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From T. Greer commenting at Marginal Revolution, a quote from the Ming Dynasty novel The Scholars:

“Gifted as you are and coming from an illustrious family,” said Ma Zhunshang, “you should have passed the examinations long ago. How is it that you are still in retirement?” “Since my father died early I was brought up by my grandfather and occupied with family business: I had no time to study for the civil service.”

“That was a mistake. Right from ancient times all the best men have gone in for the civil service. Confucius, for instance, lived during the Spring and Autumn Period when men were selected as officials on the strength of their activities and sayings. That is why Confucius said: ‘Make few false statements and do little you may regret, then all will be well.’ That was the civil service of Confucius’ time.

“By the time of the Warring States, the art of rhetoric had become the road to officialdom: that is why Mencius traveled through Qi and Liang delivering orations to the princes. That was the civil service of Mencius’ time.

“By the Han Dynasty, the examination system was designed to select men for their ability, goodness and justice; and thus men like Gongsun Hong and Dong Zhongshu were appointed to office. That was the civil service of the Han Dynasty.

“By the Tang Dynasty, scholars were chosen for their ability to write poetry. Even if a man could talk like Confucius or Mencius, that would not get him a post; so all the Tang scholars learned to write poems. That was the civil service of the Tang Dynasty.

“By the Song Dynasty, it was even better: all the officials had to be philosophers. That was why the Cheng brothers and Zhu Xi propagated neo-Confucianism. That was the civil service of the Song Dynasty.

“Nowadays, however, we use essays to select scholars, and this is the best criterion of all. Even Confucius, if he were alive today, would be studying essays and preparing for the examinations instead of saying, ‘Make few false statements and do little you may regret.’ Why? Because that kind of talk would get him nowhere: nobody would give him an official position. No, the old sage would find it impossible to realize his ideal.”

–Wu Jingzi, The Scholars (儒林外史), chapter XIII, translated by Yang Hsien-yi and Gladys Yang (Beijing: Foreign Language Press, 2005),173-4.

Much has changed since the time of Confucius. Or, then again, maybe it hasn’t.

 
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  1. I am pretty miffed that the US politically-driven diversocracy bureaucrats gave away ALL of the government workers’ secrets to the hard-working Chinese hackers.

    Katherine Archuleta leads the US civil service, and gave away the store.

    In her own words, her main goal was to build “inclusive diversity.” I suppose she succeeded there.

    https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2015/03/11/building-inclusive-diversity-more-numbers

    • Agree: International Jew
    • Replies: @Ivy
    There is a tragic 'playing with the house money' element to the misguided actions of the Archuletas of the world.

    Think of the house money as the citizenry's brand equity and the overall quality of life built up over the centuries, getting quite a boost from those dreaded and maligned Founding Fathers.

    Their insights and actions were supplemented by imagination, ingenuity, grit, sacrifice and not-infrequent blood, sweat and tears of generations of Americans in these United States.

    The inclusive diversity approach is merely another case of the Dunning-Kruger effect in action, albeit with potential consequences far worse than imagined by the protagonists. See Goose and Golden Egg.

    They are not alone in the harmful actions arena, as there are numerous other examples of playing with house money, sometimes literally, originating from Wall Street and their fellow travelers in DC.

    , @Lugash
    America has become something never seen before, a politically correct police state. The political correctness aspect is deleterious to the traditional police state. Watching it collapse in on itself is hilarious.
    , @Enrique Cardova
    It has nothing to do with "diversity" and conservative administrations have themselves shown sloppy handling of classified info. Under the conservative Reagan regime, Fawn Hall removed concealed classified information in her clothing for transport elsewhere. Aldrich Ames a CIA officer took his secret info out on a floppy disk, bound for the Soviets. Johnathan Pollard walked out of Navy Intelligence with a briefcase full of secret papers destined for the Israelis.
  2. “The charm of history and its enigmatic lesson consist in the fact that, from age to age, nothing changes and yet everything is completely different.”
    — Aldous Huxley – The Devils of Loudun

    “The high-flying recruit must bear this danger in mind and not show too much brilliance during the first year with his new company. Unfortunately, this means that should he be fired for some other reason, perhaps in a company reorganization or a recession, he will depart without having established a reputation for good performance. So he has to decide which chance to take. If he survives the first year and has established his position more firmly by the laws of Secretiveness, Con Game and Semi-Blackmail, he might perhaps venture to use his capabilities more fully. However, innocuous performance stills seems safest.”
    http://www.big-lies.org/catt/ivor-catt-the-catt-concept.html#ap

    Secretiveness, Con Game and Semi-Blackmail have been taken to extreme new levels by Ed Snowden. We aren’t doing much with space and the future. The space age might as well be the stone age. Meet the Flintstones.

    ” Apollo should never have succeeded. Too many people depended on its failure. Hundreds of thousands of people were betrayed by the top management in NASA, who were willing to see ghost towns in place of happy communities just so that a couple of men could take photographs of each other wandering over the wilderness. The top brass lost interest and so wrecked the space industry.”

    Fast forward: They’ve wrecked the security industry. Mars is secure though.

  3. For clarification’s sake: The novel was set in Ming times, but was written a dynasty later, during the Qing (c. 1750). There are few satires of “meritocratic” systems with more bite than The Scholars. This was but one of its many humorous and sometimes bitter vignettes on this theme.

  4. And not just any essay but an eight-legged one.

  5. 3. Arguably a country’s best chance of achieving meritocracy is to have many smart individuals who are culturally central. No system of government is going to overcome the lack of that.

    Seems to me that mass immigration by people who are “culturally distant” (cf Hispanic Mestizos and Amerinds) makes that rather difficult…..

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Seems to me that mass immigration by people who are “culturally distant” (cf Hispanic Mestizos and Amerinds) makes that rather difficult….."

    Mexicans in the U.S do not even have their own version of a Neil deGrasse Tyson.

  6. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    Isn’t the point of the satire that much indeed has changed and for the worse?

    The earlier Confucians seemed to actually stand for something. They were less into formality; they were more about saying things that needed to be said, doing what needed to be done.

    But then, with the Tang dynasty, a decisive shift took place. Primacy of poetry meant style over substance.
    And then the primacy of philosophy in the Song dynasty favored theory over practice.

    In contrast, prior to the Tang, Confucianism had been about theory + practice.

    “Confucius, for instance, lived during the Spring and Autumn Period when men were selected as officials on the strength of their activities and sayings.”

    “By the time of the Warring States, the art of rhetoric had become the road to officialdom: that is why Mencius traveled through Qi and Liang delivering orations to the princes.”

    “By the Han Dynasty, the examination system was designed to select men for their ability, goodness and justice.”

    In the three above examples, the sayings and activities are united.

    But Tang-ism put style of poetics above all else.
    And Song became overly theoretical in ‘philosophy’.

    The combination of Tang poetics and Song theoretics was the eight-legged essay where one had to be poetically and theoretically correct without paying much attention to reality.

    But the foolish teller of the tale sees no contradiction in how a system of theory + practice gradually turned into a system of theory + style(divorced from reality).

    The person sees no break from the original Confucius and Confucianism that ossified into a poetic dogma.

    But this could be said for any system. If Jesus saw what became of Christianity, He would likely have been baffled.

    And liberalism too. It began as a movement for greater freedom but now it’s all about being ‘correctly liberal’ or Liberal.

    And look what became of the GOP. Does what it stands for have any bearing on reality? In the end, a system turns into a game of striving for status and approval, and its means of qualification becomes ever less grounded in reality.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The examination system really started to be used during the Song dynasty, about a thousand years ago. Confucius was a wandering freelance advisor that no state really listened to while he was alive. The Tang dynasty was run by aristocrats and military men. The Song dynasty which followed was when the examination system began being used in earnest.
    , @SFG
    That is one of the fascinating things about China--you see the same themes as in the West (probably universal to any complex culture) play themselves out on a completely different canvas.
    , @Anonymous
    "But then, with the Tang dynasty, a decisive shift took place. Primacy of poetry meant style over substance.
    And then the primacy of philosophy in the Song dynasty favored theory over practice.

    "In contrast, prior to the Tang, Confucianism had been about theory + practice."

    I remember learning about philosopher kings when I was in college, and I was very impressed by the idea. It sounded like the perfect way to ensure a well-run, non-corrupt government and just society. Looking back, I would guess that part of the reason I was so taken by this idea is because of the way it was undoubtedly lovingly taught by my professors, who I would guess imagined themselves as the perfect philosopher kings. I would also imagine that other students had a similar reaction to the idea of philosopher kings, as I did, and nowadays it seems like many of the ideas that dominate our public policies favor kooky theories vs. reality and practice.

    , @Dan Kurt
    re: Song Dynasty

    If I recall correctly, the Song perished on the shoal of PAPER MONEY just as we are about to discover with our fiat money & credit and derivatives.

    Dan Kurt
    , @The most deplorable one

    But then, with the Tang dynasty, a decisive shift took place. Primacy of poetry meant style over substance.
     
    How can anyone say that about 静夜思


    床前明月光, Chuáng qián míng yuè guāng,
    疑是地上霜。 Yí shì dì shàng shuāng.
    举头望明月, Jŭ tóu wàng míng yuè,
    低头思故乡。 Dī tóu sī gù xiāng.

     

  7. Any system devised by people sitting around seminar tables, as at Harvard, Oxford, or Washington DC, probably drifts soon into fantasy unconnected to reality. Big unrecoverable mistakes are made. Retrogession sets in, but the fantasies can hide it for a long time.

    • Replies: @Jeff77450
    Well said.
  8. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    Isn't the point of the satire that much indeed has changed and for the worse?

    The earlier Confucians seemed to actually stand for something. They were less into formality; they were more about saying things that needed to be said, doing what needed to be done.

    But then, with the Tang dynasty, a decisive shift took place. Primacy of poetry meant style over substance.
    And then the primacy of philosophy in the Song dynasty favored theory over practice.

    In contrast, prior to the Tang, Confucianism had been about theory + practice.

    "Confucius, for instance, lived during the Spring and Autumn Period when men were selected as officials on the strength of their activities and sayings."

    "By the time of the Warring States, the art of rhetoric had become the road to officialdom: that is why Mencius traveled through Qi and Liang delivering orations to the princes."

    "By the Han Dynasty, the examination system was designed to select men for their ability, goodness and justice."

    In the three above examples, the sayings and activities are united.

    But Tang-ism put style of poetics above all else.
    And Song became overly theoretical in 'philosophy'.

    The combination of Tang poetics and Song theoretics was the eight-legged essay where one had to be poetically and theoretically correct without paying much attention to reality.

    But the foolish teller of the tale sees no contradiction in how a system of theory + practice gradually turned into a system of theory + style(divorced from reality).

    The person sees no break from the original Confucius and Confucianism that ossified into a poetic dogma.

    But this could be said for any system. If Jesus saw what became of Christianity, He would likely have been baffled.

    And liberalism too. It began as a movement for greater freedom but now it's all about being 'correctly liberal' or Liberal.

    And look what became of the GOP. Does what it stands for have any bearing on reality? In the end, a system turns into a game of striving for status and approval, and its means of qualification becomes ever less grounded in reality.

    The examination system really started to be used during the Song dynasty, about a thousand years ago. Confucius was a wandering freelance advisor that no state really listened to while he was alive. The Tang dynasty was run by aristocrats and military men. The Song dynasty which followed was when the examination system began being used in earnest.

  9. OT…..Word control IS mind control. Goldman Sachs is Big Brother. Someone ought to sue for big bucks as a company doing this is guilty of creating a threatening environment for its employees.

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2015/06/21/exclusive-goldman-sachs-tells-employees-wife-insults-gays-and-transgenders/

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    It's not Goldman ,it's J.P. Morgan Chase
  10. All systems are inevitably gamed by the clever who lack the competence and experience to succeed.

    Hell there are entire industries centered around how to take all sorts of entrance and certification exams.

    This is how you get the current crop of GOP candidates, nincompoops at the Ivies(not that the Ivies are worth much content wise anyway, it’s access it gets you) who are clever enough to pay for others to take their exams or because they are a legacy like the Bushes or how you get workers who have all the right certs but don’t know squat.

    Tiger Mom’s are probably the best at it. They are the end product of the credentialing system. Producing kids who can pass the exams and get the credential yet are total moral lepers with zero social skills like Ellen Pao. Who in another time would be making Won Ton soup for a living.

  11. @Anon
    Isn't the point of the satire that much indeed has changed and for the worse?

    The earlier Confucians seemed to actually stand for something. They were less into formality; they were more about saying things that needed to be said, doing what needed to be done.

    But then, with the Tang dynasty, a decisive shift took place. Primacy of poetry meant style over substance.
    And then the primacy of philosophy in the Song dynasty favored theory over practice.

    In contrast, prior to the Tang, Confucianism had been about theory + practice.

    "Confucius, for instance, lived during the Spring and Autumn Period when men were selected as officials on the strength of their activities and sayings."

    "By the time of the Warring States, the art of rhetoric had become the road to officialdom: that is why Mencius traveled through Qi and Liang delivering orations to the princes."

    "By the Han Dynasty, the examination system was designed to select men for their ability, goodness and justice."

    In the three above examples, the sayings and activities are united.

    But Tang-ism put style of poetics above all else.
    And Song became overly theoretical in 'philosophy'.

    The combination of Tang poetics and Song theoretics was the eight-legged essay where one had to be poetically and theoretically correct without paying much attention to reality.

    But the foolish teller of the tale sees no contradiction in how a system of theory + practice gradually turned into a system of theory + style(divorced from reality).

    The person sees no break from the original Confucius and Confucianism that ossified into a poetic dogma.

    But this could be said for any system. If Jesus saw what became of Christianity, He would likely have been baffled.

    And liberalism too. It began as a movement for greater freedom but now it's all about being 'correctly liberal' or Liberal.

    And look what became of the GOP. Does what it stands for have any bearing on reality? In the end, a system turns into a game of striving for status and approval, and its means of qualification becomes ever less grounded in reality.

    That is one of the fascinating things about China–you see the same themes as in the West (probably universal to any complex culture) play themselves out on a completely different canvas.

  12. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    Isn't the point of the satire that much indeed has changed and for the worse?

    The earlier Confucians seemed to actually stand for something. They were less into formality; they were more about saying things that needed to be said, doing what needed to be done.

    But then, with the Tang dynasty, a decisive shift took place. Primacy of poetry meant style over substance.
    And then the primacy of philosophy in the Song dynasty favored theory over practice.

    In contrast, prior to the Tang, Confucianism had been about theory + practice.

    "Confucius, for instance, lived during the Spring and Autumn Period when men were selected as officials on the strength of their activities and sayings."

    "By the time of the Warring States, the art of rhetoric had become the road to officialdom: that is why Mencius traveled through Qi and Liang delivering orations to the princes."

    "By the Han Dynasty, the examination system was designed to select men for their ability, goodness and justice."

    In the three above examples, the sayings and activities are united.

    But Tang-ism put style of poetics above all else.
    And Song became overly theoretical in 'philosophy'.

    The combination of Tang poetics and Song theoretics was the eight-legged essay where one had to be poetically and theoretically correct without paying much attention to reality.

    But the foolish teller of the tale sees no contradiction in how a system of theory + practice gradually turned into a system of theory + style(divorced from reality).

    The person sees no break from the original Confucius and Confucianism that ossified into a poetic dogma.

    But this could be said for any system. If Jesus saw what became of Christianity, He would likely have been baffled.

    And liberalism too. It began as a movement for greater freedom but now it's all about being 'correctly liberal' or Liberal.

    And look what became of the GOP. Does what it stands for have any bearing on reality? In the end, a system turns into a game of striving for status and approval, and its means of qualification becomes ever less grounded in reality.

    “But then, with the Tang dynasty, a decisive shift took place. Primacy of poetry meant style over substance.
    And then the primacy of philosophy in the Song dynasty favored theory over practice.

    “In contrast, prior to the Tang, Confucianism had been about theory + practice.”

    I remember learning about philosopher kings when I was in college, and I was very impressed by the idea. It sounded like the perfect way to ensure a well-run, non-corrupt government and just society. Looking back, I would guess that part of the reason I was so taken by this idea is because of the way it was undoubtedly lovingly taught by my professors, who I would guess imagined themselves as the perfect philosopher kings. I would also imagine that other students had a similar reaction to the idea of philosopher kings, as I did, and nowadays it seems like many of the ideas that dominate our public policies favor kooky theories vs. reality and practice.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    His interest in Plato's theory erodes as a student discovers that his professors cannot manage to run even a small philosophy department with competence.
  13. @Anon
    Isn't the point of the satire that much indeed has changed and for the worse?

    The earlier Confucians seemed to actually stand for something. They were less into formality; they were more about saying things that needed to be said, doing what needed to be done.

    But then, with the Tang dynasty, a decisive shift took place. Primacy of poetry meant style over substance.
    And then the primacy of philosophy in the Song dynasty favored theory over practice.

    In contrast, prior to the Tang, Confucianism had been about theory + practice.

    "Confucius, for instance, lived during the Spring and Autumn Period when men were selected as officials on the strength of their activities and sayings."

    "By the time of the Warring States, the art of rhetoric had become the road to officialdom: that is why Mencius traveled through Qi and Liang delivering orations to the princes."

    "By the Han Dynasty, the examination system was designed to select men for their ability, goodness and justice."

    In the three above examples, the sayings and activities are united.

    But Tang-ism put style of poetics above all else.
    And Song became overly theoretical in 'philosophy'.

    The combination of Tang poetics and Song theoretics was the eight-legged essay where one had to be poetically and theoretically correct without paying much attention to reality.

    But the foolish teller of the tale sees no contradiction in how a system of theory + practice gradually turned into a system of theory + style(divorced from reality).

    The person sees no break from the original Confucius and Confucianism that ossified into a poetic dogma.

    But this could be said for any system. If Jesus saw what became of Christianity, He would likely have been baffled.

    And liberalism too. It began as a movement for greater freedom but now it's all about being 'correctly liberal' or Liberal.

    And look what became of the GOP. Does what it stands for have any bearing on reality? In the end, a system turns into a game of striving for status and approval, and its means of qualification becomes ever less grounded in reality.

    re: Song Dynasty

    If I recall correctly, the Song perished on the shoal of PAPER MONEY just as we are about to discover with our fiat money & credit and derivatives.

    Dan Kurt

    • Replies: @gcochran
    The Song dynasty's problem was steppe nomads - first the Jurchen, then the Mongols under Genghis Khan.

    But I'm sure that sound money would have stopped the Lord of All Men.
  14. Some of these observations should be taken with a giant grain of salt.

    First of all, while Confucius was lionized later on and his teachings became a more rigid code, he was not nearly as influential during his own time. Indeed, much of his writings was a *reaction* to what he saw as “evils of the times” – the endemic civil wars and conflict, the collapse of central authority, and the constant jockeying for power and advantages. As with Plato, Confucius created an idealized framework that could never be. We should not confuse this idealized state with the actual history of China and its civilization.

    Second, the novel in question was written in the 18th Century, and was again a reaction to the prevailing culture of that *particular* time. While it is true that the Chinese civilization has maintained a culture and institution of civil meritocracy based on examinations for millennia, we should keep in mind that it also underwent many periods of tumult and intense warfare (which is why the most famous Chinese book in the West is probably “The Art of War” by Sun Tzu).

    And these wars weren’t fought by Confucian scholars.

    Third, while the Chinese civilization was able to absorb culturally most of the invaders, we should also note that it (particularly Northern China) saw invasions and settlements of numerous “barbarian” groups who left genetic and cultural imprints on the Chinese civilization.

    The history of China is as much a story of war and strife as that of continuity.

    • Replies: @Anon
    It from fiction book. We no take it as history fact.
  15. I never knew Dylann Roof’s mother was Tiger!

  16. Wow, this novel sounds riveting… What’s in the 3rd act? Does he climb the bell tower at Xinzheng State and start picking off pedestrians with a high-powered musket

  17. @Anonymous
    "But then, with the Tang dynasty, a decisive shift took place. Primacy of poetry meant style over substance.
    And then the primacy of philosophy in the Song dynasty favored theory over practice.

    "In contrast, prior to the Tang, Confucianism had been about theory + practice."

    I remember learning about philosopher kings when I was in college, and I was very impressed by the idea. It sounded like the perfect way to ensure a well-run, non-corrupt government and just society. Looking back, I would guess that part of the reason I was so taken by this idea is because of the way it was undoubtedly lovingly taught by my professors, who I would guess imagined themselves as the perfect philosopher kings. I would also imagine that other students had a similar reaction to the idea of philosopher kings, as I did, and nowadays it seems like many of the ideas that dominate our public policies favor kooky theories vs. reality and practice.

    His interest in Plato’s theory erodes as a student discovers that his professors cannot manage to run even a small philosophy department with competence.

  18. Ivy says:
    @wren
    I am pretty miffed that the US politically-driven diversocracy bureaucrats gave away ALL of the government workers' secrets to the hard-working Chinese hackers.

    Katherine Archuleta leads the US civil service, and gave away the store.

    In her own words, her main goal was to build "inclusive diversity." I suppose she succeeded there.

    https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2015/03/11/building-inclusive-diversity-more-numbers

    There is a tragic ‘playing with the house money‘ element to the misguided actions of the Archuletas of the world.

    Think of the house money as the citizenry’s brand equity and the overall quality of life built up over the centuries, getting quite a boost from those dreaded and maligned Founding Fathers.

    Their insights and actions were supplemented by imagination, ingenuity, grit, sacrifice and not-infrequent blood, sweat and tears of generations of Americans in these United States.

    The inclusive diversity approach is merely another case of the Dunning-Kruger effect in action, albeit with potential consequences far worse than imagined by the protagonists. See Goose and Golden Egg.

    They are not alone in the harmful actions arena, as there are numerous other examples of playing with house money, sometimes literally, originating from Wall Street and their fellow travelers in DC.

    • Replies: @wren
    Yup, they may have killed the goose through sheer incompetence.

    Of course they will hide the fact, and we won't know until it is too late.

    It seems that they left the door wide open on 18 million people's files.

    I'm sure many of them are in influential positions with plenty of juicy secrets to protect.

    The US may be screwed, I think.
  19. Question.

    Is Bruce Caitlyn Jenner celebrating father’s day or mother’s day?

    • Replies: @Kate Minter
    Well, Kylie indicated that she was celebrating him on Father's Day. And got trolled for it.

    Aren't you keeping up? ;)
  20. China for all its size is a relative underperformer historically and it is illuminating to ask why.

    IMHO, over-centralization by a risk-crushing bureaucracy composed of sons of Tiger Mothers is the reason for China’s lack of historical dominance despite its large fraction of smart people, dutiful men, and astonishing inventions: silk, the compass, gunpowder, printing press, paper money, etc.

    A good example is the Eunuch bureaucrats burning China’s 1400’s fleet after successful voyages to Africa and India. See also Japan’s Edo period, where the country stagnated internally until shocked by Perry’s Black Fleet in Tokyo Bay.

    To be successful requires the ability to adopt ruthlessly, new technology that enables far greater efficiency, in all sorts of things including killing other human beings. The West up to now has been able to do that by keeping the essence intact but throwing out everything else:

    *Transitioning from a Central Imperial Roman Empire with massive manpower legions to a small, local feudal system with heavily armored mounted knights relying on armor and arrows to make up for loss of mass stabbing legions.

    *Transitioning back to mass levies of quickly trained fusiliers with muskets and printing presses showing the steps for the few literate to quickly overwhelm enemies in a neo-Empire revival.

    *Transitioning back again to local rule, but with steam and internal combustion engines substituting for mass armies and industrialization giving a combination of mass imperial resources on the machine age cheap and local rule by locals and local elites, not an Emperor in Rome or Paris.

    All this required massive changes in culture, society, local and distant elites, religious beliefs, and more. The West has therefore always valued individual initiative, rule breaking, and technical advantage as it has been historically less populated and with fewer resources than competitor cultures across the Med and to the East.

    Napoleon for example was loved by people such as Anatole France, Stendhal, Mark Twain, and others for breaking the power of the old Catholic Hierarchy particularly the Hapsburg Dynasty. Even though he himself sought to create a new hierarchy, those on the outside of the Catholic/Aristocratic hierarchy found the destruction of the old order a good thing.

    China on the other hand has stayed much the same as it always has, as has the Muslim world. Only now with European technology.

    China invented gunpowder but mostly stayed with lots of peasant soldiers and a few highly trained aristocrats. Europe took gunpowder and blew apart not only medieval castles but the whole medieval military-aristocratic complex. Because it worked. Which is why China not Europe was subject to the Opium Wars. For all China’s advances I don’t see the Communist Party encouraging technical risk taking to the point where the neo-Confucian bureaucracy is threatened.

  21. Against LGBT, I propose MWSNPD for men-women-straight-normal-proper-decent.

  22. @Twinkie
    Some of these observations should be taken with a giant grain of salt.

    First of all, while Confucius was lionized later on and his teachings became a more rigid code, he was not nearly as influential during his own time. Indeed, much of his writings was a *reaction* to what he saw as "evils of the times" - the endemic civil wars and conflict, the collapse of central authority, and the constant jockeying for power and advantages. As with Plato, Confucius created an idealized framework that could never be. We should not confuse this idealized state with the actual history of China and its civilization.

    Second, the novel in question was written in the 18th Century, and was again a reaction to the prevailing culture of that *particular* time. While it is true that the Chinese civilization has maintained a culture and institution of civil meritocracy based on examinations for millennia, we should keep in mind that it also underwent many periods of tumult and intense warfare (which is why the most famous Chinese book in the West is probably "The Art of War" by Sun Tzu).

    And these wars weren't fought by Confucian scholars.

    Third, while the Chinese civilization was able to absorb culturally most of the invaders, we should also note that it (particularly Northern China) saw invasions and settlements of numerous "barbarian" groups who left genetic and cultural imprints on the Chinese civilization.

    The history of China is as much a story of war and strife as that of continuity.

    It from fiction book. We no take it as history fact.

  23. @e
    OT.....Word control IS mind control. Goldman Sachs is Big Brother. Someone ought to sue for big bucks as a company doing this is guilty of creating a threatening environment for its employees.

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2015/06/21/exclusive-goldman-sachs-tells-employees-wife-insults-gays-and-transgenders/

    It’s not Goldman ,it’s J.P. Morgan Chase

    • Replies: @SFG
    True.

    I doubt the ethnic composition of each firm is all that different at this juncture.
  24. @wren
    I am pretty miffed that the US politically-driven diversocracy bureaucrats gave away ALL of the government workers' secrets to the hard-working Chinese hackers.

    Katherine Archuleta leads the US civil service, and gave away the store.

    In her own words, her main goal was to build "inclusive diversity." I suppose she succeeded there.

    https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2015/03/11/building-inclusive-diversity-more-numbers

    America has become something never seen before, a politically correct police state. The political correctness aspect is deleterious to the traditional police state. Watching it collapse in on itself is hilarious.

    • Replies: @SFG
    The Soviet Union was pretty politically correct. Not exactly our dogmas, but they had all sorts of elaborate rules about what you were supposed to believe, and very baroque propaganda.
    , @Zoodles
    Alexis de Tocqueville predicted the means by which democracy would be replaced with a kind of passive aggressive and all encompassing nanny state. Its eerily accurate.
  25. absolutely NO reason we should be letting in orientals by the hundreds of thousands. there is ZERO benefit . Why we continue to do is beyond me. They bring stifling rigidity, corruption, low ethics and a stunning, disturbing lack of internal conscience.

  26. I have this twisted Felliniesque fantasy where Amy Chua and Education Realist go toe to toe, while a chorus of NYT writers laments, and Steve sits back in a director’s chair.

  27. If we’re going to use an exam to select our elite, at least our exam (the SAT and the AP tests) selects for something practical. Or more practical, at any rate, than writing poetry.

    • Replies: @dearieme
    "our exam selects for something practical. Or more practical, at any rate, than writing poetry."

    Is there any evidence for that? My memory of trying to write poetry in secondary school is that it was a lot more taxing than most exams I'd faced. Doing something - even writing poetry - is very different from merely demonstrating that you've understood something.

    It's my guess that "doing things" is undervalued in modern western education.

    , @oh its just me
    Orientals cheat like mad on the SAT - and how is that a practical measure of intelligence?
    .. while it was good for civil service jobs and staving corruption, widespread use of it can lead to a stagnant, rigid system like that of china - and to some extent, i think orientals have become hard wired that way.

    Recitation of poetry was always considered a vital part of being educated and 'elite' - going back to plato through Sydney - perhaps bringing it back - at least poetry of the Dante kind vs. Mary Angelo kind, might have a good effect.
  28. @Dan Kurt
    re: Song Dynasty

    If I recall correctly, the Song perished on the shoal of PAPER MONEY just as we are about to discover with our fiat money & credit and derivatives.

    Dan Kurt

    The Song dynasty’s problem was steppe nomads – first the Jurchen, then the Mongols under Genghis Khan.

    But I’m sure that sound money would have stopped the Lord of All Men.

  29. @International Jew
    If we're going to use an exam to select our elite, at least our exam (the SAT and the AP tests) selects for something practical. Or more practical, at any rate, than writing poetry.

    “our exam selects for something practical. Or more practical, at any rate, than writing poetry.”

    Is there any evidence for that? My memory of trying to write poetry in secondary school is that it was a lot more taxing than most exams I’d faced. Doing something – even writing poetry – is very different from merely demonstrating that you’ve understood something.

    It’s my guess that “doing things” is undervalued in modern western education.

  30. I am afraid that the Chinese poet hackers will now clean our clocks so well that most Americans will not even realize it happened.

    This is particularly true because while the Chinese students studied poetry that attempted to distill reality down to its essence, American students study political correctness which attempts to supplant reality with some kind of political doublethink.

  31. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @Anon
    Isn't the point of the satire that much indeed has changed and for the worse?

    The earlier Confucians seemed to actually stand for something. They were less into formality; they were more about saying things that needed to be said, doing what needed to be done.

    But then, with the Tang dynasty, a decisive shift took place. Primacy of poetry meant style over substance.
    And then the primacy of philosophy in the Song dynasty favored theory over practice.

    In contrast, prior to the Tang, Confucianism had been about theory + practice.

    "Confucius, for instance, lived during the Spring and Autumn Period when men were selected as officials on the strength of their activities and sayings."

    "By the time of the Warring States, the art of rhetoric had become the road to officialdom: that is why Mencius traveled through Qi and Liang delivering orations to the princes."

    "By the Han Dynasty, the examination system was designed to select men for their ability, goodness and justice."

    In the three above examples, the sayings and activities are united.

    But Tang-ism put style of poetics above all else.
    And Song became overly theoretical in 'philosophy'.

    The combination of Tang poetics and Song theoretics was the eight-legged essay where one had to be poetically and theoretically correct without paying much attention to reality.

    But the foolish teller of the tale sees no contradiction in how a system of theory + practice gradually turned into a system of theory + style(divorced from reality).

    The person sees no break from the original Confucius and Confucianism that ossified into a poetic dogma.

    But this could be said for any system. If Jesus saw what became of Christianity, He would likely have been baffled.

    And liberalism too. It began as a movement for greater freedom but now it's all about being 'correctly liberal' or Liberal.

    And look what became of the GOP. Does what it stands for have any bearing on reality? In the end, a system turns into a game of striving for status and approval, and its means of qualification becomes ever less grounded in reality.

    But then, with the Tang dynasty, a decisive shift took place. Primacy of poetry meant style over substance.

    How can anyone say that about 静夜思

    床前明月光, Chuáng qián míng yuè guāng,
    疑是地上霜。 Yí shì dì shàng shuāng.
    举头望明月, Jŭ tóu wàng míng yuè,
    低头思故乡。 Dī tóu sī gù xiāng.

    • Replies: @colm
    Li Bai (known as Li Po in the West) was a white man from Kyrgyzstan, at that time part of China.

    His very name means "White".

    Something the Chinese would rather not emphasize. He and Du Fu (Tu Fu) are the two greatest Chinese poets ever but modern China just emphasize Du Fu since his Chinese bloodline is undisputed, unlike Li Bai.

    , @Anon
    "How can anyone say that about 静夜思"

    I don't know any hong kong fuey stuff.

    I was referring to the quote above, not commenting on real history.

    ------------

    One bad thing about China being a major power is more people learning Chinese, not the prettiest language.

    When Japan was supposed to take over the world and people were learning Japaneese, that was kinda cool cuz I like the sound of Japanese.

    But this?

    床前明月光, Chuáng qián míng yuè guāng,
    疑是地上霜。 Yí shì dì shàng shuāng.
    举头望明月, Jŭ tóu wàng míng yuè,
    低头思故乡。 Dī tóu sī gù xiāng.

    It's like talking with a mouse squirming inside your mouth.

  32. @Lugash
    America has become something never seen before, a politically correct police state. The political correctness aspect is deleterious to the traditional police state. Watching it collapse in on itself is hilarious.

    The Soviet Union was pretty politically correct. Not exactly our dogmas, but they had all sorts of elaborate rules about what you were supposed to believe, and very baroque propaganda.

    • Replies: @H2
    The Internet makes it so much more fun to observe though, or frightening if you ever end up under the gaze of the Eye of Soros.
  33. @International Jew
    If we're going to use an exam to select our elite, at least our exam (the SAT and the AP tests) selects for something practical. Or more practical, at any rate, than writing poetry.

    Orientals cheat like mad on the SAT – and how is that a practical measure of intelligence?
    .. while it was good for civil service jobs and staving corruption, widespread use of it can lead to a stagnant, rigid system like that of china – and to some extent, i think orientals have become hard wired that way.

    Recitation of poetry was always considered a vital part of being educated and ‘elite’ – going back to plato through Sydney – perhaps bringing it back – at least poetry of the Dante kind vs. Mary Angelo kind, might have a good effect.

    • Replies: @Anon
    "Orientals cheat like mad on the SAT – and how is that a practical measure of intelligence?"

    Smart peepul cheat betta.
    , @International Jew

    Recitation of poetry was always considered a vital part of being educated and ‘elite’ – going back to plato through Sydney – bringing it back – at least poetry of the Dante kind vs. Mary Angelo kind, might have a good effect.
     
    Whoah, dropping all those names you're making me feel rather unelite at the moment.
  34. @The most deplorable one

    But then, with the Tang dynasty, a decisive shift took place. Primacy of poetry meant style over substance.
     
    How can anyone say that about 静夜思


    床前明月光, Chuáng qián míng yuè guāng,
    疑是地上霜。 Yí shì dì shàng shuāng.
    举头望明月, Jŭ tóu wàng míng yuè,
    低头思故乡。 Dī tóu sī gù xiāng.

     

    Li Bai (known as Li Po in the West) was a white man from Kyrgyzstan, at that time part of China.

    His very name means “White”.

    Something the Chinese would rather not emphasize. He and Du Fu (Tu Fu) are the two greatest Chinese poets ever but modern China just emphasize Du Fu since his Chinese bloodline is undisputed, unlike Li Bai.

  35. @SFG
    The Soviet Union was pretty politically correct. Not exactly our dogmas, but they had all sorts of elaborate rules about what you were supposed to believe, and very baroque propaganda.

    The Internet makes it so much more fun to observe though, or frightening if you ever end up under the gaze of the Eye of Soros.

  36. @syonredux

    3. Arguably a country’s best chance of achieving meritocracy is to have many smart individuals who are culturally central. No system of government is going to overcome the lack of that.
     
    Seems to me that mass immigration by people who are "culturally distant" (cf Hispanic Mestizos and Amerinds) makes that rather difficult.....

    “Seems to me that mass immigration by people who are “culturally distant” (cf Hispanic Mestizos and Amerinds) makes that rather difficult…..”

    Mexicans in the U.S do not even have their own version of a Neil deGrasse Tyson.

  37. @The most deplorable one

    But then, with the Tang dynasty, a decisive shift took place. Primacy of poetry meant style over substance.
     
    How can anyone say that about 静夜思


    床前明月光, Chuáng qián míng yuè guāng,
    疑是地上霜。 Yí shì dì shàng shuāng.
    举头望明月, Jŭ tóu wàng míng yuè,
    低头思故乡。 Dī tóu sī gù xiāng.

     

    “How can anyone say that about 静夜思”

    I don’t know any hong kong fuey stuff.

    I was referring to the quote above, not commenting on real history.

    ————

    One bad thing about China being a major power is more people learning Chinese, not the prettiest language.

    When Japan was supposed to take over the world and people were learning Japaneese, that was kinda cool cuz I like the sound of Japanese.

    But this?

    床前明月光, Chuáng qián míng yuè guāng,
    疑是地上霜。 Yí shì dì shàng shuāng.
    举头望明月, Jŭ tóu wàng míng yuè,
    低头思故乡。 Dī tóu sī gù xiāng.

    It’s like talking with a mouse squirming inside your mouth.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    Having been to China a number of times, including a stint I returned from a few days ago, I have to say that it's not the spoken version that is so bad (although the tonalities are all beyond me even when I try to say something simple), but the written language. Ideograms are a piss poor choice for a writing system in this day and age, maybe in any day and age.

    Think of language as an operating system. It underlies every other application or program you run on your system. The more resources it consumes, the less there are left to run the program on top of. The ideogram system is a very bad fit for today's world, which is partly why countries like Vietnam switched to alphabets pretty recently and countries like South Korea did so centuries ago (it also had to do with relations with China, but I digress). It is very hard to learn, especially for the left band of the IQ spectrum, and makes it harder for one to function at a high level. The most that can be said is that learning it is a good system for training the left hemisphere of the brain, but that is not good enough for the average joe.

    China's system made sense in the initial development phases of the written word, with a stylized symbol for fire, water, man and then composites like sky being man with line on top, but it got ridiculous pretty quickly. 10.000 characters with 3.000 at least required to read a newspaper. The language itself cannot expand very quickly with new concepts.

    In a phonetic system, where you write down the word through sounds (either alphabetized, like in the West or the Arab World, or syllabic, like in the Korean system), even an ignorant person can read very complicated words, because they just have to know 20 odd symbols, plus a few rules for pronunciation. He might not know the word, but he can recognize it when someone speaks to him about it and he can link it to some written form.

    But, just like Chinese and Japanese, as well as Mandarin and Cantonese, have a lot or all of the writing in common, the spoken languages are very different. So the written word is divorced from the spoken one and new concepts have to be developed piecemeal by using existing symbols, creating new layers of information to be absorbed by the user.

    What I feel was the result (just anecdotally), is that a lot of the Chinese, even (non-native) English speakers, appear slower and dimmer than their IQs would suggest, as well as current HBD thinking on East Asians. I also find them less impressive than their American bred counterparts (for whom English is the mother tongue), who generally prove to be as advertised. I think that, quite simply, the language makes it harder to assimilate new information as rapidly as possible, with diverging lifetime results. This might especially be visible in the lower IQ percentiles.

    Of course, Chinese pride and their current economic success preclude switching to one of the already extant Western writing systems for Chinese, but one can hope. It might make picking up on Chinese much easier for foreigner.
  38. @wren
    I am pretty miffed that the US politically-driven diversocracy bureaucrats gave away ALL of the government workers' secrets to the hard-working Chinese hackers.

    Katherine Archuleta leads the US civil service, and gave away the store.

    In her own words, her main goal was to build "inclusive diversity." I suppose she succeeded there.

    https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2015/03/11/building-inclusive-diversity-more-numbers

    It has nothing to do with “diversity” and conservative administrations have themselves shown sloppy handling of classified info. Under the conservative Reagan regime, Fawn Hall removed concealed classified information in her clothing for transport elsewhere. Aldrich Ames a CIA officer took his secret info out on a floppy disk, bound for the Soviets. Johnathan Pollard walked out of Navy Intelligence with a briefcase full of secret papers destined for the Israelis.

    • Replies: @wren
    ...and Katherine Archuleta decided to hire based not on ability, but, as she said herself, the desire for "inclusive diversity."

    She preferred gender and ethnicity to ability, and her poor choices led to the hack. The OPM was warned that they were at risk, but they ignored the warnings.

    She didn't give away a floppy disk or two, or stuff her socks full of secrets, she GAVE IT ALL AWAY. There may not be much left to hide.

    But, I suppose it was not completely her fault. She was not chosen for ability, but rather for her identity.

    The White House made it very clear exactly why she was chosen for this position.

    https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/11/04/welcoming-katherine-archuleta-first-latina-director-office-personnel-management

    Read it and weep.
  39. @Enrique Cardova
    It has nothing to do with "diversity" and conservative administrations have themselves shown sloppy handling of classified info. Under the conservative Reagan regime, Fawn Hall removed concealed classified information in her clothing for transport elsewhere. Aldrich Ames a CIA officer took his secret info out on a floppy disk, bound for the Soviets. Johnathan Pollard walked out of Navy Intelligence with a briefcase full of secret papers destined for the Israelis.

    …and Katherine Archuleta decided to hire based not on ability, but, as she said herself, the desire for “inclusive diversity.”

    She preferred gender and ethnicity to ability, and her poor choices led to the hack. The OPM was warned that they were at risk, but they ignored the warnings.

    She didn’t give away a floppy disk or two, or stuff her socks full of secrets, she GAVE IT ALL AWAY. There may not be much left to hide.

    But, I suppose it was not completely her fault. She was not chosen for ability, but rather for her identity.

    The White House made it very clear exactly why she was chosen for this position.

    https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/11/04/welcoming-katherine-archuleta-first-latina-director-office-personnel-management

    Read it and weep.

  40. Su Tungpo (1036-1101 AD, statesman of the Song Dynasty) on the birth of his son:

    Families, when a child is born
    Want it to be intelligent.
    I, through intelligence,
    Having wrecked my whole life,
    Only hope the baby will prove
    Ignorant and stupid.
    Then he will crown a tranquil life
    By becoming a Cabinet Minister.

  41. @Lugash
    America has become something never seen before, a politically correct police state. The political correctness aspect is deleterious to the traditional police state. Watching it collapse in on itself is hilarious.

    Alexis de Tocqueville predicted the means by which democracy would be replaced with a kind of passive aggressive and all encompassing nanny state. Its eerily accurate.

    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    I've taught the section of Democracy in America that has that passage.
  42. @kaganovitch
    It's not Goldman ,it's J.P. Morgan Chase

    True.

    I doubt the ethnic composition of each firm is all that different at this juncture.

  43. @Zoodles
    Alexis de Tocqueville predicted the means by which democracy would be replaced with a kind of passive aggressive and all encompassing nanny state. Its eerily accurate.

    I’ve taught the section of Democracy in America that has that passage.

  44. @oh its just me
    Orientals cheat like mad on the SAT - and how is that a practical measure of intelligence?
    .. while it was good for civil service jobs and staving corruption, widespread use of it can lead to a stagnant, rigid system like that of china - and to some extent, i think orientals have become hard wired that way.

    Recitation of poetry was always considered a vital part of being educated and 'elite' - going back to plato through Sydney - perhaps bringing it back - at least poetry of the Dante kind vs. Mary Angelo kind, might have a good effect.

    “Orientals cheat like mad on the SAT – and how is that a practical measure of intelligence?”

    Smart peepul cheat betta.

  45. @oh its just me
    Orientals cheat like mad on the SAT - and how is that a practical measure of intelligence?
    .. while it was good for civil service jobs and staving corruption, widespread use of it can lead to a stagnant, rigid system like that of china - and to some extent, i think orientals have become hard wired that way.

    Recitation of poetry was always considered a vital part of being educated and 'elite' - going back to plato through Sydney - perhaps bringing it back - at least poetry of the Dante kind vs. Mary Angelo kind, might have a good effect.

    Recitation of poetry was always considered a vital part of being educated and ‘elite’ – going back to plato through Sydney – bringing it back – at least poetry of the Dante kind vs. Mary Angelo kind, might have a good effect.

    Whoah, dropping all those names you’re making me feel rather unelite at the moment.

  46. @Anon
    Question.

    Is Bruce Caitlyn Jenner celebrating father's day or mother's day?

    Well, Kylie indicated that she was celebrating him on Father’s Day. And got trolled for it.

    Aren’t you keeping up? 😉

  47. “‘Make few false statements and do little you may regret, then all will be well.’ That was the civil service of Confucius’ time.”

    Hmm. I see only one small error: “Make few true statements and do little you may regret, then all will be well.” ftfy 🙂

  48. @Ivy
    There is a tragic 'playing with the house money' element to the misguided actions of the Archuletas of the world.

    Think of the house money as the citizenry's brand equity and the overall quality of life built up over the centuries, getting quite a boost from those dreaded and maligned Founding Fathers.

    Their insights and actions were supplemented by imagination, ingenuity, grit, sacrifice and not-infrequent blood, sweat and tears of generations of Americans in these United States.

    The inclusive diversity approach is merely another case of the Dunning-Kruger effect in action, albeit with potential consequences far worse than imagined by the protagonists. See Goose and Golden Egg.

    They are not alone in the harmful actions arena, as there are numerous other examples of playing with house money, sometimes literally, originating from Wall Street and their fellow travelers in DC.

    Yup, they may have killed the goose through sheer incompetence.

    Of course they will hide the fact, and we won’t know until it is too late.

    It seems that they left the door wide open on 18 million people’s files.

    I’m sure many of them are in influential positions with plenty of juicy secrets to protect.

    The US may be screwed, I think.

  49. All this cheating on the SAT is such hard work. Skip all that and proceed directly to fake admissions: http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/harvard-stanford-admissions-hoax-becomes-international-scandal/2015/06/18/4abac970-156a-11e5-89f3-61410da94eb1_story.html

    This Tiger Dad had to eat some crow:

    The ruse unraveled when Sara’s father wrote an apology to Korean news publications.

    “I am sincerely sorry for causing trouble with what is not true,” he wrote, according to Yonhap, the South Korean news agency. “I am deeply repentant that I failed to watch properly over how painful and difficult a situation the child has been in so far and that I even aggravated and enlarged her suffering. . . . From now on, the whole family will live a quiet life, devoting ourselves to getting the child cured well and taking good care of her. Please forgive me for being unable to offer detailed explanations as the situation has not been completely figured out yet.”

  50. @anonymous
    Any system devised by people sitting around seminar tables, as at Harvard, Oxford, or Washington DC, probably drifts soon into fantasy unconnected to reality. Big unrecoverable mistakes are made. Retrogession sets in, but the fantasies can hide it for a long time.

    Well said.

  51. @Anon
    "How can anyone say that about 静夜思"

    I don't know any hong kong fuey stuff.

    I was referring to the quote above, not commenting on real history.

    ------------

    One bad thing about China being a major power is more people learning Chinese, not the prettiest language.

    When Japan was supposed to take over the world and people were learning Japaneese, that was kinda cool cuz I like the sound of Japanese.

    But this?

    床前明月光, Chuáng qián míng yuè guāng,
    疑是地上霜。 Yí shì dì shàng shuāng.
    举头望明月, Jŭ tóu wàng míng yuè,
    低头思故乡。 Dī tóu sī gù xiāng.

    It's like talking with a mouse squirming inside your mouth.

    Having been to China a number of times, including a stint I returned from a few days ago, I have to say that it’s not the spoken version that is so bad (although the tonalities are all beyond me even when I try to say something simple), but the written language. Ideograms are a piss poor choice for a writing system in this day and age, maybe in any day and age.

    Think of language as an operating system. It underlies every other application or program you run on your system. The more resources it consumes, the less there are left to run the program on top of. The ideogram system is a very bad fit for today’s world, which is partly why countries like Vietnam switched to alphabets pretty recently and countries like South Korea did so centuries ago (it also had to do with relations with China, but I digress). It is very hard to learn, especially for the left band of the IQ spectrum, and makes it harder for one to function at a high level. The most that can be said is that learning it is a good system for training the left hemisphere of the brain, but that is not good enough for the average joe.

    China’s system made sense in the initial development phases of the written word, with a stylized symbol for fire, water, man and then composites like sky being man with line on top, but it got ridiculous pretty quickly. 10.000 characters with 3.000 at least required to read a newspaper. The language itself cannot expand very quickly with new concepts.

    In a phonetic system, where you write down the word through sounds (either alphabetized, like in the West or the Arab World, or syllabic, like in the Korean system), even an ignorant person can read very complicated words, because they just have to know 20 odd symbols, plus a few rules for pronunciation. He might not know the word, but he can recognize it when someone speaks to him about it and he can link it to some written form.

    But, just like Chinese and Japanese, as well as Mandarin and Cantonese, have a lot or all of the writing in common, the spoken languages are very different. So the written word is divorced from the spoken one and new concepts have to be developed piecemeal by using existing symbols, creating new layers of information to be absorbed by the user.

    What I feel was the result (just anecdotally), is that a lot of the Chinese, even (non-native) English speakers, appear slower and dimmer than their IQs would suggest, as well as current HBD thinking on East Asians. I also find them less impressive than their American bred counterparts (for whom English is the mother tongue), who generally prove to be as advertised. I think that, quite simply, the language makes it harder to assimilate new information as rapidly as possible, with diverging lifetime results. This might especially be visible in the lower IQ percentiles.

    Of course, Chinese pride and their current economic success preclude switching to one of the already extant Western writing systems for Chinese, but one can hope. It might make picking up on Chinese much easier for foreigner.

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