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An anonymous commenter responds to an insult of “Trumpkins:”

So after months of misspelled rantings by gullible Trumpkins

Can I ask you a serious question? It’s something I’ve wanted to know for awhile.

Why do you all say “Trumpkin”? Why is it supposed to be insulting? Is it like “pumpkin”? Do you think we feel bad because you compared us to pumpkins?

I like pumpkins. They remind me of Halloween.

Is “Trumpkins” supposed to be an insult of Trump supporters?

I didn’t actually know that. I’d seen it used a lot on Twitter by people who were obviously worked up over something, but I couldn’t tell from the word “Trumpkins” which side they were on. (140 characters has certain limitations, like — unless you are as hardworking and witty as @DemsRRealRacist — it’s hard to tell what you mean.)

“Trumpkin” doesn’t sound bad. Indeed, most neologism that include “Trump” don’t sound bad. “Trump” is a really good name.

Whichever patrilineal ancestor of Trump changed the family name from Drumpf to Trump was obviously a marketing genius.

Is there a Branding Gene on the Y-chromosome?

My vague impression is that the Trump and Sanders campaigns are causing America to undergo a popular culture efflorescence, comparable to William Henry Harrison’s wonderful “Tippecanoe and Tyler too” campaigns of of 1836 and 1840.

When my son was taking American history in high school, I reread Admiral Professor Samuel Eliot Morison’s Oxford History of the American People.

The second volume was fairly dull until the democratic age arrives with Andrew Jackson, after which it’s consistently comic.

For example, here’s a bit on the 1836 campaign by Vice President Richard Johnson, whose supporters chanted in answer to William Henry Harrison’s claim to be the Hero of Tippecanoe, where he defeated the Indian chief Tecumseh:

Colonel Johnson killing Tecumseh

Rumpsey dumpsey, rumpsey dumpsey
Colonel Johnson killed Tecumseh!

But this slogan, never surpassed for electioneering imbecility, failed to give him a majority in the Electoral College.

Yet the Senate then elected Colonel Dick Johnson as Van Buren’s vice-president anyway.

Vice President Colonel Dick Johnson is most famous for:

(10) Always wearing a red vest,

(9) Proposing an expedition to the Great American Desert to find a chasm leading into the Hollow Earth in order to conquer the inside of the Earth and all its lands and peoples,

(8) His octoroon slave/mistress and illegitimate children upon whom he publicly doted, and for

(7) Disappearing from Washington for almost a year during his vice presidency to manage a tavern in Kentucky.

Vice President Colonel Dick Johnson sounds like a David Letterman Top Ten list come to life.

And that reminds me: it’s Day 6 of my April iSteve fundraiser. Yeah, okay, it’s May now, but Trump has won the GOP Presidential nomination, fair and square, so snotty technical rules about asking for money for the April fundraiser only during April are temporarily suspended. It’s an extended May Day.

Nothing more encourages me to keep up the good fight than your support, intellectual, moral, and financial. I greatly appreciate it.

Here are seven ways to contribute:

First: You can use PayPal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. PayPal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual.

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:

Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA 91617-0142

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution via VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.) Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

Fourth: You can use Bitcoin:

I’m using Coinbase as a sort of PayPal for Bitcoins.

The IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible.

Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

Fifth: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Sixth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Seventh: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address(that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)



Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless.

You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee.

Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.)

Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone
app (Android and iPhone — the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries).

Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service. Here’s how to do it.

(Non-tax deductible.)

Thanks!

 
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  1. “8) His octoroon slave/mistress”

    That Black woman in the picture is an Octoroon? Damn that is some strong as hell Sub Saharan genes in her case, especially since Octoroons tend to look either White or Whitish Off White. I have never seen an Octoroon that looks like a regular Black person, she is the first.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I found that picture on a search for Richard Johnson, but I can't tell from the context if that's the Vice President's mistress or a generic picture.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. @Jefferson
    "8) His octoroon slave/mistress"

    That Black woman in the picture is an Octoroon? Damn that is some strong as hell Sub Saharan genes in her case, especially since Octoroons tend to look either White or Whitish Off White. I have never seen an Octoroon that looks like a regular Black person, she is the first.

    I found that picture on a search for Richard Johnson, but I can’t tell from the context if that’s the Vice President’s mistress or a generic picture.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "I found that picture on a search for Richard Johnson, but I can’t tell from the context if that’s the Vice President’s mistress or a generic picture."

    There is a Puerto Rican guy named Frank Sweet, who used to be the moderator of a discussion board called The Study Of Racialism. He once posted the results of his DNA ancestry from 23AndMe, which said he is 13 percent Sub Saharan African, which basically makes him an Octoroon. Phenotype wise he would be passable as White if he lived in the South during Jim Crow. He could have avoided anti-Black racial discrimination if he lived in that part of the country during that era.

    , @Another Canadian
    All this Richard Johnson talk should remind all Americans that if it wasn't for the Kentucky militia you guys would all be singing O Canada.
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  3. Then there was the period when staunch immigrationphiles stated ridiculing him with “Drumpf”, the name of his immigrant ancestor.

    If immigrants were white, democrats would want a wall. It’s all tribal.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    His "immigrant ancestor" was his grandfather, who was named Trump from birth. The family name was changed from Drumpf to Trump maybe 400 years ago, but there's no statute of limitations on the racial crimes of white people. Of course, if you made fun of Barry Soetoro's name, you would be racis'.
    , @AndrewR
    Democrats want votes. If the "white" immigrants were reliable Dem voters, Dems would want them.
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  4. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Conservatives have shown what they are about.

    They ended up supportingTrump as a 5X draft dodger (no problem), a 2X divorced guy (no problem), an adulterer who publicly revelled in it (no problem), a woman hater against Fiorino and Megan Kelly (no problem for the religious types), and a man who hates POWs (McCain), hispanics, immigrants and muslims. In the words of Arnold Schwarzenegger, no problemo.

    What do these so-called religious people really stand for? Really, it all sounds so impressive on TV but really there is no there, there.

    Trump’s achievement was to expose the religious right’s thinness of belief and use them to his advantage. It all reminds me of the 1930s and the limited opposition from religious groups to he who shall not be named.

    Frank Rich said it best a few years ago in the Times when he said the culture wars were over: the right was pious, except when it comes to important matters, like watching TV.

    But if they don’t stand up for their values in marriage, against bullying at minorities, women, immigrants, POWs, and just social decency in general, what the F good is religion?

    Read More
    • Replies: @kihowi
    Josh Gold, huh.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    It's funny to remember that during the McCain kerfuffle some smart pundits said Trump had jumped the shark. They didn't realize Trump's honesty was part of his appeal.

    Trump grew up hearing about war heroes who kicked ass, like Audie Murphy. Vietnam had them too, men like Roy Benavidez. McCain wasn't that kind of war hero: he wasn't a hero for kicking ass; he was a war hero for stoically getting his ass kicked.

    And McCain used the coin of that suffering to repeatedly try to screw over the Republican base. It was great to see Trump take him down a peg.

    Trump performed a similar service with the Bushes. Before Trump, a Republican couldn't come out and say W. was a complete disaster. You had to qualify the disaster in Iraq by saying, "at least he kept us safe". Trump heard Jeb say that and reminded him that W. was president during the civilian version of Pearl Harbor.

    Trump has been the enema the GOP needed. He didn't just beat Jeb, Rubio, and Cruz. He exposed them. None of them has a shot at running for POTUS again. They probably won't even try.
    , @MEH 0910
    Josh Gold, just like Tiny/Sick Duck, next time go for Oscar Gold.
    , @Perplexed
    This election is about nationalists versus globalists. Everything else is a sideshow, a diversion, deck chairs on the Titanic.

    Get it?
    , @Anonymous
    Uh, excuse me-- that's "Megyn." With a Y.
    , @Jack D
    Hillary, Bill and Bernie are not exactly moral paragons or war heroes either. Cruz was supposed to be the candidate of the Holy Rollers anyway - Trump has never claimed to be an evangelical or to have lived a perfect life.

    Or is the charge "hypocrisy" because evangelicals don't require Trump to live up to their religious or moral standards? Liberals can never be accused of hypocrisy because they don't HAVE any religious or moral standards to violate. How convenient. If you are a gay Democrat Congressman and your paid boyfriend runs a male prostitution service out of your apartment, it's OK, because you are open about it.
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  5. @Anonymous
    Conservatives have shown what they are about.

    They ended up supportingTrump as a 5X draft dodger (no problem), a 2X divorced guy (no problem), an adulterer who publicly revelled in it (no problem), a woman hater against Fiorino and Megan Kelly (no problem for the religious types), and a man who hates POWs (McCain), hispanics, immigrants and muslims. In the words of Arnold Schwarzenegger, no problemo.

    What do these so-called religious people really stand for? Really, it all sounds so impressive on TV but really there is no there, there.

    Trump's achievement was to expose the religious right's thinness of belief and use them to his advantage. It all reminds me of the 1930s and the limited opposition from religious groups to he who shall not be named.

    Frank Rich said it best a few years ago in the Times when he said the culture wars were over: the right was pious, except when it comes to important matters, like watching TV.

    But if they don't stand up for their values in marriage, against bullying at minorities, women, immigrants, POWs, and just social decency in general, what the F good is religion?

    Josh Gold, huh.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rifleman
    Yeah I know.

    I think he's one of the local trolls who makes one or more comments under one fake name, leaves and finds another.

    He's either a true liberal or an anti-liberal putting up a cartoon version of a liberal. Hard to distinguish the two.

    , @PistolPete
    Josh (((Gold))). Every time...
    , @Olorin
    Comparing Trump voters to pumpkins?

    Aren't these large orange squashes descended from Native Mesoamerican cucurbits?

    This should qualify at least as a microaggression.
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  6. @Steve Sailer
    I found that picture on a search for Richard Johnson, but I can't tell from the context if that's the Vice President's mistress or a generic picture.

    “I found that picture on a search for Richard Johnson, but I can’t tell from the context if that’s the Vice President’s mistress or a generic picture.”

    There is a Puerto Rican guy named Frank Sweet, who used to be the moderator of a discussion board called The Study Of Racialism. He once posted the results of his DNA ancestry from 23AndMe, which said he is 13 percent Sub Saharan African, which basically makes him an Octoroon. Phenotype wise he would be passable as White if he lived in the South during Jim Crow. He could have avoided anti-Black racial discrimination if he lived in that part of the country during that era.

    Read More
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  7. 9 reminds me of Charles manson

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    In the late Umberto Eco's "Foucault's Pendulum," the various Hollow Earth theories are portrayed as the craziest of all the New Age ideas. Various Nazi muckety-mucks were into Hollow Earth lunacy, and I suspect Eco, a patriotic Italian, couldn't forgive the Germans for luring the Italians into WW2.
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  8. Isn’t it supposed to sound like “bumpkin”?

    I always see it used by snotty NRO types so I assumed that was it.

    Although, funnily, Nate Silver found the median household income of Trump supporters to be quite high:

    https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-mythology-of-trumps-working-class-support/

    I guess we are bumpkins in spirit if not income

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    Or munchkin, maybe? -kin has a diminutive feel to it, but I can't think of many good examples.
    , @Marcus
    My favorite is Kevin Williamson: the Amarillo Armadillo Snob
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  9. I thought Trumpkins was an insult comparing Trump’s supporters to the Munchkins with Trump being the Wizard of OZ.

    I first heard it from the National Review crowd.

    They are very witty, people respect them!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Late last yr, George Will especially used it and really relished applying that word to Trump. Obviously its a play on "bumpkins".

    Just heard that Kasich dropped out too. Anyone know if that's true, or if he's just gonna follow Trump around til Cleveland, all the while claiming he's still in the race.
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  10. @kihowi
    Josh Gold, huh.

    Yeah I know.

    I think he’s one of the local trolls who makes one or more comments under one fake name, leaves and finds another.

    He’s either a true liberal or an anti-liberal putting up a cartoon version of a liberal. Hard to distinguish the two.

    Read More
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  11. @Josh
    9 reminds me of Charles manson

    In the late Umberto Eco’s “Foucault’s Pendulum,” the various Hollow Earth theories are portrayed as the craziest of all the New Age ideas. Various Nazi muckety-mucks were into Hollow Earth lunacy, and I suspect Eco, a patriotic Italian, couldn’t forgive the Germans for luring the Italians into WW2.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Hollow Earth was also an element in Thomas Pynchon's Against The Day (which is not worth reading, in case you were wondering).
    , @meh

    In the late Umberto Eco’s “Foucault’s Pendulum,” the various Hollow Earth theories are portrayed as the craziest of all the New Age ideas. Various Nazi muckety-mucks were into Hollow Earth lunacy, and I suspect Eco, a patriotic Italian, couldn’t forgive the Germans for luring the Italians into WW2.
     
    If that was Eco's actual view of the matter, he was an idiot; Eco wasn't an idiot, so I "suspect" that you aren't understanding Eco here. The Germans did not "lure" the Italians into WW2. Mussolini happily jumped in, against Hitler's wishes, when he thought the war was safely won and almost over. Germany had to keep rescuing Italy from Mussolini's blunders in the Balkans and in North Africa. Without those diversions Germany would have had a much better concentration of forces on the eastern front. Germany most certainly did not "lure" Italy into the war.
    , @cwhatfuture
    Mussolini wanted war but his people certainly did not. Of course the war was a gigantic mistake for Italy, a horrible what could have been. Instead of getting rich selling to the Germans and the Allies, like the Swiss, they were utterly impoverished, bombed by the Allies, fought over by both sides, and terrorized by the Germans after they switched sides. And worst of all, they lost Libya, a giant pool of oil. Unlike the other Arab states, Libya then had a very small Arab/Muslim population, under a million and it was dropping due to the harsh fascist rule. Italy could have easily colonized it and they were on their way to colonizing it. Italy had a high birth rate then and Mussolini was determined to keep it high. Libya today could be European, instead of Italy becoming African. What might have been.
    , @Josh
    Youbprobably know this, being a good so cal boy, but Manson and the kids ended up in dune buggies out in Death Valley looking for the secret tunnels that would let them hide out during the helter skelter race apocalypse.
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  12. @Anonymous
    Conservatives have shown what they are about.

    They ended up supportingTrump as a 5X draft dodger (no problem), a 2X divorced guy (no problem), an adulterer who publicly revelled in it (no problem), a woman hater against Fiorino and Megan Kelly (no problem for the religious types), and a man who hates POWs (McCain), hispanics, immigrants and muslims. In the words of Arnold Schwarzenegger, no problemo.

    What do these so-called religious people really stand for? Really, it all sounds so impressive on TV but really there is no there, there.

    Trump's achievement was to expose the religious right's thinness of belief and use them to his advantage. It all reminds me of the 1930s and the limited opposition from religious groups to he who shall not be named.

    Frank Rich said it best a few years ago in the Times when he said the culture wars were over: the right was pious, except when it comes to important matters, like watching TV.

    But if they don't stand up for their values in marriage, against bullying at minorities, women, immigrants, POWs, and just social decency in general, what the F good is religion?

    It’s funny to remember that during the McCain kerfuffle some smart pundits said Trump had jumped the shark. They didn’t realize Trump’s honesty was part of his appeal.

    Trump grew up hearing about war heroes who kicked ass, like Audie Murphy. Vietnam had them too, men like Roy Benavidez. McCain wasn’t that kind of war hero: he wasn’t a hero for kicking ass; he was a war hero for stoically getting his ass kicked.

    And McCain used the coin of that suffering to repeatedly try to screw over the Republican base. It was great to see Trump take him down a peg.

    Trump performed a similar service with the Bushes. Before Trump, a Republican couldn’t come out and say W. was a complete disaster. You had to qualify the disaster in Iraq by saying, “at least he kept us safe”. Trump heard Jeb say that and reminded him that W. was president during the civilian version of Pearl Harbor.

    Trump has been the enema the GOP needed. He didn’t just beat Jeb, Rubio, and Cruz. He exposed them. None of them has a shot at running for POTUS again. They probably won’t even try.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PistolPete
    And for that I am grateful. The Bush Republican party can be discarded to the ash bin of history, once and for all. Good riddance...
    , @I, Libertine
    McCain, one of the worst pilots our armed services ever produced, totaled five aircraft before the NVA saved the U.S. taxpayers millions by taking him captive. If his father hadn't been CINCPAC, . . . .

    Everyone I know of who used a Viet Nam Vet Card as a means to seek public office was a phoney (see also, e.g., Kerry, John; Blumenthal, Richard; Harkin, Thomas). Real combat vets don't brag about it.

    Trump's self-praise about his quasi-military experience as a preppy is amusing, but at least it's not a lie.


    Edit during the five minutes: Well, Bob Kerrey lost a leg. Exception that proves the rule?

    , @Anonymous
    McCain and other vets and soldiers ultimately aren't respected and honored by many Americans because of real or perceived heroic exploits. They're respected and honored simply for serving in combat and risking their lives. Whether you like or not, there is a significant sub-culture in America that reveres and honors military service for its own sake, not for Hollywood style popularized accounts of combat. Trump is from New York City and not from this sub-culture, and seems to be a physical coward compared to someone like McCain.

    What has happened is that the GOP now includes two larger factions that had previously been politically divided. It includes traditional conservatives and Repulblicans who have always voted GOP, and now includes traditional Democrats that were the Democratic base until the 60s and 70s. Up until now, the style and culture of the traditional Republicans have persisted simply because they were there first in the GOP, but this may change as a result of the greater demographic and cultural influence of traditional Democrats from the more populous East and the their brasher nature.
    , @The Millennial Falcon
    "The enema of my friend is my enemy" - National Review
    , @Ed
    Disagree, Cruz is 45, that's 25 years younger than Trump & Clinton. He has a bright future ahead of him but he may want to learn how to make some friends or reliable allies if he wants to be president.
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  13. Glenn Beck dipped his face in crushed cheetos and than said now I know what it is like to look like orange skin Donald Trump. Maybe he is looking to get into stand up comedy once his Blaze company goes under.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pericles
    Seems more like he's in the Britney Spears head shaving phase.
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  14. 5371 says:

    [Rumpsey dumpsey, rumpsey dumpsey
    Colonel Johnson killed Tecumseh!

    ... this slogan, never surpassed for electioneering imbecility]

    Run close, though, by the Republicans who paraded down Broadway in 1884, making a deep impression on Lord Bryce, author of the famous book on American democracy by singing,

    Blaine, Blaine, James G. Blaine,
    We don’t care a – (sic) for the rain,
    O-O-O-HI-O!

    Read More
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  15. @Steve Sailer
    In the late Umberto Eco's "Foucault's Pendulum," the various Hollow Earth theories are portrayed as the craziest of all the New Age ideas. Various Nazi muckety-mucks were into Hollow Earth lunacy, and I suspect Eco, a patriotic Italian, couldn't forgive the Germans for luring the Italians into WW2.

    Hollow Earth was also an element in Thomas Pynchon’s Against The Day (which is not worth reading, in case you were wondering).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Winthorp
    That was the recent Pynchon I was most interested in - you may have just saved me a few weeks. If you've got a moment and want to elaborate I'd be interested to hear what went wrong.
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  16. meh says:
    @Steve Sailer
    In the late Umberto Eco's "Foucault's Pendulum," the various Hollow Earth theories are portrayed as the craziest of all the New Age ideas. Various Nazi muckety-mucks were into Hollow Earth lunacy, and I suspect Eco, a patriotic Italian, couldn't forgive the Germans for luring the Italians into WW2.

    In the late Umberto Eco’s “Foucault’s Pendulum,” the various Hollow Earth theories are portrayed as the craziest of all the New Age ideas. Various Nazi muckety-mucks were into Hollow Earth lunacy, and I suspect Eco, a patriotic Italian, couldn’t forgive the Germans for luring the Italians into WW2.

    If that was Eco’s actual view of the matter, he was an idiot; Eco wasn’t an idiot, so I “suspect” that you aren’t understanding Eco here. The Germans did not “lure” the Italians into WW2. Mussolini happily jumped in, against Hitler’s wishes, when he thought the war was safely won and almost over. Germany had to keep rescuing Italy from Mussolini’s blunders in the Balkans and in North Africa. Without those diversions Germany would have had a much better concentration of forces on the eastern front. Germany most certainly did not “lure” Italy into the war.

    Read More
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  17. I’m embarrassed to admit I know this. trumpkin refers to “blumpkin,” a neologism invented by some radio shock jock that describes receiving oral sex while taking a dump. Trumpkin is a cutesy way to allude to something disgusting while not actually saying it, much like Anderson Cooper’s favourite phrase: teabagger.

    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=blumpkin

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  18. Trumpkin the dwarf is a character in C S Lewis’s Chronicles of Narnia series.

    He is a cranky dwarf, but ultimately a good dwarf.

    Read More
    • Replies: @CJ

    Trumpkin the dwarf is a character in C S Lewis’s Chronicles of Narnia series.
     
    Thank you. Now I remember he was played by Peter Dinklage in Prince Caspian. I knew I had seen or heard it before.
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  19. Re- Trumpkins…..all roads lead back to Rupert Pupkin
    Honestly, when I see it on Twitter it just reinforces that the left/cucks have zero sense of humor. And yet I don’t pity them.

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  20. To get superstitious, Richard Johnson is responsible for the Tecumseh Curse that killed every President elected in a year ending in 0 until Reagan. He also made having a VP named Johnson very bad luck.

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  21. I’ve thought since the 1980s that Trump is pretty much the perfect surname to turn into a brand name–so good that I had to remind myself that the actual Trump Tower or whatever wasn’t as good as the name made you think it must be.

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  22. Trumpkin is absolutely meant as an insult. In recent months I have been called all various things for saying that Trump is popular because of immigration, Muslims and other such PC unmentionables. A lot of these people claiming to be conservatives behave no different to the SJW on the left, they claim to be all polite and smart but they hurl their insults endlessly whenever I politely question their political stances, the loyalists of the Conservatism inc. movement (I mean the true believers of the pundits) are the worst of them all, even worse than the SJW type.

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  23. @Steve Sailer
    I found that picture on a search for Richard Johnson, but I can't tell from the context if that's the Vice President's mistress or a generic picture.

    All this Richard Johnson talk should remind all Americans that if it wasn’t for the Kentucky militia you guys would all be singing O Canada.

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  24. @RamonaQ
    Isn't it supposed to sound like "bumpkin"?

    I always see it used by snotty NRO types so I assumed that was it.

    Although, funnily, Nate Silver found the median household income of Trump supporters to be quite high:

    https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-mythology-of-trumps-working-class-support/

    I guess we are bumpkins in spirit if not income

    Or munchkin, maybe? -kin has a diminutive feel to it, but I can’t think of many good examples.

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  25. Trumpkin is also the name of the good Red Dwarf from C. S. Lewis’s Chronicles of Narnia, appearing in three of the books, but mainly as Prince Caspian’s loyal lieutenant, described as “practical and skeptical”.

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  26. I guess “trumpkin” is what was left at the bottom of the barrel after “hateful”, “racist”, “bigot”, “stupid” etc. didn’t work.

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  27. “Trumpster” is also meant as an insult by some NeverTrump people. It’s even used by Limbaugh, a Cruz supporter. It’s a reference to dumpster.

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  28. Pretty sure trumpkin is derived from “otherkin”. Otherkin are people who identify as partially or entirely non-human.

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  29. Steve , check this interview with the demsrrealracist guy. He’s smart, I wonder if he’s a reader of yours? Highly likely..

    http://dailycaller.com/2016/05/03/the-man-behind-the-hilarious-conservative-pundit-parody-account-speaks-out/

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  30. Trump is actually nothing more than the translation of Drumpf. Drumpf itself being the southern German pronunciation of the word Trumpf..

    It just shows Oliver’s Germanophobia, that he thinks to poke fun at this. He should be locked up for hate speech. Cause that’s what we do these days, right?

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  31. @kihowi
    Josh Gold, huh.

    Josh (((Gold))). Every time…

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  32. @Dave Pinsen
    It's funny to remember that during the McCain kerfuffle some smart pundits said Trump had jumped the shark. They didn't realize Trump's honesty was part of his appeal.

    Trump grew up hearing about war heroes who kicked ass, like Audie Murphy. Vietnam had them too, men like Roy Benavidez. McCain wasn't that kind of war hero: he wasn't a hero for kicking ass; he was a war hero for stoically getting his ass kicked.

    And McCain used the coin of that suffering to repeatedly try to screw over the Republican base. It was great to see Trump take him down a peg.

    Trump performed a similar service with the Bushes. Before Trump, a Republican couldn't come out and say W. was a complete disaster. You had to qualify the disaster in Iraq by saying, "at least he kept us safe". Trump heard Jeb say that and reminded him that W. was president during the civilian version of Pearl Harbor.

    Trump has been the enema the GOP needed. He didn't just beat Jeb, Rubio, and Cruz. He exposed them. None of them has a shot at running for POTUS again. They probably won't even try.

    And for that I am grateful. The Bush Republican party can be discarded to the ash bin of history, once and for all. Good riddance…

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  33. @Anonymous
    Conservatives have shown what they are about.

    They ended up supportingTrump as a 5X draft dodger (no problem), a 2X divorced guy (no problem), an adulterer who publicly revelled in it (no problem), a woman hater against Fiorino and Megan Kelly (no problem for the religious types), and a man who hates POWs (McCain), hispanics, immigrants and muslims. In the words of Arnold Schwarzenegger, no problemo.

    What do these so-called religious people really stand for? Really, it all sounds so impressive on TV but really there is no there, there.

    Trump's achievement was to expose the religious right's thinness of belief and use them to his advantage. It all reminds me of the 1930s and the limited opposition from religious groups to he who shall not be named.

    Frank Rich said it best a few years ago in the Times when he said the culture wars were over: the right was pious, except when it comes to important matters, like watching TV.

    But if they don't stand up for their values in marriage, against bullying at minorities, women, immigrants, POWs, and just social decency in general, what the F good is religion?

    Josh Gold, just like Tiny/Sick Duck, next time go for Oscar Gold.

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  34. I thought Trumpkins was a portmanteau of Bumpkins and Trump.

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  35. @Anonymous
    Conservatives have shown what they are about.

    They ended up supportingTrump as a 5X draft dodger (no problem), a 2X divorced guy (no problem), an adulterer who publicly revelled in it (no problem), a woman hater against Fiorino and Megan Kelly (no problem for the religious types), and a man who hates POWs (McCain), hispanics, immigrants and muslims. In the words of Arnold Schwarzenegger, no problemo.

    What do these so-called religious people really stand for? Really, it all sounds so impressive on TV but really there is no there, there.

    Trump's achievement was to expose the religious right's thinness of belief and use them to his advantage. It all reminds me of the 1930s and the limited opposition from religious groups to he who shall not be named.

    Frank Rich said it best a few years ago in the Times when he said the culture wars were over: the right was pious, except when it comes to important matters, like watching TV.

    But if they don't stand up for their values in marriage, against bullying at minorities, women, immigrants, POWs, and just social decency in general, what the F good is religion?

    This election is about nationalists versus globalists. Everything else is a sideshow, a diversion, deck chairs on the Titanic.

    Get it?

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  36. @Dave Pinsen
    It's funny to remember that during the McCain kerfuffle some smart pundits said Trump had jumped the shark. They didn't realize Trump's honesty was part of his appeal.

    Trump grew up hearing about war heroes who kicked ass, like Audie Murphy. Vietnam had them too, men like Roy Benavidez. McCain wasn't that kind of war hero: he wasn't a hero for kicking ass; he was a war hero for stoically getting his ass kicked.

    And McCain used the coin of that suffering to repeatedly try to screw over the Republican base. It was great to see Trump take him down a peg.

    Trump performed a similar service with the Bushes. Before Trump, a Republican couldn't come out and say W. was a complete disaster. You had to qualify the disaster in Iraq by saying, "at least he kept us safe". Trump heard Jeb say that and reminded him that W. was president during the civilian version of Pearl Harbor.

    Trump has been the enema the GOP needed. He didn't just beat Jeb, Rubio, and Cruz. He exposed them. None of them has a shot at running for POTUS again. They probably won't even try.

    McCain, one of the worst pilots our armed services ever produced, totaled five aircraft before the NVA saved the U.S. taxpayers millions by taking him captive. If his father hadn’t been CINCPAC, . . . .

    Everyone I know of who used a Viet Nam Vet Card as a means to seek public office was a phoney (see also, e.g., Kerry, John; Blumenthal, Richard; Harkin, Thomas). Real combat vets don’t brag about it.

    Trump’s self-praise about his quasi-military experience as a preppy is amusing, but at least it’s not a lie.

    Edit during the five minutes: Well, Bob Kerrey lost a leg. Exception that proves the rule?

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    • Replies: @Daniel H
    >>Everyone I know of who used a Viet Nam Vet Card as a means to seek public office was a phoney (see also, e.g., Kerry,

    I don't think Kerry was a phony at all. I disagree with him on most things but he served honorably, with hard, dangerous service pacifying the Mekong Delta. He didn't shirk his duty. The Swift Boaters, and the Bush campaign, were the phonies.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    There's also Jim Webb.
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  37. Trumpkin is an obvious play on bumpkin, a rural rube from the Dutch word bommekijn.

    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=bumpkin

    But Trumpkin also rhymes with pumpkin a term of endearment for both men and women and shares an ending syllable with catkin which are the drooping pollen rich, often hairy, male flowers of trees like the mulberry.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catkin

    And next to “schweddy balls” who does not love “pumpkin balls/testicles”

    https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=pumpkin+testicle

    Trump also rhymes with hump and sounds somewhat similar to shtup/’shtuhp, the Yiddish euphemism for “to f*ck with enthusiasm” or the German word for “to nudge” And when it comes to giving someone who deserves it a “nudge”, The Donald is a “sh*tlord” extraordinaire.

    Trump is a fertile alpha male who has both a priapic name, personality and image. Not to mention a love for building towers of priapic glory.

    So while “Trumpkins” does rhyme with bumpkin is it really suppose to be an insult???

    I say bring it on, I’d be proud to be known as a TRUMPKIN!!!

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    • Agree: Kylie
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  38. C’mon, Steve, Trumpkin is clearly a play on bumpkin, not pumpkin.

    Anyways, cheers to your fundraising drive.

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  39. Trumpkin is I think an attempted rework of conservakin, by Cruz supporters. The boys at 4chan, 8chan, basically the alternate right internet coined conservakin which is based on otherkin (look it up if you honestly want to), basically more extreme furries (people who dress up as animals and form communities of like minded enthusiasts, for fetish reasons) so it is calling them people who bedeck themselves in conservativism while embracing cucky policies. Basically they engage in political pageantry but lack substance, in that they don’t stand up for their homeland. I think Cruz supporters just assumed -kin was a suffix for supporter and tried to make it work, it doesn’t. Basically conservakin was in the same mold as cuckservative, but Cruz supporters just missed the point.

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    • Replies: @Renault
    This is it.

    Any of you familiar with the Alt Right or with /pol/ should know that this is the real explanation/background for Trumpkin. Everyone else is looking way to deep into this.
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  40. To answer the question, the suffix “kin” in Germanic languages such as English implies similarity and/or relationship to whatever the stem of the word describes. It has a diminutive connotation. A [blank]kin is a little relative or example of [blank] or of a [blank]. So, a ‘bodkin” was once a small knife. “Jenkins” are the offspring of “Jen,” an alternative form of “John.” Harkin, whom I mention above, is an offspring of whoever “Har” was. It leached into Middle French as “quin,” with a pejorative sense.” Thus, a mannequin is something like, but not really, a man.

    Thus, a Trumpkin is . . . .

    Word derivation is one of my hobbykins.

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  41. It’s hard to tell the source of “Trumpkin,” but it reminds me of poster “Dominique Francon Society” aka “The Priss Factory,” who has been known on occasion to attach the “kin” suffix to various words purely for laughs. The one that comes to mind is “dotkin.” When another poster (Wizard of Oz) inquired what the word meant, DFS merely posted a link to a picture of a Hindu man with a bright red dot on his forehead, which caused me to laugh out loud. If DFS is the source of “Trumpkin,” then I am sure there is nothing deeper than an attempt to extract a good laugh.

    With re to Josh Gold’s reference to John McCain as “a man who hates POWs (McCain),” I would merely point out that Trump did not express any “hate” for McCain but merely questioned his status as a “war hero” simply because he had been a POW for 5 years. When I first started posting on unz.com on a regular basis last July, the publisher of unz.com, Ron Unz, had a fine, long running piece on the front page written by him in which he excoriated McCain as “Tokyo Rose.” Anybody who has bothered to read the interview of McCain in U.S. News back in 1973 a few months after his release by North Vietnam and compared that account with the phony Silver Star citation accompanying McCain’s Silver Star must recognize the total inconsistency of the two accounts. By his own words, McCain admitted to a violation of the military code by giving the NV military information in exchange for medical treatment. I have previously suggested that one of the first things President Trump should do is have the Pentagon release the files pertaining to McCain’s debriefing following his release by the NV. Those Vietnam vets who were on McCain’s case from the beginning deserve a belated round of applause for their efforts in exposing a phony.

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    • Replies: @tbraton
    Getting down to basics, I would note that my American Heritage dictionary has a listing of "-kin," which it defines as "Indicates small or diminutive; for example, bodkin, lambkin." Adding "-kin" to a word places an emphasis on the smaller version of the principle word being modified. That may or may not be derogatory, depending on the circumstances.

    Last August, just when Trump's candidacy was starting to take off following the beginning of the Republican primaries, there were several terms clearly meant to be derogatory competing in the attempt to marginalize Trump's supporters. One such term was "Trumpsters," with its obvious similarity in sound to "Dumpsters." Then there was the term that George Will clearly favored: "Trumpites." Here is what Will was saying last August in an early attempt to derail Trump: " “Marginalizing Trump” carries no risk of “alienating a substantial Republican cohort,” Will assures us, for these “Trumpites” are neither Republicans nor conservatives. Better off without such trash." " Compared to "Trumpsters" and "Trumpites," "Trumpkin" hardly carries any insulting heft. The fact that the insulting nature of "Trumpkin" is being debated on this thread would seem to argue that "Trumpkin" is not exactly a heavyweight term of derision.

    I earlier alluded to the practice of Dominique Francon Society of adding "-kin" as a suffix to various words in a humorous attempt to take a light jibe at someone, sort of like a kinder, gentler Don Rickles.

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  42. @Steve Sailer
    In the late Umberto Eco's "Foucault's Pendulum," the various Hollow Earth theories are portrayed as the craziest of all the New Age ideas. Various Nazi muckety-mucks were into Hollow Earth lunacy, and I suspect Eco, a patriotic Italian, couldn't forgive the Germans for luring the Italians into WW2.

    Mussolini wanted war but his people certainly did not. Of course the war was a gigantic mistake for Italy, a horrible what could have been. Instead of getting rich selling to the Germans and the Allies, like the Swiss, they were utterly impoverished, bombed by the Allies, fought over by both sides, and terrorized by the Germans after they switched sides. And worst of all, they lost Libya, a giant pool of oil. Unlike the other Arab states, Libya then had a very small Arab/Muslim population, under a million and it was dropping due to the harsh fascist rule. Italy could have easily colonized it and they were on their way to colonizing it. Italy had a high birth rate then and Mussolini was determined to keep it high. Libya today could be European, instead of Italy becoming African. What might have been.

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    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
    To see what it would have been like, just look next door to France. Unlike Italy, they kept their colony of Algeria, the Muslim population of which has dwindled away. And France has managed to keep out all the African migrants.
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  43. That’s nothing. There’s a gang of folks up here in Canada who call me and my friends “the free speechers” and mean it as an insult. I’m very serious and so are they.

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    • Replies: @Jack D
    I have heard Canadians explain that "free speech" is an American concept and constitutional mandate that is not compatible with Canadian values or law. Ergo, under Canadian law you are free to have Human Right Panels who have the right to punish hate speech, even if it is unconnected to threats of imminent action (as required under US law). The prevention of racial hatred is more important than the value of free speech, which is not absolute as it is in the US.

    What they are missing is that the Bill of Rights was not something that the American Founding Fathers made up out of thin air but that it was meant to be a codification of the common law rights that all free Englishmen (and by extension Canadians) have possessed since the time of the Magna Carta.

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  44. Priss Factor [AKA "Polly Perkins"] says:

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  45. Is Trump the Cowardly Lion?

    The Scarecrow?

    The Tinman?

    The Wizard?

    Hillary has to be the witch.

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    • Replies: @Winthorp
    All I know for sure is that he built the yellow brick road and got it done ahead of schedule and under budget.
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  46. Priss Factor [AKA "Polly Perkins"] says:

    Drudge, a fruitkin Trumpkin.

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  47. “Trumpkins”??? Wouldn’t “Trumpen Proletariat” be more apt anyway?

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  48. A lotta Beltway folks gettin’ agitated that regular unwashed people have gotten interested in politics again… But 8 years ago it was cool. What changed?

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  49. Dick Johnson is obviously a fantastic name, and being a Colonel Dick Johnson is even better.

    He should have been elected president for his name alone, and as president, he should never have been addressed or referred to as President Johnson but exclusively as Colonel Dick Johnson.

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  50. @Anonymous
    Conservatives have shown what they are about.

    They ended up supportingTrump as a 5X draft dodger (no problem), a 2X divorced guy (no problem), an adulterer who publicly revelled in it (no problem), a woman hater against Fiorino and Megan Kelly (no problem for the religious types), and a man who hates POWs (McCain), hispanics, immigrants and muslims. In the words of Arnold Schwarzenegger, no problemo.

    What do these so-called religious people really stand for? Really, it all sounds so impressive on TV but really there is no there, there.

    Trump's achievement was to expose the religious right's thinness of belief and use them to his advantage. It all reminds me of the 1930s and the limited opposition from religious groups to he who shall not be named.

    Frank Rich said it best a few years ago in the Times when he said the culture wars were over: the right was pious, except when it comes to important matters, like watching TV.

    But if they don't stand up for their values in marriage, against bullying at minorities, women, immigrants, POWs, and just social decency in general, what the F good is religion?

    Uh, excuse me– that’s “Megyn.” With a Y.

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  51. @RamonaQ
    Isn't it supposed to sound like "bumpkin"?

    I always see it used by snotty NRO types so I assumed that was it.

    Although, funnily, Nate Silver found the median household income of Trump supporters to be quite high:

    https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-mythology-of-trumps-working-class-support/

    I guess we are bumpkins in spirit if not income

    My favorite is Kevin Williamson: the Amarillo Armadillo Snob

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    • Replies: @Priss Factor
    Breaking-Bald-Head-lookalike-fool.
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  52. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    It's funny to remember that during the McCain kerfuffle some smart pundits said Trump had jumped the shark. They didn't realize Trump's honesty was part of his appeal.

    Trump grew up hearing about war heroes who kicked ass, like Audie Murphy. Vietnam had them too, men like Roy Benavidez. McCain wasn't that kind of war hero: he wasn't a hero for kicking ass; he was a war hero for stoically getting his ass kicked.

    And McCain used the coin of that suffering to repeatedly try to screw over the Republican base. It was great to see Trump take him down a peg.

    Trump performed a similar service with the Bushes. Before Trump, a Republican couldn't come out and say W. was a complete disaster. You had to qualify the disaster in Iraq by saying, "at least he kept us safe". Trump heard Jeb say that and reminded him that W. was president during the civilian version of Pearl Harbor.

    Trump has been the enema the GOP needed. He didn't just beat Jeb, Rubio, and Cruz. He exposed them. None of them has a shot at running for POTUS again. They probably won't even try.

    McCain and other vets and soldiers ultimately aren’t respected and honored by many Americans because of real or perceived heroic exploits. They’re respected and honored simply for serving in combat and risking their lives. Whether you like or not, there is a significant sub-culture in America that reveres and honors military service for its own sake, not for Hollywood style popularized accounts of combat. Trump is from New York City and not from this sub-culture, and seems to be a physical coward compared to someone like McCain.

    What has happened is that the GOP now includes two larger factions that had previously been politically divided. It includes traditional conservatives and Repulblicans who have always voted GOP, and now includes traditional Democrats that were the Democratic base until the 60s and 70s. Up until now, the style and culture of the traditional Republicans have persisted simply because they were there first in the GOP, but this may change as a result of the greater demographic and cultural influence of traditional Democrats from the more populous East and the their brasher nature.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I was trying to remember where I'd heard one particularly bad-faith variation of your argument before -- "respect da military just cuz" -- then remembered Georgia Senator Max Cleland's 2002 re-election campaign. In 1968 Cleland became a paraplegic in addition to losing an arm during combat. Technically speaking he caused it himself by picking up a live grenade that was not properly bent or taped by some other screw-up on the chopper. So this falls somewhere between gallantry and bad luck but only because Cleland was already putting himself at risk as a soldier. If a faulty grain thresher or mall escalator took off one of my limbs I doubt I could parlay it into a political career, yet that is precisely what Cleland did, beginning in the late 70s (aided greatly by the pro-Viet Cong media and the Zeitgeist & a fellow good ol' boy in the White House). Many decades later the Georgia electorate would be scolded by prep-school political consultants that it was their duty to vote for Cleland apparently forever, because of "his service to his country in the Vietnam War" (also the opponent, some sad sack who's not important, had not been in the 'Nam which therefore rendered him less qualified to design beet-sugar subsidies or whatever U.S. Senators do all day).

    Even though Georgia is a very pro-military locale of the world-view you describe despite not being especially blessed with old blueblood Republican WASP virtues you've alluded to, Cleland lost because that dog just wouldn't hunt any more. It was like Homer Simpson trying to coast on the fad popularity obtained from his perfect bowling game in perpetuity. The funny thing is even Cleland had a better claim to everlasting warrior prestige than McCain, who is still around AND more out of tune with/contemptuous of his own constituents. I chalk that up to the enduring style & culture of the traditional Stupid Party.

    , @Dave Pinsen

    McCain and other vets and soldiers ultimately aren’t respected and honored by many Americans because of real or perceived heroic exploits. They’re respected and honored simply for serving in combat and risking their lives.
     
    McCain was respected for his suffering.

    Calling everyone in uniform a hero is a combination of the "everyone gets a participation trophy" ethos and a pendulum swing away from the Vietnam-era disdain for troops. I think it dates back to the first Gulf War. Democrats didn't want to repeat past mistakes, so they made sure to "support the troops". Plus, there was guilt about the absence of a draft.

    Remember that, before the ground war started, there were predictions of thousands of casualties in trench warfare in the Gulf War. I got a free bagel sandwich in the run-up to the invasion, when I went out for lunch during an Army Reserve drill in my uniform. Today, people give up their first class seats for troops in uniform.
    , @jesse helms think-alike
    Oh Please

    I have had several lifetimes worth of being told that the worthless waste of oxygen that is JohnMcCain is a war hero that must be worshipped for his "service" in North Vietnam.


    He deserves a pension and free health care for his service as does any disabled vet, nothing more. He doesnt deserve a Senator for life gig and the right to stab conservatives and firearms owners in the back without criticism in perpetuity.
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  53. @kihowi
    Then there was the period when staunch immigrationphiles stated ridiculing him with "Drumpf", the name of his immigrant ancestor.

    If immigrants were white, democrats would want a wall. It's all tribal.

    His “immigrant ancestor” was his grandfather, who was named Trump from birth. The family name was changed from Drumpf to Trump maybe 400 years ago, but there’s no statute of limitations on the racial crimes of white people. Of course, if you made fun of Barry Soetoro’s name, you would be racis’.

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  54. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Trumpkin the dwarf is a character in C S Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia series.

    He is a cranky dwarf, but ultimately a good dwarf.

    Trumpkin the dwarf is a character in C S Lewis’s Chronicles of Narnia series.

    Thank you. Now I remember he was played by Peter Dinklage in Prince Caspian. I knew I had seen or heard it before.

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  55. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Speaking of winning name changes: Leroy McPherson sounds better if you pronounce it “Newt Gingrich”……

    On the other thread I posited that McPherson would be Drumpf’s pick for VP. But wiki says Leroy is 72 years old.

    So make that Chief of Staff.

    Drumpf’s VP choice is a head scratcher. Maybe another Slovenian!

    If it’s Rubio there will be hell to pay.

    Btw Cruz’s dad was a foreign commie just like Obama’s dad. What a coincidence.

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    • Replies: @JSM
    I vote Duncan Hunter or Tom Tancredo.
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  56. @kihowi
    Then there was the period when staunch immigrationphiles stated ridiculing him with "Drumpf", the name of his immigrant ancestor.

    If immigrants were white, democrats would want a wall. It's all tribal.

    Democrats want votes. If the “white” immigrants were reliable Dem voters, Dems would want them.

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  57. @Anonymous
    Conservatives have shown what they are about.

    They ended up supportingTrump as a 5X draft dodger (no problem), a 2X divorced guy (no problem), an adulterer who publicly revelled in it (no problem), a woman hater against Fiorino and Megan Kelly (no problem for the religious types), and a man who hates POWs (McCain), hispanics, immigrants and muslims. In the words of Arnold Schwarzenegger, no problemo.

    What do these so-called religious people really stand for? Really, it all sounds so impressive on TV but really there is no there, there.

    Trump's achievement was to expose the religious right's thinness of belief and use them to his advantage. It all reminds me of the 1930s and the limited opposition from religious groups to he who shall not be named.

    Frank Rich said it best a few years ago in the Times when he said the culture wars were over: the right was pious, except when it comes to important matters, like watching TV.

    But if they don't stand up for their values in marriage, against bullying at minorities, women, immigrants, POWs, and just social decency in general, what the F good is religion?

    Hillary, Bill and Bernie are not exactly moral paragons or war heroes either. Cruz was supposed to be the candidate of the Holy Rollers anyway – Trump has never claimed to be an evangelical or to have lived a perfect life.

    Or is the charge “hypocrisy” because evangelicals don’t require Trump to live up to their religious or moral standards? Liberals can never be accused of hypocrisy because they don’t HAVE any religious or moral standards to violate. How convenient. If you are a gay Democrat Congressman and your paid boyfriend runs a male prostitution service out of your apartment, it’s OK, because you are open about it.

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  58. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Oh yeah!! Just read that Trump doubled down on Muslim immigration this morning.

    Cucks everywhere slitting their wrists across America!

    There is no meaning in life without surrendering to the Other.

    I believe Drumpf is going to stick it to Barry Soetero in a million different ways.

    Redstate, Blaze, AceOfSpades, etc. they all hate Trump. And their real enemy was never Obama.

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    • Replies: @rod1963
    Redstate, Blaze, AceOfSpades, etc. they all hate Trump. And their real enemy was never Obama.

    Yep, they were phonies on the establishment payroll just like Levin and Limbaugh. I'd also include many of the so-called "foundations". The main job of this crew was to shape rank and file "conservative" opinion and allowing the people to blow off steam harmlessly instead of focusing on the scumbags in office and those who bankroll them.

    They made sure issues like "free trade", "globalization", "neoliberalism" along with the roll of Wall Street and the Chambers of Commerce supporting agendas that were destroying the country were never talked about among other things.

    They fed us a bunch of redmeat social issues involving god, abortion/PP, guns, gays and the evils of Social Security, etc. Stuff meant to distract the people while a select group picked our pockets and consolidated their power and wealth at our expense.
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  59. http://money.cnn.com/2016/05/04/news/economy/america-left-behind-white-men/index.html

    Now that the stakes are higher than ever, watch the establishment rush to pretend to care about non-elite white males.

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    • Replies: @27 year old
    And "we" need to make sure to call them out for their Johnny-come-lately faux concern
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  60. William Henry Harrison was our greatest president. I wish more of them would follow his example.

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    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    What, pass away suddenly of pneumonia after only serving in office for a little over a month, and leaving Mary Tyler Moore's great great whatever it is relative to ascend to the White House?

    The irony is certainly something. An 1812 War hero, runs for President and finally wins on his second time before passing in office.
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  61. @kihowi
    Josh Gold, huh.

    Comparing Trump voters to pumpkins?

    Aren’t these large orange squashes descended from Native Mesoamerican cucurbits?

    This should qualify at least as a microaggression.

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  62. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Trump veep will be Jim Demint. Reading Trump’s comment this a.m. narrows the field:

    “I have the business, let’s call them talents, and I think I’ll probably go the political route,” he continued. “Somebody that can help me with legislation and somebody that can help me get things passed and somebody that’s been friends with the senators and congressmen and all so we don’t have to go the executive order route as much as Obama did, you know, where he can’t get anything approved, so he just keeps signing executive orders.”

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    • Replies: @The Millennial Falcon
    That sounds more like Newt. Which I think would be a mistake - I enjoy Newt's punditry and he's a good communicator but he looks like a troll and he got booted from Congress almost 20 years ago.

    Let your chief of staff help you with legislation. Use your VP to help your campaign.
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  63. Priss Factor [AKA "Polly Perkins"] says:
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    • Replies: @The most deplorable one
    Is that what Aloha Snackbar means?
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  64. @Dave Pinsen
    It's funny to remember that during the McCain kerfuffle some smart pundits said Trump had jumped the shark. They didn't realize Trump's honesty was part of his appeal.

    Trump grew up hearing about war heroes who kicked ass, like Audie Murphy. Vietnam had them too, men like Roy Benavidez. McCain wasn't that kind of war hero: he wasn't a hero for kicking ass; he was a war hero for stoically getting his ass kicked.

    And McCain used the coin of that suffering to repeatedly try to screw over the Republican base. It was great to see Trump take him down a peg.

    Trump performed a similar service with the Bushes. Before Trump, a Republican couldn't come out and say W. was a complete disaster. You had to qualify the disaster in Iraq by saying, "at least he kept us safe". Trump heard Jeb say that and reminded him that W. was president during the civilian version of Pearl Harbor.

    Trump has been the enema the GOP needed. He didn't just beat Jeb, Rubio, and Cruz. He exposed them. None of them has a shot at running for POTUS again. They probably won't even try.

    “The enema of my friend is my enemy” – National Review

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  65. @Anonymous
    Trump veep will be Jim Demint. Reading Trump's comment this a.m. narrows the field:

    “I have the business, let’s call them talents, and I think I’ll probably go the political route,” he continued. “Somebody that can help me with legislation and somebody that can help me get things passed and somebody that’s been friends with the senators and congressmen and all so we don’t have to go the executive order route as much as Obama did, you know, where he can’t get anything approved, so he just keeps signing executive orders.”

    That sounds more like Newt. Which I think would be a mistake – I enjoy Newt’s punditry and he’s a good communicator but he looks like a troll and he got booted from Congress almost 20 years ago.

    Let your chief of staff help you with legislation. Use your VP to help your campaign.

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  66. Slightly older British readers will know of “Trumpton”, a stop-motion children’s TV series from the 60s: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trumpton

    It depicted an idealised, picturesque village. All white of course, though this wouldn’t have been something worth mentioning in the 60s.

    Radiohead parodied it in their new music video, released yesterday:

    The parallels in the Radiohead video are interesting. I mean, the the inhabitants of Trumpton are singing “Burn the Witch” (Hillary?) and killing some sort of government bureaucrat. Who would of thought that Radiohead are pro-Trump!

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I saw that yesterday. It turned out to be yet another boring Radiohead song. Has Radiohead come out with anything new sounding and not boring in 20 years?
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  67. Micharl Medved titters like a third-grader when he says “trumpkins.” I wonder how his ratings are lately.

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  68. Priss Factor [AKA "Polly Perkins"] says:
    @Marcus
    My favorite is Kevin Williamson: the Amarillo Armadillo Snob

    Breaking-Bald-Head-lookalike-fool.

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    • Replies: @anonymous-antiskynetist
    Satanist in a 70s B movie.
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  69. Trumpkin? Is this what they say when they’re thinking “white trash?”

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  70. @I, Libertine
    McCain, one of the worst pilots our armed services ever produced, totaled five aircraft before the NVA saved the U.S. taxpayers millions by taking him captive. If his father hadn't been CINCPAC, . . . .

    Everyone I know of who used a Viet Nam Vet Card as a means to seek public office was a phoney (see also, e.g., Kerry, John; Blumenthal, Richard; Harkin, Thomas). Real combat vets don't brag about it.

    Trump's self-praise about his quasi-military experience as a preppy is amusing, but at least it's not a lie.


    Edit during the five minutes: Well, Bob Kerrey lost a leg. Exception that proves the rule?

    >>Everyone I know of who used a Viet Nam Vet Card as a means to seek public office was a phoney (see also, e.g., Kerry,

    I don’t think Kerry was a phony at all. I disagree with him on most things but he served honorably, with hard, dangerous service pacifying the Mekong Delta. He didn’t shirk his duty. The Swift Boaters, and the Bush campaign, were the phonies.

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    • Replies: @I, Libertine
    No, no, no.

    It's too long a story to debate fully here. Let's consider one little fact. Kerry claims that after he was awarded his third Purple Heart (without ever missing even one day on duty - just three sick call visits) he mentally tortured himself considering two options: supporting his men by staying with them, or supporting them by exercising his right to get out of Viet Nam with his medals, so thath he could demonstrate against the war.

    That's what he says, right? With me so far?

    Getting out of Viet Nam DID NOT get him out of the Navy.
    , @I, Libertine
    No, no, no.

    It's too long a story to debate fully here. Let's consider one little fact. Kerry claims that after he was awarded his third Purple Heart (without ever missing even one day of duty - just three sick call visits) he mentally tortured himself for two weeks considering two options: supporting his men by staying with them, or supporting them by exercising his right to get out of Viet Nam with his medals, so that he could demonstrate against the war, and get his men home.

    That's what he says, right? With me so far?

    Getting out of Viet Nam DID NOT get him out of the Navy. It did not free him to demonstrate against the war. All it got him, as he knew it would, was a safe desk job in Brooklyn for the duration of his term. Oh, and his request to get out of the fire zone arrived at the Pentagon within three days of the award of his last medal, while he was supposedly making this awesome decision.

    So, please. . .

    , @Jim Don Bob
    Wrong. T. Boone Pickens offered a million dollars to anyone who could prove the claims made by the Swift Boat veterans were false. He still has the money.
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  71. @AshTon
    Slightly older British readers will know of "Trumpton", a stop-motion children's TV series from the 60s: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trumpton

    It depicted an idealised, picturesque village. All white of course, though this wouldn't have been something worth mentioning in the 60s.

    Radiohead parodied it in their new music video, released yesterday:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yI2oS2hoL0k

    The parallels in the Radiohead video are interesting. I mean, the the inhabitants of Trumpton are singing "Burn the Witch" (Hillary?) and killing some sort of government bureaucrat. Who would of thought that Radiohead are pro-Trump!

    I saw that yesterday. It turned out to be yet another boring Radiohead song. Has Radiohead come out with anything new sounding and not boring in 20 years?

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Radiohead peaked with The Bends, but hipsters pretend to like their later, experimental b.s.
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  72. @Rifleman
    I thought Trumpkins was an insult comparing Trump's supporters to the Munchkins with Trump being the Wizard of OZ.

    I first heard it from the National Review crowd.

    They are very witty, people respect them!

    Late last yr, George Will especially used it and really relished applying that word to Trump. Obviously its a play on “bumpkins”.

    Just heard that Kasich dropped out too. Anyone know if that’s true, or if he’s just gonna follow Trump around til Cleveland, all the while claiming he’s still in the race.

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  73. @Chris Mallory
    William Henry Harrison was our greatest president. I wish more of them would follow his example.

    What, pass away suddenly of pneumonia after only serving in office for a little over a month, and leaving Mary Tyler Moore’s great great whatever it is relative to ascend to the White House?

    The irony is certainly something. An 1812 War hero, runs for President and finally wins on his second time before passing in office.

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  74. @Kathy Shaidle
    That’s nothing. There’s a gang of folks up here in Canada who call me and my friends “the free speechers” and mean it as an insult. I’m very serious and so are they.

    I have heard Canadians explain that “free speech” is an American concept and constitutional mandate that is not compatible with Canadian values or law. Ergo, under Canadian law you are free to have Human Right Panels who have the right to punish hate speech, even if it is unconnected to threats of imminent action (as required under US law). The prevention of racial hatred is more important than the value of free speech, which is not absolute as it is in the US.

    What they are missing is that the Bill of Rights was not something that the American Founding Fathers made up out of thin air but that it was meant to be a codification of the common law rights that all free Englishmen (and by extension Canadians) have possessed since the time of the Magna Carta.

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    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
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  75. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    McCain and other vets and soldiers ultimately aren't respected and honored by many Americans because of real or perceived heroic exploits. They're respected and honored simply for serving in combat and risking their lives. Whether you like or not, there is a significant sub-culture in America that reveres and honors military service for its own sake, not for Hollywood style popularized accounts of combat. Trump is from New York City and not from this sub-culture, and seems to be a physical coward compared to someone like McCain.

    What has happened is that the GOP now includes two larger factions that had previously been politically divided. It includes traditional conservatives and Repulblicans who have always voted GOP, and now includes traditional Democrats that were the Democratic base until the 60s and 70s. Up until now, the style and culture of the traditional Republicans have persisted simply because they were there first in the GOP, but this may change as a result of the greater demographic and cultural influence of traditional Democrats from the more populous East and the their brasher nature.

    I was trying to remember where I’d heard one particularly bad-faith variation of your argument before — “respect da military just cuz” — then remembered Georgia Senator Max Cleland’s 2002 re-election campaign. In 1968 Cleland became a paraplegic in addition to losing an arm during combat. Technically speaking he caused it himself by picking up a live grenade that was not properly bent or taped by some other screw-up on the chopper. So this falls somewhere between gallantry and bad luck but only because Cleland was already putting himself at risk as a soldier. If a faulty grain thresher or mall escalator took off one of my limbs I doubt I could parlay it into a political career, yet that is precisely what Cleland did, beginning in the late 70s (aided greatly by the pro-Viet Cong media and the Zeitgeist & a fellow good ol’ boy in the White House). Many decades later the Georgia electorate would be scolded by prep-school political consultants that it was their duty to vote for Cleland apparently forever, because of “his service to his country in the Vietnam War” (also the opponent, some sad sack who’s not important, had not been in the ‘Nam which therefore rendered him less qualified to design beet-sugar subsidies or whatever U.S. Senators do all day).

    Even though Georgia is a very pro-military locale of the world-view you describe despite not being especially blessed with old blueblood Republican WASP virtues you’ve alluded to, Cleland lost because that dog just wouldn’t hunt any more. It was like Homer Simpson trying to coast on the fad popularity obtained from his perfect bowling game in perpetuity. The funny thing is even Cleland had a better claim to everlasting warrior prestige than McCain, who is still around AND more out of tune with/contemptuous of his own constituents. I chalk that up to the enduring style & culture of the traditional Stupid Party.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I'm not making any kind of argument for "respecting the military". I'm simply describing a significant sub-culture within the US. You're hardly alone in thinking that these people are just dumb losers.
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  76. @AndrewR
    http://money.cnn.com/2016/05/04/news/economy/america-left-behind-white-men/index.html

    Now that the stakes are higher than ever, watch the establishment rush to pretend to care about non-elite white males.

    And “we” need to make sure to call them out for their Johnny-come-lately faux concern

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  77. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @Priss Factor
    http://www.breitbart.com/big-hollywood/2016/05/02/abcs-quantico-american-terrorist-cell-shout-make-america-great-attack/

    Is that what Aloha Snackbar means?

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  78. @I, Libertine
    McCain, one of the worst pilots our armed services ever produced, totaled five aircraft before the NVA saved the U.S. taxpayers millions by taking him captive. If his father hadn't been CINCPAC, . . . .

    Everyone I know of who used a Viet Nam Vet Card as a means to seek public office was a phoney (see also, e.g., Kerry, John; Blumenthal, Richard; Harkin, Thomas). Real combat vets don't brag about it.

    Trump's self-praise about his quasi-military experience as a preppy is amusing, but at least it's not a lie.


    Edit during the five minutes: Well, Bob Kerrey lost a leg. Exception that proves the rule?

    There’s also Jim Webb.

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  79. @Anonymous
    McCain and other vets and soldiers ultimately aren't respected and honored by many Americans because of real or perceived heroic exploits. They're respected and honored simply for serving in combat and risking their lives. Whether you like or not, there is a significant sub-culture in America that reveres and honors military service for its own sake, not for Hollywood style popularized accounts of combat. Trump is from New York City and not from this sub-culture, and seems to be a physical coward compared to someone like McCain.

    What has happened is that the GOP now includes two larger factions that had previously been politically divided. It includes traditional conservatives and Repulblicans who have always voted GOP, and now includes traditional Democrats that were the Democratic base until the 60s and 70s. Up until now, the style and culture of the traditional Republicans have persisted simply because they were there first in the GOP, but this may change as a result of the greater demographic and cultural influence of traditional Democrats from the more populous East and the their brasher nature.

    McCain and other vets and soldiers ultimately aren’t respected and honored by many Americans because of real or perceived heroic exploits. They’re respected and honored simply for serving in combat and risking their lives.

    McCain was respected for his suffering.

    Calling everyone in uniform a hero is a combination of the “everyone gets a participation trophy” ethos and a pendulum swing away from the Vietnam-era disdain for troops. I think it dates back to the first Gulf War. Democrats didn’t want to repeat past mistakes, so they made sure to “support the troops”. Plus, there was guilt about the absence of a draft.

    Remember that, before the ground war started, there were predictions of thousands of casualties in trench warfare in the Gulf War. I got a free bagel sandwich in the run-up to the invasion, when I went out for lunch during an Army Reserve drill in my uniform. Today, people give up their first class seats for troops in uniform.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Most people don't regard service in combat as analogous to mere participation and don't regard respect for combat service as analogous to the "participation trophy" ethos, especially cultures that honor and revere military service. They just don't, regardless of how you think these people should think. Most people, the silent majority, did not have disdain for the troops in the Vietnam era.
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  80. @Anonymous
    McCain and other vets and soldiers ultimately aren't respected and honored by many Americans because of real or perceived heroic exploits. They're respected and honored simply for serving in combat and risking their lives. Whether you like or not, there is a significant sub-culture in America that reveres and honors military service for its own sake, not for Hollywood style popularized accounts of combat. Trump is from New York City and not from this sub-culture, and seems to be a physical coward compared to someone like McCain.

    What has happened is that the GOP now includes two larger factions that had previously been politically divided. It includes traditional conservatives and Repulblicans who have always voted GOP, and now includes traditional Democrats that were the Democratic base until the 60s and 70s. Up until now, the style and culture of the traditional Republicans have persisted simply because they were there first in the GOP, but this may change as a result of the greater demographic and cultural influence of traditional Democrats from the more populous East and the their brasher nature.

    Oh Please

    I have had several lifetimes worth of being told that the worthless waste of oxygen that is JohnMcCain is a war hero that must be worshipped for his “service” in North Vietnam.

    He deserves a pension and free health care for his service as does any disabled vet, nothing more. He doesnt deserve a Senator for life gig and the right to stab conservatives and firearms owners in the back without criticism in perpetuity.

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  81. I wonder if H.L. Mencken would be a Trump supporter if alive. Watching “Inherit the Wind” the other day and trying to map it onto today’s political fault lines got me thinking.

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  82. @Priss Factor
    Breaking-Bald-Head-lookalike-fool.

    Satanist in a 70s B movie.

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  83. @Dave Pinsen
    It's funny to remember that during the McCain kerfuffle some smart pundits said Trump had jumped the shark. They didn't realize Trump's honesty was part of his appeal.

    Trump grew up hearing about war heroes who kicked ass, like Audie Murphy. Vietnam had them too, men like Roy Benavidez. McCain wasn't that kind of war hero: he wasn't a hero for kicking ass; he was a war hero for stoically getting his ass kicked.

    And McCain used the coin of that suffering to repeatedly try to screw over the Republican base. It was great to see Trump take him down a peg.

    Trump performed a similar service with the Bushes. Before Trump, a Republican couldn't come out and say W. was a complete disaster. You had to qualify the disaster in Iraq by saying, "at least he kept us safe". Trump heard Jeb say that and reminded him that W. was president during the civilian version of Pearl Harbor.

    Trump has been the enema the GOP needed. He didn't just beat Jeb, Rubio, and Cruz. He exposed them. None of them has a shot at running for POTUS again. They probably won't even try.

    Disagree, Cruz is 45, that’s 25 years younger than Trump & Clinton. He has a bright future ahead of him but he may want to learn how to make some friends or reliable allies if he wants to be president.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    He has a future, but not as a POTUS.
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  84. @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin
    Trumpkin is I think an attempted rework of conservakin, by Cruz supporters. The boys at 4chan, 8chan, basically the alternate right internet coined conservakin which is based on otherkin (look it up if you honestly want to), basically more extreme furries (people who dress up as animals and form communities of like minded enthusiasts, for fetish reasons) so it is calling them people who bedeck themselves in conservativism while embracing cucky policies. Basically they engage in political pageantry but lack substance, in that they don't stand up for their homeland. I think Cruz supporters just assumed -kin was a suffix for supporter and tried to make it work, it doesn't. Basically conservakin was in the same mold as cuckservative, but Cruz supporters just missed the point.

    This is it.

    Any of you familiar with the Alt Right or with /pol/ should know that this is the real explanation/background for Trumpkin. Everyone else is looking way to deep into this.

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  85. Sure, Trump voters are bumpkins. Rubes. Hillbilly morons. Meantime if you ask Trump critics if we have a right to enforce existing immigration laws or if you ask them exactly how many tens of millions of people should this country take in as immigrants or if you ask was it good and fair that China devalued its currency 40% before joining the WTO and gutted our manufacturing, or if you ask why are we still in NATO which was designed to protect a poor Europe from a Soviet tank attack when the EU is rich and the Soviet does not exist, or if you ask if it is really a good idea to become involved with a Muslim world which is hostile and which we do not understand, the sophisticates in New York will make fun of Donald Trump’s hair and skin tone. Yes. They are so sophisticated, so intelligent and beautiful too. We must learn from our betters.

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  86. @Steve Sailer
    In the late Umberto Eco's "Foucault's Pendulum," the various Hollow Earth theories are portrayed as the craziest of all the New Age ideas. Various Nazi muckety-mucks were into Hollow Earth lunacy, and I suspect Eco, a patriotic Italian, couldn't forgive the Germans for luring the Italians into WW2.

    Youbprobably know this, being a good so cal boy, but Manson and the kids ended up in dune buggies out in Death Valley looking for the secret tunnels that would let them hide out during the helter skelter race apocalypse.

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  87. @Dave Pinsen
    Hollow Earth was also an element in Thomas Pynchon's Against The Day (which is not worth reading, in case you were wondering).

    That was the recent Pynchon I was most interested in – you may have just saved me a few weeks. If you’ve got a moment and want to elaborate I’d be interested to hear what went wrong.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Sure,

    Here's my Amazon review of it:

    I first read Gravity's Rainbow 20 years ago, and while I found it a little frustrating at the time, I've re-read parts of it many times since, and I have a number of favorite parts marked with Post-Its. I don't see myself ever rereading any of Against The Day.

    Against The Day is a more straightforward novel than Gravity's Rainbow, in terms of its chronology, for example, but it's also less interesting, much longer, and more heavy-handed in its politics. Basically, the good guys are anarchists and the bad guys are plutocrats, and there's not a whole lot of nuance there.

    So is it worth reading for Pynchon's writing? Honestly, no. There simply weren't anywhere near as many strikingly memorable parts in ATD as in GR, despite ATD's much greater length. And where there were similar elements, they were done much better in Gravity's Rainbow. Two specific examples: both books have a seance scene, and the one in Gravity's Rainbow, where the Nazis call on the ghost of Rathenau, blows the one in Against The Day away. Both books also touch on tarot, and, again, the tarot part in Gravity's Rainbow (where Pynchon's omniscient narrator compares Weismann 's and Slothrop's cards) is much better.

    Also, a minor point, but the dialect of the Colorado Traverse family characters gets a bit annoying, and Pynchon seems to have too many characters use the phrase "couple-three".

    This was the third Pynchon novel I've read; in between GR and this I read his modest-sized novel Bleeding Edge, which I enjoyed and would recommend to those new to Pynchon. I'd pass on this one unless you are a Pynchon addict.
     
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  88. @Priss Factor
    Is Trump the Cowardly Lion?

    The Scarecrow?

    The Tinman?

    The Wizard?

    Hillary has to be the witch.

    All I know for sure is that he built the yellow brick road and got it done ahead of schedule and under budget.

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  89. @Anonymous
    I saw that yesterday. It turned out to be yet another boring Radiohead song. Has Radiohead come out with anything new sounding and not boring in 20 years?

    Radiohead peaked with The Bends, but hipsters pretend to like their later, experimental b.s.

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  90. @Anonymous
    Speaking of winning name changes: Leroy McPherson sounds better if you pronounce it "Newt Gingrich"......

    On the other thread I posited that McPherson would be Drumpf's pick for VP. But wiki says Leroy is 72 years old.

    So make that Chief of Staff.

    Drumpf's VP choice is a head scratcher. Maybe another Slovenian!

    If it's Rubio there will be hell to pay.

    Btw Cruz's dad was a foreign commie just like Obama's dad. What a coincidence.

    I vote Duncan Hunter or Tom Tancredo.

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  91. @tbraton
    It's hard to tell the source of "Trumpkin," but it reminds me of poster "Dominique Francon Society" aka "The Priss Factory," who has been known on occasion to attach the "kin" suffix to various words purely for laughs. The one that comes to mind is "dotkin." When another poster (Wizard of Oz) inquired what the word meant, DFS merely posted a link to a picture of a Hindu man with a bright red dot on his forehead, which caused me to laugh out loud. If DFS is the source of "Trumpkin," then I am sure there is nothing deeper than an attempt to extract a good laugh.

    With re to Josh Gold's reference to John McCain as "a man who hates POWs (McCain)," I would merely point out that Trump did not express any "hate" for McCain but merely questioned his status as a "war hero" simply because he had been a POW for 5 years. When I first started posting on unz.com on a regular basis last July, the publisher of unz.com, Ron Unz, had a fine, long running piece on the front page written by him in which he excoriated McCain as "Tokyo Rose." Anybody who has bothered to read the interview of McCain in U.S. News back in 1973 a few months after his release by North Vietnam and compared that account with the phony Silver Star citation accompanying McCain's Silver Star must recognize the total inconsistency of the two accounts. By his own words, McCain admitted to a violation of the military code by giving the NV military information in exchange for medical treatment. I have previously suggested that one of the first things President Trump should do is have the Pentagon release the files pertaining to McCain's debriefing following his release by the NV. Those Vietnam vets who were on McCain's case from the beginning deserve a belated round of applause for their efforts in exposing a phony.

    Getting down to basics, I would note that my American Heritage dictionary has a listing of “-kin,” which it defines as “Indicates small or diminutive; for example, bodkin, lambkin.” Adding “-kin” to a word places an emphasis on the smaller version of the principle word being modified. That may or may not be derogatory, depending on the circumstances.

    Last August, just when Trump’s candidacy was starting to take off following the beginning of the Republican primaries, there were several terms clearly meant to be derogatory competing in the attempt to marginalize Trump’s supporters. One such term was “Trumpsters,” with its obvious similarity in sound to “Dumpsters.” Then there was the term that George Will clearly favored: “Trumpites.” Here is what Will was saying last August in an early attempt to derail Trump: ” “Marginalizing Trump” carries no risk of “alienating a substantial Republican cohort,” Will assures us, for these “Trumpites” are neither Republicans nor conservatives. Better off without such trash.” ” Compared to “Trumpsters” and “Trumpites,” “Trumpkin” hardly carries any insulting heft. The fact that the insulting nature of “Trumpkin” is being debated on this thread would seem to argue that “Trumpkin” is not exactly a heavyweight term of derision.

    I earlier alluded to the practice of Dominique Francon Society of adding “-kin” as a suffix to various words in a humorous attempt to take a light jibe at someone, sort of like a kinder, gentler Don Rickles.

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  92. @Ed
    Disagree, Cruz is 45, that's 25 years younger than Trump & Clinton. He has a bright future ahead of him but he may want to learn how to make some friends or reliable allies if he wants to be president.

    He has a future, but not as a POTUS.

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  93. @Winthorp
    That was the recent Pynchon I was most interested in - you may have just saved me a few weeks. If you've got a moment and want to elaborate I'd be interested to hear what went wrong.

    Sure,

    Here’s my Amazon review of it:

    I first read Gravity’s Rainbow 20 years ago, and while I found it a little frustrating at the time, I’ve re-read parts of it many times since, and I have a number of favorite parts marked with Post-Its. I don’t see myself ever rereading any of Against The Day.

    Against The Day is a more straightforward novel than Gravity’s Rainbow, in terms of its chronology, for example, but it’s also less interesting, much longer, and more heavy-handed in its politics. Basically, the good guys are anarchists and the bad guys are plutocrats, and there’s not a whole lot of nuance there.

    So is it worth reading for Pynchon’s writing? Honestly, no. There simply weren’t anywhere near as many strikingly memorable parts in ATD as in GR, despite ATD’s much greater length. And where there were similar elements, they were done much better in Gravity’s Rainbow. Two specific examples: both books have a seance scene, and the one in Gravity’s Rainbow, where the Nazis call on the ghost of Rathenau, blows the one in Against The Day away. Both books also touch on tarot, and, again, the tarot part in Gravity’s Rainbow (where Pynchon’s omniscient narrator compares Weismann ‘s and Slothrop’s cards) is much better.

    Also, a minor point, but the dialect of the Colorado Traverse family characters gets a bit annoying, and Pynchon seems to have too many characters use the phrase “couple-three”.

    This was the third Pynchon novel I’ve read; in between GR and this I read his modest-sized novel Bleeding Edge, which I enjoyed and would recommend to those new to Pynchon. I’d pass on this one unless you are a Pynchon addict.

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  94. If we’re mooting the subject of monikers, then as an ardent Trump supporter since day one, I propose that me and my kind be known hereafter as “Trumpfusards.”

    It has a nice continental ring to it which complements the essential paleoconservatism of the Trump platform, and in recalling the Dreyfus Affair it emphasizes the sheer scale of the political transformation which is propelling Trump into power. It has class; Trump would approve of it.

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  95. @Anonymous
    I was trying to remember where I'd heard one particularly bad-faith variation of your argument before -- "respect da military just cuz" -- then remembered Georgia Senator Max Cleland's 2002 re-election campaign. In 1968 Cleland became a paraplegic in addition to losing an arm during combat. Technically speaking he caused it himself by picking up a live grenade that was not properly bent or taped by some other screw-up on the chopper. So this falls somewhere between gallantry and bad luck but only because Cleland was already putting himself at risk as a soldier. If a faulty grain thresher or mall escalator took off one of my limbs I doubt I could parlay it into a political career, yet that is precisely what Cleland did, beginning in the late 70s (aided greatly by the pro-Viet Cong media and the Zeitgeist & a fellow good ol' boy in the White House). Many decades later the Georgia electorate would be scolded by prep-school political consultants that it was their duty to vote for Cleland apparently forever, because of "his service to his country in the Vietnam War" (also the opponent, some sad sack who's not important, had not been in the 'Nam which therefore rendered him less qualified to design beet-sugar subsidies or whatever U.S. Senators do all day).

    Even though Georgia is a very pro-military locale of the world-view you describe despite not being especially blessed with old blueblood Republican WASP virtues you've alluded to, Cleland lost because that dog just wouldn't hunt any more. It was like Homer Simpson trying to coast on the fad popularity obtained from his perfect bowling game in perpetuity. The funny thing is even Cleland had a better claim to everlasting warrior prestige than McCain, who is still around AND more out of tune with/contemptuous of his own constituents. I chalk that up to the enduring style & culture of the traditional Stupid Party.

    I’m not making any kind of argument for “respecting the military”. I’m simply describing a significant sub-culture within the US. You’re hardly alone in thinking that these people are just dumb losers.

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  96. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    McCain and other vets and soldiers ultimately aren’t respected and honored by many Americans because of real or perceived heroic exploits. They’re respected and honored simply for serving in combat and risking their lives.
     
    McCain was respected for his suffering.

    Calling everyone in uniform a hero is a combination of the "everyone gets a participation trophy" ethos and a pendulum swing away from the Vietnam-era disdain for troops. I think it dates back to the first Gulf War. Democrats didn't want to repeat past mistakes, so they made sure to "support the troops". Plus, there was guilt about the absence of a draft.

    Remember that, before the ground war started, there were predictions of thousands of casualties in trench warfare in the Gulf War. I got a free bagel sandwich in the run-up to the invasion, when I went out for lunch during an Army Reserve drill in my uniform. Today, people give up their first class seats for troops in uniform.

    Most people don’t regard service in combat as analogous to mere participation and don’t regard respect for combat service as analogous to the “participation trophy” ethos, especially cultures that honor and revere military service. They just don’t, regardless of how you think these people should think. Most people, the silent majority, did not have disdain for the troops in the Vietnam era.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    The silent majority didn't have disdain for troops in the Vietnam era, but they also didn't consider every combat veteran a hero. Many of them were combat veterans of Korea or World War II themselves, and in their generations, that was pretty common. You can get a sense of that from W.H. Auden's poem The Unknown Citizen, where the citizen's combat service gets 4 short words, "Except for the War". He's no hero, just an average guy.
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  97. @cwhatfuture
    Mussolini wanted war but his people certainly did not. Of course the war was a gigantic mistake for Italy, a horrible what could have been. Instead of getting rich selling to the Germans and the Allies, like the Swiss, they were utterly impoverished, bombed by the Allies, fought over by both sides, and terrorized by the Germans after they switched sides. And worst of all, they lost Libya, a giant pool of oil. Unlike the other Arab states, Libya then had a very small Arab/Muslim population, under a million and it was dropping due to the harsh fascist rule. Italy could have easily colonized it and they were on their way to colonizing it. Italy had a high birth rate then and Mussolini was determined to keep it high. Libya today could be European, instead of Italy becoming African. What might have been.

    To see what it would have been like, just look next door to France. Unlike Italy, they kept their colony of Algeria, the Muslim population of which has dwindled away. And France has managed to keep out all the African migrants.

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    • Replies: @cwhatfuture
    "To see what it might be like" if Mussolini forced the few (less than one million) Arabs to leave, as he was doing in the 1930s, then settled millions of Italians in Libya, I should look at Algeria, that forced no Arabs to leave, in fact attracted Arabs from surrounding countries, and was overwhelmingly populated by Muslims? Exactly why would I do that?
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  98. @Anonymous
    OT: Oh yeah!! Just read that Trump doubled down on Muslim immigration this morning.

    Cucks everywhere slitting their wrists across America!

    There is no meaning in life without surrendering to the Other.

    I believe Drumpf is going to stick it to Barry Soetero in a million different ways.

    Redstate, Blaze, AceOfSpades, etc. they all hate Trump. And their real enemy was never Obama.

    Redstate, Blaze, AceOfSpades, etc. they all hate Trump. And their real enemy was never Obama.

    Yep, they were phonies on the establishment payroll just like Levin and Limbaugh. I’d also include many of the so-called “foundations”. The main job of this crew was to shape rank and file “conservative” opinion and allowing the people to blow off steam harmlessly instead of focusing on the scumbags in office and those who bankroll them.

    They made sure issues like “free trade”, “globalization”, “neoliberalism” along with the roll of Wall Street and the Chambers of Commerce supporting agendas that were destroying the country were never talked about among other things.

    They fed us a bunch of redmeat social issues involving god, abortion/PP, guns, gays and the evils of Social Security, etc. Stuff meant to distract the people while a select group picked our pockets and consolidated their power and wealth at our expense.

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  99. @Anonymous
    Most people don't regard service in combat as analogous to mere participation and don't regard respect for combat service as analogous to the "participation trophy" ethos, especially cultures that honor and revere military service. They just don't, regardless of how you think these people should think. Most people, the silent majority, did not have disdain for the troops in the Vietnam era.

    The silent majority didn’t have disdain for troops in the Vietnam era, but they also didn’t consider every combat veteran a hero. Many of them were combat veterans of Korea or World War II themselves, and in their generations, that was pretty common. You can get a sense of that from W.H. Auden’s poem The Unknown Citizen, where the citizen’s combat service gets 4 short words, “Except for the War”. He’s no hero, just an average guy.

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  100. @Jefferson
    Glenn Beck dipped his face in crushed cheetos and than said now I know what it is like to look like orange skin Donald Trump. Maybe he is looking to get into stand up comedy once his Blaze company goes under.

    Seems more like he’s in the Britney Spears head shaving phase.

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    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Seems more like he’s in the Britney Spears head shaving phase."

    I wonder if Glenn Beck's mental instability is why he got fired from Fox News? Glenn Beck is like a Mormon version of Alex Jones. The difference between them is Glenn always invokes God into his conspiracy theories. Alex Jones does not follow any organized religion, so his conspiracy theories are coming from a secular Atheist point of view.

    Glenn Beck's therapist must make a shitload of money just off him alone.
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  101. @Daniel H
    >>Everyone I know of who used a Viet Nam Vet Card as a means to seek public office was a phoney (see also, e.g., Kerry,

    I don't think Kerry was a phony at all. I disagree with him on most things but he served honorably, with hard, dangerous service pacifying the Mekong Delta. He didn't shirk his duty. The Swift Boaters, and the Bush campaign, were the phonies.

    No, no, no.

    It’s too long a story to debate fully here. Let’s consider one little fact. Kerry claims that after he was awarded his third Purple Heart (without ever missing even one day on duty – just three sick call visits) he mentally tortured himself considering two options: supporting his men by staying with them, or supporting them by exercising his right to get out of Viet Nam with his medals, so thath he could demonstrate against the war.

    That’s what he says, right? With me so far?

    Getting out of Viet Nam DID NOT get him out of the Navy.

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  102. @Daniel H
    >>Everyone I know of who used a Viet Nam Vet Card as a means to seek public office was a phoney (see also, e.g., Kerry,

    I don't think Kerry was a phony at all. I disagree with him on most things but he served honorably, with hard, dangerous service pacifying the Mekong Delta. He didn't shirk his duty. The Swift Boaters, and the Bush campaign, were the phonies.

    No, no, no.

    It’s too long a story to debate fully here. Let’s consider one little fact. Kerry claims that after he was awarded his third Purple Heart (without ever missing even one day of duty – just three sick call visits) he mentally tortured himself for two weeks considering two options: supporting his men by staying with them, or supporting them by exercising his right to get out of Viet Nam with his medals, so that he could demonstrate against the war, and get his men home.

    That’s what he says, right? With me so far?

    Getting out of Viet Nam DID NOT get him out of the Navy. It did not free him to demonstrate against the war. All it got him, as he knew it would, was a safe desk job in Brooklyn for the duration of his term. Oh, and his request to get out of the fire zone arrived at the Pentagon within three days of the award of his last medal, while he was supposedly making this awesome decision.

    So, please. . .

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  103. @Daniel H
    >>Everyone I know of who used a Viet Nam Vet Card as a means to seek public office was a phoney (see also, e.g., Kerry,

    I don't think Kerry was a phony at all. I disagree with him on most things but he served honorably, with hard, dangerous service pacifying the Mekong Delta. He didn't shirk his duty. The Swift Boaters, and the Bush campaign, were the phonies.

    Wrong. T. Boone Pickens offered a million dollars to anyone who could prove the claims made by the Swift Boat veterans were false. He still has the money.

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  104. @Hippopotamusdrome
    To see what it would have been like, just look next door to France. Unlike Italy, they kept their colony of Algeria, the Muslim population of which has dwindled away. And France has managed to keep out all the African migrants.

    “To see what it might be like” if Mussolini forced the few (less than one million) Arabs to leave, as he was doing in the 1930s, then settled millions of Italians in Libya, I should look at Algeria, that forced no Arabs to leave, in fact attracted Arabs from surrounding countries, and was overwhelmingly populated by Muslims? Exactly why would I do that?

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    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
    Fance didn't join the war on the side of Germany like Italy did. And neither did Greece or Britan. But they have the same problems Italy has. Spain would have been a better example. They had a fascist government and didn't participate in the war, but have the same migrant problem as the rest of Europe.
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  105. @cwhatfuture
    "To see what it might be like" if Mussolini forced the few (less than one million) Arabs to leave, as he was doing in the 1930s, then settled millions of Italians in Libya, I should look at Algeria, that forced no Arabs to leave, in fact attracted Arabs from surrounding countries, and was overwhelmingly populated by Muslims? Exactly why would I do that?

    Fance didn’t join the war on the side of Germany like Italy did. And neither did Greece or Britan. But they have the same problems Italy has. Spain would have been a better example. They had a fascist government and didn’t participate in the war, but have the same migrant problem as the rest of Europe.

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  106. @Pericles
    Seems more like he's in the Britney Spears head shaving phase.

    “Seems more like he’s in the Britney Spears head shaving phase.”

    I wonder if Glenn Beck’s mental instability is why he got fired from Fox News? Glenn Beck is like a Mormon version of Alex Jones. The difference between them is Glenn always invokes God into his conspiracy theories. Alex Jones does not follow any organized religion, so his conspiracy theories are coming from a secular Atheist point of view.

    Glenn Beck’s therapist must make a shitload of money just off him alone.

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