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Here’s my new movie review in Taki’s Magazine:

Arkham’s Razor
by Steve Sailer

October 09, 2019

Joker is a clever and memorable (although not terribly original or enjoyable) R-rated art-house drama in the tradition of Taxi Driver and The King of Comedy masquerading as yet another comic book movie. Bizarre as it would have seemed in 1976, playing Batman’s maniacal archenemy has become for movie stars what portraying Richard III is for Shakespearean actors: the ultimate test of their villain chops. Joaquin Phoenix joins Jack Nicholson and the late Heath Ledger as impressive Jokers.

Read the whole thing there.

 
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  1. J.Ross says:

    Their Hearts Burning With Political Consciousness, Fearless NBA Owners, The Face of the People, Come Together and Stand Strong Against Terrifying Woman and her Threatening Cardboard
    https://6abc.com/sports/sixers-fan-supporting-hong-kong-ejected-from-preseason-game/5604293/

    • LOL: jim jones
    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    , @Reg Cæsar
  2. So, if it had been a shorter movie, it’d been good?

  3. I could never take those super- (heroes & villains) seriously, even as a bearable brainless entertainment. To me, these fictional characters are as interesting as Mongol throat singing (actually -less):

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Liza
    , @jamie b.
  4. @Bardon Kaldian

    I went to a Tuvan throat singing concert in the 1990s. The band was promoting their album “60 Horses in My Herd.” The lead singer was said to be descended from 57 generations of shamans.

  5. Well I gotta say, I never really understood exactly why we were supposed to treat the conflict between Batman and The Joker as some sort of profound, chthonic, operatic, Jungian contest of wills, worthy of a full-on production at Bayreuth… whereas the conflict between Batman and The Riddler was just an insignificant slightly tawdry thumb-wrestle between two weirdos wearing fetish costumes.

    Personally as a kid I hated comic books but loved the daily funny pages. Beetle Bailey versus Sarge, Charlie Brown versus Lucy, Dick Tracy versus Flat-top, Ignatz Mouse versus Offissa Pup, Nancy and Sluggo against the world and Aunt Fritzi, Zonker Harris versus Walden Puddle, those made total sense to me. Plus they were over with in about forty-five seconds each. Whoops, here comes the D train! Got actual stuff to do!

  6. SFG says:

    Your guess that he was driven by exasperation at ‘woke culture’ is…absolutely right!

    https://www.indiewire.com/2019/10/todd-phillips-left-comedy-joker-woke-culture-1202177886/

    Here’s the original article, from a Vanity Fair profile of the star:

    https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2019/10/joaquin-phoenix-cover-story

  7. Never liked Joaquin Phoenix and I don’t really care to know the Joker backstory as told from a current year perspective.

    Ever notice now the SJW’s never complain about needing more nihilistic sadists-of-color in movies? How many black villains appeared in the entirety of the 30 or so MCU movies? I believe it was two, one of we exclude the Afro-fantasy, and the remaining was only a sidekick.

    I’m surprised you haven’t commented on the Chernobyl mini series. Other than the fictional Mary Sue character played by Emily Watson, it is fairly well done and the continuity between Jared Harris and Stellan Skarsgard is the best I’ve seen between two actors in quite a long time.

  8. SamHyde says:

    Are you sure Nolan is a conservative? @Steve Sailer
    His Wikipedia doesn’t say much about his politics except for this:

    “However, he has publicly shared some of his sociopolitical concerns for the future, such as the current conditions of nuclear weapons and environmental issues that he says need to be addressed.”

  9. Hodag says:

    How did Hinkley become obsessed with Taxi Driver? It was released on Betamax in 1976 according to the internet. But I do not remember things like video rental stores in 1981. My childhood chum of mine had a Betamax around then but his father was a local TV producer and his mom lost her job to Oprah…so it was quite rare. Was Taxi Driver a midnight movie? Or did he see it once and get obsessed?

  10. Dear Abby,

    I just saw In the Shadow of the Moon on Netflix about a man whose granddaughter travels back in time to prevent a civil war by killing racists with a radioactive isotope. I don’t have access to a time machine or radioactive isotope. How should I kill racists?

    Yours Truly,

    Confused Sci Fi Fan

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian, TWS, Liza
  11. Hail says: • Website

    Trevor Lynch reviewed Joker, negatively, at the Unz Review on October 4.

    Excerpt:

    [MORE]

    Traditionally, the character of the Joker has drawn upon the Romantic idea that madness can be entwined with genius, charisma, psychological depth, and creativity. Phoenix’s Joker is much closer to the sad truth: The vast majority of crazy people are not deep, creative, or interesting. They are just pathetic, shambling, vacant defectives who repeatedly betray and disappoint the people who are unfortunate enough to love or take care of them.

    Ledger’s Joker has a Nietzschean and Heideggerian philosophy, which he articulates with striking words and deeds. Phoenix’s Joker doesn’t have a nihilistic philosophy. He’s just a depressive. When we first see him, he is holding a sign reading “Everything Must Go.” Yeah, it’s for a going out of business sale, but it’s also symbolic. Phoenix’s Joker does not “stand for” nihilism as a worldview. As he says later on, he doesn’t stand for anything. He has no worldview. He’s just a tortured soul, and a banal one at that.

    All the other Jokers—Ledger, Leto, Nicholson, even Cesar Romero, ferchrissakes—have some charisma. They are commanding presences. Phoenix’s Joker has no charisma at all. He’s a physically repulsive stick insect of a man: unkempt, unhealthy, and slightly effeminate, reeking of cigarettes and low self-esteem. You’d want to squash him like a bug, if you’d deign to notice him at all.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
  12. Hail says: • Website

    There seems to be a real split of views on Joker, which I see roughly as follows:

    – Some see Joker as a right-wing, tacitly pro-white-male movie (this includes the many hand-wringers in the MSM — who may or may not believe their own histrionics, but do see a chance to score points rhetorical against the Bad Guys);

    – Others see Joker as a left-wing movie that presents us with a corrupt, WASP-like power elite lording it over the people; that having been done, it then praises a quasi-communist uprising against the corrupt WASP elite, and is careful to keep us largely in sympathy with the uprising’s unlikely leader, the downtrodden and mistreated, if highly imperfect, Arthur Fleck. (FWIW, Fleck is an often-Jewish surname.)

    I’d come down in the latter camp. As does Jim Goad in his Takimag review. I think there is a lot of straw-clutching by those who see a pro-White message here.

    Sailer’s review consciously straddles both camps but the bulk of his commentary in this review, IMO, leans towards the latter (Joker as more left-wing than right-wing).

    • Replies: @Leonard
  13. Mr. Anon says:

    With the shift in pop cultural hegemony from Old Americans to Ellis Island Americans, movies based on comic book superheroes, most of whom were dreamed up by American Jews from the 1930s into the 1960s, now fill the role once played by Westerns as Hollywood’s bread-and-butter genre.

    America’s leading cultural product, thanks to our leading cultural producers, is now puerile dreck. You’d think a light unto the nations would burn brighter.

  14. Hail says: • Website
    @Ray Huffman

    “[Joker] is firmly leftist in its sympathies…a social-justice morality tale.” — Jim Goad

    More political analysis of Joker from Jim Goad:

    [MORE]

    Maybe I was napping, but not once throughout the film do I remember it being made a point that Arthur is white. But over and over again it’s emphasized that he’s a victim of the strong, the sane, and the wealthy.

    Even the fact that he’s an incel plays less of an integral role in his character than those depicted by Robert De Niro in Taxi Driver and King of Comedy. It’s clear that Arthur finally snaps after a society which has attempted to beat the life out of a mentally ill man forces him to start beating back. At bottom, it’s a social-justice morality tale.

  15. cyborasm says:

    Steve, what did you think was a “particularly effeminate gay” mannerism that Phoenix “tossed in at the end”?

    I’m wondering for 2 reasons,

    1) “Zorro the Gay Blade” is the Zorro movie that the Wayne’s are coming out of when they get gunned down (creating the Zorro-inspired Batman)

    2) Arthur’s masculinity is questioned at many points. He can’t defend himself without a gun. He does a droopy wand trick with Young Master Bruce, and then hands him fake flowers. He’s a Mammas Boy, and also washes his naked mother in the bathtub (but doesn’t seem to mind or have issues with it) And he’s desperate for a father figure. He wants to entertain children but his Inborn Mental Condition keeps him from doing so.

  16. BenKenobi says:
    @J.Ross

    There will now be fewer, but better NBA fans.

  17. @Steve Sailer

    57 generations, huh? Figuring 25 years per generation, that comes to 1425 years. So the first generation of his Tuvan throat-singing shaman ancestors must have been around in Anno domini 1995 – 1425 = A.D. 570, just about when Muhammad was born, says https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muhammad . I wonder how the genealogical records were kept.
    This throat singing is less pleasant than this umlaut-rich Kazakh tune, whose melody is similar to the 1966 Hollies song “Stop, stop, stop all the dancing”.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  18. “Once upon a time in Batman-wood”

  19. @Hodag

    http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/hinckley/taxidriver.htm

    SNIP:

    In the years leading up to John F. Hinckley Jr.’s attempted assassination of President Ronald Reagan, he became obsessed with the movie “Taxi Driver.” Hinckley saw the movie at least fifteen times, read and re-read the book it was based upon, and bought the soundtrack to the film, listening to it for hours on end. Hinckley even began to model certain aspects of his life on the actions of the main characters. Most importantly, Hinckley developed an intense obsession with an actress in the film, Jodie Foster.

    • Replies: @utu
  20. Alfa158 says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Several decades ago when underground cartoons were used by the counter-culture to deconstruct society, there was for a brief time a meme about Nancy and Sluggo having some profound significance below the surface. College intellectuals would discuss the hidden meanings behind the fact that the strip seemed to be so devoid of any detectable humor that it must surely have been a deliberate philosophical statement by the writer, and the brilliantly surrealist starkness of the landscapes. What was most intriguing however was the way that Nancy and Sluggo were drawn as crude and simple two dimensional shapes while in the very same cartoon, Aunt Fritzi was drawn as a meticulously rendered, lifelike sexpot. And who was she supposed to be anyway?

  21. Joe Sweet says:
    @Hodag

    How did Hinkley become obsessed with Taxi Driver?

    Likely part of the the MK Ultra programming administered by CIA operatives intent on installing their boy GHW Bush in the White House.

    • LOL: follyofwar
  22. BB753 says:

    I’m not going to watch it. I did enjoy the Gotham tv series, the guy playing a young Penguin was simply amazing.

  23. JimDandy says:

    I was riveted by Joker. Some people hated it. Some people thought it was ok, but nothing special. Who cares?

    As for political slant? Well, I think the film is a very personal, somewhat expressionistic reaction to our current society. It’s not a polemic. It’s art. Why work to dissect the political slant of a dream?

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
  24. @Hail

    The best premise and portrayal of The Joker was Nicholson. A slightly eccentric syndicate underboss and career criminal. The ladies find him irresistible, so he is vain and arrogant. His near death experience (or baptism/rebirth, I suppose), combined with the physical deformity he is left with, work to exacerbate the previous attributes. He becomes wildly and sadistically eccentric, as his twisted vanity and arrogance consume him. His previous mafia connections give him access to a crew of die hard supporters who are willing to go along with his plans.

    I can just imagine Nicholson snorting about an 8-ball’s worthy of coke right before they film the scene where The Joker electrocutes a rival crime boss with his hand buzzer.

    • Agree: fish
  25. Leonard says:
    @Hail

    There seems to be a real split of views on Joker, which I see roughly as follows: [left vs right]

    I agree with this. But also I think there is a substantial split in the critical reception of the movie, between people who are looking mainly at the surface-level movie (its plot, plausibility, fit with canon, etc.) and those looking at it as a deeper-level work of art. The former tend to dislike it — there’s not that much plot per runtime, you’re being led to sympathize with a disgusting mentally ill killer, how is this guy ever possibly the Joker? The latter tend to look at the moviemaking and be wowed — the direction, the references to all sorts of older films, the ambiguity over what is real and what is Fleck’s imagination or delusions, Phoenix’s acting, etc.

    So you end up with some people in both right and left wing camps taking up the opposite view.

    • Agree: Hail, Jesse
  26. ChrisZ says:

    Steve, this is not only an interesting review, but also a knowledgeable discussion of the character of The Joker. I wasn’t going to see the film, but perhaps I should reconsider.

    My objection with it has nothing to do with actions such a movie might “inspire,” but that the Joker is an unsuitable character to treat as a protagonist. Joker is motiveless in his violence, nameless, and lacking any identity other than his criminality. He is an emblem of unregenerate evil—as this might be expressed to a child’s sensibilities. To provide him with an explanatory “origin story” and motivation is at bottom (IMO) an attempt to justify the character, and express sympathy with him.

    This is a ubiquitous fault of our modern popular culture: its fascination with Evil, and its lack of faith in the reality of Good. The 1930s-vintage comic book heroes presented in two-dimensional form various “happy” ideas underpinning American society: for example, that power could be used responsibly for the benefit of others, and not exploited for personal gain (Superman); that trauma could be overcome, dealt with, and turned towards productive ends (Batman).

    But the creators in our own era no longer believe in such ideas, or even feel they are worthy of proposing. They utterly fail in telling compelling stories about heroism (which is one reason why the “DC Universe” movies are so dreadful). Instead, they strive to advance sentimental justifications for irredeemably evil characters, like the Joker. The Broadway show “Wicked” (a sort of post-modern take on “The Wizard of Oz”) is another example of this decadent tendency.

    Liberal society (in the fictional Gotham and in real life) is too timid to call ineradicable Evil by its proper name, so instead it calls it “crazy” and pretends that it’s amenable to therapy, or at least “understanding.”

    The corollary, of course, is that the creators re-conceive the heroes as secretly vicious or complicit in the crimes of the villain. They advance a conspiracy theory where black is white, white is black, and “everything you thought you knew is a lie”—as an overused tag line of 1980s-90s comics declared. That spirit has by now been completely internalized by the current generation of creators in most media.

    Finally, in elevating the villains, the perspective of his victims is generally ignored. Perhaps there’s a relationship here between the fascination with villainy, on the one hand, and the contempt for regular people, which is so notable among our symbol-making elites. No doubt the victims, and not the villains, are the ones who should be found to be guilty and deserving of their fates.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Whiskey
    , @Anonymous
  27. Abe says:

    Of course, owing to the boyish preposterousness of the source material, it’s harder to make a really good movie out of a comic book than out of a cowboy tale. Phillips tries by eliminating all the superpowers.

    Imagining you are Batman, or Wolverine , or Punisher is boyish and embarrassing and, in Current Year, “problematic”. Not because you’re that much more likely to shoot up a mall or something, though that is the reason they will offer up in front of normies. No, it’s because 4Chan and 8Chan, with their hilarious Pepe the Frog and “It’s OK to be white” and NPC memes are the single most effective point of resistance right now to the GloboHomoBezos Narrative.

    On the other hand, egging on women to engage in the most puerile sort of “girlz rule, boys drool” chauvinism, or to believe they can be real life Buffy the Vampire Slayers, slinging shells into 155mm howitzers one-handed or amphibiously assaulting Iranian heavy cruisers and taking their entire crew prisoner is not immature or embarrassing- our women in uniform can certainly do all those things, they just have more important responsibilities like becoming fat lesbian 4 star generals.

    And the role of respectable conservatives like McCain or Romney is to move millions and billions of dollars around so that these non-immature and totally respectable expectations can be met, damn the few eggs that get broken along the way (Jessica Lynch, West Virginia country girl who only wanted college money to become an elementary school teacher got raped and didn’t go down shooting, taking a company of Republican Guards with her? Umm, look at that squirrel! U-S-A! U-S-A!)

    • Agree: John Regan
    • Replies: @TWS
  28. @Alfa158

    If that was decades ago, it’s still going on. Nancy’s creator, Ernie Bushmiller, has been elevated to the status of a comic strip genius, up there with Walt Kelly and Charles Schulz.

    How to Read Nancy: The Elements of Comics in Three Easy Panels
    Everything that you need to know about reading, making, and understanding comics can be found in a single Nancy strip by Ernie Bushmiller from August 8, 1959. Paul Karasik and Mark Newgarden’s groundbreaking work How to Read Nancy ingeniously isolates the separate building blocks of the language of comics through the deconstruction of a single strip. No other book on comics has taken such a simple yet methodical approach to laying bare how the comics medium really works. No other book of any kind has taken a single work by any artist and minutely (and entertainingly) pulled it apart like this. How to Read Nancy is a completely new approach towards deep-reading art. In addition, How to Read Nancy is a thoroughly researched history of how comics are made, from their creation at the drawing board to their ultimate destination at the bookstore. Textbook, art book, monogram, dissection, How to Read Nancy is a game changer in understanding how the “simplest” drawings grab us and never leave. Perfect for students, academics, scholars, and casual fans.

    https://www.amazon.com/How-Read-Nancy-Elements-Comics/dp/1606993615

  29. @Alfa158

    This is actually a weird thing that used to happen quite often in funny-pages comic strips. Aunt Fritzi was actually the original star of Ernie Bushmiller’s Nancy cartoon: her name was Fritzi Ritz, and she was supposed to be sort of a glamorous supermodel type, which is why she’s drawn that way, and the whole strip was about her. Then, as part of a temporary story arc, her boorish, ugly niece Nancy came to stay with her and comically turned her life upside down with Nancy’s crassness and stupidity. This turned out to be much funnier than Fritzi, so the whole strip became about Nancy and her retarded friend Sluggo.

    The same thing happened with Popeye the Sailor: the original star of the strip was Olive Oyl, and one time she went on a cruise ship and butted heads with a grumpy sailor, who turned out to be much funnier than she was.

    Same thing with Beetle Bailey, who was originally a sort of layabout college kid in a kind of weird small-town David Lynch movie. Then he got drafted into the army, as part of a temporary story arc, and it just turned out that Camp Swampy was much funnier than civilian life, so Beetle stayed drafted.

    Believe it or not, there was a brief six or seven year period back in the 1970s, when Doonesbury was actually funny. I saw it in a museum once.

    It’s taken this long, but I guess somebody has finally managed to graft some sort of serious meaning onto the character of The Joker, instead of just pretending he’s Symbolic of something, nobody ever quite knew what. I probably won’t see the movie because I don’t care about superheroes, but hey, at least somebody took an actual swing at it.

    (I never understood all the attempts to connect The Joker with actual jokes or comedy or clowning; he’s obviously inspired by the wild card in a deck of cards, symbolizing the principle of chaos and the unexpected and uncontrollable. There’s nothing particularly comedic or clownish about that, at least not in theory.)

    • Replies: @Danindc
    , @Reg Cæsar
  30. TWS says:
    @Abe

    Certainly a woman performing to a male standard in any special forces or strength work like servicing an artillery piece is as unreal as Wolverine unsheathing his claws. Yet we do not think of those movies as superhero or sci-fi but they are simply impossible. At best it is science fiction but most veers into superhero or even parody quickly.

    If we can watch Scott’s GI Jane as a serious drama why not Logan or Dark Knight?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  31. “But these days, reviewers worry that gifted white men like Phoenix and Phillips, no matter how generous their leftist campaign contributions, must actually be Secret Nazis. If they weren’t racists, why would they humiliate Women of Color by making a good movie?”

    This is great writing. Steve Sailer’s commentary on Joker (2019) will find a receptive audience amongst those Tinseltown toilers who — secretly, or with trusted comrades — reject the current Woke regime.

    “Of course, that Ronald Reagan had been a movie star himself made this whole history even more surreal-sounding.”

    Sorry rationalists: the unconscious, individual and collective, consistently intrudes upon conscious reality. The Surrealists were onto something.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  32. utu says:
    @Hodag

    Good question: how did Hinkley see the movie many times?

    • Replies: @Franz
  33. syonredux says:

    Joker is a clever and memorable (although not terribly original or enjoyable) R-rated art-house drama in the tradition of Taxi Driver and The King of Comedy

    That’s putting it mildly , Steve. The movie is just a mash-up of bits from King of Comedy and Taxi Driver, plus a little bit of Fight Club.

  34. res says:
    @Hodag

    Some more detail at this link: http://screenprism.com/insights/article/how-is-taxi-driver-connected-to-two-assassination-attempts

    When Taxi Driver was released in 1976, Hinckley was living in Hollywood, hoping to become a famous songwriter. After the film hit theaters, Hinckley actually watched Taxi Driver fifteen times. He bought the soundtrack and listened to the music constantly.

    Probably few better places to watch movies than Hollywood. Both for theaters and rentals.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_rental_shop#History

    The first professionally managed video rental store in the U.S. was opened by George Atkinson in December 1977 at 12011 Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Alden
  35. utu says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    Hinckley saw the movie at least fifteen times, read and re-read the book it was based upon

    What book? I thought it was an original screenplay by Paul Schrader. Apparently Richard Elman novelized Schrader script into a book.

  36. syonredux says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Alex Raymond and Hal Foster are great:

  37. syonredux says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Winsor Mccay’s work is simply gorgeous:

    • Replies: @Alden
  38. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    I’m sticking with “Ginger, or Mary Ann?” as the ultimate meaning of life struggle.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  39. @Steve Sailer

    I heard they did a kick ass cover of the Stones’ “Wild Horses.”

  40. Joker is set in 1981 (judging by Brian De Palma’s Blow Out playing in a movie theater)…

    I noticed that as well. The other film also listed on that cinematic marquee, was ZORRO THE GAY BLADE, which was also a 1981 release. So that seems pretty definitive.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  41. Anonymous[200] • Disclaimer says:

    Joker is a clever and memorable (although not terribly original or enjoyable) R-rated art-house drama in the tradition of Taxi Driver and The King of Comedy masquerading as yet another comic book movie.

    I haven’t seen the movie, but I’ll wager it’s the opposite. It’s another moronic superhero(or super-antihero) movie masquerading as serious entertainments EVEN FOR ADULTS. Gee, it might even be the stuff of ‘art’.

    Bizarre as it would have seemed in 1976, playing Batman’s maniacal archenemy has become for movie stars what portraying Richard III is for Shakespearean actors: the ultimate test of their villain chops.

    Jack Nicholson started this trend with the first BATMAN movie where he stole the show from Michael Keaton, or so I heard as I still haven’t seen it.
    Actors like to ham it up, and the role of Joker allows them to go Full Clown. Joker is ultra-exhibitionist in his devilry. Unlike most villains who simply want to terrorize and intimidate, Joker acts the rock star like Mick Jagger, Freddie Mercury, and Little Richard. Apart from rock stars, another rambunctious bunch are comedians, and Joker is a comic too. Playing Joker allows actors to bring out their Id in full force, especially as their faces are covered with paint. If Batman uses his mask to hide his identity, Joker uses the face-paint to enhance his. If Batman is the dark knight, Joker is the bright jester. The only Joker who works for me is the one played by homo Cesar Romero in the TV series. I can’t imagine Nicholson as the Joker(and much less Michael Keaton as Batman). I did sit through Heath Ledger as Joker, and it was painful, as if I was trapped in a Marilyn Manson concert where he did nothing but talk, which would be worse than if he sang.

    The 19th-century Romantics conceived of madness, such as in Donizetti’s opera Lucia di Lammermoor, as an excess of emotion and personality. Actor Dustin Hoffman, who’d once had a day job as an attendant at the New York state mental hospital, introduced in The Graduate and Rain Man a new alternative: the mentally challenged as depressed, obsessive-compulsive, and on the spectrum.

    [MORE]

    I don’t see Benjamin Braddock in THE GRADUATE as mentally challenged. He’s just confused as he realizes the future has arrived, and it’s the comfortable but stifling stasis of middle class life. In college, the future was out there somewhere. Post-graduation, he has lost his wings and landed on the future, and it means becoming just like his parents who are not bad people but so like everyone else in their social milieu. He wanted to be ‘different’. And once Braddock falls head over heels over Elaine, how is his mental condition not an excess of emotion and personality? His true personality emerges in its nerd-jock romantic fury, and he drives up and down and up and down California to fulfill his mission. It’s so powerful so that Elaine, despite having made her vows, calls out to him. In its own way, it is very operatic.

    Phoenix, who played the Emperor Commodus in Gladiator and Johnny Cash in Walk the Line, is a stupendous actor.

    Is he? Certainly not in those two roles. As Commodus, he was the usual arch-villain, nothing more. His Cash was totally ill-conceived. Cash had a droopy look and been-there-done-that hangdog style like he just got out of bed with a hangover. But Phoenix, who looks nothing like Cash by the way, makes him out to be flashier than Elvis Presley. If anyone made the movie work, it was Reese Witherspoon.

    Why do comic book movies dominate the box office?

    Simple. CGI. Before CGI, it wasn’t easy to make convincing superhero movies. SUPERMAN with Christopher Reeve came closest, but even his movies don’t look so good now. Prior to CGI, impressive-looking sci-fi and superhero movies were rare. One had to wait around for another STAR WARS movie or some such. Consider movies like BLACK HOLE and SATURN 3. Though made after STAR WARS with big enough budgets, they looked terrible even then. But TERMINATOR 2 really changed the movie landscape. Suddenly, it was possible to generate out cool-looking movies with space gadgets and superheroes on a yearly basis.

    With the shift in pop cultural hegemony from Old Americans to Ellis Island Americans, movies based on comic book superheroes, most of whom were dreamed up by American Jews from the 1930s into the 1960s, now fill the role once played by Westerns as Hollywood’s bread-and-butter genre.

    There’s one key difference. Westerns were cheap to make though there were some very expensive productions. In contrast, even though CGI has made it more feasible to produce superhero movies with lavish special effects, they are still A or AAA productions. As such, superhero movies are rolled out as ‘events’. It’s not bread-and-butter but cake-and-ale. In that sense, superhero movies are more comparable to works like GONE WITH THE WIND, TEN COMMANDMENTS, BEN-HUR, SOUND OF MUSIC, DR. ZHIVAGO, GODFATHER, and TITANIC. The difference is, in the old days, the biggest budgets went toward middlebrow entertainment for adults, whereas the biggest budgets now go into franchise movies that target mainly youths or youth-stuck adults. Now, if these movies were just meant for kids and youths, they’d at least be honest. But even people mired in childishness crave some degree of respectability and seriousness. And so, what had been kid stuff is being done ‘seriously’, as if they’re loaded with complex, even profound, meaning. Now, it’s true enough that even superhero material do have mythic overtones and moral meanings. One can find such even in daily comic strips. But they lack deep insight, and what’s truly ridiculous of our age is pretending there is such to be found in stories such as BATMAN and STAR WARS(which isn’t exactly EXCALIBUR).

    Even worse is the rise of fanfic literal-mindedness. Fanfickery used to be a subculture of nerdy or aspergy fanatics, but its mindset has taken over the mainstream of pop culture. What is a key feature of fanfickery? The fans become so immersed in their favorite movies or books(or even videogames) that they go about literally constructing a ‘realistic’ universe from the fantasy material.
    And this JOKER movie has all the hallmarks of fanfickery. For sane people, the character of Joker has to be taken at face value on the comic book level. He’s some fun looney-bin villain who sets off fireworks as he dukes it out with his arch-nemesis Batman in Gotham City. In other words, he’s an archetype of pop mythology, nothing more, nothing less. But it seems this JOKER movie goes about constructing a real-life biography of how he became what he is. Do we really want the biography or autobiography of Joker, Penguin, Riddler? It’d be as foolish as trying to map out the childhood of 007 or the Man with No Name(of Dollars Trilogy), with ‘deep’ psychological probing into how they became the way they are. Such would be absurd, but fanfickers want so much to believe in their favored fictional universes that they keep expanding it to make the characters and story-threads more real, or more perverse, like what the author of FIFTY SHADES OF GREY did with TWILIGHT. In a way, all those STAR WARS novels are officially sanctioned fanfics for people who just can’t get enough of its ‘universe’. Or take the rebooting of THE PLANET OF THE APES. The original series was meant as satire that says something about OUR world, and only a fool would ponder how the world might literally be taken over by real apes. It’d be like concocting a ‘scientific’ explanation as to why there are tiny people in GULLIVER’S TRAVELS. It’s like how the aliens in GALAXY QUEST have an earnest take on earthling entertainment and materialize it into reality, a fanfic dream. Such ‘alien’ mentality is pervasive among fanfic loonies.

    Phillips tries by eliminating all the superpowers.

    Are there superpowers in BATMAN? Someone told me once that he likes BATMAN because it’s really a contest of wits and muscle without the hokum of fantastic powers like flying in the air or shooting fireballs from one’s fingertips.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Hinckley_Jr.

    “Hinckley grew up in University Park, Texas,[4] and attended Highland Park High School[5] in Dallas County. During his grade school years, he played football, basketball, hockey, soccer and baseball, learned to play the piano, and was elected class president twice.”

    What happened to him? He seems to have been a popular jock and personality in high school. Not your usual Pupkin or Bickle type.

    In response to the Bickle-Hinckley controversy, Scorsese made The King of Comedy in 1983 to mock talentless nobodies who take showbiz too seriously.

    Not sure if it was straight-out mockery. Martin Scorsese said that there is a lot of himself in Rupert Pupkin. Pupkin may be without talent, but his obsession with stardom, celebrity, and where-the-action-is has been part of Scorsese and the Movie Brats of his generation. In that sense, THE KING OF COMEDY is to Scorsese what BROADWAY DANNY ROSE is to Woody Allen. Scorsese had the talent to make it, but if he had had no talent, he could have been a creepy guy like Pupkin as he was obsessed with cinema and popular culture. (Even truer of Quentin Tarantino.) Likewise, if Allen had lacked talent, he might have ended up as someone like Broadway Danny Rose. On that level, there is some degree of sympathy for the Pupkin character who, though loathsome, pursues a dream with all his heart. Besides, the sickness in the movie as much pop culture & TV as Pupkin. TV is made up of egotistical a**holes who, every night on TV, enter your living room and pretend to be ‘your friend’. TV creates the illusion of a porous wall or a portal between TV personalities and the audience. And the American Dream says anyone can make it with just enough push. Pupkin prefigures American Idol, aka American Idiot.

    When bullied one night on the subway for wearing his clown makeup by three drunken white yuppies, junior executives of Wayne Enterprises, he goes all Bernie Goetz on them.

    Joker vs American Psycho. That ought to make quite a movie.

    Like Westerns, movies about crime-fighting superheroes tend to be inherently right-wing. Granted, Superman was usually associated with FDR’s cheerful liberalism, but Batman was always a reactionary proponent of order. Thus, the conservative director Christopher Nolan made a formidable Batman trilogy in 2005–2012.

    But fighting crime is a side gig for most superheroes. Their main enemies happen to be mad scientists(tied to shady corporations), would-be-masters-of-the-world or neo-monarchists(like the Three Villains in SUPERMAN II), or the Nazis.
    Christopher Nolan certainly has film-making chops, but the ‘formidable’-ness is part of BATMAN’s problem. When Nolan gives BATMAN a heavier treatment than DUNKIRK, something is wrong. BATMAN has to be done on the level of youth entertainment. Nolan started an awful trend that even led to heavier treatments of 007. SKYFALL was so grim and humorless I turned it off after 20 min. The problem with some sitcoms is they forget they’re sitcoms, light entertainment, and get overly serious with message or meaning. BATMAN can work as entertainment for youths; it can’t be serious art for adults.

    Joker has gotten berserk negative reviews, noteworthy for their incoherence and anger at the film’s evenhanded politics.

    Movie critics regard pop culture as political soccer. Every one of these movies is a soccer ball, and it must be kicked into the right goal. If the ball sometimes goes astray, they throw fits. When a culture becomes overly ideologized or politicized(or tribalized in terms of “Shhhhh, is it good for the Jews?”), the result is the critics unanimously going nuts over the latest Disney STAR WARS and attacking anything that is suspected of crimethink. Never mind most of these movies are about dumbthink.

  42. Anonymous[200] • Disclaimer says:
    @res

    TAXI DRIVER was a dangerous movie, but I wonder how many people got indirectly killed by Rap’s promotion of senseless violence?

    And I wonder about the effect of all those ‘muzzies are terrorists’ movies. All those Americans willing to support those Wars for Israel in which countless Arabs and in which 10,000s of Americans got killed in battle or committed suicide at home.

    • Replies: @Jimbo
  43. Liza says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    @Bardon.

    I agree with you about the fictional superhero/supervillain characters. It’s an ominous sign when some really good reviewers manage to take such films seriously.

    But about throat singing, I rather like the Sardinian version. Someone here on unz.com mentioned this and it got me interested.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  44. Jimbo says:
    @Anonymous

    Except as soon as the Muzzies actually committed terror against the U.S., it became forbidden to portray them as such in the movies. Whenever you see the evidence point to a Muslim committing terror in the first act, keep an eye out for the white supremicists who will be shown to have really done it in the 3rd. (Similar to the black man accused of a crime in Law And Order episodes…)

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  45. @J.Ross

    Their Hearts Burning With Political Consciousness, Fearless NBA Owners, The Face of the People, Come Together and Stand Strong Against Terrifying Woman and her Threatening Cardboard

    “Ultimately, the decision was made by Wells Fargo Center personnel to remove the guests from the premises, which was accomplished without incident,” the statement said.

    Amaryllis yesterday, Winthrop today:

    Oh the Wells Fargo Wagon is a-comin’
    Now I don’t know how I could ever wait to see
    It could be comin’ for someone who is no relation
    but it could be on a mission just for me

  46. @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    57 generations, huh?

    …I wonder how the genealogical records were kept.

    At 57 generations, you have 144,115,188,075,855,872 ancestral slots to fill. Yes, a gross quadrillion.

    If you have records for six or seven generations, you can pretty much assume there will be such singers in every generation before that, going back to the creation of the genre.

    57 generations may even be enough to select for the specific aptitudes. Beats castrating poor farm kids, as in certain other countries.

  47. @Kevin O'Keeffe

    The other film also listed on that cinematic marquee, was ZORRO THE GAY BLADE, which was also a 1981 release. So that seems pretty definitive.

    Pat Buchanan’s nickname in college was “the Gay Blade”.

    Boy, have the connotations ever changed.

    • Replies: @Rex Little
  48. Anonymous[200] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jimbo

    Except as soon as the Muzzies actually committed terror against the U.S., it became forbidden to portray them as such in the movies.

    Is that true? Wasn’t there a long-running TV series with Kiefer Sutherland with terrorist Muslims?
    And the sequel of SICARIO begins with Muslims slipping through the US-Mexican border and blowing up a supermarket.

    But I understand that since the US has been invading the Middle East in a major way, overt anti-Muslim talk has been muted somewhat. This has to do with the fact that US needs to convince Arabs and Americans alike that US actions are directed at terrorists, not at Muslims. Indeed, we are all supposed to believe that US is there because it cares so much about those Muslims.

    In fact, the 9/11 blowback happened because US worked with Saudis and Pakistanis to build up terrorism in the region to use against USSR and secular Arab governments and Shia states.

    It’d be interesting if there was a discussion not of movies made but of movies not-made. Movies about how CIA and Deep State built up terrorism in the Middle East. Movies about the Nakba. Movies about black-on-white crime. In art, there is the concept of ‘negative space’. It’d be good to have a discussion of negative cinema, the kind of movies that haven’t been or cannot be made.

  49. With the shift in pop cultural hegemony from Old Americans to Ellis Island Americans, movies based on comic book superheroes, most of whom were dreamed up by American Jews from the 1930s into the 1960s, now fill the role once played by Westerns as Hollywood’s bread-and-butter genre. Writer-director Todd Phillips, who previously made comedies of masculine excess such as The Hangover and War Dogs, dreamed up a story that ingeniously merges the DC Universe, the Scorsese-verse, and the Trumpian present.

    To be or not to be — That is the question.

    Bullshit!

    Who controls the propaganda — That is the question.

    Old Stocker European Christian Americans must remove the Ellis Island Jew Bolshevik Globalizer Americans from the control of the corporate propaganda apparatus in the USA.

    Jew Bolshevik Globalizers now control the New York Times and Comcast/NBC and Viacom/CBS and Disney/ABC and the Murdoch Mob that pushes Jew Bolshevik Globalization controls Fox News and the Wall Street Journal.

    The Republican Party is completely and totally controlled by Ellis Island Jew Bolshevik Globalizers such as Shelly Adelson and Paul Singer and Bernard Marcus and Les Wexner.

    I got to laugh at old stocker joker boy clowns like Tom Cotton and Josh Hawley when they dance and jump for their Jew Bolshevik Globalizer puppet masters. The joke will be on the European Christian and British Protestant Americans if they continue to vote for and support politician whores who won’t tell the American people the truth about who controls the corporate propaganda apparatus in America.

    Joker boy clowns like Tom Cotton and Josh Hawley put the interests of Israel ahead of the interests of the United States of America — that is treason.

  50. Anonymous[200] • Disclaimer says:
    @Liza

    It’s an ominous sign when some really good reviewers manage to take such films seriously.

    There are those who take them seriously as ‘art’, and that is problematic.

    There are those who take them seriously as propaganda, and they have a point. A lot of hearts and minds are swayed by Hollywood movies. Even if they don’t take the movies too seriously as anything special, they understand that the masses all over the world are crazy about them. So, they take seriously the fact that people take them seriously. As such, they want the propaganda to serve their side. Now, if they were true critics, they would point out the manipulations of mass media and urge people to think more critically. But many of these critics are either ideologues or tribalogues, and so, they are fine with propaganda as long as it ‘nudges’ the idiot masses in the way they desire. They look down on the audience as cattle.

    There are those who take them seriously as entertainment, and that’s fair enough when indeed the movies work. A work doesn’t have to be deep or profound to have considerable entertainment value. I can understand why Pauline Kael loved E.T. or why John Simon wrote a naughty rave for SPY WHO LOVED ME. (He sure had the hots for Barbara Bach.) When we suspend our disbelief, we can buy into the seriousness of the material within its proper context. We can even be moved but it has to be within the boundaries of the work’s dramatic limitations. The problem is when the work oversteps those boundaries and goes for ‘art’. We can lose ourselves in the sentimentality of GREASE but it’s not Strindberg. I thought the humor saved THOR, and ANT-MAN was conceptually ingenious and played it for all it was worth. ROBOCOP remake was genuine pop satire. But Nolan’s BATMAN movies were like toys made for real. Toys are meant to be toys.

    • Replies: @Nico
  51. Anonymous[405] • Disclaimer says:

    The amount of clickbait venom spewed at this movie amazed me. It was more than just journalists being journalists. It was almost like a tantrum (to such extent not seen since… “Lady Ghostbusters?” I dunno); animated by a weird belief that people who believe themselves (((critics))) are entitled to get TV/movies pandering perfectly to their prejudices, all day, every day:

    http://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/oct/04/cuck-review-rob-lambert-joker

    I find Joaquin Phoenix too sleepy-looking, which undercuts his admittedly unique intensity. The movie is a little too reference-dependent but these “homages” never cohere somehow. The late, lamented controversy around the release of “Joker” is more interesting art than the movie itself. In a Kantian non-clown universe, wouldn’t all the shrieking media priesthood now be completely embarrassed by their blue-hair-biddy premature overreaction to a film that turned out to contain NONE of their bugbear problematic elements? The phony moral panic proved these people out for utter fools. You could say, it had a strong “early 80s vibe” to it… But at least Tipper Gore was demagoguing lyrics that existed outside her imagination

  52. syonredux says:
    @SamHyde

    Are you sure Nolan is a conservative? @Steve Sailer
    His Wikipedia doesn’t say much about his politics except for this:

    “However, he has publicly shared some of his sociopolitical concerns for the future, such as the current conditions of nuclear weapons and environmental issues that he says need to be addressed.”.

    I’m concerned about those issues.

  53. Anonymous[200] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    The 1930s comic book authors had modeled their grinning Joker on the makeup worn by Conrad Veidt in the 1928 Expressionist Weimar-American silent film The Man Who Laughs.

    Jewish role in superhero comics is rather strange. ‘Superman’ is a Nietzschean idea, and it couldn’t have been lost on Jews who created it that Nietzsche at the time was associated with not only the German Right but Nazism.

    Also, considering that the oft-heard cultural charge against Jews was that they were proponents of ‘degenerate art’, it’s interesting to find Jewish imagination in service of aesthetically fascist ubermensch heroes of good solid looks and straight values at war with what amounts to a gallery of freaks. It’s almost like watching Art-Deco-style Neo-Classicism vs Decadent Expressionism.
    BATMAN is especially Wagnernian, an idea not lost on Tim Burton who made the first ‘auteur’ superhero movie that set the template. (I didn’t see it but heard of its cool Wagnernian vibes.) And I heard the second installment with Penguin even led to some discontent as the villain resembled ‘antisemitic’ tropes. Based on Nolan’s work — I saw the second installment and fast-forwarded through most of part 3 where Batman trades blows with Duckface — , Gotham is less like a city than mythological mountain-scape.

    There’s been a general tendency to associate Jewish sensibility with freaky, goofy, twisted, and warped expressions, such as those irreverent Looney Tunes cartoons. Though Robert Crumb isn’t Jewish, some of his biggest admirers have been. In contrast, Jews have been rather unenthusiastic about the idealized aestheticism of Disney and Japanese Anime. Indeed, consider what’s been done to STAR WARS in Jewish hands.

    But, there’s the other side of Jewishness that has idolized the ideal that has often been depicted as ‘Aryan’, though of late, ‘Afro-Aryan’ seems to be favored new type. There is a side of Jewishness that wants to destroy the gods & Rhine Maidens(out of envy and resentment) and a side that wants to bask in their glory. With superhero fantasies, Jews could imagine ‘Aryan’-looking archetypes who, however, sided with the people against would-be-masters-of-the-world. The heroes are fascist in style but humanist in deed.

    But this poses a problem in our post-humanist world where freaks have been put on the pedestal. Superheroes fighting evil Nazis is one thing. The problem today is superheroes fighting freaks like the Joker or the scarred two-faced guy. Spiderman fights freak villains such as the Goblin, Octopus, Lizard Man, and Scorpion. It’s straight vs freaks. But in a world we are supposed to honor the lunacy of 50 genders, there is a tendency to honor freakdom. This is done by turning the superheroes less ‘Aryan’ and more ‘diverse'(like mixed-race Aquaman who fights his blonde water-brother) or by giving us something like Sympathy for the Devil… or the Freak, and JOKER seems to be partly that.

    Oddly enough, while Jews in the heart of Teutonic Land indulged in decadent and ‘degenerate’ expressions during the Weimar period, Jews in America so far removed from Teutonic Land concocted what were, aesthetically at least, ‘Aryan’ fantasies. One of the superheroes was Thor, the Germanic god and also said to be the most powerful superhero because he’s a full-blown deity. And, Jews in Hollywood produced all those Westerns(and directed a good many of them), many of them beloved by Der Fuhrer. When some radical Jews in the 60s began to denounce Westerns as ‘genocidal’, were they aware that they were the products of Jewish-run Hollywood?

    • Replies: @Ian M.
    , @anonynous
  54. syonredux says:
    @The Alarmist

    I’m sticking with “Ginger, or Mary Ann?” as the ultimate meaning of life struggle.

    Perhaps that’s the real reason why the Professor (a man who can make anything out of coconuts) couldn’t get them off the island…..He just can’t make up his mind…..

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @The Alarmist
  55. Danindc says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Meredith Baxter Burney was supposed to be the star of Family Ties …

  56. Joker is set in 1981 (judging by Brian De Palma’s Blow Out playing in a movie theater), the year that Taxi Driver addict John Hinckley Jr. tried to impress Jodie Foster the way Bickle had tried to woo Cybill Shepherd: via political assassination. Of course, that Ronald Reagan had been a movie star himself made this whole history even more surreal-sounding.

    That the Bushes are Hinckley descendants related to John just adds to that. Oh, and the younger Ronald Reagan’s middle name being the same as VP Bush’s father’s.

    Or perhaps Arthur is a malign version of Peter Sellers’ simpleminded cipher Chauncey Gardiner from the 1979 film Being There?

    As Barack Obama was?

  57. Anonymous[200] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    “The professor is sexy.”

  58. Haven’t seen the film yet, but my son has, and he tells me that besides the obvious influences of Taxi Driver and The King of Comedy, he also saw any number of 70s movies influences, Dirty Harry, Network (Howard Beal), Death Wish, even French Connection.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  59. Franz says:
    @utu

    The 70s were the famous last stand of the “dollar matinee” second-run movie house.

    Seeing it 15 or twenty times would have been no problem then. And cheap.

  60. syonredux says:
    @Anonymous

    Is that true? Wasn’t there a long-running TV series with Kiefer Sutherland with terrorist Muslims?

    If memory serves, the Muslim terrorists on 24 usually turned out to be working for evil White Christians…..

  61. @Chris from Gresham (though not for long)

    Oh, yeah, French Connection … There’s a reference to the elevated train chase.

  62. Whiskey says: • Website
    @ChrisZ

    Agree and this is emblematic of a female led society. Women always identify with killers as the true masters of society and argue the victims had it coming. See the female swoon over the Tsarnaev Bomb brothers. Heck even Neil Gaiman couldn’t keep his wife from writing a love poem to Dhokar.

  63. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Same thing with Beetle Bailey, who was originally a sort of layabout college kid in a kind of weird small-town David Lynch movie.

    Beetle’s sister Lois married Hi and they got their own strip, which still runs.
    Their son Chip looks just like Uncle Beetle, but blond.

    Jimmy Hatlo’s They’ll Do It Every Time often included a bratty tomboy with red curls. She burst out as Little Iodine in 1943 with her own strip, then comic book, and even movie. Irene Ryan (!) played her mom.

    (Hatlo was the first cartoonist to base his work on readers’ suggestions, a tradition carried on, anonymously, by Scott Adams.)

    In the same era, different medium, Beverly Cleary– still kicking at 103– originally wrote stories for boys. A minor character in those took over the whole series– Ramona Quimby.

    Believe it or not, there was a brief six or seven year period back in the 1970s, when Doonesbury was actually funny. I saw it in a museum once.

    Trudeau was the first cartoonist to take an extended break and republish older strips. It was never the same thereafter. Charles Schulz, not naming names, called that strategy “lazy”. Trudeau’s archrival Berke Breathed defended it, confessing that not every cartoon artist could be done and on the golf course by noon. Breathed was always pushing deadlines, and probably spent a fortune on FedEx.

    Trudeau hated Bloom County, which he thought stole from him. But only the drawing and lettering styles were similar. Opus and friends were radically different from anything in Doonesbury, and a damned sight funnier. (If anything, Trudeau’s talking cigarette was much inferior Breathed.)

    Trudeau knew he’d been beaten. And Calvin and Hobbes hadn’t even made the scene yet.

  64. Nico says:

    Joker is a clever and memorable (although not terribly original or enjoyable) R-rated art-house drama in the tradition of Taxi Driver and The King of Comedy masquerading as yet another comic book movie.

    The more cynical among us might say it was a comic-book movie trying to be taken as seriously as an art-house drama.

    Bizarre as it would have seemed in 1976, playing Batman’s maniacal archenemy has become for movie stars what portraying Richard III is for Shakespearean actors: the ultimate test of their villain chops.

    We had pre-code cinema and Golden Age Hollywood and New Hollywood. I’m not sure what they’ll call this puerile cinema coinciding with the time of the Clintons, the Obamas and TDS.

  65. Nico says:
    @Anonymous

    Nolan’s BATMAN movies were like toys made for real. Toys are meant to be toys.

    I get into heated discussions when I explain I prefer the Tim Burton Batman films to the Christopher Nolan ones. They’ve got the appropriate mix of camp and drama to make for entertaining adult fare based on kiddie novelty products, which is the best any superhero movie should legitimately aspire to. (That’s not to say the last two were even remotely well-written…)

  66. What are you talking about, our “fascination with evil?” Movies/media for the masses are as black and white as they ever were….it’s just that the sacred values of what’s “good” and “bad” have changed.

    Female characters are definitely less layered & grey than they used to be, and it’s partially a consequence of feminism being elevated to a holy status. Compare Bette Davis’s characters with the bland heroines of today.

    The elites are not fascinated with villainy. They are fascinated with changing stories to make themselves fit in better as some hero character into their underdog vs racist sexist oppressors worldview.

    Regular people liking villains is simply because the villain gets to say edgy things and is typically given some semblance of a personality, whereas the heroes are same old same old..:just some avatar of the values that have been drilled into the viewer’s head since kindergarten. Maybe they are given a token “flaw” or too, like being a workaholic or wanting too much vengeance. Pretty standard hero “flaws.”

  67. Anonymous[747] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ray Huffman

    It’s safest to say it’s SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE.

    That way, you get money from both sides.

    Progs will see it as ‘leftist’, Deplords will see it as ‘rightist’.

    Clever way to make money.

  68. Anonymous[747] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Well I gotta say, I never really understood exactly why we were supposed to treat the conflict between Batman and The Joker as some sort of profound, chthonic, operatic, Jungian contest of wills, worthy of a full-on production at Bayreuth… whereas the conflict between Batman and The Riddler was just an insignificant slightly tawdry thumb-wrestle between two weirdos wearing fetish costumes.

    I think Batboy vs Jokester is like Apollonian vs Dionysian. Batman is all about order. A very upright, even stiff, hero. Joker is chaos. He’ll do anything for a laugh.

    And yet, if we wanna be psychological, Bruce Wayne is personal life isn’t so severe and uptight. And Joker’s merriment seems partly therapeutic. He’s actually full of angst and turned to outrage and humor as a crutch.

    Riddler, that’s the guy with question marks on his outfit, right? One thing about these villains, cops won’t have hard time identifying them.

    Batman vs Riddler would be more Apollonian vs Mercurian as I take it Riddler is a slippery character. Less charismatic in being slippery, therefore less cinematic.

  69. TB says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Slightly off topic:

    The translation is not great I believe(I don’t speak russian), but the shaman is real enough. She is talking about Fly agaric (Amanita Muscaria), and how they use reindeers to decarboxylate ibotenic acid into muscimol because ibotenic acid might be bad for your health, but muscimol is ok, and have some interesting effects:

    Then she mentions the Berserker Vikings and how they adopted the love of muscimol-

  70. Hail says: • Website
    @SamHyde

    Are you sure Nolan is a conservative?

    On right-wing themes in the Nolans’ Batman trilogy:

    From a review of The Dark Knight Rises available at the Unz Review archive:

    The Dark Knight Rises is an extremely Right wing, authoritarian, fascistic movie.

    First of all, in this movie, both the good guys (Wayne, Gordon) and the bad guys (the League of Shadows) are united in their belief that Gotham is corrupt and decadent. In the earlier films, the good guys clearly believed that progress was possible. Now they are just looking for excuses to retire, because society no longer has anything to offer them. They have given without reward until their idealism has been extinguished and their souls have been completely emptied. They have become burned out shells in thankless service to their inferiors.

    Second, Nolan’s portrayal of the Left is utterly unsympathetic: Leftist values are shown to be nihilistic. Thus promoting Leftism is a perfect tool for those who would destroy a society. That’s not just true in the movies.

    Third, and most trivially, the uncritical portrayal of the police […]

    _______________

    From a retrospective (May 2016) review of, and political commentary on, Nolan’s Batman trilogy (2005-2012), by Gregory Hood and Luke Gordon:

    Perhaps the most subversive and overtly right wing movie to be made in many years was The Dark Knight Rises, the triumphant finale to director Christopher Nolan’s epic Batman trilogy.

    The Left most recognized it for what it was. Noted Lefty policy wonk Matt Yglesias tweeted: “Had a lot of problems with Dark Knight Rises but it was sort of refreshing to see a balls-out insanely rightwing movie.” Andrew O’Hehir at Salon noted:

    It’s no exaggeration to say that the “Dark Knight” universe is fascistic (and I’m not name-calling or claiming that Nolan has Nazi sympathies). It’s simply a fact. Nolan’s screenplay (co-written with his brother, Jonathan Nolan, and based on a story developed with David S. Goyer) simply pushes the Batman legend to its logical extreme, as a vision of human history understood as a struggle between superior individual wills, a tale of symbolic heroism and sacrifice set against the hopeless corruption of society. Maybe it’s an oversimplification to say that that’s the purest form of the ideology that was bequeathed from Richard Wagner to Nietzsche to Adolf Hitler, but not by much.

    They may not necessarily like fascism, or for that matter, anything that alludes to heroism or greatness, but at least we are talking about the same thing.

  71. Anonymous[747] • Disclaimer says:
    @ChrisZ

    He is an emblem of unregenerate evil—as this might be expressed to a child’s sensibilities. To provide him with an explanatory “origin story” and motivation is at bottom (IMO) an attempt to justify the character, and express sympathy with him.

    In PROMETHEUS, we were shown how the Alien Monster came about. Totally ROTFL.

    Joker and such characters are supposed to be 2D and can be fun on that level. But they can’t make endless versions of BATMAN, so they go for spinoffs, like The Ropers spun off Three’s Company.
    But the thin material is made thinner.
    Take SOLO, as Star Wars spinoff. I must an R2D2 spinoff might be fun. How R2 came to be.

    Btw, I don’t think it’s really about generating sympathy. The thing is sympathy naturally generates among the audience over time, even with villains and bad guys. Consider how Terminator became a cult icon. And people were quoting Hannibal Lecter. And Godzilla became a beloved monster.

    But if any series started the trend of ‘get to know your villain’, it was STAR WARS where we end up with the origins story for Darth Vader. But that was okay because I think Lucas had the bigger story in mind when he conceived of it. So, I don’t he just added it later.

    In contrast, all these new variations based on superhero stuff or sci-fi sequels are just made up without any basis. It’s like Rachel having the kid in Blade Runner sequel. I mean, how did that happen? There was no indication whatsoever that such was possible in the first one. They are just making shi* up.

  72. @Reg Cæsar

    The vital, critical difference between Doonesbury and Bloom County is that…… Bloom County had the interesting and rather important feature of never, ever, ever being funny, not for a nanosecond, not funny, no way, no how, sorry, not funny, nuh-UH. HP Lovecraft says sorry Berk Breathed, you’re just cosmologically never ever funny, piteous Christ it’s thirsty in here, yet nevertheless to the Vale of Cthulhu you must go, to the Desperate Hole of Woe with you, sorry but just not funny, Perpetual smug unfunnitiude, for all Aquinasian eternity, not funny, nah-uh, sorry, nope, with respect to the question of funniness, that would be a great big f!cking NO.

    Now if you’ll excuse me, I do believe that Master Dagwood Bumstead has a minor difference of opinion with a door-to-door salesman (!!) on his front doorstep. I must go and observe his response.

  73. @syonredux

    The Professor was no dummy: With that choice, who’d want to leave?

  74. Anonymous[215] • Disclaimer says:

    Woke vs Joke.

    What a culture we have.

    Time to pile up the Jokemon points.

  75. @JimDandy

    “I was riveted by Joker.”

    Is that different from being screwed by Joker? How about nailed?

    • Replies: @JimDandy
  76. Ian M. says:
    @Anonymous

    Jewish role in superhero comics is rather strange. ‘Superman’ is a Nietzschean idea, and it couldn’t have been lost on Jews who created it that Nietzsche at the time was associated with not only the German Right but Nazism.

    Maybe it’s the Manichean world of superhero comics that is appealing to the Jewish imagination?

    https://bonald.wordpress.com/2015/11/23/superheroes-and-princesses-the-fortunes-of-gendered-entertainment-in-a-socially-just-world/:

    I find that I can’t mourn the comic stories of my youth, because I have grown to dislike them. The very idea of a class of people who go around clobbering villains in the name of “justice”, as if human beings were so cleanly divided into good and evil, has become hateful to me. If there really were a Superman, I’m sure I’d be one of the people he’d be beating up and throwing into jail each week. Him and the whole Social Justice League of America. It’s the Manichean worldview that seems so characteristic to me of the Jewish imagination. One might protest that superheroes can be imagined in a conservative way. Capturing criminals is a way to defend the social order; aren’t superheroes just glorified policemen? Well, it’s the fact that it’s unglorified that makes police work an honest job. Police don’t enforce Justice; they maintain an admittedly imperfect social system where people are allowed to be imperfectly liberal.

    • Replies: @Alden
  77. Joaquin Phoenix, Jared Leto, Heath Ledger, Jack Nicholson, and Cesar Romero all failed being the Joker.

    They were, respectively, the Loser, the Sadist, the Anarchist, the Gangster and the Clown.

    The one and only actor who captured the true spirit of the Joker was Mark Hamill on the Batman cartoon show.

    Mark Hamill is indisputably the greatest actor of the past half-century. He played the best character in each of three modern epics worth watching – Luke Skywalker in the three real Star Wars movies, the Joker in the Batman cartoon, and Fire Lord Ozai in the Avatar cartoon.

  78. @Hodag

    Well, forty years ago, popular movies would stay in the theaters for several months, so there was time to see them multiple times if you felt like it. A new movie would appear in my small city at one theater only, maybe on two screens, and there would be a couple dozen different movies playing somewhere. Major hits would stick around over a year.

    I am still not adjusted to the current industry pattern of playing the same half dozen movies at every theater for a few weeks, and then pulling them to put out the DVDs. There are a few I missed by the time a got around to being interested enough to go see them.

  79. Alden says:
    @res

    Could do it in 5 days 4, 6/15 , and 8/30 showings
    I’ve watched plenty of movies twice in the same evening

  80. Alden says:
    @syonredux

    Wow!!! Never heard of that comic Thanks

    • Replies: @syonredux
  81. @SamHyde

    I think Steve has implied he is a closeted conservative, as you need to be in Hollywood. I think he has also implied that the comedy duo Trey Parker and Matt Stone and producer Vince Gilligan probably are as well. All these guys have to keep the messages at least somewhat cryptic to avoid being blacklisted like John Milius was after making “Red Dawn” in 1984, prior to that, Milius was arguably the top screenwriter in Hollywood (There was a documentary on Netflix about Milius and what happened to his career after that movie, don’t know if it is still there).

    The leftist ideologue movie types really hate Nolan’s Batman trilogy, particularly the second and third ones, they were also upset he didn’t use global warming as a plot device in “Interstellar” and complained about the lack of black soldiers in his last film “Dunkirk”.

    • Replies: @Hail
  82. Alden says:
    @Ian M.

    I read the the Jewish creator of Superman was the son of a man killed in a common robbery. He was devastated and often fantasized about a hero who magically couldn’t be killed who’d hunt down the criminal who killed his father

    He grew up and write the comics about his super hero.

  83. But for the wild make-up, you could have seen at least a dozen people any time of day in any American city dressed like Joker back in the ’70’s. Not as strange as it first sounds when you recall Jimmuh Carter was prezzy.

  84. Jack D says:
    @TWS

    There may be a few women who have the upper body strength to handle artillery shells but they tend to be built like trannies and/or extremely ugly black women and not like Demi Moore with her head shaved. No one would ever go see a movie starring one of them because they are repulsive to look at. The movie fantasy is that a female can have a sexy body like Demi Moore AND still kick ass. That is truly impossible.

    • Replies: @TWS
  85. JimDandy says:
    @Twodees Partain

    With all due respect, ask your mom.

    • LOL: Twodees Partain
  86. Hail says: • Website
    @Unladen Swallow

    The leftist ideologue movie types really hate Nolan’s Batman trilogy, particularly the second and third ones, they were also upset he didn’t use global warming as a plot device in “Interstellar” and complained about the lack of black soldiers in his last film “Dunkirk”.

    They’ll have to get ready with more attacks because Christopher Nolan is currently filming a new one, Tenet, “an action thriller taking place in the world of espionage.” Set for a July 17, 2020, release, with the Steve Sailer review set for tentative release about July 25, 2020, give or take a few days.

    A key cast member of Tenet is Robert Pattinson, who coincidentally has been cast to be the Batman of the 2020s.

    Tenet (2020)

    Directed by
    – Christopher Nolan (b.1970, London; four children w/ Emma Thomas)

    Written by
    – Christopher Nolan

    Produced by
    – Thomas Hayslip [exec. producer] (b.1970 in Vietnam? see below)
    – Christopher Nolan [producer]
    – Emma Thomas [producer] (b. Dec. 1971, London; four children with Christopher Nolan)

    Music by
    – Ludwig Göransson (b.1984, Sweden)

    • Replies: @Hail
    , @LondonBob
    , @Anonymous
  87. Hail says: • Website
    @Hail

    Curious about the origins of producer Thomas Hayslip (in the past often credited as Tom Hayslip):

    I find with what I consider very-high-likelihood evidence that this Thomas Haslip is the ‘Hapa‘ son of author Le Ly Haslip (b. Dec. 1949 in Vietnam, in the US permanently from 1972) and a white US military contractor in Saigon whom she met in 1969.

    From a biographical entry written in early 2004 by Roger Matuz at Encyclopedia.com:

    Returning to Danang, Le Ly worked as a nurse’s aide and later as a cocktail waitress. She met and married Ed Munro, a sixty-year-old American construction worker [in 1969]. He promised education for her son and the opportunity to escape from Vietnam. After Le Ly’s second son, Tommy, was born, the family left for the United States in 1970.

    Ed Munro died of emphysema in 1973 at about age 64. Le Ly then remarried, in 1974, a Dennis Haslip. Son Tommy would have been age 3 or 4. It is natural that Le Ly, then about age 25 and new to America, would have given her son Tommy the surname of the new husband, Haslip.

    Le Ly seems to have raised her three children (one full Vietnamese son, then middle son Tommy fathered by this Ed Munro, then a third son with Vietnam war veteran Dennis Haslip) in Southern California.

    A Tom Haslip then surfaces as a credited research assistant for Oliver Stone’s JFK, released Dec. 1991 (research work presumably done in 1990 or so). This is the kind of job given to someone of college age at the time, establishing that producer Tom Haslip was likely born in the late 1960s or early 1970s. So the timing lines up for this being the half-Vietnamese Tom Haslip described above.

    So we have names, dates, and locations all lining up to say producer Thomas Haslip is a half-Vietnamese, half-White child of the Vietnam War.

    FWIW, the US Census recorded 1,401 whites and 62 nonwhites surnamed Haslip (of which, only 15 Blacks) on the 2000 census. By my calculation this means roughly 50 Haslip males were born in the age range that producer Tom Haslip must be, going by his Hollywood career arc; odds that more than one of those fifty boys was named Tom/Thomas? Even assuming there are two or three Thomas Haslips born in the correct age range (born circa 1968 to 1972), odds that more than one has ties to Southern California?

    And now, for those who have read this far and are left with any doubt, we finally come to what I think is the coup de grace:

    Le Ly Haslip published a memoir, “When Heaven and Earth Changed Places: A Vietnamese Woman’s Journey from War to Peace,” in 1989, to great acclaim. Recall that 2010s-era bigtime producer Tom Haslip got his first Hollywood job as a research assistant for Oliver Stone’s JFK, hired in or about 1990. Now this, from the wiki edntry for the Le Ly Haslip book:

    The Oliver Stone film Heaven & Earth [1993] was based on [Le Ly Haslip’s] memoir.

    Connections!

    So this Tom Haslip is not some rural White-Protestant from Missouri or Illinois after all. I assumed, from the name, that it was possible a Middle America Christian who somehow stumbled into Hollywood and made good. It’s got to happen some time, right?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  88. jamie b. says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    To me, these fictional characters are as interesting as Mongol throat singing (actually -less):

    So… it’s slightly less interesting than something that’s somewhat interesting?

  89. Nachum says:

    The first film of Nolan’s trilogy was only subtly about the Islamic threat to the US, so the critics ignored that aspect.

    The second film was much more obviously about the war on Islamic terror, but it was still not-quite-explicit enough that the Left was able to laugh off those who pointed that out. Or at least they were able to argue it wasn’t explicit. Plus, it was a really good movie, so they didn’t *want* to write it off.

    The third, though…well, it was good, in my opinion, but there was no way it could live up to the second. So they were free to attack it there. And it was very obviously an anti-Occupy Wall Street film, with elements of the Islamic and terror aspects of the previous two thrown in. So the Left went nuts in an attempt to discredit it. That shooting in Colorado certainly was used by them as well. The shooter had dyed red hair, so that made him “inspired by the Joker.” (That the Joker famously has *green* hair was glossed over, or rather the red hair was glossed over in favor of the Joker narrative.) It outgrossed the previous film, albeit on a higher budget, but they were able to give it a bad taste.

    Now, I know some on the Right will be opposed to the various themes I listed as well. But from 2005-2012, opposition to these was very much a Left thing, and there we are.

  90. @Anonymous

    It’d be interesting if there was a discussion not of movies made but of movies not-made.

    It sure would be. Hollywood finds reality problematic. Instead of a movie about Asian kids bullied by blacks in high school, it makes a sequel to Karate Kid in which a black kid is bullied by Asians.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
  91. LondonBob says:
    @Hail

    Nolan went to UCL, one of the more conservative universities with a lot of private school people, like me, going there.

  92. @Reg Cæsar

    Boy, have the connotations ever changed.

    Sure have! Remember when the opening line of a song about San Francisco called Paris “sadly gay”?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  93. Nachum says:
    @Anonymous

    “Movies about how CIA and Deep State built up terrorism in the Middle East.”

    Charlie Wilson’s War. It’s kind of explicit.

    “Movies about the Nakba.”

    Come on. Israel is the bad guy in almost every movie made about it these days. Even in Israel.

  94. anonynous says:

    I don’t have to see this “Joker” movie, because from all accounts it’s just New York City in the late 1970s and 80s. I lived in this Joker life when I was a public school teacher in Brooklyn 1985-86, then wasted some time in Real Estate , later earned a (completely worthless to me) MBA degree from Stern New York University.

    A regular American man (not a child or an old man) in good health will just “notice” that so many things about daily NYC street life were just plain wrong, things like garbage strikes, rats, all kinds of deinstitutionalized crazy people wandering around like zombies, terrible subway attacks, scary looking Islamic people. Any honest person then and now would just admit that these subway attacks were never done by rich White Protestants Republicans.

    But, this is not to say that I did not feel resentment and hatred of wealthy White WASP GOP elites because they wouldn’t do or even say anything about the collapse of civilization in NYC and other areas.

    I remember George Bush Sr. accepting his inauguration as US President in 1988; he won thanks to Lee Atwater’s very effective and very honest TV adverts slamming Mike Dukakis for being soft on rapist crime. I was watching Bush Sr.’s inauguration on TV at a street news stand with a ~ 17 year old Italian American guy. The young Italian guy asked me if Bush was promising to shut down our borders, send military troops to restore order here in New York City, pick up the trash etc. I said “No”. He said: “then what’s he talking about”? I said: “Nothing, nothing at all.”

    For the last 30 years, I ‘ve tried to work in some way with GOP establishment types – most like Mitt Romney are not really bad, evil men – but when it comes to issues like urban anarchy, mass migrant , illegal alien invasions, Sharpton led Black mob terror, Islamic terror, Hollywood perversions, Neo Conservative war mongering, these Mitt Romney, Bush family GOP establishment types do, say and pretty much think…

    Nothing. Nothing at all.

    Barbara Bush apparently went to her grave not knowing what a grocery store check out scanner was – she never did her own shopping! It’s seemingly incomprehensible for all of us commenting here, but the GOP, Cuckservative establishment really gets all of their news and information from the mainstream media CNN, the New York Times, they might think there’s some small problem with “liberal bias” but then there are Conservative media voices like George Will and National Review!

    We’d like to think there is some way to reach these healthy, neat, good looking White GOP establishment types like Mitt Romney, Paul Ryan, all the Latter Day Saint pols like Orin Hatch, Harry Reid, Jeff Flake, try to get them to read some honest, warning books by Pat Buchanan, Michele Malkin, Peter Brimelow, Geert Wilders, or even Thomas Wolfe’s “Bonfire of the Vanities” – but these books are too controversial, to extreme or else, these types just aren’t influenced by books – there’s the Bible, another book and movie celebrating Winston Churchill and The Greatest Generation – lots of luck trying to explain that World War II wasn’t a 100% good thing.

    So, I ‘m rambling.

    This Joker movie sounds like a rather straight up Lib Leftist Communist movie – Michael Moore’s favorite – the writers and directors apparently finessed the racial angle a lot and just didn’t make it an open Sharpton/BlackLivesMatter/LaRaza/SPLC “Kill All White People” movie, but the original Communists in places like Red Berlin in the early 1930s did the same.

    I now know that one can not compete with, let alone defeat the worst forms of Communism, Antifa, Cult Marxism, 3rd world envy and migrant invasions with Libertarianism, economic conservatism – race denying Constitutionalism and pretty much all tax exempt American Christian Churches are corrupt at the top.

    The current Catholic (in name only) Pope Francis is a Rolling Stone Magazine cover Leftist, pro Muslim migrant invasion, Liberation theology #(*$&%#. Southern Baptist leadership gets published in the Washington Post denouncing all things traditional Southern and a certain hostile ethno-religious group has a near monopoly on the American media. We’re not allowed to even notice this ethno -religious media mafia.

    OK – I’m up for suggestions on what to do, where to go. Anybody doing the Benedict option? How about some separatist state in South America? I just signed up for a Spanish immersion month in Chile – Got to love General Pinochet, though somehow he made Chicago free market school of economics work with his “Chicago Boys”. I’ve lived 2/3 of my life less than a mile from these “Chicago Boys” here in Chicago, they’ve never accomplished anything of note.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @dfordoom
  95. anonynous says:
    @Anonymous

    Anonymous[200] • Disclaimer says: • Website
    October 9, 2019 at 9:07 pm GMT • 600 Words

    You make a lot of good observations about Jewish in the American comic book world – what is your view on Jack Kirby who pretty much created the Marvel Universe and huckster J owner Stan Lee (can’t be his real name) ripped off all of Kirby’s great ideas/creations.

    But, one thing you don’t state the obvious. Spiegelman’s Superman is the ultimate Jewish fantasy. Some superior race of being from another planet is some how crashed in to rural White America – these/this alien beings are good people, super smart and powerful but they are some reason feared as different – this is obviously a reference to Jews from Central and Eastern Europe. Superman reassures us everyday that this/these alien beings are using their superior, God’s Chosen powers to help Truth Justice and the American Way…. as opposed to say, spreading hard core porn, inciting underclass Blacks to riot, rape White women, instigate endless wars in the Middle East or target White European Nationalists back in their old countries of Russian, Poland, Hungary etc.

    So – I would say Superman is the ultimate Jewish fantasy, propaganda – their secret disguise is just a pair of eye glasses as this race of alien people looks so close to White Americans it would take some NAZI specialist to tell the difference.

    • Replies: @Nachum
    , @kaganovitch
  96. @SunBakedSuburb

    “the unconscious”

    Should be “the subconscious”. I was slightly unconscious when I posted this comment.

  97. TWS says:
    @Jack D

    If I remember correctly the arty test was fudged as well. Men helped with the unloading and they did not shoot for as long or as many rounds as is normally required.

    If women could do the job, they would not have destroyed the records when Congress asked for them regarding the ranger school ‘graduates’.

  98. Nachum says:
    @anonynous

    A lot’s been written about the Jewish origins of superheroes. Bear in mind that the creators were not rich and powerful Jews but usually desperately poor ones. To a certain extent, Clark Kent and Bruce Wayne are two aspects of Jewish fantasy- the all-American farm boy (WASP, but not in the sense we usually think of the term) and the fantastically rich, over-on-the-Mayflower WASP. These Jews aspired to be either, or maybe even both, if that was possible. So here was an outsider who *became* both the all-American farm boy while *also* secretly being a champion of all-American values, and here was the oligarch WASP who hadn’t lost his feeling for the oppressed and nursed some dark secrets while dressing up and saving lives. International Jewish conspiracies had nothing to do with it.

    • Replies: @Hail
  99. Everyone who recognizes the name “Conrad Veidt” as the man who, 14 years later, would play Major Strasser, please raise your hands. (Of course, considering my screen name, I WOULD know……LOL LOL)

    Fun Fact- Veidt died in April ’43, shortly after Casablanca’s release, of a heart attack while playing a round at Riviera. Veidt was…………………..50.

  100. @anonynous

    You make a lot of good observations about Jewish in the American comic book world – what is your view on Jack Kirby who pretty much created the Marvel Universe and huckster J owner Stan Lee (can’t be his real name) ripped off all of Kirby’s great ideas/creations.

    Yes indeed, the Wagnerian tragedy of the Siegfriedian Kirby being expropriated by Jud Süss Stan Lee. Thing is, Jack Kirby was born Yankel Kurtzburg on the Lower East Side, so his contractual dispute with Stan Lee(born Stanley Leiber) is really a case of two yidelekh fighting over money and prestige. So, not a Wagnerian tragedy after all , but a Huxleyian tragedy ‘A beautiful theory slain by a ugly fact’.

    btw it’s Siegel who created Superman, not Spiegelman who created Maus.

  101. Proof you are all idiots. Taking Batman movies seriously.

  102. @Rex Little

    Remember when the opening line of a song about San Francisco called Paris “sadly gay”?

    And the Flinstones promised kids a “gay old time”.

  103. Anonymous[292] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonynous

    OK – I’m up for suggestions on what to do, where to go.

    White Liberation Theology.

  104. Anonymous[292] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hail

    A key cast member of Tenet is Robert Pattinson, who coincidentally has been cast to be the Batman of the 2020s.

    ROTFL. That piece of turd bitched and whined about how he wasted his talent in TWILIGHT series meant for teenyboppers. You see, he’s a real artist hungry for serious roles. So, he’s gonna don a bat costume and drive around in an over-sized toy car. What a phony.

  105. @Hail

    A Republican Mormon won a Best Picture Oscar as one of the producers of Schindler’s List:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerald_R._Molen

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  106. Hail says: • Website
    @Nachum

    To a certain extent, Clark Kent and Bruce Wayne are two aspects of Jewish fantasy- the all-American farm boy (WASP, but not in the sense we usually think of the term) and the fantastically rich, over-on-the-Mayflower WASP.

    What Jews aspire(d) to be “all-American farm boys”?

    There was likely a Jewish metaphor intended with Clark-Kent-vs.-Superman, maybe not fully consciously. I think commenter anonynous gets it right:

    Some superior race of being from another planet is some how crashed in to rural White America –

    these/this alien beings are good people, super smart and powerful but they are some reason feared as different – this is obviously a reference to Jews from Central and Eastern Europe. Superman reassures us everyday that this/these alien beings are using their superior, God’s Chosen powers to help Truth Justice and the American Way

    The Clark Kent persona may be a partial metaphor for hiding one’s Judaic origins, to some degree or other, to blend in. A phenomenon parodied, of late, esp. by Twitter people, with the line “Fellow White People.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  107. Anonymous[118] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hail

    What Jews aspire(d) to be “all-American farm boys”?

    Jews aspired to be farmers in Zion.

    What’s most interesting about Superman is his allergy to kryptonite. Despite all his strength, he turns into jelly before it. And the funny thing about Lex Luthor is he is sort of a Jewishy archetype, especially as played by Gene Hackman in the movie.

    In a way, it’s like Jews came up with kryptonite for the white race. Just yell ‘racist’, and whites turn into jelly cucks.

  108. Anonymous[118] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Will he produce a movie about Nakba or Holodomor?

  109. FPD72 says:
    @Anonymous

    “ And the sequel of SICARIO begins with Muslims slipping through the US-Mexican border and blowing up a supermarket.”

    Actually, the American government determined that at least two of the suicide bombers in Kansas City were actually domestic terrorists, not foreign nationals, and thus were not smuggled into the United States by the cartels. The one terrorist who was smuggled by coyotes was discovered at the border, where he detonated a suicide vest, killing himself and several agents.

    From my viewing experience, it seems that Hollywood is somewhat even handed. I think the Showtime series “Homeland” plays it down the middle. The last season painted “deplorables” and Russians in a more negative light. But then, it also portrayed the deep state as attempting to undo the previous presidential election.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Anonymous
  110. dfordoom says: • Website
    @anonynous

    This Joker movie sounds like a rather straight up Lib Leftist Communist movie

    You do realise that liberalism and communism are not the same thing don’t you? In fact they’re pretty much mutually incompatible.

    And you do realise that liberalism is right-wing?

  111. @FPD72

    “Homeland” is based on an Israeli show, and most everything in Israel is well to the right of the US these days.

  112. Anonymous[118] • Disclaimer says:
    @FPD72

    Actually, the American government determined that at least two of the suicide bombers in Kansas City were actually domestic terrorists

    Oh, okay. The movie was so bad I turned it off after 20 min.

  113. @Harry Baldwin

    Well, the 2nd sequel to “Unbreakable”, titled “Glass”, opened with two white kids playing the knockout game. It’s a typical Hollywood tactic.

  114. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:

    The ultimate freak

  115. The effeminate mannerisms tho I thought was Arthur Playing out his mother? For some reason it felt like that was one more ‘break’ in his brain than just Joaquin throwing it in out of boredom but who knows. Truly how much of the movie ‘happened’ in Gotham-life vs in Arthur’s head is hard to tell.

  116. syonredux says:
    @Alden

    Wow!!! Never heard of that comic Thanks

    You’re welcome. I’m always glad to introduce people to McCay’s work. It’s such a shame that he’s not better known to the general public:

  117. MEH 0910 says:

    Half in the Bag: Joker

    Published on Oct 6, 2019
    Mike and Jay thought their lives were a comedy but then realized they were a tragedy. So then they saw the Joker movie.

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