyalty and obsequiousness over ability. Trump had people who could add two and two all day long, and still with the media, college educated White professional women, and non-Whites, Trump very nearly lost. A Black candidate like Obama would have won convincingly. Hillary is just manifestly incompetent on almost everything, like most Professional White women outside nursing and medicine and the hard sciences. [Where if you make a mistake, people die, quickly.]

    Many things helped Trump. The drip drip drip of Wikileaks, cumulatively bad for Hillary, pointing out her corruption and incompetence combined. Dallas, North Carolina, Ferguson, all made a difference. But the main point was Hillary’s decades long unchanging incompetence.

    As for Democrats ever letting White men on the bus, never happen. The whole point of say, Colbert and John Stewart are to sneer at White people who work for a living. It fills a huge need for Democrats to view themselves as the saved, the predestined elite, against those who were born damned.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Agree. We are ultimately doomed. We only got a 4-year stay of execution. Most of the white people around me were ardent HRC supporters (Boston area) are like Pauline Kael x 10.
    , @Clyde

    Hillary very nearly won. As others pointed out, she won the popular vote and will do so by a couple of million. About 3 million of them illegals but they were still counted.
     
    Three million is highly unlikely. Where were these illegal alien votes racked up? California? New York City and Chicago? Houston? Florida? Donald Trump better have his people look into this intensively and publicize it. To counter the Dems propaganda of ill Hillary winning the popular vote.

    My take is at most 50-100 thousand illegals voted nationwide. If the three million illegal alien voters number is there, then Trump will use it to legitimize his Presidency. The Dems are working hard to de-legitimize it.

    , @David
    That she very nearly won is key. As darkness rolls around and Clinton pours back her 4th scotch and soda, her flickering consciousness can ruminate on the 50 or 100 things that done differently or handled differently or successfully suppressed might very well have pushed her over the line. SO much room for regret!
    , @anon5
    Stop being such a defeatist. The popular vote means nothing which is why it is not even mentioned in the Constitution. Stop falling for the media's propaganda that somehow Trump did not win because of the popular vote.

    Consider:

    1) She received over 1 million more votes than Trump in just Cook County, IL (Chicago land)!!! Just one county almost explains her entire popular vote lead. Take that away and she loses the 20 EVs of Illinois and her popular vote lead is severely reduced.

    2) Any reasonable person knows illegals voted. And not just in CA.

    3) Trumped helped carry the down ticket GOP candidates. Take Missouri, where Trump won the state by over 500K votes. Not only is that exceptional, note McCain only beat Obama by a couple thousand, but all of Missouri's statewide GOP candidates won as well. From its Senate race to Governor, Lt Govenor, Treasurer, etc. It's the first time the GOP has won every statewide race, ever!

    4) Trump's coattails helped in other states too. Which is why the GOP is keeping the House and Senate. That alone is more telling than who won the popular vote.

    5) It's why the GOP maintains 33 of the 50 governor's mansions and most state legislatures.

    6) The dems only have 5 states of 50 where they control the legislature and the governor's office.

    7) The democrats are a regional party and this election proved it.

    Stop apologizing for winning. Trump won big by the rules and he showed the future for a winning nationalistic/patriotic ticket by linking the Midwest, South and now the Great Lakes. If the GOP and other defeatists allow Trump to enact much of what he campaigned on, he can sew up this coalition for years to come.

    So stop falling for this media BS about the popular vote.
    , @Olorin
    "Almost" only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades.

    Trump's a businessman and he's familiar with the Pareto Principle.

    One invests only enough energy/resources in a goal to achieve the goal.

    The goal was not a popular vote landslide. Nor should it have been.
  25. Also, the rioting in Milwaukee in August could have helped tip WI toward Trump. Let’s not forget, in early July, it did appear that Clinton could have been indicted.

  26. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    There was no single turning point.

    I think this was like a marathon where Hillary just didn’t have the stamina despite all the steroid injections, help from the sidelines, and stuff thrown in front of Trump.

    Trump came from behind and passed her in the final lap and won.

    In a race, some runners try to remain out in from the start.

    Some runners remain behind and wait for the right timing near the end to turn on all the pistons.

    Trump’s final ad was effective, and Hillary just lost steam due to over-confidence and lost momentum because Comey-Wiener jumped out to grab her.

    Trump’s victory was like Billy Mills in the 10,000 m race. His final sprint did it.

    • Replies: @Coemgen
    Agreed that there wasn't a turning point. Hillary was a terrible candidate from the outset. Her scapegoating a video for the Benghazi 9/11 attack ruined her as a credible candidate for any position of power.

    If there was a turning point, it may have been when Trump wouldn't say he would accept the election results (unless he won). That may have resulted in a suppression of vote tampering in precincts less under Democrat Party control.
  27. Turning Point:

    February 16, 2016

    Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture NYC

    (she’s dying here)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=9C12ZvOJNfs#t=3

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Hillary’s croaky voice at the end reminds me of Rachel Dratch trying to get through an SNL Debbie Downer sketch.
    , @bomag
    The first comments under that clip were hilarious.

    At one point Hillary tells the chanting crowd, "You're a good Amen chorus." So clumsy!
  28. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    That Dallas story was shocking and horrible that it should have ended Hillary the BLM queen.

    But media pulled out all the tricks to make sure it got no traction.

    The race issue was turned into ‘Trump is the real RACIST because he wants to send illegals back and say no to Muslims.”

  29. Wikileaks had no single poison to destroy Hillary but it was like drip drip drip tranquilizer that made enough independents lose faith in her and everything she stood for.

    It offered a glimpse of politics behind the curtain, and it was not pretty, esp with Donna Brazile.

  30. @Alec Leamas
    It's always hard to get into the minds of persuadables, Steve, since if they thought like us they wouldn't be at all . . . persuadable. There was a score of reasons in each election that McCain should have beaten Obama, and Romney beaten him, and anyone beaten Clinton - but of these the only victory is Trump over Clinton. Maybe the thought of domestic black terrorist wantonly killing cops in retribution for justified killings of blacks in the act of committing crimes (and Clinton's steadfast embrace of BLM regardless) should have done it, but I think we're kidding ourselves if we think Trump would have won had Clinton not been such a horrible candidate subject to the ill fortune of a series of events rather than the one.

    There was a score of reasons in each election that McCain should have beaten Obama….

    I challenge you to name just one.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    He was not a Left wing radical who associated with domestic terrorists, possibly foreign terrorists/sympathizers, and various and sundry anti-American movements and persons.

    Whom did you vote for in 2008?
  31. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Twinkie

    My first thought
     
    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That's disappointing, Mr. Sailer.

    What happened to being a human being? Sadness for the officers and their families didn't come to mind first? Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?

    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That’s disappointing, Mr. Sailer.

    What happened to being a human being? Sadness for the officers and their families didn’t come to mind first? Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?

    Twinkie, I remember there was a point last summer where it seemed as though there was one BLM protest/riot or terrorist attack in Europe after the next. I started to become jaded about it. And, yes, I found it a little disconcerting to feel so jaded. The riots and attacks seemed to be happening on a fairly regular and predictable basis, and yet I did not hear elites condemn them in the strongest possible language or take actions to deal with these problems the most serious manner possible.

  32. I agree with those who say that Trump’s announcement and then his refusal to back down were the defining events. I’d add one more: everyone predicted that Trump would melt down when he lost Iowa. Instead, he came out and gave a great speech. He showed he could take a hit. Which was good, because he took more. His emphasis on trade was clearly essential, too. Finally, for any GOP on the line, the Supreme Court clearly was a focal point.

    But I don’t think the BLM and riots had much to do with Trump’s win.

  33. @Twinkie

    My first thought
     
    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That's disappointing, Mr. Sailer.

    What happened to being a human being? Sadness for the officers and their families didn't come to mind first? Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?

    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That’s disappointing, Mr. Sailer.

    This is ridiculous moral preening. Sadness for oneself (or other self-referential emotion) naturally and understandably comes before emotion for others. It’s involuntary.

    None of us knew any of the officers shot that day. Their suffering was completely abstract from our perspective. Even here in Dallas, I can’t name a single one of the victims, though I can tell you the name of the DPD officer who died 43 years ago today: J.D. Tippit.

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    None of us knew any of the officers shot that day. Their suffering was completely abstract from our perspective. Even here in Dallas, I can’t name a single one of the victims, though I can tell you the name of the DPD officer who died 43 years ago today: J.D. Tippit.
     
    And I doubt it's a coincidence that Steve chose to publish this post on November 22. That was a nice touch, a nice flourish.
    , @Dave Pinsen

    None of us knew any of the officers shot that day. Their suffering was completely abstract from our perspective.
     
    From The Shield of Achilles, by W.H. Auden:

    That girls are raped, that two boys knife a third,
    Were axioms to him, who’d never heard
    Of any world where promises were kept,
    Or one could weep because another wept.
     
    , @Twinkie

    Their suffering was completely abstract from our perspective.
     
    It's not "completely abstract" if you put yourself in their shoes or those of their families. Even if you are incapable of that kind of imagination, having experienced a sudden loss from violence of a beloved family member or a buddy should give you some sense of what they went (and are going) through.
    , @anonymous
    53 years, actually. But since you brought it up, the J.D. Tippit murder remains unresolved. Whoever or whatever you may think "Oswald" was, he simply could not have walked to the Tippit site in time to have pulled the trigger.
    The Dallas Police Dispatch transcript clearly has a notation that in the middle of the reaction to the Tippit shooting, the time was noted as "1:10". The Warren Commission had to blatantly fudge the time to get "Oswald" there.

    To go from 1026 N. Beckley to just east of the intersection of 10th and Patton required that "Oswald" get a ride. And, as Earlene Roberts told the FBI, a Dallas PD patrol car pulled up at 1026 N. Beckley just at 1:00 and paused, simultaneous with "Oswald's" brief stop there. She last saw "Oswald" standing on the sidewalk, as if waiting for a ride.

    To this day, the identity of the Dallas PD officer/s in that car at 1026 N. Beckley remain unknown. Their immediate presence in "Oswald's" vicinity at a time when he was officially unknown to the DPD should be deeply troubling to all civic-minded Americans.

    Whatever happened in Dallas on 11/22/63 remains unknown. No honest, full search for the unvarnished truth has ever really taken place by the government.
  34. @Clifford Brown
    Could very well be true.

    OT-

    Trump's Secret Agenda Revealed: The Completion of German Idealism!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOk6HB609po

    Not too long ago the proprietor of this site, the ineffable Ron Unz, made reference to some “loons” who frequented this web site. At the time I took a slight amount of umbrage to his reference. It looks like I overreacted to the proprietor’s comment – mea culpa.

  35. @Twinkie

    My first thought
     
    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That's disappointing, Mr. Sailer.

    What happened to being a human being? Sadness for the officers and their families didn't come to mind first? Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?

    C’mon, concern trolling, Twinkie? I’m disappointed. You’re better than that. This is a political blog – politics comes to mind.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    This is a political blog – politics comes to mind.
     
    You know, I might just stop reading or commenting on blogs like this. Look, I am a pretty politicized person myself. Compared to most Americans, I am highly "ideological" ("radicalized" some would say), and politics is of considerate import to me.

    BUT, I do my best to step back from that kind of prism, and think about ordinary individuals who are caught up in these kinds of events and occurrences. Those officers weren't some amorphous entities. They didn't die fighting a political cause. They weren't some pawns in an ideological game. They were people - ordinary individuals who were just doing their jobs and were murdered. And they had families who loved and cared about them.

    I don't know what "concern trolling" is, but if the first instinct regarding deaths such as these is national politics and who is going to be president, instead of empathy for the dead and their distraught families, I guess I am out of sorts here. Being a rather vengeful person by nature, I'd even understand the thirst for justice or even revenge against the perpetrator. But the first thought was about Donald Trump?

    I have had a high regard for Mr. Sailer's citizenism and his apparent concern for ALL Americans, but that kind of cold ideological calculation as first instinct caught me by surprise like a hidden blade.
  36. @Twinkie

    My first thought
     
    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That's disappointing, Mr. Sailer.

    What happened to being a human being? Sadness for the officers and their families didn't come to mind first? Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?

    The reply function seems to have been broken or I did something wrong, my comment at 1660622 was for Twinkie.

  37. For me, I really started to take Trump seriously when he held one of his first big rallies – in Mobile, Alabama. An agnostic yankee billionaire from New York, who didn’t give a flip about abortion or homosexual rights, had all those southern baptists cheering him on. It not only indicated that Trump could have wide appeal, it indicated that the Republican electorate had changed in an important way. Those voters had finally gotten wise to the old GOP flim-flam show of running on social issues, harvesting conservative votes, and then screwing over thier constituents. People turned out for Trump because he was championing there actual tangible, economic interests.

    I also realized something had changed during the first few Republican primary debates, when Trump openly accused several of his opponents of being bought-and-paid-for stooges. I’ve never seen that before in a debate, certainly not in a primary debate. Trump proved himself willing to dump the accepted conventions and to be as aggressive, as impolite – as mean – as the Democrats are.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    I expected him to win the nomination last fall, given that he was leading in the polls, but I think my first wow moment was when Trump ran against the Iraq War in South Carolina and won.
  38. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    There were several turning points, many of which happened years ago. Her main issue is that she’s a third world politician. She has taken more money in pay-for-play (let’s call it by its proper name-bribery) than anyone who has ever run for president. Grant’s friends loaded up, but he himself stayed pretty clean. Harding’s friends loaded up, and he may have loaded up a bit himself, but Harding also gave the country a booming economy in return. Hillary’s crony Obama couldn’t help her there.

    Hillary also had the complete backing of the media in a manner that’s third world, too. The press in those countries is totally corrupt and partisan, and they don’t have any ethical qualms about it. They are simply one big circle jerk sucking off their country’s interbreeding elite and getting money and favors in return.

    She expected to get the job because she was the wife of an elite and it was ‘her turn,’ as if the office of the presidency was the sole possession of a small, corrupt oligarchy exactly the way it is in the third world.

    Finally, Hillary went in hard for third world factional politics. The non-Anglo Saxon old world and everything below the Texas border is run by factional politics. This is alien to the American mind. It’s an old Anglo-Saxon tradition for its rulers to avoid taking sides and attempt to be above the fray. This tradition goes all the way back the medieval English monarchs. They understood themselves to be representing all the people in a manner that was unusually enlightened for their era.

    For example, French politics was divided up into the groups such as the Queen’s party, the Dauphin’s party, the Cardinal’s party, the King’s party, etc., each faction battling it out with each other. In nearly all countries today, you have either religious groups, or clans, tribes, or ethnic minorities who are fighting to be top dog and put everyone else down. All these countries accept this type of political behavior as normal, and they can’t even imagine running their country any other way. But that’s not how Anglo-Saxons see things, and that’s not what Anglo-Saxons think is good for their country. Our American presidents inherited this sense of non-factionalism from their Anglo-Saxon culture, and for the most part, they’ve understood that factionalism is idiotic because it undermines a country’s stability and leads to civil wars.

    Hillary is contemptuous–or stupidly ignorant–of this political tradition, and a lot of Americans sensed it and were wary of her. Her campaign was nothing but one big ugly attempt to whip up rage, resentment, and hatred among various factions and pit them against her chosen enemy. That, ultimately, is why she took a fall. She was an alien politician from Planet Third World, and she really honest-to-god despises most Americans. Especially now, since we’ve sent her packing.

    • Agree: anonguy
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "There were several turning points, many of which happened years ago. Her main issue is that she’s a third world politician."

    Crooked Hildabeast is the female Kwame Kilpatrick.
    , @5371
    Look up who invented party politics.
    , @dearieme
    The Duchess of Omnium was defeated by Squire Trump.
    , @Anon
    American politics were pretty darn factional in the late 1800s. The Dem vs Rep split was essentially a re-fighting of the Civil War but at the state level it was just blind partisanship. People got their news from openly partisan newspapers, much like today's voter who either goes to NewsMax or Huffington Post but not both. The governor of Kentucky was assassinated in 1900 in a partisan dispute.
    , @Jack D

    and for the most part, they’ve understood that factionalism is idiotic because it undermines a country’s stability and leads to civil wars.
     
    For the most part, except for that ONE time when it led to an actual Civil War that killed hundreds of thousands (equivalent to millions of our current population).
  39. Obamacare premium hike.

  40. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    Some progs are saying identity politics got out of hand, and Democrats got distracted.

    I don’t know if that was decisive, but the homo stuff really opened the pandora’s box to all sorts of moronosities.

    https://www.facebook.com/militantchristianmedia/videos/272140256491368/

    There is the ugly and dark side of homo culture, but homos fine-tuned the art of creating nice ‘creative’ and stylish gentrified communities. And some homos were in elite institutions and knew the in’s and out’s of power. They learned how to be ‘respectable’. Look at Peter Thiel and Tim Cook.
    Homos got so good at this that even many conservatives were won over.
    Homos were weird in their ‘sexual’ behavior but well-mannered and well-groomed.
    In WOLF OF WALL STREET, it’s high class to have a ‘gay butler’.

    But the problem with opening the homo pandora’s box was that it gave green light to every abnormal ‘identity’, and this got even more out-of-control once trannies were celebrated too.
    With the ‘culture war’ have turned into ‘culture warts and all’, every freak slobbering for 15 min of fame got on the bandwagon.

    It’s like if you leave food out for the squirrels, it will attract more than squirrels. Every critter and pest will come running to be fed too.

    Surely, many progs and homos wanted to say NO to such trashiness and craziness, but it would have them look hypocritical and non-inclusive. After all, if the ‘new normal’ is about accepting ‘difference’, then why should only homos get all the attention.

    It’s like Woodstock was meant to be a well-managed peaceful concert but once the word got out about some hippie love-in, everyone came and trashed everything.

    And normalization of tattoos, piercings, and hair dyeing made identities even more ludicrous.

    It’s one thing to have a real identity like Russian, Jewish, Mormon, Iranian, or whatever.
    But making up identities as you go along turns everything into a farce.

    Recently I read the Onion and it had no zing and edge. It was normal compared to the new reality… or no weirder.

    I think the events of last two yrs gave a shock to Pinker’s theory of Better Devils of Our Nature.

    Not just in BLM-nutty America but in EU with massive invasions. Surely, deep in his heart, Pinker knows that the West cannot be sustained with massive influxes of Muslims and Africans.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "And normalization of tattoos, piercings, and hair dyeing made identities even more ludicrous."

    Blue states have a much higher percentage of White freaks than red states. Notice that most Whites with dreadlocks, green hair, blue hair, and goths & emos reside in blue states like Minnesota , Vermont Washington, Oregon, California, etc.

    Have you ever watched the film The Lost Boys which takes place in Santa Cruz, California? Look at the amount of White freaks you see at the beginning of the film.
  41. @Alec Leamas
    It's always hard to get into the minds of persuadables, Steve, since if they thought like us they wouldn't be at all . . . persuadable. There was a score of reasons in each election that McCain should have beaten Obama, and Romney beaten him, and anyone beaten Clinton - but of these the only victory is Trump over Clinton. Maybe the thought of domestic black terrorist wantonly killing cops in retribution for justified killings of blacks in the act of committing crimes (and Clinton's steadfast embrace of BLM regardless) should have done it, but I think we're kidding ourselves if we think Trump would have won had Clinton not been such a horrible candidate subject to the ill fortune of a series of events rather than the one.

    . . . I think we’re kidding ourselves if we think Trump would have won had Clinton not been such a horrible candidate subject to the ill fortune of a series of events rather than the one.

    Horrible candidate? Compared to whom? Dufus Dukakis? Madman McCain? Rapist and maybe murderer W.J. Clinton? Former cokehead G.W. Bush? Sweaty, beady-eyed Nixon? The Gerald Ford Chevy Chase made fun of? Goofy Jimmy Carter? Bob Dole? Al Gore?

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Michael Tracey calls Hillary an awful candidate too, but I agree with you that this is mostly hindsight bias. The truth is she was a polished and skilled debater, and a first class money-raiser.

    Hillary's biggest weakness wasn't herself but her platform. It's really hard to beat nationalism with globalism in a national election. I don't think Trump could have won on her platform either, despite what Scott Adams says.
  42. @ben tillman

    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That’s disappointing, Mr. Sailer.
     
    This is ridiculous moral preening. Sadness for oneself (or other self-referential emotion) naturally and understandably comes before emotion for others. It's involuntary.

    None of us knew any of the officers shot that day. Their suffering was completely abstract from our perspective. Even here in Dallas, I can't name a single one of the victims, though I can tell you the name of the DPD officer who died 43 years ago today: J.D. Tippit.

    None of us knew any of the officers shot that day. Their suffering was completely abstract from our perspective. Even here in Dallas, I can’t name a single one of the victims, though I can tell you the name of the DPD officer who died 43 years ago today: J.D. Tippit.

    And I doubt it’s a coincidence that Steve chose to publish this post on November 22. That was a nice touch, a nice flourish.

  43. @Andra
    But he got clocked in the popular vote - it may turn out that she wins by an unconscionable two percentage points, and she did very well for a Democrat in Texas. A Rose Bowl of votes in three states and the entire post election narrative would be different. Sometimes things are about chance and there is no great lesson to be learned.

    Essentially the entirety of her lead is provisional ballots in CA. This is not really as decisive as you think it is.

  44. The thing I found most interesting about the whole Black Lives Matter thing is how it suddenly and completely disappeared from the radar in the last six weeks of the campaign.

    Almost as if it were hurting Hillary or something.

    But that’s just crazy talk…

    • Replies: @sayless
    I read that in August BLM leaders took a public position in support of the Palestinians, and they lost a lot of Jewish support on account of that.
    , @CK
    “Is there any point to which you would wish to draw my attention?'

    'To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time.'

    'The dog did nothing in the night-time.'

    'That was the curious incident,' remarked Sherlock Holmes.”
  45. Of course it played a big part but the media have barely mentioned blm in all their hand wringing about what happened. In fact I read an article today on Yahoo (I think) calling Breitbart or someone racist for saying blm was an excuse for blacks to riot. They are still saying that if you don’t support blm then you’re racist yet they can’t figure out why all their former white blue collar voters abandoned the party.

    Something I haven’t heard much about is how much Hillary’s illness affected her campaigning. I keep hearing how she didn’t spend anytime in this or that state but the reason is never that she was too sick to do as much campaigning as she needed to.

    Also, there’s a really surreal article up at the nyt about how Breitbart and others are mocking celebrities for all their crying about the election. Pretty funny stuff.

    http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/11/22/arts/how-conservative-sites-turn-celebrity-despair-on-its-head.html

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    Thanks for the link -- that is an intensely interesting article.

    A couple of quotations from it:


    But much of the text generated by these sites [i.e. right-wing sites like Breitbart] is barely politicized. The conservative online outlet Patriotic Folks recently aggregated quotes from a Lady Gaga essay, published in Harper’s Bazaar, about how she was “depressed and hurt” about Mr. Trump’s remarks about women, and worked in just a whiff of commentary: “Women are fighting for their lives because of the leaked ‘Access Hollywood’ tape where Donald Trump makes lewd comments, or at least that’s what Lady Gaga thinks.” Highlighting words like “hurt” and “depressed” works like a low-frequency conservative dog whistle, signaling to readers who want to revel in liberals’ pain or ridicule them as emotional children.
     
    It's almost as if the NYT is acknowledging that an alternative narrative might be constructed in competition with its own . . .

    These right-wing aggregators make sure that any leftist celebrity’s political reach will be neutralized by a backlash from people who don’t idolize and agree with them. None of that is likely to stop celebrities from using their own soapboxes to promote their politics. But they would be smart to consider how their words will play on other platforms, too.

     

    . . . and they're afraid.
    , @Forbes
    The NYT article is a monument to the NYT's utter lack of self-awareness.

    It's as if these so-called celebrities are not deserving of the mockery they're receiving for their public displays of anger, anguish, sorrow, protest, in light of the election. As if it matters who has the support of the bigger stars. As if blowhard celebrities deserve to remain unchallenged, uncriticized. As if the NYT doesn’t participate in the very practice (mockery and criticism of its political opponents) which it condemns in this column.

    The cluelessness on display reeks of hubris, entitlement, arrogance. But you knew that…
  46. @(((Owen)))
    Dallas is not a swing state. But consider the September 20th Black Lives riot in North Carolina. That could have been the turning point.

    North Carolina was nothing compared to the San Bernadino and Pulse nightclub massacres.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    I happened to be in Orlando in the aftermath of the Pulse nightclub massacre. It was strange and a little creepy how rapidly and effectively the local media had turned the biggest mass murder in US history--a train wreck of competing Democrat client groups--into a story about flowers and teddy bears and mourning of our [sic] departed brothers and friends. It was in the news every single day, but only in the most saccharine and unreal way. If any of the locals were capable of drawing a larger lesson from the massacre, they weren't saying so publicly.

    The only people I heard who had anything much to say about the attack were a few Nice White Ladies® who explained their plans to turn the ad hoc memorials into a government funded museum for all eternity.

    Perhaps part of the reason is that Florida is to a much greater extent than other states a set of disparate subcultures and interest groups. Compared to Iowa or New Hampshire or even South Carolina or New York, Florida is a state full of narrow constituencies sitting cheek by jowl with each other but having very little real interconnection among one another. As a result, the common denominator for anything that crosses constituencies, e.g., news media, is very low indeed.

    Steve has written before about how Florida Hispanics are not really the monolith that remote editorialists in NYC presume them to be: Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Venezuelans and Brazilians not only do not view themselves as uniform, they don't even share a language. But that's just the beginning of it. Among the Anglos there are middle American worker bees, down at their heels trailer trash, snowbirding plutocrats, and climate-changed retirees. And then these subdivide even further: Jews, various stripes of gentiles, etc. A very large portion of Floridians are really from somewhere else and their interests and affections lie in that elsewhere.
  47. @Whiskey
    Hillary very nearly won. As others pointed out, she won the popular vote and will do so by a couple of million. About 3 million of them illegals but they were still counted. And a few hundred thousand here and there in swing states and she'd have won the Electoral College and be hunting down the last few straight White men as we speak.

    What was the Schwerpunkt of the election was Hillary's insistence on absolute loyalty and obsequiousness over ability. Trump had people who could add two and two all day long, and still with the media, college educated White professional women, and non-Whites, Trump very nearly lost. A Black candidate like Obama would have won convincingly. Hillary is just manifestly incompetent on almost everything, like most Professional White women outside nursing and medicine and the hard sciences. [Where if you make a mistake, people die, quickly.]

    Many things helped Trump. The drip drip drip of Wikileaks, cumulatively bad for Hillary, pointing out her corruption and incompetence combined. Dallas, North Carolina, Ferguson, all made a difference. But the main point was Hillary's decades long unchanging incompetence.

    As for Democrats ever letting White men on the bus, never happen. The whole point of say, Colbert and John Stewart are to sneer at White people who work for a living. It fills a huge need for Democrats to view themselves as the saved, the predestined elite, against those who were born damned.

    Agree. We are ultimately doomed. We only got a 4-year stay of execution. Most of the white people around me were ardent HRC supporters (Boston area) are like Pauline Kael x 10.

    • Agree: Kylie
    • Replies: @Kyle a
    Your assuming that Trump is not going to be a plus for employment and wage increases. Why wouldn't it appeal to the minorities who are actual producers? The exit polls show Trump had big gains amongst poc relative to the previous two republican losers. Wasn't the wall and deportations going to be a preemptive strike before they become democratic voters?
  48. @Trelane
    Turning Point:

    February 16, 2016

    Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture NYC

    (she's dying here)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=9C12ZvOJNfs#t=3

    Hillary’s croaky voice at the end reminds me of Rachel Dratch trying to get through an SNL Debbie Downer sketch.

  49. @Jack D
    Probably didn't help but I don't think it was a turning point. Blacks are into blackety, black, black all the time but whites in America are just not interested in a race war.

    What's an interesting question (to me at least) is whether there is any strategy for the Democrat party that includes both blacks and blue collar whites? From FDR to LBJ, the Democrat party was the party of both. When factories in the Midwest close, both black and white workers are affected. I've heard it said that there's no way that Hillary could let white men ride the bus with the rest of the coalition of the fringes because she needed them to be standing outside the bus as the common target that everyone on the bus could hate on, but is this really true? Could she have taken Bill's advice and run a more traditional Democrat campaign or do the modern dynamics of the party require Democrats to treat blue collar whites as targets or at the very least have no more love to give to them?

    What’s an interesting question (to me at least) is whether there is any strategy for the Democrat party that includes both blacks and blue collar whites?

    This is the question the short- to medium-term future of American politics turns upon, isn’t it?

    If things go even reasonably well economically in the next four years, it may be hard for the Dems to turn the upper midwest back to blue anytime soon.

    A Dem candidate can try to appeal to white, blue-collar voters, but the other identity groups in their constituency are bound to be jealous.

    Another way to look at the question: can the Dems find a strategy for suppressing the jealousy (and increasingly vicious white-men-focused rage) of their identity-group base so that their candidates are able to campaign for white votes?

    It seemed in the past few elections that the Dems were able to ‘call off’ the most fervid members of their constituency with a wink and an under-the-table promise that appeals to stale pale males might be necessary to win an election, but all things would be put to rights after a win was declared. But this time Hillary, whether because of hubris, or of taking white working-class votes for granted, or of fear of offending her core constituency, seemed to give up on this.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Cal, There used to be a strong union element among blue collar workers and their allegiance to the Democrat party. Does that still exist? The strongest unions seem to be teachers, whose constant whining turns off many people and the service unions, SIEU, whose members only seem motivated when the union shepherds them to events.
  50. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    For me, this was the turning point in the election: June 16, 2015.

    I haven’t stopped shaking since then.

  51. @(((Owen)))
    Dallas is not a swing state. But consider the September 20th Black Lives riot in North Carolina. That could have been the turning point.

    Urp, I get your point. Nationally thought it was overshadowed by other incidents.

  52. Not directly a specific turning point in the election cycle, but if others were like me, a turning point in how I viewed the world began with Trayvon Martin. Before Trayvon Martin, I didn’t view the media as intentionally propagandish, just liberally biased because of the left wing nature of journalism schools. Trayvon Martin taught me that the media intentionally highlights insignificant police blotter stories to fabricate false narratives to ensure minority turnout in election years. Trayvon Martin taught me the disdain the left has for White Americans and the need for them to have us as the Goldstein of their narratives. Trayvon Martin taught me that its ok to pretend that a thug is a cherubic baby full of potential and that a civically inclined Peruvian Indian is some racist white Southerner so long as the lesson that white people are evil is hammered home. If others were like me, 2012 was the time to learn that the genteel conservatism that waxed about Enlightenment principles was out of its element in dealing with the cynical tribalism and power consolidation of the left. A part of me thinks others back then learned that lesson too, which, in addition to the steady drumbeat of Trayvon’s equally preposterous sequels (Mike Brown etc.) led us to get behind a man like Trump. Conservatism got rude because we learned that deep down, no matter how polite and proper the left wanted it to look, the game of politics was dirty tribalism. We got all Colonel Kurtz and decided that its ok to write f*** on our airplanes. They think Trump is obscene? Well, they had made the whole game obscene!

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @penntothal
    Trayvon Martin and Mike Brown ("Hands Up, Don't Shoot") stories were a turning point for many of us. They demonstrated to us that CNN.com and washingtonpost.com had become FAKE NEWS sites.
    , @Mr. Blank
    It's precisely because of stuff like this that I am trying to segue out of my current media job into something else. It's always been a liberal-leaning business, but the ultra-politicization trend is too much for me.

    One factor in all this has been the absolute bloodbath that the media has been experiencing at its lower levels, which has had the effect of placing media elites at places like The New York Times further out of touch with the rest of the country. In many cases, the elite media no longer has a network of local reporters and editors that it can turn to in order to make sense of things -- folks who are on the scene and have a more nuanced view of the situation, and who can tell them, for example, "hey, you should probably lay off this Michael Brown thing -- I know it looks one way to you sitting there in your office in downtown Manhattan, but there's a lot going on there that you don't know about."

    It's amusing to me that coastal liberals who have no problem diagnosing the failures of the Iraq War can't see that they are prone to making the same stupid blunders in their cultural war against traditional America.
    , @Gabriel M
    Trayvon Martin was certainly the man who red-pilled me. The British media covered the case in an even more dishonest manner than the American one, or so at least it seemed to me. It was then that I first realized that the media didn't just spin and exaggerate, it created entirely false accounts of the world.
    , @Amasius
    Trayvon was my wake-up call as well. Someone selectively edited the 911 tape, someone photoshopped Trayvon to make him look younger and more innocent, a lot of someones pushed a totally false narrative and blocked out all truth. It could no longer be explained away as "just a coincidence" or "the media just want ratings and money!" bs.

    How any White person can still be asleep after Facedown Mike Brown, BLM, and the never-ending string of ever more preposterous dindu happenings is beyond me.
    , @ogunsiron
    The Trayvon Martin summer is also when I realized that they were not just biased but outright liars.
    For me that was closely followed by the Dieudonné affair over there in the french world. Then there was gamergate. The media caste is the #1 enemy.
  53. Hillary Clinton:

    African Americans talk about the seen and unseen barriers

    No wonder blacks be trippin’.

    Hot sauce! … Yeaassss, yesss.

  54. I thought the Democrats/media released the Billy Bush/pussy-grabbing material too early. If that had been dropped the week before the election it could have done more damage. Somewhat like the GWB drunk driving bombshell. But they played their trumps too early and gave independent voters enough time to forget any misgivings that they had about Trump’s character.

    Trump is getting a lot of credit for his campaign and victory but he had some serious unforced errors that he could have avoided while still remaining true to his defiant, iconclastic persona. For example, his debate performances were poor (first debate) to mediocre. He had to dig himself out of a few holes.

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    The leaker of those tapes was likely Dan Senor, a neocon married to former CNN/NBC anchor Campbell Brown. The point of the leak was a coup in the GOP, designed to force Trump to resign from the ticket and be replaced with Paul Ryan.
  55. @ben tillman

    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That’s disappointing, Mr. Sailer.
     
    This is ridiculous moral preening. Sadness for oneself (or other self-referential emotion) naturally and understandably comes before emotion for others. It's involuntary.

    None of us knew any of the officers shot that day. Their suffering was completely abstract from our perspective. Even here in Dallas, I can't name a single one of the victims, though I can tell you the name of the DPD officer who died 43 years ago today: J.D. Tippit.

    None of us knew any of the officers shot that day. Their suffering was completely abstract from our perspective.

    From The Shield of Achilles, by W.H. Auden:

    That girls are raped, that two boys knife a third,
    Were axioms to him, who’d never heard
    Of any world where promises were kept,
    Or one could weep because another wept.

  56. @Mr. Anon
    For me, I really started to take Trump seriously when he held one of his first big rallies - in Mobile, Alabama. An agnostic yankee billionaire from New York, who didn't give a flip about abortion or homosexual rights, had all those southern baptists cheering him on. It not only indicated that Trump could have wide appeal, it indicated that the Republican electorate had changed in an important way. Those voters had finally gotten wise to the old GOP flim-flam show of running on social issues, harvesting conservative votes, and then screwing over thier constituents. People turned out for Trump because he was championing there actual tangible, economic interests.

    I also realized something had changed during the first few Republican primary debates, when Trump openly accused several of his opponents of being bought-and-paid-for stooges. I've never seen that before in a debate, certainly not in a primary debate. Trump proved himself willing to dump the accepted conventions and to be as aggressive, as impolite - as mean - as the Democrats are.

    I expected him to win the nomination last fall, given that he was leading in the polls, but I think my first wow moment was when Trump ran against the Iraq War in South Carolina and won.

  57. @Anonymous
    The baseball bats thing has been memed into the wider culture via Tarantino's Inglorious Basterds, and the media has been blasting for the past couple weeks now about Nazis being everywhere. How long before some nut or nuts actually go on a baseball bat rampage?

    "Politico Editor RESIGNS After Publishing Home Addresses Of Alt-Right Icon Richard Spencer, Advocating For ‘Baseball Bats’"

    http://dailycaller.com/2016/11/22/national-politico-editor-publishes-home-addresses-of-alt-right-icon-richard-spencer-advocates-for-baseball-bats/

    Hirsh responded in an unhinged manner: “I wasn’t thinking of a fucking letter, Doug. He lives part of the time next door to me in Arlington. Our grandfathers brought baseball bats to Bund meetings. Want to join me?”

    ...

    Hirsh’s mention of Bund meetings is a reference to the German-American Bund, a Nazi organization in the United States active in the mid-to-late 1930s, which promoted National Socialist ideology and was often subject to violent attacks by Jewish mobsters in New York City and Newark, New Jersey, using baseball bats.
     

    “The baseball bats thing has been memed into the wider culture via Tarantino’s Inglorious Basterds, and the media has been blasting for the past couple weeks now about Nazis being everywhere. How long before some nut or nuts actually go on a baseball bat rampage?”

    When it comes to baseball bats I think of The Warriors before I think of Nazis, lol.

  58. This was an extremely close election, despite the statistical curiosity known as the nationwide aggregate popular vote or the constitutional entity called the electoral college vote.

    It really came down to Hillary Clinton losing by 109,000 votes in three states. Had more than half those votes been for her instead, Donald Trump would have lost. We can analyze whether it was Donald Trump’s edge in terms of stamina, his ability to turn out the crowds, her rejection of her husband’s advice to make sure that the “blue firewall” was properly secured, and so on. But basically, from the Democrats’ point of view, for the want of a shoe nail, the kingdom was truly lost.

    What it means is that Donald Trump should move quickly to consolidate his position, and chalk up some very visible wins for the regular Joes and Janes who voted for him in the heartland states—perhaps he should begin infrastructure construction programs quickly to create jobs in a hurry.

    There are many snowflakes on the Democratic side who don’t get it and are currently hyperventilating, but there are also enough old-time pols, like Bill Clinton or Bernie Sanders, who understand that the way to get the brass ring back the next time will be to reach out to the old, formerly unionized labor base.

    Trump has the incumbents’ advantage, but the voter demographics are still balanced on a knife edge. And at some point, the Democrats will wake up and realize that the demographic variable to look at is not ethnicity and identity, but class. At that point they will remember that class politics used to be their specialty.

    There’s a lot of work to be done, and many things that need to be done right, quickly, before this victory is consolidated.

    • Agree: ic1000
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "And at some point, the Democrats will wake up and realize that the demographic variable to look at is not ethnicity and identity, but class. At that point they will remember that class politics used to be their specialty."

    You are 100 percent wrong that The Democratic Party is going to ditch identity politics for class politics. That is why they are doubling down on identity by putting a Black Muslim (Keith Ellison) as the face of their party.
  59. @ben tillman

    . . . I think we’re kidding ourselves if we think Trump would have won had Clinton not been such a horrible candidate subject to the ill fortune of a series of events rather than the one.
     
    Horrible candidate? Compared to whom? Dufus Dukakis? Madman McCain? Rapist and maybe murderer W.J. Clinton? Former cokehead G.W. Bush? Sweaty, beady-eyed Nixon? The Gerald Ford Chevy Chase made fun of? Goofy Jimmy Carter? Bob Dole? Al Gore?

    Michael Tracey calls Hillary an awful candidate too, but I agree with you that this is mostly hindsight bias. The truth is she was a polished and skilled debater, and a first class money-raiser.

    Hillary’s biggest weakness wasn’t herself but her platform. It’s really hard to beat nationalism with globalism in a national election. I don’t think Trump could have won on her platform either, despite what Scott Adams says.

    • Replies: @5371
    She exchanged some old fat hacks for young twink hacks, but she was just as much putty for her handlers in 2016 as in 2008. Also low energy.
    , @Clyde

    Michael Tracey calls Hillary an awful candidate too, but I agree with you that this is mostly hindsight bias. The truth is she was a polished and skilled debater, and a first class money-raiser.
     
    She is an awful speaker and debater. She is no better at raising money than I would have been if I were the Dems presidential candidate. It is more accurate to say that tens and hundreds of millions of dollars were showered on Illary and her campaign by Hollywood, Wall Street, lobbyists, trial lawyers, gay elites etc who were very concerned about getting a Dem into the White House. For crony capitalist reasons, for anti-Trump reasons, for emotional reasons.
    , @Jack D
    I think you are wrong about this. On paper she was a great candidate and (like Nixon) she won the debates on points, but she was completely lacking in that undefinable charisma thing. Obama had it and Trump had it and she didn't. Tens of thousands would line up for Trump rallies, no one went to a Hillary rally unless she had a rock star (someone with actual charisma) appearing with her. Nine times out of ten the candidate who has IT will win. Even women who were exactly like her (maybe even ESPECIALLY such women) couldn't get excited about her.
  60. @Yep
    Of course it played a big part but the media have barely mentioned blm in all their hand wringing about what happened. In fact I read an article today on Yahoo (I think) calling Breitbart or someone racist for saying blm was an excuse for blacks to riot. They are still saying that if you don't support blm then you're racist yet they can't figure out why all their former white blue collar voters abandoned the party.

    Something I haven't heard much about is how much Hillary's illness affected her campaigning. I keep hearing how she didn't spend anytime in this or that state but the reason is never that she was too sick to do as much campaigning as she needed to.

    Also, there's a really surreal article up at the nyt about how Breitbart and others are mocking celebrities for all their crying about the election. Pretty funny stuff.

    http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/11/22/arts/how-conservative-sites-turn-celebrity-despair-on-its-head.html

    Thanks for the link — that is an intensely interesting article.

    A couple of quotations from it:

    But much of the text generated by these sites [i.e. right-wing sites like Breitbart] is barely politicized. The conservative online outlet Patriotic Folks recently aggregated quotes from a Lady Gaga essay, published in Harper’s Bazaar, about how she was “depressed and hurt” about Mr. Trump’s remarks about women, and worked in just a whiff of commentary: “Women are fighting for their lives because of the leaked ‘Access Hollywood’ tape where Donald Trump makes lewd comments, or at least that’s what Lady Gaga thinks.” Highlighting words like “hurt” and “depressed” works like a low-frequency conservative dog whistle, signaling to readers who want to revel in liberals’ pain or ridicule them as emotional children.

    It’s almost as if the NYT is acknowledging that an alternative narrative might be constructed in competition with its own . . .

    These right-wing aggregators make sure that any leftist celebrity’s political reach will be neutralized by a backlash from people who don’t idolize and agree with them. None of that is likely to stop celebrities from using their own soapboxes to promote their politics. But they would be smart to consider how their words will play on other platforms, too.

    . . . and they’re afraid.

    • Replies: @Yep
    The New York Times is genuinely surprised that people might take celebrities seriously. Wth?
  61. @Mr. Anon
    C'mon, concern trolling, Twinkie? I'm disappointed. You're better than that. This is a political blog - politics comes to mind.

    This is a political blog – politics comes to mind.

    You know, I might just stop reading or commenting on blogs like this. Look, I am a pretty politicized person myself. Compared to most Americans, I am highly “ideological” (“radicalized” some would say), and politics is of considerate import to me.

    BUT, I do my best to step back from that kind of prism, and think about ordinary individuals who are caught up in these kinds of events and occurrences. Those officers weren’t some amorphous entities. They didn’t die fighting a political cause. They weren’t some pawns in an ideological game. They were people – ordinary individuals who were just doing their jobs and were murdered. And they had families who loved and cared about them.

    I don’t know what “concern trolling” is, but if the first instinct regarding deaths such as these is national politics and who is going to be president, instead of empathy for the dead and their distraught families, I guess I am out of sorts here. Being a rather vengeful person by nature, I’d even understand the thirst for justice or even revenge against the perpetrator. But the first thought was about Donald Trump?

    I have had a high regard for Mr. Sailer’s citizenism and his apparent concern for ALL Americans, but that kind of cold ideological calculation as first instinct caught me by surprise like a hidden blade.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    cold ideological calculation
     
    We’re all adults here and understand the loss that death (violent or otherwise) brings to survivors of the deceased. That is precisely Steve’s point about the crimes and the election: The callousness/perfidy of President Obama, candidate Clinton, and the media establishment helped instigate these atrocities. It’s no wonder that millions of peoples’ thoughts likely turned to the one candidate who could possibly turn around this madness.

    caught me by surprise like a hidden blade
     
    So you’re definitely Asian. Or at least have seen some samurai movies.
    , @Ozymandias
    "You know, I might just stop reading or commenting on blogs like this."

    Oh, the drama! Our self proclaimed moral superior just can't get any respect. Suck it up, Princess.
    , @dearieme
    You've misunderstood. iSteve said that his the first thought was about Donald Trump, not that his first emotion or first instinct was about Trump.
    , @Almost Missouri

    "They weren’t some pawns in an ideological game."
     
    I agree that they had no intention of becoming such pawns, but Hillary's and Obama's comments after their murders made them into such pawns, whether they--or we--liked it or not.

    "first thought"
     
    I assume Steve meant "first political thought". For the economy of the writing, he left out the word "political" because this is after all a heavily political blog so it would be verbose and redundant to keep labeling everything as "political".
    , @Almost Missouri
    Perhaps I should add that you are one of my preferred commenters, so I don't want you to stop commenting.
    , @Mr. Anon
    "But the first thought was about Donald Trump?"

    Jesus. It was mild hyperbole for Christ sake, of the kind often used in normal conversation. No, that probably wasn't Steve's first thought. However, it probably was his first thought that pertained to the normal range of topics found on his blog. Your over-reaction is peevish. Get a grip.

    , @Leonard
    Oh please. My first thought was just like Sailer's. Actually his might not of been that -- that might have been a figure of speech on his part; I don't know and neither do you -- but I know my mind, and yes, I am a horrible (aka normal) person. Bad things that happen to distant people I don't know from Adam don't usually strike me emotionally first, if ever. Show me video, as in the case of the WTC, then I get emotional about it. But just reading a headline doesn't.
    , @27 year old
    > I might just stop reading or commenting on blogs like this.


    Oh please, no, anything but that... What must we do to convince you to stay...
    , @TWS
    Even money this is just a tiny duck sock puppet.
    , @Johann Ricke

    I have had a high regard for Mr. Sailer’s citizenism and his apparent concern for ALL Americans, but that kind of cold ideological calculation as first instinct caught me by surprise like a hidden blade.
     
    As a devoted reader of your postings, I'll be sorely disappointed if you stop contributing. On the other hand, you'll have a heck of a lot more free time and that's certainly nothing to sniff at.

    Re the blog author, I can't speak for him, but I fully understand his reaction. Over the years, I've become numbed with respect to the litany of disasters the left has brought forth, such that the Dallas murders came off as merely another tragic but dreary statistic, rather than a coronary-inducing incident. As we age and our bodies atrophy, we learn to suppress/defuse our visceral reactions - those who don't end up in the emergency room.

  62. Per the polls, there was no ‘turning point’ — HRC was the high probability winner right up until the day of the election — all along people like Scott Adams were making the point that there were a lot of crypto Trump voters out there — people who saw how Trump was belittled, his supporters as well (‘deplorables’), even physically attacked — these people were never going to vote for Clinton, but were reluctant to openly support Trump.

  63. @Anon
    There were several turning points, many of which happened years ago. Her main issue is that she's a third world politician. She has taken more money in pay-for-play (let's call it by its proper name-bribery) than anyone who has ever run for president. Grant's friends loaded up, but he himself stayed pretty clean. Harding's friends loaded up, and he may have loaded up a bit himself, but Harding also gave the country a booming economy in return. Hillary's crony Obama couldn't help her there.

    Hillary also had the complete backing of the media in a manner that's third world, too. The press in those countries is totally corrupt and partisan, and they don't have any ethical qualms about it. They are simply one big circle jerk sucking off their country's interbreeding elite and getting money and favors in return.

    She expected to get the job because she was the wife of an elite and it was 'her turn,' as if the office of the presidency was the sole possession of a small, corrupt oligarchy exactly the way it is in the third world.

    Finally, Hillary went in hard for third world factional politics. The non-Anglo Saxon old world and everything below the Texas border is run by factional politics. This is alien to the American mind. It's an old Anglo-Saxon tradition for its rulers to avoid taking sides and attempt to be above the fray. This tradition goes all the way back the medieval English monarchs. They understood themselves to be representing all the people in a manner that was unusually enlightened for their era.

    For example, French politics was divided up into the groups such as the Queen's party, the Dauphin's party, the Cardinal's party, the King's party, etc., each faction battling it out with each other. In nearly all countries today, you have either religious groups, or clans, tribes, or ethnic minorities who are fighting to be top dog and put everyone else down. All these countries accept this type of political behavior as normal, and they can't even imagine running their country any other way. But that's not how Anglo-Saxons see things, and that's not what Anglo-Saxons think is good for their country. Our American presidents inherited this sense of non-factionalism from their Anglo-Saxon culture, and for the most part, they've understood that factionalism is idiotic because it undermines a country's stability and leads to civil wars.

    Hillary is contemptuous--or stupidly ignorant--of this political tradition, and a lot of Americans sensed it and were wary of her. Her campaign was nothing but one big ugly attempt to whip up rage, resentment, and hatred among various factions and pit them against her chosen enemy. That, ultimately, is why she took a fall. She was an alien politician from Planet Third World, and she really honest-to-god despises most Americans. Especially now, since we've sent her packing.

    “There were several turning points, many of which happened years ago. Her main issue is that she’s a third world politician.”

    Crooked Hildabeast is the female Kwame Kilpatrick.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Jefferson, Kwame dressed better, otherwise decent comparison.
  64. @theo the kraut
    I like your comments here and at Razib's mostly, but you're moralising and imputing here like those fake progressives do, not good at all.

    > Sadness for the officers and their families didn’t come to mind first?
    > Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?

    Do you honestly expect anyone here except tiny duck et al not to feel that? When things like that happen lots of things happen in your mind in split seconds, sometimes even conflicting ones, maybe Steve thought about the political implications first or he just chose it as a rhetorical or journalistic device for pertinent reasons. You're choosing the most unkind interpretation possible to preen morally, humbling others and exalting yourself. We all are funny sometimes, so just say that you're sorry and let's forget about this.

    you’re moralising and imputing here like those fake progressives do

    I understand the distaste at the often hypocritical and inane “moralizing” that leftists do, but that doesn’t make attempting to keep some semblance of civilized morality alive in any discussion, politics or otherwise, “fake.”

    This is one of my major problems with some elements in the so-called alt-right. They seem to obsess about lampooning* and destroying their enemies, closing ranks around their tribe, and achieving power – not trying to build a harmonious and just society for all. Like leftist activists, it’s always a war on the Other.

    To believe otherwise – to inject “moral preening” – seems to invite distasteful ad hominem labels such as “cuck” et al.

    *Sebastian Junger makes an excellent point in “Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging” that the kind of contempt that politically opposed Americans express toward each other is extremely jarring to returning veterans and contributes to their sense of broken community and alienation from the society which they served.

    • Replies: @Kyle a
    'Lampooning and destroying their enemies'.... my God man. Where and the hell have you been residing for the last 50 years? The left are doing whatever they can to do away wth the good guys. Even boasting about the changing demographics and your concerned with what???? Your a clown.
    , @melendwyr

    This is one of my major problems with some elements in the so-called alt-right. They seem to obsess about lampooning* and destroying their enemies, closing ranks around their tribe, and achieving power – not trying to build a harmonious and just society for all.
     
    It's becoming clearer and clearer that those two goals - a harmonious society, and a just society - are mutually exclusive.
  65. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Thanks for the link -- that is an intensely interesting article.

    A couple of quotations from it:


    But much of the text generated by these sites [i.e. right-wing sites like Breitbart] is barely politicized. The conservative online outlet Patriotic Folks recently aggregated quotes from a Lady Gaga essay, published in Harper’s Bazaar, about how she was “depressed and hurt” about Mr. Trump’s remarks about women, and worked in just a whiff of commentary: “Women are fighting for their lives because of the leaked ‘Access Hollywood’ tape where Donald Trump makes lewd comments, or at least that’s what Lady Gaga thinks.” Highlighting words like “hurt” and “depressed” works like a low-frequency conservative dog whistle, signaling to readers who want to revel in liberals’ pain or ridicule them as emotional children.
     
    It's almost as if the NYT is acknowledging that an alternative narrative might be constructed in competition with its own . . .

    These right-wing aggregators make sure that any leftist celebrity’s political reach will be neutralized by a backlash from people who don’t idolize and agree with them. None of that is likely to stop celebrities from using their own soapboxes to promote their politics. But they would be smart to consider how their words will play on other platforms, too.

     

    . . . and they're afraid.

    The New York Times is genuinely surprised that people might take celebrities seriously. Wth?

    • Replies: @Yep
    Might NOT take celebrities seriously is what I meant to say.
  66. @ben tillman

    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That’s disappointing, Mr. Sailer.
     
    This is ridiculous moral preening. Sadness for oneself (or other self-referential emotion) naturally and understandably comes before emotion for others. It's involuntary.

    None of us knew any of the officers shot that day. Their suffering was completely abstract from our perspective. Even here in Dallas, I can't name a single one of the victims, though I can tell you the name of the DPD officer who died 43 years ago today: J.D. Tippit.

    Their suffering was completely abstract from our perspective.

    It’s not “completely abstract” if you put yourself in their shoes or those of their families. Even if you are incapable of that kind of imagination, having experienced a sudden loss from violence of a beloved family member or a buddy should give you some sense of what they went (and are going) through.

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    It’s not “completely abstract” if you put yourself in their shoes or those of their families.
     
    But that was impossible, since we had no names, no faces, and no information about their families or the specifics of their deaths. It was completely abstract. Just a number -- 5 or 6, no one really seemed to know.
  67. @PiltdownMan
    This was an extremely close election, despite the statistical curiosity known as the nationwide aggregate popular vote or the constitutional entity called the electoral college vote.

    It really came down to Hillary Clinton losing by 109,000 votes in three states. Had more than half those votes been for her instead, Donald Trump would have lost. We can analyze whether it was Donald Trump's edge in terms of stamina, his ability to turn out the crowds, her rejection of her husband's advice to make sure that the "blue firewall" was properly secured, and so on. But basically, from the Democrats' point of view, for the want of a shoe nail, the kingdom was truly lost.

    What it means is that Donald Trump should move quickly to consolidate his position, and chalk up some very visible wins for the regular Joes and Janes who voted for him in the heartland states—perhaps he should begin infrastructure construction programs quickly to create jobs in a hurry.

    There are many snowflakes on the Democratic side who don't get it and are currently hyperventilating, but there are also enough old-time pols, like Bill Clinton or Bernie Sanders, who understand that the way to get the brass ring back the next time will be to reach out to the old, formerly unionized labor base.

    Trump has the incumbents' advantage, but the voter demographics are still balanced on a knife edge. And at some point, the Democrats will wake up and realize that the demographic variable to look at is not ethnicity and identity, but class. At that point they will remember that class politics used to be their specialty.

    There's a lot of work to be done, and many things that need to be done right, quickly, before this victory is consolidated.

    “And at some point, the Democrats will wake up and realize that the demographic variable to look at is not ethnicity and identity, but class. At that point they will remember that class politics used to be their specialty.”

    You are 100 percent wrong that The Democratic Party is going to ditch identity politics for class politics. That is why they are doubling down on identity by putting a Black Muslim (Keith Ellison) as the face of their party.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    That is why they are doubling down on identity by putting a Black Muslim (Keith Ellison) as the face of their party.
     
    If it is a done deal, then they're done for.
    , @Anon
    We've already had a black Muslim as president. People know what it will be like and have had ample opportunity to make up their minds. But I think you're right about Ellison. They'll try to duplicate the formula and run him.
  68. Trump had the huge advantage that, being free of wealthy donors and strict party loyalty, he was free to pick policies that would actually be popular with the American people. Of course any ol’ loser politician can sell policies that help the average American, real political skill lies in the rare few who can sell political poison to the people on behalf of the oligarchs and make voters eagerly ingest it!

    So we have to hand it to Hillary for coming so close despite advocating for mass 3rd world immigration, yet more terrible trade deals, even more disastrous regime change in the Middle East all while winking at Black Lives Matter.

    Any lawyer can get an obviously innocent client off. A true genius of a lawyer is revealed when she sets a blatantly guilty client free.

    Trump’s freedom from party and donor loyalty allowed him to flirt with political queerness. If we make an analogy to gender studies, there are two categories of cis-political gender: Democrats/Liberals and Republicans/Conservatives. Just like with gender there is some flexibility in political gender identity. But stray too far out of your partisan sheep pen and incongruent readings–queerness–is the result.

    One interesting feature of Facebook is that I get to witness exactly how politically queer many of my working class friends from high school are. On the other hand most of my Ivy League friends are both cis-political to the extreme, and 100% intolerant to political ambiguity. Reading interviews with Steve Bannon shows him to be a total political queer. The equivalent of wearing purple to interviews in political queerness is intelligently quoting Marx in at least a neutral (if not positive) fashion. The guru of right-leaning political queerness is the French intellectual Alain de Benoist who in his 2013 speech to the NPI quoted Marx and promiscuously used Marxian concepts to further his points.

    And so Trump, despite all his rookie political mistakes, hugely benefited from his freedom to pick popular campaign themes. At the same time he had to signal his political queerness to all of us non cis-political people while still maintaining enough political gender coherence to get the cis-political GOP-types to vote for him as well. He managed to thread this political needle and now has 3-4 years to make Trumpism a new cis-political gender ideology.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @anon
    Good analysis. But unfortunately, the wealth (and celebrity: remember he was actually pretty chintzy with his abundant funds) that allowed Trump a political freedom unavailable to the donor-dependent could also prove his downfall.

    It's seems to be shaping up that Trump isn't willing to put his fortunes in a true blind trust. That could add up to serious trouble as 1.) one of his main arguments against Hillary was corruption and her use of public office for money-grubbing, and 2.) this is a fairly easy-to-understand opposition talking point that D's will surely employ (and R's will be loathe to defend against, especially if it looks like the so-called Trump Revolution has lost its steam and politics is returning to the normal R and D categories pre-Trump)

    Trump, it seems, may have to choose between a guaranteed money-elite future for him and his offspring or a chance to be a society-shaping historical figure. I strongly backed Trump through the campaign but I have my doubts if he has the vision to see what many in isteve land think his role could be or a willingness to possibly lose a big chunk of his fortune.
  69. @Yep
    The New York Times is genuinely surprised that people might take celebrities seriously. Wth?

    Might NOT take celebrities seriously is what I meant to say.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Might NOT take celebrities seriously is what I meant to say.

     

    Yes, that makes more sense -- I admit I was a bit nonplussed by your previous comment!
    , @Jefferson
    "Might NOT take celebrities seriously is what I meant to say."

    What I learned from this election is that some celebrities who were rumored to be Conservatives are not Conservative at all. I am talking about celebrities like Patricia Heaton, Robert Downey Jr. and Jon Cryer who all announced that they voted for Crooked Hildabeast. Before this election they were all rumored to be closet Republicans.
  70. @Yep
    Might NOT take celebrities seriously is what I meant to say.

    Might NOT take celebrities seriously is what I meant to say.

    Yes, that makes more sense — I admit I was a bit nonplussed by your previous comment!

  71. @Senator Brundlefly
    Not directly a specific turning point in the election cycle, but if others were like me, a turning point in how I viewed the world began with Trayvon Martin. Before Trayvon Martin, I didn't view the media as intentionally propagandish, just liberally biased because of the left wing nature of journalism schools. Trayvon Martin taught me that the media intentionally highlights insignificant police blotter stories to fabricate false narratives to ensure minority turnout in election years. Trayvon Martin taught me the disdain the left has for White Americans and the need for them to have us as the Goldstein of their narratives. Trayvon Martin taught me that its ok to pretend that a thug is a cherubic baby full of potential and that a civically inclined Peruvian Indian is some racist white Southerner so long as the lesson that white people are evil is hammered home. If others were like me, 2012 was the time to learn that the genteel conservatism that waxed about Enlightenment principles was out of its element in dealing with the cynical tribalism and power consolidation of the left. A part of me thinks others back then learned that lesson too, which, in addition to the steady drumbeat of Trayvon's equally preposterous sequels (Mike Brown etc.) led us to get behind a man like Trump. Conservatism got rude because we learned that deep down, no matter how polite and proper the left wanted it to look, the game of politics was dirty tribalism. We got all Colonel Kurtz and decided that its ok to write f*** on our airplanes. They think Trump is obscene? Well, they had made the whole game obscene!

    Trayvon Martin and Mike Brown (“Hands Up, Don’t Shoot”) stories were a turning point for many of us. They demonstrated to us that CNN.com and washingtonpost.com had become FAKE NEWS sites.

  72. It was not part of their blood,
    It came to them very late,
    With long arrears to make good,
    When the Saxon began to hate.

    They were not easily moved,
    They were icy — willing to wait
    Till every count should be proved,
    Ere the Saxon began to hate.

    Their voices were even and low.
    Their eyes were level and straight.
    There was neither sign nor show
    When the Saxon began to hate.

    It was not preached to the crowd.
    It was not taught by the state.
    No man spoke it aloud
    When the Saxon began to hate.

    It was not suddently bred.
    It will not swiftly abate.
    Through the chilled years ahead,
    When Time shall count from the date
    That the Saxon began to hate.

    • Replies: @CK
    If only that were truth and not merely pretty rhyme.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Marie, Are you reciting a poem or is this your work?
  73. @Anon
    There were several turning points, many of which happened years ago. Her main issue is that she's a third world politician. She has taken more money in pay-for-play (let's call it by its proper name-bribery) than anyone who has ever run for president. Grant's friends loaded up, but he himself stayed pretty clean. Harding's friends loaded up, and he may have loaded up a bit himself, but Harding also gave the country a booming economy in return. Hillary's crony Obama couldn't help her there.

    Hillary also had the complete backing of the media in a manner that's third world, too. The press in those countries is totally corrupt and partisan, and they don't have any ethical qualms about it. They are simply one big circle jerk sucking off their country's interbreeding elite and getting money and favors in return.

    She expected to get the job because she was the wife of an elite and it was 'her turn,' as if the office of the presidency was the sole possession of a small, corrupt oligarchy exactly the way it is in the third world.

    Finally, Hillary went in hard for third world factional politics. The non-Anglo Saxon old world and everything below the Texas border is run by factional politics. This is alien to the American mind. It's an old Anglo-Saxon tradition for its rulers to avoid taking sides and attempt to be above the fray. This tradition goes all the way back the medieval English monarchs. They understood themselves to be representing all the people in a manner that was unusually enlightened for their era.

    For example, French politics was divided up into the groups such as the Queen's party, the Dauphin's party, the Cardinal's party, the King's party, etc., each faction battling it out with each other. In nearly all countries today, you have either religious groups, or clans, tribes, or ethnic minorities who are fighting to be top dog and put everyone else down. All these countries accept this type of political behavior as normal, and they can't even imagine running their country any other way. But that's not how Anglo-Saxons see things, and that's not what Anglo-Saxons think is good for their country. Our American presidents inherited this sense of non-factionalism from their Anglo-Saxon culture, and for the most part, they've understood that factionalism is idiotic because it undermines a country's stability and leads to civil wars.

    Hillary is contemptuous--or stupidly ignorant--of this political tradition, and a lot of Americans sensed it and were wary of her. Her campaign was nothing but one big ugly attempt to whip up rage, resentment, and hatred among various factions and pit them against her chosen enemy. That, ultimately, is why she took a fall. She was an alien politician from Planet Third World, and she really honest-to-god despises most Americans. Especially now, since we've sent her packing.

    Look up who invented party politics.

  74. @Dave Pinsen
    Michael Tracey calls Hillary an awful candidate too, but I agree with you that this is mostly hindsight bias. The truth is she was a polished and skilled debater, and a first class money-raiser.

    Hillary's biggest weakness wasn't herself but her platform. It's really hard to beat nationalism with globalism in a national election. I don't think Trump could have won on her platform either, despite what Scott Adams says.

    She exchanged some old fat hacks for young twink hacks, but she was just as much putty for her handlers in 2016 as in 2008. Also low energy.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    If she had Trump's energy and campaign schedule and the same unpopular platform, she still would have lost.
    , @dearieme
    She's low energy because she's an invalid. I still hope she'll be convicted of something and then plead that her ill health should spare her from prison. At that point Trump could pardon her.
  75. @Yep
    Might NOT take celebrities seriously is what I meant to say.

    “Might NOT take celebrities seriously is what I meant to say.”

    What I learned from this election is that some celebrities who were rumored to be Conservatives are not Conservative at all. I am talking about celebrities like Patricia Heaton, Robert Downey Jr. and Jon Cryer who all announced that they voted for Crooked Hildabeast. Before this election they were all rumored to be closet Republicans.

    • Replies: @Kyle a
    Downey resides other closets. None of which have anything to do with politics.
  76. The racist attacks on Temple University students, a week before the election, must have had an effect in PA.

    The national media didn’t report that much, if at all.

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/data.php?year=2016&fips=42&f=0&off=0&elect=0&def=swg&datatype=county

    The big swings in Pennsylvania were outside of the Philly metro area, it might not have been the tipping point.

    If the linked pattern holds, the GOP could win the Senate seat in 2018, as long as the candidate is the Santorum and not the Specter type.
  77. @Twinkie

    This is a political blog – politics comes to mind.
     
    You know, I might just stop reading or commenting on blogs like this. Look, I am a pretty politicized person myself. Compared to most Americans, I am highly "ideological" ("radicalized" some would say), and politics is of considerate import to me.

    BUT, I do my best to step back from that kind of prism, and think about ordinary individuals who are caught up in these kinds of events and occurrences. Those officers weren't some amorphous entities. They didn't die fighting a political cause. They weren't some pawns in an ideological game. They were people - ordinary individuals who were just doing their jobs and were murdered. And they had families who loved and cared about them.

    I don't know what "concern trolling" is, but if the first instinct regarding deaths such as these is national politics and who is going to be president, instead of empathy for the dead and their distraught families, I guess I am out of sorts here. Being a rather vengeful person by nature, I'd even understand the thirst for justice or even revenge against the perpetrator. But the first thought was about Donald Trump?

    I have had a high regard for Mr. Sailer's citizenism and his apparent concern for ALL Americans, but that kind of cold ideological calculation as first instinct caught me by surprise like a hidden blade.

    cold ideological calculation

    We’re all adults here and understand the loss that death (violent or otherwise) brings to survivors of the deceased. That is precisely Steve’s point about the crimes and the election: The callousness/perfidy of President Obama, candidate Clinton, and the media establishment helped instigate these atrocities. It’s no wonder that millions of peoples’ thoughts likely turned to the one candidate who could possibly turn around this madness.

    caught me by surprise like a hidden blade

    So you’re definitely Asian. Or at least have seen some samurai movies.

  78. @Twinkie

    This is a political blog – politics comes to mind.
     
    You know, I might just stop reading or commenting on blogs like this. Look, I am a pretty politicized person myself. Compared to most Americans, I am highly "ideological" ("radicalized" some would say), and politics is of considerate import to me.

    BUT, I do my best to step back from that kind of prism, and think about ordinary individuals who are caught up in these kinds of events and occurrences. Those officers weren't some amorphous entities. They didn't die fighting a political cause. They weren't some pawns in an ideological game. They were people - ordinary individuals who were just doing their jobs and were murdered. And they had families who loved and cared about them.

    I don't know what "concern trolling" is, but if the first instinct regarding deaths such as these is national politics and who is going to be president, instead of empathy for the dead and their distraught families, I guess I am out of sorts here. Being a rather vengeful person by nature, I'd even understand the thirst for justice or even revenge against the perpetrator. But the first thought was about Donald Trump?

    I have had a high regard for Mr. Sailer's citizenism and his apparent concern for ALL Americans, but that kind of cold ideological calculation as first instinct caught me by surprise like a hidden blade.

    “You know, I might just stop reading or commenting on blogs like this.”

    Oh, the drama! Our self proclaimed moral superior just can’t get any respect. Suck it up, Princess.

  79. According to this article, Chelsea Clinton does not have a snowball’s chance in hell of ever becoming a future U.S president because many people who used to work for the Clintons say that as a Human Being Chelsea is even more unlikable than her mother, which would make it extremely easy for any Republican to defeat her in a presidential election.
    http://www.breitbart.com/radio/2016/11/15/ed-klein-doubts-clinton-dynasty-carried-on-shoulders-chelsea/#disqus_thread

    The same Blacks who stayed at home and didn’t bother to vote for Crooked Hildabeast are not going to all of a sudden come out and vote for Chelsea.

    Chelsea does not have enough street cred to get Black voter turnout back to Barack Hussein Obama levels. Chelsea is also not going to attract a lot of White blue collar voters. Chelsea is definitely a bad investment. If Chelsea is the future of the party than The Democratic Party is screwed big time.

    • Replies: @sayless
    Chelsea is dumber than a hen. "I don't understand why people don't love my mom." It's good that she loves her mother, but really, she's how old, in her mid-to-late thirties? A fourteen-year-old would be able to distinguish between my mom and the candidate!
  80. @Jefferson
    "And at some point, the Democrats will wake up and realize that the demographic variable to look at is not ethnicity and identity, but class. At that point they will remember that class politics used to be their specialty."

    You are 100 percent wrong that The Democratic Party is going to ditch identity politics for class politics. That is why they are doubling down on identity by putting a Black Muslim (Keith Ellison) as the face of their party.

    That is why they are doubling down on identity by putting a Black Muslim (Keith Ellison) as the face of their party.

    If it is a done deal, then they’re done for.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    I would say that any shitlords who feel like starting the 2020 election early should be out there pushing Ellison as a viable candidate now. Shame any naysayers for their racism, Islamophobia etc. Use PC against them.
  81. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Shine a Light
    Trump had the huge advantage that, being free of wealthy donors and strict party loyalty, he was free to pick policies that would actually be popular with the American people. Of course any ol' loser politician can sell policies that help the average American, real political skill lies in the rare few who can sell political poison to the people on behalf of the oligarchs and make voters eagerly ingest it!

    So we have to hand it to Hillary for coming so close despite advocating for mass 3rd world immigration, yet more terrible trade deals, even more disastrous regime change in the Middle East all while winking at Black Lives Matter.

    Any lawyer can get an obviously innocent client off. A true genius of a lawyer is revealed when she sets a blatantly guilty client free.

    Trump’s freedom from party and donor loyalty allowed him to flirt with political queerness. If we make an analogy to gender studies, there are two categories of cis-political gender: Democrats/Liberals and Republicans/Conservatives. Just like with gender there is some flexibility in political gender identity. But stray too far out of your partisan sheep pen and incongruent readings--queerness--is the result.

    One interesting feature of Facebook is that I get to witness exactly how politically queer many of my working class friends from high school are. On the other hand most of my Ivy League friends are both cis-political to the extreme, and 100% intolerant to political ambiguity. Reading interviews with Steve Bannon shows him to be a total political queer. The equivalent of wearing purple to interviews in political queerness is intelligently quoting Marx in at least a neutral (if not positive) fashion. The guru of right-leaning political queerness is the French intellectual Alain de Benoist who in his 2013 speech to the NPI quoted Marx and promiscuously used Marxian concepts to further his points.

    And so Trump, despite all his rookie political mistakes, hugely benefited from his freedom to pick popular campaign themes. At the same time he had to signal his political queerness to all of us non cis-political people while still maintaining enough political gender coherence to get the cis-political GOP-types to vote for him as well. He managed to thread this political needle and now has 3-4 years to make Trumpism a new cis-political gender ideology.

    Good analysis. But unfortunately, the wealth (and celebrity: remember he was actually pretty chintzy with his abundant funds) that allowed Trump a political freedom unavailable to the donor-dependent could also prove his downfall.

    It’s seems to be shaping up that Trump isn’t willing to put his fortunes in a true blind trust. That could add up to serious trouble as 1.) one of his main arguments against Hillary was corruption and her use of public office for money-grubbing, and 2.) this is a fairly easy-to-understand opposition talking point that D’s will surely employ (and R’s will be loathe to defend against, especially if it looks like the so-called Trump Revolution has lost its steam and politics is returning to the normal R and D categories pre-Trump)

    Trump, it seems, may have to choose between a guaranteed money-elite future for him and his offspring or a chance to be a society-shaping historical figure. I strongly backed Trump through the campaign but I have my doubts if he has the vision to see what many in isteve land think his role could be or a willingness to possibly lose a big chunk of his fortune.

    • Replies: @Shine a Light
    Thanks!

    I agree that Trump's business is problematic but I have no doubt that by Inauguration Day he will have this sorted. The criticism of a President taking care of America's business while still involved with the Trump Organization is entirely merited.

    My sense is that Trump is allowing this tension to grow in order to crowd out more sensitive issues. But as always once we hit a critical point, Trump will relieve the pressure by announcing a solid separation plan.

    No new Trump Organization developments should start. Existing projects should be continued and finished. Projects that are in the very early stages of development would be best if they were cancelled. A blind trust should be create for Trump and his children. Trump can point out that his properties are subject to boycotts so his businesses are hardly profiting from his Presidency.

  82. @Whiskey
    Hillary very nearly won. As others pointed out, she won the popular vote and will do so by a couple of million. About 3 million of them illegals but they were still counted. And a few hundred thousand here and there in swing states and she'd have won the Electoral College and be hunting down the last few straight White men as we speak.

    What was the Schwerpunkt of the election was Hillary's insistence on absolute loyalty and obsequiousness over ability. Trump had people who could add two and two all day long, and still with the media, college educated White professional women, and non-Whites, Trump very nearly lost. A Black candidate like Obama would have won convincingly. Hillary is just manifestly incompetent on almost everything, like most Professional White women outside nursing and medicine and the hard sciences. [Where if you make a mistake, people die, quickly.]

    Many things helped Trump. The drip drip drip of Wikileaks, cumulatively bad for Hillary, pointing out her corruption and incompetence combined. Dallas, North Carolina, Ferguson, all made a difference. But the main point was Hillary's decades long unchanging incompetence.

    As for Democrats ever letting White men on the bus, never happen. The whole point of say, Colbert and John Stewart are to sneer at White people who work for a living. It fills a huge need for Democrats to view themselves as the saved, the predestined elite, against those who were born damned.

    Hillary very nearly won. As others pointed out, she won the popular vote and will do so by a couple of million. About 3 million of them illegals but they were still counted.

    Three million is highly unlikely. Where were these illegal alien votes racked up? California? New York City and Chicago? Houston? Florida? Donald Trump better have his people look into this intensively and publicize it. To counter the Dems propaganda of ill Hillary winning the popular vote.

    My take is at most 50-100 thousand illegals voted nationwide. If the three million illegal alien voters number is there, then Trump will use it to legitimize his Presidency. The Dems are working hard to de-legitimize it.

    • Replies: @TWS
    No. It's more than that. In my state every single, DMV, DSHS, Housing, etc person who contacts these folks has to ask them at every single encounter if they want to vote.

    Every single time even if you know they are illegals you have to ask them if they want to register to vote. Then you have to smile while they register to vote and send the form in.

    Many, many, many sign up. All of them are used by the democratic machine to fill in where they need to. Just like felon votes.
    , @Romanian
    http://www.vdare.com/articles/will-illegal-foreign-voters-steal-the-election

    6.4% of noncitizens voted in 2008 and 2.2% of noncitizens voted in 2010, according to Old Dominion University. Almost 1.2 million non-citizens turned out in 2008, many of them to vote for the Sainted One.

    How many do you think turned out this year, prodded from behind by the Dems and their partners, like Soros? To stop Hitler!


    Former Colorado Secretary of State Scott Gessler identified nearly 5,000 noncitizens in Colorado who voted in the 2010 general election. Gessler’s office uncovered upwards of 12,000 noncitizens registered to vote. Liberal groups who oppose stronger election system protections attacked him for trying to verify citizenship status—because God forbid public officials sworn to uphold the rule of law actually do anything to enhance the integrity of our election system!
    Compounding the problem: The militant immigration expansionist group Mi Familia Vota, connected with the Service Employees International Union, has ramped up its efforts in swing states to facilitate naturalization and registration of Latino voters who will promote the open-borders agenda at the polls.
    Another rare defender of American sovereignty, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, fought in court for his state’s right to require citizenship documents from people who register to vote at motor vehicle offices. Last month, a federal appeals court struck down the Kansas law despite the U.S. Constitution’s conferral of responsibility for determining who may vote to states.
    In a scene straight out of “Alice in Wonderland,” Kobach faced a contempt hearing for battling against those who hold contempt for truly free and fair elections. He was forced to sign an agreement with the ACLU allowing more than 18,000 motor-voter registrants to cast ballots this November while litigation continues.
    Last year, undercover investigative journalist James O’Keefe and his Project Veritas team blew the whistle on North Carolina political operatives who encouraged people to vote even if they were noncitizens. Like Kobach, O’Keefe endures attacks on his efforts to ensure clean elections by grievance-mongers screaming about phony voter “disenfranchisement.”
    Put on your shocked faces: These illegal noncitizen voters overwhelmingly supported Democrats. And their votes were enough to tilt the presidential election results in North Carolina to President Obama, along with handing over “Democratic victories in congressional races including a critical 2008 Senate race (Al Franken’s victory in Minnesota) that delivered for Democrats a 60-vote filibuster-proof majority in the Senate.”
    But J. Christian Adams, a former Justice Department election lawyer in the Voting Rights Section, has exposed the systemic assault on the election process at every level by activist groups funded by liberal billionaire George Soros, including:

    Blocking citizenship verification.
    Automatic voter registration of welfare recipients without local verification checks.
    Massive foreign language ballot expansion.
    Obstruction of efforts to include state qualification instructions on voter registration forms.

    This past week, the Public Interest Law Foundation uncovered thousands of foreign aliens registered to vote in swing states Virginia and Pennsylvania thanks to the federal Motor Voter law. [PDF]It’s the tip of the iceberg because the studies include just a small sample of counties.
    Oh, Virginia voters, you’ll be thrilled to know that your top election officials are now trying to cover up the true extent of the scandal. PILF noted that the commissioner of the Virginia Department of Elections issued a written guidance to local election officials instructing them “not to respond to our requests for records pertaining to non-citizen voters.”
     
    Bonus - refugees vetting themselves.
  83. @SnakeEyes
    I thought the Democrats/media released the Billy Bush/pussy-grabbing material too early. If that had been dropped the week before the election it could have done more damage. Somewhat like the GWB drunk driving bombshell. But they played their trumps too early and gave independent voters enough time to forget any misgivings that they had about Trump's character.

    Trump is getting a lot of credit for his campaign and victory but he had some serious unforced errors that he could have avoided while still remaining true to his defiant, iconclastic persona. For example, his debate performances were poor (first debate) to mediocre. He had to dig himself out of a few holes.

    The leaker of those tapes was likely Dan Senor, a neocon married to former CNN/NBC anchor Campbell Brown. The point of the leak was a coup in the GOP, designed to force Trump to resign from the ticket and be replaced with Paul Ryan.

    • Replies: @Jasper Been
    In that scenario they would have lost Wisconsin.
  84. Actually, I suspect what lost it for Democrats was the death of Scalia combined with the Left’s sudden enthusiasm for culture war mopping-up operations, i.e, going around the battlefield shooting enemy troops trying to surrender.

    Those twin factors probably focused the minds of a lot of religious conservatives who otherwise would have been sorely tempted to not vote, or even vote for Hillary. I still don’t think Democrats fully grasp just how terrified they’ve managed to make religious conservatives feel the past couple of years.

    Even if they did grasp it, I doubt they would care, because they think those Bible-thumping bigots deserve to suffer. Fine, but being so open about it turned out to be a major tactical error — not because those voters were ever going to become Democrats, but because having the religious vote locked down so tight gave Trump a lot more flexibility than GOP candidates have had in the past, and that flexibility gave him the freedom to push hard for voters that had traditionally been resistant to the GOP.

    Dems were undone by hubris. By subtly and not-so-subtly suggesting that Clinton’s election would inaugurate a new era of pogroms against Christians, they ended up with Trump — and now THEY are the ones scared of pogroms.

    • Replies: @Federalist
    "...the Left’s sudden enthusiasm for culture war mopping-up operations, i.e, going around the battlefield shooting enemy troops trying to surrender."

    This is a very good point. It seems like evangelical Christians supported Trump more than would otherwise be expected. Trump claims to be a Christian but I think most people find Trump's professed religious convictions questionable at best. He has been married three times. On the issue of sex morals, Trump is the opposite of what evangelicals would approve of. Trump was pro-choice at one time and his commitment to his current position is suspect. Trump is anti-PC but not really a culture warrior. Although it would appear that there would have been justifications for them to do so, I don't think most evangelicals took the "I just can't vote for a person like that" RINO position.

    The Left couldn't be happy with legalizing gay marriage. They have to crush all dissent. They destroy the businesses of bakers who don't want to make cakes for gay weddings. If Bruce Jenner pretends to be a woman, we are expected to treat him like a hero for his "bravery." If a state says that men can't pee in the women's restroom, big business boycotts and sporting events can't be held in that state. Opposing or even not outright celebrating the gay/trans stuff is grounds for destroying careers and reputations. Companies owned by religious people have to pay for birth control and abortions. Eventually, churches will have to pay for abortions and be required to perform same sex weddings. The American Left was already passively hostile to Christianity. Lately, it has been moving to outright persecution. Evangelical Christians see this.
  85. @Anon
    Some progs are saying identity politics got out of hand, and Democrats got distracted.

    I don't know if that was decisive, but the homo stuff really opened the pandora's box to all sorts of moronosities.

    https://www.facebook.com/militantchristianmedia/videos/272140256491368/

    There is the ugly and dark side of homo culture, but homos fine-tuned the art of creating nice 'creative' and stylish gentrified communities. And some homos were in elite institutions and knew the in's and out's of power. They learned how to be 'respectable'. Look at Peter Thiel and Tim Cook.
    Homos got so good at this that even many conservatives were won over.
    Homos were weird in their 'sexual' behavior but well-mannered and well-groomed.
    In WOLF OF WALL STREET, it's high class to have a 'gay butler'.

    But the problem with opening the homo pandora's box was that it gave green light to every abnormal 'identity', and this got even more out-of-control once trannies were celebrated too.
    With the 'culture war' have turned into 'culture warts and all', every freak slobbering for 15 min of fame got on the bandwagon.

    It's like if you leave food out for the squirrels, it will attract more than squirrels. Every critter and pest will come running to be fed too.

    Surely, many progs and homos wanted to say NO to such trashiness and craziness, but it would have them look hypocritical and non-inclusive. After all, if the 'new normal' is about accepting 'difference', then why should only homos get all the attention.

    It's like Woodstock was meant to be a well-managed peaceful concert but once the word got out about some hippie love-in, everyone came and trashed everything.

    And normalization of tattoos, piercings, and hair dyeing made identities even more ludicrous.

    It's one thing to have a real identity like Russian, Jewish, Mormon, Iranian, or whatever.
    But making up identities as you go along turns everything into a farce.

    Recently I read the Onion and it had no zing and edge. It was normal compared to the new reality... or no weirder.

    I think the events of last two yrs gave a shock to Pinker's theory of Better Devils of Our Nature.

    Not just in BLM-nutty America but in EU with massive invasions. Surely, deep in his heart, Pinker knows that the West cannot be sustained with massive influxes of Muslims and Africans.

    “And normalization of tattoos, piercings, and hair dyeing made identities even more ludicrous.”

    Blue states have a much higher percentage of White freaks than red states. Notice that most Whites with dreadlocks, green hair, blue hair, and goths & emos reside in blue states like Minnesota , Vermont Washington, Oregon, California, etc.

    Have you ever watched the film The Lost Boys which takes place in Santa Cruz, California? Look at the amount of White freaks you see at the beginning of the film.

  86. @jimmyriddle
    The racist attacks on Temple University students, a week before the election, must have had an effect in PA.

    The national media didn't report that much, if at all.

    http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/data.php?year=2016&fips=42&f=0&off=0&elect=0&def=swg&datatype=county

    The big swings in Pennsylvania were outside of the Philly metro area, it might not have been the tipping point.

    If the linked pattern holds, the GOP could win the Senate seat in 2018, as long as the candidate is the Santorum and not the Specter type.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Rural population has been growing in Pennsylvania. Also, eastern Pennsylvania has become a bedroom community for New Jerseyites trying to escape their own high property taxes, and this means Pennsylvania has been gaining migrants from New Jersey looking to buy a house in which to raise a family, and these people tend to vote more conservatively.

    Also, Philly and Pittsburgh are not particularly attractive cities in the mould of New York or Los Angeles, and it's difficult to make an argument in favor of liberalism when these are the two examples in front of your eyes. They're growing ever more like Detroit as time goes by. Also, both cities have had a recent influx of foreign-born residents in the last 5 years or so, and this may have rattled the natives, who view the intruders as competition for jobs.

    If you look at the breakdown, Hillary lost a combined total of 36,000 votes in these two cities compared to Obama in 2012, and Trump gained 14,000 votes over Romney. In a close election, shifts like these matter.
  87. @Dave Pinsen
    Michael Tracey calls Hillary an awful candidate too, but I agree with you that this is mostly hindsight bias. The truth is she was a polished and skilled debater, and a first class money-raiser.

    Hillary's biggest weakness wasn't herself but her platform. It's really hard to beat nationalism with globalism in a national election. I don't think Trump could have won on her platform either, despite what Scott Adams says.

    Michael Tracey calls Hillary an awful candidate too, but I agree with you that this is mostly hindsight bias. The truth is she was a polished and skilled debater, and a first class money-raiser.

    She is an awful speaker and debater. She is no better at raising money than I would have been if I were the Dems presidential candidate. It is more accurate to say that tens and hundreds of millions of dollars were showered on Illary and her campaign by Hollywood, Wall Street, lobbyists, trial lawyers, gay elites etc who were very concerned about getting a Dem into the White House. For crony capitalist reasons, for anti-Trump reasons, for emotional reasons.

  88. @Senator Brundlefly
    Not directly a specific turning point in the election cycle, but if others were like me, a turning point in how I viewed the world began with Trayvon Martin. Before Trayvon Martin, I didn't view the media as intentionally propagandish, just liberally biased because of the left wing nature of journalism schools. Trayvon Martin taught me that the media intentionally highlights insignificant police blotter stories to fabricate false narratives to ensure minority turnout in election years. Trayvon Martin taught me the disdain the left has for White Americans and the need for them to have us as the Goldstein of their narratives. Trayvon Martin taught me that its ok to pretend that a thug is a cherubic baby full of potential and that a civically inclined Peruvian Indian is some racist white Southerner so long as the lesson that white people are evil is hammered home. If others were like me, 2012 was the time to learn that the genteel conservatism that waxed about Enlightenment principles was out of its element in dealing with the cynical tribalism and power consolidation of the left. A part of me thinks others back then learned that lesson too, which, in addition to the steady drumbeat of Trayvon's equally preposterous sequels (Mike Brown etc.) led us to get behind a man like Trump. Conservatism got rude because we learned that deep down, no matter how polite and proper the left wanted it to look, the game of politics was dirty tribalism. We got all Colonel Kurtz and decided that its ok to write f*** on our airplanes. They think Trump is obscene? Well, they had made the whole game obscene!

    It’s precisely because of stuff like this that I am trying to segue out of my current media job into something else. It’s always been a liberal-leaning business, but the ultra-politicization trend is too much for me.

    One factor in all this has been the absolute bloodbath that the media has been experiencing at its lower levels, which has had the effect of placing media elites at places like The New York Times further out of touch with the rest of the country. In many cases, the elite media no longer has a network of local reporters and editors that it can turn to in order to make sense of things — folks who are on the scene and have a more nuanced view of the situation, and who can tell them, for example, “hey, you should probably lay off this Michael Brown thing — I know it looks one way to you sitting there in your office in downtown Manhattan, but there’s a lot going on there that you don’t know about.”

    It’s amusing to me that coastal liberals who have no problem diagnosing the failures of the Iraq War can’t see that they are prone to making the same stupid blunders in their cultural war against traditional America.

  89. @PiltdownMan

    That is why they are doubling down on identity by putting a Black Muslim (Keith Ellison) as the face of their party.
     
    If it is a done deal, then they're done for.

    I would say that any shitlords who feel like starting the 2020 election early should be out there pushing Ellison as a viable candidate now. Shame any naysayers for their racism, Islamophobia etc. Use PC against them.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Lurker, Hillary and to some extent, Bernie, had national identities. Ellison is who? to most people.
  90. @anon
    Good analysis. But unfortunately, the wealth (and celebrity: remember he was actually pretty chintzy with his abundant funds) that allowed Trump a political freedom unavailable to the donor-dependent could also prove his downfall.

    It's seems to be shaping up that Trump isn't willing to put his fortunes in a true blind trust. That could add up to serious trouble as 1.) one of his main arguments against Hillary was corruption and her use of public office for money-grubbing, and 2.) this is a fairly easy-to-understand opposition talking point that D's will surely employ (and R's will be loathe to defend against, especially if it looks like the so-called Trump Revolution has lost its steam and politics is returning to the normal R and D categories pre-Trump)

    Trump, it seems, may have to choose between a guaranteed money-elite future for him and his offspring or a chance to be a society-shaping historical figure. I strongly backed Trump through the campaign but I have my doubts if he has the vision to see what many in isteve land think his role could be or a willingness to possibly lose a big chunk of his fortune.

    Thanks!

    I agree that Trump’s business is problematic but I have no doubt that by Inauguration Day he will have this sorted. The criticism of a President taking care of America’s business while still involved with the Trump Organization is entirely merited.

    My sense is that Trump is allowing this tension to grow in order to crowd out more sensitive issues. But as always once we hit a critical point, Trump will relieve the pressure by announcing a solid separation plan.

    No new Trump Organization developments should start. Existing projects should be continued and finished. Projects that are in the very early stages of development would be best if they were cancelled. A blind trust should be create for Trump and his children. Trump can point out that his properties are subject to boycotts so his businesses are hardly profiting from his Presidency.

  91. @5371
    She exchanged some old fat hacks for young twink hacks, but she was just as much putty for her handlers in 2016 as in 2008. Also low energy.

    If she had Trump’s energy and campaign schedule and the same unpopular platform, she still would have lost.

  92. @J1234
    I have always said that Hillary's connection to black lives matter was going to cost her, big time. The problem was, she (in concert with blm) treated all of the blm associated cases as if they were carbon copies of each other, which was a very un-lawyerly thing to do. This was to pander to ghetto black emotion and fear, which isn't very often nuanced or discerning. Aside from involving typically irresponsible males from a dysfunctional American minority culture, the Michael Brown case and the Walter Scott case had very little to do with each other. Walter Scott was running away from a cop, while Michael Brown was charging a cop, trying to take his gun (presumably to shoot him.) Insinuating that every dead black guy in a blm case was equally innocent displayed Hillary's unjust notions about justice for the world to see.

    Yes, it's true - lots of internet conservatives (unfortunately) tried to portray all of the dead black guys as equally guilty, but they weren't running for president. Her demagoguery on this matter was way beyond anything Trump ever did, by a factor of five, but was never described by the MSM as such.

    OT, but as far as Trump saying he won't prosecute her on email stuff...I
    honestly believe (at this point) that he's saying these things to get beyond December 19th, when the Electoral College votes. The EC has never overturned election day results before, but this election has been like no other, so who knows? I think it's correct to be nice until then.

    Later on, he need only say that new evidence has emerged so that, reluctantly, he must restart investigations. It is also more useful simply not to pursue an investigation than to pardon, to keep the Clintons worried indefinitely. Or maybe he’s keen to shift the burden of a pardon on to Obama, where her name would doubtless appear amongst a roll of dishonour of appalling and undeniable crooks. Including, perhaps, Slick Willie himself.

  93. @G Pinfold
    This has been covered in half a dozen posts already. If Trump had been in a popular vote contest, he would have campaigned differently, and voters would have behaved differently.

    “voters would have behaved differently”: well, except the dead ones.

  94. @Anon
    There were several turning points, many of which happened years ago. Her main issue is that she's a third world politician. She has taken more money in pay-for-play (let's call it by its proper name-bribery) than anyone who has ever run for president. Grant's friends loaded up, but he himself stayed pretty clean. Harding's friends loaded up, and he may have loaded up a bit himself, but Harding also gave the country a booming economy in return. Hillary's crony Obama couldn't help her there.

    Hillary also had the complete backing of the media in a manner that's third world, too. The press in those countries is totally corrupt and partisan, and they don't have any ethical qualms about it. They are simply one big circle jerk sucking off their country's interbreeding elite and getting money and favors in return.

    She expected to get the job because she was the wife of an elite and it was 'her turn,' as if the office of the presidency was the sole possession of a small, corrupt oligarchy exactly the way it is in the third world.

    Finally, Hillary went in hard for third world factional politics. The non-Anglo Saxon old world and everything below the Texas border is run by factional politics. This is alien to the American mind. It's an old Anglo-Saxon tradition for its rulers to avoid taking sides and attempt to be above the fray. This tradition goes all the way back the medieval English monarchs. They understood themselves to be representing all the people in a manner that was unusually enlightened for their era.

    For example, French politics was divided up into the groups such as the Queen's party, the Dauphin's party, the Cardinal's party, the King's party, etc., each faction battling it out with each other. In nearly all countries today, you have either religious groups, or clans, tribes, or ethnic minorities who are fighting to be top dog and put everyone else down. All these countries accept this type of political behavior as normal, and they can't even imagine running their country any other way. But that's not how Anglo-Saxons see things, and that's not what Anglo-Saxons think is good for their country. Our American presidents inherited this sense of non-factionalism from their Anglo-Saxon culture, and for the most part, they've understood that factionalism is idiotic because it undermines a country's stability and leads to civil wars.

    Hillary is contemptuous--or stupidly ignorant--of this political tradition, and a lot of Americans sensed it and were wary of her. Her campaign was nothing but one big ugly attempt to whip up rage, resentment, and hatred among various factions and pit them against her chosen enemy. That, ultimately, is why she took a fall. She was an alien politician from Planet Third World, and she really honest-to-god despises most Americans. Especially now, since we've sent her packing.

    The Duchess of Omnium was defeated by Squire Trump.

  95. @Senator Brundlefly
    Not directly a specific turning point in the election cycle, but if others were like me, a turning point in how I viewed the world began with Trayvon Martin. Before Trayvon Martin, I didn't view the media as intentionally propagandish, just liberally biased because of the left wing nature of journalism schools. Trayvon Martin taught me that the media intentionally highlights insignificant police blotter stories to fabricate false narratives to ensure minority turnout in election years. Trayvon Martin taught me the disdain the left has for White Americans and the need for them to have us as the Goldstein of their narratives. Trayvon Martin taught me that its ok to pretend that a thug is a cherubic baby full of potential and that a civically inclined Peruvian Indian is some racist white Southerner so long as the lesson that white people are evil is hammered home. If others were like me, 2012 was the time to learn that the genteel conservatism that waxed about Enlightenment principles was out of its element in dealing with the cynical tribalism and power consolidation of the left. A part of me thinks others back then learned that lesson too, which, in addition to the steady drumbeat of Trayvon's equally preposterous sequels (Mike Brown etc.) led us to get behind a man like Trump. Conservatism got rude because we learned that deep down, no matter how polite and proper the left wanted it to look, the game of politics was dirty tribalism. We got all Colonel Kurtz and decided that its ok to write f*** on our airplanes. They think Trump is obscene? Well, they had made the whole game obscene!

    Trayvon Martin was certainly the man who red-pilled me. The British media covered the case in an even more dishonest manner than the American one, or so at least it seemed to me. It was then that I first realized that the media didn’t just spin and exaggerate, it created entirely false accounts of the world.

    • Replies: @Ed
    The media never spent much time on it but Dylan Roof said its the media's handling of the Trayvon case that drove him to race sites.

    That a dispute between two private citizens ended up being a marker for national race relations was a bridge too far for many.
  96. @Twinkie

    This is a political blog – politics comes to mind.
     
    You know, I might just stop reading or commenting on blogs like this. Look, I am a pretty politicized person myself. Compared to most Americans, I am highly "ideological" ("radicalized" some would say), and politics is of considerate import to me.

    BUT, I do my best to step back from that kind of prism, and think about ordinary individuals who are caught up in these kinds of events and occurrences. Those officers weren't some amorphous entities. They didn't die fighting a political cause. They weren't some pawns in an ideological game. They were people - ordinary individuals who were just doing their jobs and were murdered. And they had families who loved and cared about them.

    I don't know what "concern trolling" is, but if the first instinct regarding deaths such as these is national politics and who is going to be president, instead of empathy for the dead and their distraught families, I guess I am out of sorts here. Being a rather vengeful person by nature, I'd even understand the thirst for justice or even revenge against the perpetrator. But the first thought was about Donald Trump?

    I have had a high regard for Mr. Sailer's citizenism and his apparent concern for ALL Americans, but that kind of cold ideological calculation as first instinct caught me by surprise like a hidden blade.

    You’ve misunderstood. iSteve said that his the first thought was about Donald Trump, not that his first emotion or first instinct was about Trump.

  97. @Twinkie

    This is a political blog – politics comes to mind.
     
    You know, I might just stop reading or commenting on blogs like this. Look, I am a pretty politicized person myself. Compared to most Americans, I am highly "ideological" ("radicalized" some would say), and politics is of considerate import to me.

    BUT, I do my best to step back from that kind of prism, and think about ordinary individuals who are caught up in these kinds of events and occurrences. Those officers weren't some amorphous entities. They didn't die fighting a political cause. They weren't some pawns in an ideological game. They were people - ordinary individuals who were just doing their jobs and were murdered. And they had families who loved and cared about them.

    I don't know what "concern trolling" is, but if the first instinct regarding deaths such as these is national politics and who is going to be president, instead of empathy for the dead and their distraught families, I guess I am out of sorts here. Being a rather vengeful person by nature, I'd even understand the thirst for justice or even revenge against the perpetrator. But the first thought was about Donald Trump?

    I have had a high regard for Mr. Sailer's citizenism and his apparent concern for ALL Americans, but that kind of cold ideological calculation as first instinct caught me by surprise like a hidden blade.

    “They weren’t some pawns in an ideological game.”

    I agree that they had no intention of becoming such pawns, but Hillary’s and Obama’s comments after their murders made them into such pawns, whether they–or we–liked it or not.

    “first thought”

    I assume Steve meant “first political thought”. For the economy of the writing, he left out the word “political” because this is after all a heavily political blog so it would be verbose and redundant to keep labeling everything as “political”.

    • Replies: @ic1000
    Twinkie, please consider "Almost Missouri's" explanation of "first political thought." I hope you keep commenting.
  98. @5371
    She exchanged some old fat hacks for young twink hacks, but she was just as much putty for her handlers in 2016 as in 2008. Also low energy.

    She’s low energy because she’s an invalid. I still hope she’ll be convicted of something and then plead that her ill health should spare her from prison. At that point Trump could pardon her.

  99. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @ben tillman

    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That’s disappointing, Mr. Sailer.
     
    This is ridiculous moral preening. Sadness for oneself (or other self-referential emotion) naturally and understandably comes before emotion for others. It's involuntary.

    None of us knew any of the officers shot that day. Their suffering was completely abstract from our perspective. Even here in Dallas, I can't name a single one of the victims, though I can tell you the name of the DPD officer who died 43 years ago today: J.D. Tippit.

    53 years, actually. But since you brought it up, the J.D. Tippit murder remains unresolved. Whoever or whatever you may think “Oswald” was, he simply could not have walked to the Tippit site in time to have pulled the trigger.
    The Dallas Police Dispatch transcript clearly has a notation that in the middle of the reaction to the Tippit shooting, the time was noted as “1:10”. The Warren Commission had to blatantly fudge the time to get “Oswald” there.

    To go from 1026 N. Beckley to just east of the intersection of 10th and Patton required that “Oswald” get a ride. And, as Earlene Roberts told the FBI, a Dallas PD patrol car pulled up at 1026 N. Beckley just at 1:00 and paused, simultaneous with “Oswald’s” brief stop there. She last saw “Oswald” standing on the sidewalk, as if waiting for a ride.

    To this day, the identity of the Dallas PD officer/s in that car at 1026 N. Beckley remain unknown. Their immediate presence in “Oswald’s” vicinity at a time when he was officially unknown to the DPD should be deeply troubling to all civic-minded Americans.

    Whatever happened in Dallas on 11/22/63 remains unknown. No honest, full search for the unvarnished truth has ever really taken place by the government.

  100. @Andra
    But he got clocked in the popular vote - it may turn out that she wins by an unconscionable two percentage points, and she did very well for a Democrat in Texas. A Rose Bowl of votes in three states and the entire post election narrative would be different. Sometimes things are about chance and there is no great lesson to be learned.

    right, mass immigration is why
    – she got more votes in California
    – she got less elsewhere

  101. @Lugash
    North Carolina was nothing compared to the San Bernadino and Pulse nightclub massacres.

    I happened to be in Orlando in the aftermath of the Pulse nightclub massacre. It was strange and a little creepy how rapidly and effectively the local media had turned the biggest mass murder in US history–a train wreck of competing Democrat client groups–into a story about flowers and teddy bears and mourning of our [sic] departed brothers and friends. It was in the news every single day, but only in the most saccharine and unreal way. If any of the locals were capable of drawing a larger lesson from the massacre, they weren’t saying so publicly.

    The only people I heard who had anything much to say about the attack were a few Nice White Ladies® who explained their plans to turn the ad hoc memorials into a government funded museum for all eternity.

    Perhaps part of the reason is that Florida is to a much greater extent than other states a set of disparate subcultures and interest groups. Compared to Iowa or New Hampshire or even South Carolina or New York, Florida is a state full of narrow constituencies sitting cheek by jowl with each other but having very little real interconnection among one another. As a result, the common denominator for anything that crosses constituencies, e.g., news media, is very low indeed.

    Steve has written before about how Florida Hispanics are not really the monolith that remote editorialists in NYC presume them to be: Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Venezuelans and Brazilians not only do not view themselves as uniform, they don’t even share a language. But that’s just the beginning of it. Among the Anglos there are middle American worker bees, down at their heels trailer trash, snowbirding plutocrats, and climate-changed retirees. And then these subdivide even further: Jews, various stripes of gentiles, etc. A very large portion of Floridians are really from somewhere else and their interests and affections lie in that elsewhere.

    • Replies: @Spotted Toad
    A friend of mine, a Miami Cuban, went into a monologue on this point once- "The Jacksonville Ghetto, the panhandle rednecks, the rich Jews in West Palm Beach, el barrio and Little Haiti down south- what brings us together? Mickey, really. We all hate each other but we all love the Mouse."
  102. @Twinkie

    This is a political blog – politics comes to mind.
     
    You know, I might just stop reading or commenting on blogs like this. Look, I am a pretty politicized person myself. Compared to most Americans, I am highly "ideological" ("radicalized" some would say), and politics is of considerate import to me.

    BUT, I do my best to step back from that kind of prism, and think about ordinary individuals who are caught up in these kinds of events and occurrences. Those officers weren't some amorphous entities. They didn't die fighting a political cause. They weren't some pawns in an ideological game. They were people - ordinary individuals who were just doing their jobs and were murdered. And they had families who loved and cared about them.

    I don't know what "concern trolling" is, but if the first instinct regarding deaths such as these is national politics and who is going to be president, instead of empathy for the dead and their distraught families, I guess I am out of sorts here. Being a rather vengeful person by nature, I'd even understand the thirst for justice or even revenge against the perpetrator. But the first thought was about Donald Trump?

    I have had a high regard for Mr. Sailer's citizenism and his apparent concern for ALL Americans, but that kind of cold ideological calculation as first instinct caught me by surprise like a hidden blade.

    Perhaps I should add that you are one of my preferred commenters, so I don’t want you to stop commenting.

  103. @Senator Brundlefly
    Not directly a specific turning point in the election cycle, but if others were like me, a turning point in how I viewed the world began with Trayvon Martin. Before Trayvon Martin, I didn't view the media as intentionally propagandish, just liberally biased because of the left wing nature of journalism schools. Trayvon Martin taught me that the media intentionally highlights insignificant police blotter stories to fabricate false narratives to ensure minority turnout in election years. Trayvon Martin taught me the disdain the left has for White Americans and the need for them to have us as the Goldstein of their narratives. Trayvon Martin taught me that its ok to pretend that a thug is a cherubic baby full of potential and that a civically inclined Peruvian Indian is some racist white Southerner so long as the lesson that white people are evil is hammered home. If others were like me, 2012 was the time to learn that the genteel conservatism that waxed about Enlightenment principles was out of its element in dealing with the cynical tribalism and power consolidation of the left. A part of me thinks others back then learned that lesson too, which, in addition to the steady drumbeat of Trayvon's equally preposterous sequels (Mike Brown etc.) led us to get behind a man like Trump. Conservatism got rude because we learned that deep down, no matter how polite and proper the left wanted it to look, the game of politics was dirty tribalism. We got all Colonel Kurtz and decided that its ok to write f*** on our airplanes. They think Trump is obscene? Well, they had made the whole game obscene!

    Trayvon was my wake-up call as well. Someone selectively edited the 911 tape, someone photoshopped Trayvon to make him look younger and more innocent, a lot of someones pushed a totally false narrative and blocked out all truth. It could no longer be explained away as “just a coincidence” or “the media just want ratings and money!” bs.

    How any White person can still be asleep after Facedown Mike Brown, BLM, and the never-ending string of ever more preposterous dindu happenings is beyond me.

  104. @Whiskey
    Hillary very nearly won. As others pointed out, she won the popular vote and will do so by a couple of million. About 3 million of them illegals but they were still counted. And a few hundred thousand here and there in swing states and she'd have won the Electoral College and be hunting down the last few straight White men as we speak.

    What was the Schwerpunkt of the election was Hillary's insistence on absolute loyalty and obsequiousness over ability. Trump had people who could add two and two all day long, and still with the media, college educated White professional women, and non-Whites, Trump very nearly lost. A Black candidate like Obama would have won convincingly. Hillary is just manifestly incompetent on almost everything, like most Professional White women outside nursing and medicine and the hard sciences. [Where if you make a mistake, people die, quickly.]

    Many things helped Trump. The drip drip drip of Wikileaks, cumulatively bad for Hillary, pointing out her corruption and incompetence combined. Dallas, North Carolina, Ferguson, all made a difference. But the main point was Hillary's decades long unchanging incompetence.

    As for Democrats ever letting White men on the bus, never happen. The whole point of say, Colbert and John Stewart are to sneer at White people who work for a living. It fills a huge need for Democrats to view themselves as the saved, the predestined elite, against those who were born damned.

    That she very nearly won is key. As darkness rolls around and Clinton pours back her 4th scotch and soda, her flickering consciousness can ruminate on the 50 or 100 things that done differently or handled differently or successfully suppressed might very well have pushed her over the line. SO much room for regret!

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    David, A few weeks ago I commented that regrets are the abrasive that wear you down. Hillary must be worn smooth by now.
  105. @Almost Missouri
    I happened to be in Orlando in the aftermath of the Pulse nightclub massacre. It was strange and a little creepy how rapidly and effectively the local media had turned the biggest mass murder in US history--a train wreck of competing Democrat client groups--into a story about flowers and teddy bears and mourning of our [sic] departed brothers and friends. It was in the news every single day, but only in the most saccharine and unreal way. If any of the locals were capable of drawing a larger lesson from the massacre, they weren't saying so publicly.

    The only people I heard who had anything much to say about the attack were a few Nice White Ladies® who explained their plans to turn the ad hoc memorials into a government funded museum for all eternity.

    Perhaps part of the reason is that Florida is to a much greater extent than other states a set of disparate subcultures and interest groups. Compared to Iowa or New Hampshire or even South Carolina or New York, Florida is a state full of narrow constituencies sitting cheek by jowl with each other but having very little real interconnection among one another. As a result, the common denominator for anything that crosses constituencies, e.g., news media, is very low indeed.

    Steve has written before about how Florida Hispanics are not really the monolith that remote editorialists in NYC presume them to be: Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Venezuelans and Brazilians not only do not view themselves as uniform, they don't even share a language. But that's just the beginning of it. Among the Anglos there are middle American worker bees, down at their heels trailer trash, snowbirding plutocrats, and climate-changed retirees. And then these subdivide even further: Jews, various stripes of gentiles, etc. A very large portion of Floridians are really from somewhere else and their interests and affections lie in that elsewhere.

    A friend of mine, a Miami Cuban, went into a monologue on this point once- “The Jacksonville Ghetto, the panhandle rednecks, the rich Jews in West Palm Beach, el barrio and Little Haiti down south- what brings us together? Mickey, really. We all hate each other but we all love the Mouse.”

  106. I first became aware of the Trumpening when posts from the Donald started showing up on the front page of Reddit. Anyone who can subvert such a Leftist site must be a political genius.

  107. @Almost Missouri

    "They weren’t some pawns in an ideological game."
     
    I agree that they had no intention of becoming such pawns, but Hillary's and Obama's comments after their murders made them into such pawns, whether they--or we--liked it or not.

    "first thought"
     
    I assume Steve meant "first political thought". For the economy of the writing, he left out the word "political" because this is after all a heavily political blog so it would be verbose and redundant to keep labeling everything as "political".

    Twinkie, please consider “Almost Missouri’s” explanation of “first political thought.” I hope you keep commenting.

  108. @Anon
    There was no single turning point.

    I think this was like a marathon where Hillary just didn't have the stamina despite all the steroid injections, help from the sidelines, and stuff thrown in front of Trump.

    Trump came from behind and passed her in the final lap and won.

    In a race, some runners try to remain out in from the start.

    Some runners remain behind and wait for the right timing near the end to turn on all the pistons.

    Trump's final ad was effective, and Hillary just lost steam due to over-confidence and lost momentum because Comey-Wiener jumped out to grab her.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cx1TDFV5Vhk

    Trump's victory was like Billy Mills in the 10,000 m race. His final sprint did it.

    https://youtu.be/5F5iCsymMj0?t=2m40s

    Agreed that there wasn’t a turning point. Hillary was a terrible candidate from the outset. Her scapegoating a video for the Benghazi 9/11 attack ruined her as a credible candidate for any position of power.

    If there was a turning point, it may have been when Trump wouldn’t say he would accept the election results (unless he won). That may have resulted in a suppression of vote tampering in precincts less under Democrat Party control.

  109. @Anonymous
    Agree. We are ultimately doomed. We only got a 4-year stay of execution. Most of the white people around me were ardent HRC supporters (Boston area) are like Pauline Kael x 10.

    Your assuming that Trump is not going to be a plus for employment and wage increases. Why wouldn’t it appeal to the minorities who are actual producers? The exit polls show Trump had big gains amongst poc relative to the previous two republican losers. Wasn’t the wall and deportations going to be a preemptive strike before they become democratic voters?

  110. @G Pinfold
    Dallas and other similar events tempered the resolve of the silent Trump voters. I say 'silent' because 'shy Trump voters' does not capture the anger and alienation.

    “I say ‘silent’ because ‘shy Trump voters’ does not capture the anger and alienation.”

    Doesn’t even begin to. Nor has a Trump victory lessened that anger and alienation. Instead the vile response of the left has increased and deepened them.

    Ceterum censeo.

    • Replies: @iffen
    Nor has a Trump victory lessened that anger and alienation.

    Disagree with this, optimism and hope can trump anger and alienation.
  111. @Whiskey
    Hillary very nearly won. As others pointed out, she won the popular vote and will do so by a couple of million. About 3 million of them illegals but they were still counted. And a few hundred thousand here and there in swing states and she'd have won the Electoral College and be hunting down the last few straight White men as we speak.

    What was the Schwerpunkt of the election was Hillary's insistence on absolute loyalty and obsequiousness over ability. Trump had people who could add two and two all day long, and still with the media, college educated White professional women, and non-Whites, Trump very nearly lost. A Black candidate like Obama would have won convincingly. Hillary is just manifestly incompetent on almost everything, like most Professional White women outside nursing and medicine and the hard sciences. [Where if you make a mistake, people die, quickly.]

    Many things helped Trump. The drip drip drip of Wikileaks, cumulatively bad for Hillary, pointing out her corruption and incompetence combined. Dallas, North Carolina, Ferguson, all made a difference. But the main point was Hillary's decades long unchanging incompetence.

    As for Democrats ever letting White men on the bus, never happen. The whole point of say, Colbert and John Stewart are to sneer at White people who work for a living. It fills a huge need for Democrats to view themselves as the saved, the predestined elite, against those who were born damned.

    Stop being such a defeatist. The popular vote means nothing which is why it is not even mentioned in the Constitution. Stop falling for the media’s propaganda that somehow Trump did not win because of the popular vote.

    Consider:

    1) She received over 1 million more votes than Trump in just Cook County, IL (Chicago land)!!! Just one county almost explains her entire popular vote lead. Take that away and she loses the 20 EVs of Illinois and her popular vote lead is severely reduced.

    2) Any reasonable person knows illegals voted. And not just in CA.

    3) Trumped helped carry the down ticket GOP candidates. Take Missouri, where Trump won the state by over 500K votes. Not only is that exceptional, note McCain only beat Obama by a couple thousand, but all of Missouri’s statewide GOP candidates won as well. From its Senate race to Governor, Lt Govenor, Treasurer, etc. It’s the first time the GOP has won every statewide race, ever!

    4) Trump’s coattails helped in other states too. Which is why the GOP is keeping the House and Senate. That alone is more telling than who won the popular vote.

    5) It’s why the GOP maintains 33 of the 50 governor’s mansions and most state legislatures.

    6) The dems only have 5 states of 50 where they control the legislature and the governor’s office.

    7) The democrats are a regional party and this election proved it.

    Stop apologizing for winning. Trump won big by the rules and he showed the future for a winning nationalistic/patriotic ticket by linking the Midwest, South and now the Great Lakes. If the GOP and other defeatists allow Trump to enact much of what he campaigned on, he can sew up this coalition for years to come.

    So stop falling for this media BS about the popular vote.

    • Replies: @International Jew

    5) It’s why the GOP maintains 33 of the 50 governor’s mansions and most state legislatures.
     
    As a Californian, that's really really surreal!
    , @gda
    The "popular vote" meme is the plaintive cry of the loser.

    Of the more than 5,000 counties in the US, Hillary won 300. Essentially, a sea of red, with the exception (mainly) of a few major cities.

    I am reminded of the experiments done with rats regarding the implications of living in overcrowded circumstances (such as inner cities). The scientists found that, if you put too many rats in too small an area, not only do they start to eat each other, but they invariably start to vote Democrat.

    Food for thought indeed.
  112. @Andra
    But he got clocked in the popular vote - it may turn out that she wins by an unconscionable two percentage points, and she did very well for a Democrat in Texas. A Rose Bowl of votes in three states and the entire post election narrative would be different. Sometimes things are about chance and there is no great lesson to be learned.

    How can a vote margin be “unconscionable”? Was the margin unethical or immoral? Not trying to be a grammar cop but that word is absurd in this context. Leftists like the word as in unconscionable profits or unconscionable tax cuts, etc.

  113. @ben tillman

    There was a score of reasons in each election that McCain should have beaten Obama....
     
    I challenge you to name just one.

    He was not a Left wing radical who associated with domestic terrorists, possibly foreign terrorists/sympathizers, and various and sundry anti-American movements and persons.

    Whom did you vote for in 2008?

  114. @Andra
    But he got clocked in the popular vote - it may turn out that she wins by an unconscionable two percentage points, and she did very well for a Democrat in Texas. A Rose Bowl of votes in three states and the entire post election narrative would be different. Sometimes things are about chance and there is no great lesson to be learned.

    Let’s think about this: (1) Trump was outspent by about five-to-one; (2) This was primarily because (a) Trump relied on small donations from ordinary folks, his personal fortune, and one big bucks donor, Sheldon Adelson, a long-time personal friend and business associate and (b) Clinton got most of her campaign cash from the usual pay-to-play, big bucks donors; (3) All the major news and entertainment outlets were totally in the bag for Clinton including fixing the presidential debttes and spiking anti-Clinton stories that should have been front page news; (4) all the nation’s establishments worked actively for Clinton and against Trump, even that of his own party; (5) Trump’s campaign was so ad hoc that it was a running joke for prog commenters, SNL, the Onion, etc., while Clinton’s was a long-stranding, finely honed political machine.

    Despite this, Trump ran neck-to-neck with Clinton across most of the country, swamped her in all but the largest urban agglomerations, and won an overwhelming victory in the Electoral College.

    I don’t think it is unfair to speculate that in an election characterized by honest and unbiased reporting by the MSM Trump might well have won 60%-40% or better in the popular vote.

  115. anon • Disclaimer says:

    I wonder what planet the Clinton campaign was/is living on. Those brain-dead tweets were way more ridiculous than anything Trump posted.

    I was listening to NPR yesterday and they had David Brock on saying (paraphrased), “people are talking about how we need to engage white middle-class voters–and we do–but no one’s talking about white resentment, racism, sexism…”

    Yeah guys, keep going, THAT’S what this year’s election was missing: hectoring identity politics “conversations.”

  116. @Twinkie

    you’re moralising and imputing here like those fake progressives do
     
    I understand the distaste at the often hypocritical and inane "moralizing" that leftists do, but that doesn't make attempting to keep some semblance of civilized morality alive in any discussion, politics or otherwise, "fake."

    This is one of my major problems with some elements in the so-called alt-right. They seem to obsess about lampooning* and destroying their enemies, closing ranks around their tribe, and achieving power - not trying to build a harmonious and just society for all. Like leftist activists, it's always a war on the Other.

    To believe otherwise - to inject "moral preening" - seems to invite distasteful ad hominem labels such as "cuck" et al.

    *Sebastian Junger makes an excellent point in "Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging" that the kind of contempt that politically opposed Americans express toward each other is extremely jarring to returning veterans and contributes to their sense of broken community and alienation from the society which they served.

    ‘Lampooning and destroying their enemies’…. my God man. Where and the hell have you been residing for the last 50 years? The left are doing whatever they can to do away wth the good guys. Even boasting about the changing demographics and your concerned with what???? Your a clown.

  117. @Random Dude on the Internet
    I'd say it was when he refused to back down from his immigration ideas during the summer of 2015. His poll numbers went from about 6% to over 20% in the span of just two weeks (per RCP averages) when he held firm on immigration, overtaking the lukewarm Jeb, who nobody was excited to see run.

    It's also worth reminiscing about the primaries. Remember when Carly Fiorina of all people was supposed to be the one to take down Donald Trump? Good times.

    Remember when Carly Fiorina of all people was supposed to be the one to take down Donald Trump?

    Not an unreasonable assumption at the time. After all she took down Hewlett-Packard.

    • LOL: Jim Don Bob
  118. @Andra
    But he got clocked in the popular vote - it may turn out that she wins by an unconscionable two percentage points, and she did very well for a Democrat in Texas. A Rose Bowl of votes in three states and the entire post election narrative would be different. Sometimes things are about chance and there is no great lesson to be learned.

    She still hasn’t won a majority of eligible voters.

    You can spin elections in many different ways.

  119. @Jefferson
    "Might NOT take celebrities seriously is what I meant to say."

    What I learned from this election is that some celebrities who were rumored to be Conservatives are not Conservative at all. I am talking about celebrities like Patricia Heaton, Robert Downey Jr. and Jon Cryer who all announced that they voted for Crooked Hildabeast. Before this election they were all rumored to be closet Republicans.

    Downey resides other closets. None of which have anything to do with politics.

  120. @theo the kraut
    I like your comments here and at Razib's mostly, but you're moralising and imputing here like those fake progressives do, not good at all.

    > Sadness for the officers and their families didn’t come to mind first?
    > Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?

    Do you honestly expect anyone here except tiny duck et al not to feel that? When things like that happen lots of things happen in your mind in split seconds, sometimes even conflicting ones, maybe Steve thought about the political implications first or he just chose it as a rhetorical or journalistic device for pertinent reasons. You're choosing the most unkind interpretation possible to preen morally, humbling others and exalting yourself. We all are funny sometimes, so just say that you're sorry and let's forget about this.

    I agree. As an example, after the massacre at the Sandy Hook school in December 2012, I’m sure Obama felt genuine grief and horror, as did we all. However, I’m also sure that in that same moment Obama thought, “This is the ideal time to ram through my gun control agenda, now that the election has passed.”

    That sounds like a cynical thing to say but I’m certain it was the case.

  121. @NickG
    Speaking as a Brit, who toggles between the UK and South Africa, I thought he may well win about the time he took out 'low-energy', Jeb Bush who looked like a deer in the headlights.

    It's been the most entertaining election ever; it still causes me to spontaneously chortle. I don't think there was any one incident after that.

    I realised early on he isn't nearly as stupid as the great and good would have us believe and that he is a tremendous communicator. No 'normal' candidate could have smashed through the establishment - the bubble - to borrow from Mencius Moldbug - The Cathedral. Prevailing against not just the Democratic Party, but the Republican Party establishment, most of the press, phalanxes of virtue signalling celebrities, foreign political leaders - including much of the UK Tory party. Trump's work rate is just incredible and he has far more honed communication intuitions than most of us.

    It was clear that Trump was connecting at his rallies in a whole new way and that much of the great and good couldn't see what was happening - they still can't. Given the massive opprobrium and the recent UK shy Tory effect, and earlier this year the shy Brexiter effect, the shy -Trumper being worth a few points on the polls seemed likely. So his win was no surprise or shock.

    I thought he may well win about the time he took out ‘low-energy’, Jeb Bush who looked like a deer in the headlights.

    I agree with this entirely. When Trump ripped Jeb to shreds, I said to myself “He’s the only candidate willing to do this to Hillary, and that’s what it’s going to take to win.”

    Aside from that it’s hard to identify a “turning point” because the polls and the media coverage were so blatantly rigged. When ABC News was reporting a 12-point lead for Clinton 10 days before the election, I was screaming at the television that it was a lie. I was right.

  122. @celt darnell
    The thing I found most interesting about the whole Black Lives Matter thing is how it suddenly and completely disappeared from the radar in the last six weeks of the campaign.

    Almost as if it were hurting Hillary or something.

    But that's just crazy talk...

    I read that in August BLM leaders took a public position in support of the Palestinians, and they lost a lot of Jewish support on account of that.

  123. @celt darnell
    The thing I found most interesting about the whole Black Lives Matter thing is how it suddenly and completely disappeared from the radar in the last six weeks of the campaign.

    Almost as if it were hurting Hillary or something.

    But that's just crazy talk...

    “Is there any point to which you would wish to draw my attention?’

    ‘To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time.’

    ‘The dog did nothing in the night-time.’

    ‘That was the curious incident,’ remarked Sherlock Holmes.”

    • Agree: celt darnell
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    I think the images of people trapped on the Charlotte freeway with burning cars and the diverse looting trucks scared a lot of people. I am sure it helped gun sales.
  124. @Marie
    It was not part of their blood,
    It came to them very late,
    With long arrears to make good,
    When the Saxon began to hate.

    They were not easily moved,
    They were icy -- willing to wait
    Till every count should be proved,
    Ere the Saxon began to hate.

    Their voices were even and low.
    Their eyes were level and straight.
    There was neither sign nor show
    When the Saxon began to hate.

    It was not preached to the crowd.
    It was not taught by the state.
    No man spoke it aloud
    When the Saxon began to hate.

    It was not suddently bred.
    It will not swiftly abate.
    Through the chilled years ahead,
    When Time shall count from the date
    That the Saxon began to hate.

    If only that were truth and not merely pretty rhyme.

  125. One of the things that Trump did that I really appreciated was trash the reputation of George W. Bush. The messes “W” made while in office seemed destined to damage the Republican band for several election cycles. By denouncing the Iraq invasion as a disaster, Trump put W behind us. One of the things that irritates me about Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity is that they still defend the W legacy. It deserves no defense.

    I also LOVED, LOVED, LOVED that Trump refused to treat McCain as some kind of exalted hero, above all reproach. (Now if only that tiresome hack Rep John Lewis would get the same treatment.)

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    One of the things that Trump did that I really appreciated was trash the reputation of George W. Bush. The messes “W” made while in office seemed destined to damage the Republican band for several election cycles.

    The funny thing is that it didn't damage Republicans for very long. Aside from not being in the White House, the Republican Party did phenomenally well while Obama was president. In the states the GOP is stronger than ever.

    I think the major reason for that is the Tea Party movement. Hated as it was by the RINOs, the Tea Party made it clear to the voters that there was a very large contingent of Republicans disgusted with the GOP Establishment and interested in real reform.

  126. I don’t think it can be pinpointed to one event exactly. I think it was the reaction of the elites to a series of events that occurred both in the US and abroad, that led many people to believe the globalists do have their own agenda, which is not in their best interests. There was Merkel’s open door policy in August, 2015 that probably shook a lot of people, even if they didn’t express it openly. There were numerous terrorist attacks by Islamists in France, Germany and on US soil. Hillary, Obama and co. could not even mention the words Islamic terrorism for fear of upsetting their base support, it back fired.

  127. @Jefferson
    According to this article, Chelsea Clinton does not have a snowball's chance in hell of ever becoming a future U.S president because many people who used to work for the Clintons say that as a Human Being Chelsea is even more unlikable than her mother, which would make it extremely easy for any Republican to defeat her in a presidential election.
    http://www.breitbart.com/radio/2016/11/15/ed-klein-doubts-clinton-dynasty-carried-on-shoulders-chelsea/#disqus_thread

    The same Blacks who stayed at home and didn't bother to vote for Crooked Hildabeast are not going to all of a sudden come out and vote for Chelsea.

    Chelsea does not have enough street cred to get Black voter turnout back to Barack Hussein Obama levels. Chelsea is also not going to attract a lot of White blue collar voters. Chelsea is definitely a bad investment. If Chelsea is the future of the party than The Democratic Party is screwed big time.

    Chelsea is dumber than a hen. “I don’t understand why people don’t love my mom.” It’s good that she loves her mother, but really, she’s how old, in her mid-to-late thirties? A fourteen-year-old would be able to distinguish between my mom and the candidate!

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Ed Klein says here (http://www.breitbart.com/radio/2016/11/15/ed-klein-doubts-clinton-dynasty-carried-on-shoulders-chelsea/#disqus_thread) that Chelsea is an even bigger bitch than her mother.
  128. I think that, to the extent there was a “turning point,” it was Hillary’s “Basket of Deplorables” speech. Voters will forgive a lots of things, but demeaning a large portion of the voters, especially to a large group of rich people, is one they have a hard time ever forgiving. It makes them wonder what they really say and think about you. I could imagine some not-insignificant number of white women who were leaning towards Hillary seeing that speech and thinking of their Trump-supporting husbands, fathers, or sons, and changing their minds. You didn’t have to be there. It wasn’t some real or alleged attack on a journalist or a cripple or another politician. It was a mean, nasty attack on any of your loved ones who was sympathetic to Trump. Blood is Thicker Than Water, Part 8,563,124,796. The scary people are those who weren’t bothered by that comment.

    Outside of that I think 4-5 other events were huge. The first was his campaign announcement critical of Mexican illegals. It signalled he was serious about enforcement, and willing to be attacked from “polite folks” in order to back it up. Then came the murder of Kate Steinle (in a sanctuary city) by a previously deported illegal just two weeks later, on July 1. It made him look prophetic. His words were still think in the air when Steinle was killed.

    The second was the Christmas-time San Bernardino Attack which, again, had been preceded by Trump calling for a Muslim “registry,” again making him look prophetic. After the attacks he doubled down on his critique of Muslims, which made him look strong.

    The third was the attack in Dallas, which was the climax of the whole Democrat-supported Black Lives Matter riots. I don’t recall Trump making too much hay about them, which may have helped from inciting the black vote to get out on election day, but it certainly registered in the minds of a lot of voters.

    And the final event was the Pulse nightclub attacks in Orlando on June 12, almost a year to the day after Trump announce his candidacy. The terrorist murdered 49 people, most of whom were gay and Latino. “Oh, you mean this Coalition of the Fringes murders its own?” Yep.

    All of those events together painted a picture of a country careening off the tracks and the elites refusing to acknowledge. Hillary’s fine with it so long as her bank account keeps growing and she can keep hanging out with Jon Bon Jovi and the cast of “Hamilton.”

    I’ve already noted that Orange County FL and San Bernardino County CA actually voted about 3.5% less for Trump than for Romney. That’s kind of what we’ve come to expect in Diverse Cosmopolitan America, but you can bet that lots of people in the rest of America noticed.

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    I think that, to the extent there was a “turning point,” it was Hillary’s “Basket of Deplorables” speech. Voters will forgive a lots of things, but demeaning a large portion of the voters, especially to a large group of rich people, is one they have a hard time ever forgiving.
     
    Do you see a similarity between that and Romney's "47%" comment?
  129. @Twinkie

    This is a political blog – politics comes to mind.
     
    You know, I might just stop reading or commenting on blogs like this. Look, I am a pretty politicized person myself. Compared to most Americans, I am highly "ideological" ("radicalized" some would say), and politics is of considerate import to me.

    BUT, I do my best to step back from that kind of prism, and think about ordinary individuals who are caught up in these kinds of events and occurrences. Those officers weren't some amorphous entities. They didn't die fighting a political cause. They weren't some pawns in an ideological game. They were people - ordinary individuals who were just doing their jobs and were murdered. And they had families who loved and cared about them.

    I don't know what "concern trolling" is, but if the first instinct regarding deaths such as these is national politics and who is going to be president, instead of empathy for the dead and their distraught families, I guess I am out of sorts here. Being a rather vengeful person by nature, I'd even understand the thirst for justice or even revenge against the perpetrator. But the first thought was about Donald Trump?

    I have had a high regard for Mr. Sailer's citizenism and his apparent concern for ALL Americans, but that kind of cold ideological calculation as first instinct caught me by surprise like a hidden blade.

    “But the first thought was about Donald Trump?”

    Jesus. It was mild hyperbole for Christ sake, of the kind often used in normal conversation. No, that probably wasn’t Steve’s first thought. However, it probably was his first thought that pertained to the normal range of topics found on his blog. Your over-reaction is peevish. Get a grip.

  130. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    There were several turning points, many of which happened years ago. Her main issue is that she's a third world politician. She has taken more money in pay-for-play (let's call it by its proper name-bribery) than anyone who has ever run for president. Grant's friends loaded up, but he himself stayed pretty clean. Harding's friends loaded up, and he may have loaded up a bit himself, but Harding also gave the country a booming economy in return. Hillary's crony Obama couldn't help her there.

    Hillary also had the complete backing of the media in a manner that's third world, too. The press in those countries is totally corrupt and partisan, and they don't have any ethical qualms about it. They are simply one big circle jerk sucking off their country's interbreeding elite and getting money and favors in return.

    She expected to get the job because she was the wife of an elite and it was 'her turn,' as if the office of the presidency was the sole possession of a small, corrupt oligarchy exactly the way it is in the third world.

    Finally, Hillary went in hard for third world factional politics. The non-Anglo Saxon old world and everything below the Texas border is run by factional politics. This is alien to the American mind. It's an old Anglo-Saxon tradition for its rulers to avoid taking sides and attempt to be above the fray. This tradition goes all the way back the medieval English monarchs. They understood themselves to be representing all the people in a manner that was unusually enlightened for their era.

    For example, French politics was divided up into the groups such as the Queen's party, the Dauphin's party, the Cardinal's party, the King's party, etc., each faction battling it out with each other. In nearly all countries today, you have either religious groups, or clans, tribes, or ethnic minorities who are fighting to be top dog and put everyone else down. All these countries accept this type of political behavior as normal, and they can't even imagine running their country any other way. But that's not how Anglo-Saxons see things, and that's not what Anglo-Saxons think is good for their country. Our American presidents inherited this sense of non-factionalism from their Anglo-Saxon culture, and for the most part, they've understood that factionalism is idiotic because it undermines a country's stability and leads to civil wars.

    Hillary is contemptuous--or stupidly ignorant--of this political tradition, and a lot of Americans sensed it and were wary of her. Her campaign was nothing but one big ugly attempt to whip up rage, resentment, and hatred among various factions and pit them against her chosen enemy. That, ultimately, is why she took a fall. She was an alien politician from Planet Third World, and she really honest-to-god despises most Americans. Especially now, since we've sent her packing.

    American politics were pretty darn factional in the late 1800s. The Dem vs Rep split was essentially a re-fighting of the Civil War but at the state level it was just blind partisanship. People got their news from openly partisan newspapers, much like today’s voter who either goes to NewsMax or Huffington Post but not both. The governor of Kentucky was assassinated in 1900 in a partisan dispute.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Yeah, but back then, regardless of which side won, whites ruled.

    Civil wars may lead to ideological shift but maintain demographic consistency.

    In contrast, a diverse nation has 'civil wars' that look more like 'civilization wars', and victory could mean change not only in ideas but identity.

    The Jewish vs Palestinian wars are more than 'civil wars'.

    The outcome settled something far more important than tax policy.
    , @Anon
    I was referring solely to the US Presidency, not local politics.
  131. @Harry Baldwin
    One of the things that Trump did that I really appreciated was trash the reputation of George W. Bush. The messes "W" made while in office seemed destined to damage the Republican band for several election cycles. By denouncing the Iraq invasion as a disaster, Trump put W behind us. One of the things that irritates me about Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity is that they still defend the W legacy. It deserves no defense.

    I also LOVED, LOVED, LOVED that Trump refused to treat McCain as some kind of exalted hero, above all reproach. (Now if only that tiresome hack Rep John Lewis would get the same treatment.)

    One of the things that Trump did that I really appreciated was trash the reputation of George W. Bush. The messes “W” made while in office seemed destined to damage the Republican band for several election cycles.

    The funny thing is that it didn’t damage Republicans for very long. Aside from not being in the White House, the Republican Party did phenomenally well while Obama was president. In the states the GOP is stronger than ever.

    I think the major reason for that is the Tea Party movement. Hated as it was by the RINOs, the Tea Party made it clear to the voters that there was a very large contingent of Republicans disgusted with the GOP Establishment and interested in real reform.

  132. @Andra
    But he got clocked in the popular vote - it may turn out that she wins by an unconscionable two percentage points, and she did very well for a Democrat in Texas. A Rose Bowl of votes in three states and the entire post election narrative would be different. Sometimes things are about chance and there is no great lesson to be learned.

    No great lesson to be learned, other than the Dems are the party of voter fraud and one of the elements of American renewal besides deporting the illegals is establishing a uniform requirement of voter verification.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    Citizenship requirements also need reform. No dual citizenship, no anchor babies, etc. At present, the requirements favor non-citizens over citizens.
  133. Actually, I suspect what lost it for Democrats was the death of Scalia combined with the Left’s sudden enthusiasm for culture war mopping-up operations, i.e, going around the battlefield shooting enemy troops trying to surrender.

    Agree. Their vindictiveness was shocking (let’s destroy a family business!) and I think people were pretty docile about it. But then came the transgendered-men-in-the-bathroom and the punishments and threats to North Carolina, showing that they were insane as well as vicious. Viciously insane.

    Those twin factors probably focused the minds of a lot of religious conservatives who otherwise would have been sorely tempted to not vote, or even vote for Hillary. I still don’t think Democrats fully grasp just how terrified they’ve managed to make religious conservatives feel the past couple of years.

    That’s exactly how I felt about it. These people are out of their minds and they hate us. They’ll stack the Supreme Court and come after us.

    …Not just Christians either. On Election Night I wandered into a local deli to get some sandwiches and stout for the victory party at home and two Orthodox Jewish kids were watching the returns. They’d just voted for the first time: Trump.

  134. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Let’s not overlook The Enquirer running Clinton exposures thee weeks running up to the election. The magazine is positioned near the checkout line in many stores where people see the headlines whilst waiting. People saw the blazing headlines over and over again, circulating the message. It may sound silly but the magazine is seen by very many ordinary people.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Anonymous, Whilst? How vewwy British of you.
  135. Jonathan Simon on “Guns and Butter” argues that Hillary lost every primary against Bernie Sanders in those state that held caucuses where vote counting is more reliable. In the other states, exit polling data does not match the vote count:

    Seems there was manipulation of the vote count in Democrat primaries but not in Republican primaries:

    https://www.wbai.org/archive.php

    Click on

    Guns And Butter
    Wed, Nov 23, 2016
    9:00 AM 60 min

  136. Hard to say if there was any one turning point rather than a series of several small ones. Though I don’t think it was a turning point, the issue concerning what Trump did or did not pay in taxes may have unintentionally raised some eyebrows in Clinton’s direction in light of the all the largess she and the husband accumulated subsequent to having left the White House back in 2000 allegedly in a state of penury. That argument vs. Trump never had any legs and his riposte that her own colleagues helped create the loopholes of which he chose to take advantage may have sunk that argument.

    Bottom line: as a politician Hillary Clinton is a minus zero and, frankly, not very smart–nowhere near as smart as Trump, a non-politician.

  137. Maybe its too early, but beginning to get a little worried Trump watering down positions.
    Could be head fake.
    Get the Hillary thing, why waste time.
    Maybe Rudy not right guy, but Mitt Romney ,fucking turncoat?
    How are we gonna revive coal industry but stay in UN Climate Change bullshit?
    Trump ending up a disappointment will be a major problem.
    People want real change!
    We’ll see.

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "Maybe its too early, but beginning to get a little worried Trump watering down positions."

    Have no fear. This is a coordinated attack by the gaystream media and it's meant to dispirit us. President Trump, by his cabinet picks, shows every intention of fulfilling his campaign promises. Bank.

    President Trump is a man of action who accomplishes things, QED. Why would that suddenly stop because he holds the most powerful elected office on Earth? Rhetorical.

    God bless President Trump.
  138. @Twinkie

    This is a political blog – politics comes to mind.
     
    You know, I might just stop reading or commenting on blogs like this. Look, I am a pretty politicized person myself. Compared to most Americans, I am highly "ideological" ("radicalized" some would say), and politics is of considerate import to me.

    BUT, I do my best to step back from that kind of prism, and think about ordinary individuals who are caught up in these kinds of events and occurrences. Those officers weren't some amorphous entities. They didn't die fighting a political cause. They weren't some pawns in an ideological game. They were people - ordinary individuals who were just doing their jobs and were murdered. And they had families who loved and cared about them.

    I don't know what "concern trolling" is, but if the first instinct regarding deaths such as these is national politics and who is going to be president, instead of empathy for the dead and their distraught families, I guess I am out of sorts here. Being a rather vengeful person by nature, I'd even understand the thirst for justice or even revenge against the perpetrator. But the first thought was about Donald Trump?

    I have had a high regard for Mr. Sailer's citizenism and his apparent concern for ALL Americans, but that kind of cold ideological calculation as first instinct caught me by surprise like a hidden blade.

    Oh please. My first thought was just like Sailer’s. Actually his might not of been that — that might have been a figure of speech on his part; I don’t know and neither do you — but I know my mind, and yes, I am a horrible (aka normal) person. Bad things that happen to distant people I don’t know from Adam don’t usually strike me emotionally first, if ever. Show me video, as in the case of the WTC, then I get emotional about it. But just reading a headline doesn’t.

  139. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    American politics were pretty darn factional in the late 1800s. The Dem vs Rep split was essentially a re-fighting of the Civil War but at the state level it was just blind partisanship. People got their news from openly partisan newspapers, much like today's voter who either goes to NewsMax or Huffington Post but not both. The governor of Kentucky was assassinated in 1900 in a partisan dispute.

    Yeah, but back then, regardless of which side won, whites ruled.

    Civil wars may lead to ideological shift but maintain demographic consistency.

    In contrast, a diverse nation has ‘civil wars’ that look more like ‘civilization wars’, and victory could mean change not only in ideas but identity.

    The Jewish vs Palestinian wars are more than ‘civil wars’.

    The outcome settled something far more important than tax policy.

  140. @Anonymous
    The baseball bats thing has been memed into the wider culture via Tarantino's Inglorious Basterds, and the media has been blasting for the past couple weeks now about Nazis being everywhere. How long before some nut or nuts actually go on a baseball bat rampage?

    "Politico Editor RESIGNS After Publishing Home Addresses Of Alt-Right Icon Richard Spencer, Advocating For ‘Baseball Bats’"

    http://dailycaller.com/2016/11/22/national-politico-editor-publishes-home-addresses-of-alt-right-icon-richard-spencer-advocates-for-baseball-bats/

    Hirsh responded in an unhinged manner: “I wasn’t thinking of a fucking letter, Doug. He lives part of the time next door to me in Arlington. Our grandfathers brought baseball bats to Bund meetings. Want to join me?”

    ...

    Hirsh’s mention of Bund meetings is a reference to the German-American Bund, a Nazi organization in the United States active in the mid-to-late 1930s, which promoted National Socialist ideology and was often subject to violent attacks by Jewish mobsters in New York City and Newark, New Jersey, using baseball bats.
     

    I get the feeling that Hirsh wasn’t raised to be ashamed of his granfather’s politics.

    I suppose that’s because the “raising” was done by Hirsh’s mom and aunt at school and by Hirsh’s dad and uncle on tv and in the newspapers. It’d have indeed been strange for such people to raise Hirsh to despise Bubby.

    The typical american conservative is in a quite different situation. He’s been raised by Hirsch’s older relatives to think of his own grandfather who was in the John Birch society as an incomprehensible monster. He has even been raised to think of Hirsh’s bubby as a good guy and his own grandfather as someone to be ashamed of.

    • Agree: Opinionator
  141. @Twinkie

    My first thought
     
    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That's disappointing, Mr. Sailer.

    What happened to being a human being? Sadness for the officers and their families didn't come to mind first? Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?

    Being human means that your first thought is often not a socially approved “good” response.

  142. @Steve in Greensboro
    No great lesson to be learned, other than the Dems are the party of voter fraud and one of the elements of American renewal besides deporting the illegals is establishing a uniform requirement of voter verification.

    Citizenship requirements also need reform. No dual citizenship, no anchor babies, etc. At present, the requirements favor non-citizens over citizens.

    • Replies: @International Jew

    Citizenship requirements also need reform.
     
    And they should know English. Not broken English, either. They should know it at near-native proficiency. If that means citizenship has to wait until their children's generation, then so be it.
    , @Clyde

    Citizenship requirements also need reform. No dual citizenship, no anchor babies, etc. At present, the requirements favor non-citizens over citizens.
     
    Getting rid of anchor baby laws is not one Constitutional Amendment away. It is one solid Supreme Court decision away. It would even be less if Donald and Congress had the cojones to pass a law changing anchor baby's status from automatic US citizen to illegal alien. There would be ACLU type lawsuits, but it would get the ball rolling fast (expedited) up to the Supreme Court with some Donald Trump justices pre-installed.
  143. @Twinkie

    My first thought
     
    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That's disappointing, Mr. Sailer.

    What happened to being a human being? Sadness for the officers and their families didn't come to mind first? Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?

    If you’re that upset over Steve’s first thought, then mine will definitely give you the vapors.

    It was along the lines of “Those cops sacrificed their lives protecting a bunch of leftists in a proudly ‘progressive’ city. What a waste.”

  144. @Twinkie

    This is a political blog – politics comes to mind.
     
    You know, I might just stop reading or commenting on blogs like this. Look, I am a pretty politicized person myself. Compared to most Americans, I am highly "ideological" ("radicalized" some would say), and politics is of considerate import to me.

    BUT, I do my best to step back from that kind of prism, and think about ordinary individuals who are caught up in these kinds of events and occurrences. Those officers weren't some amorphous entities. They didn't die fighting a political cause. They weren't some pawns in an ideological game. They were people - ordinary individuals who were just doing their jobs and were murdered. And they had families who loved and cared about them.

    I don't know what "concern trolling" is, but if the first instinct regarding deaths such as these is national politics and who is going to be president, instead of empathy for the dead and their distraught families, I guess I am out of sorts here. Being a rather vengeful person by nature, I'd even understand the thirst for justice or even revenge against the perpetrator. But the first thought was about Donald Trump?

    I have had a high regard for Mr. Sailer's citizenism and his apparent concern for ALL Americans, but that kind of cold ideological calculation as first instinct caught me by surprise like a hidden blade.

    > I might just stop reading or commenting on blogs like this.

    Oh please, no, anything but that… What must we do to convince you to stay…

  145. @Senator Brundlefly
    Not directly a specific turning point in the election cycle, but if others were like me, a turning point in how I viewed the world began with Trayvon Martin. Before Trayvon Martin, I didn't view the media as intentionally propagandish, just liberally biased because of the left wing nature of journalism schools. Trayvon Martin taught me that the media intentionally highlights insignificant police blotter stories to fabricate false narratives to ensure minority turnout in election years. Trayvon Martin taught me the disdain the left has for White Americans and the need for them to have us as the Goldstein of their narratives. Trayvon Martin taught me that its ok to pretend that a thug is a cherubic baby full of potential and that a civically inclined Peruvian Indian is some racist white Southerner so long as the lesson that white people are evil is hammered home. If others were like me, 2012 was the time to learn that the genteel conservatism that waxed about Enlightenment principles was out of its element in dealing with the cynical tribalism and power consolidation of the left. A part of me thinks others back then learned that lesson too, which, in addition to the steady drumbeat of Trayvon's equally preposterous sequels (Mike Brown etc.) led us to get behind a man like Trump. Conservatism got rude because we learned that deep down, no matter how polite and proper the left wanted it to look, the game of politics was dirty tribalism. We got all Colonel Kurtz and decided that its ok to write f*** on our airplanes. They think Trump is obscene? Well, they had made the whole game obscene!

    The Trayvon Martin summer is also when I realized that they were not just biased but outright liars.
    For me that was closely followed by the Dieudonné affair over there in the french world. Then there was gamergate. The media caste is the #1 enemy.

  146. @Twinkie

    This is a political blog – politics comes to mind.
     
    You know, I might just stop reading or commenting on blogs like this. Look, I am a pretty politicized person myself. Compared to most Americans, I am highly "ideological" ("radicalized" some would say), and politics is of considerate import to me.

    BUT, I do my best to step back from that kind of prism, and think about ordinary individuals who are caught up in these kinds of events and occurrences. Those officers weren't some amorphous entities. They didn't die fighting a political cause. They weren't some pawns in an ideological game. They were people - ordinary individuals who were just doing their jobs and were murdered. And they had families who loved and cared about them.

    I don't know what "concern trolling" is, but if the first instinct regarding deaths such as these is national politics and who is going to be president, instead of empathy for the dead and their distraught families, I guess I am out of sorts here. Being a rather vengeful person by nature, I'd even understand the thirst for justice or even revenge against the perpetrator. But the first thought was about Donald Trump?

    I have had a high regard for Mr. Sailer's citizenism and his apparent concern for ALL Americans, but that kind of cold ideological calculation as first instinct caught me by surprise like a hidden blade.

    Even money this is just a tiny duck sock puppet.

  147. @Clyde

    Hillary very nearly won. As others pointed out, she won the popular vote and will do so by a couple of million. About 3 million of them illegals but they were still counted.
     
    Three million is highly unlikely. Where were these illegal alien votes racked up? California? New York City and Chicago? Houston? Florida? Donald Trump better have his people look into this intensively and publicize it. To counter the Dems propaganda of ill Hillary winning the popular vote.

    My take is at most 50-100 thousand illegals voted nationwide. If the three million illegal alien voters number is there, then Trump will use it to legitimize his Presidency. The Dems are working hard to de-legitimize it.

    No. It’s more than that. In my state every single, DMV, DSHS, Housing, etc person who contacts these folks has to ask them at every single encounter if they want to vote.

    Every single time even if you know they are illegals you have to ask them if they want to register to vote. Then you have to smile while they register to vote and send the form in.

    Many, many, many sign up. All of them are used by the democratic machine to fill in where they need to. Just like felon votes.

  148. @anon5
    Stop being such a defeatist. The popular vote means nothing which is why it is not even mentioned in the Constitution. Stop falling for the media's propaganda that somehow Trump did not win because of the popular vote.

    Consider:

    1) She received over 1 million more votes than Trump in just Cook County, IL (Chicago land)!!! Just one county almost explains her entire popular vote lead. Take that away and she loses the 20 EVs of Illinois and her popular vote lead is severely reduced.

    2) Any reasonable person knows illegals voted. And not just in CA.

    3) Trumped helped carry the down ticket GOP candidates. Take Missouri, where Trump won the state by over 500K votes. Not only is that exceptional, note McCain only beat Obama by a couple thousand, but all of Missouri's statewide GOP candidates won as well. From its Senate race to Governor, Lt Govenor, Treasurer, etc. It's the first time the GOP has won every statewide race, ever!

    4) Trump's coattails helped in other states too. Which is why the GOP is keeping the House and Senate. That alone is more telling than who won the popular vote.

    5) It's why the GOP maintains 33 of the 50 governor's mansions and most state legislatures.

    6) The dems only have 5 states of 50 where they control the legislature and the governor's office.

    7) The democrats are a regional party and this election proved it.

    Stop apologizing for winning. Trump won big by the rules and he showed the future for a winning nationalistic/patriotic ticket by linking the Midwest, South and now the Great Lakes. If the GOP and other defeatists allow Trump to enact much of what he campaigned on, he can sew up this coalition for years to come.

    So stop falling for this media BS about the popular vote.

    5) It’s why the GOP maintains 33 of the 50 governor’s mansions and most state legislatures.

    As a Californian, that’s really really surreal!

  149. @Kylie
    Citizenship requirements also need reform. No dual citizenship, no anchor babies, etc. At present, the requirements favor non-citizens over citizens.

    Citizenship requirements also need reform.

    And they should know English. Not broken English, either. They should know it at near-native proficiency. If that means citizenship has to wait until their children’s generation, then so be it.

    • Agree: Kylie
    • Replies: @ogunsiron
    In general, there should be no hurry at all to grant citizenship to foreigners.
    , @kaganovitch
    When my mom took her citizenship test in the 50's , the judge told her "you did very well ma'am , but your English needs to improve". My mom has read 3-4 books a week for the last seventy + years. At the time she read in German, as that was her first language. She was so dismayed by the judge's statement that she never read another book in German, only English. Nowadays the judge would probably be Eiched.
  150. @Twinkie

    Their suffering was completely abstract from our perspective.
     
    It's not "completely abstract" if you put yourself in their shoes or those of their families. Even if you are incapable of that kind of imagination, having experienced a sudden loss from violence of a beloved family member or a buddy should give you some sense of what they went (and are going) through.

    It’s not “completely abstract” if you put yourself in their shoes or those of their families.

    But that was impossible, since we had no names, no faces, and no information about their families or the specifics of their deaths. It was completely abstract. Just a number — 5 or 6, no one really seemed to know.

  151. @J1234
    I have always said that Hillary's connection to black lives matter was going to cost her, big time. The problem was, she (in concert with blm) treated all of the blm associated cases as if they were carbon copies of each other, which was a very un-lawyerly thing to do. This was to pander to ghetto black emotion and fear, which isn't very often nuanced or discerning. Aside from involving typically irresponsible males from a dysfunctional American minority culture, the Michael Brown case and the Walter Scott case had very little to do with each other. Walter Scott was running away from a cop, while Michael Brown was charging a cop, trying to take his gun (presumably to shoot him.) Insinuating that every dead black guy in a blm case was equally innocent displayed Hillary's unjust notions about justice for the world to see.

    Yes, it's true - lots of internet conservatives (unfortunately) tried to portray all of the dead black guys as equally guilty, but they weren't running for president. Her demagoguery on this matter was way beyond anything Trump ever did, by a factor of five, but was never described by the MSM as such.

    OT, but as far as Trump saying he won't prosecute her on email stuff...I
    honestly believe (at this point) that he's saying these things to get beyond December 19th, when the Electoral College votes. The EC has never overturned election day results before, but this election has been like no other, so who knows? I think it's correct to be nice until then.

    My thoughts are that 2018, and 60 seats in the Senate is the real goal in mind. He will play (generally) nice with the Dems by promoting and proceeding quickly with mostly non-partisan measures until then (corporate tax reform, infrastructure spending etc.).

    After 2018 he will have unimpeded power to implement his plan to drain the swamp for real. The Clinton Foundation FBI investigation will then likely come to the forefront as well.

    It will be interesting to see whether Obama issues a blanket pardon as he slinks out the door in January.

    • Replies: @J1234

    It will be interesting to see whether Obama issues a blanket pardon as he slinks out the door in January.
     
    My understanding is that Hillary can't get a pardon from BO unless she requests one, and last I heard, she hadn't requested one. If she ever does, that request would be worth copying, framing and displaying in a prominent place once Trump gets into the White House.
  152. @Wilkey
    I think that, to the extent there was a "turning point," it was Hillary's "Basket of Deplorables" speech. Voters will forgive a lots of things, but demeaning a large portion of the voters, especially to a large group of rich people, is one they have a hard time ever forgiving. It makes them wonder what they really say and think about you. I could imagine some not-insignificant number of white women who were leaning towards Hillary seeing that speech and thinking of their Trump-supporting husbands, fathers, or sons, and changing their minds. You didn't have to be there. It wasn't some real or alleged attack on a journalist or a cripple or another politician. It was a mean, nasty attack on any of your loved ones who was sympathetic to Trump. Blood is Thicker Than Water, Part 8,563,124,796. The scary people are those who weren't bothered by that comment.

    Outside of that I think 4-5 other events were huge. The first was his campaign announcement critical of Mexican illegals. It signalled he was serious about enforcement, and willing to be attacked from "polite folks" in order to back it up. Then came the murder of Kate Steinle (in a sanctuary city) by a previously deported illegal just two weeks later, on July 1. It made him look prophetic. His words were still think in the air when Steinle was killed.

    The second was the Christmas-time San Bernardino Attack which, again, had been preceded by Trump calling for a Muslim "registry," again making him look prophetic. After the attacks he doubled down on his critique of Muslims, which made him look strong.

    The third was the attack in Dallas, which was the climax of the whole Democrat-supported Black Lives Matter riots. I don't recall Trump making too much hay about them, which may have helped from inciting the black vote to get out on election day, but it certainly registered in the minds of a lot of voters.

    And the final event was the Pulse nightclub attacks in Orlando on June 12, almost a year to the day after Trump announce his candidacy. The terrorist murdered 49 people, most of whom were gay and Latino. "Oh, you mean this Coalition of the Fringes murders its own?" Yep.

    All of those events together painted a picture of a country careening off the tracks and the elites refusing to acknowledge. Hillary's fine with it so long as her bank account keeps growing and she can keep hanging out with Jon Bon Jovi and the cast of "Hamilton."

    I've already noted that Orange County FL and San Bernardino County CA actually voted about 3.5% less for Trump than for Romney. That's kind of what we've come to expect in Diverse Cosmopolitan America, but you can bet that lots of people in the rest of America noticed.

    I think that, to the extent there was a “turning point,” it was Hillary’s “Basket of Deplorables” speech. Voters will forgive a lots of things, but demeaning a large portion of the voters, especially to a large group of rich people, is one they have a hard time ever forgiving.

    Do you see a similarity between that and Romney’s “47%” comment?

  153. @Twinkie

    This is a political blog – politics comes to mind.
     
    You know, I might just stop reading or commenting on blogs like this. Look, I am a pretty politicized person myself. Compared to most Americans, I am highly "ideological" ("radicalized" some would say), and politics is of considerate import to me.

    BUT, I do my best to step back from that kind of prism, and think about ordinary individuals who are caught up in these kinds of events and occurrences. Those officers weren't some amorphous entities. They didn't die fighting a political cause. They weren't some pawns in an ideological game. They were people - ordinary individuals who were just doing their jobs and were murdered. And they had families who loved and cared about them.

    I don't know what "concern trolling" is, but if the first instinct regarding deaths such as these is national politics and who is going to be president, instead of empathy for the dead and their distraught families, I guess I am out of sorts here. Being a rather vengeful person by nature, I'd even understand the thirst for justice or even revenge against the perpetrator. But the first thought was about Donald Trump?

    I have had a high regard for Mr. Sailer's citizenism and his apparent concern for ALL Americans, but that kind of cold ideological calculation as first instinct caught me by surprise like a hidden blade.

    I have had a high regard for Mr. Sailer’s citizenism and his apparent concern for ALL Americans, but that kind of cold ideological calculation as first instinct caught me by surprise like a hidden blade.

    As a devoted reader of your postings, I’ll be sorely disappointed if you stop contributing. On the other hand, you’ll have a heck of a lot more free time and that’s certainly nothing to sniff at.

    Re the blog author, I can’t speak for him, but I fully understand his reaction. Over the years, I’ve become numbed with respect to the litany of disasters the left has brought forth, such that the Dallas murders came off as merely another tragic but dreary statistic, rather than a coronary-inducing incident. As we age and our bodies atrophy, we learn to suppress/defuse our visceral reactions – those who don’t end up in the emergency room.

  154. @Mr. Blank
    Actually, I suspect what lost it for Democrats was the death of Scalia combined with the Left's sudden enthusiasm for culture war mopping-up operations, i.e, going around the battlefield shooting enemy troops trying to surrender.

    Those twin factors probably focused the minds of a lot of religious conservatives who otherwise would have been sorely tempted to not vote, or even vote for Hillary. I still don't think Democrats fully grasp just how terrified they've managed to make religious conservatives feel the past couple of years.

    Even if they did grasp it, I doubt they would care, because they think those Bible-thumping bigots deserve to suffer. Fine, but being so open about it turned out to be a major tactical error -- not because those voters were ever going to become Democrats, but because having the religious vote locked down so tight gave Trump a lot more flexibility than GOP candidates have had in the past, and that flexibility gave him the freedom to push hard for voters that had traditionally been resistant to the GOP.

    Dems were undone by hubris. By subtly and not-so-subtly suggesting that Clinton's election would inaugurate a new era of pogroms against Christians, they ended up with Trump -- and now THEY are the ones scared of pogroms.

    “…the Left’s sudden enthusiasm for culture war mopping-up operations, i.e, going around the battlefield shooting enemy troops trying to surrender.”

    This is a very good point. It seems like evangelical Christians supported Trump more than would otherwise be expected. Trump claims to be a Christian but I think most people find Trump’s professed religious convictions questionable at best. He has been married three times. On the issue of sex morals, Trump is the opposite of what evangelicals would approve of. Trump was pro-choice at one time and his commitment to his current position is suspect. Trump is anti-PC but not really a culture warrior. Although it would appear that there would have been justifications for them to do so, I don’t think most evangelicals took the “I just can’t vote for a person like that” RINO position.

    The Left couldn’t be happy with legalizing gay marriage. They have to crush all dissent. They destroy the businesses of bakers who don’t want to make cakes for gay weddings. If Bruce Jenner pretends to be a woman, we are expected to treat him like a hero for his “bravery.” If a state says that men can’t pee in the women’s restroom, big business boycotts and sporting events can’t be held in that state. Opposing or even not outright celebrating the gay/trans stuff is grounds for destroying careers and reputations. Companies owned by religious people have to pay for birth control and abortions. Eventually, churches will have to pay for abortions and be required to perform same sex weddings. The American Left was already passively hostile to Christianity. Lately, it has been moving to outright persecution. Evangelical Christians see this.

  155. @Jack D
    Probably didn't help but I don't think it was a turning point. Blacks are into blackety, black, black all the time but whites in America are just not interested in a race war.

    What's an interesting question (to me at least) is whether there is any strategy for the Democrat party that includes both blacks and blue collar whites? From FDR to LBJ, the Democrat party was the party of both. When factories in the Midwest close, both black and white workers are affected. I've heard it said that there's no way that Hillary could let white men ride the bus with the rest of the coalition of the fringes because she needed them to be standing outside the bus as the common target that everyone on the bus could hate on, but is this really true? Could she have taken Bill's advice and run a more traditional Democrat campaign or do the modern dynamics of the party require Democrats to treat blue collar whites as targets or at the very least have no more love to give to them?

    I’ve heard it said that there’s no way that Hillary could let white men ride the bus with the rest of the coalition of the fringes because she needed them to be standing outside the bus as the common target that everyone on the bus could hate on, but is this really true?

    I think there’s some wishful thinking going on here ie., many Democrats really like the idea of excoriating straight White males, Christians, rural folks, gun owners, etc., and so they’ve convinced themselves that this is a winning strategy. They basically believe anyone who doesn’t want to do those things, is some kind of a Nazi, hence they’re trapped perpetually (one hopes) in an ineffective strategy.

  156. @anon5
    Stop being such a defeatist. The popular vote means nothing which is why it is not even mentioned in the Constitution. Stop falling for the media's propaganda that somehow Trump did not win because of the popular vote.

    Consider:

    1) She received over 1 million more votes than Trump in just Cook County, IL (Chicago land)!!! Just one county almost explains her entire popular vote lead. Take that away and she loses the 20 EVs of Illinois and her popular vote lead is severely reduced.

    2) Any reasonable person knows illegals voted. And not just in CA.

    3) Trumped helped carry the down ticket GOP candidates. Take Missouri, where Trump won the state by over 500K votes. Not only is that exceptional, note McCain only beat Obama by a couple thousand, but all of Missouri's statewide GOP candidates won as well. From its Senate race to Governor, Lt Govenor, Treasurer, etc. It's the first time the GOP has won every statewide race, ever!

    4) Trump's coattails helped in other states too. Which is why the GOP is keeping the House and Senate. That alone is more telling than who won the popular vote.

    5) It's why the GOP maintains 33 of the 50 governor's mansions and most state legislatures.

    6) The dems only have 5 states of 50 where they control the legislature and the governor's office.

    7) The democrats are a regional party and this election proved it.

    Stop apologizing for winning. Trump won big by the rules and he showed the future for a winning nationalistic/patriotic ticket by linking the Midwest, South and now the Great Lakes. If the GOP and other defeatists allow Trump to enact much of what he campaigned on, he can sew up this coalition for years to come.

    So stop falling for this media BS about the popular vote.

    The “popular vote” meme is the plaintive cry of the loser.

    Of the more than 5,000 counties in the US, Hillary won 300. Essentially, a sea of red, with the exception (mainly) of a few major cities.

    I am reminded of the experiments done with rats regarding the implications of living in overcrowded circumstances (such as inner cities). The scientists found that, if you put too many rats in too small an area, not only do they start to eat each other, but they invariably start to vote Democrat.

    Food for thought indeed.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    gda, even the dead rats vote democrat.
  157. @Anon
    There were several turning points, many of which happened years ago. Her main issue is that she's a third world politician. She has taken more money in pay-for-play (let's call it by its proper name-bribery) than anyone who has ever run for president. Grant's friends loaded up, but he himself stayed pretty clean. Harding's friends loaded up, and he may have loaded up a bit himself, but Harding also gave the country a booming economy in return. Hillary's crony Obama couldn't help her there.

    Hillary also had the complete backing of the media in a manner that's third world, too. The press in those countries is totally corrupt and partisan, and they don't have any ethical qualms about it. They are simply one big circle jerk sucking off their country's interbreeding elite and getting money and favors in return.

    She expected to get the job because she was the wife of an elite and it was 'her turn,' as if the office of the presidency was the sole possession of a small, corrupt oligarchy exactly the way it is in the third world.

    Finally, Hillary went in hard for third world factional politics. The non-Anglo Saxon old world and everything below the Texas border is run by factional politics. This is alien to the American mind. It's an old Anglo-Saxon tradition for its rulers to avoid taking sides and attempt to be above the fray. This tradition goes all the way back the medieval English monarchs. They understood themselves to be representing all the people in a manner that was unusually enlightened for their era.

    For example, French politics was divided up into the groups such as the Queen's party, the Dauphin's party, the Cardinal's party, the King's party, etc., each faction battling it out with each other. In nearly all countries today, you have either religious groups, or clans, tribes, or ethnic minorities who are fighting to be top dog and put everyone else down. All these countries accept this type of political behavior as normal, and they can't even imagine running their country any other way. But that's not how Anglo-Saxons see things, and that's not what Anglo-Saxons think is good for their country. Our American presidents inherited this sense of non-factionalism from their Anglo-Saxon culture, and for the most part, they've understood that factionalism is idiotic because it undermines a country's stability and leads to civil wars.

    Hillary is contemptuous--or stupidly ignorant--of this political tradition, and a lot of Americans sensed it and were wary of her. Her campaign was nothing but one big ugly attempt to whip up rage, resentment, and hatred among various factions and pit them against her chosen enemy. That, ultimately, is why she took a fall. She was an alien politician from Planet Third World, and she really honest-to-god despises most Americans. Especially now, since we've sent her packing.

    and for the most part, they’ve understood that factionalism is idiotic because it undermines a country’s stability and leads to civil wars.

    For the most part, except for that ONE time when it led to an actual Civil War that killed hundreds of thousands (equivalent to millions of our current population).

  158. @Twinkie

    My first thought
     
    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That's disappointing, Mr. Sailer.

    What happened to being a human being? Sadness for the officers and their families didn't come to mind first? Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?

    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That’s disappointing, Mr. Sailer.

    What happened to being a human being? Sadness for the officers and their families didn’t come to mind first? Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?

    My thought as well. Nobody’s perfect.

  159. Hard to do much listening when you’re dead, Hillary.

    Likewise, Cruz lost a lot of support when he blamed Trump for the violence/threats that shut down his own rally.

  160. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Maj. Kong
    http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/data.php?year=2016&fips=42&f=0&off=0&elect=0&def=swg&datatype=county

    The big swings in Pennsylvania were outside of the Philly metro area, it might not have been the tipping point.

    If the linked pattern holds, the GOP could win the Senate seat in 2018, as long as the candidate is the Santorum and not the Specter type.

    Rural population has been growing in Pennsylvania. Also, eastern Pennsylvania has become a bedroom community for New Jerseyites trying to escape their own high property taxes, and this means Pennsylvania has been gaining migrants from New Jersey looking to buy a house in which to raise a family, and these people tend to vote more conservatively.

    Also, Philly and Pittsburgh are not particularly attractive cities in the mould of New York or Los Angeles, and it’s difficult to make an argument in favor of liberalism when these are the two examples in front of your eyes. They’re growing ever more like Detroit as time goes by. Also, both cities have had a recent influx of foreign-born residents in the last 5 years or so, and this may have rattled the natives, who view the intruders as competition for jobs.

    If you look at the breakdown, Hillary lost a combined total of 36,000 votes in these two cities compared to Obama in 2012, and Trump gained 14,000 votes over Romney. In a close election, shifts like these matter.

  161. @Jefferson
    "And at some point, the Democrats will wake up and realize that the demographic variable to look at is not ethnicity and identity, but class. At that point they will remember that class politics used to be their specialty."

    You are 100 percent wrong that The Democratic Party is going to ditch identity politics for class politics. That is why they are doubling down on identity by putting a Black Muslim (Keith Ellison) as the face of their party.

    We’ve already had a black Muslim as president. People know what it will be like and have had ample opportunity to make up their minds. But I think you’re right about Ellison. They’ll try to duplicate the formula and run him.

  162. @Dave Pinsen
    Michael Tracey calls Hillary an awful candidate too, but I agree with you that this is mostly hindsight bias. The truth is she was a polished and skilled debater, and a first class money-raiser.

    Hillary's biggest weakness wasn't herself but her platform. It's really hard to beat nationalism with globalism in a national election. I don't think Trump could have won on her platform either, despite what Scott Adams says.

    I think you are wrong about this. On paper she was a great candidate and (like Nixon) she won the debates on points, but she was completely lacking in that undefinable charisma thing. Obama had it and Trump had it and she didn’t. Tens of thousands would line up for Trump rallies, no one went to a Hillary rally unless she had a rock star (someone with actual charisma) appearing with her. Nine times out of ten the candidate who has IT will win. Even women who were exactly like her (maybe even ESPECIALLY such women) couldn’t get excited about her.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    "that undefinable charisma thing. Obama had it and Trump had it and she didn’t"

    Did Obama have it? Or was a well-spoken and literate black guy, supported by media for whom he could do no wrong, a blank slate onto which the public could project the charisma of their choice?

    I remember the huge crowds he got when he went to Europe early in his presidency, but I always had the impression his appeal was WHAT he was (first 'black' pres) rather than WHO he was.
    , @Jefferson
    "Tens of thousands would line up for Trump rallies, no one went to a Hillary rally unless she had a rock star (someone with actual charisma) appearing with her."

    As an Italian the only way I would be caught dead at a Crooked Hildabeast rally would be if The Boss was there perform Born To Run.

    https://youtu.be/IxuThNgl3YA

    After the song ends I would get the hell out of there ASAP. I can't stand Crooked Hildabeast's voice.

  163. @Anon
    American politics were pretty darn factional in the late 1800s. The Dem vs Rep split was essentially a re-fighting of the Civil War but at the state level it was just blind partisanship. People got their news from openly partisan newspapers, much like today's voter who either goes to NewsMax or Huffington Post but not both. The governor of Kentucky was assassinated in 1900 in a partisan dispute.

    I was referring solely to the US Presidency, not local politics.

  164. @Twinkie

    My first thought
     
    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That's disappointing, Mr. Sailer.

    What happened to being a human being? Sadness for the officers and their families didn't come to mind first? Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?

    Pre-planned assassination of law enforcement officers IS politics, meathead.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  165. @Whiskey
    Hillary very nearly won. As others pointed out, she won the popular vote and will do so by a couple of million. About 3 million of them illegals but they were still counted. And a few hundred thousand here and there in swing states and she'd have won the Electoral College and be hunting down the last few straight White men as we speak.

    What was the Schwerpunkt of the election was Hillary's insistence on absolute loyalty and obsequiousness over ability. Trump had people who could add two and two all day long, and still with the media, college educated White professional women, and non-Whites, Trump very nearly lost. A Black candidate like Obama would have won convincingly. Hillary is just manifestly incompetent on almost everything, like most Professional White women outside nursing and medicine and the hard sciences. [Where if you make a mistake, people die, quickly.]

    Many things helped Trump. The drip drip drip of Wikileaks, cumulatively bad for Hillary, pointing out her corruption and incompetence combined. Dallas, North Carolina, Ferguson, all made a difference. But the main point was Hillary's decades long unchanging incompetence.

    As for Democrats ever letting White men on the bus, never happen. The whole point of say, Colbert and John Stewart are to sneer at White people who work for a living. It fills a huge need for Democrats to view themselves as the saved, the predestined elite, against those who were born damned.

    “Almost” only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades.

    Trump’s a businessman and he’s familiar with the Pareto Principle.

    One invests only enough energy/resources in a goal to achieve the goal.

    The goal was not a popular vote landslide. Nor should it have been.

  166. @Anonymous
    The baseball bats thing has been memed into the wider culture via Tarantino's Inglorious Basterds, and the media has been blasting for the past couple weeks now about Nazis being everywhere. How long before some nut or nuts actually go on a baseball bat rampage?

    "Politico Editor RESIGNS After Publishing Home Addresses Of Alt-Right Icon Richard Spencer, Advocating For ‘Baseball Bats’"

    http://dailycaller.com/2016/11/22/national-politico-editor-publishes-home-addresses-of-alt-right-icon-richard-spencer-advocates-for-baseball-bats/

    Hirsh responded in an unhinged manner: “I wasn’t thinking of a fucking letter, Doug. He lives part of the time next door to me in Arlington. Our grandfathers brought baseball bats to Bund meetings. Want to join me?”

    ...

    Hirsh’s mention of Bund meetings is a reference to the German-American Bund, a Nazi organization in the United States active in the mid-to-late 1930s, which promoted National Socialist ideology and was often subject to violent attacks by Jewish mobsters in New York City and Newark, New Jersey, using baseball bats.
     

    Yeah sure, violent attacks by Jewish mobsters on pacific followers of Hitler. Relatives of our jewish family (domiciled in Brooklyn), lived in Yorksville in the late 1930s, then as now, a heavily German neighborhood centered around East 86th street in Manhattan. The father of the family carried a baseball bat with a lead insert when he went outdoors for self-protection against local home-grown Nazis. So my father told me, so I’m assuming its a true story.

  167. @Clyde

    Hillary very nearly won. As others pointed out, she won the popular vote and will do so by a couple of million. About 3 million of them illegals but they were still counted.
     
    Three million is highly unlikely. Where were these illegal alien votes racked up? California? New York City and Chicago? Houston? Florida? Donald Trump better have his people look into this intensively and publicize it. To counter the Dems propaganda of ill Hillary winning the popular vote.

    My take is at most 50-100 thousand illegals voted nationwide. If the three million illegal alien voters number is there, then Trump will use it to legitimize his Presidency. The Dems are working hard to de-legitimize it.

    http://www.vdare.com/articles/will-illegal-foreign-voters-steal-the-election

    6.4% of noncitizens voted in 2008 and 2.2% of noncitizens voted in 2010, according to Old Dominion University. Almost 1.2 million non-citizens turned out in 2008, many of them to vote for the Sainted One.

    How many do you think turned out this year, prodded from behind by the Dems and their partners, like Soros? To stop Hitler!

    Former Colorado Secretary of State Scott Gessler identified nearly 5,000 noncitizens in Colorado who voted in the 2010 general election. Gessler’s office uncovered upwards of 12,000 noncitizens registered to vote. Liberal groups who oppose stronger election system protections attacked him for trying to verify citizenship status—because God forbid public officials sworn to uphold the rule of law actually do anything to enhance the integrity of our election system!
    Compounding the problem: The militant immigration expansionist group Mi Familia Vota, connected with the Service Employees International Union, has ramped up its efforts in swing states to facilitate naturalization and registration of Latino voters who will promote the open-borders agenda at the polls.
    Another rare defender of American sovereignty, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, fought in court for his state’s right to require citizenship documents from people who register to vote at motor vehicle offices. Last month, a federal appeals court struck down the Kansas law despite the U.S. Constitution’s conferral of responsibility for determining who may vote to states.
    In a scene straight out of “Alice in Wonderland,” Kobach faced a contempt hearing for battling against those who hold contempt for truly free and fair elections. He was forced to sign an agreement with the ACLU allowing more than 18,000 motor-voter registrants to cast ballots this November while litigation continues.
    Last year, undercover investigative journalist James O’Keefe and his Project Veritas team blew the whistle on North Carolina political operatives who encouraged people to vote even if they were noncitizens. Like Kobach, O’Keefe endures attacks on his efforts to ensure clean elections by grievance-mongers screaming about phony voter “disenfranchisement.”
    Put on your shocked faces: These illegal noncitizen voters overwhelmingly supported Democrats. And their votes were enough to tilt the presidential election results in North Carolina to President Obama, along with handing over “Democratic victories in congressional races including a critical 2008 Senate race (Al Franken’s victory in Minnesota) that delivered for Democrats a 60-vote filibuster-proof majority in the Senate.”
    But J. Christian Adams, a former Justice Department election lawyer in the Voting Rights Section, has exposed the systemic assault on the election process at every level by activist groups funded by liberal billionaire George Soros, including:

    Blocking citizenship verification.
    Automatic voter registration of welfare recipients without local verification checks.
    Massive foreign language ballot expansion.
    Obstruction of efforts to include state qualification instructions on voter registration forms.

    This past week, the Public Interest Law Foundation uncovered thousands of foreign aliens registered to vote in swing states Virginia and Pennsylvania thanks to the federal Motor Voter law. [PDF]It’s the tip of the iceberg because the studies include just a small sample of counties.
    Oh, Virginia voters, you’ll be thrilled to know that your top election officials are now trying to cover up the true extent of the scandal. PILF noted that the commissioner of the Virginia Department of Elections issued a written guidance to local election officials instructing them “not to respond to our requests for records pertaining to non-citizen voters.”

    Bonus – refugees vetting themselves.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    America, where self-vetting refugees Dream to participate. Then they read those comic book guides (thank you, Mexican government) to tap into juicy welfare benefits for which they just registered Dem and voted. The Dems took that whole public-private partnership in a different direction, where the public, meaning us taxpayers, get to pay for private activities. Can't wait for more of that to be exposed and eliminated, and for news of self-deportations.
    , @Clyde
    In Colorado 0.0024 of the votes cast were by non citizens. This is arrived at from 6,000 non citizen voters (who actually cast votes) (mentioned in the Vdare piece you cited) out of a total of 2478664 Colorado voters in 2016. Voting for Hillary, Trump, Johnson.

    About 126,000,000 votes cast for Donald and Hillary nationwide. Johnson votes left out. Multiply this number by 0.0024 and you get 309,600 non citizen voters nationwide.

    Of course this assumes that the non citizen voter rate of Colorado can be applied nationwide. I think it can with at most an inaccuracy of 100,000 in either direction. Bear in mind that Colorado has higher percentage of Hispanics than most states. Not that its only Hispanics that would vote illegally.

    300,000 illegal voters (non-citizens) nationwide sounds more accurate than the three or two million I have heard batted around. All the above calculations done quick and dirty so you can verify if you like.

    *****mistake I calculated using 6000 instead of 5000 for Colorado

  168. @Andra
    But he got clocked in the popular vote - it may turn out that she wins by an unconscionable two percentage points, and she did very well for a Democrat in Texas. A Rose Bowl of votes in three states and the entire post election narrative would be different. Sometimes things are about chance and there is no great lesson to be learned.

    Andra, Every time I forced myself to watch campaign coverage, not election coverage, on MSNBC, CNN or PBS, the talking heads always had an interactive state map of the USA and constantly shilled how HRC was winning the Electoral College number. Lose the game, change the rules.

  169. @JohnnyD
    Obama probably hurt Hillary's campaign, when he lectured people at the cops' funeral service about "systematic racism" and the need for more gun control.

    JohnnyD, I think you are spot on. Obama and his condescending manner hurt HRC by addressing topics, inner city crime and gun control, when HRC would have liked to back away from those topics.

  170. @CK
    “Is there any point to which you would wish to draw my attention?'

    'To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time.'

    'The dog did nothing in the night-time.'

    'That was the curious incident,' remarked Sherlock Holmes.”

    I think the images of people trapped on the Charlotte freeway with burning cars and the diverse looting trucks scared a lot of people. I am sure it helped gun sales.

  171. @Maj. Kong
    The leaker of those tapes was likely Dan Senor, a neocon married to former CNN/NBC anchor Campbell Brown. The point of the leak was a coup in the GOP, designed to force Trump to resign from the ticket and be replaced with Paul Ryan.

    In that scenario they would have lost Wisconsin.

  172. @The Last Real Calvinist

    What’s an interesting question (to me at least) is whether there is any strategy for the Democrat party that includes both blacks and blue collar whites?

     

    This is the question the short- to medium-term future of American politics turns upon, isn't it?

    If things go even reasonably well economically in the next four years, it may be hard for the Dems to turn the upper midwest back to blue anytime soon.

    A Dem candidate can try to appeal to white, blue-collar voters, but the other identity groups in their constituency are bound to be jealous.

    Another way to look at the question: can the Dems find a strategy for suppressing the jealousy (and increasingly vicious white-men-focused rage) of their identity-group base so that their candidates are able to campaign for white votes?

    It seemed in the past few elections that the Dems were able to 'call off' the most fervid members of their constituency with a wink and an under-the-table promise that appeals to stale pale males might be necessary to win an election, but all things would be put to rights after a win was declared. But this time Hillary, whether because of hubris, or of taking white working-class votes for granted, or of fear of offending her core constituency, seemed to give up on this.

    Cal, There used to be a strong union element among blue collar workers and their allegiance to the Democrat party. Does that still exist? The strongest unions seem to be teachers, whose constant whining turns off many people and the service unions, SIEU, whose members only seem motivated when the union shepherds them to events.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Cal, There used to be a strong union element among blue collar workers and their allegiance to the Democrat party. Does that still exist?"

    Fireman and police unions vote strongly Republican because those professions are much more White male than the general U.S population. Also any profession in The U.S in general where you have a sizable chance of dying while on the job will vote heavily Republican whether it's a fisherman, a coal miner, a fireman, a member of the military, or a police officer. Those professions scare away most Liberals who mostly want safe indoor office desk building jobs where their life is never at risk.

  173. @sayless
    Chelsea is dumber than a hen. "I don't understand why people don't love my mom." It's good that she loves her mother, but really, she's how old, in her mid-to-late thirties? A fourteen-year-old would be able to distinguish between my mom and the candidate!
    • Replies: @Ivy
    Thinking of the Chelster and her mum, I wonder if perhaps there is an old Arkansas saying along the lines of:
    "The road apple doesn't fall far from the horse's ass".
  174. @Jefferson
    "There were several turning points, many of which happened years ago. Her main issue is that she’s a third world politician."

    Crooked Hildabeast is the female Kwame Kilpatrick.

    Jefferson, Kwame dressed better, otherwise decent comparison.

  175. @Marie
    It was not part of their blood,
    It came to them very late,
    With long arrears to make good,
    When the Saxon began to hate.

    They were not easily moved,
    They were icy -- willing to wait
    Till every count should be proved,
    Ere the Saxon began to hate.

    Their voices were even and low.
    Their eyes were level and straight.
    There was neither sign nor show
    When the Saxon began to hate.

    It was not preached to the crowd.
    It was not taught by the state.
    No man spoke it aloud
    When the Saxon began to hate.

    It was not suddently bred.
    It will not swiftly abate.
    Through the chilled years ahead,
    When Time shall count from the date
    That the Saxon began to hate.

    Marie, Are you reciting a poem or is this your work?

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Its Kipling IIRC
  176. @Romanian
    http://www.vdare.com/articles/will-illegal-foreign-voters-steal-the-election

    6.4% of noncitizens voted in 2008 and 2.2% of noncitizens voted in 2010, according to Old Dominion University. Almost 1.2 million non-citizens turned out in 2008, many of them to vote for the Sainted One.

    How many do you think turned out this year, prodded from behind by the Dems and their partners, like Soros? To stop Hitler!


    Former Colorado Secretary of State Scott Gessler identified nearly 5,000 noncitizens in Colorado who voted in the 2010 general election. Gessler’s office uncovered upwards of 12,000 noncitizens registered to vote. Liberal groups who oppose stronger election system protections attacked him for trying to verify citizenship status—because God forbid public officials sworn to uphold the rule of law actually do anything to enhance the integrity of our election system!
    Compounding the problem: The militant immigration expansionist group Mi Familia Vota, connected with the Service Employees International Union, has ramped up its efforts in swing states to facilitate naturalization and registration of Latino voters who will promote the open-borders agenda at the polls.
    Another rare defender of American sovereignty, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, fought in court for his state’s right to require citizenship documents from people who register to vote at motor vehicle offices. Last month, a federal appeals court struck down the Kansas law despite the U.S. Constitution’s conferral of responsibility for determining who may vote to states.
    In a scene straight out of “Alice in Wonderland,” Kobach faced a contempt hearing for battling against those who hold contempt for truly free and fair elections. He was forced to sign an agreement with the ACLU allowing more than 18,000 motor-voter registrants to cast ballots this November while litigation continues.
    Last year, undercover investigative journalist James O’Keefe and his Project Veritas team blew the whistle on North Carolina political operatives who encouraged people to vote even if they were noncitizens. Like Kobach, O’Keefe endures attacks on his efforts to ensure clean elections by grievance-mongers screaming about phony voter “disenfranchisement.”
    Put on your shocked faces: These illegal noncitizen voters overwhelmingly supported Democrats. And their votes were enough to tilt the presidential election results in North Carolina to President Obama, along with handing over “Democratic victories in congressional races including a critical 2008 Senate race (Al Franken’s victory in Minnesota) that delivered for Democrats a 60-vote filibuster-proof majority in the Senate.”
    But J. Christian Adams, a former Justice Department election lawyer in the Voting Rights Section, has exposed the systemic assault on the election process at every level by activist groups funded by liberal billionaire George Soros, including:

    Blocking citizenship verification.
    Automatic voter registration of welfare recipients without local verification checks.
    Massive foreign language ballot expansion.
    Obstruction of efforts to include state qualification instructions on voter registration forms.

    This past week, the Public Interest Law Foundation uncovered thousands of foreign aliens registered to vote in swing states Virginia and Pennsylvania thanks to the federal Motor Voter law. [PDF]It’s the tip of the iceberg because the studies include just a small sample of counties.
    Oh, Virginia voters, you’ll be thrilled to know that your top election officials are now trying to cover up the true extent of the scandal. PILF noted that the commissioner of the Virginia Department of Elections issued a written guidance to local election officials instructing them “not to respond to our requests for records pertaining to non-citizen voters.”
     
    Bonus - refugees vetting themselves.

    America, where self-vetting refugees Dream to participate. Then they read those comic book guides (thank you, Mexican government) to tap into juicy welfare benefits for which they just registered Dem and voted. The Dems took that whole public-private partnership in a different direction, where the public, meaning us taxpayers, get to pay for private activities. Can’t wait for more of that to be exposed and eliminated, and for news of self-deportations.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    Sorry, I forgot to add the link to refugees vetting themselves http://www.wnd.com/2016/09/obama-telling-refugees-go-vet-yourself/
  177. @Jim Don Bob
    Ed Klein says here (http://www.breitbart.com/radio/2016/11/15/ed-klein-doubts-clinton-dynasty-carried-on-shoulders-chelsea/#disqus_thread) that Chelsea is an even bigger bitch than her mother.

    Thinking of the Chelster and her mum, I wonder if perhaps there is an old Arkansas saying along the lines of:
    The road apple doesn’t fall far from the horse’s ass“.

  178. @Twinkie

    you’re moralising and imputing here like those fake progressives do
     
    I understand the distaste at the often hypocritical and inane "moralizing" that leftists do, but that doesn't make attempting to keep some semblance of civilized morality alive in any discussion, politics or otherwise, "fake."

    This is one of my major problems with some elements in the so-called alt-right. They seem to obsess about lampooning* and destroying their enemies, closing ranks around their tribe, and achieving power - not trying to build a harmonious and just society for all. Like leftist activists, it's always a war on the Other.

    To believe otherwise - to inject "moral preening" - seems to invite distasteful ad hominem labels such as "cuck" et al.

    *Sebastian Junger makes an excellent point in "Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging" that the kind of contempt that politically opposed Americans express toward each other is extremely jarring to returning veterans and contributes to their sense of broken community and alienation from the society which they served.

    This is one of my major problems with some elements in the so-called alt-right. They seem to obsess about lampooning* and destroying their enemies, closing ranks around their tribe, and achieving power – not trying to build a harmonious and just society for all.

    It’s becoming clearer and clearer that those two goals – a harmonious society, and a just society – are mutually exclusive.

  179. @International Jew

    Citizenship requirements also need reform.
     
    And they should know English. Not broken English, either. They should know it at near-native proficiency. If that means citizenship has to wait until their children's generation, then so be it.

    In general, there should be no hurry at all to grant citizenship to foreigners.

    • Agree: Kylie
  180. @Lurker
    I would say that any shitlords who feel like starting the 2020 election early should be out there pushing Ellison as a viable candidate now. Shame any naysayers for their racism, Islamophobia etc. Use PC against them.

    Lurker, Hillary and to some extent, Bernie, had national identities. Ellison is who? to most people.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    Then we need to make him a thing now!
  181. @Romanian
    http://www.vdare.com/articles/will-illegal-foreign-voters-steal-the-election

    6.4% of noncitizens voted in 2008 and 2.2% of noncitizens voted in 2010, according to Old Dominion University. Almost 1.2 million non-citizens turned out in 2008, many of them to vote for the Sainted One.

    How many do you think turned out this year, prodded from behind by the Dems and their partners, like Soros? To stop Hitler!


    Former Colorado Secretary of State Scott Gessler identified nearly 5,000 noncitizens in Colorado who voted in the 2010 general election. Gessler’s office uncovered upwards of 12,000 noncitizens registered to vote. Liberal groups who oppose stronger election system protections attacked him for trying to verify citizenship status—because God forbid public officials sworn to uphold the rule of law actually do anything to enhance the integrity of our election system!
    Compounding the problem: The militant immigration expansionist group Mi Familia Vota, connected with the Service Employees International Union, has ramped up its efforts in swing states to facilitate naturalization and registration of Latino voters who will promote the open-borders agenda at the polls.
    Another rare defender of American sovereignty, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, fought in court for his state’s right to require citizenship documents from people who register to vote at motor vehicle offices. Last month, a federal appeals court struck down the Kansas law despite the U.S. Constitution’s conferral of responsibility for determining who may vote to states.
    In a scene straight out of “Alice in Wonderland,” Kobach faced a contempt hearing for battling against those who hold contempt for truly free and fair elections. He was forced to sign an agreement with the ACLU allowing more than 18,000 motor-voter registrants to cast ballots this November while litigation continues.
    Last year, undercover investigative journalist James O’Keefe and his Project Veritas team blew the whistle on North Carolina political operatives who encouraged people to vote even if they were noncitizens. Like Kobach, O’Keefe endures attacks on his efforts to ensure clean elections by grievance-mongers screaming about phony voter “disenfranchisement.”
    Put on your shocked faces: These illegal noncitizen voters overwhelmingly supported Democrats. And their votes were enough to tilt the presidential election results in North Carolina to President Obama, along with handing over “Democratic victories in congressional races including a critical 2008 Senate race (Al Franken’s victory in Minnesota) that delivered for Democrats a 60-vote filibuster-proof majority in the Senate.”
    But J. Christian Adams, a former Justice Department election lawyer in the Voting Rights Section, has exposed the systemic assault on the election process at every level by activist groups funded by liberal billionaire George Soros, including:

    Blocking citizenship verification.
    Automatic voter registration of welfare recipients without local verification checks.
    Massive foreign language ballot expansion.
    Obstruction of efforts to include state qualification instructions on voter registration forms.

    This past week, the Public Interest Law Foundation uncovered thousands of foreign aliens registered to vote in swing states Virginia and Pennsylvania thanks to the federal Motor Voter law. [PDF]It’s the tip of the iceberg because the studies include just a small sample of counties.
    Oh, Virginia voters, you’ll be thrilled to know that your top election officials are now trying to cover up the true extent of the scandal. PILF noted that the commissioner of the Virginia Department of Elections issued a written guidance to local election officials instructing them “not to respond to our requests for records pertaining to non-citizen voters.”
     
    Bonus - refugees vetting themselves.

    In Colorado 0.0024 of the votes cast were by non citizens. This is arrived at from 6,000 non citizen voters (who actually cast votes) (mentioned in the Vdare piece you cited) out of a total of 2478664 Colorado voters in 2016. Voting for Hillary, Trump, Johnson.

    About 126,000,000 votes cast for Donald and Hillary nationwide. Johnson votes left out. Multiply this number by 0.0024 and you get 309,600 non citizen voters nationwide.

    Of course this assumes that the non citizen voter rate of Colorado can be applied nationwide. I think it can with at most an inaccuracy of 100,000 in either direction. Bear in mind that Colorado has higher percentage of Hispanics than most states. Not that its only Hispanics that would vote illegally.

    300,000 illegal voters (non-citizens) nationwide sounds more accurate than the three or two million I have heard batted around. All the above calculations done quick and dirty so you can verify if you like.

    *****mistake I calculated using 6000 instead of 5000 for Colorado

  182. @Andra
    But he got clocked in the popular vote - it may turn out that she wins by an unconscionable two percentage points, and she did very well for a Democrat in Texas. A Rose Bowl of votes in three states and the entire post election narrative would be different. Sometimes things are about chance and there is no great lesson to be learned.

    She probably did well as a Democrat in TX for 3 reasons:

    A. Lots of neo-con types who have served as officers in the military or worked for the DoD in some capacity. I suspect these were the only “moderates” who were susceptible to the nutty talk about the Russian menace.

    B. hispanic/Asian demographic shift

    C. Mega-church going, wealthy “neverTrump” Conservative Inc. type people. Probably one of the few places they exist in any kind of numbers. Not saying they voted Hillary, they probably just stayed home or voted for Johnson.

  183. @Buffalo Joe
    Cal, There used to be a strong union element among blue collar workers and their allegiance to the Democrat party. Does that still exist? The strongest unions seem to be teachers, whose constant whining turns off many people and the service unions, SIEU, whose members only seem motivated when the union shepherds them to events.

    “Cal, There used to be a strong union element among blue collar workers and their allegiance to the Democrat party. Does that still exist?”

    Fireman and police unions vote strongly Republican because those professions are much more White male than the general U.S population. Also any profession in The U.S in general where you have a sizable chance of dying while on the job will vote heavily Republican whether it’s a fisherman, a coal miner, a fireman, a member of the military, or a police officer. Those professions scare away most Liberals who mostly want safe indoor office desk building jobs where their life is never at risk.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Jefferson, The guy risking his life or limbs, and that includes lots of construction workers, detest the Dems and their gimme dat followers, especially after a hard day of freezing your ass off on a Midwest or Northeast construction site, but the Dems still think they have them on the hook.
  184. @David
    That she very nearly won is key. As darkness rolls around and Clinton pours back her 4th scotch and soda, her flickering consciousness can ruminate on the 50 or 100 things that done differently or handled differently or successfully suppressed might very well have pushed her over the line. SO much room for regret!

    David, A few weeks ago I commented that regrets are the abrasive that wear you down. Hillary must be worn smooth by now.

  185. Has no one mentioned the possible turning point being sick Hillary on Queer Street, tossed into the side of a van??

    Her downfall was most likely death by a thousand cuts, while her “killshot” on Trump ended up being a fleshwound. When you come at the king, you best not miss.

  186. @Andra
    But he got clocked in the popular vote - it may turn out that she wins by an unconscionable two percentage points, and she did very well for a Democrat in Texas. A Rose Bowl of votes in three states and the entire post election narrative would be different. Sometimes things are about chance and there is no great lesson to be learned.

    But he got clocked in the popular vote

    So?

    A popular strategy does not always translate into a winning strategy, as pointed out by leftie icon Michael Moore and her own husband. “It’s the economy stupid” In the swing states that Trump won in, that was more true today than when James Carville, Bill Clinton’s campaign manager, uttered them back in 1992.

    The man who made the Sailor Strategy a reality is Jewish.
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevenbertoni/2016/11/22/exclusive-interview-how-jared-kushner-won-trump-the-white-house/#35d4b7482f50

  187. @anonymous
    Let's not overlook The Enquirer running Clinton exposures thee weeks running up to the election. The magazine is positioned near the checkout line in many stores where people see the headlines whilst waiting. People saw the blazing headlines over and over again, circulating the message. It may sound silly but the magazine is seen by very many ordinary people.

    Anonymous, Whilst? How vewwy British of you.

  188. @gda
    The "popular vote" meme is the plaintive cry of the loser.

    Of the more than 5,000 counties in the US, Hillary won 300. Essentially, a sea of red, with the exception (mainly) of a few major cities.

    I am reminded of the experiments done with rats regarding the implications of living in overcrowded circumstances (such as inner cities). The scientists found that, if you put too many rats in too small an area, not only do they start to eat each other, but they invariably start to vote Democrat.

    Food for thought indeed.

    gda, even the dead rats vote democrat.

  189. @Ivy
    America, where self-vetting refugees Dream to participate. Then they read those comic book guides (thank you, Mexican government) to tap into juicy welfare benefits for which they just registered Dem and voted. The Dems took that whole public-private partnership in a different direction, where the public, meaning us taxpayers, get to pay for private activities. Can't wait for more of that to be exposed and eliminated, and for news of self-deportations.

    Sorry, I forgot to add the link to refugees vetting themselves http://www.wnd.com/2016/09/obama-telling-refugees-go-vet-yourself/

  190. I wonder if the pollsters didnt help Trump out, it kept Hillary confident in her failing plan, and let the media create a false narrative about a failing Trump campaign that they will never live down.

    No. Millions of people are susceptible to Big Media’s indoctrination. It suppressed many would-be Trump voters.

    But he got clocked in the popular vote – it may turn out that she wins by an unconscionable two percentage points, and she did very well for a Democrat in Texas. A Rose Bowl of votes in three states and the entire post election narrative would be different. Sometimes things are about chance and there is no great lesson to be learned.

    The lesson to be learned, is that leftists alone get to dictate what lessons are learned.

    Until we finally learn our lesson, and throw them over the side, that is.

    What happened to being a human being? Sadness for the officers and their families didn’t come to mind first? Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?

    Men generally talk about the relevant implications of their reactions, not useless crap about their emotions.

    A Black candidate like Obama would have won convincingly.

    Such as?

    Trump very nearly lost.

    Yes, Clinton’s basking in the “very nearly won” right now…

  191. @Jefferson
    "Cal, There used to be a strong union element among blue collar workers and their allegiance to the Democrat party. Does that still exist?"

    Fireman and police unions vote strongly Republican because those professions are much more White male than the general U.S population. Also any profession in The U.S in general where you have a sizable chance of dying while on the job will vote heavily Republican whether it's a fisherman, a coal miner, a fireman, a member of the military, or a police officer. Those professions scare away most Liberals who mostly want safe indoor office desk building jobs where their life is never at risk.

    Jefferson, The guy risking his life or limbs, and that includes lots of construction workers, detest the Dems and their gimme dat followers, especially after a hard day of freezing your ass off on a Midwest or Northeast construction site, but the Dems still think they have them on the hook.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Jefferson, The guy risking his life or limbs, and that includes lots of construction workers, detest the Dems and their gimme dat followers, especially after a hard day of freezing your ass off on a Midwest or Northeast construction site, but the Dems still think they have them on the hook."

    Crooked Hildabeast looks like the snobby type who would disown her own daughter from the Clinton family if she had ended up marrying a blue collar White guy who went to a trade school. Crooked Hildabeast would be more accepting of Chelsea wanting to have a gender change operation to become a man before she would be accepting of Chelsea marrying a blue collar White man.

    Blue collar Whites are even more culturally alien to Crooked Hildabeast than World War T is.
  192. @Buffalo Joe
    Jefferson, The guy risking his life or limbs, and that includes lots of construction workers, detest the Dems and their gimme dat followers, especially after a hard day of freezing your ass off on a Midwest or Northeast construction site, but the Dems still think they have them on the hook.

    “Jefferson, The guy risking his life or limbs, and that includes lots of construction workers, detest the Dems and their gimme dat followers, especially after a hard day of freezing your ass off on a Midwest or Northeast construction site, but the Dems still think they have them on the hook.”

    Crooked Hildabeast looks like the snobby type who would disown her own daughter from the Clinton family if she had ended up marrying a blue collar White guy who went to a trade school. Crooked Hildabeast would be more accepting of Chelsea wanting to have a gender change operation to become a man before she would be accepting of Chelsea marrying a blue collar White man.

    Blue collar Whites are even more culturally alien to Crooked Hildabeast than World War T is.

  193. @Kylie
    Citizenship requirements also need reform. No dual citizenship, no anchor babies, etc. At present, the requirements favor non-citizens over citizens.

    Citizenship requirements also need reform. No dual citizenship, no anchor babies, etc. At present, the requirements favor non-citizens over citizens.

    Getting rid of anchor baby laws is not one Constitutional Amendment away. It is one solid Supreme Court decision away. It would even be less if Donald and Congress had the cojones to pass a law changing anchor baby’s status from automatic US citizen to illegal alien. There would be ACLU type lawsuits, but it would get the ball rolling fast (expedited) up to the Supreme Court with some Donald Trump justices pre-installed.

  194. That video of Hillary saying that punishing the banks wouldn’t stop racism or sexism or discrimination or whatever. When was it?

    It was a provocation to everyone who suffered (unemployment, debt, repossession) as a result of the banking crisis and the ensuing recession. A lot of people.

    If she didn’t want to attack the banks she should have just kept quiet about them. To publicly defend them like this was just bad politics.

    There wasn’t a single ‘turning point’ in this election, but I’m sure that each time that video got played on TV another great slew of voters turned against her.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Mid-February 2016.

    I'm not sure that Hillary's "big banks" video was played much on TV. I brought it up a lot because it so perfectly summarized the logic of Hillary's campaign, but most people don't yet possess the explicit concepts that make it comprehensible as the reductio ad absurdum of Hillaryism.

  195. @Jack D
    I think you are wrong about this. On paper she was a great candidate and (like Nixon) she won the debates on points, but she was completely lacking in that undefinable charisma thing. Obama had it and Trump had it and she didn't. Tens of thousands would line up for Trump rallies, no one went to a Hillary rally unless she had a rock star (someone with actual charisma) appearing with her. Nine times out of ten the candidate who has IT will win. Even women who were exactly like her (maybe even ESPECIALLY such women) couldn't get excited about her.

    “that undefinable charisma thing. Obama had it and Trump had it and she didn’t”

    Did Obama have it? Or was a well-spoken and literate black guy, supported by media for whom he could do no wrong, a blank slate onto which the public could project the charisma of their choice?

    I remember the huge crowds he got when he went to Europe early in his presidency, but I always had the impression his appeal was WHAT he was (first ‘black’ pres) rather than WHO he was.

  196. @Giant Goose
    That video of Hillary saying that punishing the banks wouldn't stop racism or sexism or discrimination or whatever. When was it?

    It was a provocation to everyone who suffered (unemployment, debt, repossession) as a result of the banking crisis and the ensuing recession. A lot of people.

    If she didn't want to attack the banks she should have just kept quiet about them. To publicly defend them like this was just bad politics.

    There wasn't a single 'turning point' in this election, but I'm sure that each time that video got played on TV another great slew of voters turned against her.

    Mid-February 2016.

    I’m not sure that Hillary’s “big banks” video was played much on TV. I brought it up a lot because it so perfectly summarized the logic of Hillary’s campaign, but most people don’t yet possess the explicit concepts that make it comprehensible as the reductio ad absurdum of Hillaryism.

  197. @gda
    My thoughts are that 2018, and 60 seats in the Senate is the real goal in mind. He will play (generally) nice with the Dems by promoting and proceeding quickly with mostly non-partisan measures until then (corporate tax reform, infrastructure spending etc.).

    After 2018 he will have unimpeded power to implement his plan to drain the swamp for real. The Clinton Foundation FBI investigation will then likely come to the forefront as well.

    It will be interesting to see whether Obama issues a blanket pardon as he slinks out the door in January.

    It will be interesting to see whether Obama issues a blanket pardon as he slinks out the door in January.

    My understanding is that Hillary can’t get a pardon from BO unless she requests one, and last I heard, she hadn’t requested one. If she ever does, that request would be worth copying, framing and displaying in a prominent place once Trump gets into the White House.

  198. @Gabriel M
    Trayvon Martin was certainly the man who red-pilled me. The British media covered the case in an even more dishonest manner than the American one, or so at least it seemed to me. It was then that I first realized that the media didn't just spin and exaggerate, it created entirely false accounts of the world.

    The media never spent much time on it but Dylan Roof said its the media’s handling of the Trayvon case that drove him to race sites.

    That a dispute between two private citizens ended up being a marker for national race relations was a bridge too far for many.

  199. @Twinkie

    My first thought
     
    Really? You heard that some police officers were gunned down, and your first thought was about politics? That's disappointing, Mr. Sailer.

    What happened to being a human being? Sadness for the officers and their families didn't come to mind first? Or at least some sense of wanting to bring the perpetrator to justice?

    The first thing left-wingers have been doing in response to deaths, if they comment on them at all, is to push sensationalistic political interpretations through the popular media. They have diffused this mentality and this viscerality and I am perfectly at ease with the thesis that it is their fault.

  200. @pepperinmono
    Maybe its too early, but beginning to get a little worried Trump watering down positions.
    Could be head fake.
    Get the Hillary thing, why waste time.
    Maybe Rudy not right guy, but Mitt Romney ,fucking turncoat?
    How are we gonna revive coal industry but stay in UN Climate Change bullshit?
    Trump ending up a disappointment will be a major problem.
    People want real change!
    We'll see.

    “Maybe its too early, but beginning to get a little worried Trump watering down positions.”

    Have no fear. This is a coordinated attack by the gaystream media and it’s meant to dispirit us. President Trump, by his cabinet picks, shows every intention of fulfilling his campaign promises. Bank.

    President Trump is a man of action who accomplishes things, QED. Why would that suddenly stop because he holds the most powerful elected office on Earth? Rhetorical.

    God bless President Trump.

  201. I suspect there were a number of turning points, but I think Trump’s promise to repeal Obamacare probably won him a lot of votes. The thing about Obamacare is that it doesn’t really provide Affordable Health Care, but is a form of health care tax that still leaves health care financially out of reach of the people who have to pay for it due to the swingeing “copays”.

    Obamacare may be the best that is possible, but it should be voluntary, because many people who choose not to pay monthly premiums will then be able to afford health care by paying for cash with the money they use to pay for Obamacare. Also as cash customers, they will, to a limited extent, be able to negotiate their own prices.

    Also a useful reform would be to separate insurance coverage for routine visits to the doctor’s office, for example to get birth control pills, or antibiotics, and hospital insurance, which is a whole different ball game.

    Additionally, may non urgent medical conditions may be addressed by going overseas where medical care is much cheaper, and the money not spent on Obamacare could pay for this.

    For example I had a cortisone shot in my shoulder and a month’s supply of steroid medication from a doctor in the Dominican Republic for $75, whereas a doctor in the US would want to milk the process for 2 or three visits plus make me pay thousands of dollars for a scan.

    Another time in the Domican Republic I had a knee problem (Baker’s Cyst) and had an ultrasound at the local (private) hospital for $40 that produced excellent pictures. They recomended surgery, which I declined, Both the shoulder and the knee are now better, or at least no worse.)

  202. @Yep
    Of course it played a big part but the media have barely mentioned blm in all their hand wringing about what happened. In fact I read an article today on Yahoo (I think) calling Breitbart or someone racist for saying blm was an excuse for blacks to riot. They are still saying that if you don't support blm then you're racist yet they can't figure out why all their former white blue collar voters abandoned the party.

    Something I haven't heard much about is how much Hillary's illness affected her campaigning. I keep hearing how she didn't spend anytime in this or that state but the reason is never that she was too sick to do as much campaigning as she needed to.

    Also, there's a really surreal article up at the nyt about how Breitbart and others are mocking celebrities for all their crying about the election. Pretty funny stuff.

    http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/11/22/arts/how-conservative-sites-turn-celebrity-despair-on-its-head.html

    The NYT article is a monument to the NYT’s utter lack of self-awareness.

    It’s as if these so-called celebrities are not deserving of the mockery they’re receiving for their public displays of anger, anguish, sorrow, protest, in light of the election. As if it matters who has the support of the bigger stars. As if blowhard celebrities deserve to remain unchallenged, uncriticized. As if the NYT doesn’t participate in the very practice (mockery and criticism of its political opponents) which it condemns in this column.

    The cluelessness on display reeks of hubris, entitlement, arrogance. But you knew that…

  203. @International Jew

    Citizenship requirements also need reform.
     
    And they should know English. Not broken English, either. They should know it at near-native proficiency. If that means citizenship has to wait until their children's generation, then so be it.

    When my mom took her citizenship test in the 50’s , the judge told her “you did very well ma’am , but your English needs to improve”. My mom has read 3-4 books a week for the last seventy + years. At the time she read in German, as that was her first language. She was so dismayed by the judge’s statement that she never read another book in German, only English. Nowadays the judge would probably be Eiched.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    She'd been here at least five years at that point, right? And she liked to read? I've never met a German immigrant who didn't know English astonishingly well.

    Not so much Chinese, who never seem to master noun-verb agreement or get it into their heads that verb tense and mood matters. Just the other day I was on the phone with some guy at my insurance company. I needed a precise answer to an important question where, as it happens, the timing of things makes a great deal of difference. Well, this guy could only speak in the present tense, besides other problems and of course with his accent on top of it all..

    After I'd had enough frustration I said to him, "Look, we're getting nowhere. Could I speak to an American?" He: "I fi' tha' offesive [offensive]. I am a' Amewica' citize'."

  204. “Relatives of our jewish family (domiciled in Brooklyn), lived in Yorksville in the late 1930s, then as now, a heavily German neighborhood centered around East 86th street in Manhattan”

    It’s Yorkville not Yorksville. While it was heavily German then, it is nothing of the sort now.

  205. @Jack D
    I think you are wrong about this. On paper she was a great candidate and (like Nixon) she won the debates on points, but she was completely lacking in that undefinable charisma thing. Obama had it and Trump had it and she didn't. Tens of thousands would line up for Trump rallies, no one went to a Hillary rally unless she had a rock star (someone with actual charisma) appearing with her. Nine times out of ten the candidate who has IT will win. Even women who were exactly like her (maybe even ESPECIALLY such women) couldn't get excited about her.

    “Tens of thousands would line up for Trump rallies, no one went to a Hillary rally unless she had a rock star (someone with actual charisma) appearing with her.”

    As an Italian the only way I would be caught dead at a Crooked Hildabeast rally would be if The Boss was there perform Born To Run.

    After the song ends I would get the hell out of there ASAP. I can’t stand Crooked Hildabeast’s voice.

  206. @Andra
    But he got clocked in the popular vote - it may turn out that she wins by an unconscionable two percentage points, and she did very well for a Democrat in Texas. A Rose Bowl of votes in three states and the entire post election narrative would be different. Sometimes things are about chance and there is no great lesson to be learned.

    I’m tired of the popular vote argument. It’s a game no one was playing. If popular vote mattered, WAY more people vote. Republicans in California, New York, and Massachusetts etc turn out, as well as dems in red states. So who knows.

  207. @Trelane
    Turning Point:

    February 16, 2016

    Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture NYC

    (she's dying here)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=9C12ZvOJNfs#t=3

    The first comments under that clip were hilarious.

    At one point Hillary tells the chanting crowd, “You’re a good Amen chorus.” So clumsy!

  208. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “…the Turning Point of the Election?”

    Maybe when Hillary Clinton started calling anybody that seemed to think America wasn’t the universal property of all mankind “deplorables”? And said “Because that’s not who we are!” in a particular screech.

    That might get even a middle-aged Rust belt white guy who had voted Democrat all his life, whose dad had voted Democrat all his life, whose immigrant grand-dad had voted European and American socialist, and whose grand-dad’s father had voted European communist to wake up and realize the Democrats were using him, they sure weren’t going to make his problems their top priority.

    I’m with the commenters who say there wasn’t one event. It was more like the 1989 fall of communism. Everybody knew the government wasn’t on their side. Once it is no longer taboo to talk about it and it is clear to enough people where the government’s policy will lead, it all fell down. For all its faults the interminable campaign did that.

    (In communism’s case I think one fairly low-level East German border police colonel type had to make the call; when a couple (part of a large crowd) who had crossed into West Berlin to just take a quick look around (because the government had said people could) wanted to come back to their baby that they had left with the babysitter… the colonel had to decide, let them back in (and the rest of the crowd) or adhere to the government’s secret real plan to achieve the right demographics by “getting rid of the radicals”. It didn’t help that none of his superiors would man-up and give him a direct order one way or another.)

  209. @J1234
    I have always said that Hillary's connection to black lives matter was going to cost her, big time. The problem was, she (in concert with blm) treated all of the blm associated cases as if they were carbon copies of each other, which was a very un-lawyerly thing to do. This was to pander to ghetto black emotion and fear, which isn't very often nuanced or discerning. Aside from involving typically irresponsible males from a dysfunctional American minority culture, the Michael Brown case and the Walter Scott case had very little to do with each other. Walter Scott was running away from a cop, while Michael Brown was charging a cop, trying to take his gun (presumably to shoot him.) Insinuating that every dead black guy in a blm case was equally innocent displayed Hillary's unjust notions about justice for the world to see.

    Yes, it's true - lots of internet conservatives (unfortunately) tried to portray all of the dead black guys as equally guilty, but they weren't running for president. Her demagoguery on this matter was way beyond anything Trump ever did, by a factor of five, but was never described by the MSM as such.

    OT, but as far as Trump saying he won't prosecute her on email stuff...I
    honestly believe (at this point) that he's saying these things to get beyond December 19th, when the Electoral College votes. The EC has never overturned election day results before, but this election has been like no other, so who knows? I think it's correct to be nice until then.

    OT, but as far as Trump saying he won’t prosecute her on email stuff…I
    honestly believe (at this point) that he’s saying these things to get beyond December 19th, when the Electoral College votes.

    He’s saying those things because prosecuting Crooked Hillary is not important.

    — Building the wall is important.
    — E-verify is important.
    — Not inviting in 650,000 Syrian “refugees” is important.
    — Stopping Muslim immigration is important.
    — On shoring jobs is important.
    — Getting male labor force employment rate up is important.
    — Not messing around in Syria imposing a no-fly zone and creating conflict with Russia is important.
    — Dialing back Obama’s attacks–e.g. AFFH–on whites is important.
    — Even “pump-priming” infrastructure improvement is important.

    Hillary is … no longer important. Her behavior was a very critical in making the case for why she was unfit for the Presidency. Prosecuting her is not an important part of the Trump agenda. It does not matter to the lives of Americans.

  210. People underestimate the effect of Bernie Sanders. Thanks to Bernie Sanders, HRC had to turn to blacks and browns to win the primary. That was the impetus of her “punishing the banks won’t end racism” quote, which itself wasn’t played up much, but the subliminal effect of the primary where Clinton’s blacks and browns outvoted Bernie’s whites was huge.

  211. @Buffalo Joe
    Marie, Are you reciting a poem or is this your work?

    Its Kipling IIRC

  212. @kaganovitch
    When my mom took her citizenship test in the 50's , the judge told her "you did very well ma'am , but your English needs to improve". My mom has read 3-4 books a week for the last seventy + years. At the time she read in German, as that was her first language. She was so dismayed by the judge's statement that she never read another book in German, only English. Nowadays the judge would probably be Eiched.

    She’d been here at least five years at that point, right? And she liked to read? I’ve never met a German immigrant who didn’t know English astonishingly well.

    Not so much Chinese, who never seem to master noun-verb agreement or get it into their heads that verb tense and mood matters. Just the other day I was on the phone with some guy at my insurance company. I needed a precise answer to an important question where, as it happens, the timing of things makes a great deal of difference. Well, this guy could only speak in the present tense, besides other problems and of course with his accent on top of it all..

    After I’d had enough frustration I said to him, “Look, we’re getting nowhere. Could I speak to an American?” He: “I fi’ tha’ offesive [offensive]. I am a’ Amewica’ citize’.”

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    It is kind of funny, as my mom has a good ear for language and she's still fluent in 5 languages (in her 90's now). I think it's because she lived in a neighborhood where she didn't have to speak English at the time . She could get by with either German, Hungarian or Yiddish and not have to speak English .
  213. @Andra
    But he got clocked in the popular vote - it may turn out that she wins by an unconscionable two percentage points, and she did very well for a Democrat in Texas. A Rose Bowl of votes in three states and the entire post election narrative would be different. Sometimes things are about chance and there is no great lesson to be learned.

    Trump didn’t “get clocked” in the popular vote. Hillary lost the popular vote, too. VoteFraud.org just completed their investigation of the votes cast in the election and determined 3 million were cast by illegal aliens. This means Trump won the Presidency by majority of Electoral College votes AND the popular vote. Greg Phillips, President of VoteFraud.org, Tweeted the findings: “We have verified more than three million votes cast by non-citizens. We are joining [email protected] to initiate legal action.”

    Couple this with the millions of dead voters registered illegally by Democrats, the disappearance of valid Trump votes in Democrat-controlled areas, the usual suppression of the overseas military vote and the switching votes for Trump to HRC on thousands of electronically-cast voting machines, means Trump won in a landslide of popular votes, too. Most likely somewhere in the range of 3-million to 7-million more votes for Trump.

  214. A couple of days ago I was held up for some hours in traffic. What happened was that some homeland security immigration officers and a couple of cops had stopped a van full of 6 illegal immigrants, a roofing crew apparently, and arrested three of them, at which point one of them ran away.

    The two cops gave chase and one of them was hit by a SUV driven by a local woman while running across the highway and was killed instantly. As a result one side of the highway was closed down for at least 4 hours while they took measurements, photos, etc, whatever cops do, and at the time I passed going the other way I counted at least 25 cop cars in attendance.

    My Haitian wife’s comment was interesting. She said police in the US are stupid, putting their life at risk over something so trivial so they can get patted on the head by their superiors. If it was that important, they should have just shot the guy, just the same way they frequently shoot people for nothing much. If it wasn’t that important, they should have let him run and they would surely have found him later via his contacts or employers as he would not get far on foot.

    One has to wonder how many law enforcement officers will be killed trying to be heroes once the deportation machine really gets going.

    Incidentally the illegal who ran was later captured and it turned out he had been deported before at least 2 times, and he just returned a few days ago after crossing the border in Texas. He was from Guatemala or San Salvador (reports are conflicting, so perhaps he had dual citizenship).

    There was some talk as to whether the poor guy he could be charged in the death of the cop, but it would seem to me to be a much better idea to arrest his employer, That would put a shiver down the backs of employers of illegals.

    Meanwhile cops have been instructed to look left, then right, then left again before crossing the road.

  215. @International Jew
    She'd been here at least five years at that point, right? And she liked to read? I've never met a German immigrant who didn't know English astonishingly well.

    Not so much Chinese, who never seem to master noun-verb agreement or get it into their heads that verb tense and mood matters. Just the other day I was on the phone with some guy at my insurance company. I needed a precise answer to an important question where, as it happens, the timing of things makes a great deal of difference. Well, this guy could only speak in the present tense, besides other problems and of course with his accent on top of it all..

    After I'd had enough frustration I said to him, "Look, we're getting nowhere. Could I speak to an American?" He: "I fi' tha' offesive [offensive]. I am a' Amewica' citize'."

    It is kind of funny, as my mom has a good ear for language and she’s still fluent in 5 languages (in her 90’s now). I think it’s because she lived in a neighborhood where she didn’t have to speak English at the time . She could get by with either German, Hungarian or Yiddish and not have to speak English .

  216. @Buffalo Joe
    Lurker, Hillary and to some extent, Bernie, had national identities. Ellison is who? to most people.

    Then we need to make him a thing now!

  217. @Kylie
    "I say ‘silent’ because ‘shy Trump voters’ does not capture the anger and alienation."

    Doesn't even begin to. Nor has a Trump victory lessened that anger and alienation. Instead the vile response of the left has increased and deepened them.

    Ceterum censeo.

    Nor has a Trump victory lessened that anger and alienation.

    Disagree with this, optimism and hope can trump anger and alienation.

  218. @Spyder
    I wonder if the pollsters didnt help Trump out, it kept Hillary confident in her failing plan, and let the media create a false narrative about a failing Trump campaign that they will never live down.

    Constantly saying Trump was certain to lose in a landslide, and providing numbers to show it, was necessary for the moral of the establishment and their supporters. Even giving Trump a serious chance was something they could not cope with. At the same time, it suppressed their turnout, probably enough to make a difference.

    Leftism depends a lot on the sense of inevitability.

  219. […] employment. After five police officers were murdered in a Black Lives Matter protest in July, her bizarre response was to urge whites to “do a better job of listening” when blacks talk about the […]

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