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Jameis Winston's Old College Coach Jimbo Fisher Gets $75 Million Contract
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College football players aren’t overtly paid, so that leaves a lot of cash left over to pay college football coaches. For example, Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher just signed a $75 million ten year deal with Texas A&M.

At Florida State, Fisher won a national championship and helped keep his Heisman winning quarterback Jameis Winston eligible despite a rape allegation, a situation straight out of Tom Wolfe’s 1990s novel A Man in Full.

 
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  1. Garrett says:

    Steve, are you going out to Anaheim tomorrow to see the last day of the World Weightlifting Championships? The Super-Heavyweights are lifting – 2012 London gold medalist Behdad Salimi (6’6, 370 lbs.) of Iran against 2016 Rio gold medalist Lasha Talakadzhe (6’5, 345 lbs.) of Georgia. Rematch of the controversial 2016 Olympic contest. There might very well be a world record set in the snatch or the total. I would think it would be a spectacle of some interest to the student of human biodiversity.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wally
    said:
    " I would think it would be a spectacle of some interest to the student of human biodiversity."

    Indeed, these weightlifters are known for their high IQs.

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  2. Danindc says:

    Jameis. The most annoying name and guy in sports. Buffoon is too kind.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Truth

    Buffoon is too kind.
     
    LOL.

    Funny, if he looked at your paycheck he'd say the same about you.
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  3. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    It was not just a “rape allegation”. It was, and correct me if I am wrong, a compensated “rape complaint.” In other words, and again, correct me if I am wrong, under the legal system that the scumbags at that university profited under, it was a rape complaint that they had to apologize for, and pay money for, in order to keep making money off their evil system. I would love to be wrong but I am almost certainly not. Even “Ken Starr” would likely agree.

    Read More
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  4. whorefinder says: • Website

    Being just outside a major blue city, I may never understand the obsession with college football and basketball.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Aristippus
    It's a substitute for professional sports with a smattering of local pride. College sports tend to be more popular in more rural areas and 3/4 teams in the cfb playoff (Clemson, Alabama, and Oklahoma) are from states that don't have an NFL franchise while Georgia's most rabid fan tend to be located somewhat far away from Atlanta. As for the local pride aspect, typically the big state university is the most democratic institution in the college football states. It's pretty common for a regular Joe (ok, slightly above average Joe) to have some combination of his accountant, doctor, governor, uncle, sister, coworkers, boss, spouse and himself as alumni of State U.
    , @Barnard
    Which city? College basketball has been popular in a lot of blue areas for decades. Most of the old Big East spanned from Georgetown up to Boston College.
    , @Truth
    What are you obsessed with?
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  5. Bobby says:

    I went to A&M and started rooting for the team when I was a kid in the late 80s.

    College football in the south (especially) and certain other areas of the country needs to burn to the ground 10 times more than the NFL. In my personal circles more and more are realizing that, but it’s harder to let go of your college team from Texas than it is the Cowboys. Tighter identity group i guess.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    College football in the south (especially) and certain other areas of the country needs to burn to the ground 10 times more than the NFL.

     

    It seems the situation is less hopeless than just a year or two ago.

    The NFL looked utterly invincible, a true cultural juggernaut. But as PacificPundit and others have been documenting all season, NFL attendance figures and revenues are way down, and they're panicking.

    For example, here's a nice shot of the Meadowlands for this past Sunday's Jets/Chiefs game, presumably taken just before kickoff:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DQI9GGAUMAEMOIt.jpg
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  6. At my alma mater, one of the black football players got the coach’s daughter pregnant.

    I never went to a game.

    Read More
    • Replies: @FPD72
    Let me guess: Colorado?

    The pregnancy of McCartney’s daughter was one of the precipitating stressors in the coach’s life that gave rise to the Promise Keepers movement.
    , @midtown
    Was that Colorado?
    , @njguy73
    I thought she got pregnant by two different players in separate incidents.
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  7. SnakeEyes says:

    Jimbo’s departure from a prestige football program at FSU solely in pursuit of the filthy lucre is likely to raise the anti-amateur hackles of even the most somnolent “student athlete”. The latest round of the coaches’ carousel seems designed to start the next wave of demands for payment by the amateur athletes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    prestige football program at FSU
     
    LOL
    , @Boethiuss

    Jimbo’s departure from a prestige football program at FSU solely in pursuit of the filthy lucre is likely to raise the anti-amateur hackles of even the most somnolent “student athlete”. The latest round of the coaches’ carousel seems designed to start the next wave of demands for payment by the amateur athletes.
     
    Yeah this. I think there's probably something to Steve's point about there being some wink-and-nod collusion to cap coaching salaries in the NFL. In the colleges, the rivalries are too raw for this to work.
    , @CJ

    The latest round of the coaches’ carousel seems designed to start the next wave of demands for payment by the amateur athletes.
     
    They SHOULD be paid. Paid at least as much as the players in the American Hockey League or the Pacific Coast League of baseball. They're not amateurs. They're not students. Why can't football and basketball pay for their own development leagues the way baseball and hockey do?

    I'm one of nature's right-wingers, but this society needs some old-fashioned unionism. Let's get rid of the whole concept of "interns" along with the neo-feudalism of academia. Let's stop exploiting the young.

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  8. @Bobby
    I went to A&M and started rooting for the team when I was a kid in the late 80s.

    College football in the south (especially) and certain other areas of the country needs to burn to the ground 10 times more than the NFL. In my personal circles more and more are realizing that, but it's harder to let go of your college team from Texas than it is the Cowboys. Tighter identity group i guess.

    College football in the south (especially) and certain other areas of the country needs to burn to the ground 10 times more than the NFL.

    It seems the situation is less hopeless than just a year or two ago.

    The NFL looked utterly invincible, a true cultural juggernaut. But as PacificPundit and others have been documenting all season, NFL attendance figures and revenues are way down, and they’re panicking.

    For example, here’s a nice shot of the Meadowlands for this past Sunday’s Jets/Chiefs game, presumably taken just before kickoff:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Boethiuss

    The NFL looked utterly invincible, a true cultural juggernaut. But as PacificPundit and others have been documenting all season, NFL attendance figures and revenues are way down, and they’re panicking.
     
    Yeah, there's been a surprising lack of commentary about the NFL's payoff to the players to resolve the National Anthem protests. Maybe the owners' stratagem was just effective enough to work. Of course it doesn't stop the slow bleed the league was already suffering, but they might hope that will reverse itself (though I don't believe it will).
    , @Ed
    The games just aren’t that interesting. QB play is mediocre with a few exceptions. If you’re still interested you can watch the games at home or at bar as opposed to fighting traffic, paying exorbitant prices at the game etc.

    The NFL will go on but it’s not invincible.
    , @stillCARealist
    Which is kind of ironic since that game was spectacular. I only know because I watched the highlights on YouTube. the entire game in 11 minutes.

    I want to like Alex Smith and Josh McCown.
    , @Forbes
    Photo of any NY sports crowd just before the start of a game is meaningless--I think only LA has a later arriving crowd. Take the photo in the second period.

    Though there is no denial attendance and viewership is off this year--I've not watched one minute of NFL at home.
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  9. @whorefinder
    Being just outside a major blue city, I may never understand the obsession with college football and basketball.

    It’s a substitute for professional sports with a smattering of local pride. College sports tend to be more popular in more rural areas and 3/4 teams in the cfb playoff (Clemson, Alabama, and Oklahoma) are from states that don’t have an NFL franchise while Georgia’s most rabid fan tend to be located somewhat far away from Atlanta. As for the local pride aspect, typically the big state university is the most democratic institution in the college football states. It’s pretty common for a regular Joe (ok, slightly above average Joe) to have some combination of his accountant, doctor, governor, uncle, sister, coworkers, boss, spouse and himself as alumni of State U.

    Read More
    • Agree: clyde
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  10. Wally says:
    @Garrett
    Steve, are you going out to Anaheim tomorrow to see the last day of the World Weightlifting Championships? The Super-Heavyweights are lifting - 2012 London gold medalist Behdad Salimi (6’6, 370 lbs.) of Iran against 2016 Rio gold medalist Lasha Talakadzhe (6’5, 345 lbs.) of Georgia. Rematch of the controversial 2016 Olympic contest. There might very well be a world record set in the snatch or the total. I would think it would be a spectacle of some interest to the student of human biodiversity.

    said:
    ” I would think it would be a spectacle of some interest to the student of human biodiversity.”

    Indeed, these weightlifters are known for their high IQs.

    Read More
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  11. wally says:

    said:
    “The latest round of the coaches’ carousel seems designed to start the next wave of demands for payment by the amateur athletes.”

    They already receive payment, tons of it.

    ‘Pay College Athletes? They’re Already Paid Up To $125,000 Per Year’

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffreydorfman/2013/08/29/pay-college-athletes-theyre-already-paid-up-to-125000year/#6b1de21b2b82

    BTW, must college ‘scholarship’ athletes do not graduate.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Barnard
    The players requirements for football go far beyond a normal student and in some cases limit their options academically. In addition, many of the players don't have the aptitude for college in the first place and really shouldn't be there. Pushing them through to get a sociology or criminal justice degree with heavy help from tutors, really isn't a big benefit to their ability to obtain employment after football.

    The worst part is that for star players, the school and the NCAA is making money off the player's likeness without the player receiving a cent of compensation. This is just theft. Both the NCAA and the schools should lose their tax exempt status, everything they do in regard to football and basketball is designed to generate revenue.
    , @Truth

    ‘Pay College Athletes? They’re Already Paid Up To $125,000 Per Year’
     
    Yeah, but the coaches are paid up SEVEN-MILLION dollars a year. And they don't get CTE.
    , @Hibernian
    I propose lightened academic loads, and pay beyond the facade of "expense money," for football, men's and women's basketball, and one other women's sport, maybe volleyball. This would be for Division I only. Division II schools would choose to join Division I or III. Division III, NAIA, and minor sports in Division I would have true student athletes, who might have a slightly reduced academic load and go to summer school.

    The major sport, major school, semi-pros, would have 1/2 academic loads, and if pro material, would probably join the pros before graduating, if they ever graduate. The schools would be to these teams what their commercial/industrial sponsors were to the original Cardinals, Bears, and Packers.

    The NFL would have a developmental league for talented players who were absolutely not college material. Junior college programs would continue to provide an opportunity for some players.

    Mr. Dorfman, as a participant in college athletic management, has a dog in the fight and is resistant to change, as most people are. The splendid physical training has few benefits except for a few very good athletes. Ditto for the publicity. You don't need to be a professional economist to realize that the athletes are not getting the equivalent of a $125,000.00 salary. That argument is obvious special pleading.

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  12. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @SnakeEyes
    Jimbo's departure from a prestige football program at FSU solely in pursuit of the filthy lucre is likely to raise the anti-amateur hackles of even the most somnolent "student athlete". The latest round of the coaches' carousel seems designed to start the next wave of demands for payment by the amateur athletes.

    prestige football program at FSU

    LOL

    Read More
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  13. Boethiuss says:
    @SnakeEyes
    Jimbo's departure from a prestige football program at FSU solely in pursuit of the filthy lucre is likely to raise the anti-amateur hackles of even the most somnolent "student athlete". The latest round of the coaches' carousel seems designed to start the next wave of demands for payment by the amateur athletes.

    Jimbo’s departure from a prestige football program at FSU solely in pursuit of the filthy lucre is likely to raise the anti-amateur hackles of even the most somnolent “student athlete”. The latest round of the coaches’ carousel seems designed to start the next wave of demands for payment by the amateur athletes.

    Yeah this. I think there’s probably something to Steve’s point about there being some wink-and-nod collusion to cap coaching salaries in the NFL. In the colleges, the rivalries are too raw for this to work.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    College coaches work really, really hard. They have to recruit players, which NFL coaches don't.
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  14. Boethiuss says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    College football in the south (especially) and certain other areas of the country needs to burn to the ground 10 times more than the NFL.

     

    It seems the situation is less hopeless than just a year or two ago.

    The NFL looked utterly invincible, a true cultural juggernaut. But as PacificPundit and others have been documenting all season, NFL attendance figures and revenues are way down, and they're panicking.

    For example, here's a nice shot of the Meadowlands for this past Sunday's Jets/Chiefs game, presumably taken just before kickoff:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DQI9GGAUMAEMOIt.jpg

    The NFL looked utterly invincible, a true cultural juggernaut. But as PacificPundit and others have been documenting all season, NFL attendance figures and revenues are way down, and they’re panicking.

    Yeah, there’s been a surprising lack of commentary about the NFL’s payoff to the players to resolve the National Anthem protests. Maybe the owners’ stratagem was just effective enough to work. Of course it doesn’t stop the slow bleed the league was already suffering, but they might hope that will reverse itself (though I don’t believe it will).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pericles

    Yeah, there’s been a surprising lack of commentary about the NFL’s payoff to the players to resolve the National Anthem protests.

     

    Someone should tell the owners they're placating in the wrong direction.
    , @David In TN
    The anthem "protests" are still going on after the attempt to buy them off.
    , @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Yeah, there’s been a surprising lack of commentary about the NFL’s payoff to the players to resolve the National Anthem protests. Maybe the owners’ stratagem was just effective enough to work.
     
    Maybe not. From Slate:

    “It’s a Charade”

    The San Francisco 49ers’ Eric Reid says the NFL wants to use breast cancer awareness and “Salute to Service” funds to buy off protesting players.
     
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  15. @Boethiuss

    Jimbo’s departure from a prestige football program at FSU solely in pursuit of the filthy lucre is likely to raise the anti-amateur hackles of even the most somnolent “student athlete”. The latest round of the coaches’ carousel seems designed to start the next wave of demands for payment by the amateur athletes.
     
    Yeah this. I think there's probably something to Steve's point about there being some wink-and-nod collusion to cap coaching salaries in the NFL. In the colleges, the rivalries are too raw for this to work.

    College coaches work really, really hard. They have to recruit players, which NFL coaches don’t.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Boethiuss

    College coaches work really, really hard. They have to recruit players, which NFL coaches don’t.
     
    I'm not saying you're wrong, but that's not the reputation at least. Like you mentioned, college coaches have to recruit. They also have to handhold the fans more, at least some of the important ones. But aside from that, NFL coaches are routinely expected to work 80-100 hours a week, and college guys don't. Frankly I'm not sure what they doing all that time. But that is the reputation.
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  16. Boethiuss says:
    @Steve Sailer
    College coaches work really, really hard. They have to recruit players, which NFL coaches don't.

    College coaches work really, really hard. They have to recruit players, which NFL coaches don’t.

    I’m not saying you’re wrong, but that’s not the reputation at least. Like you mentioned, college coaches have to recruit. They also have to handhold the fans more, at least some of the important ones. But aside from that, NFL coaches are routinely expected to work 80-100 hours a week, and college guys don’t. Frankly I’m not sure what they doing all that time. But that is the reputation.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I read an article about high school assistant coaches putting in 80 hour weeks during the season for an annual stipend of $1,600. There is a lot of competition out there to be a big time football coach. A lot of guys really like football.
    , @Steve Sailer
    I read an article about high school assistant coaches putting in 80 hour weeks during the season for an annual stipend of $1,600. There is a lot of competition out there to be a big time football coach. A lot of guys really like football.
    , @Diversity Heretic
    I recall years ago that one reason Joe Gibbs quit the Redskins coaching job was that he said that he was sleeping in his office after watching game films until late in the evening; and doing so regularly.
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  17. Ed says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    College football in the south (especially) and certain other areas of the country needs to burn to the ground 10 times more than the NFL.

     

    It seems the situation is less hopeless than just a year or two ago.

    The NFL looked utterly invincible, a true cultural juggernaut. But as PacificPundit and others have been documenting all season, NFL attendance figures and revenues are way down, and they're panicking.

    For example, here's a nice shot of the Meadowlands for this past Sunday's Jets/Chiefs game, presumably taken just before kickoff:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DQI9GGAUMAEMOIt.jpg

    The games just aren’t that interesting. QB play is mediocre with a few exceptions. If you’re still interested you can watch the games at home or at bar as opposed to fighting traffic, paying exorbitant prices at the game etc.

    The NFL will go on but it’s not invincible.

    Read More
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  18. @Boethiuss

    College coaches work really, really hard. They have to recruit players, which NFL coaches don’t.
     
    I'm not saying you're wrong, but that's not the reputation at least. Like you mentioned, college coaches have to recruit. They also have to handhold the fans more, at least some of the important ones. But aside from that, NFL coaches are routinely expected to work 80-100 hours a week, and college guys don't. Frankly I'm not sure what they doing all that time. But that is the reputation.

    I read an article about high school assistant coaches putting in 80 hour weeks during the season for an annual stipend of $1,600. There is a lot of competition out there to be a big time football coach. A lot of guys really like football.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Is there any route to a pro sports front office job that pays anything more than zero?
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  19. @Boethiuss

    College coaches work really, really hard. They have to recruit players, which NFL coaches don’t.
     
    I'm not saying you're wrong, but that's not the reputation at least. Like you mentioned, college coaches have to recruit. They also have to handhold the fans more, at least some of the important ones. But aside from that, NFL coaches are routinely expected to work 80-100 hours a week, and college guys don't. Frankly I'm not sure what they doing all that time. But that is the reputation.

    I read an article about high school assistant coaches putting in 80 hour weeks during the season for an annual stipend of $1,600. There is a lot of competition out there to be a big time football coach. A lot of guys really like football.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Boethiuss


    I read an article about high school assistant coaches putting in 80 hour weeks during the season for an annual stipend of $1,600. There is a lot of competition out there to be a big time football coach. A lot of guys really like football.
     
    Yeah but 40 hours of that is teaching drivers' ed, for which they're making 65K or whatever. So football is more analogous to a medical device salesman who is addicted to his golf game. Except that he gets paid instead of paying himself. And if he's any good his neighbors love him for it. By contrast, the pro game is straight grind.
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  20. $75 million contract for a coach who just went 6-6. That sounds like an Aggie joke.

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    • LOL: ben tillman
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  21. JerryC says:

    Trouble seems to find Jameis Winston pretty consistently, for some reason.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/nypost.com/2017/11/17/jameis-winston-grabbed-my-crotch-uber-driver/amp/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sarah Toga
    "trouble" is racist?
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  22. Barnard says:
    @whorefinder
    Being just outside a major blue city, I may never understand the obsession with college football and basketball.

    Which city? College basketball has been popular in a lot of blue areas for decades. Most of the old Big East spanned from Georgetown up to Boston College.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Yeah, no. Outside of a hardcore small fanbase college basketball isn't a draw in the blue cities, except if the local boys are making a serious run (i.e. ranked in top 5 from the first day of the season).

    In almost every blue city I've traveled to, and listened to the local talk radio, there's always at least one guy trying to sell the locals on the "excitement" of college sports, and how the attendance for local big-name school X should be way higher. Then everyone goes back to watching the local pros and ignores college again.

    I can't watch college sports because I didn't grow up with it, and as an adult, knowing how corrupt it is and how the players are being paid off and all those black players are sleeping with white girls and committing felonies and skipping class and are too dumb to be there makes me sick to my stomach and I can't view anything more than a few seconds without turning away.
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  23. FPD72 says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    At my alma mater, one of the black football players got the coach's daughter pregnant.

    I never went to a game.

    Let me guess: Colorado?

    The pregnancy of McCartney’s daughter was one of the precipitating stressors in the coach’s life that gave rise to the Promise Keepers movement.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Yes, that was Coach McCartney. He filled the CU football stadium with those Promise Keepers while I was still living in town.

    I got invited to join them but was not of a mind to go because of the fundamentalist feeling of it all. (You will find a lot of varieties evangelical Christian groups in Colorado, even though it is now a purple state.)

    In retrospect, they were good men making a promise to be good husbands, fathers, and citizens. Things we could use more of now.
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  24. midtown says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    At my alma mater, one of the black football players got the coach's daughter pregnant.

    I never went to a game.

    Was that Colorado?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Sure enough, Colorado. The coach was a good guy. Though I wasn't into football, I met him and met some of his players and friends during those years. One black girl I worked with was a friend of him and his family. She raved about him.
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  25. Travis says:

    The NCAA should impose a salary Cap on Coaches and staff.
    NCAA football already is skewed to the top programs because they are able to recruit the top high school football players…imagine if the top pro-teams were able to “recruit” the top players out of college year-after-year while the less desirable teams were forced to accept the leftover players ? It is much easier for the coaches at Alabama, USC and Ohio State to “recruit” the best college players than for the coaches at Rice, Cincinnati and UCF.

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  26. TWalsh2 says:

    College coaches generate more revenue than NFL coaches. If anything, the top ones(Saban, Meyer, etc) are underpaid.

    Saban, in particular, has brought hundreds of millions if not a billion in to Alabama’s coffers. Look not only at revenue from games, but spring games, merchandise, increased enrollment, etc.

    Bama football under Saban is not only an on field juggernaut but also a financial one.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    The regeants here at A&M calculated that even after paying Sumlin his go away money and 7.5 mill a year to Fisher, the football program would still turn a 30 million dollar profit every year. Supposedly A&M is the most profitable college sports program in the country, which seems pretty retarded since none of our teams our good, we haven't won a championship since 39, and about 80% of the student body are Han Chinese or Indians brought in to prop up tuition and PhD numbers (so we can be a 'tier one' research institute... lol). Given the demographics on campus, I'd be surprised if ten years from now A&M has a strong football fan base, regardless of how many championships Fisher wins.
    , @Wally
    "College coaches generate more revenue than NFL coaches. If anything, the top ones (Saban, Meyer, etc) are underpaid."

    However, that revenue does not go into the college's general funds, it stays in the various athletic departments.

    Yet the reason that athletic departments exist at all is because of the colleges / universities which started them.

    Not to mention the numerous 'scholarships' handed out to athletes who generally do not graduate, thereby taking away a seat from a more worthy student.

    Something wrong here.

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  27. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @TWalsh2
    College coaches generate more revenue than NFL coaches. If anything, the top ones(Saban, Meyer, etc) are underpaid.

    Saban, in particular, has brought hundreds of millions if not a billion in to Alabama's coffers. Look not only at revenue from games, but spring games, merchandise, increased enrollment, etc.

    Bama football under Saban is not only an on field juggernaut but also a financial one.

    The regeants here at A&M calculated that even after paying Sumlin his go away money and 7.5 mill a year to Fisher, the football program would still turn a 30 million dollar profit every year. Supposedly A&M is the most profitable college sports program in the country, which seems pretty retarded since none of our teams our good, we haven’t won a championship since 39, and about 80% of the student body are Han Chinese or Indians brought in to prop up tuition and PhD numbers (so we can be a ‘tier one’ research institute… lol). Given the demographics on campus, I’d be surprised if ten years from now A&M has a strong football fan base, regardless of how many championships Fisher wins.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TWalsh2
    Interesting. If A&M were to win three national championships in the next ten years and compete for them every year, a la Saban, I would expect that 30 million number to increase dramatically. It's amazing how much money good college football can generate.
    , @PenskeFile
    Good point about the changing demographics. I'm surprised to hear that about A&M, but I know what you describe is certainly happening at UT-Austin.

    Right now, the football programs are bankrolled by a small group of extremely wealthy individuals (in some cases billionaires) who are in their 60's or older. In 20 years, when those guys are dead and gone, the new rich alumni are likely to be ethnic Chinese, Indian or generally tech nerds with no interest in football. The money will be gone and the madness will start to wind down
    , @Truth

    and about 80% of the student body are Han Chinese or Indians brought in to prop up tuition and PhD numbers
     
    I'm guessing this is a large exaggeration.

    When I think A&M I think not football or research, but ROTC.
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  28. Pericles says:
    @Boethiuss

    The NFL looked utterly invincible, a true cultural juggernaut. But as PacificPundit and others have been documenting all season, NFL attendance figures and revenues are way down, and they’re panicking.
     
    Yeah, there's been a surprising lack of commentary about the NFL's payoff to the players to resolve the National Anthem protests. Maybe the owners' stratagem was just effective enough to work. Of course it doesn't stop the slow bleed the league was already suffering, but they might hope that will reverse itself (though I don't believe it will).

    Yeah, there’s been a surprising lack of commentary about the NFL’s payoff to the players to resolve the National Anthem protests.

    Someone should tell the owners they’re placating in the wrong direction.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Truth

    Someone should tell the owners they’re placating in the wrong direction.
     
    Then I guess you should start doing push-ups and put some shoulder pads on, because without players they don't have a business.
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  29. rienzi says:

    Way back in the 70′s I attended a Big Ten university. I lived in the most expensive and luxurious, then new, dorm. Also living in the dorm were most of the “stars” of the football and basketball programs.

    It was amazing how just about all of these semi- to completely illiterate guys from some of the poorest neighborhoods in the country were able to afford the new Corvettes, Mercedes, Cadillacs, and Lincolns that littered the dorm’s parking lot. The quick answer would be selling drugs, but I knew these guys personally, and they were consumers, not suppliers.

    The real kicker was both the football and basketball programs were mediocre, and regularly got stomped by the top rank schools. I always thought that if they were going to cheat, the least we should expect is that they would win.

    Read More
    • Replies: @CAL2
    I went to school at a mid-major and lived in the dorm with the football and basketball players. Surprisingly, it was a very quite dorm. We had one false fire alarm during the first week of the year and that was it. The caught the girl who did it and the wrath of the players was enough to discourage another incident.

    While college coaches aren't lazy bums, in general their time seems to be spent more on socializing than actual coaching. If you are a decent recruiter and not at the absolute top tier (OSU, Alabama, etc.), you can cruise along with 8-5 to 10-3 records and have pretty solid job security. College coaches rely more on talent than actual game planning. A lot of big school QB's never make it in the pro's because they have top tier receivers that create amounts of separation that a pro only sees when coverage is blown.
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  30. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    The nearest good schools to the state of Florida are Emory and Georgia Tech in Atlanta, and beyond that you have to go all the way to NC for Duke and Davidson. There’s also Vanderbilt in Nashville.

    It’s a long way off no matter how you look at it. So I guess you concentrate on football, which is something you can do reasonably well. If you cared about academics this might be a bit humiliating.

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  31. poolside says:

    I’d be surprised if ten years from now A&M has a strong football fan base, regardless of how many championships Fisher wins.

    Because of its strong traditions that are passed down from generation to generation, A&M is a perfect test case for the assimilation of various cultures.

    The demographic makeup of A&M in 1980 or even 2000 was very similar to that of 1950 or ’60 … maybe more suburban than rural but still white and conservative. That allowed the old traditions that developed when the school was male and all Corps to survive and thrive.

    But the demographics have changed dramatically in the past 20 years.

    It remains to be seen if the university’s culture of tradition wins over the students, or the students change the culture. My bet is the latter.

    Read More
    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    My brother was an engineering professor there until about 2004. He said back then that almost all the grad students were Indians. He was irritated by it, claiming they tended to cheat and lie. Also, he had a bad experience with one FOB who came in with TB, didn't stay quarantined, and then spread it around to other students.

    Being at that job didn't make him racially sensitive in the preferred way at all. He was happy to leave and go into the private sector.
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  32. CAL2 says:
    @rienzi
    Way back in the 70's I attended a Big Ten university. I lived in the most expensive and luxurious, then new, dorm. Also living in the dorm were most of the "stars" of the football and basketball programs.

    It was amazing how just about all of these semi- to completely illiterate guys from some of the poorest neighborhoods in the country were able to afford the new Corvettes, Mercedes, Cadillacs, and Lincolns that littered the dorm's parking lot. The quick answer would be selling drugs, but I knew these guys personally, and they were consumers, not suppliers.

    The real kicker was both the football and basketball programs were mediocre, and regularly got stomped by the top rank schools. I always thought that if they were going to cheat, the least we should expect is that they would win.

    I went to school at a mid-major and lived in the dorm with the football and basketball players. Surprisingly, it was a very quite dorm. We had one false fire alarm during the first week of the year and that was it. The caught the girl who did it and the wrath of the players was enough to discourage another incident.

    While college coaches aren’t lazy bums, in general their time seems to be spent more on socializing than actual coaching. If you are a decent recruiter and not at the absolute top tier (OSU, Alabama, etc.), you can cruise along with 8-5 to 10-3 records and have pretty solid job security. College coaches rely more on talent than actual game planning. A lot of big school QB’s never make it in the pro’s because they have top tier receivers that create amounts of separation that a pro only sees when coverage is blown.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    When the very successful college coach Steve Spurrier left college and took a job in the pros rebuilding the Washington Redskins, he would leave the office every day at 5pm and not come back until 8-9am the next day, and would make fun of reporters/sports heads who criticized him for not working hard enough and much longer hours, like other NFL coaches. Spurrier said this was exactly how he ran shop in college and he was mega-successful, so why would he change?

    But Spurrier was a disaster in the pros. He couldn't simply recruit the best athletes, put them on the field, and expect them to run over the other guys, because everyone in the NFL had more or less equal talent, so coaching mattered. The Redskins remained at the bottom of the heap and Spurrier returned to college soon after.

    Ditto for Rick Pitino when he left college to head up the Boston Celtics. Pitino, despite all his college basketball accolades, was simply a guy who hired the best athletes and expected that to be enough. He failed with the Celtics and put his tail between his legs and went back to college, where the lazy corruption he loved actually worked.
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  33. @FPD72
    Let me guess: Colorado?

    The pregnancy of McCartney’s daughter was one of the precipitating stressors in the coach’s life that gave rise to the Promise Keepers movement.

    Yes, that was Coach McCartney. He filled the CU football stadium with those Promise Keepers while I was still living in town.

    I got invited to join them but was not of a mind to go because of the fundamentalist feeling of it all. (You will find a lot of varieties evangelical Christian groups in Colorado, even though it is now a purple state.)

    In retrospect, they were good men making a promise to be good husbands, fathers, and citizens. Things we could use more of now.

    Read More
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  34. @midtown
    Was that Colorado?

    Sure enough, Colorado. The coach was a good guy. Though I wasn’t into football, I met him and met some of his players and friends during those years. One black girl I worked with was a friend of him and his family. She raved about him.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
    Didn’t the player who impregnated his daughter also die of cancer not long after that?
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  35. @The Last Real Calvinist

    College football in the south (especially) and certain other areas of the country needs to burn to the ground 10 times more than the NFL.

     

    It seems the situation is less hopeless than just a year or two ago.

    The NFL looked utterly invincible, a true cultural juggernaut. But as PacificPundit and others have been documenting all season, NFL attendance figures and revenues are way down, and they're panicking.

    For example, here's a nice shot of the Meadowlands for this past Sunday's Jets/Chiefs game, presumably taken just before kickoff:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DQI9GGAUMAEMOIt.jpg

    Which is kind of ironic since that game was spectacular. I only know because I watched the highlights on YouTube. the entire game in 11 minutes.

    I want to like Alex Smith and Josh McCown.

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  36. @poolside

    I’d be surprised if ten years from now A&M has a strong football fan base, regardless of how many championships Fisher wins.
     
    Because of its strong traditions that are passed down from generation to generation, A&M is a perfect test case for the assimilation of various cultures.

    The demographic makeup of A&M in 1980 or even 2000 was very similar to that of 1950 or '60 ... maybe more suburban than rural but still white and conservative. That allowed the old traditions that developed when the school was male and all Corps to survive and thrive.

    But the demographics have changed dramatically in the past 20 years.

    It remains to be seen if the university's culture of tradition wins over the students, or the students change the culture. My bet is the latter.

    My brother was an engineering professor there until about 2004. He said back then that almost all the grad students were Indians. He was irritated by it, claiming they tended to cheat and lie. Also, he had a bad experience with one FOB who came in with TB, didn’t stay quarantined, and then spread it around to other students.

    Being at that job didn’t make him racially sensitive in the preferred way at all. He was happy to leave and go into the private sector.

    Read More
    • Replies: @poolside
    Interesting ... Yes, many graduate programs at A&M have been heavily Indian/Chinese for awhile. But that type of diversity is finally making its way into the undergraduate population -- partly due to the top 10 percent rule in Texas, and partly due to the fact that Texas' big cities are very diverse themselves.

    The question is: Can A&M's traditions survive in a multi-cultural environment? I just don't see it happening.

    A parallel is how we celebrate Christmas in America. Many of our Christmas traditions and much of the imagery comes from Victorian England, other European countries and of course New England. One-horse sleighs, caroling, etc. Does any of that mean anything to Habib or Sun-Yoo or their children/grandchildren? Doubtful.
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  37. @Boethiuss

    The NFL looked utterly invincible, a true cultural juggernaut. But as PacificPundit and others have been documenting all season, NFL attendance figures and revenues are way down, and they’re panicking.
     
    Yeah, there's been a surprising lack of commentary about the NFL's payoff to the players to resolve the National Anthem protests. Maybe the owners' stratagem was just effective enough to work. Of course it doesn't stop the slow bleed the league was already suffering, but they might hope that will reverse itself (though I don't believe it will).

    The anthem “protests” are still going on after the attempt to buy them off.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Boethiuss

    The anthem “protests” are still going on after the attempt to buy them off.
     
    Maybe, but I've heard little if any about them, here or elsewhere, which leads me to believe the payoff could have been worth it from the owners' pov.
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  38. I think I recall during the Jameis Winston Rape Controvery Steve observed that the name “Jimbo Fisher” for a college football coach could have come right out of a Tom Wolfe novel.

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  39. TWalsh2 says:
    @Anon
    The regeants here at A&M calculated that even after paying Sumlin his go away money and 7.5 mill a year to Fisher, the football program would still turn a 30 million dollar profit every year. Supposedly A&M is the most profitable college sports program in the country, which seems pretty retarded since none of our teams our good, we haven't won a championship since 39, and about 80% of the student body are Han Chinese or Indians brought in to prop up tuition and PhD numbers (so we can be a 'tier one' research institute... lol). Given the demographics on campus, I'd be surprised if ten years from now A&M has a strong football fan base, regardless of how many championships Fisher wins.

    Interesting. If A&M were to win three national championships in the next ten years and compete for them every year, a la Saban, I would expect that 30 million number to increase dramatically. It’s amazing how much money good college football can generate.

    Read More
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  40. whorefinder says: • Website
    @Barnard
    Which city? College basketball has been popular in a lot of blue areas for decades. Most of the old Big East spanned from Georgetown up to Boston College.

    Yeah, no. Outside of a hardcore small fanbase college basketball isn’t a draw in the blue cities, except if the local boys are making a serious run (i.e. ranked in top 5 from the first day of the season).

    In almost every blue city I’ve traveled to, and listened to the local talk radio, there’s always at least one guy trying to sell the locals on the “excitement” of college sports, and how the attendance for local big-name school X should be way higher. Then everyone goes back to watching the local pros and ignores college again.

    I can’t watch college sports because I didn’t grow up with it, and as an adult, knowing how corrupt it is and how the players are being paid off and all those black players are sleeping with white girls and committing felonies and skipping class and are too dumb to be there makes me sick to my stomach and I can’t view anything more than a few seconds without turning away.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Barnard
    Villanova, Georgetown and Syracuse all have popular teams. Syracuse, is no longer in the Big East, but they routinely draw more fans than most NBA teams. College basketball is also very popular in Connecticut, even the women's team draws a good audience on TV. The success of the team is going to be a factor like it is for everything other sport.

    http://www.syracuse.com/orangebasketball/index.ssf/2017/08/where_did_syracuse_basketball_attendance_rank_nationally_in_2016-17.html
    , @Truth

    and all those black players are sleeping with white girls and committing felonies and skipping class and are too dumb to be there makes me sick to my stomach
     
    Well what do you want?

    They're whorefinders.
    , @Escher

    I can’t watch college sports because I didn’t grow up with it, and as an adult, knowing how corrupt it is and how the players are being paid off and all those black players are sleeping with white girls and committing felonies and skipping class and are too dumb to be there makes me sick to my stomach and I can’t view anything more than a few seconds without turning away.
     
    And the NFL and NBA players are of course Mensa members and models of rectitude.
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  41. whorefinder says: • Website
    @CAL2
    I went to school at a mid-major and lived in the dorm with the football and basketball players. Surprisingly, it was a very quite dorm. We had one false fire alarm during the first week of the year and that was it. The caught the girl who did it and the wrath of the players was enough to discourage another incident.

    While college coaches aren't lazy bums, in general their time seems to be spent more on socializing than actual coaching. If you are a decent recruiter and not at the absolute top tier (OSU, Alabama, etc.), you can cruise along with 8-5 to 10-3 records and have pretty solid job security. College coaches rely more on talent than actual game planning. A lot of big school QB's never make it in the pro's because they have top tier receivers that create amounts of separation that a pro only sees when coverage is blown.

    When the very successful college coach Steve Spurrier left college and took a job in the pros rebuilding the Washington Redskins, he would leave the office every day at 5pm and not come back until 8-9am the next day, and would make fun of reporters/sports heads who criticized him for not working hard enough and much longer hours, like other NFL coaches. Spurrier said this was exactly how he ran shop in college and he was mega-successful, so why would he change?

    But Spurrier was a disaster in the pros. He couldn’t simply recruit the best athletes, put them on the field, and expect them to run over the other guys, because everyone in the NFL had more or less equal talent, so coaching mattered. The Redskins remained at the bottom of the heap and Spurrier returned to college soon after.

    Ditto for Rick Pitino when he left college to head up the Boston Celtics. Pitino, despite all his college basketball accolades, was simply a guy who hired the best athletes and expected that to be enough. He failed with the Celtics and put his tail between his legs and went back to college, where the lazy corruption he loved actually worked.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Syagrius
    If your thesis about the success of big-time NCAA coaches is correct, then Mike Kryzyzewski and Roy Williams must be the laziest men in Division I basketball.

    Say what you want about Pitino as a human being, but he is a terrific basketball coach. It's not like Louisville has been cheating the A-level programs out of the top talent, any more than Providence suddenly had a talent surge in 1987 when Pitino coached the Friars to the Final Four.

    The NBA doesn't really have coaches, it has 'managers' - like baseball. The coach is hired to make what he can of a multi-million dollar roster of prima donnas assembled by (frequently) stupid owners and GMs. It's political, it's psychological. You want to talk lazy - what about Phil Jackson, that "great NBA coach", who always seemed to take jobs with teams loaded with talent? Hard-core commie too, which probably helped.

    As for Spurrier, he ran a very non-NFL offense in college and it just didn't translate to NFL ball, and his paymasters were impatient. It's just silly to think the man just happened to succeed on the college level because of his recruits.

    In 1989 the coach of (I think) Mount Saint Mary's (CA) - missing his best player, Hank Gaithers, who'd died on the floor of heart failure - ran a run and gun club that beat the defending champions, Michigan I think, by 47 points in the national quarterfinals. I could check all this out but the point stays the same: This same coach, a "genius", got a gig in the NBA and he soon "failed".

    Was he just a bad basketball coach, a guy who leaned on his recruiting prowess, or what?
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  42. Buck says:

    And in 5 years A&M will be buying out Jimbo’s contract if not sooner. Perhaps they’ll get out of it because of the inevitable NCAA scandal which will come to pass. College football is corrupt and probably should die or be severely wounded in the least. It’s a victim of its own success. It is the best football played today having a good mixture of pure talent and variety of play. The NFL is boring by comparison even if it’s athletes have more raw talent, they play like a team of 11 autonomous stars. High school is fun to watch because it is somewhat cringeworthy with missed tackles and dropped passes.

    The problem is college football makes a tremendous amount of money and most schools will sell their souls to get it. A decent team can pay for every other title IX required sport a bring prestige which can attract and help pay for academic talent. Money is fungible. If you don’t have to pay for women’s golf, soccer, basketball, volleyball, tennis, field hockey, swimming, etc., more money is left for other things.

    But that has led to the down side. While sports which don’t make money still have student-athletes, football and men’s basketball just have athletes in top tier programs. Athletes like Jameis Winston. Shoplifters and rapists hanging out on college campuses kind of ruin the point.

    Read More
    • Replies: @David In TN
    The money a college football team generates goes to the athletic program, very little to the academic side of the school.

    A standard ploy for athletic directors, especially at a big-time school, is to cry "We need more money to be competitive." The AD then raises the budget again and calls for more money. The cycle keeps on repeating.

    A favorite trope is "We meed more funding for the recruiting budget."
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  43. njguy73 says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    At my alma mater, one of the black football players got the coach's daughter pregnant.

    I never went to a game.

    I thought she got pregnant by two different players in separate incidents.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Triumph104
    She did. One player was black and the other was Samoan.
    , @roo_ster
    What a skank whore. And what a failure of a father.
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  44. The weightlifting coach at Alabama makes $525,000 per year.

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  45. @Anon
    The regeants here at A&M calculated that even after paying Sumlin his go away money and 7.5 mill a year to Fisher, the football program would still turn a 30 million dollar profit every year. Supposedly A&M is the most profitable college sports program in the country, which seems pretty retarded since none of our teams our good, we haven't won a championship since 39, and about 80% of the student body are Han Chinese or Indians brought in to prop up tuition and PhD numbers (so we can be a 'tier one' research institute... lol). Given the demographics on campus, I'd be surprised if ten years from now A&M has a strong football fan base, regardless of how many championships Fisher wins.

    Good point about the changing demographics. I’m surprised to hear that about A&M, but I know what you describe is certainly happening at UT-Austin.

    Right now, the football programs are bankrolled by a small group of extremely wealthy individuals (in some cases billionaires) who are in their 60′s or older. In 20 years, when those guys are dead and gone, the new rich alumni are likely to be ethnic Chinese, Indian or generally tech nerds with no interest in football. The money will be gone and the madness will start to wind down

    Read More
    • Agree: Triumph104
    • Replies: @poolside

    In 20 years, when those guys are dead and gone, the new rich alumni are likely to be ethnic Chinese, Indian or generally tech nerds with no interest in football. The money will be gone and the madness will start to wind down
     
    Right ... your comment echoes my thoughts exactly.

    In places like Texas and Oklahoma, the big college boosters are mostly older white men who made their money -- and lots of it -- in the oil business.

    But colleges are graduating fewer men than ever before, and many of the men who are graduating aren't even from the U.S. or are first or second generation without any connection to college football. They simply won't care.
    , @Truth

    In 20 years, when those guys are dead and gone, the new rich alumni are likely to be ethnic Chinese, Indian or generally tech nerds with no interest in football.
     
    What does interest have to do with anything?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shahid_Khan

    https://www.si.com/eats/2017/07/29/rich-cho-charlotte-hornets-gm-big-time-bites-food-blog

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivek_Ranadiv%C3%A9
    , @Barnard
    It might take a little longer, Boone Pickens is still bankrolling the Oklahoma State football team at 89 years old. If their heirs are also fans, it could continue beyond the current crop of boosters. Long term I think you are right, and that is if the NCAA and the schools can keep their charade going until then.
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  46. Wally says:
    @TWalsh2
    College coaches generate more revenue than NFL coaches. If anything, the top ones(Saban, Meyer, etc) are underpaid.

    Saban, in particular, has brought hundreds of millions if not a billion in to Alabama's coffers. Look not only at revenue from games, but spring games, merchandise, increased enrollment, etc.

    Bama football under Saban is not only an on field juggernaut but also a financial one.

    “College coaches generate more revenue than NFL coaches. If anything, the top ones (Saban, Meyer, etc) are underpaid.”

    However, that revenue does not go into the college’s general funds, it stays in the various athletic departments.

    Yet the reason that athletic departments exist at all is because of the colleges / universities which started them.

    Not to mention the numerous ‘scholarships’ handed out to athletes who generally do not graduate, thereby taking away a seat from a more worthy student.

    Something wrong here.

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  47. Barnard says:
    @wally
    said:
    "The latest round of the coaches’ carousel seems designed to start the next wave of demands for payment by the amateur athletes."

    They already receive payment, tons of it.

    'Pay College Athletes? They're Already Paid Up To $125,000 Per Year'
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffreydorfman/2013/08/29/pay-college-athletes-theyre-already-paid-up-to-125000year/#6b1de21b2b82

    BTW, must college 'scholarship' athletes do not graduate.

    The players requirements for football go far beyond a normal student and in some cases limit their options academically. In addition, many of the players don’t have the aptitude for college in the first place and really shouldn’t be there. Pushing them through to get a sociology or criminal justice degree with heavy help from tutors, really isn’t a big benefit to their ability to obtain employment after football.

    The worst part is that for star players, the school and the NCAA is making money off the player’s likeness without the player receiving a cent of compensation. This is just theft. Both the NCAA and the schools should lose their tax exempt status, everything they do in regard to football and basketball is designed to generate revenue.

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  48. Scotty says:

    I think “situational Alpha’s” are probably the most dangerous men, because they’ve always felt slighted (since pre-teen years) and know that their Alpha status is typically based on something tenuous and artificial–something that can be removed in a few months, weeks, or minutes. And unlike Betas, who actually respect Alphas and fall in line–the kind of men that make good soldiers who follow the game plan, SitAlfs are ALWAYS passive-aggressive gammas behind the scenes–doing junior high girl stuff to sabotage legit men. Their like a woman scorned, 24/7.

    All the Sandusky case proved to me, besides the obvious as the criminal case proved, is that most folks really don’t care about boys being raped–so much so that a FREAKIN GROWN MAN could walk by a shower where a boy was being anally raped and just walk on, without beating the shit out of the offender. You think that would happen if it had been a girl? The guy who did that (forgot his name),who just walked the F on…would have had his home torched if the victim had been a GIRL. Everyone knows it too.

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  49. Boethiuss says:
    @Steve Sailer
    I read an article about high school assistant coaches putting in 80 hour weeks during the season for an annual stipend of $1,600. There is a lot of competition out there to be a big time football coach. A lot of guys really like football.

    I read an article about high school assistant coaches putting in 80 hour weeks during the season for an annual stipend of $1,600. There is a lot of competition out there to be a big time football coach. A lot of guys really like football.

    Yeah but 40 hours of that is teaching drivers’ ed, for which they’re making 65K or whatever. So football is more analogous to a medical device salesman who is addicted to his golf game. Except that he gets paid instead of paying himself. And if he’s any good his neighbors love him for it. By contrast, the pro game is straight grind.

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  50. Boethiuss says:
    @David In TN
    The anthem "protests" are still going on after the attempt to buy them off.

    The anthem “protests” are still going on after the attempt to buy them off.

    Maybe, but I’ve heard little if any about them, here or elsewhere, which leads me to believe the payoff could have been worth it from the owners’ pov.

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  51. Barnard says:
    @whorefinder
    Yeah, no. Outside of a hardcore small fanbase college basketball isn't a draw in the blue cities, except if the local boys are making a serious run (i.e. ranked in top 5 from the first day of the season).

    In almost every blue city I've traveled to, and listened to the local talk radio, there's always at least one guy trying to sell the locals on the "excitement" of college sports, and how the attendance for local big-name school X should be way higher. Then everyone goes back to watching the local pros and ignores college again.

    I can't watch college sports because I didn't grow up with it, and as an adult, knowing how corrupt it is and how the players are being paid off and all those black players are sleeping with white girls and committing felonies and skipping class and are too dumb to be there makes me sick to my stomach and I can't view anything more than a few seconds without turning away.

    Villanova, Georgetown and Syracuse all have popular teams. Syracuse, is no longer in the Big East, but they routinely draw more fans than most NBA teams. College basketball is also very popular in Connecticut, even the women’s team draws a good audience on TV. The success of the team is going to be a factor like it is for everything other sport.

    http://www.syracuse.com/orangebasketball/index.ssf/2017/08/where_did_syracuse_basketball_attendance_rank_nationally_in_2016-17.html

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    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    Syracuse plays in a dome, not in an arena. Also, the Nationals moved in 1963, so there is literally nothing else do to in Syracuse on a winter weekday night.
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  52. CJ says:
    @SnakeEyes
    Jimbo's departure from a prestige football program at FSU solely in pursuit of the filthy lucre is likely to raise the anti-amateur hackles of even the most somnolent "student athlete". The latest round of the coaches' carousel seems designed to start the next wave of demands for payment by the amateur athletes.

    The latest round of the coaches’ carousel seems designed to start the next wave of demands for payment by the amateur athletes.

    They SHOULD be paid. Paid at least as much as the players in the American Hockey League or the Pacific Coast League of baseball. They’re not amateurs. They’re not students. Why can’t football and basketball pay for their own development leagues the way baseball and hockey do?

    I’m one of nature’s right-wingers, but this society needs some old-fashioned unionism. Let’s get rid of the whole concept of “interns” along with the neo-feudalism of academia. Let’s stop exploiting the young.

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    • Agree: Desiderius, Autochthon
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  53. @Boethiuss

    College coaches work really, really hard. They have to recruit players, which NFL coaches don’t.
     
    I'm not saying you're wrong, but that's not the reputation at least. Like you mentioned, college coaches have to recruit. They also have to handhold the fans more, at least some of the important ones. But aside from that, NFL coaches are routinely expected to work 80-100 hours a week, and college guys don't. Frankly I'm not sure what they doing all that time. But that is the reputation.

    I recall years ago that one reason Joe Gibbs quit the Redskins coaching job was that he said that he was sleeping in his office after watching game films until late in the evening; and doing so regularly.

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  54. @Buck
    And in 5 years A&M will be buying out Jimbo's contract if not sooner. Perhaps they'll get out of it because of the inevitable NCAA scandal which will come to pass. College football is corrupt and probably should die or be severely wounded in the least. It's a victim of its own success. It is the best football played today having a good mixture of pure talent and variety of play. The NFL is boring by comparison even if it's athletes have more raw talent, they play like a team of 11 autonomous stars. High school is fun to watch because it is somewhat cringeworthy with missed tackles and dropped passes.

    The problem is college football makes a tremendous amount of money and most schools will sell their souls to get it. A decent team can pay for every other title IX required sport a bring prestige which can attract and help pay for academic talent. Money is fungible. If you don't have to pay for women's golf, soccer, basketball, volleyball, tennis, field hockey, swimming, etc., more money is left for other things.

    But that has led to the down side. While sports which don't make money still have student-athletes, football and men's basketball just have athletes in top tier programs. Athletes like Jameis Winston. Shoplifters and rapists hanging out on college campuses kind of ruin the point.

    The money a college football team generates goes to the athletic program, very little to the academic side of the school.

    A standard ploy for athletic directors, especially at a big-time school, is to cry “We need more money to be competitive.” The AD then raises the budget again and calls for more money. The cycle keeps on repeating.

    A favorite trope is “We meed more funding for the recruiting budget.”

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    • Replies: @Truth

    The money a college football team generates goes to the athletic program, very little to the academic side of the school.
     
    Now Dave, you're not giving the incredibly greedy, wealthy white men you would give your eye teeth to be, enough credit...


    https://www.seccountry.com/alabama/decade-dominance-nick-sabans-success-transformed-alabama-not-just-football
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  55. The Jameis Winston phenomenon – jock-sniffers hustling to cover up the crimes of a badly-behaving afflete – is not altogether isolated. It isn’t even a black thing.

    In some areas, if you are a star football player, even at the high-school level, then you can literally kill someone and (almost) get away with it:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_Brian_Deneke

    Folks like to joke that adulthood is nothing more than an attempt to deal with everything that happened in high school. (Supposedly conservatives were the jocks and the cheerleaders, while liberals were the geeks and the drama fags.)

    These dichotomies – the popular kids vs. the freaks – were present in pre-1965 America. They are present, to some extent, in every society. (The other day, I read a newspaper editorial from 1910 complaining that academic standards were being compromised to accommodate top athletes. The “dumb jock” stereotype goes way back.)

    There will always be a social hierarchy. In the halcyon days of youth, the strong and the beautiful will always enjoy an unfair advantage. Those who are smart but socially awkward can only dream of better days to come.

    Liberals seek to upend the pyramid to put the losers and rejects on top. But, in a twist, the white soyboy gamma who grew up bitterly resenting the blond jock who stole his lunch money (and his girlfriend) ends up on the same side as the swaggering black afflete who is ten times more depraved than Haven Monahan ever dreamed of being. That center cannot hold.

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  56. @Buzz Mohawk
    Sure enough, Colorado. The coach was a good guy. Though I wasn't into football, I met him and met some of his players and friends during those years. One black girl I worked with was a friend of him and his family. She raved about him.

    Didn’t the player who impregnated his daughter also die of cancer not long after that?

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  57. poolside says:
    @stillCARealist
    My brother was an engineering professor there until about 2004. He said back then that almost all the grad students were Indians. He was irritated by it, claiming they tended to cheat and lie. Also, he had a bad experience with one FOB who came in with TB, didn't stay quarantined, and then spread it around to other students.

    Being at that job didn't make him racially sensitive in the preferred way at all. He was happy to leave and go into the private sector.

    Interesting … Yes, many graduate programs at A&M have been heavily Indian/Chinese for awhile. But that type of diversity is finally making its way into the undergraduate population — partly due to the top 10 percent rule in Texas, and partly due to the fact that Texas’ big cities are very diverse themselves.

    The question is: Can A&M’s traditions survive in a multi-cultural environment? I just don’t see it happening.

    A parallel is how we celebrate Christmas in America. Many of our Christmas traditions and much of the imagery comes from Victorian England, other European countries and of course New England. One-horse sleighs, caroling, etc. Does any of that mean anything to Habib or Sun-Yoo or their children/grandchildren? Doubtful.

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    • Replies: @penskefile
    I was pleased to see the number of National Merit Scholars that my kid's relatively small Catholic high school produced last year - then I looked at the results from nearby HS in Austin. Over 60 semi-finalists and nearly all had Chinese and Indian names!

    I reviewed undergrad resumes to recruit at the UT-Austin McCombs School of Business (Red McCombs is incidentally one of the big-money boosters for the Longhorns) and out of about 100, only about 20 were not Chinese, Indian or MENA names. All great kids kids and very capable, poised and accomplished when it came to interviews.
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  58. poolside says:
    @PenskeFile
    Good point about the changing demographics. I'm surprised to hear that about A&M, but I know what you describe is certainly happening at UT-Austin.

    Right now, the football programs are bankrolled by a small group of extremely wealthy individuals (in some cases billionaires) who are in their 60's or older. In 20 years, when those guys are dead and gone, the new rich alumni are likely to be ethnic Chinese, Indian or generally tech nerds with no interest in football. The money will be gone and the madness will start to wind down

    In 20 years, when those guys are dead and gone, the new rich alumni are likely to be ethnic Chinese, Indian or generally tech nerds with no interest in football. The money will be gone and the madness will start to wind down

    Right … your comment echoes my thoughts exactly.

    In places like Texas and Oklahoma, the big college boosters are mostly older white men who made their money — and lots of it — in the oil business.

    But colleges are graduating fewer men than ever before, and many of the men who are graduating aren’t even from the U.S. or are first or second generation without any connection to college football. They simply won’t care.

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  59. Truth says:

    At Florida State, Fisher won a national championship and helped keep his Heisman winning quarterback Jameis Winston eligible despite a rape allegation, a situation straight out of Tom Wolfe’s 1990s novel A Man in Full.

    It’s lookin’ like that was a damn good business decision, for all involved. Including the young lad:

    In January, Florida State settled the Title IX lawsuit Kinsman filed against it for $950,000.

    http://www.orlandosentinel.com/sports/florida-state-seminoles/jameis-winston/os-jameis-winston-rape-accuser-settle-civil-lawsuit-20161214-story.html

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  60. Truth says:
    @Danindc
    Jameis. The most annoying name and guy in sports. Buffoon is too kind.

    Buffoon is too kind.

    LOL.

    Funny, if he looked at your paycheck he’d say the same about you.

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  61. Truth says:
    @whorefinder
    Being just outside a major blue city, I may never understand the obsession with college football and basketball.

    What are you obsessed with?

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  62. Truth says:
    @wally
    said:
    "The latest round of the coaches’ carousel seems designed to start the next wave of demands for payment by the amateur athletes."

    They already receive payment, tons of it.

    'Pay College Athletes? They're Already Paid Up To $125,000 Per Year'
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffreydorfman/2013/08/29/pay-college-athletes-theyre-already-paid-up-to-125000year/#6b1de21b2b82

    BTW, must college 'scholarship' athletes do not graduate.

    ‘Pay College Athletes? They’re Already Paid Up To $125,000 Per Year’

    Yeah, but the coaches are paid up SEVEN-MILLION dollars a year. And they don’t get CTE.

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    • Replies: @It's All Ball Bearings
    "Yeah, but the coaches are paid up SEVEN-MILLION dollars a year. And they don’t get CTE."
    We know who the college graduates are then.
    , @Autochthon
    The coaches don't get nubile, eager co-eds (both the so-called boosters paid for by the university formally and the volunteers amongst the student body at large; not to mention de facto impunity to rape the unwilling) for the taking, though, either, and some things you just can't put a price on....
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  63. Truth says:
    @Anon
    The regeants here at A&M calculated that even after paying Sumlin his go away money and 7.5 mill a year to Fisher, the football program would still turn a 30 million dollar profit every year. Supposedly A&M is the most profitable college sports program in the country, which seems pretty retarded since none of our teams our good, we haven't won a championship since 39, and about 80% of the student body are Han Chinese or Indians brought in to prop up tuition and PhD numbers (so we can be a 'tier one' research institute... lol). Given the demographics on campus, I'd be surprised if ten years from now A&M has a strong football fan base, regardless of how many championships Fisher wins.

    and about 80% of the student body are Han Chinese or Indians brought in to prop up tuition and PhD numbers

    I’m guessing this is a large exaggeration.

    When I think A&M I think not football or research, but ROTC.

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  64. Truth says:
    @Pericles

    Yeah, there’s been a surprising lack of commentary about the NFL’s payoff to the players to resolve the National Anthem protests.

     

    Someone should tell the owners they're placating in the wrong direction.

    Someone should tell the owners they’re placating in the wrong direction.

    Then I guess you should start doing push-ups and put some shoulder pads on, because without players they don’t have a business.

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    • Replies: @Hibernian
    Fans and players are both very necessary. TV advertisers too.
    , @David In TN
    Yes, without players there wouldn't be a business, but without fans there isn't any money. In other words, without the fans the players would be unemployed.
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  65. Truth says:
    @whorefinder
    Yeah, no. Outside of a hardcore small fanbase college basketball isn't a draw in the blue cities, except if the local boys are making a serious run (i.e. ranked in top 5 from the first day of the season).

    In almost every blue city I've traveled to, and listened to the local talk radio, there's always at least one guy trying to sell the locals on the "excitement" of college sports, and how the attendance for local big-name school X should be way higher. Then everyone goes back to watching the local pros and ignores college again.

    I can't watch college sports because I didn't grow up with it, and as an adult, knowing how corrupt it is and how the players are being paid off and all those black players are sleeping with white girls and committing felonies and skipping class and are too dumb to be there makes me sick to my stomach and I can't view anything more than a few seconds without turning away.

    and all those black players are sleeping with white girls and committing felonies and skipping class and are too dumb to be there makes me sick to my stomach

    Well what do you want?

    They’re whorefinders.

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  66. Truth says:
    @PenskeFile
    Good point about the changing demographics. I'm surprised to hear that about A&M, but I know what you describe is certainly happening at UT-Austin.

    Right now, the football programs are bankrolled by a small group of extremely wealthy individuals (in some cases billionaires) who are in their 60's or older. In 20 years, when those guys are dead and gone, the new rich alumni are likely to be ethnic Chinese, Indian or generally tech nerds with no interest in football. The money will be gone and the madness will start to wind down

    In 20 years, when those guys are dead and gone, the new rich alumni are likely to be ethnic Chinese, Indian or generally tech nerds with no interest in football.

    What does interest have to do with anything?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shahid_Khan

    https://www.si.com/eats/2017/07/29/rich-cho-charlotte-hornets-gm-big-time-bites-food-blog

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivek_Ranadiv%C3%A9

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    • Replies: @PenskeFile
    Your anecdotes are both professional franchise owners, not big-money college football donors. Those are COMPLETELY different scenarios. The owners of pro-sports teams are after recognition and most of all - MONEY. They are looking for a financial return on their investment and for the credibility and prestige to open doors to new business opportunities

    These college donors remain mostly low-profile (except to the Athletic Directors) and they're not making money off their donations. They are looking to "big-time" it with their colleagues and fellow alumni. They've already made their money and this is their way of enhancing their experience.
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  67. Truth says:
    @David In TN
    The money a college football team generates goes to the athletic program, very little to the academic side of the school.

    A standard ploy for athletic directors, especially at a big-time school, is to cry "We need more money to be competitive." The AD then raises the budget again and calls for more money. The cycle keeps on repeating.

    A favorite trope is "We meed more funding for the recruiting budget."

    The money a college football team generates goes to the athletic program, very little to the academic side of the school.

    Now Dave, you’re not giving the incredibly greedy, wealthy white men you would give your eye teeth to be, enough credit…

    https://www.seccountry.com/alabama/decade-dominance-nick-sabans-success-transformed-alabama-not-just-football

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    • Replies: @David In TN
    I have nothing but contempt for the "incredibly greedy, wealthy white men" you refer to.
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  68. Brutusale says:
    @Steve Sailer
    I read an article about high school assistant coaches putting in 80 hour weeks during the season for an annual stipend of $1,600. There is a lot of competition out there to be a big time football coach. A lot of guys really like football.

    Is there any route to a pro sports front office job that pays anything more than zero?

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    • Replies: @Truth


    Is there any route to a pro sports front office job that pays anything more than zero?
     
    Hey Brutey, I think this is what is known as a "dangling participle", kind of like "a panda eats shoots and leaves..."
    , @Hibernian
    Be a scion of the founding family, like the Mc Caskeys.
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  69. @njguy73
    I thought she got pregnant by two different players in separate incidents.

    She did. One player was black and the other was Samoan.

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  70. Barnard says:
    @PenskeFile
    Good point about the changing demographics. I'm surprised to hear that about A&M, but I know what you describe is certainly happening at UT-Austin.

    Right now, the football programs are bankrolled by a small group of extremely wealthy individuals (in some cases billionaires) who are in their 60's or older. In 20 years, when those guys are dead and gone, the new rich alumni are likely to be ethnic Chinese, Indian or generally tech nerds with no interest in football. The money will be gone and the madness will start to wind down

    It might take a little longer, Boone Pickens is still bankrolling the Oklahoma State football team at 89 years old. If their heirs are also fans, it could continue beyond the current crop of boosters. Long term I think you are right, and that is if the NCAA and the schools can keep their charade going until then.

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  71. anon says: • Disclaimer

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2017-01-04/college-football-s-top-teams-are-built-on-crippling-debt

    Shocked to see that A&M is the most profitable football program. They seem to do it on the expense side more than revenue.

    Jimbo will take care of any excess cash the program generated.

    There are a lot of schools that are losing big money on sports. Cal went heavily into debt to do a stadium and Northwestern, as a private school, has trouble competing.

    As odd as it sounds, having a profitable program (20 teams or so) is very beneficial because the alternative is to have a very unprofitable program and have explicit student fees subsidize the losing.

    Although I think a lot of football programs go out of their way to break even rather than produce a lot of profit which they might then be expected to contribute to non sports.

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  72. Forbes says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    College football in the south (especially) and certain other areas of the country needs to burn to the ground 10 times more than the NFL.

     

    It seems the situation is less hopeless than just a year or two ago.

    The NFL looked utterly invincible, a true cultural juggernaut. But as PacificPundit and others have been documenting all season, NFL attendance figures and revenues are way down, and they're panicking.

    For example, here's a nice shot of the Meadowlands for this past Sunday's Jets/Chiefs game, presumably taken just before kickoff:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DQI9GGAUMAEMOIt.jpg

    Photo of any NY sports crowd just before the start of a game is meaningless–I think only LA has a later arriving crowd. Take the photo in the second period.

    Though there is no denial attendance and viewership is off this year–I’ve not watched one minute of NFL at home.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I arrived midway through the second quarter at a UCLA game last month and it was still about two and a half hours and the scoring during the 2.5 quarters I saw was 30-23, so that was plenty to time and action for one game.
    , @The Last Real Calvinist

    Photo of any NY sports crowd just before the start of a game is meaningless–I think only LA has a later arriving crowd. Take the photo in the second period.

     

    Yes, fair point. But there sure are a lot of empties.

    The link to Pacific Pundit has lots of stadium photos showing various degrees of emptiness, but since they're obviously crowdsourced, there's no control over the point in the game at which they're taken.

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  73. Truth says:
    @Brutusale
    Is there any route to a pro sports front office job that pays anything more than zero?

    Is there any route to a pro sports front office job that pays anything more than zero?

    Hey Brutey, I think this is what is known as a “dangling participle”, kind of like “a panda eats shoots and leaves…”

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  74. @Barnard
    Villanova, Georgetown and Syracuse all have popular teams. Syracuse, is no longer in the Big East, but they routinely draw more fans than most NBA teams. College basketball is also very popular in Connecticut, even the women's team draws a good audience on TV. The success of the team is going to be a factor like it is for everything other sport.

    http://www.syracuse.com/orangebasketball/index.ssf/2017/08/where_did_syracuse_basketball_attendance_rank_nationally_in_2016-17.html

    Syracuse plays in a dome, not in an arena. Also, the Nationals moved in 1963, so there is literally nothing else do to in Syracuse on a winter weekday night.

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  75. @Forbes
    Photo of any NY sports crowd just before the start of a game is meaningless--I think only LA has a later arriving crowd. Take the photo in the second period.

    Though there is no denial attendance and viewership is off this year--I've not watched one minute of NFL at home.

    I arrived midway through the second quarter at a UCLA game last month and it was still about two and a half hours and the scoring during the 2.5 quarters I saw was 30-23, so that was plenty to time and action for one game.

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  76. @Forbes
    Photo of any NY sports crowd just before the start of a game is meaningless--I think only LA has a later arriving crowd. Take the photo in the second period.

    Though there is no denial attendance and viewership is off this year--I've not watched one minute of NFL at home.

    Photo of any NY sports crowd just before the start of a game is meaningless–I think only LA has a later arriving crowd. Take the photo in the second period.

    Yes, fair point. But there sure are a lot of empties.

    The link to Pacific Pundit has lots of stadium photos showing various degrees of emptiness, but since they’re obviously crowdsourced, there’s no control over the point in the game at which they’re taken.

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  77. Hibernian says:
    @wally
    said:
    "The latest round of the coaches’ carousel seems designed to start the next wave of demands for payment by the amateur athletes."

    They already receive payment, tons of it.

    'Pay College Athletes? They're Already Paid Up To $125,000 Per Year'
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffreydorfman/2013/08/29/pay-college-athletes-theyre-already-paid-up-to-125000year/#6b1de21b2b82

    BTW, must college 'scholarship' athletes do not graduate.

    I propose lightened academic loads, and pay beyond the facade of “expense money,” for football, men’s and women’s basketball, and one other women’s sport, maybe volleyball. This would be for Division I only. Division II schools would choose to join Division I or III. Division III, NAIA, and minor sports in Division I would have true student athletes, who might have a slightly reduced academic load and go to summer school.

    The major sport, major school, semi-pros, would have 1/2 academic loads, and if pro material, would probably join the pros before graduating, if they ever graduate. The schools would be to these teams what their commercial/industrial sponsors were to the original Cardinals, Bears, and Packers.

    The NFL would have a developmental league for talented players who were absolutely not college material. Junior college programs would continue to provide an opportunity for some players.

    Mr. Dorfman, as a participant in college athletic management, has a dog in the fight and is resistant to change, as most people are. The splendid physical training has few benefits except for a few very good athletes. Ditto for the publicity. You don’t need to be a professional economist to realize that the athletes are not getting the equivalent of a $125,000.00 salary. That argument is obvious special pleading.

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  78. Hibernian says:
    @Truth

    Someone should tell the owners they’re placating in the wrong direction.
     
    Then I guess you should start doing push-ups and put some shoulder pads on, because without players they don't have a business.

    Fans and players are both very necessary. TV advertisers too.

    Read More
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  79. Hibernian says:
    @Brutusale
    Is there any route to a pro sports front office job that pays anything more than zero?

    Be a scion of the founding family, like the Mc Caskeys.

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  80. @Truth

    ‘Pay College Athletes? They’re Already Paid Up To $125,000 Per Year’
     
    Yeah, but the coaches are paid up SEVEN-MILLION dollars a year. And they don't get CTE.

    “Yeah, but the coaches are paid up SEVEN-MILLION dollars a year. And they don’t get CTE.”
    We know who the college graduates are then.

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  81. @Truth

    ‘Pay College Athletes? They’re Already Paid Up To $125,000 Per Year’
     
    Yeah, but the coaches are paid up SEVEN-MILLION dollars a year. And they don't get CTE.

    The coaches don’t get nubile, eager co-eds (both the so-called boosters paid for by the university formally and the volunteers amongst the student body at large; not to mention de facto impunity to rape the unwilling) for the taking, though, either, and some things you just can’t put a price on….

    Read More
    • Replies: @Truth
    Oh yes they do. I am good friends with a kid who graduated from the local university 8 years ago and lettered in football 4 years told me that the VERY unsuccessful fat, 50+ year old head coach of the team banged half the cheerleaders on the squad.
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  82. @Truth

    The money a college football team generates goes to the athletic program, very little to the academic side of the school.
     
    Now Dave, you're not giving the incredibly greedy, wealthy white men you would give your eye teeth to be, enough credit...


    https://www.seccountry.com/alabama/decade-dominance-nick-sabans-success-transformed-alabama-not-just-football

    I have nothing but contempt for the “incredibly greedy, wealthy white men” you refer to.

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    • Replies: @Truth
    "Moral indignation is usually %2 moral, %48 indignation, and %50 envy."
    -Vittorio de Sicca
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  83. @Truth

    Someone should tell the owners they’re placating in the wrong direction.
     
    Then I guess you should start doing push-ups and put some shoulder pads on, because without players they don't have a business.

    Yes, without players there wouldn’t be a business, but without fans there isn’t any money. In other words, without the fans the players would be unemployed.

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    • Agree: Triumph104
    • Replies: @Truth
    Yep, and the quickest way to turn off fans, in a customer facing business, to to have unhappy employees. This is why they want the baristas to smile and say "welcome" when you walk into Starbucks.
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  84. @Boethiuss

    The NFL looked utterly invincible, a true cultural juggernaut. But as PacificPundit and others have been documenting all season, NFL attendance figures and revenues are way down, and they’re panicking.
     
    Yeah, there's been a surprising lack of commentary about the NFL's payoff to the players to resolve the National Anthem protests. Maybe the owners' stratagem was just effective enough to work. Of course it doesn't stop the slow bleed the league was already suffering, but they might hope that will reverse itself (though I don't believe it will).

    Yeah, there’s been a surprising lack of commentary about the NFL’s payoff to the players to resolve the National Anthem protests. Maybe the owners’ stratagem was just effective enough to work.

    Maybe not. From Slate:

    “It’s a Charade”

    The San Francisco 49ers’ Eric Reid says the NFL wants to use breast cancer awareness and “Salute to Service” funds to buy off protesting players.

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  85. Truth says:
    @Autochthon
    The coaches don't get nubile, eager co-eds (both the so-called boosters paid for by the university formally and the volunteers amongst the student body at large; not to mention de facto impunity to rape the unwilling) for the taking, though, either, and some things you just can't put a price on....

    Oh yes they do. I am good friends with a kid who graduated from the local university 8 years ago and lettered in football 4 years told me that the VERY unsuccessful fat, 50+ year old head coach of the team banged half the cheerleaders on the squad.

    Read More
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  86. Truth says:
    @David In TN
    I have nothing but contempt for the "incredibly greedy, wealthy white men" you refer to.

    “Moral indignation is usually %2 moral, %48 indignation, and %50 envy.”
    -Vittorio de Sicca

    Read More
    • Replies: @David In TN
    You don't "envy" those for whom you have no respect.
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  87. Truth says:
    @David In TN
    Yes, without players there wouldn't be a business, but without fans there isn't any money. In other words, without the fans the players would be unemployed.

    Yep, and the quickest way to turn off fans, in a customer facing business, to to have unhappy employees. This is why they want the baristas to smile and say “welcome” when you walk into Starbucks.

    Read More
    • Agree: Autochthon
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  88. Escher says:
    @whorefinder
    Yeah, no. Outside of a hardcore small fanbase college basketball isn't a draw in the blue cities, except if the local boys are making a serious run (i.e. ranked in top 5 from the first day of the season).

    In almost every blue city I've traveled to, and listened to the local talk radio, there's always at least one guy trying to sell the locals on the "excitement" of college sports, and how the attendance for local big-name school X should be way higher. Then everyone goes back to watching the local pros and ignores college again.

    I can't watch college sports because I didn't grow up with it, and as an adult, knowing how corrupt it is and how the players are being paid off and all those black players are sleeping with white girls and committing felonies and skipping class and are too dumb to be there makes me sick to my stomach and I can't view anything more than a few seconds without turning away.

    I can’t watch college sports because I didn’t grow up with it, and as an adult, knowing how corrupt it is and how the players are being paid off and all those black players are sleeping with white girls and committing felonies and skipping class and are too dumb to be there makes me sick to my stomach and I can’t view anything more than a few seconds without turning away.

    And the NFL and NBA players are of course Mensa members and models of rectitude.

    Read More
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  89. @Truth
    "Moral indignation is usually %2 moral, %48 indignation, and %50 envy."
    -Vittorio de Sicca

    You don’t “envy” those for whom you have no respect.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Oh, I don't know. I lack even an iota of respect for Justin Bieber as person, but I can certainly envy him for having adoring, attractive females throwing themselves at him by the thousands if not millions for as long as he could possibly have begun to be interested in such attentions.

    I downright detest many professional athletes, but I must admit to envy of their youth, talent, and physiques.

    And so on. I think the nuance at work to make your observation sound is to specify that one will seldom if ever envy traits in another those very traits for which one disrespects the other (I don't envy Bieber's feckless and vapid ways, nor the athletes' boorish manners and stupidity....)
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  90. @poolside
    Interesting ... Yes, many graduate programs at A&M have been heavily Indian/Chinese for awhile. But that type of diversity is finally making its way into the undergraduate population -- partly due to the top 10 percent rule in Texas, and partly due to the fact that Texas' big cities are very diverse themselves.

    The question is: Can A&M's traditions survive in a multi-cultural environment? I just don't see it happening.

    A parallel is how we celebrate Christmas in America. Many of our Christmas traditions and much of the imagery comes from Victorian England, other European countries and of course New England. One-horse sleighs, caroling, etc. Does any of that mean anything to Habib or Sun-Yoo or their children/grandchildren? Doubtful.

    I was pleased to see the number of National Merit Scholars that my kid’s relatively small Catholic high school produced last year – then I looked at the results from nearby HS in Austin. Over 60 semi-finalists and nearly all had Chinese and Indian names!

    I reviewed undergrad resumes to recruit at the UT-Austin McCombs School of Business (Red McCombs is incidentally one of the big-money boosters for the Longhorns) and out of about 100, only about 20 were not Chinese, Indian or MENA names. All great kids kids and very capable, poised and accomplished when it came to interviews.

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  91. roo_ster says:
    @njguy73
    I thought she got pregnant by two different players in separate incidents.

    What a skank whore. And what a failure of a father.

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    • Agree: Autochthon
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  92. @Truth

    In 20 years, when those guys are dead and gone, the new rich alumni are likely to be ethnic Chinese, Indian or generally tech nerds with no interest in football.
     
    What does interest have to do with anything?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shahid_Khan

    https://www.si.com/eats/2017/07/29/rich-cho-charlotte-hornets-gm-big-time-bites-food-blog

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivek_Ranadiv%C3%A9

    Your anecdotes are both professional franchise owners, not big-money college football donors. Those are COMPLETELY different scenarios. The owners of pro-sports teams are after recognition and most of all – MONEY. They are looking for a financial return on their investment and for the credibility and prestige to open doors to new business opportunities

    These college donors remain mostly low-profile (except to the Athletic Directors) and they’re not making money off their donations. They are looking to “big-time” it with their colleagues and fellow alumni. They’ve already made their money and this is their way of enhancing their experience.

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    • Replies: @Truth

    These college donors remain mostly low-profile (except to the Athletic Directors) and they’re not making money off their donations.
     
    LOL, No Old Sport I'm afraid this is not the way it works. They donate money because they are invited to meet other rich donors. They are not doing this for free cheese and champagne, or because they particularly give a wit about the institutions.

    It's business.
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  93. Truth says:
    @PenskeFile
    Your anecdotes are both professional franchise owners, not big-money college football donors. Those are COMPLETELY different scenarios. The owners of pro-sports teams are after recognition and most of all - MONEY. They are looking for a financial return on their investment and for the credibility and prestige to open doors to new business opportunities

    These college donors remain mostly low-profile (except to the Athletic Directors) and they're not making money off their donations. They are looking to "big-time" it with their colleagues and fellow alumni. They've already made their money and this is their way of enhancing their experience.

    These college donors remain mostly low-profile (except to the Athletic Directors) and they’re not making money off their donations.

    LOL, No Old Sport I’m afraid this is not the way it works. They donate money because they are invited to meet other rich donors. They are not doing this for free cheese and champagne, or because they particularly give a wit about the institutions.

    It’s business.

    Read More
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  94. Syagrius says:
    @whorefinder
    When the very successful college coach Steve Spurrier left college and took a job in the pros rebuilding the Washington Redskins, he would leave the office every day at 5pm and not come back until 8-9am the next day, and would make fun of reporters/sports heads who criticized him for not working hard enough and much longer hours, like other NFL coaches. Spurrier said this was exactly how he ran shop in college and he was mega-successful, so why would he change?

    But Spurrier was a disaster in the pros. He couldn't simply recruit the best athletes, put them on the field, and expect them to run over the other guys, because everyone in the NFL had more or less equal talent, so coaching mattered. The Redskins remained at the bottom of the heap and Spurrier returned to college soon after.

    Ditto for Rick Pitino when he left college to head up the Boston Celtics. Pitino, despite all his college basketball accolades, was simply a guy who hired the best athletes and expected that to be enough. He failed with the Celtics and put his tail between his legs and went back to college, where the lazy corruption he loved actually worked.

    If your thesis about the success of big-time NCAA coaches is correct, then Mike Kryzyzewski and Roy Williams must be the laziest men in Division I basketball.

    Say what you want about Pitino as a human being, but he is a terrific basketball coach. It’s not like Louisville has been cheating the A-level programs out of the top talent, any more than Providence suddenly had a talent surge in 1987 when Pitino coached the Friars to the Final Four.

    The NBA doesn’t really have coaches, it has ‘managers’ – like baseball. The coach is hired to make what he can of a multi-million dollar roster of prima donnas assembled by (frequently) stupid owners and GMs. It’s political, it’s psychological. You want to talk lazy – what about Phil Jackson, that “great NBA coach”, who always seemed to take jobs with teams loaded with talent? Hard-core commie too, which probably helped.

    As for Spurrier, he ran a very non-NFL offense in college and it just didn’t translate to NFL ball, and his paymasters were impatient. It’s just silly to think the man just happened to succeed on the college level because of his recruits.

    In 1989 the coach of (I think) Mount Saint Mary’s (CA) – missing his best player, Hank Gaithers, who’d died on the floor of heart failure – ran a run and gun club that beat the defending champions, Michigan I think, by 47 points in the national quarterfinals. I could check all this out but the point stays the same: This same coach, a “genius”, got a gig in the NBA and he soon “failed”.

    Was he just a bad basketball coach, a guy who leaned on his recruiting prowess, or what?

    Read More
    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    It was 1990.
    The school was Loyola Marymount.
    The player was Hank Gathers.
    They beat Michigan by 34 in the West Regional quarterfinals.
    The coach was Paul Westhead. The same Paul Westhead that Magic Johnson ran out of the NBA on a rail in 1981.
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  95. @David In TN
    You don't "envy" those for whom you have no respect.

    Oh, I don’t know. I lack even an iota of respect for Justin Bieber as person, but I can certainly envy him for having adoring, attractive females throwing themselves at him by the thousands if not millions for as long as he could possibly have begun to be interested in such attentions.

    I downright detest many professional athletes, but I must admit to envy of their youth, talent, and physiques.

    And so on. I think the nuance at work to make your observation sound is to specify that one will seldom if ever envy traits in another those very traits for which one disrespects the other (I don’t envy Bieber’s feckless and vapid ways, nor the athletes’ boorish manners and stupidity….)

    Read More
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  96. @Syagrius
    If your thesis about the success of big-time NCAA coaches is correct, then Mike Kryzyzewski and Roy Williams must be the laziest men in Division I basketball.

    Say what you want about Pitino as a human being, but he is a terrific basketball coach. It's not like Louisville has been cheating the A-level programs out of the top talent, any more than Providence suddenly had a talent surge in 1987 when Pitino coached the Friars to the Final Four.

    The NBA doesn't really have coaches, it has 'managers' - like baseball. The coach is hired to make what he can of a multi-million dollar roster of prima donnas assembled by (frequently) stupid owners and GMs. It's political, it's psychological. You want to talk lazy - what about Phil Jackson, that "great NBA coach", who always seemed to take jobs with teams loaded with talent? Hard-core commie too, which probably helped.

    As for Spurrier, he ran a very non-NFL offense in college and it just didn't translate to NFL ball, and his paymasters were impatient. It's just silly to think the man just happened to succeed on the college level because of his recruits.

    In 1989 the coach of (I think) Mount Saint Mary's (CA) - missing his best player, Hank Gaithers, who'd died on the floor of heart failure - ran a run and gun club that beat the defending champions, Michigan I think, by 47 points in the national quarterfinals. I could check all this out but the point stays the same: This same coach, a "genius", got a gig in the NBA and he soon "failed".

    Was he just a bad basketball coach, a guy who leaned on his recruiting prowess, or what?

    It was 1990.
    The school was Loyola Marymount.
    The player was Hank Gathers.
    They beat Michigan by 34 in the West Regional quarterfinals.
    The coach was Paul Westhead. The same Paul Westhead that Magic Johnson ran out of the NBA on a rail in 1981.

    Read More
    • Replies: @njguy73
    Yeah, then Westhead brought his run-and-gun approach to the Denver Nuggets, and they went 20-62.
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  97. @JerryC
    Trouble seems to find Jameis Winston pretty consistently, for some reason.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/nypost.com/2017/11/17/jameis-winston-grabbed-my-crotch-uber-driver/amp/

    “trouble” is racist?

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  98. njguy73 says:
    @ScarletNumber
    It was 1990.
    The school was Loyola Marymount.
    The player was Hank Gathers.
    They beat Michigan by 34 in the West Regional quarterfinals.
    The coach was Paul Westhead. The same Paul Westhead that Magic Johnson ran out of the NBA on a rail in 1981.

    Yeah, then Westhead brought his run-and-gun approach to the Denver Nuggets, and they went 20-62.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    Westhead's last three years at LMU they went 44-5 in conference play. Those were the 3 seasons he had Gathers and Bo Kimble, who were kicked off the team at USC by new coach George Raveling.

    So having 2 Pac-10-caliber players in the West Coast Conference will do a lot to turn a coach into a genius.
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  99. @njguy73
    Yeah, then Westhead brought his run-and-gun approach to the Denver Nuggets, and they went 20-62.

    Westhead’s last three years at LMU they went 44-5 in conference play. Those were the 3 seasons he had Gathers and Bo Kimble, who were kicked off the team at USC by new coach George Raveling.

    So having 2 Pac-10-caliber players in the West Coast Conference will do a lot to turn a coach into a genius.

    Read More
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