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Continuing with my recent Islands Kick, Trinidad and Tobago is a relatively prosperous West Indian country with some oil and a big refinery. The population is split between South Asians (like Nobel laureate writer Sir V.S. Naipaul), blacks (e.g., the late actor Geoffrey Holder), and mixed (e.g., the rapper Nicki Minaj), which has made for some rather tumultuous politics over the years.

Now ISIS is recruiting in Trinidad.

From The Atlantic:

ISIS in the Caribbean

Trinidad has the highest rate of Islamic State recruitment in the Western hemisphere. How did this happen?

SIMON COTTEE DEC 8, 2016

… The Islamic scene on the island is divided: There is the Indo Islam of the East Indians, who first came to Trinidad in the mid-19th century as indentured slaves, and there is the Islam of the Jamaat al Muslimeen, whose members, many of whom were formerly Christians, are almost exclusively black. These two groups do not tend to mix, still less intermarry. But both, in their different ways, are far from the Salafi Islam that the Trinidadian criminologist Daurius Figueira believes has infiltrated T&T. Figueira, who is Muslim…

He attributes the growth of Salafism on the island to Saudi proselytizing. “They’ve spent money and brought in all these Wahhabi scholars from Mecca,” he told me when I visited him. “They’ve passed on the doctrine, then they’ve started to take the young males and send them to Mecca, and then they come back to Mecca and they continue, so now you don’t even need to send missionaries again.”

Razib 101: The hajj radicalizes through social climbing. Everybody comes back from Mecca a world traveling sophisticate and rubs in to their bumpkin, stick-in-the-mud neighbors, “When I was in Mecca, I saw how to do it the proper way …”

The most visible sign of this infiltration, he said, is the full hijab: Before the Saudis’ missionaries came, Muslim women in Trinidad didn’t wear it, but now he said it’s relatively commonplace.

So it’s not just that there are more Muslims around, it’s that the Saudis missionaires have radicalized them to bundle up their womenfolk.

Figueira was keen to dissociate the Jamaat al Muslimeen [the black converts from Christianity] from the militant Salafis whom he believes are sympathetic to ISIS. “If you have any understanding of the Jamaat al Muslimeen,” Figueira said, “you’ll understand that Islamic State will have nothing to do with them because the Muslimeen does not pass the test by Islamic State to be a Salafi jihadi organization.”

In a research paper on the Jamaat al Muslimeen, published in the British Journal of Criminology, the sociologist Cynthia Mahabir describes how the Muslimeen, after 1990, transformed itself from an idealistic social movement—“a fraternity of ‘revolutionary men of Allah’”—into an criminal enterprise, or “Allah’s outlaws,” to use the title of Mahabir’s paper. Figueira puts it like this: “Yasin [Abu Bakr] would never get involved with Islamic State and recruit [people] and send them to Syria, because it’s bad for business! They [are] on a hustle, they’re hustlers, they looking for a living.” According to the analyst Chris Zambelis, this hustle has allegedly involved “gangland-style slayings, narcotics and arms trafficking, money laundering, extortion, kidnapping, and political corruption.”

Sounds vibrant!

 
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  1. Sounds like just more of that bullshit Chicago-style crypto hoodoo Muslim bruthas slangin’ dope for the struggle you see with black street gangs here.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
  2. “as indentured slaves”: he should make his mind up. Which?

    • Replies: @syonredux

    “as indentured slaves”: he should make his mind up. Which?
     
    My personal favorite bit of PC academic jargon: calling the Pygmies the "hereditary servants" of their Bantu overlords....
  3. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Few people know how insidious this cancer of radical Islam is, and it’s metastasized and spread into our federal government. It was bad under G. W. Bush and has gotten insane under Obama. I say this as someone who did investigations for USG. From what I’ve seen, I think there’s been a concerted effort over the past 8 years to radically alter federal bureaucracies,and make it more Muslim. Oh the stories I could tell you but can’t. Here a news article and I’ll add a rest of the story below.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/01/31/AR2008013103458.html

    Fairfax Officer Admits Misusing Computers
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Friday, February 1, 2008
    A Fairfax County police sergeant pleaded guilty yesterday to illegally using police computers to check license plate numbers for a friend, not knowing that the friend was the target of a federal investigation and that the license plates were on cars used to surveil the friend.

    Sgt. Weiss Rasool, 30, joined the county police in 2000 and is assigned to patrol the McLean district. He has been suspended with pay pending the outcome of an internal investigation, Officer Don Gotthardt said.

    During a brief hearing in federal court in Alexandria, Rasool pleaded guilty to one misdemeanor count of unauthorized computer access. The maximum sentence is one year in prison, though sentencing guidelines call for probation or up to six months.

    In a statement of facts filed by the government and signed by Rasool, authorities said Rasool used the Fairfax police computer system June 10, 2005, to access the Virginia Criminal Information Network and the National Crime Information Center to check three license plates. After learning that the plates were registered to a leasing company — which authorities say Rasool had reason to believe was providing vehicles to federal investigators — Rasool told his friend that the plates had been traced to a company, not an individual.

    That phone call was being monitored by federal agents on a wiretap authorized by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, court records show. The subject of the surveillance has since been convicted of felonies in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, but a spokesman for the U.S. attorney’s office declined to identify him yesterday.

    The agents could tell from the phone call that Rasool and their target had spoken before, court records state. And because Rasool was not conducting a police investigation or other official business, he was breaking the law by accessing the state and federal databases.

    He interrupted an FBI investigation involving an associate of Anwar al-Awlaki. The associate fled the U.S. and left the FBI empty handed. Rasool received probation. Rasool is now making six-figures as an analyst in the IRS Deputy Chief Financial Officer’s Office. Oh, and he has a security clearance with the U.S. Government, which was investigated, adjudicated, and issued after this incident.

  4. Trinidad and Tobago is a relatively prosperous West Indian country

    I see.

    According to the USDOS Overseas Security Advisory Council, the crime situation in Trinidad is “Critical”.

    According to gov.uk, “There are high levels of violent crime in Trinidad, including murder,…”

  5. I know this is off topic, but can someone please explain to me why the Podests brothers haven’t been arrested in connection with the disappearance of Madeleine McCann. The efits are a clear match. I would think thay alone would constitute probable cause, let alone the spirit cooking and demonic art in Podesta’s collection. I mean, isn’t that the whole point of these renderings in the first place: to arrest prrsons who match the picture?!?!?!?!

  6. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Because of all the faux anti-Muslim hate crimes since Trump’s election, the Attorney General is going to calm fears of more faux anti-Muslim hate crimes.

    http://dailycaller.com/2016/12/09/loretta-lynch-plans-to-visit-mosque-once-raided-in-counterterrorism-probe/#ixzz4SNVa0qZJ

    Loretta Lynch Plans To Visit Mosque Once Raided In Counterterrorism Probe
    12/09/2016

    Attorney General Loretta Lynch will visit a controversial Virginia mosque next week, likely as a response to a recent FBI report that found a spike in anti-Muslim hate crimes in the U.S.

    The visit to the All Dulles Area Muslim Society Center (ADAMS) will mark Lynch’s first to a mosque since she took over the Justice Department last year. And that will be one visit more than the number she has paid to a synagogue. That despite there being two-and-a-half times as many hate crimes against Jews reported last year than against Muslims.

  7. It’s been obvious for some time that Saudi Arabia is a huge problem for the US.

    If we were going to invade someone back in 2003, it should have been SA, not Iraq. If we had:
    1- stolen their gold
    2- installed a moderate Islamic dictator
    3- suppressed domestic Wahabism
    4- frozen their overseas assets
    5- stopped overseas funding of mosques

    etc, I might still be an NR-reading Republican instead of an iSteve-reading independent. (My intuition is that keeping Saddam, Gaddafi, and Mubarak in power and installing a Baathist-style junta in SA would have gone much more smoothly than trying to turn the Middle East into pro-Western democratic bloc.)

    Of course, that was never going to happen with the two parties’ pro-Saudi stances.

    It remains the case that something needs to be done about SA’s influence, if not about their regime. Barring another invade the world fiasco, I’m not sure what that should/could be.

    For the long-term prosperity of the US, Trump’s turn toward Asia and dealing with China is the correct strategy, but in the short term the Saudis still need to be dealt with. Is this something we could work with the Russians on?

    • Replies: @eah
    Saudi Arabia is a huge problem

    Any problem they pose is not quite so "huge" due to advances in exploiting shale -- the petrodollar regime helped establish and maintain the USD as 'the world's reserve currency', but as US production ramps up, the Saudis will be less important there too, especially given the lack of credible alternatives (it would still hurt if they completely stopped buying or aggressively sold their UST bond holdings).

    the Saudis still need to be dealt with

    How exactly do you propose to 'deal with' them? -- I think many people voted for Trump in the hope there would not be quite so much 'dealing with' other countries in America's future foreign policy.
    , @Lot
    It would be a lot cheaper than invading and occupying Saudi Arabia to just greatly reduce our use of imported oil, thus destroying their economy and ability to finance terrorism, with a combination of subsidizing domestic production and vehicles that are hybrids or run on CNG.
    , @cipher
    I hope President Trump's turn toward Asia doesn't include kissing and bowing to near east potentates as was done by his predecessors.

    https://qph.ec.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-219de59d94b845272e03ff4d7016ecb4-c?convert_to_webp=true

    http://pamelageller.com/2009/04/obama-bows-and-kisses-the-of-saudi-king.html/
    , @Bill B.
    The Carlotta Gall piece in the NYT on Dec 6 is very much worth reading: how the Saudis are propping up the Taliban with a great wall of money, even while Riyadh claims to be supporting Kabul.

    Saudi Arabia - the maleficent cesspit whence pours so much disruption and evil.
    , @Seran
    Let's bring democracy to Saudi Arabia.
    Democracy is SA's strength!
  8. @Chrisnonymous
    It's been obvious for some time that Saudi Arabia is a huge problem for the US.

    If we were going to invade someone back in 2003, it should have been SA, not Iraq. If we had:
    1- stolen their gold
    2- installed a moderate Islamic dictator
    3- suppressed domestic Wahabism
    4- frozen their overseas assets
    5- stopped overseas funding of mosques

    etc, I might still be an NR-reading Republican instead of an iSteve-reading independent. (My intuition is that keeping Saddam, Gaddafi, and Mubarak in power and installing a Baathist-style junta in SA would have gone much more smoothly than trying to turn the Middle East into pro-Western democratic bloc.)

    Of course, that was never going to happen with the two parties' pro-Saudi stances.

    It remains the case that something needs to be done about SA's influence, if not about their regime. Barring another invade the world fiasco, I'm not sure what that should/could be.

    For the long-term prosperity of the US, Trump's turn toward Asia and dealing with China is the correct strategy, but in the short term the Saudis still need to be dealt with. Is this something we could work with the Russians on?

    Saudi Arabia is a huge problem

    Any problem they pose is not quite so “huge” due to advances in exploiting shale — the petrodollar regime helped establish and maintain the USD as ‘the world’s reserve currency’, but as US production ramps up, the Saudis will be less important there too, especially given the lack of credible alternatives (it would still hurt if they completely stopped buying or aggressively sold their UST bond holdings).

    the Saudis still need to be dealt with

    How exactly do you propose to ‘deal with’ them? — I think many people voted for Trump in the hope there would not be quite so much ‘dealing with’ other countries in America’s future foreign policy.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Me too. But there's a difference between not attacking your neighbor's castle and refusing to fill in the tunnels they're digging under your walls.
  9. @Chrisnonymous
    It's been obvious for some time that Saudi Arabia is a huge problem for the US.

    If we were going to invade someone back in 2003, it should have been SA, not Iraq. If we had:
    1- stolen their gold
    2- installed a moderate Islamic dictator
    3- suppressed domestic Wahabism
    4- frozen their overseas assets
    5- stopped overseas funding of mosques

    etc, I might still be an NR-reading Republican instead of an iSteve-reading independent. (My intuition is that keeping Saddam, Gaddafi, and Mubarak in power and installing a Baathist-style junta in SA would have gone much more smoothly than trying to turn the Middle East into pro-Western democratic bloc.)

    Of course, that was never going to happen with the two parties' pro-Saudi stances.

    It remains the case that something needs to be done about SA's influence, if not about their regime. Barring another invade the world fiasco, I'm not sure what that should/could be.

    For the long-term prosperity of the US, Trump's turn toward Asia and dealing with China is the correct strategy, but in the short term the Saudis still need to be dealt with. Is this something we could work with the Russians on?

    It would be a lot cheaper than invading and occupying Saudi Arabia to just greatly reduce our use of imported oil, thus destroying their economy and ability to finance terrorism, with a combination of subsidizing domestic production and vehicles that are hybrids or run on CNG.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    I don't think we can destroy their oil income on our own. Also, that doesn't help with the billions they've already banked. Funding radicals in developing nations can't cost very much.

    Something like freezing assets and creating a no-fly zone pending the Saudis' taking action against agents ID'd by the US was more in line with what I was thinking.
  10. @Chrisnonymous
    It's been obvious for some time that Saudi Arabia is a huge problem for the US.

    If we were going to invade someone back in 2003, it should have been SA, not Iraq. If we had:
    1- stolen their gold
    2- installed a moderate Islamic dictator
    3- suppressed domestic Wahabism
    4- frozen their overseas assets
    5- stopped overseas funding of mosques

    etc, I might still be an NR-reading Republican instead of an iSteve-reading independent. (My intuition is that keeping Saddam, Gaddafi, and Mubarak in power and installing a Baathist-style junta in SA would have gone much more smoothly than trying to turn the Middle East into pro-Western democratic bloc.)

    Of course, that was never going to happen with the two parties' pro-Saudi stances.

    It remains the case that something needs to be done about SA's influence, if not about their regime. Barring another invade the world fiasco, I'm not sure what that should/could be.

    For the long-term prosperity of the US, Trump's turn toward Asia and dealing with China is the correct strategy, but in the short term the Saudis still need to be dealt with. Is this something we could work with the Russians on?

    I hope President Trump’s turn toward Asia doesn’t include kissing and bowing to near east potentates as was done by his predecessors.

    https://qph.ec.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-219de59d94b845272e03ff4d7016ecb4-c?convert_to_webp=true

    http://pamelageller.com/2009/04/obama-bows-and-kisses-the-of-saudi-king.html/

  11. Trinidad is known for Miss Trinidad Tobago, angostura bitters and Rum and Coca-cola. Credited to Morey Amsterdam but written by Lord Invader. ISteve comment section fave Louis Nizer (from the Westbrook Pegler libel case) won a copyright case for the latter:

    THE ANDREWS SISTERS lyrics – Rum And Coca-Cola
    THE ANDREWS SISTERS
    “Rum And Coca-Cola”
    (Words: Morey Amsterdam / Music: Jeri Sullavan, Paul Baron)

    “Rum And Coca-Cola”

    If you ever go down Trinidad
    They make you feel so very glad
    Calypso sing and make up rhyme
    Guarantee you one real good fine time
    Drinkin’ rum and Coca-Cola
    Go down Point Koomahnah
    Both mother and daughter
    Workin’ for the Yankee dollar

    (Oh, beat it man, beat it)

    Since the Yankee come to Trinidad
    They got the young girls all goin’ mad
    Young girls say they treat ’em nice
    Make Trinidad like paradise
    Drinkin’ rum and Coca-Cola
    Go down Point Koomahnah
    Both mother and daughter
    Workin’ for the Yankee dollar

    (Oh, you vex me, you vex me)

    From Chicachicaree to Mona’s Isle
    Native girls all dance and smile
    Help soldier celebrate his leave
    Make every day like New Year’s Eve
    Drinkin’ rum and Coca-Cola
    Go down Point Koomahnah
    Both mother and daughter
    Workin’ for the Yankee dollar

    (It’s a fact, man, it’s a fact)

    In old Trinidad, I also fear
    The situation is mighty queer
    Like the Yankee girl, the native swoon
    When she hear der Bingo croon
    Drinkin’ rum and Coca-Cola
    Go down Point Koomahnah
    Both mother and daughter
    Workin’ for the Yankee dollar
    Out on Manzanella Beach
    G.I. romance with native peach
    All night long, make tropic love
    Next day, sit in hot sun and cool off
    Drinkin’ rum and Coca-Cola
    Go down Point Koomahnah
    Both mother and daughter
    Workin’ for the Yankee dollar
    It’s a fact, man, it’s a fact
    Rum and Coca-Cola
    Rum and Coca-Cola
    Workin’ for the Yankee dollar

  12. Trinidad is currently going through a vicious crime wave. An old high school friend of mine recently contacted me to tell me that they were moving back to Canada because of the sky high crime rate. Most Trinidadians I’ve known are quite friendly and do well academically, apparently the situation on the island is quite different.

  13. The analogy is very simple. Saudi Arabia is the new USSR, with its equivalent of Comintern and Moscow Gold corrupting people, especially young people, in large tracts of the planet, and recruiting them to a vile ideology intended to overthrow civilisation as we know it.

    • Agree: syonredux, reiner Tor
    • Replies: @res
    The big difference is "we" are helping to support it now rather than opposing it.
  14. @dearieme
    "as indentured slaves": he should make his mind up. Which?

    “as indentured slaves”: he should make his mind up. Which?

    My personal favorite bit of PC academic jargon: calling the Pygmies the “hereditary servants” of their Bantu overlords….

  15. Saudi Arabia is populated by people who make Iraqis look tame. Bush for all his faults was simply acting on the Carter Doctrine, itself a mere formalization of the US policy since FDR.

    We could have pacified Saudi Arabia, that would have required killing about 50% of its male population, and that was never in the cards.

    Muslims like the IRS Analysts making well over six figures are not making the money due to brilliance. But being Muslim. Why? Are Jews suddenly pushing for, “hey lets put more Muslims in the IRS. Its genius!”

    Nope. Its part and parcel of the anti-White MALE sentiment, by gays, women, Blacks, etc. that make up the Hillary coalition. Recently Hillary toured the Capitol Building and female staffers were in tears. Typical.

    Whenever you see dirt-level IQ, aggressive, violent, non-White males being put into important government positions this is done by Nice White Ladies who loathe their male co-ethnics. And want to replace their men.

    • Replies: @Neoconned
    Whiskey, if you are ever in the New Orleans area let me know man and the drinks are on me.

    Seriously my ribs have hurt the last week from laughing so hard from your posts.

    Your posts about women are fucken hilarious and bizarrely on the mark. I really mean this - it's helped me understand women a whole lot better.

    And I don't look at "domestic violence" the same way any more.

    So please, more "hate hate hate" threads so I can continue pissing myself laughing
  16. @Chrisnonymous
    It's been obvious for some time that Saudi Arabia is a huge problem for the US.

    If we were going to invade someone back in 2003, it should have been SA, not Iraq. If we had:
    1- stolen their gold
    2- installed a moderate Islamic dictator
    3- suppressed domestic Wahabism
    4- frozen their overseas assets
    5- stopped overseas funding of mosques

    etc, I might still be an NR-reading Republican instead of an iSteve-reading independent. (My intuition is that keeping Saddam, Gaddafi, and Mubarak in power and installing a Baathist-style junta in SA would have gone much more smoothly than trying to turn the Middle East into pro-Western democratic bloc.)

    Of course, that was never going to happen with the two parties' pro-Saudi stances.

    It remains the case that something needs to be done about SA's influence, if not about their regime. Barring another invade the world fiasco, I'm not sure what that should/could be.

    For the long-term prosperity of the US, Trump's turn toward Asia and dealing with China is the correct strategy, but in the short term the Saudis still need to be dealt with. Is this something we could work with the Russians on?

    The Carlotta Gall piece in the NYT on Dec 6 is very much worth reading: how the Saudis are propping up the Taliban with a great wall of money, even while Riyadh claims to be supporting Kabul.

    Saudi Arabia – the maleficent cesspit whence pours so much disruption and evil.

  17. “radicalized them to bundle up their womenfolk”

    Maybe what is really happening is the poor are revolting against oppression, and Islam is just an unfortunate detail.

    Expert on such things and transitional figure between communist and Islamic revolution and convert to Islam, Ilich Ramírez Sánchez, also known as Carlos the Jackal wrote a book:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revolutionary_Islam

  18. Western elites like to portray radical Islam as a backward ideology. However, as John Gray points out, it’s very modern in some respects. Like western liberalism it’s a globalist ideology with a utopian vision (establishing a global caliphate) and an ability to spread rapidly across borders.

    Fortunately Russia isn’t as ideologically dogmatic as the West, and appears to be quite happy to use force to shore up quasi nationalist regimes that are opposed to Islamic globalism.

  19. OT, California residents might want to write their legislators to explain why AB 54, the so-called California values act, which would make Ca. a sanctuary state, would be a bad law. Also write the governor, who once in a great while has moments of lucidity.

    • Replies: @Seth Largo
    California has been a sanctuary state for at least two decades. Ship, sailed.

    Indeed, most sanctuary cities boldly proclaiming their status as such have been sanctuary cities for a while now. It's the status quo. Some cities have the millionaire tax base to handle it, others don't. The former will continue to be Brazil, the latter will declare bankruptcy.

    At this point, the problem isn't sanctuary cities but sanctuary cities allowing their, err, "parishioners" to spill outward into the suburbs, first, then the exurbs, then finally into the heartland. In fact, one of my explanations for the election is that lots of country folks decided they're fine with L.A. and Chicago being sanctuary cities but, no, they don't want the rest of the country to turn into L.A. and Chicago in miniature.
  20. Imagine if rich Catholics, like rich Saudis, spent money to send Catholic high schools students on trips to the Camino, to Rome, to Tours, to Lepanto, to Malta, to Granada, to Vienna… or for a summer of Birthright Europe tourism (since so many are mixed ethnicity); instead of giving money to groups to spend on proselytizing Marxism in Guatemala, or in sponsoring Tim Kaine-like charity tourism tours…
    What is the white gentile equivalent of finding roots and regeneration? I was one of the only ones to win a Fulbright/Marshall/Rhodes in my year who used it to actually study European culture, the rest were utilitarian courses of study on modern political economy and cultural marxism (broad brush but every one knows what I mean)… which reminds me: my peers, who self-hate European civilization, nonetheless spend so much time there on vacation taking pictures of…. Churches!

    • Replies: @Desiderius

    my peers, who self-hate European civilization, nonetheless spend so much time there on vacation taking pictures of…. Churches!
     
    It's more love-hate than hate-hate, and it's certainly not self-hate. It's an attempt to distance the self from a narrowly (in their view) European identity so they can spread their wings as a full-fledged cosmopolitan, ready to take their rightful place as rulers of the world, not merely a country.

    It is as ridiculous as it sounds, which is why many of the best gradually revert to the opposite - extreme localism - as they put down roots. They go from too big to be European to too small. That unfortunately leaves the not so best stuck in grandiosity.

  21. @Whiskey
    Saudi Arabia is populated by people who make Iraqis look tame. Bush for all his faults was simply acting on the Carter Doctrine, itself a mere formalization of the US policy since FDR.

    We could have pacified Saudi Arabia, that would have required killing about 50% of its male population, and that was never in the cards.

    Muslims like the IRS Analysts making well over six figures are not making the money due to brilliance. But being Muslim. Why? Are Jews suddenly pushing for, "hey lets put more Muslims in the IRS. Its genius!"

    Nope. Its part and parcel of the anti-White MALE sentiment, by gays, women, Blacks, etc. that make up the Hillary coalition. Recently Hillary toured the Capitol Building and female staffers were in tears. Typical.

    Whenever you see dirt-level IQ, aggressive, violent, non-White males being put into important government positions this is done by Nice White Ladies who loathe their male co-ethnics. And want to replace their men.

    Whiskey, if you are ever in the New Orleans area let me know man and the drinks are on me.

    Seriously my ribs have hurt the last week from laughing so hard from your posts.

    Your posts about women are fucken hilarious and bizarrely on the mark. I really mean this – it’s helped me understand women a whole lot better.

    And I don’t look at “domestic violence” the same way any more.

    So please, more “hate hate hate” threads so I can continue pissing myself laughing

  22. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    The ‘East Indians’ never came to Trinidad as ‘indentured slaves’.
    Someone is just using that emotive word ‘slave’ to cause trouble and hate on whitey.

    In fact, the indentured Indian cane workers were transported to Trinidad with their own full consent, and for cash payment, and ‘signed’ (more like thumb printed) their contracts with full, fair freedom and knowledge of terms and conditions, and were absolutely free to decline the offer with no coercion.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The blacks did come to Trinidad as slaves, so it's probably a Thing among Indian ethnic activism in Trinidad to retcon indentured servitude as indentured slavery to keep the blacks from one-downing them in the victimology department.
  23. @Je Suis Charlie Martel
    Imagine if rich Catholics, like rich Saudis, spent money to send Catholic high schools students on trips to the Camino, to Rome, to Tours, to Lepanto, to Malta, to Granada, to Vienna... or for a summer of Birthright Europe tourism (since so many are mixed ethnicity); instead of giving money to groups to spend on proselytizing Marxism in Guatemala, or in sponsoring Tim Kaine-like charity tourism tours...
    What is the white gentile equivalent of finding roots and regeneration? I was one of the only ones to win a Fulbright/Marshall/Rhodes in my year who used it to actually study European culture, the rest were utilitarian courses of study on modern political economy and cultural marxism (broad brush but every one knows what I mean)... which reminds me: my peers, who self-hate European civilization, nonetheless spend so much time there on vacation taking pictures of.... Churches!

    my peers, who self-hate European civilization, nonetheless spend so much time there on vacation taking pictures of…. Churches!

    It’s more love-hate than hate-hate, and it’s certainly not self-hate. It’s an attempt to distance the self from a narrowly (in their view) European identity so they can spread their wings as a full-fledged cosmopolitan, ready to take their rightful place as rulers of the world, not merely a country.

    It is as ridiculous as it sounds, which is why many of the best gradually revert to the opposite – extreme localism – as they put down roots. They go from too big to be European to too small. That unfortunately leaves the not so best stuck in grandiosity.

  24. The “Saudi Problem” was apparent and much talked about in South-East Asia and South Asia even 23 years ago, when I moved there for a few years, for work.

    Older mullahs complained that the younger ones were in thrall to Saudi money, but they were helpless against the onslaught of Saudi religious foreign aid funds supplied to renovate and equip madrassas and train scholars. The aid came with strings, the chief of which was an acceptance of Salafist values infiltrating the indigenous theological reasoning and culture of those previously quietist Muslim religious cultures.

    At a social level, the complaints were the loudest among the older generation. Newlywed young Muslim women, who traditionally dressed in colorful clothes in South-East Asia, and in mid-riff baring saris in South Asia were being made to cover up in black by their young husbands. The older men and women hated the changes among their daughters and sons but had few arguments against the theological reasoning of the young zealots.

    I oversimplify, but as Steve points out, the younger hardliners were in awe of Saudis.

    Saudis had special status, because they were seen as the purist inheritors of Muhammad’s Islam as the (self-appointed, of course) guardians of the holy cities. More importantly, they must have been specially favored by Allah, the young reformers reasoned, because of the immense riches that Allah had bestowed Saudis in the form of petroleum. This was seen as a divine indication granting Saudis ultimate authority in religious matters.

    Our foreign policy specialists have certainly known of this problem for a long time, but what is amazing is that no action was taken, in concrete policy terms, even after 9/11.

  25. I am not convinced the Sailer thesis on visiting Mecca = radicalisation of the tourists holds water.

    I was in Mecca for a religious pilgrimage last December. There is little opportunity for radicalisation since you are usually too busy either getting the rituals done, praying or negotiating the crush of pilgrims. Secondly the bulk of the clergy there only speak Arabic. The vast majority of non-Arab Muslims don’t speak or understand Arabic. You would learn how to read Arabic script sufficient to read the Qur’an and pray but few would be taught what the words actually mean. Non-Arab Muslims wanting to know what the Qur’an says would read a translation.

    Finally going on a religious pilgrimage to Mecca is really expensive. For most Muslims this is likely to be one of the few foreign trips they make in their lives. You are not going to spend more time on pilgrimage than absolutely necessary.

    Saudi Wahabbi Islam has a lot of push behind it because of oil money, hopefully shale and solar will put an end to their influence.

    • Replies: @Talha
    Salaam Ali,

    I agree - anybody who has been to Hajj realizes that it's a pretty open playground since the scholars of the world are present; the Wahhabi's can manage it at a high-level, but there is no way they are able to regulate what is going on at Mina, Muzdalifah or Arafah. Anyone can spend their spare time looking for what they want. I found traditional (Sufi-oriented) scholars from South Africa in my time there. Was hoping to see the Sufi-scholars of Yemen there too, but only got to see one.

    In fact, Sh. Hasan Nasrallah was there as well - one of my Shia friends from college met him, but I didn't even spot him.

    Wa salaam

  26. @sf
    OT, California residents might want to write their legislators to explain why AB 54, the so-called California values act, which would make Ca. a sanctuary state, would be a bad law. Also write the governor, who once in a great while has moments of lucidity.

    California has been a sanctuary state for at least two decades. Ship, sailed.

    Indeed, most sanctuary cities boldly proclaiming their status as such have been sanctuary cities for a while now. It’s the status quo. Some cities have the millionaire tax base to handle it, others don’t. The former will continue to be Brazil, the latter will declare bankruptcy.

    At this point, the problem isn’t sanctuary cities but sanctuary cities allowing their, err, “parishioners” to spill outward into the suburbs, first, then the exurbs, then finally into the heartland. In fact, one of my explanations for the election is that lots of country folks decided they’re fine with L.A. and Chicago being sanctuary cities but, no, they don’t want the rest of the country to turn into L.A. and Chicago in miniature.

    • Replies: @SF
    There are more or less 38 sanctuary cities in California, but geographically, you would find most of the state not in that category. http://sanctuarycities.info/sanctuary_state_california.htm The law would apply to county sheriffs and small town police in a lot of areas that would prefer not to be sanctuary cities. For Californians who would like to get back some of the tax money we send to Washington, this would be a big red flag, challenging Trump to cut off the state cold.
  27. @dearieme
    The analogy is very simple. Saudi Arabia is the new USSR, with its equivalent of Comintern and Moscow Gold corrupting people, especially young people, in large tracts of the planet, and recruiting them to a vile ideology intended to overthrow civilisation as we know it.

    The big difference is “we” are helping to support it now rather than opposing it.

  28. @Anonymous
    The 'East Indians' never came to Trinidad as 'indentured slaves'.
    Someone is just using that emotive word 'slave' to cause trouble and hate on whitey.

    In fact, the indentured Indian cane workers were transported to Trinidad with their own full consent, and for cash payment, and 'signed' (more like thumb printed) their contracts with full, fair freedom and knowledge of terms and conditions, and were absolutely free to decline the offer with no coercion.

    The blacks did come to Trinidad as slaves, so it’s probably a Thing among Indian ethnic activism in Trinidad to retcon indentured servitude as indentured slavery to keep the blacks from one-downing them in the victimology department.

  29. @Seth Largo
    California has been a sanctuary state for at least two decades. Ship, sailed.

    Indeed, most sanctuary cities boldly proclaiming their status as such have been sanctuary cities for a while now. It's the status quo. Some cities have the millionaire tax base to handle it, others don't. The former will continue to be Brazil, the latter will declare bankruptcy.

    At this point, the problem isn't sanctuary cities but sanctuary cities allowing their, err, "parishioners" to spill outward into the suburbs, first, then the exurbs, then finally into the heartland. In fact, one of my explanations for the election is that lots of country folks decided they're fine with L.A. and Chicago being sanctuary cities but, no, they don't want the rest of the country to turn into L.A. and Chicago in miniature.

    There are more or less 38 sanctuary cities in California, but geographically, you would find most of the state not in that category. http://sanctuarycities.info/sanctuary_state_california.htm The law would apply to county sheriffs and small town police in a lot of areas that would prefer not to be sanctuary cities. For Californians who would like to get back some of the tax money we send to Washington, this would be a big red flag, challenging Trump to cut off the state cold.

  30. @Ali Choudhury
    I am not convinced the Sailer thesis on visiting Mecca = radicalisation of the tourists holds water.

    I was in Mecca for a religious pilgrimage last December. There is little opportunity for radicalisation since you are usually too busy either getting the rituals done, praying or negotiating the crush of pilgrims. Secondly the bulk of the clergy there only speak Arabic. The vast majority of non-Arab Muslims don't speak or understand Arabic. You would learn how to read Arabic script sufficient to read the Qur'an and pray but few would be taught what the words actually mean. Non-Arab Muslims wanting to know what the Qur'an says would read a translation.

    Finally going on a religious pilgrimage to Mecca is really expensive. For most Muslims this is likely to be one of the few foreign trips they make in their lives. You are not going to spend more time on pilgrimage than absolutely necessary.

    Saudi Wahabbi Islam has a lot of push behind it because of oil money, hopefully shale and solar will put an end to their influence.

    Salaam Ali,

    I agree – anybody who has been to Hajj realizes that it’s a pretty open playground since the scholars of the world are present; the Wahhabi’s can manage it at a high-level, but there is no way they are able to regulate what is going on at Mina, Muzdalifah or Arafah. Anyone can spend their spare time looking for what they want. I found traditional (Sufi-oriented) scholars from South Africa in my time there. Was hoping to see the Sufi-scholars of Yemen there too, but only got to see one.

    In fact, Sh. Hasan Nasrallah was there as well – one of my Shia friends from college met him, but I didn’t even spot him.

    Wa salaam

  31. @Chrisnonymous
    It's been obvious for some time that Saudi Arabia is a huge problem for the US.

    If we were going to invade someone back in 2003, it should have been SA, not Iraq. If we had:
    1- stolen their gold
    2- installed a moderate Islamic dictator
    3- suppressed domestic Wahabism
    4- frozen their overseas assets
    5- stopped overseas funding of mosques

    etc, I might still be an NR-reading Republican instead of an iSteve-reading independent. (My intuition is that keeping Saddam, Gaddafi, and Mubarak in power and installing a Baathist-style junta in SA would have gone much more smoothly than trying to turn the Middle East into pro-Western democratic bloc.)

    Of course, that was never going to happen with the two parties' pro-Saudi stances.

    It remains the case that something needs to be done about SA's influence, if not about their regime. Barring another invade the world fiasco, I'm not sure what that should/could be.

    For the long-term prosperity of the US, Trump's turn toward Asia and dealing with China is the correct strategy, but in the short term the Saudis still need to be dealt with. Is this something we could work with the Russians on?

    Let’s bring democracy to Saudi Arabia.
    Democracy is SA’s strength!

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    That's not what I said at all.
  32. Diversity? Radical Islam and Salafism are like a cancer. They deny human rights and refuse any compromise. They seek to destroy Western Culture and bring on Sharia law. Violence is not only condoned but applauded. Saudi Arabia is just a polite ISIS. Islam should be confronted as a violent cult until they denounce violence and Sharia.

  33. @Seran
    Let's bring democracy to Saudi Arabia.
    Democracy is SA's strength!

    That’s not what I said at all.

  34. @eah
    Saudi Arabia is a huge problem

    Any problem they pose is not quite so "huge" due to advances in exploiting shale -- the petrodollar regime helped establish and maintain the USD as 'the world's reserve currency', but as US production ramps up, the Saudis will be less important there too, especially given the lack of credible alternatives (it would still hurt if they completely stopped buying or aggressively sold their UST bond holdings).

    the Saudis still need to be dealt with

    How exactly do you propose to 'deal with' them? -- I think many people voted for Trump in the hope there would not be quite so much 'dealing with' other countries in America's future foreign policy.

    Me too. But there’s a difference between not attacking your neighbor’s castle and refusing to fill in the tunnels they’re digging under your walls.

  35. @Lot
    It would be a lot cheaper than invading and occupying Saudi Arabia to just greatly reduce our use of imported oil, thus destroying their economy and ability to finance terrorism, with a combination of subsidizing domestic production and vehicles that are hybrids or run on CNG.

    I don’t think we can destroy their oil income on our own. Also, that doesn’t help with the billions they’ve already banked. Funding radicals in developing nations can’t cost very much.

    Something like freezing assets and creating a no-fly zone pending the Saudis’ taking action against agents ID’d by the US was more in line with what I was thinking.

  36. Another country I can cross off my bucket list.

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